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Sample records for atmospherically correct awifs

  1. Development of a scheme for atmospheric correction of Resourcesat-2 AWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, M. R.; Pathak, V. N.; Shah, D. B.; Trivedi, H. J.; Chipade, R. A.; Singh, R. P.; Kirankumar, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a method called SACRS2, a scheme for atmospheric correction of RS2-AWiFS (Resourcesat2-Advanced Wide Field Sensor) data. The SACRS2 is a computationally fast scheme developed from a physics-based detailed radiative transfer model 6SV for correcting large amount of data from the high-repetivity AWiFS sensor. The method is based on deriving a set of equations with coefficients which depend on the spectral bands of the RS2-AWiFS sensor through forward signal simulations by 6SV. Semi-empirical formulations provided in the SMAC method with a few improvements have been used to describe various atmospheric interactions. A total of 112 coefficients for different equations are determined using the best fit equations against the computations of the 6SV. After the specific coefficients for the RS2-AWiFS spectral bands are determined, the major inputs of the scheme are raw digital numbers recorded by RS2-AWiFS sensor, atmospheric columnar water vapour content, ozone content, aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm and viewing-illumination conditions. Results showed a good performance of the SACRS2 with a maximum relative error in the SACRS2 simulations ranged between 1% for a reflectance of 0.5 and 8.6% for reflectance of 0.05 with respect to 6SV computations. Validation of retrieved surface reflectance using the SACRS2 scheme with respect to in-situ measurements at two sites indicated a capability of this scheme to determine the surface reflectance within 10%. This is a first of its kind scheme developed for the atmospheric correction of any Indian Remote Sensing satellite data. A package containing the SACRS2 software is available on the MOSDAC website for the researchers.

  2. Inter Comparison of Atmospheric Correction Models - SACRS2, FLAASH and 6SV Using Resourcesat-2 AWiFS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, V. N.; Pandya, M. R.; Shah, D. B.; Trivedi, H. J.; Patel, K. D.; Sridhar, V. N.; Singh, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Remote sensing measurements from space born sensors are strongly attenuated by the scattering and absorption processes through atmospheric molecules, aerosols and gases (ozone, water vapour, oxygen etc). The process of removing the atmospheric interference from the satellite-level signal is called atmospheric correction. Atmospheric correction can be performed through various methods such as, empirical method, semi-physical method, detailed radiative transfer models. Various methods exist for atmospheric correction of available global sensors such as NOAA-AVHRR, MODIS-Terra/Aqua, MERIS, Landsat-TM/ETM etc. However, there was no method available for atmospheric correction of the IRS data sets. A new physics-based model called Scheme for Atmospheric Correction of ResourceSat-2 AWiFS data (SACRS2) has been developed at Space Applications Centre (SAC) specifically tuned for the RS2-AWiFS sensor. This model has been developed from theoretical signal simulations using the 6SV (The Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum vector version) code. A detail analysis was carried out to perform inter comparison of the results of SACRS2 model with standard atmospheric correction models such as FLAASH (Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercube) and 6SV on RS2-AWiFS data. In turn, the performance of all three models was compared to in-situ measurements carried out over an experimental site located in the Kutch desert for seven RS2-AWiFS overpasses. The results showed a fairly good match of reflectance derived by all three correction models with the in-situ measurements.

  3. Ground based measurements on reflectance towards validating atmospheric correction algorithms on IRS-P6 AWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani Sharma, Anu; Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kvs, Badarinath; Roy, P. S.

    In Earth observation, the atmosphere has a non-negligible influence on the visible and infrared radiation which is strong enough to modify the reflected electromagnetic signal and at-target reflectance. Scattering of solar irradiance by atmospheric molecules and aerosol generates path radiance, which increases the apparent surface reflectance over dark surfaces while absorption by aerosols and other molecules in the atmosphere causes loss of brightness to the scene, as recorded by the satellite sensor. In order to derive precise surface reflectance from satellite image data, it is indispensable to apply the atmospheric correction which serves to remove the effects of molecular and aerosol scattering. In the present study, we have implemented a fast atmospheric correction algorithm to IRS-P6 AWiFS satellite data which can effectively retrieve surface reflectance under different atmospheric and surface conditions. The algorithm is based on MODIS climatology products and simplified use of Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code, which is used to generate look-up-tables (LUTs). The algorithm requires information on aerosol optical depth for correcting the satellite dataset. The proposed method is simple and easy to implement for estimating surface reflectance from the at sensor recorded signal, on a per pixel basis. The atmospheric correction algorithm has been tested for different IRS-P6 AWiFS False color composites (FCC) covering the ICRISAT Farm, Patancheru, Hyderabad, India under varying atmospheric conditions. Ground measurements of surface reflectance representing different land use/land cover, i.e., Red soil, Chick Pea crop, Groundnut crop and Pigeon Pea crop were conducted to validate the algorithm and found a very good match between surface reflectance and atmospherically corrected reflectance for all spectral bands. Further, we aggregated all datasets together and compared the retrieved AWiFS reflectance with

  4. Retrieval of Surface Reflectance using SACRS2: a Scheme for Atmospheric Correction of ResourceSat-2 AWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, M. R.; Pathak, V. N.; Shah, D. B.; Singh, R.. P.

    2014-11-01

    The Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) satellite series has been providing data since 1988 through various Earth observation missions. Before using IRS data for the quantitative analysis and parameter retrieval, it must be corrected for the atmospheric effects because spectral bands of IRS sensors are contaminated by intervening atmosphere. Standard atmospheric correction model tuned for the IRS sensors was not available for deriving surface reflectance. Looking at this gap area, a study was carried out to develop a physicsbased method, called SACRS2- a Scheme for Atmospheric Correction of Resourcesat-2 (RS2) AWiFS data. SACRS2 is a computationally fast scheme developed for correcting large amount of data acquired by RS2-AWiFS sensor using a detailed radiative transfer model 6SV. The method is based on deriving a set of coefficients which depend on spectral bands of the RS2-AWiFS sensor through thousands of forward signal simulations by 6SV. Once precise coefficients of all the physical processes of atmospheric correction are determined for RS2-AWiFS spectral bands then a complete scheme was developed using these coefficients. Major inputs of the SACRS2 scheme are raw digital numbers recorded by RS2-AWiFS sensor, aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm, columnar water vapour content, ozone content and viewing-geometry. Results showed a good performance of SACRS2 with a maximum relative error in the SACRS2 simulations ranged between approximately 2 to 7 percent with respect to reference 6SV computations. A complete software package containing the SACRS2 model along with user guide and test dataset has been released on the website (www.mosdac.gov.in) for the researchers.

  5. Using NASA Techniques to Atmospherically Correct AWiFS Data for Carbon Sequestration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara L.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas emitted in a number of ways, including the burning of fossil fuels and the conversion of forest to agriculture. Research has begun to quantify the ability of vegetative land cover and oceans to absorb and store carbon dioxide. The USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Forest Service is currently evaluating a DSS (decision support system) developed by researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center called CASA-CQUEST (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach-Carbon Query and Evaluation Support Tools). CASA-CQUEST is capable of estimating levels of carbon sequestration based on different land cover types and of predicting the effects of land use change on atmospheric carbon amounts to assist land use management decisions. The CASA-CQUEST DSS currently uses land cover data acquired from MODIS (the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and the CASA-CQUEST project team is involved in several projects that use moderate-resolution land cover data derived from Landsat surface reflectance. Landsat offers higher spatial resolution than MODIS, allowing for increased ability to detect land use changes and forest disturbance. However, because of the rate at which changes occur and the fact that disturbances can be hidden by regrowth, updated land cover classifications may be required before the launch of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, and consistent classifications will be needed after that time. This candidate solution investigates the potential of using NASA atmospheric correction techniques to produce science-quality surface reflectance data from the Indian Remote Sensing Advanced Wide-Field Sensor on the RESOURCESAT-1 mission to produce land cover classification maps for the CASA-CQUEST DSS.

  6. Absolute vicarious calibration of Landsat-8 OLI and Resourcesat-2 AWiFS sensors over Rann of Kutch site in Gujarat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shweta; Sridhar, V. N.; Prajapati, R. P.; Rao, K. M.; Mathur, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, vicarious calibration coefficients for all the four bands (green, red, NIR and SWIR) of Resourcesat-2 AWiFS sensor for four dates during Dec 2013-Nov 2014 and for seven bands (blue, green, red, NIR, SWIR1, SWIR2 and PAN) of OLI sensor onboard Landsat-8 for six dates during Dec 2013-Feb 2015 were estimated using field measured reflectance and measured atmospheric parameters during sensor image acquisition over Rann of Kutch site in Gujarat. The top of atmosphere (TOA) at-satellite radiances for all the bands were simulated using 6S radiative transfer code with field measured reflectance, synchronous atmospheric measurements and respective sensor's spectral response functions as an input. These predicted spectral radiances were compared with the radiances from the respective sensor's image in the respective band over the calibration site. Cross-calibration between the sensors AWiFS and OLI was also attempted using near-simultaneous same day image acquisition. Effect of spectral band adjustment factor was also studied with OLI sensor taken as reference sensor. Results show that the variation in average estimated radiance ratio for the AWiFS sensor was found to be within 10% for all the bands, whereas, for OLI sensor, the variation was found to be within 6% for all the bands except green and SWIR2 for which the variation was 8% and 11% respectively higher than the 5% uncertainty of the OLI sensor specification for TOA spectral radiance. At the 1σ level, red, NIR, SWIR1 and Panchromatic bands of OLI sensor showed close agreement between sensor-measured and vicarious TOA radiance resulting no change in calibration coefficient and hence indicating no sensor degradation. Two sets of near-simultaneous SBAFs were derived from respective ground measured target reflectance profiles and applied to the AWiFS and it was observed that overall, SBAF compensation provides a significant improvement in sensor agreement. The reduction in the difference between AWiFS and

  7. Radiometric Calibration of the AWiFS Sensor and a Cross-calibration Enhanced Vicarious Calibration Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, David

    2007-01-01

    Using vicarious calibration validation of moderate resolution sensors such as AWiFS is complicated by requiring more land area to ensure proper registration and sufficient pixel numbers. A trial AWiFS calibration was performed on a grass site that consisted of two dramatically different grass heights. Ground truth data was collected over relatively small areas representing only a few pixels. The radiometric gain results for each of these areas will be reported. To enhance this analysis, since a near coincidence high resolution image was collected, the high resolution data was effectively resized to produce pixels comparable to AWiFS and the atmospheric model was used to produce a top of canopy radiance map. Multiple uniform vegetated areas of several radiances were then identified and subsequently propagated to the top of atmosphere viewpoint of the moderate resolution (AWiFS) satellite. The radiometric gain was then calculated based on the vendor high resolution satellite gains (for the 3 bands with comparable wavelengths). Band-to-band conversion was performed assuming a hyperspectral reflectance based on the standard vegetated site. The initial comparison produces AWiFS radiometric gain values that agree to better than 10% of the values measured using the standard vicarious gain technique.

  8. AWiFS camera for Resourcesat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Himanshu; Dewan, Chirag; Paul, Sandip; Sarkar, S. S.; Pandya, Himanshu; Joshi, S. R.; Mishra, Ashish; Detroja, Manoj

    2006-12-01

    Remote sensors were developed and used extensively world over using aircraft and space platforms. India has developed and launched many sensors into space to survey natural resources. The AWiFS is one such Camera, launched onboard Resourcesat-1 satellite by ISRO in 2003. It is a medium resolution camera with 5-day revisit designed for studies related to forestry, vegetation, soil, snow and disaster warning. The camera provides 56m (nadir) resolution from 817 km altitude in three visible bands and one SWIR band. This paper deals with configuration features of AWiFS Camera of Resourcesat-1, its onboard performance and also the highlights of Camera being developed for Resourcesat-2. The AWiFS is realized with two identical cameras viz. AWiFS-A and AWiFS-B, which cover the large field of view of 48°. Each camera consists of independent collecting optics and associated 6000 element detectors and electronics catering to 4 bands. The visible bands use linear Silicon CCDs, with 10μ × 7μ element while SWIR band uses 13μ staggered InGaAs linear active pixels. Camera Electronics are custom designed for each detector based on detector and system requirements. The camera covers the total dynamic range up to 100% albedo with a single gain setting and 12-bit digitization of which 10 MSBs are transmitted. The Camera saturation radiance of each band can also be selected through telecommand. The Camera provides very high SNR of about 700 near saturation. The camera components are housed in specially designed Invar structures. The AWiFS Camera onboard Resourcesat-1 is providing excellent imageries and the data is routinely used world over. AWiFS for Resourcesat-2 is being developed with overall performance specifications remaining same. The Camera electronics is miniaturized with reductions in hardware packages, size and weight to one third.

  9. Comparison of ground reflectance measurement with satellite derived atmospherically corrected reflectance: A case study over semi arid landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani Sharma, Anu; Badarinath, Kvs; Vikshalakshie Muthukumaraswamy Ganeshamoorthy, Ms; Roy, Parthsarathi

    Optical remote sensing data is contaminated due to scattering and absorption by aerosols, water vapour and trace gases in the atmosphere. In order to remove scattering and absorption effects and to derive precise surface reflectance from satellite image data, it is indispensable to apply the atmospheric correction. Various empirical methods and radiative transfer models that attempt to account for wavelength specific absorption and scattering are available in literature. Empirical methods include ratio, subtraction, and empirical line correction etc and the radiative transfer models include LOWTRAN, MODTRAN, 5S, 6S, SBDART and SMAC etc. Amongst these models Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) has better options for different satellite sensors. In this study, we evaluated the potential of 6S radiative transfer model for atmospheric corrections of IRS AWiFS satellite data, in a semi-arid landscape. Ground measurements of surface reflectance over Maize and chic pea crop were conducted with spectroradiometer and compared with top of atmospheric reflectance derived from IRS-AWiFS. The 6S radiative transfer model was modified for local conditions using ground measurements on aerosol optical depth (AOD), water vapor and ozone using sun photometer. In order to extract surface reflectance from satellite data, individual bands digital numbers (DN) were first converted into spectral radiance (Li ) using pre launch calibration coefficients. The top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance (˜(¨)i ) for each spectral band were then computed by ne converting spectral radiance to reflectance using the relation, n (¨) i =πLi d2 /E0 Cosθ (1); where, ˜ e Li is spectral radiance, d2 is Earth-Sun distance, E0 is the ex-atmospheric solar irradiance, θ is the solar zenith angle.Further the surface reflectance free from atmospheric effect, is computed as Ref = [(Aρ+ B] / [1 + ( Υ (Aρ + B))] (2); Where A= 1/αβ , B = -ρ / β and p = TOA reflectance, α is

  10. Monitoring the long term stability of the IRS-P6 AWiFS sensor using the Sonoran and RVPN sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Sampath, Aparajithan; Angal, Amit; Choi, Taeyoung; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on radiometric and geometric assessment of the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS-P6) Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) sensor using the Sonoran desert and Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada (RVPN) ground sites. Imageto- Image (I2I) accuracy and relative band-to-band (B2B) accuracy were measured. I2I accuracy of the AWiFS imagery was assessed by measuring the imagery against Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS) 2000. The AWiFS images were typically registered to within one pixel to the GLS 2000 mosaic images. The B2B process used the same concepts as the I2I, except instead of a reference image and a search image; the individual bands of a multispectral image are tested against each other. The B2B results showed that all the AWiFS multispectral bands are registered to sub-pixel accuracy. Using the limited amount of scenes available over these ground sites, the reflective bands of AWiFS sensor indicate a long-term drift in the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance. Because of the limited availability of AWiFS scenes over these ground sites, a comprehensive evaluation of the radiometric stability using these sites is not possible. In order to overcome this limitation, a cross-comparison between AWiFS and Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) was performed using image statistics based on large common areas observed by the sensors within 30 minutes. Regression curves and coefficients of determination for the TOA trends from these sensors were generated to quantify the uncertainty in these relationships and to provide an assessment of the calibration differences between these sensors.

  11. Atmospheric Correction for Satellite Ocean Color Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, Curtis D.; Werdell, Jeremy; Franz, Bryan; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bailey, Sean

    2016-01-01

    This tutorial is an introduction to atmospheric correction in general and also documentation of the atmospheric correction algorithms currently implemented by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) for processing ocean color data from satellite-borne sensors such as MODIS and VIIRS. The intended audience is graduate students or others who are encountering this topic for the first time. The tutorial is in two parts. Part I discusses the generic atmospheric correction problem. The magnitude and nature of the problem are first illustrated with numerical results generated by a coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer model. That code allow the various contributions (Rayleigh and aerosol path radiance, surface reflectance, water-leaving radiance, etc.) to the topof- the-atmosphere (TOA) radiance to be separated out. Particular attention is then paid to the definition, calculation, and interpretation of the so-called "exact normalized water-leaving radiance" and its equivalent reflectance. Part I ends with chapters on the calculation of direct and diffuse atmospheric transmittances, and on how vicarious calibration is performed. Part II then describes one by one the particular algorithms currently used by the OBPG to effect the various steps of the atmospheric correction process, viz. the corrections for absorption and scattering by gases and aerosols, Sun and sky reflectance by the sea surface and whitecaps, and finally corrections for sensor out-of-band response and polarization effects. One goal of the tutorial-guided by teaching needs- is to distill the results of dozens of papers published over several decades of research in atmospheric correction for ocean color remote sensing.

  12. Atmospheric model for correction of spacecraft data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Spencer, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a radiative transfer model which has been used to correct Apollo photographic imagery for degradation arising from atmospheric scattering. The model was tested using aircraft scanner data, and an extrapolation was then made to spacecraft altitudes. Using standard meteorological data for the region of interest, it is possible to determine transmittance, path radiance, and total radiance from calculations made with the multiple scattering atmospheric model. Simple algorithms are presented which allow potential users of spacecraft sensor data to correct imagery for the deleterious effects due to the scattering of radiation under clear or hazy atmospheric conditions.

  13. Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Hyperspectral Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Pollina

    1999-09-01

    In December 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established a Center of Excellence (Hyperspectral-Multispectral Algorithm Research Center, HyMARC) for promoting the research and development of algorithms to exploit spectral imagery. This center is located at the DOE Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, and is operated for the DOE by Bechtel Nevada. This paper presents the results to date of a research project begun at the center during 1998 to investigate the correction of hyperspectral data for atmospheric aerosols. Results of a project conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology to define, implement, and test procedures for absolute calibration and correction of hyperspectral data to absolute units of high spectral resolution imagery will be presented. Hybrid techniques for atmospheric correction using image or spectral scene data coupled through radiative propagation models will be specifically addressed. Results of this effort to analyze HYDICE sensor data will be included. Preliminary results based on studying the performance of standard routines, such as Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption and Nonlinear Least Squares Spectral Fit, in retrieving reflectance spectra show overall reflectance retrieval errors of approximately one to two reflectance units in the 0.4- to 2.5-micron-wavelength region (outside of the absorption features). These results are based on HYDICE sensor data collected from the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site during overflights conducted in July of 1997. Results of an upgrade made in the model-based atmospheric correction techniques, which take advantage of updates made to the moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance model (MODTRAN 4.0) software, will also be presented. Data will be shown to demonstrate how the reflectance retrieval in the shorter wavelengths of the blue-green region will be improved because of enhanced modeling of multiple scattering effects.

  14. Refining atmospheric correction for aquatic remote spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Guild, L. S.; Negrey, K.; Kudela, R. M.; Palacios, S. L.; Gao, B. C.; Green, R. O.

    2015-12-01

    Remote spectroscopic investigations of aquatic ecosystems typically measure radiance at high spectral resolution and then correct these data for atmospheric effects to estimate Remote Sensing Reflectance (Rrs) at the surface. These reflectance spectra reveal phytoplankton absorption and scattering features, enabling accurate retrieval of traditional remote sensing parameters, such as chlorophyll-a, and new retrievals of additional parameters, such as phytoplankton functional type. Future missions will significantly expand coverage of these datasets with airborne campaigns (CORAL, ORCAS, and the HyspIRI Preparatory Campaign) and orbital instruments (EnMAP, HyspIRI). Remote characterization of phytoplankton can be influenced by errors in atmospheric correction due to uncertain atmospheric constituents such as aerosols. The "empirical line method" is an expedient solution that estimates a linear relationship between observed radiances and in-situ reflectance measurements. While this approach is common for terrestrial data, there are few examples involving aquatic scenes. Aquatic scenes are challenging due to the difficulty of acquiring in situ measurements from open water; with only a handful of reference spectra, the resulting corrections may not be stable. Here we present a brief overview of methods for atmospheric correction, and describe ongoing experiments on empirical line adjustment with AVIRIS overflights of Monterey Bay from the 2013-2014 HyspIRI preparatory campaign. We present new methods, based on generalized Tikhonov regularization, to improve stability and performance when few reference spectra are available. Copyright 2015 California Institute of Technology. All Rights Reserved. US Government Support Acknowledged.

  15. Atmospheric monitoring in MAGIC and data corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruck, Christian; Gaug, Markus

    2015-03-01

    A method for analyzing returns of a custom-made "micro"-LIDAR system, operated alongside the two MAGIC telescopes is presented. This method allows for calculating the transmission through the atmospheric boundary layer as well as thin cloud layers. This is achieved by applying exponential fits to regions of the back-scattering signal that are dominated by Rayleigh scattering. Making this real-time transmission information available for the MAGIC data stream allows to apply atmospheric corrections later on in the analysis. Such corrections allow for extending the effective observation time of MAGIC by including data taken under adverse atmospheric conditions. In the future they will help reducing the systematic uncertainties of energy and flux.

  16. A temperature correction method for expanding atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, W.-R.; Gräfener, G.

    2003-11-01

    Model atmospheres form the basis for the interpretation of stellar spectra. A major problem in those model calculations is to establish the temperature stratification from the condition of radiative equilibrium. Dealing with non-LTE models for spherically expanding atmospheres of Wolf-Rayet stars, we developed a new temperature correction method. Its basic idea dates back to 1955 when it was proposed by Unsöld for grey, static and plane-parallel atmospheres in LTE. The equations were later generalized to the non-grey case by Lucy. In the present paper we furthermore drop the Eddington approximation, proceed to spherical geometry and allow for expansion of the atmosphere. Finally the concept of an ``approximate lambda operator'' is employed to speed up the convergence. Tests for Wolf-Rayet type models demonstrate that the method works fine even in situations of strong non-LTE.

  17. Generic atmospheric correction models for radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhong; Yu, Chen; Crippa, Paola; Penna, Nigel

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric effects (especially the part due to tropospheric water vapour) represent one of the major error sources of repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), and limit the accuracy of InSAR derived surface displacements. The spatio-temporal variations of atmospheric water vapour make it a challenge to measure small-amplitude surface displacements with InSAR. In previous studies, several InSAR atmospheric correction models have been successfully demonstrated: (1) Ground-based correction models such as those using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and/or surface meteorological observations, (2) Space-based correction models including those involving NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and/or ESA Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and (3) Numerical Weather Model (NWM) based corrections including those using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim and/or Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. Each model has its own inherited limitations. For example, ground-based correction models are limited by the availability (and distribution) of ground observations, whilst MODIS/MERIS correction models are sensitive to the presence of clouds and there is often a time difference between space-based water vapour and radar observations. Similar to space-based correction models, NWM correction models might be impacted by the time difference between NWM and radar observations. Taking into account the inherent advantages and limitations of GNSS, MODIS and ECMWF water vapour products, we aim to develop a global and near-real-time mode InSAR atmospheric correction model. Tropospheric delays can be routinely retrieved from ground-based GNSS arrays in all-weather conditions and also in real-time. We develop an Iterative Tropospheric Decomposition (ITD) interpolation model that decouples the GNSS-estimated total tropospheric delays into (i) a stratified component highly correlated

  18. Atmospheric correction with the Bayesian empirical line.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David R; Roberts, Dar A; Gao, Bo Cai; Green, Robert O; Guild, Liane; Hayashi, Kendra; Kudela, Raphael; Palacios, Sherry

    2016-02-08

    Atmospheric correction of visible/infrared spectra traditionally involves either (1) physics-based methods using Radiative Transfer Models (RTMs), or (2) empirical methods using in situ measurements. Here a more general probabilistic formulation unifies the approaches and enables combined solutions. The technique is simple to implement and provides stable results from one or more reference spectra. This makes empirical corrections practical for large or remote environments where it is difficult to acquire coincident field data. First, we use a physics-based solution to define a prior distribution over reflectances and their correction coefficients. We then incorporate reference measurements via Bayesian inference, leading to a Maximum A Posteriori estimate which is generally more accurate than pure physics-based methods yet more stable than pure empirical methods. Gaussian assumptions enable a closed form solution based on Tikhonov regularization. We demonstrate performance in atmospheric simulations and historical data from the "Classic" Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-C) acquired during the HyspIRI mission preparatory campaign.

  19. Atmospheric scattering corrections to solar radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1979-01-01

    Whenever a solar radiometer is used to measure direct solar radiation, some diffuse sky radiation invariably enters the detector's field of view along with the direct beam. Therefore, the atmospheric optical depth obtained by the use of Bouguer's transmission law (also called Beer-Lambert's law), that is valid only for direct radiation, needs to be corrected by taking account of the scattered radiation. This paper discusses the correction factors needed to account for the diffuse (i,e., singly and multiply scattered) radiation and the algorithms developed for retrieving aerosol size distribution from such measurements. For a radiometer with a small field of view (half-cone angle of less than 5 deg) and relatively clear skies (optical depths less than 0.4), it is shown that the total diffuse contribution represents approximately 1% of the total intensity.

  20. [Atmospheric adjacency effect correction of ETM images].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-yu; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Shu-qing; Gao, Ji-yue

    2010-09-01

    It is an important precondition to retrieve the ground surface reflectance exactly for improving the subsequent product of remote sensing images and the quantitative application of remote sensing. However, because the electromagnetic wave is scattered by the atmosphere during its transmission from the ground surface to the sensor, the electromagnetic wave signal of the target received by the sensor contained the signal of the background. The adjacency effect emerges. Because of the adjacency effect, the remote sensing images become blurry, and their contrast reduces. So the ground surface reflectance retrieved from the remote sensing images is also inaccurate. Finally, the quality of subsequent product of remote sensing images and the accuracy of quantitative application of remote sensing might decrease. In the present paper, according to the radiative transfer equation, the atmospheric adjacency effect correction experiment of ETM images was carried out by using the point spread function method. The result of the experiment indicated that the contrast of the corrected ETM images increased, and the ground surface reflectance retrieved from those images was more accurate.

  1. Spatial Resolution Characterization for AWiFS Multispectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the spatial resolution of the AWiFS multispectral images characterized by an estimation of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency. The contents include: 1) MTF Analysis; 2) Target Analysis; 3) "Pulse Target"; 4) "Pulse" Method; 5) Target Images; 6) Bridge Profiles; 7) MTF Calculation; 8) MTF Results; and 9) Results Summary.

  2. Spatial Resolution Characterization for AWiFS Multispectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Within the framework of the Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the U.S. Geological Survey cooperate in the characterization of high-to-moderate-resolution commercial imagery of mutual interest. One of the systems involved in this effort is the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) onboard the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) Reourcesat-1 satellite, IRS-P6. Spatial resolution of the AWiFS multispectral images was characterized by estimating the value of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) at the Nyquist spatial frequency. The Nyquist frequency is defined as half the sampling frequency, and the sampling frequency is equal to the inverse of the ground sample distance. The MTF was calculated as a ratio of the Fourier transform of a profile across an AWiFS image of the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway Bridge and the Fourier transform of a profile across an idealized model of the bridge for each spectral band evaluated. The mean MTF value for the AWiFS imagery evaluated was estimated to be 0.1.

  3. Atmospheric scattering corrections to solar radiometry.

    PubMed

    Box, M A; Deepak, A

    1979-06-15

    Whenever a solar radiometer is used to measure direct solar radiation, some diffuse sky radiation invariably enters the detector's field of view along with the direct beam. Therefore, the atmospheric optical depth obtained by the use of Bouguer's transmission law (also called Beer-Lambert's law), that is valid only for direct radiation, needs to be corrected by taking account of the scattered radiation. In this paper we shall discuss the correction factors needed to account for the diffuse (i.e., singly and multiply scattered) radiation and the algorithms developed for retrieving aerosol size distribution from such measurements. For a radiometer with a small field of view (half-cone angle < 5 degrees ) and relatively clear skies (optical depths < 0.4), it is shown that the total diffuse contribution represents approximately 1% of the total intensity. It is assumed here that the main contributions to the diffuse radiation within the detector's view cone are due to single scattering by molecules and aerosols and multiple scattering by molecules alone, aerosol multiple scattering contributions being treated as negligibly small. The theory and the numerical results discussed in this paper will be helpful not only in making corrections to the measured optical depth data but also in designing improved solar radiometers.

  4. ACIX: Atmospheric Correction Inter-comparison Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, E.; Roger, J. C.; Gascon, F.; Doxani, G.

    2016-12-01

    Surface reflectance is one of the key products used in developing several higher-order land products. Understanding and characterizing the uncertainties of surface reflectance is critical for downstream users. The purpose of ACIX is to inter-compare the performance of 14 atmospheric processors from five different countries for the Landsat8 OLI and Sentinel 2 MSI data. The exercise is expected to point out the strengths and weaknesses as well as the commonalities and differences of the different atmospheric correction processors with aim to enable further improvements. A carefully crafted protocol for the inter-comparison and the test dataset focused on the AERONET sites will be described, according to what was agreed during the first ACIX workshop held in June 2016. The protocol includes the comparison of aerosol optical thickness and water vapor products of the processors with the AERONET measurements.. Concerning the surface reflectances, the protocol describes the inter-comparison among the processors, as well as the comparison with the MODIS surface reflectance and with a reference surface reflectance product. Such a reference product will be obtained using the AERONET characterization of the aerosol (size distribution and refractive indices) and an accurate radiative transfer code. We will present the first results and lessons learned from the first phase of this exercise.

  5. ACIX: Atmospheric Correction Inter-comparison Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxani, Georgia; Gascon, Ferran; Vermote, Éric; Roger, Jean-Claude

    2017-04-01

    The free and open data access policy to Sentinel-2 (S-2) and Landsat-8 (L-8) satellite imagery has stimulated the development of atmospheric correction (AC) processors for generating Bottom-of-Atmosphere (BOA) products. Several entities have started to generate (or plan to generate in the short term) BOA reflectance products at global scale for S-2 and L-8 missions. To this end, the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are organizing an exercise on AC processors inter-comparison. The results of the exercise are expected to point out the strengths and weaknesses, as well as communalities and discrepancies of various AC processors, in order to suggest and define ways for their further improvement. In particular, 13 atmospheric processors from five different countries participate in ACIX with the aim to inter-compare their performance when applied to L-8 and S-2 data. A protocol describing the inter-comparison process and the test dataset, which is based on the AERONET sites, will be presented. The protocol has been defined according to what was agreed among the participants during the 1st ACIX workshop held in June 2016. It includes the comparison of aerosol optical thickness and water vapour products of the processors with the AERONET measurements. Moreover, concerning the surface reflectances, the protocol describes the inter-comparison among the processors, as well as the comparison with the MODIS surface reflectance and with a reference surface reflectance product. Such a reference product will be obtained using the AERONET characterization of the aerosol (size distribution and refractive indices) and an accurate radiative transfer code. The inter-comparison outcomes will be presented and discussed among the participants in the 2nd ACIX workshop, which will be held on 11-12 April 2017 (ESRIN/ESA). The proposed presentation is an opportunity for the user community to be informed for the first time about the ACIX results and conclusions.

  6. Shuttle program: Computing atmospheric scale height for refraction corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for computing the atmospheric scale height to determine radio wave refraction were investigated for different atmospheres, and different angles of elevation. Tables of refractivity versus altitude are included. The equations used to compute the refraction corrections are given. It is concluded that very accurate corrections are determined with the assumption of an exponential atmosphere.

  7. Atmospheric correction with multi-angle polarimeters: information content assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Chowdhary, J.; Franz, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate ocean color remote sensing requires an appropriate atmospheric correction, to compensate for the atmosphere so that ocean geophysical properties can be determined. At optical wavelengths, atmospheric aerosols are the largest contributor to atmospheric correction uncertainty. In canonical missions such as SeaWiFS (Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), atmospheric correction uses observations in the Near Infrared (NIR) to determine aerosol optical properties, which are extrapolated to shorter wavelengths in the visible (VIS), where they are used correct for the aerosol signal. This works because ocean reflectance is very small in the NIR, but the technique is limited by the ability to determine aerosol optical properties in only that spectral range. The Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) on the upcoming NASA PACE (Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, and ocean Ecosystem) mission will have greater spectral sensitivity and range than previous instruments, requiring atmospheric correction technique improvements. For this reason, PACE is considering an additional instrument, a multi-angle, multi-spectral, polarimeter. Such an instrument could provide more information about aerosols and significantly improve atmospheric correction. However, the atmospheric correction process is complex and nonlinear, and understanding the relationship between instrument characteristics and atmospheric correction success can be difficult without quantitative tools. We present a toolset we have developed, which couples radiative transfer simulations with information content assessment tools, to predict and explore the atmospheric correction benefit of different multi-angle polarimeter designs.

  8. MRS proof-of-concept on atmospheric corrections. Atmospheric corrections using an orbital pointable imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using a pointable imager to determine atmospheric parameters was studied. In particular the determination of the atmospheric extinction coefficient and the path radiance, the two quantities that have to be known in order to correct spectral signatures for atmospheric effects, was simulated. The study included the consideration of the geometry of ground irradiance and observation conditions for a pointable imager in a LANDSAT orbit as a function of time of year. A simulation study was conducted on the sensitivity of scene classification accuracy to changes in atmospheric condition. A two wavelength and a nonlinear regression method for determining the required atmospheric parameters were investigated. The results indicate the feasibility of using a pointable imaging system (1) for the determination of the atmospheric parameters required to improve classification accuracies in urban-rural transition zones and to apply in studies of bi-directional reflectance distribution function data and polarization effects; and (2) for the determination of the spectral reflectances of ground features.

  9. Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction for MODIS (MAIAC). Part 3: Atmospheric Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Laszlo, I.; Hilker, T.; Hall, F.; Sellers, P.; Tucker, J.; Korkin, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the atmospheric correction (AC) component of the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction algorithm (MAIAC) which introduces a new way to compute parameters of the Ross-Thick Li-Sparse (RTLS) Bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), spectral surface albedo and bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF) from satellite measurements obtained by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). MAIAC uses a time series and spatial analysis for cloud detection, aerosol retrievals and atmospheric correction. It implements a moving window of up to 16 days of MODIS data gridded to 1 km resolution in a selected projection. The RTLS parameters are computed directly by fitting the cloud-free MODIS top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance data stored in the processing queue. The RTLS retrieval is applied when the land surface is stable or changes slowly. In case of rapid or large magnitude change (as for instance caused by disturbance), MAIAC follows the MODIS operational BRDF/albedo algorithm and uses a scaling approach where the BRDF shape is assumed stable but its magnitude is adjusted based on the latest single measurement. To assess the stability of the surface, MAIAC features a change detection algorithm which analyzes relative change of reflectance in the Red and NIR bands during the accumulation period. To adjust for the reflectance variability with the sun-observer geometry and allow comparison among different days (view geometries), the BRFs are normalized to the fixed view geometry using the RTLS model. An empirical analysis of MODIS data suggests that the RTLS inversion remains robust when the relative change of geometry-normalized reflectance stays below 15%. This first of two papers introduces the algorithm, a second, companion paper illustrates its potential by analyzing MODIS data over a tropical rainforest and assessing errors and uncertainties of MAIAC compared to conventional MODIS products.

  10. Airborne experiment results for spaceborne atmospheric synchronous correction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wenyu; Yi, Weining; Du, Lili; Liu, Xiao

    2015-10-01

    The image quality of optical remote sensing satellite is affected by the atmosphere, thus the image needs to be corrected. Due to the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric conditions, correction by using synchronous atmospheric parameters can effectively improve the remote sensing image quality. For this reason, a small light spaceborne instrument, the atmospheric synchronous correction device (airborne prototype), is developed by AIOFM of CAS(Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences). With this instrument, of which the detection mode is timing synchronization and spatial coverage, the atmospheric parameters consistent with the images to be corrected in time and space can be obtained, and then the correction is achieved by radiative transfer model. To verify the technical process and treatment effect of spaceborne atmospheric correction system, the first airborne experiment is designed and completed. The experiment is implemented by the "satellite-airborne-ground" synchronous measuring method. A high resolution(0.4 m) camera and the atmospheric correction device are equipped on the aircraft, which photograph the ground with the satellite observation over the top simultaneously. And aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) in the imagery area are also acquired, which are used for the atmospheric correction for satellite and aerial images. Experimental results show that using the AOD and CWV of imagery area retrieved by the data obtained by the device to correct aviation and satellite images, can improve image definition and contrast by more than 30%, and increase MTF by more than 1 time, which means atmospheric correction for satellite images by using the data of spaceborne atmospheric synchronous correction device is accurate and effective.

  11. OPERA: An Atmospheric Correction for Land and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterckx, Sindy; Knaeps, Els; Adriaensen, Stefan; Reusen, Ils; De Keukelaere, Liesbeth; Hunter, Peter; Giardino, Claudia; Odermatt, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric correction is one of the most important part of the pre-processing of satellite remotely sensed data used to retrieve bio-geophysical paramters. In this paper we present the scene and sensor generic atmospheric correction scheme ‘OPERA’ allowing to correct both land and water areas in the remote sensing image. OPERA can now be used to correct for atmospheric effects in scenes acquired by MERIS, Landsat-8, hyperspectral sensors and will be applicable to Sentinel-3 and Sentinel-2.

  12. Haze compensation and atmospheric correction for Sentinel-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarau, Aliaksei; Richter, Rudolf; Zekoll, Viktoria; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Sentinel-2 data offer the opportunity to analyse landcover at a high spatial accuracy together with a wide swath. Nevertheless, the high data volume requires a per granule analysis. This may lead to border effects (difference in the radiance/reflectance values) between the neighbouring granules during atmospheric correction. Especially in case of high variations of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) across the granules, especially in case of haze, the atmospherically corrected mosaicked products often show granule border effects. To overcome these artefacts a dehazing prior to the atmospheric correction is performed. The dehazing compensates only for the haze thickness keeping the AOT fraction for further estimation and compensation in the atmospheric correction chain. This approach results in a smoother AOT map estimate and a corresponding bottom of atmosphere (BOA) reflectance with low or no border artefacts. Using digital elevation models (DEMs) allows a better labelling of haze and a higher accuracy of the dehazing. The DEM analysis rejects high elevation areas where bright surfaces might erroneously be classified as haze, thus reducing the probability of misclassification. The dehazing and atmospheric correction are implemented in the DLR's ATCOR software. An example of a numeric evaluation of atmospheric correction products (AOT and BOA reflectance) is given. It demonstrates a smooth transition between the granules in the AOT map leading to a proper estimate of the BOA reflectance data.

  13. SSC Geopositional Assessment of an AWiFS Image Orthorectified Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenton, Ross; Stubbs, Ruby

    2007-01-01

    The geopositional accuracy of an AWiFS (Advanced Wide Field Sensor) orthorectified product was evaluated. Specifically, the image products were acquired by the Indian Remote Sensing Resourcesat-1 satellite, then orthorectified by GeoEye . Analysis was performed using DOQs (digital orthophoto quadrangles) and other reference sources of similar accuracy. A total of six AWiFS images were characterized. These images were acquired over the continental United States from June through September 2005. The images were equally divided between the two AWiFS cameras. Forty to fifty check points were collected manually per scene and analyzed to determine overall circular error, estimates of horizontal bias, and other systematic errors.

  14. Atmospheric corrections for satellite water quality studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piech, K. R.; Schott, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Variations in the relative value of the blue and green reflectances of a lake can be correlated with important optical and biological parameters measured from surface vessels. Measurement of the relative reflectance values from color film imagery requires removal of atmospheric effects. Data processing is particularly crucial because: (1) lakes are the darkest objects in a scene; (2) minor reflectance changes can correspond to important physical changes; (3) lake systems extend over broad areas in which atmospheric conditions may fluctuate; (4) seasonal changes are of importance; and, (5) effects of weather are important, precluding flights under only ideal weather conditions. Data processing can be accomplished through microdensitometry of scene shadow areas. Measurements of reflectance ratios can be made to an accuracy of plus or minus 12%, sufficient to permit monitoring of important eutrophication indices.

  15. Crop Acreage Estimation: Landsat TM and Resourcesat-1 AWiFS Sensor Assessment of the Mississippi River Delta, 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boryan, Claire; Johnson, Dave; Craig, Mike; Seffrin, Bob; Mueller, RIck

    2007-01-01

    AWiFs data are appropriate for crop acreage estimation over large, spectrally homogenous, crop areas such as the Mid-West, the Delta and the Northern Great Plains. Regression and Kappa statistics for soybean, corn, cotton, rice and sorghum produced using both the Landsat TM and AWiFS data are very similar. AWiFS data appear to be a suitable alternative or supplement to Landsat TM data for production of NASS'Cropland Data Layer product.

  16. Evaluation of LISS-III and AWiFS sensor data for wheat acreage estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, S. B.; Bairagi, G. D.; Kar, Sarat C.; Sharma, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Crop acreage estimation is important for advanced planning and taking various policy decisions. The present study was carried out in Indore district using AWiFS sensor satellite data from sowing to maturity period as well as single date LISS-III sensor satellite data of maximum vegetation growth stage of wheat crop. The technique used for single date LISS-III data classification is complete enumeration approach based on supervised classification. While Multi-date AWiFS data classification technique is based on two-stage classification of multi-date dataset by unsupervised Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique (ISODATA). The acreage estimated using the LISS- III sensor data is 98.41 000'ha while using AWiFS sensor data is 105.70 000'ha. It was found that LISS - III results shows -6.89 percent underestimation as compared to AWiFS estimates. The comparison of both (LISS-III and AWiFS) sensor's acreage estimates with the actual acreage data (viz. 97.20 000'ha) shows that higher spatial resolution (LISS-III) sensor satellite data have more accuracy than low spatial resolution (AWiFS) sensor.

  17. Auto-correcting for atmospherical effects in thermal hyperspectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago-Acevedo, Maria; Verhoef, Wout

    2017-04-01

    Correct estimation of soil and vegetation thermal emissivity's has been of huge importance in remote sensing studies. Field measurements of the leaf/soil and canopy emissivity can lead to estimations of water content. Consequently several studies have been performed with the objective of identifying the spectral behavior of the emissivity. However such measurements provide additional challenges before any retrieval can successfully be performed. While in laboratory the influence of the atmospheric conditions can be controlled in field experiments this cannot be done. In most cases such atmospheric correction however requires detailed knowledge of the atmospheric constituents at the time of the measurements. The objective of this research was to create an auto-atmospherically correct thermal hyperspectral emissivity measurements for retrieving canopy water content. For this hyperspectral thermal measurements were obtained during ESAs REFLEX campaign in 2012 using a MIDAC FTIR radiometer. MODTRAN simulations were used to construct a simple quadratic radiative transfer model that couples atmospheric transmissivities to the different gas constituents. This model was afterwards used to estimate the concentrations of H20 (g) and CO2 (g). The radiative measurements were afterwards corrected for these gas absorptions. Finally a temperature emissivity separation was applied to estimate the emissivities of the different land surface components. Gas concentrations were validated against measurements of a LICOR 7500 taken in parallel to the MIDAC measurements. It is observed that in general the relative errors are around 25% of the LICOR measurements, which are in the same range as the instrumental errors of the eddy-covariance system (15-30%). The correction of the absorption features proved however more difficult and resulted in overestimations of the correction-terms; 1) because spectral collocation of the simulations with the observations proved troublesome, and 2 because

  18. Comparison of diverse methods for the correction of atmospheric effects on LANDSAT and SKYLAB images. [radiometric correction in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Camara, G.; Dias, L. A. V.; Mascarenhas, N. D. D.; Desouza, R. C. M.; Pereira, A. E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Earth's atmosphere reduces a sensors ability in currently discriminating targets. Using radiometric correction to reduce the atmospheric effects may improve considerably the performance of an automatic image interpreter. Several methods for radiometric correction from the open literature are compared leading to the development of an atmospheric correction system.

  19. Algorithm for Atmospheric Corrections of Aircraft and Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Robert S.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Mattoo, Shana

    1989-01-01

    A simple and fast atmospheric correction algorithm is described which is used to correct radiances of scattered sunlight measured by aircraft and/or satellite above a uniform surface. The atmospheric effect, the basic equations, a description of the computational procedure, and a sensitivity study are discussed. The program is designed to take the measured radiances, view and illumination directions, and the aerosol and gaseous absorption optical thickness to compute the radiance just above the surface, the irradiance on the surface, and surface reflectance. Alternatively, the program will compute the upward radiance at a specific altitude for a given surface reflectance, view and illumination directions, and aerosol and gaseous absorption optical thickness. The algorithm can be applied for any view and illumination directions and any wavelength in the range 0.48 micron to 2.2 micron. The relation between the measured radiance and surface reflectance, which is expressed as a function of atmospheric properties and measurement geometry, is computed using a radiative transfer routine. The results of the computations are presented in a table which forms the basis of the correction algorithm. The algorithm can be used for atmospheric corrections in the presence of a rural aerosol. The sensitivity of the derived surface reflectance to uncertainties in the model and input data is discussed.

  20. Algorithm for atmospheric corrections of aircraft and satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, R. S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Markham, B. L.; Mattoo, S.

    1992-01-01

    A simple and fast atmospheric correction algorithm is described which is used to correct radiances of scattered sunlight measured by aircraft and/or satellite above a uniform surface. The atmospheric effect, the basic equations, a description of the computational procedure, and a sensitivity study are discussed. The program is designed to take the measured radiances, view and illumination directions, and the aerosol and gaseous absorption optical thickness to compute the radiance just above the surface, the irradiance on the surface, and surface reflectance. Alternatively, the program will compute the upward radiance at a specific altitude for a given surface reflectance, view and illumination directions, and aerosol and gaseous absorption optical thickness. The algorithm can be applied for any view and illumination directions and any wavelength in the range 0.48 micron to 2.2 microns. The relation between the measured radiance and surface reflectance, which is expressed as a function of atmospheric properties and measurement geometry, is computed using a radiative transfer routine. The results of the computations are presented in a table which forms the basis of the correction algorithm. The algorithm can be used for atmospheric corrections in the presence of a rural aerosol. The sensitivity of the derived surface reflectance to uncertainties in the model and input data is discussed.

  1. Computer correction of an image distorted by turbulent atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Averin, A P; Pryanichkov, V S; Tyapin, V V

    2010-08-03

    The method for computer correction of images distorted by turbulent atmosphere is realised by means of the simplest optical system comprising a telescope and digital TV-camera. Real-time images with the diffraction resolution are obtained at ground paths of length up to 1800 m.

  2. Correcting Satellite Image Derived Surface Model for Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William; Baldwin, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This project was a continuation of the project entitled "Resolution Earth Surface Features from Repeat Moderate Resolution Satellite Imagery". In the previous study, a Bayesian Maximum Posterior Estimate (BMPE) algorithm was used to obtain a composite series of repeat imagery from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The spatial resolution of the resulting composite was significantly greater than the 1 km resolution of the individual AVHRR images. The BMPE algorithm utilized a simple, no-atmosphere geometrical model for the short-wave radiation budget at the Earth's surface. A necessary assumption of the algorithm is that all non geometrical parameters remain static over the compositing period. This assumption is of course violated by temporal variations in both the surface albedo and the atmospheric medium. The effect of the albedo variations is expected to be minimal since the variations are on a fairly long time scale compared to the compositing period, however, the atmospheric variability occurs on a relatively short time scale and can be expected to cause significant errors in the surface reconstruction. The current project proposed to incorporate an atmospheric correction into the BMPE algorithm for the purpose of investigating the effects of a variable atmosphere on the surface reconstructions. Once the atmospheric effects were determined, the investigation could be extended to include corrections various cloud effects, including short wave radiation through thin cirrus clouds. The original proposal was written for a three year project, funded one year at a time. The first year of the project focused on developing an understanding of atmospheric corrections and choosing an appropriate correction model. Several models were considered and the list was narrowed to the two best suited. These were the 5S and 6S shortwave radiation models developed at NASA/GODDARD and tested extensively with data from the AVHRR instrument. Although the 6S model

  3. Atmospheric correction of AVIRIS data in ocean waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrie, Gregory; Arnone, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Hyperspectral data offers unique capabilities for characterizing the ocean environment. The spectral characterization of the composition of ocean waters can be organized into biological and terrigenous components. Biological photosynthetic pigments in ocean waters have unique spectral ocean color signatures which can be associated with different biological species. Additionally, suspended sediment has different scattering coefficients which result in ocean color signatures. Measuring the spatial distributions of these components in the maritime environments provides important tools for understanding and monitoring the ocean environment. These tools have significant applications in pollution, carbon cycle, current and water mass detection, location of fronts and eddies, sewage discharge and fate etc. Ocean color was used from satellite for describing the spatial variability of chlorophyll, water clarity (K(sub 490)), suspended sediment concentration, currents etc. Additionally, with improved atmospheric correction methods, ocean color results produced global products of spectral water leaving radiance (L(sub W)). Ocean color results clearly indicated strong applications for characterizing the spatial and temporal variability of bio-optical oceanography. These studies were largely the results of advanced atmospheric correction techniques applied to multispectral imagery. The atmosphere contributes approximately 80 percent - 90 percent of the satellite received radiance in the blue-green portion of the spectrum. In deep ocean waters, maximum transmission of visible radiance is achieved at 490nm. Conversely, nearly all of the light is absorbed by the water at wavelengths greater than about 650nm and thus appears black. These spectral ocean properties are exploited by algorithms developed for the atmospheric correction used in satellite ocean color processing. The objective was to apply atmospheric correction techniques that were used for procesing satellite Coastal

  4. Landscape scale thermography - from simple to sophisticated atmospheric data correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Surface temperature is a key variable in the study of energy and mass exchange at the surface-atmosphere interface. Surface temperatures are typically measured onsite by infrared radiometers, by infrared scanners mounted on aircrafts or on satellite platforms. While onsite measurements provide data at a high temporal resolution they cannot capture surface temperatures at the landscape scale. In contrast remotely sensed data provide surface temperature measurements on a wide area but relatively low temporal and/or spatial resolution - or in case of airborne measurements at very high costs. Recent technical advances and the improved accessibility of mobile thermal-infrared (TIR) cameras provide an instrument that can produce surface temperature measurements from close proximity to an object right up to distances of several kilometres. This measurement system provides spatial resolutions of some millimetres up to some meters at a temporal resolution down to some seconds covering areas of several square kilometers. Due to this available range of spatio-temporal resolutions this method perfectly closes that gap between point measurements onsite by infrared radiometers and remotely sensed data at relatively low costs. Therefore this method gains more and more popularity in ecological research. While remotely sensed surface temperature data are routinely corrected for atmospheric influences by this time such corrections are often neglected or waived for data retrieved with TIR cameras. This practice is defensible for short distance measurements. But for measurements on landscape-scales taken from a distance of kilometres, the bias caused by atmospheric distortion becomes highly relevant for the accuracy of the surface temperature data. In this study we compared different approaches for atmospheric correction of thermal infrared images. 2500 TIR surface temperature measurements that were retrieved during several campaigns in summer 2012 were compared with continuous on

  5. Analysis of Vegetation and Atmospheric Correction Indices for Landsat Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Tasha R.; Desai, M.

    1997-01-01

    Vegetation and Atmospheric Indices are mathematical combinations of remote sensing bands which are useful in distinguishing the various values of the spectral reflectance. In this paper we study how the applications of various atmospherically corrected indices and vegetation indices can aide in retrieving the amount of surface reflectance from a remotely sensed image. Specifically, this paper studies and compares three vegetation indices and one atmospherically resistant index. These indices include the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), the Green Vegetation Index (GVI), and the Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index (ARVI), respectively. The algorithms attempt to estimate the optical characteristics of Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. It will be shown that the NDVI algorithm followed by the ARVI correcting algorithm provided significant improvements in the tonal qualities of the retrieved images. The results are presented on 1987 TM images over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and are compared with a set of United States Geological Survey (U.S.G.S) maps.

  6. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  7. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  8. The correction of infrasound signals for upper atmospheric winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutschlecner, J. Paul; Whitaker, Rodney W.

    1990-01-01

    Infrasound waves propagate in the atmosphere by a well known mechanism produced by refraction of the waves, return to earth, and reflection at the surface into the atmosphere for subsequent bounces. A figure illustrates this phenomenon with results from a ray trace model. In this instance three rays are returned to earth from a region centered at about 50 kilometers in altitude and two from a region near 110 kilometers in altitude. The control of the wave refraction is largely dominated by the temperature-height profile and inversions; however, a major influence is also produced by the atmospheric wind profile. Another figure illustrates the considerable ray differences for rays moving in the wind direction (to the right) and in the counter direction (to the left). It obviously can be expected that infrasonic signal amplitudes will be greatly influenced by the winds in the atmosphere. The seasonal variation of the high altitude atmospheric winds is well documented. A third figure illustrates this with average statistics on the observed zonal wind in the region of 50 plus or minus 5 kilometers in altitude. The results are based upon a survey by Webb; Webb terms this parameterization the Stratospheric Circulation Index (SCI). The very strong seasonal variation has the ability to exert a major seasonal influence on infrasonic signals. The purpose here is to obtain a method for the correction of this effect.

  9. Atmospheric effect on spectral signature - Measurements and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric effect on the spectral signature of surface cover were conducted during hazy conditions over the Chesapeake Bay and its eastern shore. In the experiment the upward radiance was measured by an airborne scanning radiometer in nine spectral bands between 465 and 773 nm, above and below the haze layer. Simultaneous measurements of the aerosol optical thickness and its vertical distribution were conducted. The results of the measurements are used to study the spectral dependence of the atmospheric effect on remote sensing of water bodies and vegetated fields (forest, corn field, and pasture), and to verify theoretical predictions. It is suggested that the radiances over dark areas (e.g., water in the near IR and forest in the visible) can be used to derive the aerosol optical thickness as is done over oceans with the CZCS satellite images. Combined with climatological information, the derived optical thickness can be used to perform corrections of the atmospheric effect. Examples of the derivation of the aerosol optical thickness and correction of the upward radiances are given.

  10. Classification Metrics for Improved Atmospheric Correction of Multispectral VNIR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Multispectral visible/near-infrared (VNIR) earth observation satellites, e.g., Ikonos, Quickbird, ALOS AVNIR-2, and DMC, usually acquire imagery in a few (3 – 5) spectral bands. Atmospheric correction is a challenging task for these images because the standard methods require at least one shortwave infrared band (around 1.6 or 2.2 μm) or hyperspectral instruments to derive the aerosol optical thickness. New classification metrics for defining cloud, cloud over water, haze, water, and saturation are presented to achieve improvements for an automatic processing system. The background is an ESA contract for the development of a prototype atmospheric processor for the optical payload AVNIR-2 on the ALOS platform. PMID:27873911

  11. Cross-comparison of the IRS-P6 AWiFS sensor with the L5 TM, L7 ETM+, & Terra MODIS sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Xiong, X.; Angal, A.; Choi, T.; Malla, R.

    2009-01-01

    As scientists and decision makers increasingly rely on multiple Earth-observing satellites to address urgent global issues, it is imperative that they can rely on the accuracy of Earth-observing data products. This paper focuses on the crosscomparison of the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS-P6) Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) with the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM), Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), and Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors. The cross-comparison was performed using image statistics based on large common areas observed by the sensors within 30 minutes. Because of the limited availability of simultaneous observations between the AWiFS and the Landsat and MODIS sensors, only a few images were analyzed. These initial results are presented. Regression curves and coefficients of determination for the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) trends from these sensors were generated to quantify the uncertainty in these relationships and to provide an assessment of the calibration differences between these sensors. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  12. Accounting for Chromatic Atmospheric Effects on Barycentric Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Ryan T.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Fischer, Debra A.; Jurgenson, Colby A.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric effects on stellar radial velocity measurements for exoplanet discovery and characterization have not yet been fully investigated for extreme precision levels. We carry out calculations to determine the wavelength dependence of barycentric corrections across optical wavelengths, due to the ubiquitous variations in air mass during observations. We demonstrate that radial velocity errors of at least several cm s‑1 can be incurred if the wavelength dependence is not included in the photon-weighted barycentric corrections. A minimum of four wavelength channels across optical spectra (380–680 nm) are required to account for this effect at the 10 cm s‑1 level, with polynomial fits of the barycentric corrections applied to cover all wavelengths. Additional channels may be required in poor observing conditions or to avoid strong telluric absorption features. Furthermore, consistent flux sampling on the order of seconds throughout the observation is necessary to ensure that accurate photon weights are obtained. Finally, we describe how a multiple-channel exposure meter will be implemented in the EXtreme PREcision Spectrograph (EXPRES).

  13. Coastal Zone Color Scanner atmospheric correction algorithm: multiple scattering effects.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Castaño, D J

    1987-06-01

    An analysis of the errors due to multiple scattering which are expected to be encountered in application of the current Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) atmospheric correction algorithm is presented in detail. This was prompted by the observations of others that significant errors would be encountered if the present algorithm were applied to a hypothetical instrument possessing higher radiometric sensitivity than the present CZCS. This study provides CZCS users sufficient information with which to judge the efficacy of the current algorithm with the current sensor and enables them to estimate the impact of the algorithm-induced errors on their applications in a variety of situations. The greatest source of error is the assumption that the molecular and aerosol contributions to the total radiance observed at the sensor can be computed separately. This leads to the requirement that a value epsilon'(lambda,lambda(0)) for the atmospheric correction parameter, which bears little resemblance to its theoretically meaningful counterpart, must usually be employed in the algorithm to obtain an accurate atmospheric correction. The behavior of '(lambda,lambda(0)) with the aerosol optical thickness and aerosol phase function is thoroughly investigated through realistic modeling of radiative transfer in a stratified atmosphere over a Fresnel reflecting ocean. A unique feature of the analysis is that it is carried out in scan coordinates rather than typical earth-sun coordinates allowing elucidation of the errors along typical CZCS scan lines; this is important since, in the normal application of the algorithm, it is assumed that the same value of can be used for an entire CZCS scene or at least for a reasonably large subscene. Two types of variation of ' are found in models for which it would be constant in the single scattering approximation: (1) variation with scan angle in scenes in which a relatively large portion of the aerosol scattering phase function would be examined

  14. OSCAR: Online Service for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Allmen, P. A.; Xing, Z.; Fielding, E. J.; Fishbein, E.; Pan, L.; Li, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Tropospheric water vapor content causes delays in radar signals that can alter the phase shifts due to surface deformations or other physical phenomena of interest. In general terms, the accuracy and reliability of interferometric radar data analysis depends on the quality of the correction procedure used to subtract the effect of water vapor on radar signal delays. Data from Global Positioning Systems and infrared radiometers are current used on an ad hoc basis for these corrections when available, and operational weather forecast was demonstrated to be able to fill in the remaining spatial and temporal gaps. OSCAR is a coordinated set of web services that transparently to the user retrieves remote sensing and weather forecast data and delivers atmospheric radar delays on a latitude longitude grid that can be directly integrated with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data processing software. This tool is currently used by members of the science planning team for DESDynI. We will discuss the architecture of OSCAR, detail the underlying information technology and show concrete examples where water vapor delays were obtained from MODIS infrared data and ECMWF operational weather forecasts.

  15. Investigation of a new method for determination of atmospheric refractivity corrections in satellite laser ranging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, N. T.; Prokopov, A. V.; Remaev, E. V.

    1997-08-01

    A new algorithm is investigated for calculating atmospheric refractivity corrections in satellite laser ranging in the Earth's spherically stratified atmosphere based on results of measuring meteorological parameters on the Earth's surface. A numerical experiment with 125 meteorological sounding profiles shows that the new method allows to determine atmospheric refractivity corrections with the accuracy better than the Marini-Murray method does.

  16. Aerosol Retrieval and Atmospheric Correction Algorithms for EPIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Marshak, Alexander; Korkin, Sergey; Herman, Jay

    2011-01-01

    EPIC is a multi-spectral imager onboard planned Deep Space Climate ObserVatoRy (DSCOVR) designed for observations of the full illuminated disk of the Earth with high temporal and coarse spatial resolution (10 km) from Lagrangian L1 point. During the course of the day, EPIC will view the same Earth surface area in the full range of solar and view zenith angles at equator with fixed scattering angle near the backscattering direction. This talk will describe a new aerosol retrieval/atmospheric correction algorithm developed for EPIC and tested with EPIC Simulator data. This algorithm uses the time series approach and consists of two stages: the first stage is designed to periodically re-initialize the surface spectral bidirectional reflectance (BRF) on stable low AOD days. Such days can be selected based on the same measured reflectance between the morning and afternoon reciprocal view geometries of EPIC. On the second stage, the algorithm will monitor the diurnal cycle of aerosol optical depth and fine mode fraction based on the known spectral surface BRF. Testing of the developed algorithm with simulated EPIC data over continental USA showed a good accuracy of AOD retrievals (10-20%) except over very bright surfaces.

  17. Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) is a new algorithm developed for MODIS. MAIAC uses a time series analysis and processing of groups of pixels to perform simultaneous retrievals of aerosol properties and surface bidirectional reflectance without typical assumptions about the surface. It is a generic algorithm which works over both dark and bright land surfaces, including deserts. MAIAC has an internal Cloud Mask, a dynamic land-water-snow classification and a surface change mask which allows it to flexibly choose processing path over different surfaces. A distinct feature of MAIAC is a high 1 km resolution of aerosol retrievals which is required in different applications including the air quality analysis. The novel features of MAIAC include the high quality cloud mask, discrimination of aerosol type, including biomass burning smoke and dust, and detection of surface change - all required for high quality aerosol retrievals. An overview of the algorithm, results of AERONET validation, and examples of comparison with MODIS Collection 5 aerosol product and Deep Blue algorithm for different parts of the world, will be presented.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  19. Complementarity of ResourceSat-1 AWiFS and Landsat TM/ETM+ sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goward, S.N.; Chander, G.; Pagnutti, M.; Marx, A.; Ryan, R.; Thomas, N.; Tetrault, R.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest has been given to forming an international collaboration to develop a virtual moderate spatial resolution land observation constellation through aggregation of data sets from comparable national observatories such as the US Landsat, the Indian ResourceSat and related systems. This study explores the complementarity of India's ResourceSat-1 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) with the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). The analysis focuses on the comparative radiometry, geometry, and spectral properties of the two sensors. Two applied assessments of these data are also explored to examine the strengths and limitations of these alternate sources of moderate resolution land imagery with specific application domains. There are significant technical differences in these imaging systems including spectral band response, pixel dimensions, swath width, and radiometric resolution which produce differences in observation data sets. None of these differences was found to strongly limit comparable analyses in agricultural and forestry applications. Overall, we found that the AWiFS and Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery are comparable and in some ways complementary, particularly with respect to temporal repeat frequency. We have found that there are limits to our understanding of the AWiFS performance, for example, multi-camera design and stability of radiometric calibration over time, that leave some uncertainty that has been better addressed for Landsat through the Image Assessment System and related cross-sensor calibration studies. Such work still needs to be undertaken for AWiFS and similar observatories that may play roles in the Global Earth Observation System of Systems Land Surface Imaging Constellation.

  20. Impact of AWiFS derived land use land cover on simulation of heavy rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karri, Srinivasarao; Gharai, Biswadip; Sai Krishna, S. V. S.; Rao, P. V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Land use/land cover (LU/LC) changes are considered to be one of the most important factors affecting regional climate and are thus an area of public concern. The land surface plays a crucial role in boundary layer evolution and precipitation patterns thereby establishing the need for LU/LC inputs as a critical part of modeling systems. Inaccurate LU/LC information often leads to very large errors in surface energy fluxes thus leading to errors in boundary layer state. We have investigated an incident of heavy rainfall during August 2015 over West Bengal, India using Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model by incorporating different LU/LC datasets, IRS P6 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) LU/LC data for 2012-13 and the default Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) derived USGS LU/LC data for 2001. In the present study, we have made a comparative assessment between AWiFS derived LU/LC and USGS LU/LC by incorporating these datasets as one of the lower boundary conditions over Indian region in WRF model version 3.5.1 to simulate, at 10km resolution, a heavy rainfall event associated with landfall of a cyclonic system over West Bengal. The results of the study suggested influence of LU/LC in occurrence of heavy rainfall with WRF model using AWiFS LU/LC showing more realistic simulation as AWiFS LU/LC is more up-to-date and features recent changes in LU/LC over India.

  1. Improved PPP Ambiguity Resolution Considering the Stochastic Characteristics of Atmospheric Corrections from Regional Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yihe; Li, Bofeng; Gao, Yang

    2015-11-30

    With the increased availability of regional reference networks, Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can achieve fast ambiguity resolution (AR) and precise positioning by assimilating the satellite fractional cycle biases (FCBs) and atmospheric corrections derived from these networks. In such processing, the atmospheric corrections are usually treated as deterministic quantities. This is however unrealistic since the estimated atmospheric corrections obtained from the network data are random and furthermore the interpolated corrections diverge from the realistic corrections. This paper is dedicated to the stochastic modelling of atmospheric corrections and analyzing their effects on the PPP AR efficiency. The random errors of the interpolated corrections are processed as two components: one is from the random errors of estimated corrections at reference stations, while the other arises from the atmospheric delay discrepancies between reference stations and users. The interpolated atmospheric corrections are then applied by users as pseudo-observations with the estimated stochastic model. Two data sets are processed to assess the performance of interpolated corrections with the estimated stochastic models. The results show that when the stochastic characteristics of interpolated corrections are properly taken into account, the successful fix rate reaches 93.3% within 5 min for a medium inter-station distance network and 80.6% within 10 min for a long inter-station distance network.

  2. Improved PPP Ambiguity Resolution Considering the Stochastic Characteristics of Atmospheric Corrections from Regional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihe; Li, Bofeng; Gao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    With the increased availability of regional reference networks, Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can achieve fast ambiguity resolution (AR) and precise positioning by assimilating the satellite fractional cycle biases (FCBs) and atmospheric corrections derived from these networks. In such processing, the atmospheric corrections are usually treated as deterministic quantities. This is however unrealistic since the estimated atmospheric corrections obtained from the network data are random and furthermore the interpolated corrections diverge from the realistic corrections. This paper is dedicated to the stochastic modelling of atmospheric corrections and analyzing their effects on the PPP AR efficiency. The random errors of the interpolated corrections are processed as two components: one is from the random errors of estimated corrections at reference stations, while the other arises from the atmospheric delay discrepancies between reference stations and users. The interpolated atmospheric corrections are then applied by users as pseudo-observations with the estimated stochastic model. Two data sets are processed to assess the performance of interpolated corrections with the estimated stochastic models. The results show that when the stochastic characteristics of interpolated corrections are properly taken into account, the successful fix rate reaches 93.3% within 5 min for a medium inter-station distance network and 80.6% within 10 min for a long inter-station distance network. PMID:26633400

  3. Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Ocean Color from Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-20

    Existing atmospheric correction algorithms for multichannel remote sensing of ocean color from space were designed for retrieving water-leaving...atmospheric correction algorithm for hyperspectral remote sensing of ocean color with the near-future Coastal Ocean Imaging Spectrometer. The algorithm uses

  4. Atmospheric correction analysis on LANDSAT data over the Amazon region. [Manaus, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Dias, L. A. V.; Dossantos, J. R.; Formaggio, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Amazon Region natural resources were studied in two ways and compared. A LANDSAT scene and its attributes were selected, and a maximum likelihood classification was made. The scene was atmospherically corrected, taking into account Amazonic peculiarities revealed by (ground truth) of the same area, and the subsequent classification. Comparison shows that the classification improves with the atmospherically corrected images.

  5. Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the creation of a prototype algorithm for atmospheric correction using high spatial resolution earth observing imaging systems. The objective of the work was to evaluate accuracy of a prototype algorithm that uses satellite-derived atmospheric products to generate scene reflectance maps for high spatial resolution (HSR) systems. This presentation focused on preliminary results of only the satellite-based atmospheric correction algorithm.

  6. Investigation of a new method for the determination of atmospheric correction in satellite laser ranging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, N. T.; Prokopov, A. V.; Remaev, E. V.

    The authors investigate a new algorithm for calculating atmospheric correction in satellite laser ranging in the spherically stratified terrestrial atmosphere. The algorithm is based on results of measuring meteorological parameters on the Earth's surface. A numerical experiment with 125 meteorological sounding profiles shows that the new method allows the atmospheric corrections to be determined in the range of zenith angles from 0° to 80° more accurately than with the Marini-Murray method.

  7. Multispectral Resource Sampler (MPS): Proof of Concept. Literature survey of atmospheric corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. A.; Slater, P. N.

    1981-01-01

    Work done in combining spectral bands to reduce atmospheric effects on spectral signatures is described. The development of atmospheric models and their use with ground and aerial measurements in correcting spectral signatures is reviewed. An overview of studies of atmospheric effects on the accuracy of scene classification is provided.

  8. The effect of atmospheric and topographic correction methods on land cover classification accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanonckelen, Steven; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Van Rompaey, Anton

    2013-10-01

    Mapping of vegetation in mountain areas based on remote sensing is obstructed by atmospheric and topographic distortions. A variety of atmospheric and topographic correction methods has been proposed to minimize atmospheric and topographic effects and should in principle lead to a better land cover classification. Only a limited number of atmospheric and topographic combinations has been tested and the effect on class accuracy and on different illumination conditions is not yet researched extensively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of coupled correction methods on land cover classification accuracy. Therefore, all combinations of three atmospheric (no atmospheric correction, dark object subtraction and correction based on transmittance functions) and five topographic corrections (no topographic correction, band ratioing, cosine correction, pixel-based Minnaert and pixel-based C-correction) were applied on two acquisitions (2009 and 2010) of a Landsat image in the Romanian Carpathian mountains. The accuracies of the fifteen resulting land cover maps were evaluated statistically based on two validation sets: a random validation set and a validation subset containing pixels present in the difference area between the uncorrected classification and one of the fourteen corrected classifications. New insights into the differences in classification accuracy were obtained. First, results showed that all corrected images resulted in higher overall classification accuracies than the uncorrected images. The highest accuracy for the full validation set was achieved after combination of an atmospheric correction based on transmittance functions and a pixel-based Minnaert topographic correction. Secondly, class accuracies of especially the coniferous and mixed forest classes were enhanced after correction. There was only a minor improvement for the other land cover classes (broadleaved forest, bare soil, grass and water). This was explained by the position

  9. Atmospheric correction of AVHRR data for biophysical remote sensing of the Sahel

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N.P.; Prince, S.D.; Holben, B.N.

    1995-02-01

    The importance of atmospheric correction of reflectances measured with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer(AVHRR) for biophysical studies using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is examined for a study area in the Sahel for which measurements of aerosol and water vapor were available. During the rainy season atmospheric aerosols were relatively more variable than water vapor. Atmospheric corrections were applied to Channel 1 (red) and Channel 2 (near-infrared) for the effects of molecular absorption and Rayleigh scatter, aerosol scatter and absorption, and water vapor absorption. The results were expressed as the difference between corrected and uncorrected reflectances ({Delta}{rho}). In Channel 1 the magnitude and variability of {Delta}{rho} was mostly caused by aerosols. In Channel 2 the magnitude of {Delta}{rho} was caused by water vapor, but most of the variability was caused by aerosols. Most of the degradation in the NDVI signal ({delta}{nu}{iota}) was caused by water vapor but the variability in {Delta}{nu}{iota} was caused by both water vapor and aerosol. Atmospheric corrections using seasonal averages of atmospheric water vapor and aerosol optical depths resulted in corrections that were similar to the full corrections using daily values. In the Sahel it may therefore be acceptable to use average values for the atmospheric variables to correct satellite data when sunphotometer data are not available, although the effects of interannual variability in mean atmospheric conditions are not known.

  10. Atmospheric refraction correction for Ka-band blind pointing on the DSS-13 beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Borroto, I. M.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the atmospheric refraction corrections at the DSS-13 34-m diameter beam waveguide (BWG) antenna for the period Jul. - Dec. 1990 is presented. The current Deep Space Network (DSN) atmospheric refraction model and its sensitivity with respect to sensor accuracy are reviewed. Refraction corrections based on actual atmospheric parameters are compared with the DSS-13 station default corrections for the six-month period. Average blind-pointing improvement during the worst month would have amounted to 5 mdeg at 10 deg elevation using actual surface weather values. This would have resulted in an average gain improvement of 1.1 dB.

  11. Evaluation and effect of various noise reduction techniques used before atmospheric correction of Hyperion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Chinmaya; Kumar, Vinay; Pandey, Kamal; Jyothi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing, in recent days, has seen the emergence of hyperspectral sensors as the helping aspect to numerous applications. Hyperspectral remote sensing often contains data with narrow spectral bandwidth (10nm) that enables the feature identification and distinction of spectral similar features. Hyperion L1R data consists of 242 bands and out of which some bands contain noise (a pattern reorganization that hinders information). After removal of these sensor errors like bad bands and dropped line error, atmospheric correction using Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Hypercubes (FLAASH) is carried out to get true ground reflectance. It was observed in the spectral reflectance curve of the obtained product is still affected with several noise and in order to remove this noise some corrections are required before atmospheric correction. In this study various noise reduction techniques like Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) are implemented to observe their effect on sensor error removed Hyperion data before carrying out atmospheric correction. At first noise reduction techniques (MNF, PCA and ICA) are applied separately to the Hyperion sensor error corrected product and then inverse of (MNF, PCA and ICA) are carried out respectively. It was observed that applying atmospheric correction after applying MNF & inverse MNF was giving better spectral profiles of the features (i.e. with less noise). From the above spectral profiles we can conclude that the data which is atmospherically corrected after applying MNF & inverse MNF is giving better results i.e. the spectral profiles of vegetation, water, urban and coal field is smooth and less noisy in comparison with the spectral profiles obtained by directly applying atmospheric correction and the spectral profiles obtained by applying PCA & inverse PCA and ICA &inverse ICA. After applying PCA & inverse PCA and then atmospheric correction the

  12. Effects of atmospheric correction of Landsat imagery on lake water clarity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonansea, Matias; Ledesma, C.; Rodríguez, C.; Pinotti, L.; Antunes, M. Homem

    2015-12-01

    Empirical relationships between Landsat data and water clarity expressed in terms of Secchi disk transparency (SDT) have been widely used for monitoring and assessment of water quality. The atmosphere affects differently sensor bands depending on the waveband, thus affecting the relationships obtained from top-of-atmosphere reflectance. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the reliability of water clarity can be improved applying atmospheric correction of Landsat imagery. Further, a general predictive algorithm to determine water clarity in the reservoir was developed. Samples of SDT were taken from Río Tercero reservoir (Argentina). Landsat images were atmospheric corrected using the 6S code. Estimated values of SDT with and without atmospheric correction were compared for their differences. Results suggested that atmospheric corrected values of Landsat band 3 and the ratio 1/3 proved to be the best predictor of water clarity in the reservoir (R2 = 0.84). Using the 6S code we demonstrate the usefulness of atmospheric correction to Landsat data since water clarity algorithm using surface reflectance was more reliable than the top-of atmosphere reflectance model.

  13. Single band atmospheric correction tool for thermal infrared data: application to Landsat 7 ETM+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, Joan Miquel; Coll, César; Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Valor, Enric; Niclòs, Raquel; Pérez-Planells, Lluís.; Doña, Carolina; Caselles, Vicente

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric correction of Thermal Infrared (TIR) remote sensing data is a key process in order to obtain accurate land surface temperatures (LST). Single band atmospheric correction methods are used for sensors provided with a single TIR band. Which employs a radiative transfer model using atmospheric profiles over the study area as inputs to estimate the atmospheric transmittances and emitted radiances. Currently, TIR data from Landsat 5-TM, Landsat 7-ETM+ and Landsat 8-TIRS can be atmospherically corrected using the on-line Atmospheric Correction Parameter Calculator (ACPC, http://atmcorr.gsfc.nasa.gov). For specific geographical coordinates and observation time, the ACPC provides the atmospheric transmittance, and both upwelling and downwelling radiances, which are calculated from MODTRAN4 radiative transfer simulations with NCEP atmospheric profiles as inputs. Since the ACPC provides the atmospheric parameters for a single location, it does not account for their eventual variability within the full Landsat scene. The new Single Band Atmospheric Correction (SBAC) tool provides the geolocated atmospheric parameters for every pixel taking into account their altitude. SBAC defines a three-dimensional grid with 1°×1° latitude/longitude spatial resolution, corresponding to the location of NCEP profiles, and 13 altitudes from sea level to 5000 meters. These profiles are entered in MODTRAN5 to calculate the atmospheric parameters corresponding to a given pixel are obtained by weighted spatial interpolation in the horizontal dimensions and linear interpolation in the vertical dimension. In order to compare both SBAC and ACPC tools, we have compared with ground measurements the Landsat-7/ETM+ LST obtained using both tools over the Valencia ground validation site.

  14. Cross-sensor comparisons between Landsat 5 TM and IRS-P6 AWiFS and disturbance detection using integrated Landsat and AWiFS time-series images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Xuexia; Vogelmann, James E.; Chander, Gyanesh; Ji, Lei; Tolk, Brian; Huang, Chengquan; Rollins, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Routine acquisition of Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data was discontinued recently and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) has an ongoing problem with the scan line corrector (SLC), thereby creating spatial gaps when covering images obtained during the process. Since temporal and spatial discontinuities of Landsat data are now imminent, it is therefore important to investigate other potential satellite data that can be used to replace Landsat data. We thus cross-compared two near-simultaneous images obtained from Landsat 5 TM and the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS)-P6 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS), both captured on 29 May 2007 over Los Angeles, CA. TM and AWiFS reflectances were compared for the green, red, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands, as well as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) based on manually selected polygons in homogeneous areas. All R2 values of linear regressions were found to be higher than 0.99. The temporally invariant cluster (TIC) method was used to calculate the NDVI correlation between the TM and AWiFS images. The NDVI regression line derived from selected polygons passed through several invariant cluster centres of the TIC density maps and demonstrated that both the scene-dependent polygon regression method and TIC method can generate accurate radiometric normalization. A scene-independent normalization method was also used to normalize the AWiFS data. Image agreement assessment demonstrated that the scene-dependent normalization using homogeneous polygons provided slightly higher accuracy values than those obtained by the scene-independent method. Finally, the non-normalized and relatively normalized ‘Landsat-like’ AWiFS 2007 images were integrated into 1984 to 2010 Landsat time-series stacks (LTSS) for disturbance detection using the Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT) model. Both scene-dependent and scene-independent normalized AWiFS data sets could generate disturbance maps similar to

  15. Comparison of observation level versus 24-hour average atmospheric loading corrections in VLBI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, D. S.; van Dam, T. M.

    2009-04-01

    Variations in the horizontal distribution of atmospheric mass induce displacements of the Earth's surface. Theoretical estimates of the amplitude of the surface displacement indicate that the predicted surface displacement is often large enough to be detected by current geodetic techniques. In fact, the effects of atmospheric pressure loading have been detected in Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinate time series [van Dam et al., 1994; Dong et al., 2002; Scherneck et al., 2003; Zerbini et al., 2004] and very long baseline interferometery (VLBI) coordinates [Rabble and Schuh, 1986; Manabe et al., 1991; van Dam and Herring, 1994; Schuh et al., 2003; MacMillan and Gipson, 1994; and Petrov and Boy, 2004]. Some of these studies applied the atmospheric displacement at the observation level and in other studies, the predicted atmospheric and observed geodetic surface displacements have been averaged over 24 hours. A direct comparison of observation level and 24 hour corrections has not been carried out for VLBI to determine if one or the other approach is superior. In this presentation, we address the following questions: 1) Is it better to correct geodetic data at the observation level rather than applying corrections averaged over 24 hours to estimated geodetic coordinates a posteriori? 2) At the sub-daily periods, the atmospheric mass signal is composed of two components: a tidal component and a non-tidal component. If observation level corrections reduce the scatter of VLBI data more than a posteriori correction, is it sufficient to only model the atmospheric tides or must the entire atmospheric load signal be incorporated into the corrections? 3) When solutions from different geodetic techniques (or analysis centers within a technique) are combined (e.g., for ITRF2008), not all solutions may have applied atmospheric loading corrections. Are any systematic effects on the estimated TRF introduced when atmospheric loading is applied?

  16. Sensitivity of earthquake source inversions to atmospheric noise and corrections of InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Chelsea Phipps; Lohman, Rowena Benfer

    2016-05-01

    Tropospheric phase delays pose a major challenge to InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar)-based studies of tectonic deformation. One approach to the mitigation of effects from tropospheric noise is the application of elevation-dependent corrections based on empirical fits between elevation and interferometric phase. We quantify the effects of corrections with a range of complexity on inferred earthquake source parameters using synthetic interferograms with known atmospheric characteristics. We infer statistical properties of the stratified component of the atmosphere using pressure, temperature, and water vapor data from the North America Regional Reanalysis model over our region of interest in the Basin and Range province of the western United States. The statistics of the simulated atmospheric turbulence are estimated from InSAR and Global Positioning System data. We demonstrate potentially significant improvements in the precision of earthquake magnitude, depth, and dip estimates for several synthetic earthquake focal mechanisms following a correction for spatially variable atmospheric characteristics, relative to cases where the correction is based on a uniform delay versus elevation relationship or where no correction is applied. We apply our approach to the 1992 M5.6 Little Skull Mountain, Nevada, earthquake and demonstrate that the earthquake source parameter error bounds decrease in size after applying the atmospheric corrections. Our approach for evaluating the impact of atmospheric noise on inferred fault parameters is easily adaptable to other regions and source mechanisms.

  17. Assessment, Validation, and Refinement of the Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for the Ocean Color Sensors. Chapter 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Menghua

    2003-01-01

    The primary focus of this proposed research is for the atmospheric correction algorithm evaluation and development and satellite sensor calibration and characterization. It is well known that the atmospheric correction, which removes more than 90% of sensor-measured signals contributed from atmosphere in the visible, is the key procedure in the ocean color remote sensing (Gordon and Wang, 1994). The accuracy and effectiveness of the atmospheric correction directly affect the remotely retrieved ocean bio-optical products. On the other hand, for ocean color remote sensing, in order to obtain the required accuracy in the derived water-leaving signals from satellite measurements, an on-orbit vicarious calibration of the whole system, i.e., sensor and algorithms, is necessary. In addition, it is important to address issues of (i) cross-calibration of two or more sensors and (ii) in-orbit vicarious calibration of the sensor-atmosphere system. The goal of these researches is to develop methods for meaningful comparison and possible merging of data products from multiple ocean color missions. In the past year, much efforts have been on (a) understanding and correcting the artifacts appeared in the SeaWiFS-derived ocean and atmospheric produces; (b) developing an efficient method in generating the SeaWiFS aerosol lookup tables, (c) evaluating the effects of calibration error in the near-infrared (NIR) band to the atmospheric correction of the ocean color remote sensors, (d) comparing the aerosol correction algorithm using the singlescattering epsilon (the current SeaWiFS algorithm) vs. the multiple-scattering epsilon method, and (e) continuing on activities for the International Ocean-Color Coordinating Group (IOCCG) atmospheric correction working group. In this report, I will briefly present and discuss these and some other research activities.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

  19. Comparison and evaluation of atmospheric correction algorithms of QUAC, DOS, and FLAASH for HICO hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liangliang; Mao, Zhihua; Chen, Peng; Han, Sha'ou; Gong, Fang; Zhu, Qiankun

    2016-10-01

    In order to obtain the spectral information of objects and improve the retrieval of quantitative parameters from remotely sensing data accurately on land or over water bodies, atmospheric correction is a vital step, certainly, it is also a prerequisite to hyperspectral imagery data analysis approaches. On the base of previous studies, the atmospheric correction algorithms were divided to two categories: image-based empirical and model-based correction methods. The Quick Atmospheric Correction (QUAC) and Dark Object Subtraction (DOS) methods belong to the empirical or semiempirical methods, however, the Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercube (FLAASH) method was developed from the radiative transfer model. In this paper, we initially evaluated the performance from Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) of 16 Nov 2013 using QUAC, DOS, and MODTRAN integrated in FLAASH, and compared the results of these correction methods with in situ data. The results indicate that the method of FLAASH model performs much better than DOS and QUAC in atmospheric correction for HICO hyperspectral imagery, although the DOS and QUAC method is conducted more easily and do not require inputs of complex parameters.

  20. Radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction of satellite and aircraft data for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Markham, Brian L.; Newcomer, Jeffery A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite and aircraft radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction work carried out as part of the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) are summarized. A large volume (120 Gbytes) of radiometric data were acquired and derived from a number of different instruments on a variety of platforms. The same basic procedure was applied to each instrument: derive the most recent calibration coefficients for converting sensor counts to reflective spectral radiances; correct the radiances for earth-sun distance variations and incident solar spectral irradiance within the bandpass of each respective instrument channel at the top of the atmosphere; characterize the atmosphere for aerosols and absorbing gases; and derive apparent surface reflectance by correcting the exoatmospheric values for atmospheric attenuation. The same basic approach was used for surface temperature derivation. The results of this processing were verified by surface measurements, and corroborated by sensor intercomparisons.

  1. An Algorithm to Atmospherically Correct Visible and Thermal Airborne Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug L.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Schiller, Stephen; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The program Watts implements a system of physically based models developed by the authors, described elsewhere, for the removal of atmospheric effects in multispectral imagery. The band range we treat covers the visible, near IR and the thermal IR. Input to the program begins with atmospheric pal red models specifying transmittance and path radiance. The system also requires the sensor's spectral response curves and knowledge of the scanner's geometric definition. Radiometric characterization of the sensor during data acquisition is also necessary. While the authors contend that active calibration is critical for serious analytical efforts, we recognize that most remote sensing systems, either airborne or space borne, do not as yet attain that minimal level of sophistication. Therefore, Watts will also use semi-active calibration where necessary and available. All of the input is then reduced to common terms, in terms of the physical units. From this it Is then practical to convert raw sensor readings into geophysically meaningful units. There are a large number of intricate details necessary to bring an algorithm or this type to fruition and to even use the program. Further, at this stage of development the authors are uncertain as to the optimal presentation or minimal analytical techniques which users of this type of software must have. Therefore, Watts permits users to break out and analyze the input in various ways. Implemented in REXX under OS/2 the program is designed with attention to the probability that it will be ported to other systems and other languages. Further, as it is in REXX, it is relatively simple for anyone that is literate in any computer language to open the code and modify to meet their needs. The authors have employed Watts in their research addressing precision agriculture and urban heat island.

  2. Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS): Proof of concept study on atmospheric corrections. Determinations of atmospheric optical parameters using the multispectral resource sampler atmospheric optical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine which mathematical algorithms should be used in the calculation of atmospheric optical parameters using the Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS) sensor. A simulation of the MRS sensor was performed using a radiative-transfer model. The simulation provides the spectral radiance at the satellite sensor in terms of various atmospheric parameters, such as optical thickness, solar zenith angle, nadir view angle, relative azimuth angle, bi-directional reflectance of the target, background albedo, and wavelength. Atmospheric correction algorithms were also developed for the determination of the total spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere for: (1) homogeneous (horizontal) hazy atmospheres with diffuse targets; (2) inhomogeneous (horizontal) hazy atmospheres with diffuse targets; and (3) homogeneous (horizontal) hazy atmospheres with non-diffuse targets.

  3. Atmospheric correction of LANDSAT TM thermal band using surface energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, Alain; Devaux-Ros, Claire; Moran, M. Susan

    1994-01-01

    Thermal infrared data of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) are hardly used, probably due to the difficulties met when trying to correct them for atmospheric effects. A method for correcting these data was designed, based on surface energy balance estimation of known wet and dry targets included in the TM image to be corrected. This method, only using the image itself and local meteorological data was tested and validated on various surfaces: agricultural, forest and rangeland. The root mean square error on corrected temperatures is on the order of 1C.

  4. Comparison of FLAASH and QUAC atmospheric correction methods for Resourcesat-2 LISS-IV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, V.; Tiwari, R. K.; Gupta, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    The LISS-IV sensor aboard Resourcesat-2 is a modern relatively high resolution multispectral sensor having immense potential for generation of good quality land use land cover maps. It generates data in high (10-bit) radiometric resolution and 5.8 m spatial resolution and has three bands in the visible-near infrared region. This is of particular importance to global community as the data are provided at highly competitive prices. However, no literature describing the atmospheric correction of Resourcesat-2-LISS-IV data could be found. Further, without atmospheric correction full radiometric potential of any remote sensing data remains underutilized. The FLAASH and QUAC module of ENVI software are highly used by researchers for atmospheric correction of popular remote sensing data such as Landsat, SPOT, IKONOS, LISS-I, III etc. This article outlines a methodology for atmospheric correction of Resourcesat-2-LISS-IV data. Also, a comparison of reflectance from different atmospheric correction modules (FLAASH and QUAC) with TOA and standard data has been made to determine the best suitable method for reflectance estimation for this sensor.

  5. Continental-scale Validation of MODIS-based and LEDAPS Landsat ETM+ Atmospheric Correction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Junchang; Roy, David P.; Vermote, Eric; Masek, Jeffrey; Kovalskyy, Valeriy

    2012-01-01

    The potential of Landsat data processing to provide systematic continental scale products has been demonstrated by several projects including the NASA Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD) project. The recent free availability of Landsat data increases the need for robust and efficient atmospheric correction algorithms applicable to large volume Landsat data sets. This paper compares the accuracy of two Landsat atmospheric correction methods: a MODIS-based method and the Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) method. Both methods are based on the 6SV radiative transfer code but have different atmospheric characterization approaches. The MODIS-based method uses the MODIS Terra derived dynamic aerosol type, aerosol optical thickness, and water vapor to atmospherically correct ETM+ acquisitions in each coincident orbit. The LEDAPS method uses aerosol characterizations derived independently from each Landsat acquisition and assumes a fixed continental aerosol type and uses ancillary water vapor. Validation results are presented comparing ETM+ atmospherically corrected data generated using these two methods with AERONET corrected ETM+ data for 95 10 km×10 km 30 m subsets, a total of nearly 8 million 30 m pixels, located across the conterminous United States. The results indicate that the MODIS-based method has better accuracy than the LEDAPS method for the ETM+ red and longer wavelength bands.

  6. Atmospheric correction of remotely sensed image data by a simplified model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Spanner, M. A.; Slye, R. E.; Pueschel, R. F.; Aggarwal, H. R.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of radiation with the atmosphere is complex and has proved difficult to calculate without reference to measurements made at or close to the time and location of interest. In this paper we describe the use of data from an airborne-tracking sunphotometer mounted on a NASA C-130 aircraft to derive optical properties of the atmospheric aerosols above the aircraft when it is on the ground as well as when the aircraft is at altitude collecting remote sensing data. Furthermore, we describe the use of these optical properties for quantitative atmospheric correction of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and NS001 TM simulator radiances in a simplified radiative transfer model appropriate for each pixel of entire images. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons of results from use of the model show it provides good to excellent correction for atmospheric effects in TM and NS001 TM simulator data. Quantitative comparisons with measurements of surface radiances measured near the time of the TM overpass showed agreement within a few percent for bands 2, 3, and 4. Band 1 yielded radiances within 15 percent of the surface radiances. We think the simplified atmospheric correction model shows great promise for applying atmospheric corrections to entire images instead of individual points within images to yield surface radiances within a few percent in a computationally efficient manner.

  7. Atmospheric correction of remotely sensed image data by a simplified model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Spanner, M. A.; Slye, R. E.; Pueschel, R. F.; Aggarwal, H. R.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of radiation with the atmosphere is complex and has proved difficult to calculate without reference to measurements made at or close to the time and location of interest. In this paper we describe the use of data from an airborne-tracking sunphotometer mounted on a NASA C-130 aircraft to derive optical properties of the atmospheric aerosols above the aircraft when it is on the ground as well as when the aircraft is at altitude collecting remote sensing data. Furthermore, we describe the use of these optical properties for quantitative atmospheric correction of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and NS001 TM simulator radiances in a simplified radiative transfer model appropriate for each pixel of entire images. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons of results from use of the model show it provides good to excellent correction for atmospheric effects in TM and NS001 TM simulator data. Quantitative comparisons with measurements of surface radiances measured near the time of the TM overpass showed agreement within a few percent for bands 2, 3, and 4. Band 1 yielded radiances within 15 percent of the surface radiances. We think the simplified atmospheric correction model shows great promise for applying atmospheric corrections to entire images instead of individual points within images to yield surface radiances within a few percent in a computationally efficient manner.

  8. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  9. [Application of five atmospheric correction models for Landsat TM data in vegetation remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Song, Wei-wei; Guan, Dong-sheng

    2008-04-01

    Based on the Landsat TM image of northeast Guangzhou City and north Huizhou City on July 18, 2005, and compared with apparent reflectance model, five atmospheric correction models including four dark object subtraction models and 6S model were evaluated from the aspects of vegetation reflectance, surface reflectance, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The results showed that the dark object subtraction model DOS4 produced the highest accurate vegetation reflectance, and had the largest information loads for surface reflectance and NDVI, being the best for the atmospheric correction in the study areas. It was necessary to analyze and to compare different models to find out an appropriate model for atmospheric correction in the study of other areas.

  10. Analysis Of AVIRIS Data From LEO-15 Using Tafkaa Atmospheric Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Marcos J.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Davis, Curtiss O.; Moline, Mark

    2004-01-01

    We previously developed an algorithm named Tafkaa for atmospheric correction of remote sensing ocean color data from aircraft and satellite platforms. The algorithm allows quick atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data using lookup tables generated with a modified version of Ahmad & Fraser s vector radiative transfer code. During the past few years we have extended the capabilities of the code. Current modifications include the ability to account for within scene variation in solar geometry (important for very long scenes) and view geometries (important for wide fields of view). Additionally, versions of Tafkaa have been made for a variety of multi-spectral sensors, including SeaWiFS and MODIS. In this proceeding we present some initial results of atmospheric correction of AVIRIS data from the 2001 July Hyperspectral Coastal Ocean Dynamics Experiment (HyCODE) at LEO-15.

  11. A Useful Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivalland, Vincent; Tardy, Benjamin; Huc, Mireille; Hagolle, Olivier; Marcq, Sébastien; Boulet, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Land Surface temperature (LST) is a critical variable for studying the energy and water budgets at the Earth surface, and is a key component of many aspects of climate research and services. The Landsat program jointly carried out by NASA and USGS has been providing thermal infrared data for 40 years, but no associated LST product has been yet routinely proposed to community. To derive LST values, radiances measured at sensor-level need to be corrected for the atmospheric absorption, the atmospheric emission and the surface emissivity effect. Until now, existing LST products have been generated with multi channel methods such as the Temperature/Emissivity Separation (TES) adapted to ASTER data or the generalized split-window algorithm adapted to MODIS multispectral data. Those approaches are ill-adapted to the Landsat mono-window data specificity. The atmospheric correction methodology usually used for Landsat data requires detailed information about the state of the atmosphere. This information may be obtained from radio-sounding or model atmospheric reanalysis and is supplied to a radiative transfer model in order to estimate atmospheric parameters for a given coordinate. In this work, we present a new automatic tool dedicated to Landsat thermal data correction which improves the common atmospheric correction methodology by introducing the spatial dimension in the process. The python tool developed during this study, named LANDARTs for LANDsat Automatic Retrieval of surface Temperature, is fully automatic and provides atmospheric corrections for a whole Landsat tile. Vertical atmospheric conditions are downloaded from the ERA Interim dataset from ECMWF meteorological organization which provides them at 0.125 degrees resolution, at a global scale and with a 6-hour-time step. The atmospheric correction parameters are estimated on the atmospheric grid using the commercial software MODTRAN, then interpolated to 30m resolution. We detail the processing steps

  12. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  14. Retrieval of atmospheric methane from high spectral resolution satellite measurements: a correction for cirrus cloud effects.

    PubMed

    Bril, Andrey; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2009-04-10

    We assessed the accuracy of methane (CH(4)) retrievals from synthetic radiance spectra particular to Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite observations. We focused on estimating the CH(4) vertical column amount from an atmosphere that includes thin cirrus clouds, taking into account uncertain meteorological conditions. A photon path-length probability density function (PPDF)-based method was adapted to correct for atmospheric scattering effects in CH(4) retrievals. This method was shown to provide similar retrieval accuracy as compared to a carbon dioxide (CO(2))-proxy-based correction approach. It infers some advantages of PPDF-based method for methane retrievals under high variability of CO(2) abundance.

  15. Influence of atmospheric correction on image classification for irrigated agriculture in the Lower Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric correction is essential for accurate quantitative information retrieval from satellite imagery. In this paper, we applied the atmospheric correction algorithm, Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code, to retrieve surface reflectance from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery for the Palo Verde Irrigation District (PVID) within the lower Colorado River basin. The 6S code was implemented with the input data of visibility, aerosol optical depth, pressure, temperature, water vapour, and ozone from local measurements. The 6S corrected image of PVID was classified into the irrigated agriculture of alfalfa, cotton, melons, corn, grass, and vegetables. We performed multiple classification methods of maximum likelihood, fuzzy means, and object-oriented classification methods. Using field crop type data, we conducted accuracy assessment for the results from 6S corrected image and uncorrected image and found a consistent improvement of classification accuracy for 6S corrected image. The study proves that 6S code is a robust atmospheric correction method in providing a better simulation of surface reflectance and improving image classification accuracy.;

  16. A comparison of atmospheric disturbance correction techniques in GBInSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Jianping; Qiu, Shanming; Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Shun

    2015-11-01

    Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry (GBInSAR) has generated movement with sub-millimeter accuracy in line-of-sight(LOS) direction, and it can provide movement images with high spatial and temporal resolution. Though the fluctuation of atmospheric environment affects interferometric phases strongly, GBInSAR can be used for deformation measurement after removing the interference phase and transforming the displacement from LOS direction to radial and tangential. This paper provides a comparison of different atmospheric disturbance correction techniques. We made an experiment of deformation measurement about Geheyan Dam on Qingjiang to estimate the movement caused by atmosphere. In the experiment, displacement information of the dam was obtained by IBIS-L system and atmospheric parameters (humidity, temperature and barometric pressure) were collected from the weather station located on the dam. The collection process lasted for several days. By processing and analysis the data of a whole day without equipment malfunction, the results show an atmospheric delay of 15mm when the system located 1000m away from the target dam and atmospheric correction should be reinforced somehow for most Ground-Based InSAR applications. Then three correction algorithms are presented in order to weaken the influence from atmospheric disturbance. The techniques respectively based on the atmospheric parameters, Ground Control Points(GCP) and distribution model are quantitively compared using a reference dataset gotten by inverted perpendicular lines. And the accuracy of each method are finally drawn. It could be seen that the atmospheric disturbance be weaken by the three methods with reliable results and error of the technique based on distribution model was less than 2mm with the highest reliability. This analysis is followed by a discussion of the advantages and the limitations of each technique.

  17. Solving for the Surface: An Automated Approach to THEMIS Atmospheric Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, A. J.; Salvatore, M. R.; Smith, R.; Edwards, C. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present the initial results of an automated atmospheric correction algorithm for the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) instrument, whereby high spectral resolution Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data are queried to generate numerous atmospheric opacity values for each THEMIS infrared image. While the pioneering methods of Bandfield et al. [2004] also used TES spectra to atmospherically correct THEMIS data, the algorithm presented here is a significant improvement because of the reduced dependency on user-defined inputs for individual images. Additionally, this technique is particularly useful for correcting THEMIS images that have captured a range of atmospheric conditions and/or surface elevations, issues that have been difficult to correct for using previous techniques. Thermal infrared observations of the Martian surface can be used to determine the spatial distribution and relative abundance of many common rock-forming minerals. This information is essential to understanding the planet's geologic and climatic history. However, the Martian atmosphere also has absorptions in the thermal infrared which complicate the interpretation of infrared measurements obtained from orbit. TES has sufficient spectral resolution (143 bands at 10 cm-1 sampling) to linearly unmix and remove atmospheric spectral end-members from the acquired spectra. THEMIS has the benefit of higher spatial resolution (~100 m/pixel vs. 3x5 km/TES-pixel) but has lower spectral resolution (8 surface sensitive spectral bands). As such, it is not possible to isolate the surface component by unmixing the atmospheric contribution from the THEMIS spectra, as is done with TES. Bandfield et al. [2004] developed a technique using atmospherically corrected TES spectra as tie-points for constant radiance offset correction and surface emissivity retrieval. This technique is the primary method used to correct THEMIS but is highly susceptible to inconsistent results if great care in the

  18. Validation of The Standard Aerosol Models Used In The Atmospheric Correction Algorithms For Satellite Ocean Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, N.; Santer, R.

    Over ocean, the total radiance measured by the satellite sensors at the top of the atmo- sphere is mainly atmospheric. In order to access to the water leaving radiance, directly related to the concentration of the different components of the water, we need to cor- rect the satellite measurements from the important atmospheric contribution. In the atmosphere, the light emitted by the sun is scattered by the molecules, absorbed by the gases, and both scattered and absorbed in unknown proportions by the aerosols, particles confined in the first layer of the atmosphere due to their large size. The remote sensing of the aerosols represents then a complex step in the atmospheric correction scheme. Over ocean, the principle of the aerosol remote sensing lies on the assump- tion that the water is absorbent in the red and the near-infrared. The aerosol model is then deduced from these spectral bands and used to extrapolate the aerosol optical properties in the visible wavelengths. For ocean color sensors such as CZCS, OCTS, POLDER, SeaWiFS or MODIS, the atmospheric correction algorithms use standard aerosol models defined by Shettle &Fenn for their look-up-tables. Over coastal wa- ters, are these models still suitable? The goal of this work is to validate the standard aerosol models used in the atmospheric correction algorithms over coastal zones. For this work, we use ground-based in-situ measurements from the CIMEL sunphotome- ter instrument. Using the extinction measurements, we can deduce the aerosol spectral dependency which falls between the spectral dependency of two standard Shettle &Fenn aerosol models. After the interpolation of the aerosol model, we can use it to extrapolate in the visible the optical parameters needed for the atmospheric correction scheme: Latm, the atmospheric radiance and T, the atmospheric transmittance. The simulations are done using a radiative transfer code based on the successive order of scattering. Latm and T are then used for

  19. First on-sky closed loop measurement and correction of atmospheric dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Prashant; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Takami, H.; Hayano, Y.; Narita, N.

    2016-07-01

    In the field of exoplanetary sciences, high contrast imaging is crucial for the direct detection of, and answering questions about habitability of exoplanets. For the direct imaging of habitable exoplanets, it is important to employ low inner working angle (IWA) coronagraphs, which can image exoplanets close to the PSF. To achieve the full performance of such coronagraphs, it is crucial to correct for atmospheric dispersion to the highest degree, as any leakage will limit the contrast. To achieve the highest contrast with the state-of-the-art coronagraphs in the SCExAO instrument, the spread in the point-spread function due to residual atmospheric dispersion should not be more than 1 mas in the science band. In a traditional approach, atmospheric dispersion is compensated by an atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC), which is simply based on model which only takes into account the elevation of telescope and hence results in imperfect correction of dispersion. In this paper we present the first on-sky closed-loop measurement and correction of residual atmospheric dispersion. Exploiting the elongated nature of chromatic speckles, we can precisely measure the presence of atmospheric dispersion and by driving the ADC, we can do real-time correction. With the above approach, in broadband operation (y-H band) we achieved a residual of 4.2 mas from an initial 18.8 mas and as low as 1.4 mas in H-band only after correction, which is close to our science requirement. This work will be valuable in the field of high contrast imaging of habitable exoplanets in the era of the ELTs.

  20. Optimal Atmospheric Correction for Above-Ground Forest Biomass Estimation with the ETM+ Remote Sensor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu Cong; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Jungbin; Choi, Sung-Uk; Hong, Suk-Young; Heo, Joon

    2015-07-31

    The reflectance of the Earth's surface is significantly influenced by atmospheric conditions such as water vapor content and aerosols. Particularly, the absorption and scattering effects become stronger when the target features are non-bright objects, such as in aqueous or vegetated areas. For any remote-sensing approach, atmospheric correction is thus required to minimize those effects and to convert digital number (DN) values to surface reflectance. The main aim of this study was to test the three most popular atmospheric correction models, namely (1) Dark Object Subtraction (DOS); (2) Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) and (3) the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) and compare them with Top of Atmospheric (TOA) reflectance. By using the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) algorithm, a series of experiments were conducted for above-ground forest biomass (AGB) estimations of the Gongju and Sejong region of South Korea, in order to check the effectiveness of atmospheric correction methods for Landsat ETM+. Overall, in the forest biomass estimation, the 6S model showed the bestRMSE's, followed by FLAASH, DOS and TOA. In addition, a significant improvement of RMSE by 6S was found with images when the study site had higher total water vapor and temperature levels. Moreover, we also tested the sensitivity of the atmospheric correction methods to each of the Landsat ETM+ bands. The results confirmed that 6S dominates the other methods, especially in the infrared wavelengths covering the pivotal bands for forest applications. Finally, we suggest that the 6S model, integrating water vapor and aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS products, is better suited for AGB estimation based on optical remote-sensing data, especially when using satellite images acquired in the summer during full canopy development.

  1. Optimal Atmospheric Correction for Above-Ground Forest Biomass Estimation with the ETM+ Remote Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu Cong; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Jungbin; Choi, Sung-Uk; Hong, Suk-Young; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The reflectance of the Earth’s surface is significantly influenced by atmospheric conditions such as water vapor content and aerosols. Particularly, the absorption and scattering effects become stronger when the target features are non-bright objects, such as in aqueous or vegetated areas. For any remote-sensing approach, atmospheric correction is thus required to minimize those effects and to convert digital number (DN) values to surface reflectance. The main aim of this study was to test the three most popular atmospheric correction models, namely (1) Dark Object Subtraction (DOS); (2) Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) and (3) the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) and compare them with Top of Atmospheric (TOA) reflectance. By using the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) algorithm, a series of experiments were conducted for above-ground forest biomass (AGB) estimations of the Gongju and Sejong region of South Korea, in order to check the effectiveness of atmospheric correction methods for Landsat ETM+. Overall, in the forest biomass estimation, the 6S model showed the bestRMSE’s, followed by FLAASH, DOS and TOA. In addition, a significant improvement of RMSE by 6S was found with images when the study site had higher total water vapor and temperature levels. Moreover, we also tested the sensitivity of the atmospheric correction methods to each of the Landsat ETM+ bands. The results confirmed that 6S dominates the other methods, especially in the infrared wavelengths covering the pivotal bands for forest applications. Finally, we suggest that the 6S model, integrating water vapor and aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS products, is better suited for AGB estimation based on optical remote-sensing data, especially when using satellite images acquired in the summer during full canopy development. PMID:26263996

  2. [Errors Analysis and Correction in Atmospheric Methane Retrieval Based on Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite Data].

    PubMed

    Bu, Ting-ting; Wang, Xian-hua; Ye, Han-han; Jiang, Xin-hua

    2016-01-01

    High precision retrieval of atmospheric CH4 is influenced by a variety of factors. The uncertainties of ground properties and atmospheric conditions are important factors, such as surface reflectance, temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile. Surface reflectance is affected by many factors so that it is difficult to get the precise value. The uncertainty of surface reflectance will cause large error to retrieval result. The uncertainties of temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile are also important sources of retrieval error and they will cause unavoidable systematic error. This error is hard to eliminate only using CH4 band. In this paper, ratio spectrometry method and CO2 band correction method are proposed to reduce the error caused by these factors. Ratio spectrometry method can decrease the effect of surface reflectance in CH4 retrieval by converting absolute radiance spectrometry into ratio spectrometry. CO2 band correction method converts column amounts of CH4 into column averaged mixing ratio by using CO2 1.61 μm band and it can correct the systematic error caused by temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile. The combination of these two correction methods will decrease the effect caused by surface reflectance, temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile at the same time and reduce the retrieval error. GOSAT data were used to retrieve atmospheric CH4 to test and validate the two correction methods. The results showed that CH4 column averaged mixing ratio retrieved after correction was close to GOSAT Level2 product and the retrieval precision was up to -0.24%. The studies suggest that the error of CH4 retrieval caused by the uncertainties of ground properties and atmospheric conditions can be significantly reduced and the retrieval precision can be highly improved by using ratio spectrometry method and CO2 hand correction method.

  3. Atmospheric correction of AVIRIS data of Monterey Bay contaminated by thin cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbosch, Jeannette; Davis, Curtiss O.; Mobley, Curtis D.; Rhea, W. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Point source measurements (e.g. sun photometer data, weather station observations) are often used to constrain radiative transfer models such as MODTRAN/LOWTRAN7 when atmospherically correcting AVIRIS imagery. The basic assumption is that the atmosphere is horizontally homogeneous throughout the entire area. If the target area of interest is isolated a distance away from the point measurement position, the calculated visibility and atmospheric profiles may not be characteristic of the atmosphere over the target. AVIRIS scenes are often rejected when cloud cover exceeds 10%. However, if the cloud cover is determined to be primarily cirrus rather than cumulus, in-water optical properties may still be extracted over open ocean. High altitude cirrus clouds are non-absorbing at 744 nm. If the optical properties of the AVIRIS scene can be determined from the 744 nm band itself, the atmospheric conditions during the overflight may be deduced.

  4. Reflectance of Antarctic surfaces from multispectral radiometers: The correction of atmospheric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zibordi, G. ); Maracci, G. )

    1993-01-01

    Monitoring reflectance of polar icecaps has relevance in climate studies. In fact, climate changes produce variations in the morphology of ice and snow covers, which are detectable as surface reflectance change. Surface reflectance can be retrieved from remotely sensed data. However, absolute values independent of atmospheric turbidity and surface altitude can only be obtained after removing masking effects of the atmosphere. An atmospheric correction model, accounting for surface and sensor altitudes above sea level, is described and validated through data detected over Antarctic surfaces with a Barnes Modular Multispectral Radiometer having bands overlapping those of the Landsat Thematic Mapper. The model is also applied in a sensitivity analysis to investigate error induced in reflectance obtained from satellite data by indeterminacy in optical parameters of atmospheric constituents. Results show that indeterminacy in the atmospheric water vapor optical thickness is the main source of nonaccuracy in the retrieval of surface reflectance from data remotely sensed over Antarctic regions.

  5. An evaluation of atmospheric corrections to advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, David; Hood, Joy J.

    1993-01-01

    A data set compiled to analyze vegetation indices is used to evaluate the effect of atmospheric correction to AVHRR measurement in the solar spectrum. Such corrections include cloud screening and "clear sky" corrections. We used the "clouds from AVHRR" (CLAVR) method for cloud detection and evaluated its performance over vegetated targets. Clear sky corrections, designed to reduce the effects of molecular scattering and absorption due to ozone, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and molecular oxygen, were applied to data values determine to be cloud free. Generally, it was found that the screening and correction of the AVHRR data did not affect the maximum NDVI compositing process adversely, while at the same time improving estimates of the land-surface radiances over a compositing period.

  6. Laboratory spectra of field samples as a check on two atmospheric correction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Pung; Greeley, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric correction is the first step toward quantitative analysis of imaging spectroscopy data. Two methods, MODTRAN model and the empirical line, were used to convert AVIRIS radiance values to reflectance values. A set of laboratory spectra of field samples corresponding to AVIRIS coverage was used to assess these methods. This will also serve to select bands for future quantative analyses.

  7. Continental-Scale Validation of Modis-Based and LEDAPS Landsat ETM + Atmospheric Correction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Junchang; Roy, David P.; Vermote, Eric; Masek, Jeffrey; Kovalskyy, Valeriy

    2012-01-01

    The potential of Landsat data processing to provide systematic continental scale products has been demonstratedby several projects including the NASA Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD) project. The recent freeavailability of Landsat data increases the need for robust and efficient atmospheric correction algorithms applicableto large volume Landsat data sets. This paper compares the accuracy of two Landsat atmospheric correctionmethods: a MODIS-based method and the Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive ProcessingSystem (LEDAPS) method. Both methods are based on the 6SV radiative transfer code but have different atmosphericcharacterization approaches. The MODIS-based method uses the MODIS Terra derived dynamicaerosol type, aerosol optical thickness, and water vapor to atmospherically correct ETM+ acquisitions ineach coincident orbit. The LEDAPS method uses aerosol characterizations derived independently from eachLandsat acquisition and assumes a fixed continental aerosol type and uses ancillary water vapor. Validationresults are presented comparing ETM+ atmospherically corrected data generated using these two methodswith AERONET corrected ETM+ data for 95 10 km10 km 30 m subsets, a total of nearly 8 million 30 mpixels, located across the conterminous United States. The results indicate that the MODIS-based methodhas better accuracy than the LEDAPS method for the ETM+ red and longer wavelength bands.

  8. Applying Tafkaa For Atmospheric Correction of Aviris Over Coral Ecosystems In The Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, James A.; Montes, Marcos J.; Ustin, Susan L.

    2004-01-01

    Growing concern over the health of coastal ecosystems, particularly coral reefs, has produced increased interest in remote sensing as a tool for the management and monitoring of these valuable natural resources. Hyperspectral capabilities show promising results in this regard, but as yet remain somewhat hindered by the technical and physical issues concerning the intervening water layer. One such issue is the ability to atmospherically correct images over shallow aquatic areas, where complications arise due to varying effects from specular reflection, wind blown surface waves, and reflectance from the benthic substrate. Tafkaa, an atmospheric correction algorithm under development at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, addresses these variables and provides a viable approach to the atmospheric correction issue. Using imagery from the Advanced Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over two shallow coral ecosystems in the Hawai ian Islands, French Frigate Shoals and Kane ohe Bay, we first demonstrate how land-based atmospheric corrections can be limited in such an environment. We then discuss the input requirements and underlying algorithm concepts of Tafkaa and conclude with examples illustrating the improved performance of Tafkaa using the same AVIRIS images.

  9. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: the Absorption and Broadband Correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-05-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrating solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in raytracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested and more than 19 months of measurements were collected at the Plataforma Solar de Almería and compared. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the actual, time-dependent by the collector reflected solar spectrum. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the Absorption and Broadband Correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  10. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery in the Earth Observing System era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Howard R.

    1997-07-01

    Sensors that can be used for the observation of ocean color in NASA's Earth Observing System era (SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MISR) have been designed with 2-4 times the radiometric sensitivity of the proof-of-concept ocean color instrument CZCS (coastal zone color scanner). To realize an improvement in the retrieval of biologically important ocean parameters, e.g., the concentration of the photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll a, from this increased sensitivity, significantly better atmospheric correction than was applied to CZCS is required. Atmospheric correction improvement necessitates the inclusion of the effects of multiple scattering, which are strongly dependent on the aerosol size distribution, concentration, and absorption properties. We review the basic concepts of atmospheric correction over the oceans and provide the details of the algorithms currently being developed for SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MISR. An alternate correction algorithm that could be of significant value in the coastal zone is described for MISR. Related issues such as the influence of aerosol vertical structure in the troposphere, polarization of the light field, sea surface roughness, and oceanic whitecaps on the sea surface are evaluated and plans for their inclusion in the algorithm are described. Unresolved issues, such as the presence of stratospheric aerosol, the appropriateness of the aerosol models used in the assessment of multiple scattering, and the identification of, and difficulties associated with the correction for, the presence of absorbing aerosols, e.g., urban pollution or mineral dust, are identified, and suggestions are provided for their resolution.

  11. Evaluation of Shortwave Infrared Atmospheric Correction for Ocean Color Remote Sensing of Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Franz, Bryan A.; Bailey, Sean W.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard the Aqua platform (MODIS-Aqua) provides a viable data stream for operational water quality monitoring of Chesapeake Bay. Marine geophysical products from MODIS-Aqua depend on the efficacy of the atmospheric correction process, which can be problematic in coastal environments. The operational atmospheric correction algorithm for MODIS-Aqua requires an assumption of negligible near-infrared water-leaving radiance, nL(sub w)(NIR). This assumption progressively degrades with increasing turbidity and, as such, methods exist to account for non-negligible nL(sub w)(NIR) within the atmospheric correction process or to use alternate radiometric bands where the assumption is satisfied, such as those positioned within shortwave infrared (SWIR) region of the spectrum. We evaluated a decade-long time-series of nL(sub w)(lambda) from MODIS-Aqua in Chesapeake Bay derived using NIR and SWIR bands for atmospheric correction. Low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for the SWIR bands of MODIS-Aqua added noise errors to the derived radiances, which produced broad, flat frequency distributions of nL(sub w)(lambda) relative to those produced using the NIR bands. The SWIR approach produced an increased number of negative nL(sub w)(lambda) and decreased sample size relative to the NIR approach. Revised vicarious calibration and regional tuning of the scheme to switch between the NIR and SWIR approaches may improve retrievals in Chesapeake Bay, however, poor SNR values for the MODIS-Aqua SWIR bands remain the primary deficiency of the SWIR-based atmospheric correction approach.

  12. Evaluation of Shortwave Infrared Atmospheric Correction for Ocean Color Remote Sensing of Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Franz, Bryan A.; Bailey, Sean W.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard the Aqua platform (MODIS-Aqua) provides a viable data stream for operational water quality monitoring of Chesapeake Bay. Marine geophysical products from MODIS-Aqua depend on the efficacy of the atmospheric correction process, which can be problematic in coastal environments. The operational atmospheric correction algorithm for MODIS-Aqua requires an assumption of negligible near-infrared water-leaving radiance, nL(sub w)(NIR). This assumption progressively degrades with increasing turbidity and, as such, methods exist to account for non-negligible nL(sub w)(NIR) within the atmospheric correction process or to use alternate radiometric bands where the assumption is satisfied, such as those positioned within shortwave infrared (SWIR) region of the spectrum. We evaluated a decade-long time-series of nL(sub w)(lambda) from MODIS-Aqua in Chesapeake Bay derived using NIR and SWIR bands for atmospheric correction. Low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for the SWIR bands of MODIS-Aqua added noise errors to the derived radiances, which produced broad, flat frequency distributions of nL(sub w)(lambda) relative to those produced using the NIR bands. The SWIR approach produced an increased number of negative nL(sub w)(lambda) and decreased sample size relative to the NIR approach. Revised vicarious calibration and regional tuning of the scheme to switch between the NIR and SWIR approaches may improve retrievals in Chesapeake Bay, however, poor SNR values for the MODIS-Aqua SWIR bands remain the primary deficiency of the SWIR-based atmospheric correction approach.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  14. Atmospheric corrections of passive microwave data for estimating land surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeng-Lin; Wu, Hua; Tang, Bo-Hui; Qiu, Shi; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative analysis of the atmospheric effects on observations made by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) has been performed. The differences between observed brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere and at the bottom of the atmosphere were analyzed using a database of simulated observations, which were configured to replicate AMSR-E data. The differences between observed brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere and land surface-emitted brightness temperatures were also computed. Quantitative results show that the atmosphere has different effects on brightness temperatures in different AMSR-E channels. Atmospheric effects can be neglected at 6.925 and 10.65 GHz, when the standard deviation is less than 1 K. However, at other frequencies and polarizations, atmospheric effects on observations should not be neglected. An atmospheric correction algorithm was developed at 18.7 GHz vertical polarization, based on the classic split-window algorithm used in thermal remote sensing. Land surface emission can be estimated with RMSE = 0.99 K using the proposed method. Using the known land surface emissivity, Land Surface Temperature (LST) can be retrieved. The RMSE of retrieved LST is 1.17 K using the simulated data.

  15. EPIC Aerosol Retrieval and Atmospheric Correction - Challenges, Solutions, and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Wang, Y.; Lyapustin, A.; Marshak, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) provides images of the entire sunlit face of Earth in 10 spectral channels from UV to near infrared wavelengths. At an orbit about 1.5 million kilometers from the Earth - the L1 Lagrangian point, EPIC offers a unique view of the Earth and thus is of high interest to climate, atmosphere, hydrology, and ecology studies. The unique orbit and choice of spectral channels also pose challenges for aerosol retrievals and atmospheric correction: (1) the ubiquitous presence of partial cloudiness due to EPIC's large pixel size; and (2) the potential ambiguity between aerosols and thin clouds without an infrared channel. We have adopted the MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm to retrieve aerosol information and perform atmospheric correction for both clear and partially cloudy pixels. The key improvement on MAIAC is the introduction of spectral, spatial, and temporal constraints to estimate the contribution of subpixel clouds to the observed reflectance. The ambiguity between aerosols and thin clouds is partially resolved by using the oxygen absorption channels. The first aerosol optical depth retrievals based on two-month worth of EPIC observations are promising and agree well with those of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a correlation of about 0.75 and a mean bias less than 0.05. .

  16. Relative Radiometric Normalization and Atmospheric Correction of a SPOT 5 Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Mahmoud El; Bégué, Agnès; Lafrance, Bruno; Hagolle, Olivier; Dedieu, Gérard; Rumeau, Matthieu

    2008-01-01

    Multi-temporal images acquired at high spatial and temporal resolution are an important tool for detecting change and analyzing trends, especially in agricultural applications. However, to insure a reliable use of this kind of data, a rigorous radiometric normalization step is required. Normalization can be addressed by performing an atmospheric correction of each image in the time series. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining an atmospheric characterization at a given acquisition date. In this paper, we investigate whether relative radiometric normalization can substitute for atmospheric correction. We develop an automatic method for relative radiometric normalization based on calculating linear regressions between unnormalized and reference images. Regressions are obtained using the reflectances of automatically selected invariant targets. We compare this method with an atmospheric correction method that uses the 6S model. The performances of both methods are compared using 18 images from of a SPOT 5 time series acquired over Reunion Island. Results obtained for a set of manually selected invariant targets show excellent agreement between the two methods in all spectral bands: values of the coefficient of determination (r2 exceed 0.960, and bias magnitude values are less than 2.65. There is also a strong correlation between normalized NDVI values of sugarcane fields (r2 = 0.959). Despite a relative error of 12.66% between values, very comparable NDVI patterns are observed. PMID:27879849

  17. An Empirical Study of Atmospheric Correction Procedures for Regional Infrasound Amplitudes with Ground Truth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    This study focusses on improving methods of accounting for atmospheric effects on infrasound amplitudes observed on arrays at regional distances in the southwestern United States. Recordings at ranges of 150 to nearly 300 km from a repeating ground truth source of small HE explosions are used. The explosions range in actual weight from approximately 2000-4000 lbs. and are detonated year-round which provides signals for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Three methods of correcting the observed amplitudes for atmospheric effects are investigated with the data set. The first corrects amplitudes for upper stratospheric wind as developed by Mutschlecner and Whitaker (1999) and uses the average wind speed between 45-55 km altitudes in the direction of propagation to derive an empirical correction formula. This approach was developed using large chemical and nuclear explosions and is tested with the smaller explosions for which shorter wavelengths cause the energy to be scattered by the smaller scale structure of the atmosphere. The second approach isa semi-empirical method using ray tracing to determine wind speed at ray turning heights where the wind estimates replace the wind values in the existing formula. Finally, parabolic equation (PE) modeling is used to predict the amplitudes at the arrays at 1 Hz. The PE amplitudes are compared to the observed amplitudes with a narrow band filter centered at 1 Hz. An analysis is performed of the conditions under which the empirical and semi-empirical methods fail and full wave methods must be used.

  18. Artificial-neural-network-based atmospheric correction algorithm: application to MERIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Thomas; Fischer, Juergen; Schaale, Michael; Fell, Frank

    2003-05-01

    After the successful launch of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) on board of the European Space Agency (ESA) Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) on March 1st 2002, first MERIS data are available for validation purposes. The primary goal of the MERIS mission is to measure the color of the sea with respect to oceanic biology and marine water quality. We present an atmospheric correction algorithm for case-I waters based on the inverse modeling of radiative transfer calculations by artificial neural networks. The proposed correction scheme accounts for multiple scattering and high concentrations of absorbing aerosols (e.g. desert dust). Above case-I waters, the measured near infrared path radiance at Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) is assumed to originate from atmospheric processes only and is used to determine the aerosol properties with the help of an additional classification test in the visible spectral region. A synthetic data set is generated from radiative transfer simulations and is subsequently used to train different Multi-Layer-Perceptrons (MLP). The atmospheric correction scheme consists of two steps. First a set of MLPs is used to derive the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and the aerosol type for each pixel. Second these quantities are fed into a further MLP trained with simulated data for various chlorophyll concentrations to perform the radiative transfer inversion and to obtain the water-leaving radiance. In this work we apply the inversion algorithm to a MERIS Level 1b data track covering the Indian Ocean along the west coast of Madagascar.

  19. Development of the atmospheric correction algorithm for the next generation geostationary ocean color sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwon-Ho; Kim, Wonkook

    2017-04-01

    The geostationary ocean color imager-II (GOCI-II), designed to be focused on the ocean environmental monitoring with better spatial (250m for local and 1km for full disk) and spectral resolution (13 bands) then the current operational mission of the GOCI-I. GOCI-II will be launched in 2018. This study presents currently developing algorithm for atmospheric correction and retrieval of surface reflectance over land to be optimized with the sensor's characteristics. We first derived the top-of-atmosphere radiances as the proxy data derived from the parameterized radiative transfer code in the 13 bands of GOCI-II. Based on the proxy data, the algorithm has been made with cloud masking, gas absorption correction, aerosol inversion, computation of aerosol extinction correction. The retrieved surface reflectances are evaluated by the MODIS level 2 surface reflectance products (MOD09). For the initial test period, the algorithm gave error of within 0.05 compared to MOD09. Further work will be progressed to fully implement the GOCI-II Ground Segment system (G2GS) algorithm development environment. These atmospherically corrected surface reflectance product will be the standard GOCI-II product after launch.

  20. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  1. The effect of finite field size on classification and atmospheric correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric effect on the upward radiance of sunlight scattered from the Earth-atmosphere system is strongly influenced by the contrasts between fields and their sizes. For a given atmospheric turbidity, the atmospheric effect on classification of surface features is much stronger for nonuniform surfaces than for uniform surfaces. Therefore, the classification accuracy of agricultural fields and urban areas is dependent not only on the optical characteristics of the atmosphere, but also on the size of the surface do not account for the nonuniformity of the surface have only a slight effect on the classification accuracy; in other cases the classification accuracy descreases. The radiances above finite fields were computed to simulate radiances measured by a satellite. A simulation case including 11 agricultural fields and four natural fields (water, soil, savanah, and forest) was used to test the effect of the size of the background reflectance and the optical thickness of the atmosphere on classification accuracy. It is concluded that new atmospheric correction methods, which take into account the finite size of the fields, have to be developed to improve significantly the classification accuracy.

  2. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: absorption and broadband correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-08-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrated solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in ray-tracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested, and more than 19 months of measurements were collected and compared at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for concentrated solar power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the time-dependent solar spectrum which is reflected by the collector. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the absorption and broadband correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  3. On the application of iteration factors for temperature correction in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonneau, E.; Crivellari, L.

    1988-07-01

    The authors present an improved iterative method for deriving temperature corrections in stellar atmospheres. At each step of iteration, the procedure computes, from the current values of the radiation field, a set of depth-dependent factors, averaged over angles and frequencies. Even a crude initial estimate of the radiation field leads to a fairly accurate determination of these factors on the first iteration: they are quasi-invariant in subsequent iterations. For a range of effective temperatures the procedure quickly converges to the correct solution of the radiative transfer equation. At each iteration, the temperature distribution is directly derived via the energy conservation constraint.

  4. Atmospheric correction algorithm for hyperspectral remote sensing of ocean color from space.

    PubMed

    Gao, B C; Montes, M J; Ahmad, Z; Davis, C O

    2000-02-20

    Existing atmospheric correction algorithms for multichannel remote sensing of ocean color from space were designed for retrieving water-leaving radiances in the visible over clear deep ocean areas and cannot easily be modified for retrievals over turbid coastal waters. We have developed an atmospheric correction algorithm for hyperspectral remote sensing of ocean color with the near-future Coastal Ocean Imaging Spectrometer. The algorithm uses look-up tables generated with a vector radiative transfer code. Aerosol parameters are determined by a spectrum-matching technique that uses channels located at wavelengths longer than 0.86 mum. The aerosol information is extracted back to the visible based on aerosol models during the retrieval of water-leaving radiances. Quite reasonable water-leaving radiances have been obtained when our algorithm was applied to process hyperspectral imaging data acquired with an airborne imaging spectrometer.

  5. A radiation model for calculating atmospheric corrections to remotely sensed infrared measurements, version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boudreau, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A numerical model is developed which calculates the atmospheric corrections to infrared radiometric measurements due to absorption and emission by water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone. The corrections due to aerosols are not accounted for. The transmissions functions for water vapor, carbon dioxide, and water are given. The model requires as input the vertical distribution of temperature and water vapor as determined by a standard radiosonde. The vertical distribution of carbon dioxide is assumed to be constant. The vertical distribution of ozone is an average of observed values. The model also requires as input the spectral response function of the radiometer and the nadir angle at which the measurements were made. A listing of the FORTRAN program is given with details for its use and examples of input and output listings. Calculations for four model atmospheres are presented.

  6. Practical Atmospheric Correction Algorithms for a Multi-Spectral Sensor From the Visible Through the Thermal Spectral Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Villeneuve, P.V.; Clodium, W.B.; Szymenski, J.J.; Davis, A.B.

    1999-04-04

    Deriving information about the Earth's surface requires atmospheric corrections of the measured top-of-the-atmosphere radiances. One possible path is to use atmospheric radiative transfer codes to predict how the radiance leaving the ground is affected by the scattering and attenuation. In practice the atmosphere is usually not well known and thus it is necessary to use more practical methods. The authors will describe how to find dark surfaces, estimate the atmospheric optical depth, estimate path radiance and identify thick clouds using thresholds on reflectance and NDVI and columnar water vapor. The authors describe a simple method to correct a visible channel contaminated by a thin cirrus clouds.

  7. An improved dark-object subtraction technique for atmospheric scattering correction of multispectral data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    Digital analysis of remotely sensed data has become an important component of many earth-science studies. These data are often processed through a set of preprocessing or "clean-up" routines that includes a correction for atmospheric scattering, often called haze. Various methods to correct or remove the additive haze component have been developed, including the widely used dark-object subtraction technique. A problem with most of these methods is that the haze values for each spectral band are selected independently. This can create problems because atmospheric scattering is highly wavelength-dependent in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum and the scattering values are correlated with each other. Therefore, multispectral data such as from the Landsat Thematic Mapper and Multispectral Scanner must be corrected with haze values that are spectral band dependent. An improved dark-object subtraction technique is demonstrated that allows the user to select a relative atmospheric scattering model to predict the haze values for all the spectral bands from a selected starting band haze value. The improved method normalizes the predicted haze values for the different gain and offset parameters used by the imaging system. Examples of haze value differences between the old and improved methods for Thematic Mapper Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 are 40.0, 13.0, 12.0, 8.0, 5.0, and 2.0 vs. 40.0, 13.2, 8.9, 4.9, 16.7, and 3.3, respectively, using a relative scattering model of a clear atmosphere. In one Landsat multispectral scanner image the haze value differences for Bands 4, 5, 6, and 7 were 30.0, 50.0, 50.0, and 40.0 for the old method vs. 30.0, 34.4, 43.6, and 6.4 for the new method using a relative scattering model of a hazy atmosphere. ?? 1988.

  8. Landsat 8's atmospheric correction in SeaDAS: comparison with AERONET-OC (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha, Javier A.

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing interest in high spatial resolution imagery for the retrieval of biogeochemical components over water to study the processes involved in inland and coastal waters as well as in the open ocean. High spatial resolution satellite presents a kind of different problems to the ones for coarse spatial resolution satellites (i.e. MODIS) for deriving ocean color products (i.e. chlorophyll-a or colored dissolved organic matter at a specific wavelength). The SeaDAS package has recently added the capability to handle Landsat 8 data and to produce ocean color standard products, but validation of the atmospheric correction with in situ data is needed. In this work, different schemes for atmospheric correction within SeaDAS are applied. These schemes include the use of the NIR-SWIR 2, SWIR 1-SWIR 2 combinations, with and without spatial averaging to account for the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the SWIR bands. The products from the atmospheric correction in SeaDAS, i.e. remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) at four different wavelengths, are compared with in situ data. This is the first attempt to compare in situ Rrs with the output from SeaDAS/l2gen.

  9. Correcting atmospheric effects in thermal ground observations for hyperspectral emissivity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of Land surface temperature is of crucial importance in energy balance studies and environmental modeling. Accurate retrieval of land surface temperature (LST) demands detailed knowledge of the land surface emissivity. Measured radiation by remote sensing sensors to land surface temperature can only be performed using a-priori knowledge of the emissivity. Uncertainties in the retrieval of this emissivity can cause huge errors in LST estimations. The retrieval of emissivity (and LST) is per definition an underdetermined inversion, as only one observation is made while two variables are to be estimated. Several researches have therefore been performed on measuring emissivity, such as the normalized emissivity method, the temperature-emissivity separation (TES) using the minimum and maximum difference of emissivity and the use of vegetation indices. In each of these approaches atmospherically corrected radiance measurements by remote sensing sensors are correlated to ground measurements. Usually these ground measurements are performed with the ground equivalent of the remote sensing sensors; the CIMEL 312-2 has the same spectral bands as ASTER. This way parameterizations acquired this way are only usable for specific sensors and need to be redone for newer sensors. Recently hyperspectral thermal radiometers, such as the MIDAC, have been developed that can solve this problem. By using hyperspectral observations of emissivity, together with sensor simulators, ground measurements of different satellite sensor can be simulated. This facilitates the production of validation data for the different TES algorithms. However before such measurements can be performed extra steps of processing need to be performed. Atmospheric correction becomes more important in hyperspectral observations than for broadband observations, as energy levels measured per band is lower. As such the atmosphere has a relative larger contribution if bandwidths become smaller. The goal of this

  10. Atmospheric correction of satellite ocean color imagery using the ultraviolet wavelength for highly turbid waters.

    PubMed

    He, Xianqiang; Bai, Yan; Pan, Delu; Tang, Junwu; Wang, Difeng

    2012-08-27

    Instead of the conventionally atmospheric correction algorithms using the near-infrared and shortwave infrared wavelengths, an alternative practical atmospheric correction algorithm using the ultraviolet wavelength for turbid waters (named UV-AC) is proposed for satellite ocean color imagery in the paper. The principle of the algorithm is based on the fact that the water-leaving radiance at ultraviolet wavelengths can be neglected as compared with that at the visible light wavelengths or even near-infrared wavelengths in most cases of highly turbid waters due to the strong absorption by detritus and colored dissolved organic matter. The UV-AC algorithm uses the ultraviolet band to estimate the aerosol scattering radiance empirically, and it does not need any assumption of the water's optical properties. Validations by both of the simulated data and in situ data show that the algorithm is appropriate for the retrieval of the water-leaving radiance in turbid waters. The UV-AC algorithm can be used for all the current satellite ocean color sensors, and it is especially useful for those ocean color sensors lacking the shortwave infrared bands. Moreover, the algorithm can be used for any turbid waters with negligible water-leaving radiance at ultraviolet wavelength. Based on our work, we recommend the future satellite ocean color remote sensors setting the ultraviolet band to perform the atmospheric correction in turbid waters.

  11. A Portable Ground-Based Atmospheric Monitoring System (PGAMS) for the Calibration and Validation of Atmospheric Correction Algorithms Applied to Aircraft and Satellite Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Stephen; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Doug L.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Detecting changes in the Earth's environment using satellite images of ocean and land surfaces must take into account atmospheric effects. As a result, major programs are underway to develop algorithms for image retrieval of atmospheric aerosol properties and atmospheric correction. However, because of the temporal and spatial variability of atmospheric transmittance it is very difficult to model atmospheric effects and implement models in an operational mode. For this reason, simultaneous in situ ground measurements of atmospheric optical properties are vital to the development of accurate atmospheric correction techniques. Presented in this paper is a spectroradiometer system that provides an optimized set of surface measurements for the calibration and validation of atmospheric correction algorithms. The Portable Ground-based Atmospheric Monitoring System (PGAMS) obtains a comprehensive series of in situ irradiance, radiance, and reflectance measurements for the calibration of atmospheric correction algorithms applied to multispectral. and hyperspectral images. The observations include: total downwelling irradiance, diffuse sky irradiance, direct solar irradiance, path radiance in the direction of the north celestial pole, path radiance in the direction of the overflying satellite, almucantar scans of path radiance, full sky radiance maps, and surface reflectance. Each of these parameters are recorded over a wavelength range from 350 to 1050 nm in 512 channels. The system is fast, with the potential to acquire the complete set of observations in only 8 to 10 minutes depending on the selected spatial resolution of the sky path radiance measurements

  12. Martian particle size based on thermal inertia corrected for elevation-dependent atmospheric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal inertia is commonly used to derive physical properties of the Martian surface. If the surface is composed of loosely consolidated grains, then the thermal conductivity derived from the inertia can theoretically be used to compute the particle size. However, one persistent difficulty associated with the interpretation of thermal inertia and the derivation of particle size from it has been the degree to which atmospheric properties affect both the radiation balance at the surface and the gas conductivity. These factors vary with atmospheric pressure so that derived thermal inertias and particle sizes are a function of elevation. By utilizing currently available thermal models and laboratory information, a fine component thermal inertia map was convolved with digital topography to produce particle size maps of the Martian surface corrected for these elevation-dependent effects. Such an approach is especially applicable for the highest elevations on Mars, where atmospheric back radiation and gas conductivity are low.

  13. [Correction Method of Atmospheric Scattering Effect Based on Three Spectrum Bands].

    PubMed

    Ye, Han-han; Wang, Xian-hua; Jiang, Xin-hua; Bu, Ting-ting

    2016-03-01

    As a major error of CO2 retrieval, atmospheric scattering effect hampers the application of satellite products. Effect of aerosol and combined effect of aerosol and ground surface are important source of atmospheric scattering, so it needs comprehensive consideration of scattering effect from aerosol and ground surface. Based on the continuum, strong and weak absorption part of three spectrum bands O2-A, CO2 1.6 μm and 2.06 μm, information of aerosol and albedo was analyzed, and improved full physics retrieval method was proposed, which can retrieve aerosol and albedo simultaneously to correct the scattering effect. Simulation study on CO2 error caused by aerosol and ground surface albedo CO2 error by correction method was carried out. CO2 error caused by aerosol optical depth and ground surface albedo can reach up to 8%, and CO2 error caused by different types of aerosol can reach up to 10%, while these two types of error can be controlled within 1% and 2% separately by this correction method, which shows that the method can correct the scattering effect effectively. Through evaluation of the results, the potential of this method for high precision satellite data retrieval is obvious, meanwhile, some problems which need to be noticed in real application were also pointed out.

  14. Renormalisation group corrections to the littlest seesaw model and maximal atmospheric mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-12-01

    The Littlest Seesaw (LS) model involves two right-handed neutrinos and a very constrained Dirac neutrino mass matrix, involving one texture zero and two independent Dirac masses, leading to a highly predictive scheme in which all neutrino masses and the entire PMNS matrix is successfully predicted in terms of just two real parameters. We calculate the renormalisation group (RG) corrections to the LS predictions, with and without supersymmetry, including also the threshold effects induced by the decoupling of heavy Majorana neutrinos both analytically and numerically. We find that the predictions for neutrino mixing angles and mass ratios are rather stable under RG corrections. For example we find that the LS model with RG corrections predicts close to maximal atmospheric mixing, θ 23 = 45° ± 1°, in most considered cases, in tension with the latest NOvA results. The techniques used here apply to other seesaw models with a strong normal mass hierarchy.

  15. Correction of laser range tracking data for atmospheric refraction at elevations above 10 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marini, J. W.; Murray, C. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A formula for correcting laser measurements of satellite range for the effect of atmospheric refraction is given. The corrections apply above 10 deg elevation to satellites whose heights exceed 70 km. The meteorological measurements required are the temperature, pressure, and relative humidity of the air at the laser site at the time of satellite pass. The accuracy of the formula was tested by comparison with corrections obtained by ray-tracing radiosonde profiles. The standard deviation of the difference between the refractive retardation given by the formula and that calculated by ray-tracing was less than about 0.04% of the retardation or about 0.5 cm at 10 deg elevation, decreasing to 0.04 cm near zenith.

  16. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar atmospheric correction: Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhong; Fielding, Eric J.; Cross, Paul; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2006-03-01

    Atmospheric water vapor effects represent one of the major limitations of repeat-pass InSAR, and limit the accuracy of deformation rates derived from InSAR. The use of contemporaneous MERIS data to correct ENVISAT ASAR measurements shows a significant reduction in water vapor effects. After correction, the RMS differences between GPS and InSAR range changes in the satellite line of sight direction decreased to 0.55 cm with a reduction of up to 0.35 cm. It is also shown that it is possible to implement an extra `conservative' cloud mask and obtain better water vapor corrections than that from using the official ESA cloud mask product.

  17. Comparison of two atmospheric correction models for a vegetated Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbosch, Jeannette Marie; Alley, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Current atmospheric correction models applied to imaging spectroscopy data include such methods as residual (scene average) and flat field correction, regression method, and the LOWTRAN 7 method. Due to the limitations of using residual and flat field corrections on vegetated scenes, regression and LOWTRAN 7 are compared. Field measured targets taken at the time of the 13 April, 1989 AVIRIS overflight of Jasper Ridge, California (U.S.) were used to formulate the regression atmospheric correction. Assuming the regressed image represents ground truth, results show that the LOWTRAN 7 method with radiosonde data does not compensate as well for atmospheric water vapor as the regression method, but it may be easier to obtain a posteriori information to perform the LOWTRAN 7 atmospheric correction.

  18. Rapid strain accumulation on the Ashkabad fault (Turkmenistan) from atmosphere-corrected InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Elliott, J. R.; Li, Z.; Parsons, B.

    2013-07-01

    We have measured interseismic deformation across the Ashkabad strike-slip fault using 13 Envisat interferograms covering a total effective timespan of ˜30 years. Atmospheric contributions to phase delay are significant and variable due to the close proximity of the Caspian Sea. In order to retrieve the pattern of strain accumulation, we show it is necessary to use data from Envisat's Medium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument, as well as numerical weather model outputs from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), to correct interferograms for differences in water vapor and atmospheric pressure, respectively. This has enabled us to robustly estimate the slip rate and locking depth for the Ashkabad fault using a simple elastic dislocation model. Our data are consistent with a slip rate of 5-12 mm/yr below a locking depth of 5.5-17 km for the Ashkabad fault, and synthetic tests support the magnitude of the uncertainties on these estimates. Our estimate of slip rate is 1.25-6 times higher than some previous geodetic estimates, with implications for both seismic hazard and regional tectonics, in particular supporting fast relative motion between the South Caspian Block and Eurasia. This result reinforces the importance of correcting for atmospheric contributions to interferometric phase for small strain measurements. We also attempt to validate a recent method for atmospheric correction based on ECMWF ERA-Interim model outputs alone and find that this technique does not work satisfactorily for this region when compared to the independent MERIS estimates.

  19. Chlorophyll Concentration Estimates for Coastal Waters using Pixel-Based Atmospheric Correction of Landsat Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, E.; Xie, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean color analysis is more challenging for coastal regions than the global ocean due the effects of optical brightness, shallow and turbid water, higher phytoplankton growth rates, and the complex geometry of coastal bays and estuaries. Also, one of the key atmospheric correction assumptions (zero water leaving radiance in the near infrared) is not valid for these complex conditions. This makes it difficult to estimate the spectral radiance noise caused by atmospheric aerosols, which can vary rapidly with time and space. This project evaluated using Landsat-7 ETM+ observations over a set of coastal bays, and allowing atmospheric correction calculations to vary with time and location as much as practical. Precise satellite orbit vector data was combined with operational weather and climate data to create interpolated arrays of atmospheric profiles which varied with time and location, allowing separate calculation of the Rayleigh and aerosol radiance corrections for all pixels. The resulting normalized water-leaving radiance values were compared with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements made at five in-situ stations inside a set of Texas coastal bays: the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. Curve-fitting analysis showed it was possible to estimate chlorophyll surface area concentrations by using ETM+ water-leaving radiance values and a third-order polynomial equation. Two pairs of ETM+ bands were identified as inputs (Bands 1 and 3, and the Log10 values of Bands 3 and 4), both achieving R2 of 0.69. Additional research efforts were recommended to obtain additional data, identify better curve fitting equations, and potentially extend the radiative transfer model into the water column.

  20. A method for atmospheric correction based on the MERIS spectral and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béal, D.; Baret, F.; Bacour, C.; Gu, X.; Regner, P.

    Atmospheric correction is necessary to estimate the surface reflectance required within biophysical algorithms used to estimate canopy characteristics. Aerosol characterization is obviously one of the main problem in atmospheric correction because aerosol may vary rapidly with time and space. The objective of this study is to develop an autonomous aerosol correction method exploiting the information content in MERIS images. The spectral variation of the radiance signal, when enough sampled by the sensor, allows decoupling aerosol effects from that of the surface because of the very different spectral features exhibited. We thus propose to use (i) 13 over the 15 MERIS bands, (ii) the geometry of the scene and (iii) the atmospheric pressure and ozone and water vapour contents to estimate the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) assuming only continental aerosol type in this prototype algorithm. For this purpose, several dedicated neural networks were trained to retrieve aerosol AOT from the top of atmosphere signal contained in MERIS level 1B products. The training database was generated with radiative transfer model simulations, SMAC coupled to SAIL and PROSPECT. Performances demonstrate the pertinence of the method for the median of 5 neural networks, with a 0.047 Root Mean Square Error associated to the estimation of the AOT at 550nm. This induces a RMSE on the estimated top of canopy reflectance better than 0.005. In addition, assuming that the aerosol vary typically over scales of few tenths of kilometers, while the surface varies at shorter distances, allows to smooth out the AOT values for all pixels of an image using a moving window. The method was applied to actual MERIS data (more than 50 scenes) over AERONET sites for its validation with a 0.07 Root Mean Square Error associated to the estimation of the AOT. Conclusions are drawn on possible improvements of the database and of the neural network's architecture like the number of entries and the inclusion of

  1. Atmospheric correction algorithm based on vector radiative transfer modeling for hyperspectral remote sensing of ocean color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, BoCai; Montes, Marcos J.; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Davis, Curtiss O.

    1999-10-01

    Multi-channel remote sensing of ocean color from space has a rich history -- from the past CZCS, to the present SeaWiFS, and to the near-future MODIS. The atmospheric correction algorithms for processing remotely sensed data from these sensors were mainly developed by Howard Gordon at University of Miami. The algorithms were primarily designed for retrieving water leaving radiances in the visible spectral region over clear deep ocean areas. The information about atmospheric aerosols is derived from channels between 0.66 and 0.87 micrometer, where the water leaving radiances are close to zero. The derived aerosol information is extrapolated back to the visible when retrieving water leaving radiances from remotely sensed data. For the turbid coastal environment, the water leaving radiances for channels between 0.66 and 0.87 micrometer may not be close to zero because of back scattering by suspended materials in the water. Under these conditions, the channels are no longer useful for deriving information on atmospheric aerosols. As a result, the algorithms developed for applications to clear ocean waters cannot be easily modified to retrieve water leaving radiances from remote sensing data acquired over the costal environments. We have recently developed a fast and fully functional atmospheric correction algorithm for hyperspectral remote sensing of ocean color with the Coastal Ocean Imaging Spectrometer (COIS). Our algorithm uses lookup tables generated with a vector radiative transfer code developed by Ahmad and Fraser (1982) and a spectral matching technique for the retrieval of water leaving radiances. The information on atmospheric aerosols is estimated using dark channels beyond 0.86 micron. Quite reasonable results were obtained when applying the algorithm to process spectral imaging data acquired over Chesapeake Bay with the NASA JPL Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS).

  2. Adaptation of a Hyperspectral Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Multi-spectral Ocean Color Data in Coastal Waters. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Montes, Marcos J.; Davis, Curtiss O.

    2003-01-01

    This SIMBIOS contract supports several activities over its three-year time-span. These include certain computational aspects of atmospheric correction, including the modification of our hyperspectral atmospheric correction algorithm Tafkaa for various multi-spectral instruments, such as SeaWiFS, MODIS, and GLI. Additionally, since absorbing aerosols are becoming common in many coastal areas, we are making the model calculations to incorporate various absorbing aerosol models into tables used by our Tafkaa atmospheric correction algorithm. Finally, we have developed the algorithms to use MODIS data to characterize thin cirrus effects on aerosol retrieval.

  3. An automated baseline correction protocol for infrared spectra of atmospheric aerosols collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmiakova, Adele; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of research on statistical applications for characterization of atmospheric aerosol Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters (e.g., Russell et al., 2011; Ruthenburg et al., 2014) and a rising interest in analyzing FT-IR samples collected by air quality monitoring networks call for an automated PTFE baseline correction solution. The existing polynomial technique (Takahama et al., 2013) is not scalable to a project with a large number of aerosol samples because it contains many parameters and requires expert intervention. Therefore, the question of how to develop an automated method for baseline correcting hundreds to thousands of ambient aerosol spectra given the variability in both environmental mixture composition and PTFE baselines remains. This study approaches the question by detailing the statistical protocol, which allows for the precise definition of analyte and background subregions, applies nonparametric smoothing splines to reproduce sample-specific PTFE variations, and integrates performance metrics from atmospheric aerosol and blank samples alike in the smoothing parameter selection. Referencing 794 atmospheric aerosol samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011, we start by identifying key FT-IR signal characteristics, such as non-negative absorbance or analyte segment transformation, to capture sample-specific transitions between background and analyte. While referring to qualitative properties of PTFE background, the goal of smoothing splines interpolation is to learn the baseline structure in the background region to predict the baseline structure in the analyte region. We then validate the model by comparing smoothing splines baseline-corrected spectra with uncorrected and polynomial baseline (PB)-corrected equivalents via three statistical applications: (1) clustering analysis, (2) functional group quantification

  4. Passive remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol and atmospheric correction for the aerosol effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanré, D.; Gordon, H. R.; Nakajima, T.; Lenoble, J.; Frouin, R.; Grassl, H.; Herman, B. M.; King, M. D.; Teillet, P. M.

    1997-07-01

    The launch of ADEOS in August 1996 with POLDER, TOMS, and OCTS instruments on board and the future launch of EOS-AM 1 in mid-1998 with MODIS and MISR instruments on board start a new era in remote sensing of aerosol as part of a new remote sensing of the whole Earth system (see a list of the acronyms in the Notation section of the paper). These platforms will be followed by other international platforms with unique aerosol sensing capability, some still in this century (e.g., ENVISAT in 1999). These international spaceborne multispectral, multiangular, and polarization measurements, combined for the first time with international automatic, routine monitoring of aerosol from the ground, are expected to form a quantum leap in our ability to observe the highly variable global aerosol. This new capability is contrasted with present single-channel techniques for AVHRR, Meteosat, and GOES that although poorly calibrated and poorly characterized already generated important aerosol global maps and regional transport assessments. The new data will improve significantly atmospheric corrections for the aerosol effect on remote sensing of the oceans and be used to generate first real-time atmospheric corrections over the land. This special issue summarizes the science behind this change in remote sensing, and the sensitivity studies and applications of the new algorithms to data from present satellite and aircraft instruments. Background information and a summary of a critical discussion that took place in a workshop devoted to this topic is given in this introductory paper. In the discussion it was concluded that the anticipated remote sensing of aerosol simultaneously from several space platforms with different observation strategies, together with continuous validations around the world, is expected to be of significant importance to test remote sensing approaches to characterize the complex and highly variable aerosol field. So far, we have only partial understanding of

  5. Use of OLCI and SLSTR Bands for Atmospheric Correction over Turbid Coastal and Inland Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddick, Kevin; Vanhellement, Quinten

    2015-12-01

    The OLCI sensor has strong heritage from MERIS and some new bands, e.g. 400nm and 1020nm. The SLSTR spectral bands at 1.61μm and 2.25μm may also help improve the OLCI atmospheric correction. At 1020nm the water-leaving radiance is much lower than at shorter wavelengths and the spectral shapes of water and aerosol reflectance over the range 709-1020nm will be quite different, even in the most turbid waters. This band may therefore help improve the aerosol correction in extremely turbid waters. At 1.61μm and 2.25μm water-leaving radiance is negligible even for the most turbid waters. The advantage of these bands for atmospheric correction has been demonstrated previously for MODIS and Landsat-8. Exploiting these new bands will involve many challenges including: low signal:noise for the SWIR bands, SWIR contamination by objects at sea, straylight, calibration, OLCI/SLSTR colocation, etc.

  6. Multiangle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC):. 1; Radiative Transfer Basis and Look-up Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, Alexei; Martonchik, John; Wang, Yujie; Laszlo, Istvan; Korkin, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a radiative transfer basis of the algorithm MAIAC which performs simultaneous retrievals of atmospheric aerosol and bidirectional surface reflectance from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The retrievals are based on an accurate semianalytical solution for the top-of-atmosphere reflectance expressed as an explicit function of three parameters of the Ross-Thick Li-Sparse model of surface bidirectional reflectance. This solution depends on certain functions of atmospheric properties and geometry which are precomputed in the look-up table (LUT). This paper further considers correction of the LUT functions for variations of surface pressure/height and of atmospheric water vapor, which is a common task in the operational remote sensing. It introduces a new analytical method for the water vapor correction of the multiple ]scattering path radiance. It also summarizes the few basic principles that provide a high efficiency and accuracy of the LUT ]based radiative transfer for the aerosol/surface retrievals and optimize the size of LUT. For example, the single-scattering path radiance is calculated analytically for a given surface pressure and atmospheric water vapor. The same is true for the direct surface-reflected radiance, which along with the single-scattering path radiance largely defines the angular dependence of measurements. For these calculations, the aerosol phase functions and kernels of the surface bidirectional reflectance model are precalculated at a high angular resolution. The other radiative transfer functions depend rather smoothly on angles because of multiple scattering and can be calculated at coarser angular resolution to reduce the LUT size. At the same time, this resolution should be high enough to use the nearest neighbor geometry angles to avoid costly three ]dimensional interpolation. The pressure correction is implemented via linear interpolation between two LUTs computed for the standard and reduced

  7. Multiangle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC):. 1; Radiative Transfer Basis and Look-up Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, Alexei; Martonchik, John; Wang, Yujie; Laszlo, Istvan; Korkin, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a radiative transfer basis of the algorithm MAIAC which performs simultaneous retrievals of atmospheric aerosol and bidirectional surface reflectance from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The retrievals are based on an accurate semianalytical solution for the top-of-atmosphere reflectance expressed as an explicit function of three parameters of the Ross-Thick Li-Sparse model of surface bidirectional reflectance. This solution depends on certain functions of atmospheric properties and geometry which are precomputed in the look-up table (LUT). This paper further considers correction of the LUT functions for variations of surface pressure/height and of atmospheric water vapor, which is a common task in the operational remote sensing. It introduces a new analytical method for the water vapor correction of the multiple ]scattering path radiance. It also summarizes the few basic principles that provide a high efficiency and accuracy of the LUT ]based radiative transfer for the aerosol/surface retrievals and optimize the size of LUT. For example, the single-scattering path radiance is calculated analytically for a given surface pressure and atmospheric water vapor. The same is true for the direct surface-reflected radiance, which along with the single-scattering path radiance largely defines the angular dependence of measurements. For these calculations, the aerosol phase functions and kernels of the surface bidirectional reflectance model are precalculated at a high angular resolution. The other radiative transfer functions depend rather smoothly on angles because of multiple scattering and can be calculated at coarser angular resolution to reduce the LUT size. At the same time, this resolution should be high enough to use the nearest neighbor geometry angles to avoid costly three ]dimensional interpolation. The pressure correction is implemented via linear interpolation between two LUTs computed for the standard and reduced

  8. Improving Atmospheric Corrections to InSAR Path Delays Using Operational Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E.; Fielding, E. J.; Moore, A. W.; von Allmen, P. A.; Xing, Z.; Li, Z.; Pan, L.

    2010-12-01

    Using InSAR to measure surface displacements immediately following earthquakes is difficult. Tropospheric radar propagation delays can be a large source of error, especially for moderate-sized events at low altitudes and latitudes, and it cannot be reduced by averaging several overpasses. We evaluate tropospheric delays from several operational global and regional weather forecast models and compare these with delays from fixed GPS receivers and Envisat’s InSAR. Although dry airmass (surface pressure) and liquid water burden both contribute to the delay, water vapor burden dominates the delay. Accurate representations of near surface atmospheric water vapor are the single most important criteria for using one weather model over another. Several weather model characteristics are key for good estimates of atmospheric water vapor distribution. One is modeling of water vapor transport, which is improved by increased spatial resolution and topography. A second aspect is accurate inputs of water vapor sources and sinks. These will improve with better assimilations of satellite and in situ observations in weather forecast models. We present an estimate of the model-dependent error by deriving delays from several weather models, using identical processing algorithms. In this study we use products from the 0.125° ECMWF global deterministic forecast, the 1° NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) and the 12km NCEP North America Mesoscale (NAM) model. Additionally, delays from weather forecasts must be interpolated to the higher spatial resolution of InSAR imagery. We have evaluated delays using simple interpolation and contour-following adjustments and have compare these to the GFS observations sorted by distance from the model grid points and amount of elevation correction. We are developing Online Services for Correcting Atmosphere in Radar (OSCAR), which should aid rapid use of InSAR measurements. These analyses will be used to optimize the correction algorithms within

  9. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Smith, Greg; Kent, Steve; Doel, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2°-3° ields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a `Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  10. ICARE-HS: atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral urban images using 3D information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, Xavier; Briottet, Xavier; Roussel, Guillaume; Gilardy, Hugo

    2016-10-01

    The algorithm ICARE-HS (Inversion Code for urban Areas Reflectance Extraction using HyperSpectral imagery) is presented in this paper. ICARE-HS processes airborne hyperspectral images for atmospheric compensation taking into account the strong relief of urban areas. A digital surface model is used to provide the 3D information, which is key to simulating relief-related effects such as shadow casting, multiple reflections between objects and variable illumination depending on local solid angle of view of the sky. Some of these effects are modeled using ray tracing techniques. ICARE-HS is applied to airborne hyperspectral data of the city center of Toulouse, which are also processed by a standard atmospheric correction method for comparison.

  11. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Smith, Greg; Kent, Steve; Doel, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  12. A procedure for testing the quality of LANDSAT atmospheric correction algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, L. A. V. (Principal Investigator); Vijaykumar, N. L.; Neto, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    There are two basic methods for testing the quality of an algorithm to minimize atmospheric effects on LANDSAT imagery: (1) test the results a posteriori, using ground truth or control points; (2) use a method based on image data plus estimation of additional ground and/or atmospheric parameters. A procedure based on the second method is described. In order to select the parameters, initially the image contrast is examined for a series of parameter combinations. The contrast improves for better corrections. In addition the correlation coefficient between two subimages, taken at different times, of the same scene is used for parameter's selection. The regions to be correlated should not have changed considerably in time. A few examples using this proposed procedure are presented.

  13. Atmospheric Pressure Corrections in Geodesy and Oceanography: a Strategy for Handling Air Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Global pressure data are often needed for processing or interpreting modern geodetic and oceanographic measurements. The most common source of these data is the analysis or reanalysis products of various meteorological centers. Tidal signals in these products can be problematic for several reasons, including potentially aliased sampling of the semidiurnal solar tide as well as the presence of various modeling or timing errors. Building on the work of Van den Dool and colleagues, we lay out a strategy for handling atmospheric tides in (re)analysis data. The procedure also offers a method to account for ocean loading corrections in satellite altimeter data that are consistent with standard ocean-tide corrections. The proposed strategy has immediate application to the on-going Jason-1 and GRACE satellite missions.

  14. Atmospheric Pressure Corrections in Geodesy and Oceanography: a Strategy for Handling Air Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Global pressure data are often needed for processing or interpreting modern geodetic and oceanographic measurements. The most common source of these data is the analysis or reanalysis products of various meteorological centers. Tidal signals in these products can be problematic for several reasons, including potentially aliased sampling of the semidiurnal solar tide as well as the presence of various modeling or timing errors. Building on the work of Van den Dool and colleagues, we lay out a strategy for handling atmospheric tides in (re)analysis data. The procedure also offers a method to account for ocean loading corrections in satellite altimeter data that are consistent with standard ocean-tide corrections. The proposed strategy has immediate application to the on-going Jason-1 and GRACE satellite missions.

  15. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, Marie-Pierre; Lasserre, Cécile; Peltzer, Gilles; Cavalié, Olivier; Doubre, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  16. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M.-P.; Lasserre, C.; Peltzer, G.; Cavalié, O.; Doubre, C.

    2009-09-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/ T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  17. Correction of detector nonlinearity for the balloonborne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, Anne

    2006-01-20

    The detectors used in the cryogenic limb-emission sounder MIPAS-B2 (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) show a nonlinear response, which leads to radiometric errors in the calibrated spectra if the nonlinearity is not taken into account. In the case of emission measurements, the dominant error that arises from the nonlinearity is the changing detector responsivity as the incident photon load changes. The effect of the distortion of a single interferogram can be neglected. A method to characterize the variable responsivity and to correct for this effect is proposed. Furthermore, a detailed error estimation is presented.

  18. A wide field corrector with loss-less and purely passive atmospheric dispersion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, Peter; Saunders, Will

    2014-07-01

    A 2.5 degree field diameter corrector lens design for the Cassegrain focus of the VISTA 4 meter telescope is presented. It comprises four single elements of glasses with high UV transmission, all axi-symmetric for operation at the zenith. One element is displaced laterally to provide atmospheric dispersion correction. A key feature, especially beneficial for the VISTA application, is that the ADC element can be mounted so it is driven simply by gravity; thus its operation needs no motors, encoders, cabling, or software control. A simple mechanical design to achieve this and the optical performance details are described.

  19. Remote Sensing of Tropical Ecosystems: Atmospheric Correction and Cloud Masking Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilker, Thomas; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Tucker, Compton J.; Sellers, Piers J.; Hall, Forrest G.; Wang, Yujie

    2012-01-01

    Tropical rainforests are significant contributors to the global cycles of energy, water and carbon. As a result, monitoring of the vegetation status over regions such as Amazonia has been a long standing interest of Earth scientists trying to determine the effect of climate change and anthropogenic disturbance on the tropical ecosystems and its feedback on the Earth's climate. Satellite-based remote sensing is the only practical approach for observing the vegetation dynamics of regions like the Amazon over useful spatial and temporal scales, but recent years have seen much controversy over satellite-derived vegetation states in Amazônia, with studies predicting opposite feedbacks depending on data processing technique and interpretation. Recent results suggest that some of this uncertainty could stem from a lack of quality in atmospheric correction and cloud screening. In this paper, we assess these uncertainties by comparing the current standard surface reflectance products (MYD09, MYD09GA) and derived composites (MYD09A1, MCD43A4 and MYD13A2 - Vegetation Index) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the Aqua satellite to results obtained from the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. MAIAC uses a new cloud screening technique, and novel aerosol retrieval and atmospheric correction procedures which are based on time-series and spatial analyses. Our results show considerable improvements of MAIAC processed surface reflectance compared to MYD09/MYD13 with noise levels reduced by a factor of up to 10. Uncertainties in the current MODIS surface reflectance product were mainly due to residual cloud and aerosol contamination which affected the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI): During the wet season, with cloud cover ranging between 90 percent and 99 percent, conventionally processed NDVI was significantly depressed due to undetected clouds. A smaller reduction in NDVI due to increased

  20. Spatial heterogeneity in geothermally-influenced lakes derived from atmospherically corrected Landsat thermal imagery and three-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Mathew G.; Hamilton, David P.; Trolle, Dennis; Muraoka, Kohji; McBride, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric correction of Landsat 7 thermal data was carried out for the purpose of retrieval of lake skin water temperature in Rotorua lakes, and Lake Taupo, North Island, New Zealand. The effect of the atmosphere was modelled using four sources of atmospheric profile data as input to the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model. The retrieved skin water temperatures were validated using a high-frequency temperature sensor deployed from a monitoring buoy at the water surface of Lake Rotorua. The most accurate atmospheric correction method was with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) atmospheric profile data (root-mean-square-error, RMSE, 0.48 K), followed by radiosonde (0.52 K), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Level 3 (0.54 K), and the NASA atmospheric correction parameter calculator (0.94 K). Retrieved water temperature was used for assessing spatial heterogeneity and accuracy of surface water temperature simulated with a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic model of Lake Rotoehu, located approximately 20 km east of Lake Rotorua. This comparison indicated that the model was suitable for reproducing the dominant horizontal variations in surface water temperature in the lake. This study demonstrated the potential of accurate satellite-based thermal monitoring to validate temperature outputs from 3-D hydrodynamic model simulations. It also provided atmospheric correction options for local and global applications of Landsat thermal data.

  1. Chlorophyll concentration estimates for coastal water using pixel-based atmospheric correction of Landsat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Eric

    Ocean color analysis is more challenging for coastal regions than the global ocean due the effects of optical brightness, shallow and turbid water, higher phytoplankton growth rates, and the complex geometry of coastal bays and estuaries. Also, one of the key atmospheric correction assumptions (zero water leaving radiance in the near infrared) is not valid for these complex conditions. This makes it difficult to estimate the spectral radiance noise caused by atmospheric aerosols, which can vary rapidly with time and space. This study conducts pixel-based atmospheric correction of Landsat-7 ETM+ images over the Texas coast. Precise satellite orbit data, operational weather data, and climate data are combined to create interpolated arrays of viewing angles and atmospheric profiles. These arrays vary with time and location, allowing calculation of the Rayleigh and aerosol radiances separately for all pixels. The resulting normalized water-leaving radiances are then compared with in situ chlorophyll fluorescence measurements from five locations inside a set of Texas coastal bays: the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve. Curve-fitting analysis shows it is possible to estimate chlorophyll-a surface area concentrations by using ETM+ water-leaving radiance values and a third-order polynomial equation. Two pairs of ETM+ bands are identified as inputs (Bands 1 and 3, and the Log10 values of Bands 3 and 4), both achieving good performance (R2 of 0.69). Further research efforts are recommended to obtain additional data, identify better curve fitting equations, and potentially extend the radiative transfer model into the water column.

  2. Correcting infrared satellite estimates of sea surface temperature for atmospheric water vapor attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Yu, Yunyue; Wick, Gary A.; Schluessel, Peter; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A new satellite sea surface temperature (SST) algorithm is developed that uses nearly coincident measurements from the microwave special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) to correct for atmospheric moisture attenuation of the infrared signal from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). This new SST algorithm is applied to AVHRR imagery from the South Pacific and Norwegian seas, which are then compared with simultaneous in situ (ship based) measurements of both skin and bulk SST. In addition, an SST algorithm using a quadratic product of the difference between the two AVHRR thermal infrared channels is compared with the in situ measurements. While the quadratic formulation provides a considerable improvement over the older cross product (CPSST) and multichannel (MCSST) algorithms, the SSM/I corrected SST (called the water vapor or WVSST) shows overall smaller errors when compared to both the skin and bulk in situ SST observations. Applied to individual AVHRR images, the WVSST reveals an SST difference pattern (CPSST-WVSST) similar in shape to the water vapor structure while the CPSST-quadratic SST difference appears unrelated in pattern to the nearly coincident water vapor pattern. An application of the WVSST to week-long composites of global area coverage (GAC) AVHRR data demonstrates again the manner in which the WVSST corrects the AVHRR for atmospheric moisture attenuation. By comparison the quadratic SST method underestimates the SST corrections in the lower latitudes and overestimates the SST in th e higher latitudes. Correlations between the AVHRR thermal channel differences and the SSM/I water vapor demonstrate the inability of the channel difference to represent water vapor in the midlatitude and high latitudes during summer. Compared against drifting buoy data the WVSST and the quadratic SST both exhibit the same general behavior with the relatively small differences with the buoy temperatures.

  3. Correcting infrared satellite estimates of sea surface temperature for atmospheric water vapor attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Yu, Yunyue; Wick, Gary A.; Schluessel, Peter; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A new satellite sea surface temperature (SST) algorithm is developed that uses nearly coincident measurements from the microwave special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) to correct for atmospheric moisture attenuation of the infrared signal from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). This new SST algorithm is applied to AVHRR imagery from the South Pacific and Norwegian seas, which are then compared with simultaneous in situ (ship based) measurements of both skin and bulk SST. In addition, an SST algorithm using a quadratic product of the difference between the two AVHRR thermal infrared channels is compared with the in situ measurements. While the quadratic formulation provides a considerable improvement over the older cross product (CPSST) and multichannel (MCSST) algorithms, the SSM/I corrected SST (called the water vapor or WVSST) shows overall smaller errors when compared to both the skin and bulk in situ SST observations. Applied to individual AVHRR images, the WVSST reveals an SST difference pattern (CPSST-WVSST) similar in shape to the water vapor structure while the CPSST-quadratic SST difference appears unrelated in pattern to the nearly coincident water vapor pattern. An application of the WVSST to week-long composites of global area coverage (GAC) AVHRR data demonstrates again the manner in which the WVSST corrects the AVHRR for atmospheric moisture attenuation. By comparison the quadratic SST method underestimates the SST corrections in the lower latitudes and overestimates the SST in th e higher latitudes. Correlations between the AVHRR thermal channel differences and the SSM/I water vapor demonstrate the inability of the channel difference to represent water vapor in the midlatitude and high latitudes during summer. Compared against drifting buoy data the WVSST and the quadratic SST both exhibit the same general behavior with the relatively small differences with the buoy temperatures.

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-27

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C · CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 · CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site · CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a · CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) · CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) · CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) · CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) · CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) · CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth · CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 · CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b · CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office

  5. The effect of anthropogenic emissions corrections on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B. J.; Hoffman, F. M.; Mills, R. T.; Erickson, D. J.; Blasing, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    A previous study (Erickson et al. 2008) approximated the monthly global emission estimates of anthropogenic CO2 by applying a 2-harmonic Fourier expansion with coefficients as a function of latitude to annual CO2 flux estimates derived from United States data (Blasing et al. 2005) that were extrapolated globally. These monthly anthropogenic CO2 flux estimates were used to model atmospheric concentrations using the NASA GEOS-4 data assimilation system. Local variability in the amplitude of the simulated CO2 seasonal cycle were found to be on the order of 2-6 ppmv. Here we used the same Fourier expansion to seasonally adjust the global annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions from the SRES A2 scenario. For a total of four simulations, both the annual and seasonalized fluxes were advected in two configurations of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) used in the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP). One configuration used the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM) coupled with the CASA‧ (carbon only) biogeochemistry model and the other used CLM coupled with the CN (coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles) biogeochemistry model. All four simulations were forced with observed sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre and a prescribed transient atmospheric CO2 concentration for the radiation and land forcing over the 20th century. The model results exhibit differences in the seasonal cycle of CO2 between the seasonally corrected and uncorrected simulations. Moreover, because of differing energy and water feedbacks between the atmosphere model and the two land biogeochemistry models, features of the CO2 seasonal cycle were different between these two model configurations. This study reinforces previous findings that suggest that regional near-surface atmospheric CO2 concentrations depend strongly on the natural sources and sinks of CO2, but also on the strength of local anthropogenic CO2 emissions and geographic position. This work further

  6. Radiometric correction of atmospheric path length fluctuations in interferometric experiments. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Hogg, D. E.; Napier, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    To support very long baseline interferometric experiments, a system has been developed for estimating atmospheric water vapor path delay. The system consists of dual microwave radiometers, one operating at 20.7 GHz and the other at 31.4 GHz. The measured atmospheric brightness temperatures at these two frequencies yield the estimate of the precipitable water present in both vapor and droplets. To determine the accuracy of the system, a series of observations were undertaken, comparing the outputs of two water vapor radiometers with the phase variation observed with two connected elements of the very large array (VLA). The results show that: (1) water vapor fluctuations dominate the residual VLA phase and (2) the microwave radiometers can measure and correct these effects. The rms phase error after correction is typically 15 deg at a wavelength of 6 cm, corresponding to an uncertainty in the path delay of 0.25 cm. The residual uncertainty is consistent with the stability of the microwave radiometer but is still considerably larger than the stability of the VLA. The technique is less successful under conditions of heavy cloud.

  7. Radiometric correction of atmospheric path length fluctuations in interferometric experiments. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Hogg, D. E.; Napier, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    To support very long baseline interferometric experiments, a system has been developed for estimating atmospheric water vapor path delay. The system consists of dual microwave radiometers, one operating at 20.7 GHz and the other at 31.4 GHz. The measured atmospheric brightness temperatures at these two frequencies yield the estimate of the precipitable water present in both vapor and droplets. To determine the accuracy of the system, a series of observations were undertaken, comparing the outputs of two water vapor radiometers with the phase variation observed with two connected elements of the very large array (VLA). The results show that: (1) water vapor fluctuations dominate the residual VLA phase and (2) the microwave radiometers can measure and correct these effects. The rms phase error after correction is typically 15 deg at a wavelength of 6 cm, corresponding to an uncertainty in the path delay of 0.25 cm. The residual uncertainty is consistent with the stability of the microwave radiometer but is still considerably larger than the stability of the VLA. The technique is less successful under conditions of heavy cloud.

  8. Specificity of Atmosphere Correction of Satellite Ocean Color Data in Far-Eastern Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusenkova, O.; Kachur, V.; Aleksanin, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    It was carried out an error analysis of satellite reflectance coefficients (Rrs) of MODIS/AQUA colour data for two atmospheric correction algorithms (NIR, MUMM) in the Far-Eastern region. Some sets of unique data of in situ and satellite measurements have been analysed. A set has some measurements with ASD spectroradiometer for each satellite pass. The measurement allocations were selected so the Chlorophyll-a concentration has high variability. Analysis of arbitrary set demonstrated that the main error component is systematic error, and it has simple relations on Rrs values. The reasons of such error behavior are considered. The most probable explanation of the large errors of oceanic color parameters in the Far-Eastern region is the ability of high concentrations of continental aerosol. A comparison of satellite and in situ measurements at AERONET stations of USA and South Korea regions has been made. It was shown that for NIR-correction of the atmosphere influence the error values in these two regions have differences up to 10 times for almost the same water turbidity and relatively good accuracy of computation of aerosol optical thickness. The study was supported by grant Russian Scientific Foundation No. 14-50-00034, by grant of Russian Foundation of Basic Research No.15-35-21032-mol-a-ved, and by Program of Basic Research "Far East" of Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences.

  9. Atmospheric Correction at AERONET Locations: A New Science and Validation Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Privette, Jeffery L.; Morisette, Jeffery T.; Holben, Brent

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an AERONET-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN) and its dataset of spectral surface bidirectional reflectance and albedo based on MODIS TERRA and AQUA data. The ASRVN is an operational data collection and processing system. It receives 50x50 square kilometer subsets of MODIS L1B data from MODAPS and AERONET aerosol and water vapor information. Then it performs an accurate atmospheric correction for about 100 AERONET sites based on accurate radiative transfer theory with high quality control of the input data. The ASRVN processing software consists of L1B data gridding algorithm, a new cloud mask algorithm based on a time series analysis, and an atmospheric correction algorithm. The atmospheric correction is achieved by fitting the MODIS top of atmosphere measurements, accumulated for 16-day interval, with theoretical reflectance parameterized in terms of coefficients of the LSRT BRF model. The ASRVN takes several steps to ensure high quality of results: 1) cloud mask algorithm filters opaque clouds; 2) an aerosol filter has been developed to filter residual semi-transparent and sub-pixel clouds, as well as cases with high inhomogeneity of aerosols in the processing area; 3) imposing requirement of consistency of the new solution with previously retrieved BRF and albedo; 4) rapid adjustment of the 16-day retrieval to the surface changes using the last day of measurements; and 5) development of seasonal back-up spectral BRF database to increase data coverage. The ASRVN provides a gapless or near-gapless coverage for the processing area. The gaps, caused by clouds, are filled most naturally with the latest solution for a given pixels. The ASRVN products include three parameters of LSRT model (k(sup L), k(sup G), k(sup V)), surface albedo, NBRF (a normalized BRF computed for a standard viewing geometry, VZA=0 deg., SZA=45 deg.), and IBRF (instantaneous, or one angle, BRF value derived from the last day of MODIS measurement for

  10. Atmospheric correction using near-infrared bands for satellite ocean color data processing in the turbid western Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Lide

    2012-01-16

    A regional near-infrared (NIR) ocean normalized water-leaving radiance (nL(w)(λ)) model is proposed for atmospheric correction for ocean color data processing in the western Pacific region, including the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, and East China Sea. Our motivation for this work is to derive ocean color products in the highly turbid western Pacific region using the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) onboard South Korean Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS). GOCI has eight spectral bands from 412 to 865 nm but does not have shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands that are needed for satellite ocean color remote sensing in the turbid ocean region. Based on a regional empirical relationship between the NIR nL(w)(λ) and diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (K(d)(490)), which is derived from the long-term measurements with the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite, an iterative scheme with the NIR-based atmospheric correction algorithm has been developed. Results from MODIS-Aqua measurements show that ocean color products in the region derived from the new proposed NIR-corrected atmospheric correction algorithm match well with those from the SWIR atmospheric correction algorithm. Thus, the proposed new atmospheric correction method provides an alternative for ocean color data processing for GOCI (and other ocean color satellite sensors without SWIR bands) in the turbid ocean regions of the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, and East China Sea, although the SWIR-based atmospheric correction approach is still much preferred. The proposed atmospheric correction methodology can also be applied to other turbid coastal regions.

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  12. The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA): A reference atmospheric reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, Luca; Read, Peter; Lewis, Stephen; Steele, Liam; Holmes, James; Valeanu, Alexandru

    2016-07-01

    The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset version 1.0 contains the reanalysis of fundamental atmospheric and surface variables for the planet Mars covering a period of about three Martian years (late MY 24 to early MY 27). This has been produced by data assimilation of retrieved thermal profiles and column dust optical depths from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES), which have been assimilated into a Mars global climate model (MGCM) using the Analysis Correction scheme developed at the UK Meteorological Office. The MACDA v1.0 reanalysis is publicly available, and the NetCDF files can be downloaded from the archive at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis/British Atmospheric Data Centre (CEDA/BADC). The variables included in the dataset can be visualised using an ad-hoc graphical user interface (the "MACDA Plotter") at the following URL: http://macdap.physics.ox.ac.uk/ MACDA is an ongoing collaborative project, and work is currently undertaken to produce version 2.0 of the Mars atmospheric reanalysis. One of the key improvements is the extension of the reanalysis period to nine martian years (MY 24 through MY 32), with the assimilation of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter/Mars Climate Sounder (MRO/MCS) retrievals of thermal and dust opacity profiles. MACDA 2.0 is also going to be based on an improved version of the underlying MGCM and an updated scheme to fully assimilate (radiative active) tracers, such as dust and water ice.

  13. Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Imagery Using Modtran 3.5 Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Fabian O.; Velez-Reyes, Miguel

    1997-01-01

    When performing satellite remote sensing of the earth in the solar spectrum, atmospheric scattering and absorption effects provide the sensors corrupted information about the target's radiance characteristics. We are faced with the problem of reconstructing the signal that was reflected from the target, from the data sensed by the remote sensing instrument. This article presents a method for simulating radiance characteristic curves of satellite images using a MODTRAN 3.5 band model (BM) code to solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE), and proposes a method for the implementation of an adaptive system for automated atmospheric corrections. The simulation procedure is carried out as follows: (1) for each satellite digital image a radiance characteristic curve is obtained by performing a digital number (DN) to radiance conversion, (2) using MODTRAN 3.5 a simulation of the images characteristic curves is generated, (3) the output of the code is processed to generate radiance characteristic curves for the simulated cases. The simulation algorithm was used to simulate Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images for two types of locations: the ocean surface, and a forest surface. The simulation procedure was validated by computing the error between the empirical and simulated radiance curves. While results in the visible region of the spectrum where not very accurate, those for the infrared region of the spectrum were encouraging. This information can be used for correction of the atmospheric effects. For the simulation over ocean, the lowest error produced in this region was of the order of 105 and up to 14 times smaller than errors in the visible region. For the same spectral region on the forest case, the lowest error produced was of the order of 10-4, and up to 41 times smaller than errors in the visible region,

  14. The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA): A reference atmospheric reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, Luca; Lewis, Stephen R.; Steele, Liam J.; Holmes, James; Read, Peter L.; Valeanu, Alexandru; Smith, Michael D.; Kass, David; Kleinboehl, Armin; LMD Team, MGS/TES Team, MRO/MCS Team

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset version 1.0 contains the reanalysis of fundamental atmospheric and surface variables for the planet Mars covering a period of about three Martian years (late MY 24 to early MY 27). This four-dimensional dataset has been produced by data assimilation of retrieved thermal profiles and column dust optical depths from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES), which have been assimilated into a Mars global climate model (MGCM) using the Analysis Correction scheme developed at the UK Meteorological Office.The MACDA v1.0 reanalysis is publicly available, and the NetCDF files can be downloaded from the archive at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis/British Atmospheric Data Centre (CEDA/BADC). The variables included in the dataset can be visualised using an ad-hoc graphical user interface (the "MACDA Plotter") located at the following URL: http://macdap.physics.ox.ac.uk/The first paper about MACDA reanalysis of TES retrievals appeared in 2006, although the acronym MACDA was not yet used at that time. Ten years later, MACDA v1.0 has been used by several researchers worldwide and has contributed to the advancement of the knowledge about the martian atmosphere in critical areas such as the radiative impact of water ice clouds, the solsticial pause in baroclinic wave activity, and the climatology and dynamics of polar vortices, to cite only a few. It is therefore timely to review the scientific results obtained by using such Mars reference atmospheric reanalysis, in order to understand what priorities the user community should focus on in the next decade.MACDA is an ongoing collaborative project, and work funded by NASA MDAP Programme is currently undertaken to produce version 2.0 of the Mars atmospheric reanalysis. One of the key improvements is the extension of the reanalysis period to nine martian years (MY 24 through MY 32), with the assimilation of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance

  15. Titan's Surface Reflectivity and Composition from Empirical Atmospheric Correction of Cassini/VIMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul; McCord, T. B.

    2009-12-01

    One of the primary challenges to constraining Titan's surface composition from visible and near infrared reflectance measurements is the moon's optically-thick atmosphere. We present a simple radiative transfer model, constrained by atmospheric transmission measurements from solar occultations, which we apply to reflectance data from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Using an inverse model for absorption and scattering in the atmosphere, we recover corrected reflectance spectra and map the distribution of compositional units. Our results suggest that exposed water ice is concentrated in fluvial channels and along the margins of topographically higher infrared-bright terrain. The latter, exemplified by the anomalously bright (and possibly active) features Tui Regio and Hotei Regio, appear depleted in water ice relative to the darker "bedrock” unit, and their reflectance spectra are consistent with enrichment in cyanoacetylene (HC3N), ammonia, and/or small quantities of carbon dioxide. A narrow absorption band at 4.92 μm promotes HC3N over the other two candidates, though CO2 also has a band within 25 nm of the observed wavelength, so that a shift due to the particular bonding configuration (e.g. with water ice) may be consistent with this component. If Tui Regio and Hotei Regio are enriched in precipitated aerosols such as HC3N, this implies an unknown concentration mechanism. Dune material is spectrally more neutral than water ice, consistent with a hydrocarbon heteropolymer.

  16. Atmospheric correction in time-series SAR interferometry for land surface deformation mapping - A case study of Taiyuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Liao, Mingsheng; Yuan, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The dominant error source of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) is atmospheric phase screen (APS), resulting in phase delay of the radar signal propagating through the atmosphere. The APS in the atmosphere can be decomposed into stratified and turbulent components. In this paper, we introduced a method to compensate for stratified component in a radar interferogram using ERA-Interim reanalysis products obtained from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Our comparative results with radiosonde data demonstrated that atmospheric condition from ERA-Interim could produce reasonable patterns of vertical profiles of atmospheric states. The stratified atmosphere shows seasonal changes which are correlated with time. It cannot be properly estimated by temporal high-pass filtering which assumes that atmospheric effects are random in time in conventional persistent scatterer InSAR (PSI). Thus, the estimated deformation velocity fields are biased. Therefore, we propose the atmosphere-corrected PSI method that the stratified delay are corrected on each interferogram by using ERA-Interim. The atmospheric residuals after correction of stratified delay were interpreted as random variations in space and time which are mitigated by using spatial-temporal filtering. We applied the proposed method to ENVISAT ASAR images covering Taiyuan basin, China, to study the ground deformation associated with groundwater withdrawal. Experimental results show that the proposed method significantly mitigate the topography-correlated APS and the estimated ground displacements agree more closely with GPS measurements than the conventional PSI.

  17. Implementation of Coupled Skin Temperature Analysis and Bias Correction in a Global Atmospheric Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radakovich, Jon; Bosilovich, M.; Chern, Jiun-dar; daSilva, Arlindo

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/NCAR Finite Volume GCM (fvGCM) with the NCAR CLM (Community Land Model) version 2.0 was integrated into the NASA/GMAO Finite Volume Data Assimilation System (fvDAS). A new method was developed for coupled skin temperature assimilation and bias correction where the analysis increment and bias correction term is passed into the CLM2 and considered a forcing term in the solution to the energy balance. For our purposes, the fvDAS CLM2 was run at 1 deg. x 1.25 deg. horizontal resolution with 55 vertical levels. We assimilate the ISCCP-DX (30 km resolution) surface temperature product. The atmospheric analysis was performed 6-hourly, while the skin temperature analysis was performed 3-hourly. The bias correction term, which was updated at the analysis times, was added to the skin temperature tendency equation at every timestep. In this presentation, we focus on the validation of the surface energy budget at the in situ reference sites for the Coordinated Enhanced Observation Period (CEOP). We will concentrate on sites that include independent skin temperature measurements and complete energy budget observations for the month of July 2001. In addition, MODIS skin temperature will be used for validation. Several assimilations were conducted and preliminary results will be presented.

  18. Skin Temperature Analysis and Bias Correction in a Coupled Land-Atmosphere Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Radakovich, Jon D.; daSilva, Arlindo; Todling, Ricardo; Verter, Frances

    2006-01-01

    In an initial investigation, remotely sensed surface temperature is assimilated into a coupled atmosphere/land global data assimilation system, with explicit accounting for biases in the model state. In this scheme, an incremental bias correction term is introduced in the model's surface energy budget. In its simplest form, the algorithm estimates and corrects a constant time mean bias for each gridpoint; additional benefits are attained with a refined version of the algorithm which allows for a correction of the mean diurnal cycle. The method is validated against the assimilated observations, as well as independent near-surface air temperature observations. In many regions, not accounting for the diurnal cycle of bias caused degradation of the diurnal amplitude of background model air temperature. Energy fluxes collected through the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) are used to more closely inspect the surface energy budget. In general, sensible heat flux is improved with the surface temperature assimilation, and two stations show a reduction of bias by as much as 30 Wm(sup -2) Rondonia station in Amazonia, the Bowen ratio changes direction in an improvement related to the temperature assimilation. However, at many stations the monthly latent heat flux bias is slightly increased. These results show the impact of univariate assimilation of surface temperature observations on the surface energy budget, and suggest the need for multivariate land data assimilation. The results also show the need for independent validation data, especially flux stations in varied climate regimes.

  19. Atmospheric correction for sea surface temperature retrieval from single thermal channel radiometer data onboard Kalpana satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Naveen R.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Mathur, Aloke K.; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2011-06-01

    An atmospheric correction method has been applied on sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval algorithm using Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) single window channel radiance data onboard Kalpana satellite (K-SAT). The technique makes use of concurrent water vapour fields available from Microwave Imager onboard Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/TMI) satellite. Total water vapour content and satellite zenith angle dependent SST retrieval algorithm has been developed using Radiative Transfer Model [MODTRAN ver3.0] simulations for Kalpana 10.5-12.5 μm thermal window channel. Retrieval of Kalpana SST (K-SST) has been carried out for every half-hourly acquisition of Kalpana data for the year 2008 to cover whole annual cycle of SST over Indian Ocean (IO). Validation of the retrieved corrected SST has been carried out using near-simultaneous observations of ship and buoys datasets covering Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and IO regions. A significant improvement in Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) of K-SST with respect to buoy (1.50-1.02 K) and to ship datasets (1.41-1.19 K) is seen with the use of near real-time water vapour fields of TMI. Furthermore, comparison of the retrieved SST has also been carried out using near simultaneous observations of TRMM/TMI SST over IO regions. The analysis shows that K-SST has overall cold bias of 1.17 K and an RMSD of 1.09 K after bias correction.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison

  1. Comparison of three atmospheric correction models for a vegetated airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Den Bosch, J. M.; Alley, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Current atmospheric correction models applied to imaging spectroscopy data include such methods as residual or scene average, flat field correction, regression method or empirical line algorithm, the continuum interpolated band ratio (CIBR) derivation and the LOWTRAN 7 method. Due to the limitations of using residual and flat field corrections on vegetated scenes, three methods will be compared: regression, CIBR derivation and LOWTRAN 7. Field-measured bright and dark targets taken at the time of the 13 April, 1989 AVIRIS overflight of Jasper Ridge, California were used to formulate the regression method atmospheric correction. Using this corrected scene as 'ground truth', the CIBR derivation and the LOWTRAN 7 method with both input models are compared on the vegetated Jasper Ridge scene. Although representing a qualitative approach, this is a first approximation and shows the need for more quantitative analysis.

  2. Comparison of three atmospheric correction models for a vegetated airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Den Bosch, J. M.; Alley, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Current atmospheric correction models applied to imaging spectroscopy data include such methods as residual or scene average, flat field correction, regression method or empirical line algorithm, the continuum interpolated band ratio (CIBR) derivation and the LOWTRAN 7 method. Due to the limitations of using residual and flat field corrections on vegetated scenes, three methods will be compared: regression, CIBR derivation and LOWTRAN 7. Field-measured bright and dark targets taken at the time of the 13 April, 1989 AVIRIS overflight of Jasper Ridge, California were used to formulate the regression method atmospheric correction. Using this corrected scene as 'ground truth', the CIBR derivation and the LOWTRAN 7 method with both input models are compared on the vegetated Jasper Ridge scene. Although representing a qualitative approach, this is a first approximation and shows the need for more quantitative analysis.

  3. Energetics of the martian atmosphere using the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Michael; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The energetics of the atmosphere of the northern hemisphere of Mars during the pre-winter solstice period are explored using the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset (v1.0) and the eddy kinetic energy equation, with the quasi-geostrophic omega equation providing vertical velocities. Traveling waves are typically triggered by geopotential flux convergence. The effect of dust on baroclinic instability is examined by comparing a year with a global-scale dust storm (GDS) to two years without a global-scale dust storm. During the non-GDS years, results agree with that of a previous study using a general circulation model simulation. In the GDS year, waves develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Though the total amount of eddy kinetic energy generated by baroclinic energy conversion is lower during the GDS year, the maximum eddy intensity is not diminished. Instead, the number of intense eddies is reduced by about 50%.

  4. Current Status of Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm has been developed for MODIS. MAIAC uses a time series and an image based rather than pixel-based processing to perform simultaneous retrievals of aerosol properties and surface bidirectional reflectance. It is a generic algorithm which works over all land surface types with the exception of snow. MAIAC has an internal Cloud Mask, a dynamic land-water-snow classification and a surface change mask which allows it to flexibly choose processing path over different surfaces. A distinct feature of MAIAC is a high 1 km resolution of aerosol retrievals including optical thickness and fine mode fraction, which is required in different applications including the air quality analysis. An overview of the algorithm, results of AERONET validation, and examples of comparison with MODIS Collection 5 aerosol product, including Deep Blue algorithm, will be presented for different parts of the world including continental USA, Persian Gulf region and India.

  5. [Remote sensing estimation of vegetation coverage in guangzhou based on the correction of atmospheric radiation].

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian-Zhou; Xia, Bei-Cheng

    2007-03-01

    Vegetation coverage is a basic parameter in describing landscape ecosystem, and an important index in assessing ecosystem health and security. Based on the four TM images in 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2005, and by using the correction model to deduct atmospheric radiation effect and the spatial operating model for TM image under unsupervised classification, the relationship model between vegetation coverage and normalized vegetation index was established, and the vegetation coverage in different phases in Guangzhou was calculated. The results showed that the vegetation coverage in Guangzhou decreased continuously from 1990 to 2000 but began to increase thereafter, which accorded with the economic development and environmental construction of the city. The model established in this paper could simulate well the dynamics of regional vegetation cover, and have the advantage in describing the dynamics of vegetation coverage more accurately, being available to the assessment of urban eco-environmental quality and its dynamic characters.

  6. Automated Burned Area Delineation Using IRS AWiFS satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, J.; Kiranchand, T. R.; Rajashekar, G.; Jha, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    spectral data from the IRS AWiFS sensor. The method is intended to be used by non-specialist users for diagnostic rapid burnt area mapping.

  7. The method of atmospheric correction for coastal case 2 water of Beijing-1 micro-satellite with MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Jitang

    2008-12-01

    Accurate atmospheric correction is an important and essential process in ocean color remote sensing because the influence of atmosphere account for the main part of signals received by sensors. Traditional methods usually depend on in-situ measured parameters of atmosphere and could not be applied in operational system. In this paper, MODIS products synchronize with Beijing-1 micro-satellite image were used to extract the parameters of atmosphere. we chose a marine space of clean water far away from the coast in MODIS image and used the products include MOD02, MOD03 and MOD07 to calculate the aerosol radiance of near-infrared bands of MODIS which were used to extrapolate the aerosol radiances of each band of Beijing-1 micro-satellite. Brought the results into radioactive transfer equation and fulfilled atmosphere correction. We found this method can enhanced the detail information of water body, especially to case 2 water. We compared the correction results with original image and the results from 6S model; its effect was consistent well with real conditions and better than 6S model. All these indicated that this method is feasible to atmospheric correction of turbid coastal waters and expands the application of multi-spectral sensors in ocean color remote sensing.

  8. Iterative Atmospheric Correction Scheme and the Polarization Color of Alpine Snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, Matteo; Cairns, Brian; Ferrare, Rich; Rogers, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the Earth's surface is crucial to remote sensing, both to map geomorphological features and because subtracting this signal is essential during retrievals of the atmospheric constituents located between the surface and the sensor. Current operational algorithms model the surface total reflectance through a weighted linear combination of a few geometry-dependent kernels, each devised to describe a particular scattering mechanism. The information content of these measurements is overwhelmed by that of instruments with polarization capabilities: proposed models in this case are based on the Fresnel reflectance of an isotropic distribution of facets. Because of its remarkable lack of spectral contrast, the polarized reflectance of land surfaces in the shortwave infrared spectral region, where atmospheric scattering is minimal, can be used to model the surface also at shorter wavelengths, where aerosol retrievals are attempted based on well-established scattering theories. In radiative transfer simulations, straightforward separation of the surface and atmospheric contributions is not possible without approximations because of the coupling introduced by multiple reflections. Within a general inversion framework, the problem can be eliminated by linearizing the radiative transfer calculation, and making the Jacobian (i.e., the derivative expressing the sensitivity of the reflectance with respect to model parameters) available at output. We present a general methodology based on a Gauss-Newton iterative search, which automates this procedure and eliminates de facto the need of an ad hoc atmospheric correction. In this case study we analyze the color variations in the polarized reflectance measured by the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Studies Research Scanning Polarimeter during a survey of late-season snowfields in the High Sierra. This insofar unique dataset presents challenges linked to the rugged topography associated with the alpine environment

  9. On the use of optical satellite data in atmospheric corrections for satellite InSAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanorte, Antonio; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    above quoted approaches, great attention has been devoted to the use of satellite-based Precipitable Water Vapour (PWV) products due to the technical improvements achieved in the last years in terms of resolution and accuracy. Both MODIS and MERIS PWV products have been adopted for atmospheric correction in InSAR techniques.

  10. Retrieval of wheat leaf area index from AWiFS multispectral data using canopy radiative transfer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Rahul; Bhattacharya, Bimal K.; Vyas, Swapnil; Oza, Markand P.

    2014-10-01

    Accurate representation of leaf area index (LAI) from high resolution satellite observations is obligatory for various modelling exercises and predicting the precise farm productivity. Present study compared the two retrieval approach based on canopy radiative transfer (CRT) method and empirical method using four vegetation indices (VI) (e.g. NDVI, NDWI, RVI and GNDVI) to estimate the wheat LAI. Reflectance observations available at very high (56 m) spatial resolution from Advanced Wide-Field Sensor (AWiFS) sensor onboard Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) P6, Resourcesat-1 satellite was used in this study. This study was performed over two different wheat growing regions, situated in different agro-climatic settings/environments: Trans-Gangetic Plain Region (TGPR) and Central Plateau and Hill Region (CPHR). Forward simulation of canopy reflectances in four AWiFS bands viz. green (0.52-0.59 μm), red (0.62-0.68 μm), NIR (0.77-0.86 μm) and SWIR (1.55-1.70 μm) were carried out to generate the look up table (LUT) using CRT model PROSAIL from all combinations of canopy intrinsic variables. An inversion technique based on minimization of cost function was used to retrieve LAI from LUT and observed AWiFS surface reflectances. Two consecutive wheat growing seasons (November 2005-March 2006 and November 2006-March 2007) datasets were used in this study. The empirical models were developed from first season data and second growing season data used for validation. Among all the models, LAI-NDVI empirical model showed the least RMSE (root mean square error) of 0.54 and 0.51 in both agro-climatic regions respectively. The comparison of PROSAIL retrieved LAI with in situ measurements of 2006-2007 over the two agro-climatic regions produced substantially less RMSE of 0.34 and 0.41 having more R2 of 0.91 and 0.95 for TGPR and CPHR respectively in comparison to empirical models. Moreover, CRT retrieved LAI had less value of errors in all the LAI classes contrary to empirical estimates

  11. Algorithm for Atmospheric and Glint Corrections of Satellite Measurements of Ocean Pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Robert S.; Mattoo, Shana; Yeh, Eueng-Nan; McClain, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to correct satellite measurements of ocean color for atmospheric and surface reflection effects. The algorithm depends on taking the difference between measured and tabulated radiances for deriving water-leaving radiances. 'ne tabulated radiances are related to the measured radiance where the water-leaving radiance is negligible (670 nm). The tabulated radiances are calculated for rough surface reflection, polarization of the scattered light, and multiple scattering. The accuracy of the tables is discussed. The method is validated by simulating the effect of different wind speeds than that for which the lookup table is calculated, and aerosol models different from the maritime model for which the table is computed. The derived water-leaving radiances are accurate enough to compute the pigment concentration with an error of less than q 15% for wind speeds of 6 and 10 m/s and an urban atmosphere with aerosol optical thickness of 0.20 at lambda 443 nm and decreasing to 0.10 at lambda 670 nm. The pigment accuracy is less for wind speeds less than 6 m/s and is about 30% for a model with aeolian dust. On the other hand, in a preliminary comparison with coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) measurements this algorithm and the CZCS operational algorithm produced values of pigment concentration in one image that agreed closely.

  12. Retrieval of Marine Water Constituents Using Atmospherically Corrected AVIRIS Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagheri, Sima; Peters, Steef

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the validation of bio-optical models in estuarine and nearshore (case 2) waters of New Jersey-New York to retrieve accurate water-leaving radiance spectra and chlorophyll concentration from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imaging spectrometer data. MODTRAN-4 was applied to remove the effects of the atmosphere so as to infer the water-leaving radiance. The study area - Hudson/Raritan of New York and New Jersey (Figure 1) is an extremely complex estuarine system where tidal and wind-driven currents are modified by freshwater discharges from the Hudson, Raritan, Hackensack, and Passaic rivers. Over the last century, the estuarine water quality has degraded in part due to eutrophication, which has disrupted the preexisting natural balance, resulting in phytoplankton blooms of both increased frequency and intensity, increasing oxygen demand, and leading to episodes of hypoxia. As the end result, a thematic map of chlorophyll-a concentration was generated using an atmospherically corrected AVIRIS ratio image. This thematic map serves as an indication of phytoplankton concentration. Such maps are important input into the geographic information system (GIS) for use as a management tool for monitoring water resources.

  13. Algorithm for Atmospheric and Glint Corrections of Satellite Measurements of Ocean Pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Robert S.; Mattoo, Shana; Yeh, Eueng-Nan; McClain, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to correct satellite measurements of ocean color for atmospheric and surface reflection effects. The algorithm depends on taking the difference between measured and tabulated radiances for deriving water-leaving radiances. 'ne tabulated radiances are related to the measured radiance where the water-leaving radiance is negligible (670 nm). The tabulated radiances are calculated for rough surface reflection, polarization of the scattered light, and multiple scattering. The accuracy of the tables is discussed. The method is validated by simulating the effect of different wind speeds than that for which the lookup table is calculated, and aerosol models different from the maritime model for which the table is computed. The derived water-leaving radiances are accurate enough to compute the pigment concentration with an error of less than q 15% for wind speeds of 6 and 10 m/s and an urban atmosphere with aerosol optical thickness of 0.20 at lambda 443 nm and decreasing to 0.10 at lambda 670 nm. The pigment accuracy is less for wind speeds less than 6 m/s and is about 30% for a model with aeolian dust. On the other hand, in a preliminary comparison with coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) measurements this algorithm and the CZCS operational algorithm produced values of pigment concentration in one image that agreed closely.

  14. Improved Correction of Atmospheric Pressure Data Obtained by Smartphones through Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hyuk; Ha, Ji-Hun; Kim, Na-Young; Im, Hyo-Hyuc; Sim, Sangjin; Choi, Reno K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    A correction method using machine learning aims to improve the conventional linear regression (LR) based method for correction of atmospheric pressure data obtained by smartphones. The method proposed in this study conducts clustering and regression analysis with time domain classification. Data obtained in Gyeonggi-do, one of the most populous provinces in South Korea surrounding Seoul with the size of 10,000 km2, from July 2014 through December 2014, using smartphones were classified with respect to time of day (daytime or nighttime) as well as day of the week (weekday or weekend) and the user's mobility, prior to the expectation-maximization (EM) clustering. Subsequently, the results were analyzed for comparison by applying machine learning methods such as multilayer perceptron (MLP) and support vector regression (SVR). The results showed a mean absolute error (MAE) 26% lower on average when regression analysis was performed through EM clustering compared to that obtained without EM clustering. For machine learning methods, the MAE for SVR was around 31% lower for LR and about 19% lower for MLP. It is concluded that pressure data from smartphones are as good as the ones from national automatic weather station (AWS) network. PMID:27524999

  15. Improved Correction of Atmospheric Pressure Data Obtained by Smartphones through Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyuk; Ha, Ji-Hun; Yoon, Yourim; Kim, Na-Young; Im, Hyo-Hyuc; Sim, Sangjin; Choi, Reno K Y

    2016-01-01

    A correction method using machine learning aims to improve the conventional linear regression (LR) based method for correction of atmospheric pressure data obtained by smartphones. The method proposed in this study conducts clustering and regression analysis with time domain classification. Data obtained in Gyeonggi-do, one of the most populous provinces in South Korea surrounding Seoul with the size of 10,000 km(2), from July 2014 through December 2014, using smartphones were classified with respect to time of day (daytime or nighttime) as well as day of the week (weekday or weekend) and the user's mobility, prior to the expectation-maximization (EM) clustering. Subsequently, the results were analyzed for comparison by applying machine learning methods such as multilayer perceptron (MLP) and support vector regression (SVR). The results showed a mean absolute error (MAE) 26% lower on average when regression analysis was performed through EM clustering compared to that obtained without EM clustering. For machine learning methods, the MAE for SVR was around 31% lower for LR and about 19% lower for MLP. It is concluded that pressure data from smartphones are as good as the ones from national automatic weather station (AWS) network.

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

    2011-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification

  17. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    Seismic images of the Brooks Range, Arctic Alaska, reveal crustal-scale duplexing: Correction Geology, v. 23, p. 65 68 (January 1995) The correct Figure 4A, for the loose insert, is given here. See Figure 4A below. Corrected inserts will be available to those requesting copies of the article from the senior author, Gary S. Fuis, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Figure 4A. P-wave velocity model of Brooks Range region (thin gray contours) with migrated wide-angle reflections (heavy red lines) and migreated vertical-incidence reflections (short black lines) superimposed. Velocity contour interval is 0.25 km/s; 4,5, and 6 km/s contours are labeled. Estimated error in velocities is one contour interval. Symbols on faults shown at top are as in Figure 2 caption.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Pat Matthews

    2008-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370 is located in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and/or implement a corrective action. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The investigation results may also be used to evaluate improvements in the Soils Project strategy to be implemented. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 10, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Desert Research Institute; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 370. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to the CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 370 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect samples to define the extent of the

  19. Precipitation effects on the selection of suitable non-variant targets intended for atmospheric correction of satellite remotely sensed imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Retalis, Adrianos; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Michaelides, Silas

    2013-09-01

    One of the most well-established atmospheric correction methods of satellite imagery is the use of the empirical line method using non-variant targets. Non-variant targets serve as pseudo-invariant targets since their reflectance values are stable across time. A recent adaptation of the empirical line method incorporates the use of ground reflectance measurements of selected non-variant targets. Most of the users are not aware of the existing conditions of the pseudo-invariant targets; i.e., whether they are dry or wet. Any omission of such effects may cause erroneous results; therefore, remote sensing users must be aware of such effects. This study assessed the effects of precipitation on five types of commonly located surfaces, including asphalt, concrete and sand, intended as pseudo-invariant targets for atmospheric correction. Spectroradiometric measurements were taken in wet and dry conditions to obtain the spectral signatures of the targets, from January 2010 to May 2011 (46 campaigns). An atmospheric correction of eleven Landsat TM/ETM + satellite images using the empirical line method was conducted. To identify the effects of precipitation, a comparison was conducted of the atmospheric path radiance component for wet and dry conditions. It was found that precipitation conditions such as rainfall affected the reflectance values of the surfaces, especially sand. Therefore, precipitation conditions need to be considered when using non-variant targets in atmospheric correction methods.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological

  2. Evaluation of 0.4- to 2.2-μm atmospheric correction techniques using the spectral similarity scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, James C.; Sweet, James N.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate the effectiveness of atmospheric correction and radiometric calibration techniques by measuring the differences of corrected data and ground truth spectra. Several atmospheric correction methods have been performed utilizing the ATREM and ACORN software packages. A variety of different settings (14 for ATREM and 5 for ACORN) have been tested and evaluated. The Spectral Similarity Scale (SSS) developed by BAE SYSTEMS is a measure of spectral similarity based on spectral magnitude and shape. The SSS-based spectral comparison process indicates that the default settings for iron rich soils are the best ATREM inputs for the Shelton, NEAVIRIS scene. The SSS comparison of the ACORN results with the spectral ground truth revealed that ACORN with the artifact type 1 was the best correction setting available for both ATREM and ACORN. For atmospheric water we find that ACORN is superior to ATREM. ATREM does correct for gain offsets that ACORN does not correct for with default settings. When used incorrectly, it is possible to severely reduce the spectral accuracy with either software package.

  3. Corrections.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Lai Y-S, Biedermann P, Ekpo UF, et al. Spatial distribution of schistosomiasis and treatment needs in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and geostatistical analysis. Lancet Infect Dis 2015; published online May 22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00066-3—Figure 1 of this Article should have contained a box stating ‘100 references added’ with an arrow pointing inwards, rather than a box stating ‘199 records excluded’, and an asterisk should have been added after ‘1473 records extracted into GNTD’. Additionally, the positioning of the ‘§ and ‘†’ footnotes has been corrected in table 1. These corrections have been made to the online version as of June 4, 2015.

  4. Correction.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In the article by Guessous et al (Guessous I, Pruijm M, Ponte B, Ackermann D, Ehret G, Ansermot N, Vuistiner P, Staessen J, Gu Y, Paccaud F, Mohaupt M, Vogt B, Pechère-Bertschi A, Martin PY, Burnier M, Eap CB, Bochud M. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions. Hypertension. 2015;65:691–696. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04512), which published online ahead of print December 8, 2014, and appeared in the March 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed.One of the author surnames was misspelled. Antoinette Pechère-Berstchi has been corrected to read Antoinette Pechère-Bertschi.The authors apologize for this error.

  5. Revisiting Short-Wave-Infrared (SWIR) Bands for Atmospheric Correction in Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahlevan, Nima; Roger, Jean-Claude; Ahmad, Ziauddin

    2017-01-01

    The shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands on the existing Earth Observing missions like MODIS have been designed to meet land and atmospheric science requirements. The future geostationary and polar-orbiting ocean color missions, however, require highly sensitive SWIR bands (greater than 1550nm) to allow for a precise removal of aerosol contributions. This will allow for reasonable retrievals of the remote sensing reflectance (R(sub rs)) using standard NASA atmospheric corrections over turbid coastal waters. Design, fabrication, and maintaining high-performance SWIR bands at very low signal levels bear significant costs on dedicated ocean color missions. This study aims at providing a full analysis of the utility of alternative SWIR bands within the 1600nm atmospheric window if the bands within the 2200nm window were to be excluded due to engineering/cost constraints. Following a series of sensitivity analyses for various spectral band configurations as a function of water vapor amount, we chose spectral bands centered at 1565 and 1675nm as suitable alternative bands within the 1600nm window for a future geostationary imager. The sensitivity of this band combination to different aerosol conditions, calibration uncertainties, and extreme water turbidity were studied and compared with that of all band combinations available on existing polar-orbiting missions. The combination of the alternative channels was shown to be as sensitive to test aerosol models as existing near-infrared (NIR) band combinations (e.g., 748 and 869nm) over clear open ocean waters. It was further demonstrated that while in extremely turbid waters the 1565/1675 band pair yields R(sub rs) retrievals as good as those derived from all other existing SWIR band pairs (greater than 1550nm), their total calibration uncertainties must be less than 1% to meet current science requirements for ocean color retrievals (i.e., delta R(sub rs) (443) less than 5%). We further show that the aerosol removal using the

  6. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  7. Using Graphical Processing Units to Accelerate Orthorectification, Atmospheric Correction and Transformations for Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. S.; Justice, B.; Harris, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are high-performance multiple-core processors capable of very high computational speeds and large data throughput. Modern GPUs are inexpensive and widely available commercially. These are general-purpose parallel processors with support for a variety of programming interfaces, including industry standard languages such as C. GPU implementations of algorithms that are well suited for parallel processing can often achieve speedups of several orders of magnitude over optimized CPU codes. Significant improvements in speeds for imagery orthorectification, atmospheric correction, target detection and image transformations like Independent Components Analsyis (ICA) have been achieved using GPU-based implementations. Additional optimizations, when factored in with GPU processing capabilities, can provide 50x - 100x reduction in the time required to process large imagery. Exelis Visual Information Solutions (VIS) has implemented a CUDA based GPU processing frame work for accelerating ENVI and IDL processes that can best take advantage of parallelization. Testing Exelis VIS has performed shows that orthorectification can take as long as two hours with a WorldView1 35,0000 x 35,000 pixel image. With GPU orthorecification, the same orthorectification process takes three minutes. By speeding up image processing, imagery can successfully be used by first responders, scientists making rapid discoveries with near real time data, and provides an operational component to data centers needing to quickly process and disseminate data.

  8. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  9. Aerosol polarization effects on atmospheric correction and aerosol retrievals in ocean color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2006-12-10

    The current ocean color data processing system for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses the Rayleigh lookup tables that were generated using the vector radiative transfer theory with inclusion of the polarization effects. The polarization effects, however, are not accounted for in the aerosol lookup tables for the ocean color data processing. I describe a study of the aerosol polarization effects on the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms in the ocean color remote sensing. Using an efficient method for the multiple vector radiative transfer computations, aerosol lookup tables that include polarization effects are generated. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the aerosol polarization effects on the derived ocean color and aerosol products for all possible solar-sensor geometries and the various aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, the new aerosol lookup tables have been implemented in the SeaWiFS data processing system and extensively tested and evaluated with SeaWiFS regional and global measurements. Results show that in open oceans (maritime environment), the aerosol polarization effects on the ocean color and aerosol products are usually negligible, while there are some noticeable effects on the derived products in the coastal regions with nonmaritime aerosols.

  10. Impact of atmospheric correction and image filtering on hyperspectral classification of tree species using support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari Nia, Morteza; Wang, Daisy Zhe; Bohlman, Stephanie Ann; Gader, Paul; Graves, Sarah J.; Petrovic, Milenko

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral images can be used to identify savannah tree species at the landscape scale, which is a key step in measuring biomass and carbon, and tracking changes in species distributions, including invasive species, in these ecosystems. Before automated species mapping can be performed, image processing and atmospheric correction is often performed, which can potentially affect the performance of classification algorithms. We determine how three processing and correction techniques (atmospheric correction, Gaussian filters, and shade/green vegetation filters) affect the prediction accuracy of classification of tree species at pixel level from airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer imagery of longleaf pine savanna in Central Florida, United States. Species classification using fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes (FLAASH) atmospheric correction outperformed ATCOR in the majority of cases. Green vegetation (normalized difference vegetation index) and shade (near-infrared) filters did not increase classification accuracy when applied to large and continuous patches of specific species. Finally, applying a Gaussian filter reduces interband noise and increases species classification accuracy. Using the optimal preprocessing steps, our classification accuracy of six species classes is about 75%.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond • 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able • 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area • 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from groundwater pumping during the Radionuclide Migration study program (CAS 05-20-02), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). The presence and nature of contamination from surface-deposited radiological contamination from CAS 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able, and other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) from the remaining three CASs will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations

  12. Atmospheric and Adjacency Correction of Landsat-8 Imagery of Inland and Coastal Waters Near AERONET-OC Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Manzo, Ciro; Bresciani, Mariano; Braga, Federica; Giardino, Claudia; Schroeder, Thomas; Kratzer, Susanne; Brando, Vittorio

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary results of a new algorithm for the atmospheric correction of OLI imagery acquired over coastal and inland water are presented. The algorithm was based on the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6SV) radiative transfer model and the atmopheric contribution was simulated by using the microphysical properties of the aerosol, their size distribution and refractive index, available from the AERONET stations located in the study area. The SeaDAS software was also applied to the OLI data to compare the results obtained by OLI@CRI algorithm with the standard procedure for atmospheric correction of remotely data. Furthermore, the adjacency effect was removed by the well-known empirical formula as well as a new empirical formula to assess any possible improvement of the atmospheric correction products using the diffuse fraction of the total atmospheric transmission as weight for averaged reflectance removal. To validate the results and assess its accuracy, the above-water data acquired at AERONET- OC sites were used. A coastal area and a lake are considered, where AERONET and AERONET-OC data are available. These sites cover a significant range of both atmospheric (from boreal to tropics) and water quality conditions.

  13. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    Alleged mosasaur bite marks on Late Cretaceous ammonites are limpet (patellogastropod) home scars Geology, v. 26, p. 947 950 (October 1998) This article had the following printing errors: p. 947, Abstract, line 11, “sepia” should be “septa” p. 947, 1st paragraph under Introduction, line 2, “creep” should be “deep” p. 948, column 1, 2nd paragraph, line 7, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 1, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 5, “19774” should be “1977)” p. 949, column 1, 4th paragraph, line 7, “in particular” should be “In particular” CORRECTION Mammalian community response to the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: An isotaphonomic study in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Geology, v. 26, p. 1011 1014 (November 1998) An error appeared in the References Cited. The correct reference appears below: Fricke, H. C., Clyde, W. C., O'Neil, J. R., and Gingerich, P. D., 1998, Evidence for rapid climate change in North America during the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphate from the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming): Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 160, p. 193 208.

  14. Performance of the high-resolution atmospheric model HRRR-AK for correcting geodetic observations from spaceborne radars

    PubMed Central

    Gong, W; Meyer, F J; Webley, P; Morton, D

    2013-01-01

    [1] Atmospheric phase delays are considered to be one of the main performance limitations for high-quality satellite radar techniques, especially when applied to ground deformation monitoring. Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are widely seen as a promising tool for the mitigation of atmospheric delays as they can provide knowledge of the atmospheric conditions at the time of Synthetic Aperture Radar data acquisition. However, a thorough statistical analysis of the performance of using NWP production in radar signal correction is missing to date. This study provides a quantitative analysis of the accuracy in using operational NWP products for signal delay correction in satellite radar geodetic remote sensing. The study focuses on the temperate, subarctic, and Arctic climate regions due to a prevalence of relevant geophysical signals in these areas. In this study, the operational High Resolution Rapid Refresh over the Alaska region (HRRR-AK) model is used and evaluated. Five test sites were selected over Alaska (AK), USA, covering a wide range of climatic regimes that are commonly encountered in high-latitude regions. The performance of the HRRR-AK NWP model for correcting absolute atmospheric range delays of radar signals is assessed by comparing to radiosonde observations. The average estimation accuracy for the one-way zenith total atmospheric delay from 24 h simulations was calculated to be better than ∼14 mm. This suggests that the HRRR-AK operational products are a good data source for spaceborne geodetic radar observations atmospheric delay correction, if the geophysical signal to be observed is larger than 20 mm. PMID:25973360

  15. Performance of the high-resolution atmospheric model HRRR-AK for correcting geodetic observations from spaceborne radars.

    PubMed

    Gong, W; Meyer, F J; Webley, P; Morton, D

    2013-10-27

    [1] Atmospheric phase delays are considered to be one of the main performance limitations for high-quality satellite radar techniques, especially when applied to ground deformation monitoring. Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are widely seen as a promising tool for the mitigation of atmospheric delays as they can provide knowledge of the atmospheric conditions at the time of Synthetic Aperture Radar data acquisition. However, a thorough statistical analysis of the performance of using NWP production in radar signal correction is missing to date. This study provides a quantitative analysis of the accuracy in using operational NWP products for signal delay correction in satellite radar geodetic remote sensing. The study focuses on the temperate, subarctic, and Arctic climate regions due to a prevalence of relevant geophysical signals in these areas. In this study, the operational High Resolution Rapid Refresh over the Alaska region (HRRR-AK) model is used and evaluated. Five test sites were selected over Alaska (AK), USA, covering a wide range of climatic regimes that are commonly encountered in high-latitude regions. The performance of the HRRR-AK NWP model for correcting absolute atmospheric range delays of radar signals is assessed by comparing to radiosonde observations. The average estimation accuracy for the one-way zenith total atmospheric delay from 24 h simulations was calculated to be better than ∼14 mm. This suggests that the HRRR-AK operational products are a good data source for spaceborne geodetic radar observations atmospheric delay correction, if the geophysical signal to be observed is larger than 20 mm.

  16. Mass-dependent Corrections and Atmospheric Invasion: Working with the Radiocarbon Content of CO2 in the Soil Gas Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Bowling, D. R.; Risk, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon is becoming a more commonly utilized tool for C cycling studies, as it helps constrain biotic ecosystem processes such as C turnover times and sources of production. However, for studies that focus on CO2, the sampling methods for Δ14CO2 (surface chambers and subsurface gas wells) can be affected by abiotic processes, which may bias results as a function of gas transport regime (diffusion and advection). The radiocarbon community currently uses a δ13C correction to account for mass-dependent fractionation, but to date this correction has not been validated for the soil gas environment, where atmospheric invasion and gas transport are important. This study used an analytical soil gas transport model across a range of soil diffusivities and production rates, in which we could control Δ14CO2 and δ13CO2 signatures of production and atmosphere. This synthetic situation allowed us to assess the bias that results from using the conventional correction method for estimating Δ14CO2 of soil production. We found that the conventional correction is not strictly valid in this setting for interpreting the signature of production and does not account for diffusion and atmospheric invasion. The resultant Δ14CO2 bias scales with soil diffusivity and production rates. We propose a new two-step correction for Δ14CO2 work in the soil environment that accounts for atmospheric invasion and the δ13CO2 correction, and is able to reproduce a true value of Δ14CO2 of production. This work not only assists in data interpretation, but also helps clarify a methodological window of opportunity for accurately measuring the Δ14CO2 of soil production using subsurface sampling.

  17. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  18. Performance evaluation of operational atmospheric correction algorithms over the East China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuangyan; He, Mingxia; Fischer, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    To acquire high-quality operational data products for Chinese in-orbit and scheduled ocean color sensors, the performances of two operational atmospheric correction (AC) algorithms (ESA MEGS 7.4.1 and NASA SeaDAS 6.1) were evaluated over the East China Seas (ECS) using MERIS data. The spectral remote sensing reflectance R rs(λ), aerosol optical thickness (AOT), and Ångström exponent (α) retrieved using the two algorithms were validated using in situ measurements obtained between May 2002 and October 2009. Match-ups of R rs, AOT, and α between the in situ and MERIS data were obtained through strict exclusion criteria. Statistical analysis of R rs(λ) showed a mean percentage difference (MPD) of 9%-13% in the 490-560 nm spectral range, and significant overestimation was observed at 413 nm (MPD>72%). The AOTs were overestimated (MPD>32%), and although the ESA algorithm outperformed the NASA algorithm in the blue-green bands, the situation was reversed in the red-near-infrared bands. The value of α was obviously underestimated by the ESA algorithm (MPD=41%) but not by the NASA algorithm (MPD=35%). To clarify why the NASA algorithm performed better in the retrieval of α, scatter plots of the α single scattering albedo (SSA) density were prepared. These α-SSA density scatter plots showed that the applicability of the aerosol models used by the NASA algorithm over the ECS is better than that used by the ESA algorithm, although neither aerosol model is suitable for the ECS region. The results of this study provide a reference to both data users and data agencies regarding the use of operational data products and the investigation into the improvement of current AC schemes over the ECS.

  19. Long-term changes in the aerosol optical thickness in moscow and correction under strong atmospheric turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbarenko, E. V.; Rublev, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We have estimated and compensated the error in long-term series of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) calculated from the data on direct integral solar radiation measured by a standard actinometer at the Meteorological Observatory of the Moscow State University (MO MSU) for strong atmospheric turbidity conditions. The necessary corrections have been obtained by the Monte-Carlo simulation of the actinometry measurements for different atmospheric conditions, taking into account the angular size of the field of view of the instrument; and a special correctional formula has been obtained. This correction formula has been applied for all timed AOT values of above 0.5 observed at the MO MSU for the entire time period from 1955 to 2013. Changes in the long-term average AOT values in Moscow occurred only when the smoky haze from the forest and peat fires affected the aerosol turbidity of the atmosphere. Here, the significant decreasing trend of aerosol optical depth of the atmosphere from 1955 to 2013 has been retained with the same confidence level.

  20. Atmospheric corrections in interferometric synthetic aperture radar surface deformation - a case study of the city of Mendoza, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbarani, S.; Euillades, P. A.; Euillades, L. D.; Casu, F.; Riveros, N. C.

    2013-09-01

    Differential interferometry is a remote sensing technique that allows studying crustal deformation produced by several phenomena like earthquakes, landslides, land subsidence and volcanic eruptions. Advanced techniques, like small baseline subsets (SBAS), exploit series of images acquired by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors during a given time span. Phase propagation delay in the atmosphere is the main systematic error of interferometric SAR measurements. It affects differently images acquired at different days or even at different hours of the same day. So, datasets acquired during the same time span from different sensors (or sensor configuration) often give diverging results. Here we processed two datasets acquired from June 2010 to December 2011 by COSMO-SkyMed satellites. One of them is HH-polarized, and the other one is VV-polarized and acquired on different days. As expected, time series computed from these datasets show differences. We attributed them to non-compensated atmospheric artifacts and tried to correct them by using ERA-Interim global atmospheric model (GAM) data. With this method, we were able to correct less than 50% of the scenes, considering an area where no phase unwrapping errors were detected. We conclude that GAM-based corrections are not enough for explaining differences in computed time series, at least in the processed area of interest. We remark that no direct meteorological data for the GAM-based corrections were employed. Further research is needed in order to understand under what conditions this kind of data can be used.

  1. Atmospheric correction at AERONET locations: A new science and validation data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; Lyapustin, A.I.; Privette, J.L.; Morisette, J.T.; Holben, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN) and its data set of spectral surface bidirectional reflectance and albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) TERRA and AQUA data. The ASRVN is an operational data collection and processing system. It receives 50 ?? 50 km2; subsets of MODIS level 1B (L1B) data from MODIS adaptive processing system and AERONET aerosol and water-vapor information. Then, it performs an atmospheric correction (AC) for about 100 AERONET sites based on accurate radiative-transfer theory with complex quality control of the input data. The ASRVN processing software consists of an L1B data gridding algorithm, a new cloud-mask (CM) algorithm based on a time-series analysis, and an AC algorithm using ancillary AERONET aerosol and water-vapor data. The AC is achieved by fitting the MODIS top-of-atmosphere measurements, accumulated for a 16-day interval, with theoretical reflectance parameterized in terms of the coefficients of the Li SparseRoss Thick (LSRT) model of the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). The ASRVN takes several steps to ensure high quality of results: 1) the filtering of opaque clouds by a CM algorithm; 2) the development of an aerosol filter to filter residual semitransparent and subpixel clouds, as well as cases with high inhomogeneity of aerosols in the processing area; 3) imposing the requirement of the consistency of the new solution with previously retrieved BRF and albedo; 4) rapid adjustment of the 16-day retrieval to the surface changes using the last day of measurements; and 5) development of a seasonal backup spectral BRF database to increase data coverage. The ASRVN provides a gapless or near-gapless coverage for the processing area. The gaps, caused by clouds, are filled most naturally with the latest solution for a given pixel. The ASRVN products include three parameters of the LSRT model (kL, kG, and kV), surface albedo

  2. Simple aerosol correction technique based on the spectral relationships of the aerosol multiple-scattering reflectances for atmospheric correction over the oceans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hyun; Park, Young-Je; Kim, Wonkook; Lee, Boram

    2016-12-26

    An estimation of the aerosol multiple-scattering reflectance is an important part of the atmospheric correction procedure in satellite ocean color data processing. Most commonly, the utilization of two near-infrared (NIR) bands to estimate the aerosol optical properties has been adopted for the estimation of the effects of aerosols. Previously, the operational Geostationary Color Ocean Imager (GOCI) atmospheric correction scheme relies on a single-scattering reflectance ratio (SSE), which was developed for the processing of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) data to determine the appropriate aerosol models and their aerosol optical thicknesses. The scheme computes reflectance contributions (weighting factor) of candidate aerosol models in a single scattering domain then spectrally extrapolates the single-scattering aerosol reflectance from NIR to visible (VIS) bands using the SSE. However, it directly applies the weight value to all wavelengths in a multiple-scattering domain although the multiple-scattering aerosol reflectance has a non-linear relationship with the single-scattering reflectance and inter-band relationship of multiple scattering aerosol reflectances is non-linear. To avoid these issues, we propose an alternative scheme for estimating the aerosol reflectance that uses the spectral relationships in the aerosol multiple-scattering reflectance between different wavelengths (called SRAMS). The process directly calculates the multiple-scattering reflectance contributions in NIR with no residual errors for selected aerosol models. Then it spectrally extrapolates the reflectance contribution from NIR to visible bands for each selected model using the SRAMS. To assess the performance of the algorithm regarding the errors in the water reflectance at the surface or remote-sensing reflectance retrieval, we compared the SRAMS atmospheric correction results with the SSE atmospheric correction using both simulations and in situ match-ups with the

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area •05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able •05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton •05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area •05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), “equation of state” experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose

  4. Assessment of temporal variations of water quality in inland water bodies using atmospheric corrected satellite remotely sensed image data.

    PubMed

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G; Clayton, Chris

    2009-12-01

    Although there have been many studies conducted on the use of satellite remote sensing for water quality monitoring and assessment in inland water bodies, relatively few studies have considered the problem of atmospheric intervention of the satellite signal. The problem is especially significant when using time series multi-spectral satellite data to monitor water quality surveillance in inland waters such as reservoirs, lakes, and dams because atmospheric effects constitute the majority of the at-satellite reflectance over water. For the assessment of temporal variations of water quality, the use of multi-date satellite images is required so atmospheric corrected image data must be determined. The aim of this study is to provide a simple way of monitoring and assessing temporal variations of water quality in a set of inland water bodies using an earth observation- based approach. The proposed methodology is based on the development of an image-based algorithm which consists of a selection of sampling area on the image (outlet), application of masking and convolution image processing filter, and application of the darkest pixel atmospheric correction. The proposed method has been applied in two different geographical areas, in UK and Cyprus. Mainly, the method has been applied to a series of eight archived Landsat-5 TM images acquired from March 1985 up to November 1985 of the Lower Thames Valley area in the West London (UK) consisting of large water treatment reservoirs. Finally, the method is further tested to the Kourris Dam in Cyprus. It has been found that atmospheric correction is essential in water quality assessment studies using satellite remotely sensed imagery since it improves significantly the water reflectance enabling effective water quality assessment to be made.

  5. Atmospheric Correction of Satellite GF-1/WFV Imagery and Quantitative Estimation of Suspended Particulate Matter in the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Shang, Pei; Shen, Fang

    2016-11-25

    The Multispectral Wide Field of View (WFV) camera on the Chinese GF-1 satellite, launched in 2013, has advantages of high spatial resolution (16 m), short revisit period (4 days) and wide scene swath (800 km) compared to the Landsat-8/OLI, which make it an ideal means of monitoring spatial-temporal changes of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) in large estuaries like the Yangtze Estuary. However, a lack of proper atmospheric correction methods has limited its application in water quality assessment. We propose an atmospheric correction method based on a look up table coupled by the atmosphere radiative transfer model (6S) and the water semi-empirical radiative transfer (SERT) model for inversion of water-leaving reflectance from GF-1 top-of-atmosphere radiance, and then retrieving SPM concentration from water-leaving radiance reflectance of the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent sea. Results are validated by the Landsat-8/OLI imagery together with autonomous fixed station data, and influences of human activities (e.g., waterway construction and shipping) on SPM distribution are analyzed.

  6. Atmospheric Correction of Satellite GF-1/WFV Imagery and Quantitative Estimation of Suspended Particulate Matter in the Yangtze Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Pei; Shen, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The Multispectral Wide Field of View (WFV) camera on the Chinese GF-1 satellite, launched in 2013, has advantages of high spatial resolution (16 m), short revisit period (4 days) and wide scene swath (800 km) compared to the Landsat-8/OLI, which make it an ideal means of monitoring spatial-temporal changes of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) in large estuaries like the Yangtze Estuary. However, a lack of proper atmospheric correction methods has limited its application in water quality assessment. We propose an atmospheric correction method based on a look up table coupled by the atmosphere radiative transfer model (6S) and the water semi-empirical radiative transfer (SERT) model for inversion of water-leaving reflectance from GF-1 top-of-atmosphere radiance, and then retrieving SPM concentration from water-leaving radiance reflectance of the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent sea. Results are validated by the Landsat-8/OLI imagery together with autonomous fixed station data, and influences of human activities (e.g., waterway construction and shipping) on SPM distribution are analyzed. PMID:27897987

  7. Characterization of artifacts introduced by the empirical volcano-scan atmospheric correction commonly applied to CRISM and OMEGA near-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, S. M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Wolff, M. J.; Smith, M. D.; Seelos, F. P.; Morgan, F.; Murchie, S. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Morris, R. V.; Humm, D.; McGuire, P. C.

    2016-05-01

    The empirical 'volcano-scan' atmospheric correction is widely applied to martian near infrared CRISM and OMEGA spectra between ∼1000 and ∼2600 nm to remove prominent atmospheric gas absorptions with minimal computational investment. This correction method employs division by a scaled empirically-derived atmospheric transmission spectrum that is generated from observations of the martian surface in which different path lengths through the atmosphere were measured and transmission calculated using the Beer-Lambert Law. Identifying and characterizing both artifacts and residual atmospheric features left by the volcano-scan correction is important for robust interpretation of CRISM and OMEGA volcano-scan corrected spectra. In order to identify and determine the cause of spectral artifacts introduced by the volcano-scan correction, we simulated this correction using a multiple scattering radiative transfer algorithm (DISORT). Simulated transmission spectra that are similar to actual CRISM- and OMEGA-derived transmission spectra were generated from modeled Olympus Mons base and summit spectra. Results from the simulations were used to investigate the validity of assumptions inherent in the volcano-scan correction and to identify artifacts introduced by this method of atmospheric correction. We found that the most prominent artifact, a bowl-shaped feature centered near 2000 nm, is caused by the inaccurate assumption that absorption coefficients of CO2 in the martian atmosphere are independent of column density. In addition, spectral albedo and slope are modified by atmospheric aerosols. Residual atmospheric contributions that are caused by variable amounts of dust aerosols, ice aerosols, and water vapor are characterized by the analysis of CRISM volcano-scan corrected spectra from the same location acquired at different times under variable atmospheric conditions.

  8. Characterization of Artifacts Introduced by the Empirical Volcano-Scan Atmospheric Correction Commonly Applied to CRISM and OMEGA Near-Infrared Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, S.M.; Arvidson, R.E.; Wolff, M. J.; Smith, M. D.; Seelos, F. P.; Morgan, F.; Murchie, S. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Morris, R. V.; Humm, D.; McGuire, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The empirical volcano-scan atmospheric correction is widely applied to Martian near infrared CRISM and OMEGA spectra between 1000 and 2600 nanometers to remove prominent atmospheric gas absorptions with minimal computational investment. This correction method employs division by a scaled empirically-derived atmospheric transmission spectrum that is generated from observations of the Martian surface in which different path lengths through the atmosphere were measured and transmission calculated using the Beer-Lambert Law. Identifying and characterizing both artifacts and residual atmospheric features left by the volcano-scan correction is important for robust interpretation of CRISM and OMEGA volcano scan corrected spectra. In order to identify and determine the cause of spectral artifacts introduced by the volcano-scan correction, we simulated this correction using a multiple scattering radiative transfer algorithm (DISORT). Simulated transmission spectra that are similar to actual CRISM- and OMEGA-derived transmission spectra were generated from modeled Olympus Mons base and summit spectra. Results from the simulations were used to investigate the validity of assumptions inherent in the volcano-scan correction and to identify artifacts introduced by this method of atmospheric correction. We found that the most prominent artifact, a bowl-shaped feature centered near 2000 nanometers, is caused by the inaccurate assumption that absorption coefficients of CO2 in the Martian atmosphere are independent of column density. In addition, spectral albedo and slope are modified by atmospheric aerosols. Residual atmospheric contributions that are caused by variable amounts of dust aerosols, ice aerosols, and water vapor are characterized by the analysis of CRISM volcano-scan corrected spectra from the same location acquired at different times under variable atmospheric conditions.

  9. Generating and Evaluation Leaf Area Index (LAI) from MODIS MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) Surface Reflectance Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Park, T.; Yan, K.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; CHOI, S.; Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Myneni, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    This study generates and evaluates prototype Leaf Area Index (LAI) product based on MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF, commonly known as surface reflectance) which is a product of MultiAngle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) package. LAI is a key parameter of vegetation in characterizing interactions of energy and mass between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. On the other hand, MAIAC BRF is retrieved from a new atmospheric correction algorithm, which has higher spatial resolution and is believed to have more reliable cloud/aerosol detection technique than standard MODIS BRF product. Two main objectives of this study are: 1). Maintaining the radiative transfer theory based LAI algorithm's look up table (LUT) unchanged, to compare LAI product retrieved from different versions of BRF products (MODIS collection 5, collection 6 and MAIAC); 2). To adjust the LUT to resolve LAI's possible systematic discrepancies resulting from atmospheric correction methods within the input BRF other than our LAI algorithm. Before the LUT adjusting, comparing to standard MODIS products shows that MAIAC LAI product will overestimate among herbaceous biome types which have low LAI values, while underestimate among woody biome types which have relatively higher values. Based on the theory of radiative transfer of canopy spectral invariants, two biome and MAIAC specific configurable parameters (Single Scattering Albedo and Uncertainty) in the LUT are adjusted to minimize the inconsistency due to input BRFs. Experiments shows that our new result: 1). has good agreement with field measured data (e.g. DIRECT); 2) is consistent with standard MODIS LAI product.

  10. A High-precision Technique to Correct for Residual Atmospheric Dispersion in High-contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Takami, H.; Hayano, Y.; Narita, N.

    2016-12-01

    Direct detection and spectroscopy of exoplanets requires high-contrast imaging. For habitable exoplanets in particular, located at a small angular separation from the host star, it is crucial to employ small inner working angle (IWA) coronagraphs that efficiently suppress starlight. These coronagraphs, in turn, require careful control of the wavefront that directly impacts their performance. For ground-based telescopes, atmospheric refraction is also an important factor, since it results in a smearing of the point-spread function (PSF), that can no longer be efficiently suppressed by the coronagraph. Traditionally, atmospheric refraction is compensated for by an atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC). ADC control relies on an a priori model of the atmosphere whose parameters are solely based on the pointing of the telescope, which can result in imperfect compensation. For a high-contrast instrument like the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system, which employs very small IWA coronagraphs, refraction-induced smearing of the PSF has to be less than 1 mas in the science band for optimum performance. In this paper, we present the first on-sky measurement and correction of residual atmospheric dispersion. Atmospheric dispersion is measured from the science image directly, using an adaptive grid of artificially introduced speckles as a diagnostic to feedback to the telescope’s ADC. With our current setup, we were able to reduce the initial residual atmospheric dispersion from 18.8 mas to 4.2 in broadband light (y- to H-band) and to 1.4 mas in the H-band only. This work is particularly relevant to the upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) that will require fine control of their ADC to reach their full high-contrast imaging potential.

  11. Robust corrections for topographically-correlated atmospheric noise in InSAR data from large deforming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Hooper, A. J.; Wright, T. J.; Walters, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    For Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) the atmosphere forms one of the biggest challenges when it comes to the extraction of small-magnitude long-wavelength tectonics signals. Spatio-temporal variation of water vapour, pressure and temperature in the lower 15 km of the troposphere is the main cause of these signals, introducing apparent differential path delays in interferograms of up to 15 cm. Several correction techniques have been applied in the past that rely on external data from weather models, GPS or spectrometer data, but these are typically limited by the lower spatial resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively, time-series InSAR techniques and filtering of the interferometric phase in space and time can be applied, but separating atmospheric delays from non-linear deformation is challenging. Another method, which can be applied to individual interferograms, is to estimate the correlation between interferometric phase and topography, either in a non-deforming area or using a frequency band insensitive to deformation. While this method can be successful for small areas, it does not account for spatial variation of atmospheric properties, which can be significant across regions larger than 100 km. While the slope relating phase and topography can be reliably estimated for subregions, the intercept cannot, as it is biased by the presence of unrelated signals. The intercept cannot however be neglected, as the mean height of each subregion typically varies, leading to a different intercept for each window. Here we present a new power law representation of the topographically-correlated phase delay that can be applied locally and which is able to account for these spatial variations in atmospheric properties. We estimate the power law from sounding data to fit altitudes of up to 4 km, as this includes most of the topography range in our/most regions of interest. We also constrain the power law by specifying the height above which the relative

  12. Water quality monitoring by thematic mapper in coastal environments. A performance analysis of local biooptical algorithms and atmospheric correction procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tassan, S. . Inst. for Remote Sensing Applications); d'Alcala, M.R. . Biological Oceanography Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    The Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor's ability to monitor localized phenomena associated with anthropogenic pollution in coastal waters has been investigated with reference to experimental data collected on a test site in the Gulf of Naples. In situ measurements yielded the biooptical algorithms for chlorophyll and sediment retrieval as well as an optical model for the computation of the subsurface reflectance as a function of water composition, specific to the site. The algorithms' performance was assessed through a sensitivity analysis, taking into account the correlation among chlorophyll, sediment, and yellow substance contents, as well as the stratification characteristics of the water body. Sensitivity analysis techniques were similarly used to evaluate the performance in the coastal environment of three atmospheric correction models, which assume uniform aerosol load and composition, uniform aerosol composition, and varying aerosol load and composition, respectively. A comparison with sea-truth data collected for the Land-sat overpass of 22 June 1988 showed a satisfactory correspondence between measured concentrations and concentrations retrieved from the TM data using the above atmospheric correction procedures and local biooptical algorithms. Consistent with the indications of the sensitivity analysis, the best agreement was obtained by the atmospheric model assuming varying aerosol load and composition.

  13. The study of atmospheric correction of satellite remotely sensed images intended for air pollution using sun-photometers (AERONET) and lidar system in Lemesos, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Nisantzi, Argyro; Matsas, Alexandros

    2010-10-01

    Solar radiation reflected by the Earth's surface to satellite sensors is modified by its interaction with the atmosphere. The objective of atmospheric correction is to determine true surface reflectance values by removing atmospheric effects from satellite images. Atmospheric correction is arguably the most important part of the pre-processing of satellite remotely sensed data. The most important parameter in applying any atmospheric correction is the aerosol optical thickness which is also used for assessing air pollution. This paper explores how the AOT is extracted from atmospheric corrected satellite imagery acquired from Landsat ETM + and how then AOT values are used to assess air pollution. The atmospheric correction algorihm developed by Hadjimitsis and Clayton (2009) is applied to short wavelengths like Landsat TM band 1 and 2 (0.45-0.52μm, 0.52-0.60 μm). The results are also assessed using Lidar system and Cimel Sunphotometer located in the premises of the Cyprus University of Technology in Limassol. The authors run the atmospheric correction developed by Hadjimitsis and Clayton (2009) in MATLAB and sample AOT results for the Landsat ETM+ images acquired on the 15/01/2010, 20/4/2010, 09/06/2010 are shown. For the Landsat ETM+ image acquired on 20/4/2010, the AOT was found 1.4 after the application of the atmospheric correction. Such value complies with the AOT value measured by the Cimel Sun-photometer (AERONET) during the satellite overpass. An example of how Lidar is used to assess the existing atmospheric conditions which is useful for assessing air pollution is also presented.

  14. Correction for water vapor in the measurement of atmospheric trace gases.

    PubMed

    Butenhoff, C L; Khalil, M A K

    2002-06-01

    The presence of water vapor in a sample of air reduces the concentration of a trace gas measured from the sample. We present a methodology to correct for this effect for those cases when the concentration of the trace gas has already been measured from a wet sample. The conversion or correction factor that takes the wet mole fraction to a dry mole fraction is determined by the mixing ratio of water vapor inside the sampling canister. For those samples where the water vapor is saturated inside the canister, the water vapor mixing ratio is largely determined by laboratory conditions; for the unsaturated samples, the mixing ratio is determined by station conditions. If the meteorology at the sampling station is known, the equations presented here can be used directly to calculate the appropriate correction factor. For convenience, we use climatological data to derive average monthly correction factors for seven common global sampling sites: Barrow, AK, US (71 degrees N, 157degrees W); Cape Meares, OR, US (45 degrees N, 124 degrees W); Mauna Loa, HI, US (19 degrees N, 155 degrees W); Ragged Point, Barbados (13 degrees N, 59 degrees W); American Samoa (14 degrees S, 171 degrees W); Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia (41 degrees S, 145 degrees E); South Pole (90 degrees S). These factors adjust wet mole fractions upwards within a range of 0.002% for the South Pole to over 0.8% for saturated sites. We apply the correction factors to wet nitrous oxide (N2O) mole fractions. The corrected data are more consistent with our understanding of N2O sources.

  15. Methods for correcting microwave scattering and emission measurements for atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komen, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Algorithms were developed to permit correction of scattering coefficient and brightness temperature for the Skylab S193 Radscat for the effects of cloud attenuation. These algorithms depend upon a measurement of the vertically polarized excess brightness temperature at 50 deg incidence angle. This excess temperature is converted to an equivalent 50 deg attenuation, which may then be used to estimate the horizontally polarized excess brightness temperature and reduced scattering coefficient at 50 deg. For angles other than 50 deg, the correction also requires use of the variation of emissivity with salinity and water temperature.

  16. Robust corrections for topographically-correlated atmospheric noise in InSAR data from large deforming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, David; Walters, Richard; Hooper, Andrew; Wright, Tim; Parker, Doug

    2014-05-01

    For Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) the atmosphere forms one of the biggest challenges when it comes to the extraction of small-magnitude long-wavelength tectonic signals. Spatio-temporal variation of water vapour, pressure and temperature in the troposphere is the main cause of these signals, introducing apparent differential path delays in interferograms of up to 15 cm. Several correction techniques have been applied in the past that rely on external data from weather models, GPS or spectrometer data, but these are typically limited by the lower spatial resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively, time-series InSAR techniques and filtering of the interferometric phase in space and time can be applied, but separating atmospheric delays from non-linear deformation is challenging. Another method, which can be applied to individual interferograms, is to estimate the correlation between interferometric phase and topography, either in a non-deforming area or using a frequency band insensitive to deformation. While this method can be successful for small areas, it does not account for spatial variation of atmospheric properties, which can be significant across regions larger than 100 km. While the slope relating phase and topography can be reliably estimated for subregions, the intercept cannot, as it is biased by the presence of unrelated signals. The intercept cannot however be neglected, as the mean height of each subregion typically varies, leading to a different intercept for each window. Here we present a new power-law representation of the topographically-correlated phase delay that can be applied locally and which is able to account for these spatial variations in atmospheric properties. We estimate the power-law from sounding data to fit altitudes of up to 4 km, as this includes the topography range in most regions of interest. We also constrain the power-law by specifying the height above which the relative tropospheric delays are

  17. Phase Correction for the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) or Getting a clearer view through the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedner, M. C.; Cunningham, C.; Rodrigues, G.; Wilson, C. D.; SMA Team

    2001-12-01

    The angular resolution that can be obtained by ground-based aperture synthesis telescopes at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths is limited by wave front distortions caused by water vapor in the Earth's atmosphere, analogous to ``seeing'' in optical astronomy. For the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, we expect average path fluctuations of 300 microns (phase fluctuations of 125 deg at 350GHz) for baselines of 500m. This would reduce the signal of a point source by about 90% at 350GHz and more at higher frequency. Clearly, a phase correction method needs to be found to make high resolution observations feasible. In one possible correction method the amount of water vapor above each element of the interferometer is measured in real-time by monitoring the strength of the 183 GHz water vapor line. Any difference in water vapor above the individual antennas, which will result in wave front distortions, can be corrected for. Previously, we obtained encouraging results with this method at the joint Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and James Clark Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) interferometer (Wiedner et al., 2001). Now, 183 GHz phase correction is investigated in more detail at the SMA, where two WVMs have been installed. Extrapolating from the earlier tests we hope to correct the path lengths fluctuations to 60 microns (25 deg rms at 350 GHz), which would translate into a signal loss of less than 10% at 350GHz even at the longest baselines. We will report about the phase correction initiatives at the SMA and present our latest results. We thank the SMA for supporting M.C. Wiedner, NSERC and the NRC of Canada for financing the building of one WVM, and the CSO for lending us their WVM. References: Wiedner, M.C., Hills, R.E., Carlstrom, J.E., & Lay, O.P., 2001, ApJ 553, 1036.

  18. Correcting the Errors in the Writing of University Students in the Comfortable Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Tuanhua

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzed the common errors in university students' writing. At the same time, it showed some methods based on activities designed to give students practice in these problem areas. The activities are meant to be carried out in a comfortable, non-threatening atmosphere in which students can make positive steps toward reducing their errors…

  19. The Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document for the Atmospheric Delay Correction to GLAS Laser Altimeter Ranges. Volume 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Quinn, Katherine J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission will be launched late 2001. It s primary instrument is the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument. The main purpose of this instrument is to measure elevation changes of the Greenland and Antarctic icesheets. To accurately measure the ranges it is necessary to correct for the atmospheric delay of the laser pulses. The atmospheric delay depends on the integral of the refractive index along the path that the laser pulse travels through the atmosphere. The refractive index of air at optical wavelengths is a function of density and molecular composition. For ray paths near zenith and closed form equations for the refractivity, the atmospheric delay can be shown to be directly related to surface pressure and total column precipitable water vapor. For ray paths off zenith a mapping function relates the delay to the zenith delay. The closed form equations for refractivity recommended by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) are optimized for ground based geodesy techniques and in the next section we will consider whether these equations are suitable for satellite laser altimetry.

  20. Atmospheric Correction, Vicarious Calibration and Development of Algorithms for Quantifying Cyanobacteria Blooms from Oceansat-1 OCM Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, P.; Walker, N. D.; Mishra, D. R.; Hu, C.; D'Sa, E. J.; Pinckney, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Cyanobacteria represent a major harmful algal group in fresh to brackish water environments. Lac des Allemands, a freshwater lake located southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana on the upper end of the Barataria Estuary, provides a natural laboratory for remote characterization of cyanobacteria blooms because of their seasonal occurrence. The Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) sensor provides radiance measurements similar to SeaWiFS but with higher spatial resolution. However, OCM does not have a standard atmospheric correction procedure, and it is difficult to find a detailed description of the entire atmospheric correction procedure for ocean (or lake) in one place. Atmospheric correction of satellite data over small lakes and estuaries (Case 2 waters) is also challenging due to difficulties in estimation of aerosol scattering accurately in these areas. Therefore, an atmospheric correction procedure was written for processing OCM data, based on the extensive work done for SeaWiFS. Since OCM-retrieved radiances were abnormally low in the blue wavelength region, a vicarious calibration procedure was also developed. Empirical inversion algorithms were developed to convert the OCM remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) at bands centered at 510.6 and 556.4 nm to concentrations of phycocyanin (PC), the primary cyanobacterial pigment. A holistic approach was followed to minimize the influence of other optically active constituents on the PC algorithm. Similarly, empirical algorithms to estimate chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations were developed using OCM bands centered at 556.4 and 669 nm. The best PC algorithm (R2=0.7450, p<0.0001, n=72) yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of 36.92 μg/L with a relative RMSE of 10.27% (PC from 2.75-363.50 μg/L, n=48). The best algorithm for Chl a (R2=0.7510, p<0.0001, n=72) produced an RMSE of 31.19 μg/L with a relative RMSE of 16.56% (Chl a from 9.46-212.76 μg/L, n=48). While more field data are required to further validate the long

  1. On the N2O correction used for mass spectrometric analysis of atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Assonov, S S; Brenninkmeijer, C A M

    2006-01-01

    To obtain accurate values of delta(13)C(CO(2)) and delta(18)O(CO(2)) on environmental CO(2) by mass spectrometry, the raw isotope data must be corrected for the isobaric N(2)O contribution. This is one of the analytical problems limiting inter-laboratory delta(13)C(CO(2)) data consistency. The key parameter, the N(2)O relative ionisation efficiency (E(N2O)), cannot be determined with sufficient accuracy by direct measurements of pure N(2)O. The determination of (E(N2O)) by analyses on N(2)O--CO(2) mixtures of known isotope composition and mixing proportions has been recently suggested. In this work we propose a new method of N(2)O correction which uses the m/z 30 signal as a measure of the N(2)O/CO(2) ratio, so that determinations of (E(N2O)) and N(2)O content are not required. The method uses the fact that fragment-ion spectra of N(2)O and CO(2) are very specific. The formalism of the correction is considered. Various tests demonstrate that the new method is robust, stable and easy to implement in practice. The effective value (E(N2O)) (the key parameter for the new correction) has to be calibrated on known N(2)O--CO(2) mixtures by measuring (30)R signals only. The method accuracy we presently achieved is around 2.5% and any error which appears to come mostly from our N(2)O--CO(2) mixture preparation. Based on our tests and error considerations, the error of the proposed method that may be achieved is as low as +/-1.5% (relative to the correction magnitude). For tropospheric CO(2) this means +/-0.003 per thousand and +/-0.005 per thousand for delta(13)C(CO(2)) and delta(18)O(CO(2)), respectively. The proposed method may be valuable for small samples where no separate N(2)O determinations are available (e.g. ice core samples and CF-IRMS measurements) as well as for determination of (E(N2O)) and testing the 'traditional' N(2)O correction based on mass balance calculations.

  2. Radiative transfer codes for atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval: intercomparison study.

    PubMed

    Kotchenova, Svetlana Y; Vermote, Eric F; Levy, Robert; Lyapustin, Alexei

    2008-05-01

    Results are summarized for a scientific project devoted to the comparison of four atmospheric radiative transfer codes incorporated into different satellite data processing algorithms, namely, 6SV1.1 (second simulation of a satellite signal in the solar spectrum, vector, version 1.1), RT3 (radiative transfer), MODTRAN (moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance and radiance code), and SHARM (spherical harmonics). The performance of the codes is tested against well-known benchmarks, such as Coulson's tabulated values and a Monte Carlo code. The influence of revealed differences on aerosol optical thickness and surface reflectance retrieval is estimated theoretically by using a simple mathematical approach. All information about the project can be found at http://rtcodes.ltdri.org.

  3. The MM5 Numerical Model to Correct PSInSAR Atmospheric Phase Screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissin, D.; Pichelli, E.; Ferretti, R.; Rocca, F.; Pierdicca, N.

    2010-03-01

    In this work we make an experimental analysis to research the capability of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models as MM5 to produce high resolution (1km-500m) maps of Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) in the atmosphere to mitigate the well-known disturbances that affect the radar signal while travelling from the sensor to the ground and back. Experiments have been conducted over the area surrounding Rome using ERS data acquired during the three days phase in '94 and using Envisat data acquired in recent years. By means of the PS technique SAR data have been processed and the Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) of Slave images with respect to a reference Master have been extracted. MM5 IWV maps have a much lower resolution than PSInSAR APS's: the turbulent term of the atmospheric vapour field cannot be well resolved by MM5, at least with the low resolution ECMWF inputs. However, the vapour distribution term that depends on the local topography has been found quite in accordance.

  4. Calibration of MODTRAN3 with PGAMS observational data for atmospheric correction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Stephen; Luvall, Jeffery C.; Justus, Jere

    1996-06-01

    The portable ground-based atmospheric monitoring system (PGAMS) is a spectroradiometer system that provides a set of in situ solar and hemispherical sky irradiance, path radiance, and surface reflectance measurements. The observations provide input parameters for the calibration of atmospheric algorithms applied to multispectral and hyperspectral images in the visible and near infrared spectrum. Presented in this paper are the results of comparing hyperspectral surface radiances calculated using MODTRAN3 with PGAMS field measurements for a blue tarp and grass surface targets. Good agreement was obtained by constraining MODTRAN3 to only a rural atmospheric model with a calibrated visibility and surface reflectance from PGAMS observations. This was accomplished even though the sky conditions were unsteady as indicated by a varying aerosol extinction. Average absolute differences of 11.3 and 7.4 percent over the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm were obtained for the grass and blue tarp surfaces respectively. However, transformation to at-sensor radiances require additional constraints on the single-scattering albedo and scattering phase function so that they exhibit the specific real-time aerosol properties rather than a seasonal average model.

  5. The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative: I. A Methodology for Assessing Atmospheric Correction Processors Based on In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Dagmar; Krasemann, Hajo; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Doerffer, Roland; Fomferra, Norman; Franz, Bryan A.; Grant, Mike G.; Groom, Steve B.; Melin, Frederic; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative intends to provide a long-term time series of ocean colour data and investigate the detectable climate impact. A reliable and stable atmospheric correction procedure is the basis for ocean colour products of the necessary high quality. In order to guarantee an objective selection from a set of four atmospheric correction processors, the common validation strategy of comparisons between in-situ and satellite derived water leaving reflectance spectra, is extended by a ranking system. In principle, the statistical parameters such as root mean square error, bias, etc. and measures of goodness of fit, are transformed into relative scores, which evaluate the relationship of quality dependent on the algorithms under study. The sensitivity of these scores to the selected database has been assessed by a bootstrapping exercise, which allows identification of the uncertainty in the scoring results. Although the presented methodology is intended to be used in an algorithm selection process, this paper focusses on the scope of the methodology rather than the properties of the individual processors.

  6. The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative: I. A Methodology for Assessing Atmospheric Correction Processors Based on In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Dagmar; Krasemann, Hajo; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Doerffer, Roland; Fomferra, Norman; Franz, Bryan A.; Grant, Mike G.; Groom, Steve B.; Melin, Frederic; Platt, Trevor; Regner, Peter; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Steinmetz, Francois; Swinton, John

    2015-01-01

    The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative intends to provide a long-term time series of ocean colour data and investigate the detectable climate impact. A reliable and stable atmospheric correction procedure is the basis for ocean colour products of the necessary high quality. In order to guarantee an objective selection from a set of four atmospheric correction processors, the common validation strategy of comparisons between in-situ and satellite derived water leaving reflectance spectra, is extended by a ranking system. In principle, the statistical parameters such as root mean square error, bias, etc. and measures of goodness of fit, are transformed into relative scores, which evaluate the relationship of quality dependent on the algorithms under study. The sensitivity of these scores to the selected database has been assessed by a bootstrapping exercise, which allows identification of the uncertainty in the scoring results. Although the presented methodology is intended to be used in an algorithm selection process, this paper focusses on the scope of the methodology rather than the properties of the individual processors.

  7. Atmospheric tomography with Rayleigh laser beacons for correction of wide fields and 30-m-class telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, J. Roger P.; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2000-07-01

    Single sodium beacons will likely be the most convenient for adaptive systems to correct 6 - 10 m class telescopes over a small field of view (the isoplanatic angle), provided reliable, powerful 589 nm lasers become available and affordable. However, when adaptive optics are applied to extended fields of view and correction of telescopes as large as 32 m diameter, it seems likely that laser beacons produced by Rayleigh scattering will be preferred. For these more demanding applications which require atmospheric tomography, Rayleigh beacons come into their own for two reasons. First, the cone effect, which causes the high turbulence to be sampled at a different scale, is no longer problematic when multiple lasers are used and height dependence is solved for explicitly. Second, the tomographic solution can make use of the beacon created by a laser pulse during all of its journey through the upper atmosphere, not just scattering from a thin layer selected by range gating. In this way a laser that costs an order of magnitude less to buy and maintain than a sodium laser of the same power can yield a brighter beacon and more information about the atmospheric turbulence. This is important because both the number and brightness of beacons or stars must increase with the number of layers included in the tomographic solution. For the same reason, tomography with natural stars is unlikely to be valuable for very large telescopes because in general the number and required brightness of each star increase with corrected field angle, while current narrow-field adaptive optics systems relying on natural stars are already very limited in sky coverage. Our method for tomography to take advantage of Rayleigh scattering over a wide range of heights uses short pulses from near diffraction-limited, ultraviolet lasers, projected from a small aperture above the telescope's secondary mirror. Each pulse subtends less than 1 arcsec at any instant as it travels up through many kilometers. An

  8. Influence of atmospheric correction and number of sampling points on the accuracy of water clarity assessment using remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriwongsitanon, Nutchanart; Surakit, Kritsanat; Thianpopirug, Sansarith

    2011-05-01

    SummaryThe main objectives of the research described in this paper are to assess the influence of atmospheric correction and the number of sampling points on the accuracy of lake water clarity using remote sensing. For this purpose field experiments were carried out at Bung Boraphet - the largest fresh water lake in Central Thailand. Two clarity parameters, secchi disk transparency (SDT), at 80 locations for three events on April 15th 2008 and March 24th and 31st 2009, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) for the last two events were collected. These field data were collected nearly contemporaneous or contemporaneous to three Landsat 5 TM images, which were acquired on April 13th 2008 and March 24th and 31st 2009, respectively. Digital numbers of the Thematic Mapper (TM) image bands were transformed to at-sensor radiance by a radiometric correction process and then atmospheric correction was made using the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) code to acquire the surface reflectance. Linear regression equations between the log-transformed of clarity parameters and surface reflectance of each band and their band ratios at the same pixels were then determined. The band combinations TM1/TM3 and TM1 to estimate ln(SDT), and TM3/TM1 and TM1 to determine ln(SSC) for all satellite images were selected. These equations were later used to estimate the SDT and SSC values distributed across the whole lake. The results showed that lake wide average values of SDT for the three images are approximately 37, 97 and 81 cm, respectively, while the values of SSC for the second and third images are around 11 and 13 mg/l, respectively. The application of atmospheric correction to the TM data has proved to have the effect on the average values of SDT and SSC, and especially on their maximum and minimum values. Finally, it is possible to reduce the ground observation data of SDT and SSC substantially and still obtain reliable empirical relationships for

  9. Two-laser optical distance-measuring instrument that corrects for the atmospheric index of refraction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earnshaw, K. B.; Hernandez, E. N.

    1972-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory of the Environmental Research Laboratories of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been engaged in the development of dual-wavelength, optical distance-measuring instruments. Recently a new generation of this type of high-accuracy instrument has been completed. Preliminary testing of the new instrument indicates that the original goal of the project, accuracy of better than one part in a million over distances of 5-10 km using averaging times of less than 1 min, is being met. This paper describes the instrument and preliminary test results.

  10. Comparison of atmospheric correction algorithms for the Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, F. J.; Jain, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Before Nimbus-7 Costal Zone Color Scanner (CZC) data can be used to distinguish between coastal water types, methods must be developed for the removal of spatial variations in aerosol path radiance. These can dominate radiance measurements made by the satellite. An assessment is presently made of the ability of four different algorithms to quantitatively remove haze effects; each was adapted for the extraction of the required scene-dependent parameters during an initial pass through the data set The CZCS correction algorithms considered are (1) the Gordon (1981, 1983) algorithm; (2) the Smith and Wilson (1981) iterative algorityhm; (3) the pseudooptical depth method; and (4) the residual component algorithm.

  11. Steps Toward Real-Time Atmospheric Phase Fluctuation Correction for a High Resolution Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Grant R.; Geldzahler, Barry; Birr, Rick; Brown, Robert; Hoblitzell, Richard; Grant, Kevin; Miller, Michael; Woods, Gary; Archuleta, Arby; Ciminera, Michael; Cornish, Timothy; davarian, faramaz; kocz, jonathan; lee, dennis; Morabito, David Dominic; Soriano, Melissa; Tsao, Philip; Vilnrotter, Victor; Jakeman-Flores, Hali; Ott, melanie; Thomes, W. Joe; Soloff, Jason; NASA Kennedy Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Metropolitan State University of Denver

    2016-01-01

    NASA is pursuing a demonstration of coherent uplink arraying at 7.145-7.190 GHz (X-band) and 30-31 GHz (Ka-band) using three 12m diameter COTS antennas separated by 60m at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the goal of a high-power, high-resolution radar array that employs real-time correction for tropospheric phase fluctuation. The major uses for this array will be (a) observations of Near Earth Objects, (b) detection and tracking of orbital debris, (c) high power emergency uplink capability for spacecraft, and (d) radio science experiments.

  12. Monitoring Orbital Precession of EO-1 Hyperion With Three Atmospheric Correction Models in the Libya-4 PICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neigh, Christopher S. R.; McCorkel, Joel; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Ong, Lawrence; Ly, Vuong; Landis, David; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Spaceborne spectrometers require spectral-temporal stability characterization to aid in validation of derived data products. Earth Observation 1 (EO-1) began orbital precession in 2011 after exhausting onboard fuel resources. In the Libya-4 pseudo-invariant calibration site (PICS), this resulted in a progressive shift from a mean local equatorial crossing time of approximately10:00 A.M. in 2011 to approximately 8:30 A.M. in late 2015. Here, we studied precession impacts to Hyperion surface reflectance products using three atmospheric correction approaches from 2004 to 2015. Combined difference estimates of surface reflectance were less than 5 percent in the visible near infrared (VNIR) and less than 10 percent for most of the shortwave infrared (SWIR). Combined coefficient of variation estimates in the VNIR ranged from 0.025 to 0.095, and in the SWIR it ranged from 0.025 to 0.06, excluding bands near atmospheric absorption features. Reflectances produced with different atmospheric models were correlated (R squared) in VNIR from 0.25 to 0.94 and in SWIR from 0.12 to 0.88 (p value (calculated probability) less than 0.01). The uncertainties in all the models increased with a terrain slope up to 15 degrees and selecting dune flats could reduce errors. We conclude that these data remain a valuable resource over this period for sensor intercalibration despite orbital decay.

  13. Surface measurement system for the atmospheric electrical vertical conduction current density, with displacement current density correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, A. J.; Harrison, R. G.

    2008-08-01

    Global thunderstorm and shower cloud activity generate the global electric potential difference between the Earth's surface and the lower ionosphere. The finite conductivity of atmospheric air, which arises from cosmic ray and natural radioactive ionisation, permits a vertical conduction current density (~1 pA m-2) between the lower ionosphere and the surface during fair-weather conditions; this current provides a physical link between the upper and lower atmospheres. A new instrument system is described to measure the conduction current density at the surface (the "air-Earth current"), which operates on a novel principle using two collecting electrodes of different geometry. Simultaneous measurements from two independent co-located systems using the geometrical principle show close agreement (correlation of 0.96 during 2.5 h of 5 min measurements). The sensor design described is durable and successful measurements in fair and disturbed weather have been obtained in air temperatures between -6 and 35 °C, relative humidity between 44% and 100%, fog, rain and snowfall. The uncertainty in conduction current density determinations is 0.20 pA m-2.

  14. Measurement and limitations of optical orbital angular momentum through corrected atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Neo, Richard; Goodwin, Michael; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-02-08

    In recent years, there have been a series of proposals to exploit the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for astronomical applications. The OAM of light potentially represents a new way in which to probe the universe. The study of this property of light entails the development of new instrumentation and problems which must be addressed. One of the key issues is whether we can overcome the loss of the information carried by OAM due to atmospheric turbulence. We experimentally analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the OAM content of a signal over a range of realistic turbulence strengths typical for astronomical observations. With an adaptive optics system we are able to recover up to 89% power in an initial non-zero OAM mode (ℓ = 1) at low turbulence strengths (0.30" FWHM seeing). However, for poorer seeing conditions (1.1" FWHM seeing), the amount of power recovered is significantly lower (5%), showing that for the terrestrial detection of astronomical OAM, a careful design of the adaptive optics system is needed.

  15. Investigation of techniques for correcting ERTS data for solar and atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The design and fabrication of five radiant power measuring instruments (RPMI) for ERTS ground truth have been completed. These instruments will be deployed in concert with ERTS overflights to obtain radiometric measurements needed to determine solar and atmospheric parameters that effect ERTS radiance measurements. With these parameters, the accuracy and capability of various procedures for transforming ERTS data into absolute target reflectance signatures will be evaluated. The RPMI is a rugged, hand-carried instrument accurately calibrated to measure both downwelling and reflected radiance within each ERTS multispectral scanner band. A foldover handle permits a quick change from wide angle global or sky irradiance measurements to narrow angle radiance measurements from sky and ground targets. These measurements yield ground truth site reflectance and permit calculation of additional parameters such as beam transmittance between spacecraft and ground, and path radiance (path reflectance).

  16. Contribution of ultraviolet and shortwave infrared observations to atmospheric correction of PACE ocean-color imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert J.; Gross-Colzy, Lydwine S.

    2016-05-01

    The Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will carry into space a spectrometer measuring at 5 nm resolution in the ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) and at lower resolution in spectral bands in the NIR and shortwave infrared (SWIR). These observations have great potential for improving estimates of marine reflectance in the post-EOS era. In view of this, we evaluate, using simulations with a coupled radiation transfer code, the gain in marine reflectance accuracy expected by including observations in the UV and SWIR compared with just using observations in the visible to NIR. The study is performed for the PACE threshold aggregate bands with respect to the standard set of bands used to generate ocean color products. The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) signal measured by the PACE spectrometer is simulated for a variety of realistic atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The TOA reflectance and the marine reflectance of the simulated ensemble are decomposed into principal components, and the components of the TOA reflectance sensitive to the ocean signal identified. Inverse models are constructed to retrieve the principal components of the marine reflectance, allowing a reconstruction, therefore an estimation of the marine reflectance. Theoretical performance is quantified as a function of angular geometry, aerosol properties, and water type, showing a significant improvement in retrieval accuracy when using the extended spectral range. On average over all the situations considered (including sun glint), the RMS error is reduced from 0.0037 to 0.0024 at 412 nm, from 0.0013 to 0.0007 at 665 nm, and from 0.0010 to 0.0004 at 865 nm (Case 2 waters are better handled). The performance is degraded at large zenith angles and aerosol optical thickness, is better at scattering angles around 120-130 degrees, and exhibits little dependence on aerosol single scattering albedo and aerosol scale height.

  17. Major improvement of altimetry sea level estimations using pressure-derived corrections based on ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrere, Loren; Faugère, Yannice; Ablain, Michaël

    2016-06-01

    The new dynamic atmospheric correction (DAC) and dry tropospheric (DT) correction derived from the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis have been computed for the 1992-2013 altimeter period. Using these new corrections significantly improves sea level estimations for short temporal signals (< 2 months); the impact is stronger if considering old altimeter missions (ERS-1, ERS-2, and Topex/Poseidon), for which DAC_ERA (DAC derived from ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis) allows reduction of the along-track altimeter sea surface height (SSH) error by more than 3 cm in the Southern Ocean and in some shallow water regions. The impact of DT_ERA (DT derived from ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis) is also significant in the southern high latitudes for these missions. Concerning more recent missions (Jason-1, Jason-2, and Envisat), results are very similar between ERA-Interim and ECMWF-based corrections: on average for the global ocean, the operational DAC becomes slightly better than DAC_ERA only from the year 2006, likely due to the switch of the operational forcing to a higher spatial resolution. At regional scale, both DACs are similar in the deep ocean but DAC_ERA raises the residual crossovers' variance in some shallow water regions, indicating a slight degradation in the most recent years of the study. In the second decade of altimetry, unexpectedly DT_ERA still gives better results compared to the operational DT. Concerning climate signals, both DAC_ERA and DT_ERA have a low impact on global mean sea level rise (MSL) trends, but they can have a strong impact on long-term regional trends' estimation, up to several millimeters per year locally.

  18. Effects of stratospheric aerosols and thin cirrus clouds on the atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: simulations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Zhang, T; He, F; Ding, K

    1997-01-20

    Using simulations, we determine the influence of stratospheric aerosol and thin cirrus clouds on the performance of the proposed atmospheric correction algorithm for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data over the oceans. Further, we investigate the possibility of using the radiance exiting the top of the atmosphere in the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to remove their effects prior to application of the algorithm. The computations suggest that for moderate optical thicknesses in the stratosphere, i.e., tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, the stratospheric aerosol-cirrus cloud contamination does not seriously degrade the MODIS except for the combination of large (approximately 60 degrees) solar zenith angles and large (approximately 45 degrees) viewing angles, for which multiple-scattering effects can be expected to be particularly severe. The performance of a hierarchy of stratospheric aerosol/cirrus cloud removal procedures for employing the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to correct for stratospheric aerosol/cirrus clouds, ranging from simply subtracting the reflectance at 1.38 microm from that in the visible bands, to assuming that their optical properties are known and carrying out multiple-scattering computations of their effect by the use of the 1.38-microm reflectance-derived concentration, are studied for stratospheric aerosol optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 0.15 and for cirrus cloud optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 1.0. Typically, those procedures requiring the most knowledge concerning the aerosol optical properties (and also the most complex) performed the best; however, for tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, their performance is usually not significantly better than that found by applying the simplest correction procedure. A semiempirical algorithm is presented that permits accurate correction for thin cirrus clouds with tau(s) as large as unity when an accurate estimate of the cirrus cloud

  19. E-Collaboration for Earth Observation: Example Challenge Focused on the Atmospheric Correction of Ocean Colour Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavender, Samantha; Boissier, Enguerran; Brito, Fabrice; Ribeiro, Rita; Aas, Christina; Casu, Francesco; Iapaolo, Michele

    2016-08-01

    The E-Collaboration for Earth Observation (E-CEO) project aimed to deliver a collaborative platform that, through data challenges, would improve the adoption and outreach of new applications and methods to process Earth Observation (EO) data. To test the E-CEO platform, a contest based on the Atmospheric Correction (AC) of ocean color data was proposed. Existing processors were tested, and the evaluation results analysed.Overall, the challenge showed that the E-CEO platform can be used to simplify the process of comparing different processors. Once the different participants' software is uploaded and connected to the data packages, the processing runs automatically, and so the processing is quick to re-run and adjust. However, additional work has shown it's important to continue to have human involvement in the evaluation step as otherwise statistics may be incorrectly interpreted due to outliers.

  20. MACCS : Multi-Mission Atmospheric Correction and Cloud Screening tool for high-frequency revisit data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrucci, B.; Huc, M.; Feuvrier, T.; Ruffel, C.; Hagolle, O.; Lonjou, V.; Desjardins, C.

    2015-10-01

    For the production of Level2A products during Sentinel-2 commissioning in the Technical Expertise Center Sentinel-2 in CNES, CESBIO proposed to adapt the Venus Level-2 , taking advantage of the similarities between the two missions: image acquisition at a high frequency (2 days for Venus, 5 days with the two Sentinel-2), high resolution (5m for Venus, 10, 20 and 60m for Sentinel-2), images acquisition under constant viewing conditions. The Multi-Mission Atmospheric Correction and Cloud Screening (MACCS) tool was born: based on CNES Orfeo Toolbox Library, Venμs processor which was already able to process Formosat2 and VENμS data, was adapted to process Sentinel-2 and Landsat5-7 data; since then, a great effort has been made reviewing MACCS software architecture in order to ease the add-on of new missions that have also the peculiarity of acquiring images at high resolution, high revisit and under constant viewing angles, such as Spot4/Take5 and Landsat8. The recursive and multi-temporal algorithm is implemented in a core that is the same for all the sensors and that combines several processing steps: estimation of cloud cover, cloud shadow, water, snow and shadows masks, of water vapor content, aerosol optical thickness, atmospheric correction. This core is accessed via a number of plug-ins where the specificity of the sensor and of the user project are taken into account: products format, algorithmic processing chaining and parameters. After a presentation of MACCS architecture and functionalities, the paper will give an overview of the production facilities integrating MACCS and the associated specificities: the interest for this tool has grown worldwide and MACCS will be used for extensive production within the THEIA land data center and Agri-S2 project. Finally the paper will zoom on the use of MACCS during Sentinel-2 In Orbit Test phase showing the first Level-2A products.

  1. A general ocean color atmospheric correction scheme based on principal components analysis: Part II. Level 4 merging capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross-Colzy, Lydwine; Colzy, Stéphane; Frouin, Robert; Henry, Patrice

    2007-09-01

    The Ocean Color Estimation by principal component ANalysis (OCEAN) algorithm performs atmospheric correction of satellite ocean-color imagery in the presence of various aerosol contents and types, including absorbing mixtures, and for the full range of water properties (Case 1 and Case 2 waters), retrieving diffuse water reflectance with good theoretical accuracy. It is easy to implement and has several advantages for operational processing lines: (1) It has de-noising abilities, for it is based on principal component analysis and neural networks, (2) it is able to perform atmospheric correction through cirrus and thin clouds, (3) it is able to retrieve water reflectance in the presence of Sun glint until a glint reflectance of 0.2, and more importantly, (4) it is less sensitive to absolute radiometric calibration and directionality than classical ocean-color algorithms. This allows multi-sensor merging (denoted hereafter Level 4 synthesis). These abilities may improve dramatically the daily spatial coverage of ocean color products. In the companion paper (Part I), the theoretical performance of OCEAN in situations of both Case 1 and Case 2 waters is presented for various multispectral radiometers (i.e., POLDER, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS). In this paper (Part II), the focus is made on OCEAN de-noising and merging properties. The ability of the algorithm to work in situations of Sun glint and cirrus/thin clouds is illustrated using MERIS imagery. Multi-directional merging is demonstrated using POLDER imagery (daily and temporal merging), and multi-sensor merging using SeaWiFS and MODIS imagery (daily merging). The resulting products do not show directional artifacts.

  2. Evaluation of atmospheric correction procedures for ocean color data processing using hyper- and multi-spectral radiometric measurements from the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Gilerson, A.; Harmel, T.; Hlaing, S.; Tonizzo, A.; Weidemann, A.; Arnone, R.

    2012-06-01

    In Ocean Color (OC) data processing one of the most critical steps is the atmospheric correction procedure used to separate the water leaving radiance, which contains information on water constituents, from the total radiance measured by space borne sensors, which contains atmospheric contributions. To ensure reliability of retrieved water leaving radiance values, and OC information derived from them, the quality of the atmospheric correction procedures applied needs to be assessed and validated. In this regard, the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO), jointly established by the City College of New York and the Naval Research Laboratory is becoming one of the key elements for OC sensors validation efforts, in part because of its capabilities for co-located hyper and multi-spectral measurements using HyperSAS and SeaPRISM radiometers respectively, with the latter being part of the NASA AERONET - OC network. Accordingly, the impact of the procedures used for atmospheric correction on the retrieval of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) data can then be evaluated based on satellite OC data acquired from the LISCO site over the last two years. From this, the qualities of atmospheric correction procedures are assessed by performing matchup comparisons between the satellites retrieved atmospheric data and that of LISCO.

  3. Atmospheric correction for ocean spectra retrievals from high-altitude multi-angle, multi-spectral photo-polarimetric remote sensing observations: Results for coastal ocean waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; McCubbin, I.

    2015-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS.To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed to increase the aerosol information content for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry. However few systematic studies have been performed to quantify the improvement such measurements bring to atmospheric correction. To study the polarimetric atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we conducted field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude (65,000 ft) and ship-based observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and multi-spectral multi-angle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss examples of retrieved atmosphere and ocean state vectors, and of corresponding ocean color spectra obtained by subtracting the computed atmospheric scattering contribution from the high-altitude radiance measurements. The ocean color spectra thus obtained are compared with those measured from the ship.

  4. The Thousand Star Magnitudes in the Catalogues of Ptolemy, Al Sufi, and Tycho Are All Corrected for Atmospheric Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2013-02-01

    Three pre-telescopic star catalogues contain about a thousand star magnitudes each (with magnitudes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6), with these reported brightnesses as the original basis for what has become the modern magnitude scale. These catalogues are those of Ptolemy (c. 137, from Alexandria at a latitude of 31.2), Al Sufi (c. 960, from Isfahan at a latitude of 32.6), and Tycho Brahe (c. 1590, from the island of Hven at a latitude of 55.9). Previously, extensive work has been made on the positions of the catalogued stars, but only scant attention has been paid to the magnitudes as reported. These magnitudes will be affected by a variety of processes, including the dimming of the light by our Earth's atmosphere (atmospheric extinction), the quantization of the brightnesses into magnitude bins, and copying or influence from prior catalogues. This paper provides a detailed examination of these effects. Indeed, I find all three catalogues to report magnitudes that have near-zero extinction effects, so the old observers in some way extinction corrected their observations.

  5. A Method to Use Modis Water Vapor Products For Correction of Atmospheric-Induced Phase in Interferogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeratikasikorn, Chaiyapon; Trisirisatayawong, Itthi

    2011-01-01

    DInSAR is a major space-geodetic technique widely used in the study of earth surface deformation. A major source of phase errors in DInSAR technique is heterogeneous phase delay caused mainly by variation of water vapors in troposphere, which is a factor limiting applications of DInSAR mainly to arid areas. This paper presents study results of three methods to correct atmospheric phase errors in DInSAR interferograms formed by TerraSAR-X images. The first method is the use of wet delay derived directly from MODIS precipitable water vapor product. The second method employs ground-based meteorological data to calibrate MODIS PWV before computing phase delays. The third method improves the second method by estimating the expected MODIS PWV value at the time of the TerraSAR-X image acquisitions which over the Bangkok test area is 5 hour earlier than that of MODIS. The time-shifted linear fit model along with the IDW interpolation is used to estimate more realistic phase delays over entire imaging area. From the study of this tropical test area, this time-corrected method provides best results while the second method also achieves a significantly better result than those obtained from direct use of MODIS PWV data.

  6. Caracterisation, modelisation et validation du transfert radiatif d'atmospheres non standard; impact sur les corrections atmospheriques d'images de teledetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidane, Shems

    This study is based on data acquired with an airborne multi-altitude sensor on July 2004 during a nonstandard atmospheric event in the region of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec. By non-standard atmospheric event we mean an aerosol atmosphere that does not obey the typical monotonic, scale height variation employed in virtually all atmospheric correction codes. The surfaces imaged during this field campaign included a diverse variety of targets : agricultural land, water bodies, urban areas and forests. The multi-altitude approach employed in this campaign allowed us to better understand the altitude dependent influence of the atmosphere over the array of ground targets and thus to better characterize the perturbation induced by a non-standard (smoke) plume. The transformation of the apparent radiance at 3 different altitudes into apparent reflectance and the insertion of the plume optics into an atmospheric correction model permitted an atmospheric correction of the apparent reflectance at the two higher altitudes. The results showed consistency with the apparent validation reflectances derived from the lowest altitude radiances. This approach effectively confirmed the accuracy of our non-standard atmospheric correction approach. This test was particularly relevant at the highest altitude of 3.17 km : the apparent reflectances at this altitude were above most of the plume and therefore represented a good test of our ability to adequately correct for the influence of the perturbation. Standard atmospheric disturbances are obviously taken into account in most atmospheric correction models, but these are based on monotonically decreasing aerosol variations with increasing altitude. When the atmospheric radiation is affected by a plume or a local, non-standard pollution event, one must adapt the existing models to the radiative transfer constraints of the local perturbation and to the reality of the measurable parameters available for ingestion into the model. The

  7. Land adjacency effects on MODIS Aqua top-of-atmosphere radiance in the shortwave infrared: Statistical assessment and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lian; Hu, Chuanmin

    2017-06-01

    Satellite measurements of coastal or inland waters near land/water interfaces suffer from land adjacency effects (LAEs), particularly in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) wavelengths. Here a statistical method was developed to quantify the LAEs as the ratio of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) total radiance (Lt, W m-2 µm-1 sr-1) between near-shore pixels and LAE-free offshore pixels (>12 pixels away from land). The calculations were conducted using MODIS Aqua images between 2003 and 2012 over the Madagascar Island, with results showing the dependency of LAEs on different environmental and observational factors. The LAEs decrease dramatically with increasing distance from shoreline, and increase with decreasing aerosol optical thickness at 869 nm (τ869). The nearby land surface albedo also plays a role in modulating the LAEs, but the impact is only prominent under low-aerosol conditions. Based on these observations, a look-up-table (LUT) to formulate a correction scheme was established. Tests of the correction scheme using satellite observations over the Hawaii Islands and using in situ measurements in the Chesapeake Bay show significant improvements in Lt (LAEs much closer to 1 than uncorrected data) and retrieved surface chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a, mg m-3), respectively. Furthermore, the number of Chl-a retrievals within the range of 0-64 mg m-3 also increases by >60%. While the ultimate solution of correcting the LAEs for coastal/inland water applications still requires further work, these preliminary results suggest that the method proposed here deserves further tests for other estuaries and lakes.

  8. Use of Vis-SWIR imagery to aid atmospheric correction of multispectral and hyperspectral thermal infrared TIR imagery: The TIR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruninger, John H.; Fox, Marsha J.; Lee, Jamine; Ratkowski, Anthony J.; Hoke, Michael L.

    2002-11-01

    The atmospheric correction of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery involves the combined tasks of separation of atmospheric transmittance, downwelling flux and upwelling radiance from the surface material spectral emissivity and temperature. The problem is ill posed and is thus hampered by spectral ambiguity among several possible feasible combinations of atmospheric temperature, constituent profiles, and surface material emissivities and temperatures. For many materials, their reflectance spectra in the Vis-SWIR provide a means of identification or at least classification into generic material types, vegetation, soil, etc. If Vis-SWIR data can be registered to TIR data or collected simultaneously as in sensors like the MASTER sensor, then the additional information on material type can be utilized to help lower the ambiguities in the TIR data. If the Vis-SWIR and TIR are collected simultaneously the water column amounts obtained form the atmospheric correction of the Vis-SWIR can also be utilized in reducing the ambiguity in the atmospheric quantities. The TIR atmospheric correction involves expansions in atmospheric and material emissivity basis sets. The method can be applied to hyperspectral and ultraspectral data, however it is particularly useful for multispectral TIR, where spectral smoothness techniques cannot be readily applied. The algorithm is described, and the approach applied to a MASTER sensor data set.

  9. Ground deformation tracking over Mt. Baekdu with DInSAR time series analysis and atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.; Kim, J.; Lin, S.; yun, H.; Seo, H.; Choi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    (Hopper et al., 2007) with ENVISAT ASAR images was employed. Subsequently, the StaMPS/MTI processing results from Mt. Baekdu were analyzed and interpreted together with the two-pass D-InSAR result using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to suppress the atmospheric errors. The DInSAR processing with ENVISAT ASAR and ALOS APLSAR in this study showed clear surface deformations over the northern and southern Crater Lake during 2007-2010. Although it still not fully clear whether such activations are just temporal episodes or an event that may result in an eruption in the future, considering the huge impact that Mt. Baekdu's potential eruption would have on all eastern Asian countries, international collaboration to exploit all advanced sensor capabilities, together with ground truth, should be established.

  10. Monitoring of Western Corn Rootworm Damage in Maize Fields by Using Integrated Radar (ALOS PALSAR) and Optical (IRS LISS, AWiFS) Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nador, Gizella; Fenyes, Diana; Surek, Gyorgy; Vasas, Laszlo

    2008-11-01

    The gradual dispersion of western corn rootworm (WCR) is becoming a serious maize pest in Europe, and all over the world. In 2008 using remote sensing data, the Remote Sensing Centre of Institute of Geodesy, Cartography and Remote Sensing (FÖMI RSC) carried out this project to identify WCR larval damage. Our goal with the present project is to assess and identify the disorder and structural changes caused by WCR larvae using optical (IRS-P6 AWiFS, IRS-P6 LISS, SPOT4 and SPOT5) and polarimetic radar (ALOS PALSAR) satellite images. The project aims to identify the extent of WCR damaged cornfields using both polarimetic radar images and optical satellite data time series. Findings were tested against on-the-spot ground assessments. Using radar polarimetry increased the accuracy significantly. The final results have implications for plant protection strategy, farming practices, pesticide producers, state authorities and research institutes.

  11. Monitoring seasonal progress of rice stubble burning in major rice growing districts of Haryana, India, using multidate AWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, M.; Prawasi, R.; Jangra, S.; Rana, P.; Kumari, K.; Lal, S.; Jakhar, K.; Sharma, S.; Hooda, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    The present paper describes the methodology and results of assessment of seasonal progress of rice stubble burning for 10 major rice growing districts of Haryana state in India. These 10 districts contribute about 84 per cent of total rice area of the state. As the rice fields are immediately required to be vacated for the sowing of next crop the farmers opt for mechanized harvesting and easy way out of burning the stubbles in the field. Such burning result in release of polluting gases and aerosols. Besides, the heating of the soil kills the useful micro-flora of the soil causing soil degradation. Multi-date AWiFS data from Resourcesat 1 and 2 satellites acquired between October 16, 2013 to November 26, 2013 were used for estimating paddy stubble burning areas at different intervals for the year 2013 crop growing season. In season collected ground truth data using hand held GPS along with field photographs were used to identify paddy stubble burning areas and other land features. Complete enumeration approach and Iterative Self-organizing Data Analysis Technique (ISODATA) unsupervised classifier was used for digital analysis. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of each date was also used with other spectral bands of temporal images. To improve the classification accuracy the non-agricultural areas were masked out. The area was estimated by computing pixels under the classified image mask. Progress of paddy stubble burning was estimated at different intervals for the year 2013 using available cloud free multi-date IRS-P6 AWiFS data to identify the crucial period when stubbles burning takes place in major area so that preventive measures can be taken to curb the menace.

  12. Assessment of capabilities of multiangle imaging photo-polarimetry for atmospheric correction in presence of absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color is a critical tool for assessing the productivity of marine ecosystems and monitoring changes resulting from climatic or environmental influences. Yet water-leaving radiance comprises less than 10% of the signal measured from space, making correction for absorption and scattering by the intervening atmosphere imperative. Traditional ocean color retrieval algorithms utilize a standard set of aerosol models and the assumption of negligible water-leaving radiance in the near-infrared. Modern improvements have been developed to handle absorbing aerosols such as urban particulates in coastal areas and transported desert dust over the open ocean, where ocean fertilization can impact biological productivity at the base of the marine food chain. Even so, imperfect knowledge of the absorbing aerosol optical properties or their height distribution results in well-documented sources of error. In the UV, the problem of UV-enhanced absorption and nonsphericity of certain aerosol types are amplified due to the increased Rayleigh and aerosol optical depth, especially at off-nadir view angles. Multi-angle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of the work to be described is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on water leaving radiance measurement uncertainty by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard

  13. Case Studies for UV, O2-A Band and Polarimetric Airborne Remote Sensing Observations of Coastal Waters: Implications for Atmospheric Correction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; Mccubbin, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS. To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry, to increase the aerosol information content. However no studies have been performed on whether such observations contain sufficient aerosol information, and on how to use this information, to substantially improve atmospheric correction. To study the atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we are conducting field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude airborne and in-situ observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and narrow-band multiangle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss the quality of and comparisons between these data sets, and their differential sensitivities to variations in aerosol properties and ocean color.

  14. Evaluation of applicability of high-resolution multiangle imaging photo-polarimetric observations for aerosol atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Olga; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Diner, David; Seidel, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Multiangle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool for better understanding and quantifying the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of this work is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on remote sensing reflectance measurement uncertainty caused by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. In this work a vector Markov Chain radiative transfer code including bio-optical models was used to quantitatively evaluate in water leaving radiances between atmospheres containing realistic UV-enhanced and non-spherical aerosols and the SEADAS carbonaceous and dust-like aerosol models. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard Mie code, while those for non-spherical dust particles were calculated using the numerical approach developed for modeling dust for the AERONET network of ground-based sunphotometers. As a next step, we have developed a retrieval code that employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) and adding/doubling radiative transfer method for joint retrieval of aerosol properties and water leaving radiance from Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager-1 (AirMSPI-1) polarimetric observations. The AirMSPI-1 instrument has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° at 10 m resolution. AirMSPI spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, and 865 nm, with 470, 660, and 865 reporting linear polarization. We

  15. Failure of Taylor's hypothesis in the atmospheric surface layer and its correction for eddy-covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu; Sayde, Chadi; Li, Qi; Basara, Jeffrey; Selker, John; Tanner, Evan; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Taylors' frozen turbulence hypothesis suggests that all turbulent eddies are advected by the mean streamwise velocity, without changes in their properties. This hypothesis has been widely invoked to compute Reynolds averaging using temporal turbulence data measured at a single point in space. However, in the atmospheric surface layer, the exact relationship between convection velocity and wave number k has not been fully revealed since previous observations were limited by either their spatial resolution or by the sampling length. Using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS), acquiring turbulent temperature fluctuations at high temporal and spatial frequencies, we computed convection velocities across wave numbers using a phase spectrum method. We found that convection velocity decreases as k-1/3 at the higher wave numbers of the inertial subrange instead of being independent of wave number as suggested by Taylor's hypothesis. We further corroborated this result using large eddy simulations. Applying Taylor's hypothesis thus systematically underestimates turbulent spectrum in the inertial subrange. A correction is proposed for point-based eddy-covariance measurements, which can improve surface energy budget closure and estimates of CO2 fluxes.

  16. Atmospheric Phase Correction Using CARMA-PACS: High Angular Resolution Observations of the FU Orionis Star PP 13S*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura M.; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Carpenter, John M.; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Isella, Andrea; Bock, Douglas C.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Carlstrom, John; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Joy, Marshall; Kwon, Woojin; Leitch, Erik M.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Scott, Stephen L.; Teuben, Peter J.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.

    2010-11-01

    We present 0farcs15 resolution observations of the 227 GHz continuum emission from the circumstellar disk around the FU Orionis star PP 13S*. The data were obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) Paired Antenna Calibration System (C-PACS), which measures and corrects the atmospheric delay fluctuations on the longest baselines of the array in order to improve the sensitivity and angular resolution of the observations. A description of the C-PACS technique and the data reduction procedures are presented. C-PACS was applied to CARMA observations of PP 13S*, which led to a factor of 1.6 increase in the observed peak flux of the source, a 36% reduction in the noise of the image, and a 52% decrease in the measured size of the source major axis. The calibrated complex visibilities were fitted with a theoretical disk model to constrain the disk surface density. The total disk mass from the best-fit model corresponds to 0.06 M sun, which is larger than the median mass of a disk around a classical T Tauri star. The disk is optically thick at a wavelength of 1.3 mm for orbital radii less than 48 AU. At larger radii, the inferred surface density of the PP 13S* disk is an order of magnitude lower than that needed to develop a gravitational instability.

  17. Failure of Taylor's hypothesis in the atmospheric surface layer and its correction for eddy-covariance measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Yu; Sayde, Chadi; Li, Qi; ...

    2017-04-18

    Taylors’ frozen turbulence hypothesis suggests that all turbulent eddies are advected by the mean streamwise velocity, without changes in their properties. This hypothesis has been widely invoked to compute Reynolds’ averaging using temporal turbulence data measured at a single point in space. However, in the atmospheric surface layer, the exact relationship between convection velocity and wavenumber k has not been fully revealed since previous observations were limited by either their spatial resolution or by the sampling length. Using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS), acquiring turbulent temperature fluctuations at high temporal and spatial frequencies, we computed convection velocities across wavenumbers using amore » phase spectrum method. We found that convection velocity decreases as k–1/3 at the higher wavenumbers of the inertial subrange instead of being independent of wavenumber as suggested by Taylor's hypothesis. We further corroborated this result using large eddy simulations. Applying Taylor's hypothesis thus systematically underestimates turbulent spectrum in the inertial subrange. As a result, a correction is proposed for point-based eddy-covariance measurements, which can improve surface energy budget closure and estimates of CO2 fluxes.« less

  18. ATMOSPHERIC PHASE CORRECTION USING CARMA-PACS: HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF THE FU ORIONIS STAR PP 13S*

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Laura M.; Carpenter, John M.; Isella, Andrea; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Leitch, Erik M.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Scott, Stephen L.; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Teuben, Peter J.; Bock, Douglas C.; Carlstrom, John; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Joy, Marshall; Kwon, Woojin; Plambeck, Richard L.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.

    2010-11-20

    We present 0.''15 resolution observations of the 227 GHz continuum emission from the circumstellar disk around the FU Orionis star PP 13S*. The data were obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) Paired Antenna Calibration System (C-PACS), which measures and corrects the atmospheric delay fluctuations on the longest baselines of the array in order to improve the sensitivity and angular resolution of the observations. A description of the C-PACS technique and the data reduction procedures are presented. C-PACS was applied to CARMA observations of PP 13S*, which led to a factor of 1.6 increase in the observed peak flux of the source, a 36% reduction in the noise of the image, and a 52% decrease in the measured size of the source major axis. The calibrated complex visibilities were fitted with a theoretical disk model to constrain the disk surface density. The total disk mass from the best-fit model corresponds to 0.06 M{sub sun}, which is larger than the median mass of a disk around a classical T Tauri star. The disk is optically thick at a wavelength of 1.3 mm for orbital radii less than 48 AU. At larger radii, the inferred surface density of the PP 13S* disk is an order of magnitude lower than that needed to develop a gravitational instability.

  19. Quantitative and comparative examination of the spectral features characteristics of the surface reflectance information retrieved from the atmospherically corrected images of Hyperion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayadibi, Önder; Aydal, Doğan

    2013-01-01

    The retrieval of surface reflectance information from the same single pixel of the Hyperion image atmospherically corrected by using image-based [internal average relative reflectance (IARR), log residuals, and flat field] and radiative transfer model (RTM)-based [the fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes (FLAASH) and the Atmospheric and Topographic Correction 2 (ATCOR-2)] approaches and the spectral feature characteristics of this information were quantitatively and comparatively examined based on measured ground spectral reflectance data. The spectral features quantitative analysis results of the reflectance data showed that spectral reflectances that are suitable and best fitting to the ground spectral reflectances which were obtained from the pixels of FLAASH, ATCOR-2, and flat field-corrected images, respectively. The retrieval of surface reflectance from the FLAASH-corrected image pixels, in general, produced high scores in spectral parameter analyses. Of the image-based approaches, only in flat field-derived reflectance data, results were obtained which are high and nearest to those of RTM and ground spectral reflectance data. Generally, low scores obtained in the spectral parameter analyses of the surface reflectance values retrieved from single pixels of IARR and log residuals-corrected images showed the results that fit worst to the measured ground spectral reflectance.

  20. A general ocean color atmospheric correction scheme based on principal components analysis: Part I. Performance on Case 1 and Case 2 waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross-Colzy, Lydwine; Colzy, Stéphane; Frouin, Robert; Henry, Patrice

    2007-09-01

    In order to retrieve ocean color from satellite imagery, one must perform atmospheric correction, because when observed from space the ocean signature is weak compared with the strong atmospheric signal. The color of the ocean depends on its optically active constituents: water molecules, dissolved matter, and particulate matter. In the open ocean, the color is mainly due to water molecules and phytoplankton, whereas in the coastal zone, the color also results from the presence of sediments and colored dissolved organic matter. Because coastal waters (Case 2 waters) are much more difficult to decouple from the atmosphere than open ocean (Case 1 waters), operational atmospheric correction algorithms usually separate Case 1 from Case 2 waters processing. The solution proposed in this paper does not separate them. Our algorithm, referred to as Ocean Color Estimation by principal component ANalysis (OCEAN), exploits the fact that ocean is more variable spectrally than the atmosphere, while the atmosphere signal is more variable in magnitude. The satellite reflectance is first decomposed into principal components. The components sensitive to the ocean signal are then combined to retrieve the principal components of the marine reflectance via neural network methodology. The algorithm is described, and results are presented on real and simulated data for POLDER, MERIS, SeaWiFS, and MODIS. Accurate water reflectance estimates are obtained for various aerosol types and contents (including maritime, coastal and urban mixtures), and for the full range of water properties (resulting from realistic combinations of chlorophyll content, sediment content, and colored dissolved matter absorption).

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Sloop, Christy

    2013-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 569 comprises the following nine corrective action sites (CASs): • 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area • 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area • 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area • 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area • 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area • 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area • 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area • 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area • 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 569 based on the implementation of the corrective actions listed in Table ES-2.

  2. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction using a large actuator-number MEMS spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase conjugation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olsen, J; Olivier, S; Young, P; Kartz, M; Flath, L; Kruelivitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, O

    2004-03-04

    Atmospheric propagation results for a high-speed, large-actuator-number, adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a MEMS-based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35 km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large actuator number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

    2012-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO

  4. MEETC2: Ocean Color Atmospheric Corrections in Coastal Complex Waters Using a Bayesian Latent Class Model and Potential for the Incoming Sentinel 3- OLCI Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulquin, Bertrand; Fablet, Ronan; Bourg, Ludovic; Mercier, Gregoire; Fanton d'Andon, Odile

    2016-08-01

    From top-of-atmosphere (TOA) observations, atmospheric correction for ocean color inversion aims at distinguishing atmosphere and water contributions. From a methodological point of view, our approach relies on a Bayesian inference using Gaussian Mixture Model prior distributions and reference spectra of aerosol and water reflectance [1].We evaluate our estimates of the sea surface reflectance from the MERIS TOA observations. Using the MERMAID radiometric in-situ dataset, we obtain significant improvements in the estimation of the sea surface reflectance, especially for the 412, 442, 490 and 510 nm bands, compared with the standard ESA MEGS algorithm and the a state-of- the-art neural network approach (C2R). The mean gain value on the relative error for the 13 bands between 412 and 885 nm is of 57% compared with MEGS algorithm and 10% compared with the C2R. We further discuss the potential of MEETC2 for new ESA OLCI / Sentinel 3 mission.

  5. A Grid of NLTE Corrections for Sulphur Lines in Atmospheres of Cool Stars for the Gaia-ESO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotin, S.; Andrievsky, S.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2017-06-01

    To derive sulfur abundance in a large amount of the stars from Gaia-ESO survey we calculated grid of theoretical line equivalent widths of 8th multiplet. We show that NLTE effects increase equivalent widths of the sulfur lines. NLTE corrections for this multiplet are not too large (about 0.15 dex) in contrast with corrections for other sulfur multiplets.

  6. Influence of the micro-physical properties of the aerosol on the atmospheric correction of OLI data acquired over desert area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of surface reflectance obtained by different atmospheric correction algorithms of the Landsat 8 OLI data considering or not the micro-physical properties of the aerosol when images are acquired in desert area located in South-West of Nile delta. The atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. In particular, the role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was investigated [Bassani et al., 2015; Tirelli et al., 2015]. In this work, the OLI surface reflectance was retrieved by the developed OLI@CRI (OLI ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) physically-based atmospheric correction which considers the aerosol micro-physical properties available from the two AERONET stations [Holben et al., 1998] close to the study area (El_Farafra and Cairo_EMA_2). The OLI@CRI algorithm is based on 6SV radiative transfer model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997], specifically developed for Landsat 8 OLI data. The OLI reflectance obtained by the OLI@CRI was compared with reflectance obtained by other atmospheric correction algorithms which do not consider micro-physical properties of aerosol (DOS) or take on aerosol standard models (FLAASH, implemented in ENVI software). The accuracy of the surface reflectance retrieved by different algorithms were calculated by comparing the spatially resampled OLI images with the MODIS surface reflectance products. Finally, specific image processing was applied to the OLI reflectance images in order to compare remote sensing products obtained for same scene. The results highlight the influence of the physical characterization of aerosol on the OLI data improving the retrieved atmospherically corrected

  7. Retrieving water surface temperature from archive LANDSAT thermal infrared data: Application of the mono-channel atmospheric correction algorithm over two freshwater reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, R. N.; Tormos, T.; Danis, P.-A.

    2014-08-01

    Water surface temperature is a key element in characterizing the thermodynamics of waterbodies, and for irregularly-shaped inland reservoirs, LANDSAT thermal infrared images are the best alternative yet for the retrieval of this parameter. However, images must be corrected mainly for atmospheric effects in order to be fully exploitable. The objective of this study is to validate the mono-channel correction algorithm for single-band thermal infrared LANDSAT data as put forward by Jiménez-Muñoz et al. (2009). Two freshwater reservoirs in continental France were selected as study sites, and best use was made of all accessible image and field data. Results obtained are satisfactory and in accordance with the literature: r2 values are above 0.90 and root-mean-square error values are comprised between 1 and 2 °C. Moreover, paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests showed a highly significant difference between field and uncorrected image data, a very highly significant difference between uncorrected and corrected image data, and no significant difference between field and corrected image data. The mono-channel algorithm is hence recommended for correcting archive LANDSAT single-band thermal infrared data for inland waterbody monitoring and study.

  8. The effect of atmospheric and topographic correction on pixel-based image composites: Improved forest cover detection in mountain environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanonckelen, Steven; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Rompaey, Anton

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of forest cover is essential as a tool to stimulate forest management and conservation. Image compositing techniques that sample the most suited pixel from multi-temporal image acquisitions, provide an important tool for forest cover detection as they provide alternatives for missing data due to cloud cover and data discontinuities. At present, however, it is not clear to which extent forest cover detection based on compositing can be improved if the source imagery is firstly corrected for topographic distortions on a pixel-basis. In this study, the results of a pixel compositing algorithm with and without preprocessing topographic correction are compared for a study area covering 9 Landsat footprints in the Romanian Carpathians based on two different classifiers: Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). Results show that classifier selection has a stronger impact on the classification accuracy than topographic correction. Finally, application of the optimal method (SVM classifier with topographic correction) on the Romanian Carpathian Ecoregion between 1985, 1995 and 2010 shows a steady greening due to more afforestation than deforestation.

  9. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: use of the junge power-law aerosol size distribution with variable refractive index to handle aerosol absorption.

    PubMed

    Chomko, R M; Gordon, H R

    1998-08-20

    When strongly absorbing aerosols are present in the atmosphere, the usual two-step procedure of processing ocean color data-(1) atmospheric correction to provide the water-leaving reflectance (rho(w)), followed by (2) relating rho(w) to the water constituents-fails and simultaneous estimation of the ocean and aerosol optical properties is necessary. We explore the efficacy of using a simple model of the aerosol-a Junge power-law size distribution consisting of homogeneous spheres with arbitrary refractive index-in a nonlinear optimization procedure for estimating the relevant oceanic and atmospheric parameters for case 1 waters. Using simulated test data generated from more realistic aerosol size distributions (sums of log-normally distributed components with different compositions), we show that the ocean's pigment concentration (C) can be retrieved with good accuracy in the presence of weakly or strongly absorbing aerosols. However, because of significant differences in the scattering phase functions for the test and power-law distributions, large error is possible in the estimate of the aerosol optical thickness. The positive result for C suggests that the detailed shape of the aerosol-scattering phase function is not relevant to the atmospheric correction of ocean color sensors. The relevant parameters are the aerosol single-scattering albedo and the spectral variation of the aerosol optical depth. We argue that the assumption of aerosol sphericity should not restrict the validity of the algorithm and suggest an avenue for including colored aerosols, e.g., wind-blown dust, in the procedure. A significant advantage of the new approach is that realistic multicomponent aerosol models are not required for the retrieval of C.

  10. E-Collaboration for Earth Observation (E-CEO) with the example of Contest #3 that focuses on the Atmospheric Correction of Ocean Colour data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavender, Samantha; Brito, Fabrice; Aas, Christina; Casu, Francesco; Ribeiro, Rita; Farres, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Data challenges are becoming the new method to promote innovation within data-intensive applications; building or evolving user communities and potentially developing sustainable commercial services. These can utilise the vast amount of information (both in scope and volume) that's available online, and profits from reduced processing costs. Data Challenges are also closely related to the recent paradigm shift towards e-Science, also referred to as "data-intensive science'. The E-CEO project aims to deliver a collaborative platform that, through Data Challenge Contests, will improve the adoption and outreach of new applications and methods to processes Earth Observation (EO) data. Underneath, the backbone must be a common environment where the applications can be developed, deployed and executed. Then, the results need to be easily published in a common visualization platform for their effective validation, evaluation and transparent peer comparisons. Contest #3 is based around the atmospheric correction (AC) of ocean colour data with a particular focus on the use of auxiliary data files for processing Level 1 (Top of Atmosphere, TOA, calibrated radiances/reflectances) to Level 2 products (Bottom of Atmosphere, BOA, calibrated radiances/reflectance and derived products). Scientific researchers commonly accept the auxiliary inputs that they've been provided with and/or use the climatological data that accompanies the processing software; often because it can be difficult to obtain multiple data sources and convert them into a format the software accepts. Therefore, it's proposed to compare various ocean colour AC approaches and in the process study the uncertainties associated with using different meteorological auxiliary products for the processing of Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) i.e. the sensitivity of different atmospheric correction input assumptions.

  11. Analysis of vegetation by the application of a physically-based atmospheric correction algorithm to OLI data: a case study of Leonessa Municipality, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Alessandro; Manzo, Ciro; Petracchini, Francesco; Bassani, Cristiana

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques allow to estimate vegetation parameters related to large areas for forest health evaluation and biomass estimation. Moreover, the parametrization of specific indices such as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) allows to study biogeochemical cycles and radiative energy transfer processes between soil/vegetation and atmosphere. This paper focuses on the evaluation of vegetation cover analysis in Leonessa Municipality, Latium Region (Italy) by the use of 2015 Landsat 8 applying the OLI@CRI (OLI ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) algorithm developed following the procedure described in Bassani et al. 2015. The OLI@CRI is based on 6SV radiative transfer model (Kotchenova et al., 2006) ables to simulate the radiative field in the atmosphere-earth coupled system. NDVI was derived from the OLI corrected image. This index, widely used for biomass estimation and vegetation analysis cover, considers the sensor channels falling in the near infrared and red spectral regions which are sensitive to chlorophyll absorption and cell structure. The retrieved product was then spatially resampled at MODIS image resolution and then validated by the NDVI of MODIS considered as reference. The physically-based OLI@CRI algorithm also provides the incident solar radiation at ground at the acquisition time by 6SV simulation. Thus, the OLI@CRI algorithm completes the remote sensing dataset required for a comprehensive analysis of the sub-regional biomass production by using data of the new generation remote sensing sensor and an atmospheric radiative transfer model. If the OLI@CRI algorithm is applied to a temporal series of OLI data, the influence of the solar radiation on the above-ground vegetation can be analysed as well as vegetation index variation.

  12. An End-to-End simulator for the development of atmospheric corrections and temperature - emissivity separation algorithms in the TIR spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, Gilles; Fischer, Kim; Schlerf, Martin; Gerhards, Max; Udelhoven, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The development and optimization of image processing algorithms requires the availability of datasets depicting every step from earth surface to the sensor's detector. The lack of ground truth data obliges to develop algorithms on simulated data. The simulation of hyperspectral remote sensing data is a useful tool for a variety of tasks such as the design of systems, the understanding of the image formation process, and the development and validation of data processing algorithms. An end-to-end simulator has been set up consisting of a forward simulator, a backward simulator and a validation module. The forward simulator derives radiance datasets based on laboratory sample spectra, applies atmospheric contributions using radiative transfer equations, and simulates the instrument response using configurable sensor models. This is followed by the backward simulation branch, consisting of an atmospheric correction (AC), a temperature and emissivity separation (TES) or a hybrid AC and TES algorithm. An independent validation module allows the comparison between input and output dataset and the benchmarking of different processing algorithms. In this study, hyperspectral thermal infrared scenes of a variety of surfaces have been simulated to analyze existing AC and TES algorithms. The ARTEMISS algorithm was optimized and benchmarked against the original implementations. The errors in TES were found to be related to incorrect water vapor retrieval. The atmospheric characterization could be optimized resulting in increasing accuracies in temperature and emissivity retrieval. Airborne datasets of different spectral resolutions were simulated from terrestrial HyperCam-LW measurements. The simulated airborne radiance spectra were subjected to atmospheric correction and TES and further used for a plant species classification study analyzing effects related to noise and mixed pixels.

  13. Assess Calibration Consistency of MODIS and AVHRR Thermal Infrared Bands Using SNO Observations Corrected for Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Aisheng; Xie, Yong; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chu, I-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring environmental changes from space requires extremely well-calibrated observations to achieve the necessary high accuracy and stability. The calibration differences between the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) thermal bands provide a valuable quality assessment of the instrument performance. This letter compares the calibration differences between the Aqua MODIS and NOAA-18 AVHRR bands at 11.0 and 12.0 /Lm using simultaneous nadir overpass observations obtained in nearly parallel orbits. Impacts due to the relative spectral-response differences between the two sensors are estimated by MODTRAN simulations with real-time atmospheric profiles of temperature, water vapor, atmospheric pressure and ozone, and surface skin temperatures. Results show that the temperature difference after the removal of atmospheric impacts is within 0.30 K (or 0.40% in radiance) across the effective calibration range (or the 1l.0 l'm band/channel. For the 12.0 pm band, the differences are OAO K (or 0.50%) at the typical radiance and up to 0.70 K (or 0.90%) close to the maximum radiance, indicating an excellent calibration consistency between MODIS and AVHRR for both bands.

  14. Brown carbon and thermal-optical analysis: A correction based on optical multi-wavelength apportionment of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bove, M. C.; Prati, P.

    2016-01-01

    Thermo-optical analysis is widely adopted for the quantitative determination of total, TC, organic, OC and elemental, EC, Carbon in aerosol samples collected on quartz fibre filters. Nevertheless, the methodology presents several issues in particular about the artefacts related to the formation of pyrolytic carbon. It is usually neglected the uncertainty due to the possible presence of brown carbon (BrC) in the sample under analysis, i.e. the optically active fraction of OC produced by biomass burning and with characteristics intermediate between OC and EC. We introduce here a novel correction to the standard thermo-optical protocol based on the determination of the fraction of the sample absorbance due to the (possible) presence of BrC. This is achievable thanks to the coupled use of the Multi Wavelength Absorbance Analyser (MWAA) of the University of Genoa and a standard Sunset Inc. EC/OC analyser. Our correction provides a firmer OC/EC separation as well as an operative quantification of the BrC mass. The methodology has been validated against independent determination of the levoglucosan content in the same filters sent to the Sunset analysis. Corrections up to 23% in the OC and EC values, determined via the standard and new thermo-optical analysis, have been found in a set of PM10 (i.e. Particulate Matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) samples collected wintertime at a mountain site in Northern Italy.

  15. Performance analysis of adaptive fiber laser array propagating in atmosphere with correction of high order aberrations in sub-aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Geng, Chao; Li, Xinyang; Qiu, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Recently developed adaptive fiber laser array technique provides a promising way incorporating aberrations correction with laser beams transmission. Existing researches are focused on sub-aperture low order aberrations (pistons and tips/tilts) compensation and got excellent correction results for weak and moderate turbulence in short range. While such results are not adequate for future laser applications which face longer range and stronger turbulence. So sub-aperture high aberrations compensation is necessary. Relationship between corrigible orders of sub-aperture aberrations and far-field metrics as power-in-the-bucket (PIB) and Strehl ratio is investigated with numeric simulation in this paper. Numerical investigation results shows that increment in array number won't result in effective improvement of the far-field metric if sub-aperture size is fixed. Low order aberrations compensation in sub-apertures gets its best performances only when turbulence strength is weak. Pistons compensation becomes invalid and higher order aberrations compensation is necessary when turbulence gets strong enough. Cost functions of the adaptive fiber laser array with high order aberrations correction in sub-apertures are defined and the optimum corrigible orders are discussed. Results shows that high order (less than first ten Zernike orders) compensation is acceptable where balance between increment of the far-field metric and the cost and complexity of the system could be reached.

  16. Cross-calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ and Landsat-5 TM with the ResourceSat-1 (IRS-P6) AWiFS and LISS-III sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Scaramuzza, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly, data from multiple sensors are used to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. The Landsat suite of satellites has collected the longest continuous archive of multispectral data. The ResourceSat-1 Satellite (also called as IRS-P6) was launched into the polar sunsynchronous orbit on Oct 17, 2003. It carries three remote sensing sensors: the High Resolution Linear Imaging Self-Scanner (LISS-IV), Medium Resolution Linear Imaging Self-Scanner (LISS-III), and the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS). These three sensors are used together to provide images with different resolution and coverage. To understand the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy of IRS-P6 AWiFS and LISS-III sensors, image pairs from these sensors were compared to the Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ sensors. The approach involved the calibration of nearly simultaneous surface observations based on image statistics from areas observed simultaneously by the two sensors.

  17. The Assessment of Atmospheric Correction Processors for MERIS Based on In-Situ Measurements-Updates in OC-CCI Round Robin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Dagmar; Krasemann, Hajo; Zuhilke, Marco; Doerffer, Roland; Brockmann, Carsten; Steinmetz, Francois; Valente, Andre; Brotas, Vanda; Grant, kMicheal G.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Melin, Frederic; Franz, Bryan A.; Mazeran, Constant; Regner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC- CCI) provides a long-term time series of ocean colour data and investigates the detectable climate impact. A reliable and stable atmospheric correction (AC) procedure is the basis for ocean colour products of the necessary high quality.The selection of atmospheric correction processors is repeated regularly based on a round robin exercise, at the latest when a revised production and release of the OC-CCI merged product is scheduled. Most of the AC processors are under constant development and changes are implemented to improve the quality of satellite-derived retrievals of remote sensing reflectances. The changes between versions of the inter-comparison are not restricted to the implementation of AC processors. There are activities to improve the quality flagging for some processors, and the system vicarious calibration for AC algorithms in their sensor specific behaviour are widely studied. Each inter-comparison starts with an updated in-situ database, as more spectra are included in order to broaden the temporal and spatial range of satellite match-ups. While the OC-CCI's focus has laid on case-1 waters in the past, it has expanded to the retrieval of case-2 products now. In light of this goal, new bidirectional correction procedures (normalisation) for the remote sensing spectra have been introduced. As in-situ measurements are not always available at the satellite sensor specific central wave- lengths, a band-shift algorithm has to be applied to the dataset.In order to guarantee an objective selection from a set of four atmospheric correction processors, the common validation strategy of comparisons between in-situ and satellite-derived water leaving reflectance spectra, is aided by a ranking system. In principal, the statistical parameters are transformed into relative scores, which evaluate the relationship of quality dependent on the algorithms under study. The sensitivity of these scores to the selected

  18. Integrating Landsat-8, Sentinel-2, and nano-satellite data for deriving atmospherically corrected vegetation indices at enhanced spatio-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houborg, Rasmus; McCabe, Matthew F.; Ershadi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Flocks of nano-satellites are emerging as an economic resource for overcoming spatio-temporal constraints of conventional single-sensor satellite missions. Planet Labs operates an expanding constellation of currently more than 40 CubeSats (30x10x10 cm3), which will facilitate daily capture of broadband RGB and near-infrared (NIR) imagery for every location on earth at a 3-5 m ground sampling distance. However, data acquired by these miniaturized satellites lack rigorous radiometric corrections and radiance conversions and should be used in synergy with high quality imagery required by conventional large satellites such as Landsat-8 (L8) and Sentinel-2 (S2) in order to realize the full potential of this game changing observational resource. This study integrates L8, S2 and Planet data acquired over sites in Saudi Arabia and the state of California for deriving cross-sensor consistent and atmospherically corrected Vegetation Indices (VI) that may serve as important metrics for vegetation growth, health, and productivity. An automated framework, based on 6S and satellite retrieved atmospheric state and aerosol inputs, is first applied to L8 and S2 at-sensor radiances for the production of atmospherically corrected VIs. Scale-consistent Planet RGB and NIR imagery is then related to the corrected VI data using a selective, scene-specific, and computationally fast machine learning approach. The developed technique uses the closest pair of Planet and L8/S2 scenes in the training of the predictive VI models and accounts for changes in cover conditions over the acquisition timespan. Application of the models to full resolution Planet imagery results in cross-sensor consistent VI estimates at the scale and time of the nano-satellite acquisition. The utility of the approach for reproducing spatial features in L8 and S2 based indices based on Planet imagery is evaluated. The technique is generic, computationally efficient, and extendable and serves well for implementation

  19. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  20. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  1. An investigation of geometry and noise corrections to San Marco-C neutral atmospheric composition experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the calculation of ambient densities from San Marco-C neutral atmospheric composition experiment data is considered. A brief description is given of the data measurement method, followed by a description of both the theoretical and experimental data curves. Geometry, electrometer distortions, and noise effects are then studied in terms of their effects on the ideal data form. From these considerations two data reduction methods are evolved. The first is an iterative integration technique that exploits the symmetry of the experimental data about the minimum angle of attack. For the analysis of geometry effects, a second method using interval averaging was developed and studied.

  2. Improving Atmospheric Correction for Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) Imaging Spectrometers with Iterative Fitting of Absorption By Three Phases of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, E. A.; Thompson, D. R.; Green, R. O.; Gao, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometers like the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) offer valuable insight into the Earth's terrestrial and ocean ecosystems, mineralogy, and land use. Estimating surface reflectance requires accounting for atmospheric absorption, which is sensitive to the local abundance of water vapor. Analysts typically estimate water vapor concentrations using the depths of absorption features, which can be inaccurate by up to 50% over surface features containing liquid water or ice. This can bias the retrieved water vapor maps and create atmospheric artifacts in reflectance spectra. A new retrieval method offers significant accuracy improvements over plant canopies or ice by estimating the path lengths of all three phases of water simultaneously, adjusting absorptions to best fit the measurement over a broader spectral interval. This paper assesses the remaining sources of error for the three-phase retrieval technique. We analyze retrievals for synthetic data when the 940 and 1140 nm wavelength features are fitted, for initial vapor path estimates ranging from 0 to ±50% accuracy. These tests indicate that most error comes from inaccuracy in the initial path estimate used to obtain vapor absorption coefficients. We evaluate a modified algorithm that uses multiple iterations to refine this estimate. Error is found to approach a constant value, demonstrating improved robustness to initialization conditions. We also assess the new iterative method using corrected AVIRIS data over various environments. The iterative method yields significantly better water vapor maps, reducing spurious correlations between vegetation canopy water and vapor estimates. The new iterative method offers accuracy improvements over traditional Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) atmospheric correction methods, at modest computational cost.

  3. Surface roughness considerations for atmospheric correction of ocean color sensors. I - The Rayleigh-scattering component. II - Error in the retrieved water-leaving radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard R.; Wang, Menghua

    1992-01-01

    The first step in the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) atmospheric-correction algorithm is the computation of the Rayleigh-scattering (RS) contribution, L sub r, to the radiance leaving the top of the atmosphere over the ocean. In the present algorithm, L sub r is computed by assuming that the ocean surface is flat. Calculations of the radiance leaving an RS atmosphere overlying a rough Fresnel-reflecting ocean are presented to evaluate the radiance error caused by the flat-ocean assumption. Simulations are carried out to evaluate the error incurred when the CZCS-type algorithm is applied to a realistic ocean in which the surface is roughened by the wind. In situations where there is no direct sun glitter, it is concluded that the error induced by ignoring the Rayleigh-aerosol interaction is usually larger than that caused by ignoring the surface roughness. This suggests that, in refining algorithms for future sensors, more effort should be focused on dealing with the Rayleigh-aerosol interaction than on the roughness of the sea surface.

  4. THE CARMA PAIRED ANTENNA CALIBRATION SYSTEM: ATMOSPHERIC PHASE CORRECTION FOR MILLIMETER WAVE INTERFEROMETRY AND ITS APPLICATION TO MAPPING THE ULTRALUMINOUS GALAXY ARP 193

    SciTech Connect

    Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Curley, Roger; Pound, Marc W.; Mundy, Lee G.; Teng, Stacy H.; Teuben, Peter J.; Carpenter, John M.; Peréz, Laura M.; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Leitch, Erik M.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Bock, Douglas C.-J.; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Marrone, Daniel P.; and others

    2016-01-15

    Phase fluctuations introduced by the atmosphere are the main limiting factor in attaining diffraction limited performance in extended interferometric arrays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We report the results of C-PACS, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy Paired Antenna Calibration System. We present a systematic study of several hundred test observations taken during the 2009–2010 winter observing season where we utilize CARMA's eight 3.5 m antennas to monitor an atmospheric calibrator while simultaneously acquiring science observations with 6.1 and 10.4 m antennas on baselines ranging from a few hundred meters to ∼2 km. We find that C-PACS is systematically successful at improving coherence on long baselines under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We find that the angular separation between the atmospheric calibrator and target source is the most important consideration, with consistently successful phase correction at CARMA requiring a suitable calibrator located ≲6° away from the science target. We show that cloud cover does not affect the success of C-PACS. We demonstrate C-PACS in typical use by applying it to the observations of the nearby very luminous infrared galaxy Arp 193 in {sup 12}CO(2-1) at a linear resolution of ≈70 pc (0.″12 × 0.″18), 3 times better than previously published molecular maps of this galaxy. We resolve the molecular disk rotation kinematics and the molecular gas distribution and measure the gas surface densities and masses on 90 pc scales. We find that molecular gas constitutes ∼30% of the dynamical mass in the inner 700 pc of this object with a surface density ∼10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2}; we compare these properties to those of the starburst region of NGC 253.

  5. Atmospheric correction for NO2 absorption in retrieving water-leaving reflectances from the SeaWiFS and MODIS measurements.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ziauddin; McClain, Charles R; Herman, Jay R; Franz, Bryan A; Kwiatkowska, Ewa J; Robinson, Wayne D; Bucsela, Eric J; Tzortziou, Maria

    2007-09-10

    The absorption by atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas in the visible has been traditionally neglected in the retrieval of oceanic parameters from satellite measurements. Recent measurements of NO2 from spaceborne sensors show that over the Eastern United States the NO2 column amount often exceeds 1 Dobson Unit (approximately 2.69x10(16) molecules/cm2). Our radiative transfer sensitivity calculations show that under high NO2 conditions (approximately 1x10(16) molecules/cm2) the error in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance in the blue channels of the sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS) and moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors is approximately 1%. This translates into approximately 10% error in water-leaving radiance for clear waters and to higher values (>20%) in the coastal areas. We have developed an atmospheric-correction algorithm that allows an accurate retrieval of normalized water-leaving radiances (nLws) in the presence of NO2 in the atmosphere. The application of the algorithm to 52 MODIS scenes over the Chesapeake Bay area show a decrease in the frequency of negative nLw estimates in the 412 nm band and an increase in the value of nLws in the same band. For the particular scene reported in this paper, the mean value of nLws in the 412 nm band increased by 17%, which is significant, because for the MODIS sensor the error in nLws attributable to the digitization error in the observed TOA reflectance over case 2 waters is approximately 2.5%.

  6. The CARMA Paired Antenna Calibration System: Atmospheric Phase Correction for Millimeter Wave Interferometry and Its Application to Mapping the Ultraluminous Galaxy Arp 193

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Carpenter, John M.; Peréz, Laura M.; Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Bock, Douglas C.-J.; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Curley, Roger; Leitch, Erik M.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Pound, Marc W.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Mundy, Lee G.; Teng, Stacy H.; Teuben, Peter J.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Wu, Dalton

    2016-01-01

    Phase fluctuations introduced by the atmosphere are the main limiting factor in attaining diffraction limited performance in extended interferometric arrays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We report the results of C-PACS, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy Paired Antenna Calibration System. We present a systematic study of several hundred test observations taken during the 2009-2010 winter observing season where we utilize CARMA's eight 3.5 m antennas to monitor an atmospheric calibrator while simultaneously acquiring science observations with 6.1 and 10.4 m antennas on baselines ranging from a few hundred meters to ˜2 km. We find that C-PACS is systematically successful at improving coherence on long baselines under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We find that the angular separation between the atmospheric calibrator and target source is the most important consideration, with consistently successful phase correction at CARMA requiring a suitable calibrator located ≲6° away from the science target. We show that cloud cover does not affect the success of C-PACS. We demonstrate C-PACS in typical use by applying it to the observations of the nearby very luminous infrared galaxy Arp 193 in 12CO(2-1) at a linear resolution of ≈70 pc (0.″12 × 0.″18), 3 times better than previously published molecular maps of this galaxy. We resolve the molecular disk rotation kinematics and the molecular gas distribution and measure the gas surface densities and masses on 90 pc scales. We find that molecular gas constitutes ˜30% of the dynamical mass in the inner 700 pc of this object with a surface density ˜104 M⊙ pc-2 we compare these properties to those of the starburst region of NGC 253.

  7. The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative: II. Spatial and Temporal Homogeneity of Satellite Data Retrieval Due to Systematic Effects in Atmospheric Correction Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Dagmar; Krasemann, Hajo; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Brockmann, Carsten; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Fomferra, Norman; Franz, Bryan A.; Grant, Mike G.; Groom, Steve B.; Melin, Frederic; hide

    2015-01-01

    The established procedure to access the quality of atmospheric correction processors and their underlying algorithms is the comparison of satellite data products with related in-situ measurements. Although this approach addresses the accuracy of derived geophysical properties in a straight forward fashion, it is also limited in its ability to catch systematic sensor and processor dependent behaviour of satellite products along the scan-line, which might impair the usefulness of the data in spatial analyses. The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI) aims to create an ocean colour dataset on a global scale to meet the demands of the ecosystem modelling community. The need for products with increasing spatial and temporal resolution that also show as little systematic and random errors as possible, increases. Due to cloud cover, even temporal means can be influenced by along-scanline artefacts if the observations are not balanced and effects cannot be cancelled out mutually. These effects can arise from a multitude of results which are not easily separated, if at all. Among the sources of artefacts, there are some sensor-specific calibration issues which should lead to similar responses in all processors, as well as processor-specific features which correspond with the individual choices in the algorithms. A set of methods is proposed and applied to MERIS data over two regions of interest in the North Atlantic and the South Pacific Gyre. The normalised water leaving reflectance products of four atmospheric correction processors, which have also been evaluated in match-up analysis, is analysed in order to find and interpret systematic effects across track. These results are summed up with a semi-objective ranking and are used as a complement to the match-up analysis in the decision for the best Atmospheric Correction (AC) processor. Although the need for discussion remains concerning the absolutes by which to judge an AC processor, this example demonstrates

  8. The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative: II. Spatial and Temporal Homogeneity of Satellite Data Retrieval Due to Systematic Effects in Atmospheric Correction Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Dagmar; Krasemann, Hajo; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Brockmann, Carsten; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Fomferra, Norman; Franz, Bryan A.; Grant, Mike G.; Groom, Steve B.; Melin, Frederic; Platt, Trevor; Regner, Peter; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Steinmetz, Francois; Swinton, John

    2015-01-01

    The established procedure to access the quality of atmospheric correction processors and their underlying algorithms is the comparison of satellite data products with related in-situ measurements. Although this approach addresses the accuracy of derived geophysical properties in a straight forward fashion, it is also limited in its ability to catch systematic sensor and processor dependent behaviour of satellite products along the scan-line, which might impair the usefulness of the data in spatial analyses. The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI) aims to create an ocean colour dataset on a global scale to meet the demands of the ecosystem modelling community. The need for products with increasing spatial and temporal resolution that also show as little systematic and random errors as possible, increases. Due to cloud cover, even temporal means can be influenced by along-scanline artefacts if the observations are not balanced and effects cannot be cancelled out mutually. These effects can arise from a multitude of results which are not easily separated, if at all. Among the sources of artefacts, there are some sensor-specific calibration issues which should lead to similar responses in all processors, as well as processor-specific features which correspond with the individual choices in the algorithms. A set of methods is proposed and applied to MERIS data over two regions of interest in the North Atlantic and the South Pacific Gyre. The normalised water leaving reflectance products of four atmospheric correction processors, which have also been evaluated in match-up analysis, is analysed in order to find and interpret systematic effects across track. These results are summed up with a semi-objective ranking and are used as a complement to the match-up analysis in the decision for the best Atmospheric Correction (AC) processor. Although the need for discussion remains concerning the absolutes by which to judge an AC processor, this example demonstrates

  9. Changing Pattern of Crop Fraction in Late Blight Induced Potato Crops in Potato Bowl of West Bengal by using Multi-temporal Time Series AWiFs Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Abhisek

    2016-07-01

    Crop fraction is the ratio of crop occupying a unit area in ground pixel, is very important for monitoring crop growth. One of the most important variables in crop growth monitoring is the fraction of available solar radiation intercepted by foliage. Late blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum), caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is considered to be the most destructive crop diseases of potato worldwide. Under favourable climatic conditions, and without intervention (i.e. fungicide sprays), the disease can destroy potato crop within few weeks. Therefore it is important to evaluate the crop fraction for monitoring the healthy and late blight affected potato crops. This study was conducted in potato bowl of West Bengal, which consists of districts of Hooghly, Howrah, Burdwan, Bankuara, and Paschim Medinipur. In this study different crop fraction estimation method like linear spectral un-mixing, Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) based DPM model (Zhang et al. 2013), Ratio vegetation index based DPM model, improved Pixel Dichotomy Model (Li et al. 2014) ware evaluated using multi-temporal IRS AWiFs data in two successive potato growing season of 2012-13 and 2013-14 over the study area and compared with measured crop fraction. The comparative study based on measured healthy and late blight affected potato crop fraction showed that improved Pixel Dichotomy Model maintain the high coefficient of determination (R2= 0.835) with low root mean square error (RMSE=0.21) whereas the correlation values of NDVI based DPM model and RVI based DPM model is 0.763 and 0.694 respectively. The changing pattern of crop fraction profile of late blight affected potato crop was studied in respect of healthy potato crop fraction which was extracted from the 269 GPS points of potato field. It showed that the healthy potato crop fraction profile maintained the normal phenological trend whereas the late blight affected potato crop fraction profile suddenly fallen

  10. Spectral relationships for atmospheric correction. II. Improving NASA's standard and MUMM near infra-red modeling schemes.

    PubMed

    Goyens, C; Jamet, C; Ruddick, K G

    2013-09-09

    Spectral relationships, reflecting the spectral dependence of water-leaving reflectance, ρw(λ), can be easily implemented in current AC algorithms with the aim to improve ρw(λ) retrievals where the algorithms fail. The present study evaluates the potential of spectral relationships to improve the MUMM [Ruddick et al., 2006, Limnol. Oceanogr. 51, 1167-1179] and standard NASA [Bailey et al., 2010, Opt. Express 18, 7521-7527] near infra-red (NIR) modeling schemes included in the AC algorithm to account for non-zero ρw(λNIR), based on in situ coastal ρw(λ) and simulated Rayleigh corrected reflectance data. Two modified NIR-modeling schemes are investigated: (1) the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme is forced with bounding relationships in the red spectral domain and with a NIR polynomial relationship and, (2) the constant NIR ρw(λ) ratio used in the MUMM NIR-modeling scheme is replaced by a NIR polynomial spectral relationship. Results suggest that the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme performs better for all turbidity ranges and in particular in the blue spectral domain (percentage bias decreased by approximately 50%) when it is forced with the red and NIR spectral relationships. However, with these new constraints, more reflectance spectra are flagged due to non-physical Chlorophyll-a concentration estimations. The new polynomial-based MUMM NIR-modeling scheme yielded lower ρw(λ) retrieval errors and particularly in extremely turbid waters. However, including the polynomial NIR relationship significantly increased the sensitivity of the algorithm to errors on the selected aerosol model from nearby clear water pixels.

  11. Evaluation of the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) aerosol algorithm through intercomparison with VIIRS aerosol products and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Superczynski, Stephen D.; Kondragunta, Shobha; Lyapustin, Alexei I.

    2017-03-01

    The multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm is under evaluation for use in conjunction with the Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events mission. Column aerosol optical thickness (AOT) data from MAIAC are compared against corresponding data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument over North America during 2013. Product coverage and retrieval strategy, along with regional variations in AOT through comparison of both matched and unmatched seasonally gridded data, are reviewed. MAIAC shows extended coverage over parts of the continent when compared to VIIRS, owing to its pixel selection process and ability to retrieve aerosol information over brighter surfaces. To estimate data accuracy, both products are compared with Aerosol Robotic Network level 2 measurements to determine the amount of error present and discover if there is any dependency on viewing geometry and/or surface characteristics. Results suggest that MAIAC performs well over this region with a relatively small bias of -0.01; however, there is a tendency for greater negative biases over bright surfaces and at larger scattering angles. Additional analysis over an expanded area and longer time period are likely needed to determine a comprehensive assessment of the products' capability over the Western Hemisphere.

  12. Atmospheric correction of SeaWiFS ocean color imagery in the presence of absorbing aerosols off the Indian coast using a neuro-variational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajard, J.; Moulin, C.; Thiria, S.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the atmospheric correction accuracy between the standard sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS) algorithm and the NeuroVaria algorithm for the ocean off the Indian coast in March 1999. NeuroVaria is a general method developed to retrieve aerosol optical properties and water-leaving reflectances for all types of aerosols, including absorbing ones. It has been applied to SeaWiFS images of March 1999, during an episode of transport of absorbing aerosols coming from pollutant sources in India. Water-leaving reflectances and aerosol optical thickness estimated by the two methods were extracted along a transect across the aerosol plume for three days. The comparison showed that NeuroVaria allows the retrieval of oceanic properties in the presence of absorbing aerosols with a better spatial and temporal stability than the standard SeaWiFS algorithm. NeuroVaria was then applied to the available SeaWiFS images over a two-week period. NeuroVaria algorithm retrieves ocean products for a larger number of pixels than the standard one and eliminates most of the discontinuities and artifacts associated with the standard algorithm in presence of absorbing aerosols.

  13. The Advancement of Intraplate Tectonic Motion Detection by the Use of Atmospherically Corrected InSAR Time-series and its Decomposition into a 3D Field Vector in South-East Sicily, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, A.; Bekaert, D. P.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Stramondo, S.; Zucca, F.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides insights into the advancements gained by applying a tropospheric correction to a time-series InSAR small baseline network processed using the StaMPS software for the Hyblean Plateau in south-east Sicily, Italy. The contribution of the atmosphere is one of the major error sources in repeat-pass InSAR in general. For time-series analysis spatial and temporal "filtering" of the interferometric phase can be used to address atmospheric signals. This however might be at the cost of smoothing and removal of the "tectonic deformation". We applied a tropospheric correction to each interferogram based on estimates of the ERA-Interim weather model, provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). This approach is part of the InSAR Atmospheric Correction Toolbox (Bekaert et al, in prep) and converts the tropospheric water vapor content into the phase-delay of the radar line-of-sight. For the analysis we used 49 descending and 58 ascending Envisat SAR images, which cover the time period from 2003 until 2010. In addition, we have processed 30 SAR images of RADARSAT-2 for the period between 2010-2012. Furthermore, we used the different viewing geometries and the integration of GPS data to decompose the single line-of-sight velocities into a 3-dimensional field vector by applying the SISTEM approach (Guglielmino et al. 2011). First results reveal that the atmospherically corrected data retain the deformation signal along geological structures like the Scicli-Ragusa fault whilst the standard filtering approach is canceling out these very slow deformation patterns. Simultaneously, the variability of the signal in space is diminished and thus gives more confidence on the deformation patterns observed by the SAR. Consequently, the decomposition of the line-of-sight velocities and the integration with the GPS data allows us to retrieve a more realistic deformation field.

  14. Atmospheric Correction of Ocean Color Imagery: Test of the Spectral Optimization Algorithm with the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor.

    PubMed

    Chomko, R M; Gordon, H R

    2001-06-20

    We implemented the spectral optimization algorithm [SOA; Appl. Opt. 37, 5560 (1998)] in an image-processing environment and tested it with Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) imagery from the Middle Atlantic Bight and the Sargasso Sea. We compared the SOA and the standard SeaWiFS algorithm on two days that had significantly different atmospheric turbidities but, because of the location and time of the year, nearly the same water properties. The SOA-derived pigment concentration showed excellent continuity over the two days, with the relative difference in pigments exceeding 10% only in regions that are characteristic of high advection. The continuity in the derived water-leaving radiances at 443 and 555 nm was also within ~10%. There was no obvious correlation between the relative differences in pigments and the aerosol concentration. In contrast, standard processing showed poor continuity in derived pigments over the two days, with the relative differences correlating strongly with atmospheric turbidity. SOA-derived atmospheric parameters suggested that the retrieved ocean and atmospheric reflectances were decoupled on the more turbid day. On the clearer day, for which the aerosol concentration was so low that relatively large changes in aerosol properties resulted in only small changes in aerosol reflectance, water patterns were evident in the aerosol properties. This result implies that SOA-derived atmospheric parameters cannot be accurate in extremely clear atmospheres.

  15. Political Correctness--Correct?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boase, Paul H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the phenomenon of political correctness, its roots and objectives, and its successes and failures in coping with the conflicts and clashes of multicultural campuses. Argues that speech codes indicate failure in academia's primary mission to civilize and educate through talk, discussion, thought,166 and persuasion. (SR)

  16. Discovery that the Magnitudes in the Ancient Star Catalogs of Ptolemy, Al-Sufi, and Tycho Were All Corrected for Atmospheric Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    The three ancient star catalogs of Ptolemy (c. 127, Alexandria Egypt), Al Sufi (c. 961, Isfahan Iran), and Tycho Brahe (c. 1600, Hven now in Sweden) all record independent measures of the visual magnitudes of close to a thousand stars over their entire visible sky. For stars culminating 60° from zenith to the south (around -29° declination for Alexandria), they should appear roughly a quarter or a third of a magnitude fainter than those at zenith, and this is easily detected with the many stars near this declination band, despite the quantization of the reported magnitudes to roughly one third of a magnitude. For stars near the southern limit, the dimming should be 1-2 mag. To seek this effect, I use stars culminating near zenith to set up a correspondence between the reported magnitudes and modern V magnitudes, compare the modern equivalent magnitude to the star's real magnitude, and looked to see the dimming as the southern horizon is approached. Surprisingly, no dimming towards the south is viewed in any of the three ancient star catalogs. A formal fit to the effective extinction coefficient for each catalog is +0.01+-0.01, +0.05+-0.01, and +0.01+-0.01 mag/airmass respectively. That is, the reported magnitudes have already been corrected for extinction. This new result is surprising because no astronomer or historian has previously reported the effect. This is also surprising because no written source before 1729 even mentions the existence of the phenomenon of extinction (although the effect is easily recognized by any studious visual observer), so the expectation would be that the pre-telescopic astronomers were not aware of the phenomenon, not interested, or not able to do the corrections. Nevertheless, this discovery that the ancient catalogers all corrected for extinction opens new horizons in `archaeophotometry’ and new recognition for the ability of pre-telescopic observers.

  17. RECIPES FOR WRITING ALGORITHMS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CORRECTIONS AND TEMPERATURE/EMISSIVITY SEPARATIONS IN THE THERMAL REGIME FOR A MULTI-SPECTRAL SENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    C. BOREL; W. CLODIUS

    2001-04-01

    This paper discusses the algorithms created for the Multi-spectral Thermal Imager (MTI) to retrieve temperatures and emissivities. Recipes to create the physics based water temperature retrieval, emissivity of water surfaces are described. A simple radiative transfer model for multi-spectral sensors is developed. A method to create look-up-tables and the criterion of finding the optimum water temperature are covered. Practical aspects such as conversion from band-averaged radiances to brightness temperatures and effects of variations in the spectral response on the atmospheric transmission are discussed. A recipe for a temperature/emissivity separation algorithm when water surfaces are present is given. Results of retrievals of skin water temperatures are compared with in-situ measurements of the bulk water temperature at two locations are shown.

  18. A 200 year temperature record from tree ring δ13C at the Qaidam Basin of the Tibetan Plateau after identifying the optimum method to correct for changing atmospheric CO2 and δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenzhi; Liu, Xiaohong; Shao, Xuemei; Leavitt, Steven; Xu, Guobao; An, Wenling; Qin, Dahe

    2011-12-01

    Improved understanding of climate influences on tree ring stable carbon isotope (δ13C) ratios for Qilian juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) will improve prospects for long climate reconstructions in northwestern China's Qaidam Basin, where weather stations are widely scattered with relatively short records. Here, we developed an annual-resolution δ13C series from 1800 to 2005 for trees in this extremely arid, high-elevation area. As expected, a significant decline in δ13C (of about 3.5‰) occurred from 1850 to 2005 in response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and decreasing atmospheric δ13C. High-frequency correlation analysis based on comparison of the tree ring δ13C chronology with recorded weather parameters revealed that mean temperature during the current growing season (April-August) most strongly influenced tree ring δ13C discrimination from 1956 to 2005. To clarify the climatic implications of the long-term trend, we systematically compared four previously published approaches to remove the effects of decreasing atmospheric δ13C from the climate signals. The optimal correction, which accounted for the decline in atmospheric δ13C (δ13Ccor) and for a discrimination rate of about 0.016‰ ppmv-1 for the CO2 partial pressure, captured the strongest temperature signal (r = 0.75, P < 0.001). The historical mean April-August temperatures inferred from the correlations of tree ring δ13C with climate data revealed a persistent warming trend during the past two centuries, especially since the 1980s. Our results therefore reveal a high potential for reconstruction of growing season temperatures on a millennial scale in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau.

  19. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  20. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  1. Real-Time Atmospheric Phase Fluctuation Correction Using a Phased Array of Widely Separated Antennas: X-Band Results and Ka-Band Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldzahler, B.; Birr, R.; Brown, R.; Grant, K.; Hoblitzell, R.; Miller, M.; Woods, G.; Argueta, A.; Ciminera, M.; Cornish, T.; D'Addario, L.; Davarian, F.; Kocz, J.; Lee, D.; Morabito, D.; Tsao, P.; Jakeman-Flores, H.; Ott, M.; Soloff, J.; Denn, G.; Church, K.; Deffenbaugh, P.

    2016-09-01

    NASA is pursuing a demonstration of coherent uplink arraying at 7.145-7.190 GHz (X-band) and 30-31 GHz (Kaband) using three 12m diameter COTS antennas separated by 60m at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In addition, we have used up to three 34m antennas separated by 250m at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex in California at X-band 7.1 GHz incorporating real-time correction for tropospheric phase fluctuations. Such a demonstration can enable NASA to design and establish a high power, high resolution, 24/7 availability radar system for (a) tracking and characterizing observations of Near Earth Objects (NEOs), (b) tracking, characterizing and determining the statistics of small-scale (≤10cm) orbital debris, (c) incorporating the capability into its space communication and navigation tracking stations for emergency spacecraft commanding in the Ka band era which NASA is entering, and (d) fielding capabilities of interest to other US government agencies. We present herein the results of our phased array uplink combining at near 7.17 and 8.3 GHz using widely separated antennas demonstrations at both locales, the results of a study to upgrade from a communication to a radar system, and our vision for going forward in implementing a high performance, low lifecycle cost multi-element radar array.

  2. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  3. Corrective work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Leslie A.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses some general principles for planning corrective instruction and exercises in English as a second language, and follows with examples from the areas of phonemics, phonology, lexicon, idioms, morphology, and syntax. (IFS/WGA)

  4. Jitter Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waegell, Mordecai J.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Jitter_Correct.m is a MATLAB function that automatically measures and corrects inter-frame jitter in an image sequence to a user-specified precision. In addition, the algorithm dynamically adjusts the image sample size to increase the accuracy of the measurement. The Jitter_Correct.m function takes an image sequence with unknown frame-to-frame jitter and computes the translations of each frame (column and row, in pixels) relative to a chosen reference frame with sub-pixel accuracy. The translations are measured using a Cross Correlation Fourier transformation method in which the relative phase of the two transformed images is fit to a plane. The measured translations are then used to correct the inter-frame jitter of the image sequence. The function also dynamically expands the image sample size over which the cross-correlation is measured to increase the accuracy of the measurement. This increases the robustness of the measurement to variable magnitudes of inter-frame jitter

  5. Molecfit: Telluric absorption correction tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smette, A.; Kausch, W.; Sana, H.; Noll, S.; Horst, H.; Kimeswenger, S.; Barden, M.; Szyszka, C.; Jones, A. M.; Gallene, A.; Vinther, J.; Ballester, P.; Kerber, F.

    2015-01-01

    Molecfit corrects astronomical observations for atmospheric absorption features based on fitting synthetic transmission spectra to the astronomical data, which saves a significant amount of valuable telescope time and increases the instrumental efficiency. Molecfit can also estimate molecular abundances, especially the water vapor content of the Earth’s atmosphere. The tool can be run from a command-line or more conveniently through a GUI.

  6. CTI Correction Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Stoughton, Chris; Leauthaud, Alexie; Rhodes, Jason; Koekemoer, Anton; Ellis, Richard; Shaghoulian, Edgar

    2013-07-01

    Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI) due to radiation damage above the Earth's atmosphere creates spurious trailing in images from Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) imaging detectors. Radiation damage also creates unrelated warm pixels, which can be used to measure CTI. This code provides pixel-based correction for CTI and has proven effective in Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys raw images, successfully reducing the CTI trails by a factor of ~30 everywhere in the CCD and at all flux levels. The core is written in java for speed, and a front-end user interface is provided in IDL. The code operates on raw data by returning individual electrons to pixels from which they were unintentionally dragged during readout. Correction takes about 25 minutes per ACS exposure, but is trivially parallelisable to multiple processors.

  7. Political Correctness and American Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that today's political correctness atmosphere is a throwback to attempts made by the Nazis and Stalinists to force society into conformity. Academia, it is claimed, is being forced to conform to gain control of the institution of higher education. It is predicted that this effort will fail. (GR)

  8. Political Correctness and American Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that today's political correctness atmosphere is a throwback to attempts made by the Nazis and Stalinists to force society into conformity. Academia, it is claimed, is being forced to conform to gain control of the institution of higher education. It is predicted that this effort will fail. (GR)

  9. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer

    Miloshevich, Larry

    2008-01-15

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  10. Atmospheric and adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickson, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric optics is the study of optical effects induced by the atmosphere on light propagating from distant sources. Of particular concern to astronomers is atmospheric turbulence, which limits the performance of ground-based telescopes. The past two decades have seen remarkable growth in the capabilities and performance of adaptive optics (AO) systems. These opto-mechanical systems actively compensate for the blurring effect of the Earth's turbulent atmosphere. By sensing, and correcting, wavefront distortion introduced by atmospheric index-of-refraction variations, AO systems can produce images with resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope at near-infrared wavelengths. This review highlights the physical processes and fundamental relations of atmospheric optics that are most relevant to astronomy, and discusses the techniques used to characterize atmospheric turbulence. The fundamentals of AO are then introduced and the many types of advanced AO systems that have been developed are described. The principles of each are outlined, and the performance and limitations are examined. Aspects of photometric and astrometric measurements of AO-corrected images are considered. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the challenges related to current and future AO systems, particularly those that will equip the next generation of large, ground-based optical and infrared telescopes.

  11. A CORRECTION.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D

    1940-03-22

    IN a recently published volume on "The Origin of Submarine Canyons" the writer inadvertently credited to A. C. Veatch an excerpt from a submarine chart actually contoured by P. A. Smith, of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The chart in question is Chart IVB of Special Paper No. 7 of the Geological Society of America entitled "Atlantic Submarine Valleys of the United States and the Congo Submarine Valley, by A. C. Veatch and P. A. Smith," and the excerpt appears as Plate III of the volume fist cited above. In view of the heavy labor involved in contouring the charts accompanying the paper by Veatch and Smith and the beauty of the finished product, it would be unfair to Mr. Smith to permit the error to go uncorrected. Excerpts from two other charts are correctly ascribed to Dr. Veatch.

  12. 77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 171 RIN 3150-AJ16 Technical Corrections; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... corrections, including updating the street address for the Region I office, correcting authority citations and... rule. DATES: The correction is effective on December 5, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  13. Angular effects and correction on medium resolution sensors for crop monitoring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Remote sensing imagery at medium spatial resolutions (20-60m) such as Landsat, the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) and the Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) have been broadly used in mapping crop types and monitoring crop conditions. This paper examined the influence of viewing and illumina...

  14. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  15. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  16. 78 FR 75449 - Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ..., 50, 52, and 70 RIN 3150-AJ23 Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... final rule in the Federal Register on June 7, 2013, to make miscellaneous corrections to its regulations... miscellaneous corrections to its regulations in chapter I of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10...

  17. Planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with some of the principal data on extraterrestrial atmospheres obtained during the period 1975-1978. The atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and the Jovian satellites are examined, showing that many first-order questions concerning composition, physical state, and kinematics of these atmospheres have been answered.

  18. Atmospheric lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A new $11.3 million Atmospheric Emergency Response Facility is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Calif. The facility, which will take 18 months to build, will house Livermore's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) and research components of the Regional Atmospheric Sciences (RAS) division, which have been housed in trailers for the past 17 years. Along with studying the effects of episodic releases of hazardous materials in the atmosphere, the RAS division also is working on developing atmospheric models on a variety of space scales.

  19. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  20. 77 FR 2435 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ...- Free Treatment Under the Generalized System of Preferences and for Other Purposes Correction In... following correction: On page 407, the date following the proclamation number should read ``December...

  1. 78 FR 2193 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement and for Other Purposes Correction In Presidential document... correction: On page 66507, the proclamation identification heading on line one should read...

  2. The Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1983-01-01

    The composition and dynamics of the earth's atmosphere are discussed, considering the atmosphere's role in distributing the energy of solar radiation received by the earth. Models of this activity which help to explain climates of the past and predict those of the future are also considered. (JN)

  3. Atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sloane, C.S. ); Tesche, T.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the predictive strength of atmospheric models. The book covers all of the major important atmospheric areas, including large scale models for ozone depletion and global warming, regional scale models for urban smog (ozone and visibility impairment) and acid rain, as well as accompanying models of cloud processes and biofeedbacks.

  4. Sensitive determination of RDX, nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water by solid-phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure electro-spray [correction of chemical] ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cassada, D A; Monson, S J; Snow, D D; Spalding, R F

    1999-06-04

    Recent improvements in the LC-MS interface have increased the sensitivity and selectivity of this instrument in the analysis of polar and thermally-labile aqueous constituents. Determination of RDX, nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions was enhanced using LC-MS with solid-phase extraction, 15N3-RDX internal standard, and electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode. ESI produced a five-fold increase in detector response over atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for the nitramine compounds, while the more energetic APCI produced more than twenty times the ESI response for nitroaromatics. Method detection limits in ESI for nitramines varied from 0.03 microgram l-1 for MNX to 0.05 microgram l-1 for RDX.

  5. TPX correction coil studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.D.

    1994-11-03

    Error correction coils are planned for the TPX (Tokamak Plasma Experiment) in order to avoid error field induced locked modes and disruption. The FT (Fix Tokamak) code is used to evaluate the ability of these correction coils to remove islands caused by symmetry breaking magnetic field errors. The proposed correction coils are capable of correcting a variety of error fields.

  6. Molecfit: A Package for Telluric Absorption Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausch, W.; Noll, S.; Smette, A.; Kimeswenger, S.; Horst, H.; Sana, H.; Jones, A. M.; Barden, M.; Szyszka, C.; Vinther, J.

    2014-05-01

    Correcting for the sky signature usually requires supplementary data which are very expensive in terms of telescope time. In addition, the scheduling flexibility is restricted as these data have to be taken usually directly before/after the science observations due to the high variability of the telluric absorption which depends on the state and the chemical composition of the atmosphere at the time of observations. Therefore, a tool for sky correction, which does not require this supplementary calibration data, saves a significant amount of valuable telescope time and increases its efficiency. We developed a software package aimed at performing telluric feature corrections on the basis of synthetic absorption spectra.

  7. Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhusudhan, N.; Knutson, H.; Fortney, J. J.; Barman, T.

    The study of exoplanetary atmospheres is one of the most exciting and dynamic frontiers in astronomy. Over the past two decades ongoing surveys have revealed an astonishing diversity in the planetary masses, radii, temperatures, orbital parameters, and host stellar properties of exoplanetary systems. We are now moving into an era where we can begin to address fundamental questions concerning the diversity of exoplanetary compositions, atmospheric and interior processes, and formation histories, just as have been pursued for solar system planets over the past century. Exoplanetary atmospheres provide a direct means to address these questions via their observable spectral signatures. In the last decade, and particularly in the last five years, tremendous progress has been made in detecting atmospheric signatures of exoplanets through photometric and spectroscopic methods using a variety of spaceborne and/or groundbased observational facilities. These observations are beginning to provide important constraints on a wide gamut of atmospheric properties, including pressure-temperature profiles, chemical compositions, energy circulation, presence of clouds, and nonequilibrium processes. The latest studies are also beginning to connect the inferred chemical compositions to exoplanetary formation conditions. In the present chapter, we review the most recent developments in the area of exoplanetary atmospheres. Our review covers advances in both observations and theory of exoplanetary atmospheres, and spans a broad range of exoplanet types (gas giants, ice giants, and super-Earths) and detection methods (transiting planets, direct imaging, and radial velocity). A number of upcoming planet-finding surveys will focus on detecting exoplanets orbiting nearby bright stars, which are the best targets for detailed atmospheric characterization. We close with a discussion of the bright prospects for future studies of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  8. Atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  9. Atmospheric tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

  10. Atmospheric pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution (AP), its causes, and measures to prevent or reduce it are examined in reviews and reports presented at a workshop held in Damascus, Syria in August 1985. Topics discussed include AP and planning studies, emission sources, pollutant formation and transformation, AP effects on man and vegetation, AP control, atmospheric dispersion mechanisms and modeling, sampling and analysis techniques, air-quality monitoring, and applications. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  11. 75 FR 18747 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2010 Correction In Presidential... correction: On page 15601, the first line of the heading should read ``Proclamation 8485 of March 24,...

  12. 77 FR 45469 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor Correction In Presidential document 2012-17703 beginning on page 42415 in the issue of Wednesday, July 18, 2012, make the following correction: On...

  13. 78 FR 7255 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Unobligated Funds Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Correction In Presidential document... correction: On page 70883, the document identification heading on line one should read ``Notice of...

  14. 75 FR 68413 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Correction In Presidential document 2010-27676 beginning on page 67019 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On page 67019, the Presidential Determination number should...

  15. 75 FR 1013 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Correction In Presidential document E9-31418 beginning on page 707 in the issue of Tuesday, January 5, 2010, make the following correction: On page 731, the date line below the President's signature should...

  16. 75 FR 68409 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Migration Needs Resulting From Flooding In Pakistan Correction In Presidential document 2010-27673 beginning on page 67015 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On page...

  17. 78 FR 73377 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ...--Continuation of U.S. Drug Interdiction Assistance to the Government of Colombia Correction In Presidential... correction: On page 51647, the heading of the document was omitted and should read ``Continuation of...

  18. 77 FR 60037 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Commit, Threaten To Commit, or Support Terrorism Correction In Presidential document 2012-22710 beginning on page 56519 in the issue of Wednesday, September 12, 2012, make the following correction: On...

  19. 75 FR 68407 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Migration Needs Resulting from Violence in Kyrgyzstan Correction In Presidential document 2010-27672 beginning on page 67013 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On...

  20. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  1. Research in Correctional Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Forty-three leaders in corrections and rehabilitation participated in the seminar planned to provide an indication of the status of research in correctional rehabilitation. Papers include: (1) "Program Trends in Correctional Rehabilitation" by John P. Conrad, (2) "Federal Offenders Rahabilitation Program" by Percy B. Bell and Merlyn Mathews, (3)…

  2. Teaching Politically Correct Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsehelska, Maryna

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that teaching politically correct language to English learners provides them with important information and opportunities to be exposed to cultural issues. The author offers a brief review of how political correctness became an issue and how being politically correct influences the use of language. The article then presents…

  3. Can Dopplergrams be corrected for straylight?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, P. F.

    2000-10-01

    Straylight effects in solar intensity images have been framed in a well-established mathematical formulation (Chae et al., 1998a, b). Many procedures can be applied to recover the point spread function (PSF) and correct the atmospheric and instrumental distortions. Concerning velocity data, some procedures to make corrections for straylight have been addressed. Many experiments infer the velocity as the mean displacement of a spectral line and build a Dopplergram as a nonlinear combination of the intensity images sampled at different wavelengths. Unfortunately, often only the final products are available and it is not possible to apply an appropriate correction to the individual intensity images. A standard procedure to correct for the straylight has been applied to a time-series of velocity data and the results have been controlled in the single Dopplergram (that seems to be good) and in a power spectrum at the atmospheric frequencies (where any correction should reduce the power). These frequencies are characteristic of the observing site and typically in the range of the g modes: this means that no long run from a network would decrease their contribution to the noise. The results show that the correction procedures, based on the intensity and velocity gradients, are not reliable if controlled in the power spectrum. This conclusion has led to a change of the acquisition procedure at the Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory, where now the individual intensity images that build the Dopplergram are stored.

  4. 78 FR 21911 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Fish and Seafood Promotion; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Seafood Promotion; Correction AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... 20092) on the proposed information collection, Fish and Seafood Promotion. The information under...

  5. Submarine atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Knight, D R; Tappan, D V; Bowman, J S; O'Neill, H J; Gordon, S M

    1989-12-01

    Nuclear submariners live and work in an atmosphere composed of approximately 80% naturally occurring nitrogen, 19% oxygen (manufactured aboard ship), and a complex mixture of inorganic and organic contaminants. The concentrations of contaminants exist as a balance between the rates of production from human and operational activities and the rate of removal by engineering systems. The biological effects of inorganic gases, particularly carbon dioxide, have been extensively studied. Investigators are now attempting to define the composition and concentration of volatile organic compounds that accumulate during 90-day submergences. Medical studies have not conclusively shown that crewmembers incur adverse health effects from continuous exposures to the sealed atmospheres of nuclear submarines.

  6. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  7. Computer correction of turbulent distortions of image of extended objects on near-Earth paths

    SciTech Connect

    Averin, A P; Morozov, Yu B; Pryanichkov, V S; Tyapin, V V

    2011-05-31

    An algorithm of computer-based correction of images of extended objects distorted by turbulent atmosphere is developed. The method of computer correction is used to correct a distorted image of an extended object on a horizontal 2300-m-long observation path. The angular size of the corrected-image region was 15'. (image processing)

  8. Atmospheric humidity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water vapor plays a critical role in earth's atmosphere. It helps to maintain a habitable surface temperature through absorption of outgoing longwave radiation, and it transfers trmendous amounts of energy from the tropics toward the poles by absorbing latent heat during evaporation and subsequently...

  9. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  10. Preparing Correctional Officers and Inmates for Their Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, James M.

    1977-01-01

    The need for constructive correctional officer-inmate interpersonal communication has developed into a paramount, but often ignored, concern of numerous correctional institutions throughout the country. Also, many good reintegrative programs have failed because the programs' penal environments were not up to the task of providing an atmosphere for…

  11. Preparing Correctional Officers and Inmates for Their Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, James M.

    1977-01-01

    The need for constructive correctional officer-inmate interpersonal communication has developed into a paramount, but often ignored, concern of numerous correctional institutions throughout the country. Also, many good reintegrative programs have failed because the programs' penal environments were not up to the task of providing an atmosphere for…

  12. Corrective Primary Impression Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Aquaviva; Dua, Neha; Herekar, Manisha

    2010-01-01

    The article describes a simple, quick and corrective technique for making the preliminary impression. It records the extensions better as compared to the impressions made using only impression compound. This technique is accurate and gives properly extended custom tray. Any deficiencies seen in the compound primary impression are corrected using this technique hence, this technique is called as a “corrective primary impression technique”. PMID:20502648

  13. Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Planetary atmospheres are the external gaseous envelopes which surround the planets. In the case of the telluric planets, they represent only a negligible fraction of their mass, but they play an essential role in the energy balance between the surfaces and the Sun. In the case of the GIANT PLANETS, which are mostly gaseous, they account for a large fraction of their total mass and constitute the...

  14. Atmospheric Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Dietrich; Schady, Arthur; Feng, Joseph

    This chapter deals with sound propagation in the atmosphere, which is an important link in the functional chain from noise emissions from aircraft, road and rail vehicles, and wind turbines to noise perception. The principle processes in outdoor sound propagation are explained. They include refraction, diffraction, and reflection. Two sound propagation models for scientific applications are briefly outlined. Finally, three illustrative applications and their results are discussed.

  15. Request for Correction 10003

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from Jeff Rush requesting rescinding and correction online and printed information regarding alleged greenhouse gas emissions reductions resulting from beneficial use of coal combustion waste products.

  16. 78 FR 55169 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Commodities and Services From Any Agency of the United States Government to the Syrian Opposition Coalition (SOC) and the Syrian Opposition's Supreme Military Council (SMC) Correction In Presidential...

  17. Radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Wehrse, R.

    A method for defining spherical model atmospheres in radiative/convective and hydrostatic equilibrium is presented. A finite difference form is found for the transfer equation and a matrix operator is developed as the discrete space analog (in curvilinear coordinates) of a formal integral in plane geometry. Pressure is treated as a function of temperature. Flux conservation is maintained within the energy equation, although the correct luminosity transport must be assigned for any given level of the atmosphere. A perturbed integral operator is used in a complete linearization of the transfer and constraint equations. Finally, techniques for generating stable solutions in economical computer time are discussed.

  18. VIZTAB - the VIZ table correction model

    SciTech Connect

    Luers, J.K.

    1994-01-01

    The VIZ atmospheric temperature correction model VIZCOR calculates the temperature correction for the VIZ rod thermistor as a function of environmental parameters. The specified environmental input parameters are used in LOWTRAN7 to define the radiation environment experienced by the radiosonde. Running VIZCOR, with the associated LOWTRAN7 model, requires nearly 5 minutes of computer time on a 486x5O processor. Because this computer execution time is excessive for processing large quantities of radiosonde data, a regression model was developed that parameterizes the results of many runs of the VIZCOR model. The regression model, which contains table look-up algorithms, has been designated VIZTAB.

  19. Accurate and efficient correction of adjacency effects for high resolution imagery: comparison to the Lambertian correction for Landsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Alain

    2016-10-01

    The state of the art of atmospheric correction for moderate resolution and high resolution sensors is based on assuming that the surface reflectance at the bottom of the atmosphere is uniform. This assumption accounts for multiple scattering but ignores the contribution of neighboring pixels, that is it ignores adjacency effects. Its great advantage however is to substantially reduce the computational cost of performing atmospheric correction and make the problem computationally tractable. In a recent paper, (Sei, 2015) a computationally efficient method was introduced for the correction of adjacency effects through the use of fast FFT-based evaluations of singular integrals and the use of analytic continuation. It was shown that divergent Neumann series can be avoided and accurate results be obtained for clear and turbid atmospheres. We analyze in this paper the error of the standard state of the art Lambertian atmospheric correction method on Landsat imagery and compare it to our newly introduced method. We show that for high contrast scenes the state of the art atmospheric correction yields much larger errors than our method.

  20. Aerosol Type Constraints Required for Ocean Color Atmospheric Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, R.; Ahmad, Z.; Franz, B.; Massie, S.; Sayer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Organizers of the Aerosol Cloud Ecosystem (ACE) Science Working Group held a workshop at Goddard Space Flight Center June 16-18, 2014; speaker presentations will be made available on the ACE public website.

  1. Next Generation MODTRAN for Improved Atmospheric Correction of Spectral Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-29

    emission, solar/ lunar illumination, and spherical refraction. The main goal of this effort was to modernize the MODTRAN software, retaining its full...Modtran band model data and handling routines. mc_mod Contains variables and routines related to generating data used in 3D Monte Carlo simulations...of these comparisons, and prints a table of differences organized by file type and rootname, Table 5. It also provides a facility to convert

  2. Atmospheric science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Ackerman, Thomas; Clarke, Antony; Goodman, Jindra; Levin, Zev; Tomasko, Martin; Toon, O. Brian; Whitten, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The following types of experiments for a proposed Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility are described: (1) growth of liquid water drop populations; (2) coalescence; (3) drop breakup; (4) breakup of freezing drops; (5) ice nucleation for large aerosols or bacteria; (6) scavenging of gases, for example, SO2 oxidation; (7) phoretic forces, i.e., thermophoresis versus diffusiophoresis; (8) Rayleigh bursting of drops; (9) charge separation due to collisions of rimed and unrimed ice; (10) charged drop dynamics; (11) growth of particles in other planetary atmospheres; and (12) freezing and liquid-liquid evaporation. The required capabilities and desired hardware for the facility are detailed.

  3. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  4. Survey of Radar Refraction Error Corrections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    Science Laboratory. “Data Systems Manual, Meteorology and Timing.” Prepared for White Sands Missile Range under contract DAAD07-76-0007, September, 1979...reflect the different meteorological layers within the troposphere. Atmospheric Modeling Parameters 5.1 Earth Model Refraction correction models use...dissertations/AAIEP00334/. Physical Science Laboratory. “Data Systems Manual, Meteorology and Timing.” Prepared for White Sands Missile Range under

  5. Influence of the atmospheric masses on the gravitational field of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Seasonal and latitude dependent corrections to the gravity and height anomalies are developed in order to account for the neglect of the atmospheric masses outside the geoid, when using Stokes' equation. It is shown that the atmospheric correction to gravity at sea level is almost constant, equal to 0.871 mgals with a variation of 2 microgals whereas the height anomaly correction varies between -0.1 cm and -1.3 cm. Further, when the combined latitudinal/seasonal dependence is neglected in the atmospheric corrections, the maximum error introduced is on the order of 40 microgals for the gravity corrections and 0.7 cm for the height anomaly corrections.

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-04-01

    The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204.

  7. Correction of Satellite Imagery Over Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Rudolf

    1998-06-01

    A method for the radiometric correction of satellite imagery over mountainous terrain has been developed to remove atmospheric and topographic effects. The algorithm accounts for horizontally varying atmospheric conditions and also includes the height dependence of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance functions to simulate the simplified properties of a three-dimensional atmosphere. A database has been compiled that contains the results of radiative transfer calculations (atmospheric transmittance, path radiance, direct and diffuse solar flux) for a wide range of weather conditions. A digital elevation model is used to obtain information about surface elevation, slope, and orientation. Based on the Lambertian assumption the surface reflectance in rugged terrain is calculated for the specified atmospheric conditions. Regions with extreme illumination geometries sensitive to BRDF effects can be optionally processed separately. The method is restricted to high spatial resolution satellite sensors with a small swath angle such as the Landsat thematic mapper and Systeme pour l Observation de la Terre high resolution visible, since some simplifying assumptions were made to reduce the required image processing time.

  8. Correction of satellite imagery over mountainous terrain.

    PubMed

    Richter, R

    1998-06-20

    A method for the radiometric correction of satellite imagery over mountainous terrain has been developed to remove atmospheric and topographic effects. The algorithm accounts for horizontally varying atmospheric conditions and also includes the height dependence of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance functions to simulate the simplified properties of a three-dimensional atmosphere. A database has been compiled that contains the results of radiative transfer calculations (atmospheric transmittance, path radiance, direct and diffuse solar flux) for a wide range of weather conditions. A digital elevation model is used to obtain information about surface elevation, slope, and orientation. Based on the Lambertian assumption the surface reflectance in rugged terrain is calculated for the specified atmospheric conditions. Regions with extreme illumination geometries sensitive to BRDF effects can be optionally processed separately. The method is restricted to high spatial resolution satellite sensors with a small swath angle such as the Landsat thematic mapper and Systeme pour l'Observation de la Terre high resolution visible, since some simplifying assumptions were made to reduce the required image processing time.

  9. Laser correcting mirror

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    An improved laser correction mirror (10) for correcting aberrations in a laser beam wavefront having a rectangular mirror body (12) with a plurality of legs (14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28) arranged into opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) along the long sides (30, 32) of the mirror body (12). Vector force pairs (49, 50, 52, 54) are applied by adjustment mechanisms (42, 44, 46, 48) between members of the opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) for bending a reflective surface 13 of the mirror body 12 into a shape defining a function which can be used to correct for comatic aberrations.

  10. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  11. Correcting Hubble Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, John M.; Sheahen, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the theory behind the workings of the Hubble Space Telescope, the spherical aberration in the primary mirror that caused a reduction in image quality, and the corrective device that compensated for the error. (JRH)

  12. Corrected Age for Preemies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Preemie > Corrected Age For Preemies Ages & Stages ...

  13. Correcting Hubble Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, John M.; Sheahen, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the theory behind the workings of the Hubble Space Telescope, the spherical aberration in the primary mirror that caused a reduction in image quality, and the corrective device that compensated for the error. (JRH)

  14. Atmospheric Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embleton, Tony F. W.; Daigle, Gilles A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviewed here is the current state of knowledge with respect to each basic mechanism of sound propagation in the atmosphere and how each mechanism changes the spectral or temporal characteristics of the sound received at a distance from the source. Some of the basic processes affecting sound wave propagation which are present in any situation are discussed. They are geometrical spreading, molecular absorption, and turbulent scattering. In geometrical spreading, sound levels decrease with increasing distance from the source; there is no frequency dependence. In molecular absorption, sound energy is converted into heat as the sound wave propagates through the air; there is a strong dependence on frequency. In turbulent scattering, local variations in wind velocity and temperature induce fluctuations in phase and amplitude of the sound waves as they propagate through an inhomogeneous medium; there is a moderate dependence on frequency.

  15. Atmosphere Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    California Measurements, Inc.'s model PC-2 Aerosol Particle Analyzer is produced in both airborne and ground-use versions. Originating from NASA technology, it is a quick and accurate method of detecting minute amounts of mass loadings on a quartz crystal -- offers utility as highly sensitive detector of fine particles suspended in air. When combined with suitable air delivery system, it provides immediate information on the size distribution and mass concentrations of aerosols. William Chiang, obtained a NASA license for multiple crystal oscillator technology, and initially developed a particle analyzer for NASA use with Langley Research Center assistance. Later his company produced the modified PC-2 for commercial applications Brunswick Corporation uses the device for atmospheric research and in studies of smoke particles in Fires. PC-2 is used by pharmaceutical and chemical companies in research on inhalation toxicology and environmental health. Also useful in testing various filters for safety masks and nuclear installations.

  16. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  17. Adaptable DC offset correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  18. Horizontal atmospheric turbulence, beam propagation, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher C.; Santiago, Freddie; Martinez, Ty; Judd, K. Peter; Restaino, Sergio R.

    2017-05-01

    The turbulent effect from the Earth's atmosphere degrades the performance of an optical imaging system. Many studies have been conducted in the study of beam propagation in a turbulent medium. Horizontal beam propagation and correction presents many challenges when compared to vertical due to the far harsher turbulent conditions and increased complexity it induces. We investigate the collection of beam propagation data, analysis, and use for building a mathematical model of the horizontal turbulent path and the plans for an adaptive optical system to use this information to correct for horizontal path atmospheric turbulence.

  19. Geological Corrections in Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, J.; Marušiak, I.

    2015-12-01

    Applying corrections for the known geology to gravity data can be traced back into the first quarter of the 20th century. Later on, mostly in areas with sedimentary cover, at local and regional scales, the correction known as gravity stripping has been in use since the mid 1960s, provided that there was enough geological information. Stripping at regional to global scales became possible after releasing the CRUST 2.0 and later CRUST 1.0 models in the years 2000 and 2013, respectively. Especially the later model provides quite a new view on the relevant geometries and on the topographic and crustal densities as well as on the crust/mantle density contrast. Thus, the isostatic corrections, which have been often used in the past, can now be replaced by procedures working with an independent information interpreted primarily from seismic studies. We have developed software for performing geological corrections in space domain, based on a-priori geometry and density grids which can be of either rectangular or spherical/ellipsoidal types with cells of the shapes of rectangles, tesseroids or triangles. It enables us to calculate the required gravitational effects not only in the form of surface maps or profiles but, for instance, also along vertical lines, which can shed some additional light on the nature of the geological correction. The software can work at a variety of scales and considers the input information to an optional distance from the calculation point up to the antipodes. Our main objective is to treat geological correction as an alternative to accounting for the topography with varying densities since the bottoms of the topographic masses, namely the geoid or ellipsoid, generally do not represent geological boundaries. As well we would like to call attention to the possible distortions of the corrected gravity anomalies. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract APVV-0827-12.

  20. Wind-Induced Atmospheric Escape: Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Simpson, David

    2012-01-01

    Rapid thermospheric flows can significantly enhance the estimates of the atmospheric loss rate and the structure of the atmospheric corona of a planetary body. In particular, rapid horizontal flow at the exobase can increase the corresponding constituent escape rate. Here we show that such corrections, for both thermal and non-thermal escape, cannot be ignored when calculating the escape of methane from Titan, for which drastically different rates have been proposed. Such enhancements are also relevant to Pluto and exoplanets.

  1. Atmospheric electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In the last three years the focus was on the information contained in the lightning measurement, which is independent of other meteorological measurements that can be made from space. The characteristics of lightning activity in mesoscale convective systems were quantified. A strong relationship was found between lightning activity and surface rainfall. It is shown that lightning provides a precursor signature for wet microbursts (the strong downdrafts that produce windshears hazardous to aircraft) and that the lightning signature is a direct consequence of storm evolution. The Universities Space Research Association (USRA) collaborated with NASA scientists in the preliminary analysis and scientific justification for the design and deployment of an optical instrument which can detect lightning from geostationary orbit. Science proposals for the NASA mesoscale science program and for the Tethered Satellite System were reviewed. The weather forecasting research and unmanned space vehicles. Software was written to ingest and analyze the lightning ground strike data on the MSFC McIDAS system. The capabilities which were developed have a wide application to a number of problems associated with the operational impacts of electrical discharge within the atmosphere.

  2. Standard atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Willis Ray

    1923-01-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and discusses the need of a standard set of values of pressure, temperature and density at various altitudes and points out the desirability of adopting such values as are most in accord with actual average conditions, in order that corrections in individual cases may be as small as possible. To meet this need, so far as the united states is concerned, all free-air observations obtained by means of kites and balloons at several stations in this country near latitude 40 degrees N., have been used, and average values of pressure, temperature, and density, based upon those observations, have been determined for summer, winter, and the year, and for all altitudes up to 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). These values are presented in tables and graphs in both metric and english units; and in the tables of densities there are also included values of density for other parts of the world, more particularly for Europe. A comparison with these values shows that, except in the lowest levels, the agreement is very satisfactory.

  3. Infrasound as upper atmospheric monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assink, Jelle D.

    Understanding and specification of the higher altitudes of the atmosphere with global coverage over all local times is hampered by the challenges of obtaining direct measurements in the upper atmosphere. Methods to measure the properties of the atmosphere above the stratopause is an active area of scientific research. In this thesis, we revisit the use of infrasound as a passive remote sensing technique for the upper atmosphere. Signals from the Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador are used to investigate the behavior of the upper atmosphere. Depending on the atmospheric conditions, stratospheric, mesospheric and thermospheric arrivals are observed during intervals of explosive volcanic activity. It is found that the travel times and dominant frequencies of the thermospheric arrivals exhibit a coherent variability with periods equal to those of the tidal harmonics. Theoretical predictions using atmospheric specifications show that the stratospheric arrivals are predicted within 1% of the observed value. For thermospheric arrivals, this error can be as high as 10%. The error in thermospheric celerities is found to be in accord with the typical uncertainty in upper atmospheric winds. Given the observed response of the infrasound celerities to upper atmospheric tidal variability, it is suggested that infrasound observations may be used as an additional source of information to constrain the atmospheric specifications in the upper atmosphere. We present corrected wind profiles that have been obtained by minimizing misfits in traveltime and source location using a Bayesian statistics grid search algorithm. Also, a Levenberg-Marquardt search algorithm is developed. Additionally, a new numerical method has been developed to solve the problem of infrasound propagation in a stratified medium with (high Mach number) background flow, based on a modal expansion. The underlying mathematics is by no means new and has been earlier described. This solution goes beyond the effective sound

  4. Peteye detection and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jonathan; Luo, Huitao; Tretter, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Redeyes are caused by the camera flash light reflecting off the retina. Peteyes refer to similar artifacts in the eyes of other mammals caused by camera flash. In this paper we present a peteye removal algorithm for detecting and correcting peteye artifacts in digital images. Peteye removal for animals is significantly more difficult than redeye removal for humans, because peteyes can be any of a variety of colors, and human face detection cannot be used to localize the animal eyes. In many animals, including dogs and cats, the retina has a special reflective layer that can cause a variety of peteye colors, depending on the animal's breed, age, or fur color, etc. This makes the peteye correction more challenging. We have developed a semi-automatic algorithm for peteye removal that can detect peteyes based on the cursor position provided by the user and correct them by neutralizing the colors with glare reduction and glint retention.

  5. Phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, B C; Prague, J K; Mustafa, O G; Schulte, K-M; Hopkins, P A; Gilbert, J A; McGregor, A M; Aylwin, S J B

    2014-01-01

    Phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis is an endocrine emergency associated with significant mortality. There is little published guidance on the management of phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis. This clinical practice update summarizes the relevant published literature, including a detailed review of cases published in the past 5 years, and a proposed classification system. We review the recommended management of phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis including the use of alpha-blockade, which is strongly associated with survival of a crisis. Mechanical circulatory supportive therapy (including intra-aortic balloon pump or extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation) is strongly recommended for patients with sustained hypotension. Surgical intervention should be deferred until medical stabilization is achieved. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  7. Target mass corrections revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, F.M.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2006-05-15

    We propose a new implementation of target mass corrections to nucleon structure functions which, unlike existing treatments, has the correct kinematic threshold behavior at finite Q{sup 2} in the x{yields}1 limit. We illustrate the differences between the new approach and existing prescriptions by considering specific examples for the F{sub 2} and F{sub L} structure functions, and discuss the broader implications of our results, which call into question the notion of universal parton distribution at finite Q{sup 2}.

  8. Target Mass Corrections Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk; F. Steffens

    2006-03-07

    We propose a new implementation of target mass corrections to nucleon structure functions which, unlike existing treatments, has the correct kinematic threshold behavior at finite Q{sup 2} in the x {yields} 1 limit. We illustrate the differences between the new approach and existing prescriptions by considering specific examples for the F{sub 2} and F{sub L} structure functions, and discuss the broader implications of our results, which call into question the notion of universal parton distribution at finite Q{sup 2}.

  9. Corrective midfoot osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, John J; DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Zgonis, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Corrective midfoot osteotomies involve complete separation of the forefoot and hindfoot through the level of the midfoot, followed by uni-, bi-, or triplanar realignment and arthrodesis. This technique can be performed through various approaches; however, in the high-risk patient, percutaneous and minimum incision techniques are necessary to limit the potential of developing soft tissue injury. These master level techniques require extensive surgical experience and detailed knowledge of lower extremity biomechanics. The authors discuss preoperative clinical and radiographic evaluation, specific operative techniques used, and postoperative management for the high-risk patient undergoing corrective midfoot osteotomy.

  10. Correction of ocular dystopia.

    PubMed

    Janecka, I P

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine results with elective surgical correction of enophthalmos. The study was a retrospective assessment in a university-based referral practice. A consecutive sample of 10 patients who developed ocular dystopia following orbital trauma was examined. The main outcome measures were a subjective evaluation by patients and objective measurements of patients' eye position. The intervention was three-dimensional orbital reconstruction with titanium plates. It is concluded that satisfactory correction of enophthalmos and ocular dystopia can be achieved with elective surgery using titanium plates. In addition, intraoperative measurements of eye position in three planes increases the precision of surgery.

  11. The Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Michael (Editor); Travis, Larry D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A conference on the atmosphere of Jupiter produced papers in the areas of thermal and ortho-para hydrogen structure, clouds and chemistry, atmospheric structure, global dynamics, synoptic features and processes, atmospheric dynamics, and future spaceflight opportunities. A session on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune was included, and the atmosphere of Saturn was discussed in several papers.

  12. Correction to ATel 10782

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jujia

    2017-09-01

    I report a correction to the spectroscopic classification of the optical transients announced in ATEL #10782. In the main text of the telegram, the date of observation should be UT 2017 Sep. 25.6, which was written as UT 2017 Sep. 26.6 in the original report. I apologize for any confusion caused by this typo error.

  13. Errors and Their Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    "Our primary concern is not that the child learns to do something without mistakes. Our real concern is that the child does what he needs, with interest." The reaction of so many adults to the mistakes of children is to correct, immediately and directly, says Joosten. To truly aid the child in development, we must learn to control our…

  14. New Directions in Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, John M.

    A picture of the American prison situation in the past and in its present changing form is presented. The object of the correctional community is becoming more and more that of successfully reintegrating the ex-offender into the social community from which he has been separated. It is predicted that within the next five years: (1) Every state will…

  15. Correction to ATel 10681

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-08-01

    We report a correction to the spectroscopic classification of two optical transients announced in ATel #10681. In the main text of the telegram, SN 2017giq and MASTER OT J033744.97+723159.0 should be classified as type Ic and type IIb supernovae, respectively, which were reversed in the original report. We apologize for any confusion caused by this typo error.

  16. Rethinking Correctional Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David C.

    There have been enduring conflicts in correctional institutions between personnel charged with rehabilitative duties and those who oversee authority. It is only within the past few years that realistic communication between these groups has been tolerated. The same period of time has been characterized by the infusion of training and staff…

  17. Spelling Words Correctly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Traditional methods of teaching spelling emphasized that pupils might write each new spelling word correctly and repeatedly from a weekly list in the spelling textbook. Some weaknesses in this approach are that rote learning is being stressed without emphasizing application of what has been learned, and that there is nothing which relates the…

  18. Thermodynamically Correct Bioavailability Estimations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-30

    6448 I 1. SWPPUMENTA* NOTIS lIa. OISTUAMJTiOAVAILAIILTY STATIMENT 121 OT REbT ostwosCo z I Approved for public release; distribution unlimited... research is to develop thermodynamically correct bioavailability estimations using chromatographic stationary phases as a model of the "interphase

  19. Holographic Phase Correction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    aberrated wavefront. With this in mind , the following example was considered. 3.2 REPLAY EFFICIENCY - AN EXAMPLE This example represents the phase...practical points to bear in mind when considering the phase correction - in particular, the flatness of the hologram input and output surfaces, and the...DOCUMENT CONTROL SHEET Overall securty clasification of sheet UNCLASSIFIED

  20. Issues in Correctional Training and Casework. Correctional Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolford, Bruce I., Ed.; Lawrenz, Pam, Ed.

    The eight papers contained in this monograph were drawn from two national meetings on correctional training and casework. Titles and authors are: "The Challenge of Professionalism in Correctional Training" (Michael J. Gilbert); "A New Perspective in Correctional Training" (Jack Lewis); "Reasonable Expectations in Correctional Officer Training:…

  1. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  2. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Sou-Tien

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  3. Voltage correction power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rajicic, D.; Ackovski, R.; Taleski, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    A method for power flow solution of weakly meshed distribution and transmission networks is presented. It is based on oriented ordering of network elements. That allows an efficient construction of the loop impedance matrix and rational organization of the processes such as: power summation (backward sweep), current summation (backward sweep) and node voltage calculation (forward sweep). The first step of the algorithm is calculation of node voltages on the radial part of the network. The second step is calculation of the breakpoint currents. Then, the procedure continues with the first step, which is preceded by voltage correction. It is illustrated that using voltage correction approach, the iterative process of weakly meshed network voltage calculation is faster and more reliable.

  4. Error-correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, Erold W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made towards the completion of a specific task on error-correcting coding. The proposed research consisted of investigating the use of modulation block codes as the inner code of a concatenated coding system in order to improve the overall space link communications performance. The study proposed to identify and analyze candidate codes that will complement the performance of the overall coding system which uses the interleaved RS (255,223) code as the outer code.

  5. Correcting Duporcq's theorem☆

    PubMed Central

    Nawratil, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In 1898, Ernest Duporcq stated a famous theorem about rigid-body motions with spherical trajectories, without giving a rigorous proof. Today, this theorem is again of interest, as it is strongly connected with the topic of self-motions of planar Stewart–Gough platforms. We discuss Duporcq's theorem from this point of view and demonstrate that it is not correct. Moreover, we also present a revised version of this theorem. PMID:25540467

  6. Correcting solar quiet variations for tidal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzavina, Martina; Grayver, Alexander; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    Solar quiet (Sq) variations of geomagnetic field are originated from electric current system which is flowing at 110 km altitude in a thin ionospheric E-layer. This current system is driven by atmospheric tides in the ambient magnetic field of the Earth. These tides are generated from solar heating of the atmosphere on the sunlit side of Earth. Sq variations are periodic phenomenon and thus can be represented as a superposition of time harmonics with periods of 24, 12, 8, 6, 4.8 and 4 hours. These variations can be used for electromagnetic induction sounding to study electrical conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle down to approximately 600 km. However, Sq variations are potentially distorted by several factors. Among them are motionally-induced (tidal) magnetic signals which have periods close to 12 and 24 hours. This study is aimed at evaluating and correcting for the effect of tidal magnetic signals in observed Sq variations.

  7. EPIC optical design, calibration, and data correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cede, A.; Kowalewski, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) observes Space Weather and Earth's Climate from a unique position at the Lagrange 1 point, where it can continuously see the sunlit-side of the Earth. The Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board of DSCOVR takes images of the Earth in 10 ultraviolet and visible channels approximately every 75 minutes. The measurement are converted into color images and also into global maps of atmospheric parameters such as ozone and sulfur dioxide columns, aerosol properties, cloud distribution, height and thickness, as well as surface parameters such as vegetation and leaf area index. This presentation gives an overview of the EPIC optical design, the calibrations performed, and the corrections applied to the raw data to obtain corrected count rates.

  8. ARGOS wavefront sensing: from detection to correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Bonaglia, M.; Borelli, J.; Busoni, L.; Connot, C.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Kulas, M.; Mazzoni, T.; Puglisi, A.; Rabien, S.; Storm, J.; Ziegleder, J.

    2014-08-01

    Argos is the ground-layer adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope. In order to perform its wide-field correction, Argos uses three laser guide stars which sample the atmospheric turbulence. To perform the correction, Argos has at disposal three different wavefront sensing measurements : its three laser guide stars, a NGS tip-tilt, and a third wavefront sensor. We present the wavefront sensing architecture and its individual components, in particular: the finalized Argos pnCCD camera detecting the 3 laser guide stars at 1kHz, high quantum efficiency and 4e- noise; the Argos tip-tilt sensor based on a quad-cell avalanche photo-diodes; and the Argos wavefront computer. Being in the middle of the commissioning, we present the first wavefront sensing configurations and operations performed at LBT, and discuss further improvements in the measurements of the 3 laser guide star slopes as detected by the pnCCD.

  9. Atmospheric Monitoring at the Site of the MAGIC Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Martin

    The MAGIC telescopes in La Palma, Canary Islands, measure the Cherenkov light emitted by gamma ray-induced extended air showers in the atmosphere. The good knowledge of the atmospheric parameters is important, both for the correct and safe operations of the telescopes, but also for subsequent data analysis. A weather station measures the state variables of the atmosphere, temperature, humidity and wind, an elastic Lidar system and an infrared pyrometer determine the optical transmission of the atmosphere. Using an AllSky camera, the cloud cover can be estimated. The measured values are completed by data from global atmospheric models based on numeric weather forecasts.

  10. The Atmosphere Explorer power subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenschain, A.; Bacher, J.; Callen, P.

    1974-01-01

    The design and operation of the power subsystem for the Atmospheric Explorer spacecraft are discussed. The additional functional redundancy which was added in several component areas to improve the overall subsystem reliability is analyzed. The battery charging technique has been modified to include third electrode overcharge control. The automatic removal of all battery charge is provided to correct abnormally high battery voltages. An undervoltage detector has been added which removes all nonessential spacecraft loads when the battery voltage falls below a given level. All automatic functions can be over-ridden by ground command.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  12. Radiometric correction of multi-temporal Landsat data for characterization of early successional forest patterns in western Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Todd A. Schroeder; Warren B. Cohen; Conghe Song; Morton J. Canty; Zhiqiang. Yang

    2006-01-01

    Detecting and characterizing continuous changes in early forest succession using multi-temporal satellite imagery requires atmospheric correction procedures that are both operationally reliable, and that result in comparable units (e-g., surface reflectance). This paper presents a comparison of five atmospheric correction methods (2 relative, 3 absolute) used to...

  13. 77 FR 29586 - Sea Turtle Conservation; Shrimp Trawling Requirements; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 97 (Friday, May 18, 2012)] [Proposed Rules] [Pages 29586-29587] [FR Doc No: 2012-12013] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 223 RIN 0648-BC10 Sea Turtle Conservation; Shrimp Trawling Requirements; Correction AGENCY...

  14. Assessment of ionospheric and tropospheric corrections for PPP-RTK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Paulo; Fund, François; Morel, Laurent; Monico, João; Durand, Stéphane; Durand, Fréderic

    2016-04-01

    The PPP-RTK is a state of art GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) technique employed to determine accurate positions in real-time. To perform the PPP-RTK it is necessary to accomplish the SSR (State Space Representation) of the spatially correlated errors affecting the GNSS observables, such as the tropospheric delay and the ionospheric effect. Using GNSS data of local or regional GNSS active networks, it is possible to determine quite well the atmospheric errors for any position in the network coverage area, by modeling these effects or biases. This work presents the results of tropospheric and ionospheric modeling employed to obtain the respective corrections. The region in the study is France and the Orphéon GNSS active network is used to generate the atmospheric corrections. The CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) satellite orbit products are used to perform ambiguity fixing in GNSS processing. Two atmospheric modeling approaches are considered: 1) generation of a priori correction by coefficients estimated using the GNSS network and 2) the use of interpolated ionospheric and tropospheric effects from the closest reference stations to the user's location, as suggested in the second stage of RTCM (Ratio Technical Commission for Maritime) messages development. Finally, the atmospheric corrections are introduced in PPP-RTK as a priori values to allow improvements in ambiguity fixing and to reduce its convergence time. The discussion emphasizes the positive and the negative points of each solution or even the associated use of them.

  15. 50 CFR 260.27 - Issuance of corrected certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Issuance of corrected certificates. 260.27 Section 260.27 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... distribution of a certificate if errors, such as incorrect dates, code marks, grade statements, lot or car...

  16. Atmospheric and Space Sciences: Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal

    2015-09-01

    The SpringerBriefs on Atmospheric and Space Sciences in two volumes presents a concise and interdisciplinary introduction to the basic theory, observation & modeling of atmospheric and ionospheric coupling processes on Earth. The goal is to contribute toward bridging the gap between meteorology, aeronomy, and planetary science. In addition recent progress in several related research topics, such atmospheric wave coupling and variability, is discussed. Volume 1 will focus on the atmosphere, while Volume 2 will present the ionosphere— the plasma environment. Volume 1 is aimed primarily at (research) students and researchers that would like to gain quick insight in atmospheric sciences and current research. It also is a useful tool for professors who would like to develop a course in atmospheric physics.

  17. Experimental repetitive quantum error correction.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Philipp; Barreiro, Julio T; Monz, Thomas; Nebendahl, Volckmar; Nigg, Daniel; Chwalla, Michael; Hennrich, Markus; Blatt, Rainer

    2011-05-27

    The computational potential of a quantum processor can only be unleashed if errors during a quantum computation can be controlled and corrected for. Quantum error correction works if imperfections of quantum gate operations and measurements are below a certain threshold and corrections can be applied repeatedly. We implement multiple quantum error correction cycles for phase-flip errors on qubits encoded with trapped ions. Errors are corrected by a quantum-feedback algorithm using high-fidelity gate operations and a reset technique for the auxiliary qubits. Up to three consecutive correction cycles are realized, and the behavior of the algorithm for different noise environments is analyzed.

  18. Biasing errors and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of laser velocimeter measurement rate on flow velocity is discussed. Investigations outlining that any dependence is purely statistical, and is nonstationary both spatially and temporally, are described. Main conclusions drawn are that the times between successive particle arrivals should be routinely measured and the calculation of the velocity data rate correlation coefficient should be performed to determine if a dependency exists. If none is found, accept the data ensemble as an independent sample of the flow. If a dependency is found, the data should be modified to obtain an independent sample. Universal correcting procedures should never be applied because their underlying assumptions are not valid.

  19. [Correctional health care].

    PubMed

    Fix, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Court decisions taking away someone's freedom by requiring them to serve a jail sentence should not deny them access to the same health care available to free citizens in full compliance with patient confidentiality. Health institutions, responsible for administering somatic care, offer a comprehensive response to the medical needs of those under justice control, both in jails and conventional care units. For a physician, working in the correctional setting implies accepting its constraints, and violence, and protecting and enforcing fundamental rights, as well as rights to dignity, confidential care and freedom to accept or refuse a treatment.

  20. [Correction of paralytic lagophthalmos].

    PubMed

    Iskusnykh, N S; Grusha, Y O

    2015-01-01

    Current options for correction of paralytic lagophthalmos are either temporary (external eyelid weight placement, hyaluronic acid gel or botulinum toxin A injection) or permanent (various procedures for narrowing of the palpebral fissure, upper eyelid weights or spring implantation). Neuroplastic surgery (cross-facial nerve grafting, nerve anastomoses) and muscle transposition surgery is not effective enough. The majority of elderly and medically compromised patients should not be considered for such complicated and long procedures. Upper eyelid weight implantation thus appears the most reliable and simple treatment.

  1. [Atmospheric Influences Analysis on the Satellite Passive Microwave Remote Sensing].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-bao; Shi, Li-juan; Shi, Jian-cheng; Zhao, Shao-jie

    2016-02-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing offers its all-weather work capabilities, but atmospheric influences on satellite microwave brightness temperature were different under different atmospheric conditions and environments. In order to clarify atmospheric influences on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), atmospheric radiation were simulated based on AMSR-E configuration under clear sky and cloudy conditions, by using radiative transfer model and atmospheric conditions data. Results showed that atmospheric water vapor was the major factor for atmospheric radiation under clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances were almost above 0.98 at AMSR-E's low frequencies (< 18.7 GHz) and the microwave brightness temperature changes caused by atmosphere can be ignored in clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances at 36.5 and 89 GHz were 0.896 and 0.756 respectively. The effects of atmospheric water vapor needed to be corrected when using microwave high-frequency channels to inverse land surface parameters in clear sky condition. But under cloud cover or cloudy conditions, cloud liquid water was the key factor to cause atmospheric radiation. When sky was covered by typical stratus cloud, atmospheric transmittances at 10.7, 18.7 and 36.5 GHz were 0.942, 0.828 and 0.605 respectively. Comparing with the clear sky condition, the down-welling atmospheric radiation caused by cloud liquid water increased up to 75.365 K at 36.5 GHz. It showed that the atmospheric correction under different clouds covered condition was the primary work to improve the accuracy of land surface parameters inversion of passive microwave remote sensing. The results also provided the basis for microwave atmospheric correction algorithm development. Finally, the atmospheric sounding data was utilized to calculate the atmospheric transmittance of Hailaer Region, Inner Mongolia province, in July 2013. The results indicated that atmospheric transmittances were close to 1

  2. Using Online Annotations to Support Error Correction and Corrective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Shiou-Wen; Lo, Jia-Jiunn

    2009-01-01

    Giving feedback on second language (L2) writing is a challenging task. This research proposed an interactive environment for error correction and corrective feedback. First, we developed an online corrective feedback and error analysis system called "Online Annotator for EFL Writing". The system consisted of five facilities: Document Maker,…

  3. Mental Health in Corrections: An Overview for Correctional Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowers, Wesley; Thompson, Kenneth; Mullins, Stephen

    This volume is designed to provide corrections practitioners with basic staff training on the needs of those with mental illness and impairments in our correctional systems. Chapter titles are: (1) "Mental Illness in the Correctional Setting"; (2) "Substance Use Disorders"; (3) "Problems with Mood"; (4) "Problems…

  4. Using Online Annotations to Support Error Correction and Corrective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Shiou-Wen; Lo, Jia-Jiunn

    2009-01-01

    Giving feedback on second language (L2) writing is a challenging task. This research proposed an interactive environment for error correction and corrective feedback. First, we developed an online corrective feedback and error analysis system called "Online Annotator for EFL Writing". The system consisted of five facilities: Document Maker,…

  5. Mental Health in Corrections: An Overview for Correctional Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowers, Wesley; Thompson, Kenneth; Mullins, Stephen

    This volume is designed to provide corrections practitioners with basic staff training on the needs of those with mental illness and impairments in our correctional systems. Chapter titles are: (1) "Mental Illness in the Correctional Setting"; (2) "Substance Use Disorders"; (3) "Problems with Mood"; (4) "Problems…

  6. Smooth eigenvalue correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrikse, Anne; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk

    2013-12-01

    Second-order statistics play an important role in data modeling. Nowadays, there is a tendency toward measuring more signals with higher resolution (e.g., high-resolution video), causing a rapid increase of dimensionality of the measured samples, while the number of samples remains more or less the same. As a result the eigenvalue estimates are significantly biased as described by the Marčenko Pastur equation for the limit of both the number of samples and their dimensionality going to infinity. By introducing a smoothness factor, we show that the Marčenko Pastur equation can be used in practical situations where both the number of samples and their dimensionality remain finite. Based on this result we derive methods, one already known and one new to our knowledge, to estimate the sample eigenvalues when the population eigenvalues are known. However, usually the sample eigenvalues are known and the population eigenvalues are required. We therefore applied one of the these methods in a feedback loop, resulting in an eigenvalue bias correction method. We compare this eigenvalue correction method with the state-of-the-art methods and show that our method outperforms other methods particularly in real-life situations often encountered in biometrics: underdetermined configurations, high-dimensional configurations, and configurations where the eigenvalues are exponentially distributed.

  7. Worldwide radiosonde temperature corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Luers, J.; Eskridge, R.

    1997-11-01

    Detailed heat transfer analyses have been performed on ten of the world`s most commonly used radiosondes from 1960 to present. These radiosondes are the USA VIZ and Space Data, the Vaisala RS-80, RS-185/21, and RS12/15, the Japanese RS2-80, Russian MARS, RKZ, and A22, and the Chinese GZZ. The temperature error of each radiosonde has been calculated as a function of altitude and the sonde and environmental parameters that influence its magnitude. Computer models have been developed that allow the correction of temperature data from each sonde as a function of these parameters. Recommendations are made concerning the use of data from each of the radiosondes for climate studies. For some radiosondes, nighttime data requires no corrections. Other radiosondes require that day and daytime data is not feasible because parameters of significance, such as balloon rise rate, are not retrievable. The results from this study provide essential information for anyone attempting to perform climate studies using radiosonde data. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Turbulence compressibility corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.; Horstman, C. C.; Marvin, J. G.; Viegas, J. R.; Bardina, J. E.; Huang, P. G.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1994-01-01

    The basic objective of this research was to identify, develop and recommend turbulence models which could be incorporated into CFD codes used in the design of the National AeroSpace Plane vehicles. To accomplish this goal, a combined effort consisting of experimental and theoretical phases was undertaken. The experimental phase consisted of a literature survey to collect and assess a database of well documented experimental flows, with emphasis on high speed or hypersonic flows, which could be used to validate turbulence models. Since it was anticipated that this database would be incomplete and would need supplementing, additional experiments in the NASA Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (HWT) were also undertaken. The theoretical phase consisted of identifying promising turbulence models through applications to simple flows, and then investigating more promising models in applications to complex flows. The complex flows were selected from the database developed in the first phase of the study. For these flows it was anticipated that model performance would not be entirely satisfactory, so that model improvements or corrections would be required. The primary goals of the investigation were essentially achieved. A large database of flows was collected and assessed, a number of additional hypersonic experiments were conducted in the Ames HWT, and two turbulence models (kappa-epsilon and kappa-omega models with corrections) were determined which gave superior performance for most of the flows studied and are now recommended for NASP applications.

  9. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  10. A microwave radiometer weather-correcting sea ice algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, J. M.; Ruf, C.; Swift, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    A new algorithm for estimating the proportions of the multiyear and first-year sea ice types under variable atmospheric and sea surface conditions is presented, which uses all six channels of the SMMR. The algorithm is specifically tuned to derive sea ice parameters while accepting error in the auxiliary parameters of surface temperature, ocean surface wind speed, atmospheric water vapor, and cloud liquid water content. Not only does the algorithm naturally correct for changes in these weather conditions, but it retrieves sea ice parameters to the extent that gross errors in atmospheric conditions propagate only small errors into the sea ice retrievals. A preliminary evaluation indicates that the weather-correcting algorithm provides a better data product than the 'UMass-AES' algorithm, whose quality has been cross checked with independent surface observations. The algorithm performs best when the sea ice concentration is less than 20 percent.

  11. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Glasses & Contacts Contact Lenses Sections Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Contact ... to Know About Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Leer en Español: Lentes ...

  12. Yearbook of Correctional Education 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duguid, Stephen, Ed.

    This yearbook contains conference papers, commissioned papers, reprints of earlier works, and research-in-progress. They offer a retrospective view as well as address the mission and perspective of correctional education, its international dimension, correctional education in action, and current research. Papers include "Correctional Education and…

  13. 75 FR 16516 - Dates Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Office of the Federal Register Dates Correction Correction In the Notices section beginning on page 15401 in the issue of March 29th, 2010, make the following correction: On pages...

  14. Political Correctness and Cultural Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses political correctness and cultural studies, dealing with cultural studies and the left, the conservative assault on cultural studies, and political correctness in the university. Describes some of the underlying changes in the university, largely unaddressed in the political correctness debate, that provide the deep structure to the…

  15. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOEpatents

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  16. Spectroscopic imaging with prospective motion correction and retrospective phase correction.

    PubMed

    Lange, Thomas; Maclaren, Julian; Buechert, Martin; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2012-06-01

    Motion-induced artifacts are much harder to recognize in magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging than in imaging experiments and can therefore lead to erroneous interpretation. A method for prospective motion correction based on an optical tracking system has recently been proposed and has already been successfully applied to single voxel spectroscopy. In this work, the utility of prospective motion correction in combination with retrospective phase correction is evaluated for spectroscopic imaging in the human brain. Retrospective phase correction, based on the interleaved reference scan method, is used to correct for motion-induced frequency shifts and ensure correct phasing of the spectra across the whole spectroscopic imaging slice. It is demonstrated that the presented correction methodology can reduce motion-induced degradation of spectroscopic imaging data. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Atmospheric effects on remote sensing of surface reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the atmospheric effects on remote sensing of surface reflectance. The scattering and absorption of sunlight by atmospheric molecules and aerosols affects the quality of images of the surface remotely sensed from satellites and aircrafts. The concentration and characteristics of the atmospheric aerosols vary from place to place and vary with time. The effect of atmospheric aerosols on the upward radiance depends on their optical thickness, scattering phase function and absorption. These parameters result from the aerosol concentration, composition, and the relative humidity. For high resolution images the aerosol scale height is also of importance. The radiative transfer theory that predicts the atmospheric radiances for a given surface and atmosphere is a well established theory for the case of uniform surfaces (or low resolution data). Some radiative transfer models exist for nonuniform surfaces and others are being developed. Recent field experiment and laboratory simulation data confirm the need for these models and can be used for their testing. It is shown that the atmospheric effect reduces the apparent resolution of satellite imagery and causes errors in the classification of surface fields. Suggestions for correction procedures are given. Such corrections can be based on ground observations, on satellite radiances above dark areas, or on climatologic information, depending on the accuracy of the corrections needed. The chosen correction algorithm depends also on the image resolution and the specific remote sensing application.

  18. Stray-Light Correction of the Marine Optical Buoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Steven W.; Johnson, B. Carol; Flora, Stephanie J.; Feinholz, Michael E.; Yarbrough, Mark A.; Barnes, Robert A.; Kim, Yong Sung; Lykke, Keith R.; Clark, Dennis K.

    2003-01-01

    In ocean-color remote sensing, approximately 90% of the flux at the sensor originates from atmospheric scattering, with the water-leaving radiance contributing the remaining 10% of the total flux. Consequently, errors in the measured top-of-the atmosphere radiance are magnified a factor of 10 in the determination of water-leaving radiance. Proper characterization of the atmosphere is thus a critical part of the analysis of ocean-color remote sensing data. It has always been necessary to calibrate the ocean-color satellite sensor vicariously, using in situ, ground-based results, independent of the status of the pre-flight radiometric calibration or the utility of on-board calibration strategies. Because the atmosphere contributes significantly to the measured flux at the instrument sensor, both the instrument and the atmospheric correction algorithm are simultaneously calibrated vicariously. The Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY), deployed in support of the Earth Observing System (EOS) since 1996, serves as the primary calibration station for a variety of ocean-color satellite instruments, including the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Japanese Ocean Color Temperature Scanner (OCTS) , and the French Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER). MOBY is located off the coast of Lanai, Hawaii. The site was selected to simplify the application of the atmospheric correction algorithms. Vicarious calibration using MOBY data allows for a thorough comparison and merger of ocean-color data from these multiple sensors.

  19. Improved near-infrared ocean reflectance correction algorithm for satellite ocean color data processing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lide; Wang, Menghua

    2014-09-08

    A new approach for the near-infrared (NIR) ocean reflectance correction in atmospheric correction for satellite ocean color data processing in coastal and inland waters is proposed, which combines the advantages of the three existing NIR ocean reflectance correction algorithms, i.e., Bailey et al. (2010) [Opt. Express18, 7521 (2010)Appl. Opt.39, 897 (2000)Opt. Express20, 741 (2012)], and is named BMW. The normalized water-leaving radiance spectra nLw(λ) obtained from this new NIR-based atmospheric correction approach are evaluated against those obtained from the shortwave infrared (SWIR)-based atmospheric correction algorithm, as well as those from some existing NIR atmospheric correction algorithms based on several case studies. The scenes selected for case studies are obtained from two different satellite ocean color sensors, i.e., the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the satellite Aqua and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP), with an emphasis on several turbid water regions in the world. The new approach has shown to produce nLw(λ) spectra most consistent with the SWIR results among all NIR algorithms. Furthermore, validations against the in situ measurements also show that in less turbid water regions the new approach produces reasonable and similar results comparable to the current operational algorithm. In addition, by combining the new NIR atmospheric correction with the SWIR-based approach, the new NIR-SWIR atmospheric correction can produce further improved ocean color products. The new NIR atmospheric correction can be implemented in a global operational satellite ocean color data processing system.

  20. EDITORIAL: Politically correct physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople Deputy Editor, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    If you were a caring, thinking, liberally minded person in the 1960s, you marched against the bomb, against the Vietnam war, and for civil rights. By the 1980s, your voice was raised about the destruction of the rainforests and the threat to our whole planetary environment. At the same time, you opposed discrimination against any group because of race, sex or sexual orientation. You reasoned that people who spoke or acted in a discriminatory manner should be discriminated against. In other words, you became politically correct. Despite its oft-quoted excesses, the political correctness movement sprang from well-founded concerns about injustices in our society. So, on balance, I am all for it. Or, at least, I was until it started to invade science. Biologists were the first to feel the impact. No longer could they refer to 'higher' and 'lower' orders, or 'primitive' forms of life. To the list of undesirable 'isms' - sexism, racism, ageism - had been added a new one: speciesism. Chemists remained immune to the PC invasion, but what else could you expect from a group of people so steeped in tradition that their principal unit, the mole, requires the use of the thoroughly unreconstructed gram? Now it is the turn of the physicists. This time, the offenders are not those who talk disparagingly about other people or animals, but those who refer to 'forms of energy' and 'heat'. Political correctness has evolved into physical correctness. I was always rather fond of the various forms of energy: potential, kinetic, chemical, electrical, sound and so on. My students might merge heat and internal energy into a single, fuzzy concept loosely associated with moving molecules. They might be a little confused at a whole new crop of energies - hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal and tidal - but they could tell me what devices turned chemical energy into electrical energy, even if they couldn't quite appreciate that turning tidal energy into geothermal energy wasn't part of the

  1. Updating and correction.

    PubMed

    1994-09-09

    The current editions of two books edited by William T. Golden, Science Advice to the President and Science and Technology Advice to the President, Congress, and Judiciary, published this year by AAAS Press, are now being distributed by Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, at the prices $22.95 and $27.95 (paper), respectively, and are no longer available from AAAS. A related work, Golden's 1991 compilation Worldwide Science and Technology Advice to the Highest Levels of Government, originally published by Pergamon Press, is also being distributed by Transaction Publishers, at $25.95. For more information about the books see Science 1 July, p. 127. In the review of K. S. Thorne's Black Holes and Time Warps (13 May, p. 999-1000), the captions and illustrations on p. 1000 were mismatched. The correct order of the captions is (i) "A heavy rock..."; (ii) "Cosmic radio waves..."; and (iii) "The trajectories in space...."

  2. Endoscopic orientation correction.

    PubMed

    Höller, Kurt; Penne, Jochen; Schneider, Armin; Jahn, Jasper; Guttiérrez Boronat, Javier; Wittenberg, Thomas; Feussner, Hubertus; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    An open problem in endoscopic surgery (especially with flexible endoscopes) is the absence of a stable horizon in endoscopic images. With our "Endorientation" approach image rotation correction, even in non-rigid endoscopic surgery (particularly NOTES), can be realized with a tiny MEMS tri-axial inertial sensor placed on the tip of an endoscope. It measures the impact of gravity on each of the three orthogonal accelerometer axes. After an initial calibration and filtering of these three values the rotation angle is estimated directly. Achievable repetition rate is above the usual endoscopic video frame rate of 30 Hz; accuracy is about one degree. The image rotation is performed in real-time by digitally rotating the analog endoscopic video signal. Improvements and benefits have been evaluated in animal studies: Coordination of different instruments and estimation of tissue behavior regarding gravity related deformation and movement was rated to be much more intuitive with a stable horizon on endoscopic images.

  3. Temperature Corrected Bootstrap Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    A temperature corrected Bootstrap Algorithm has been developed using Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data in preparation to the upcoming AMSR instrument aboard ADEOS and EOS-PM. The procedure first calculates the effective surface emissivity using emissivities of ice and water at 6 GHz and a mixing formulation that utilizes ice concentrations derived using the current Bootstrap algorithm but using brightness temperatures from 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels. These effective emissivities are then used to calculate surface ice which in turn are used to convert the 18 GHz and 37 GHz brightness temperatures to emissivities. Ice concentrations are then derived using the same technique as with the Bootstrap algorithm but using emissivities instead of brightness temperatures. The results show significant improvement in the area where ice temperature is expected to vary considerably such as near the continental areas in the Antarctic, where the ice temperature is colder than average, and in marginal ice zones.

  4. Anomaly corrected heterotic horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanella, A.; Gutowski, J. B.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider supersymmetric near-horizon geometries in heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We identify the conditions for the horizons to admit enhancement of supersymmetry. We show that solutions which undergo supersymmetry enhancement exhibit an {s}{l}(2,{R}) symmetry, and we describe the geometry of their horizon sections. We also prove a modified Lichnerowicz type theorem, incorporating α' corrections, which relates Killing spinors to zero modes of near-horizon Dirac operators. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are no AdS2 solutions in heterotic supergravity up to second order in α' for which the fields are smooth and the internal space is smooth and compact without boundary. We investigate a class of nearly supersymmetric horizons, for which the gravitino Killing spinor equation is satisfied on the spatial cross sections but not the dilatino one, and present a description of their geometry.

  5. Temperature Corrected Bootstrap Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    A temperature corrected Bootstrap Algorithm has been developed using Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data in preparation to the upcoming AMSR instrument aboard ADEOS and EOS-PM. The procedure first calculates the effective surface emissivity using emissivities of ice and water at 6 GHz and a mixing formulation that utilizes ice concentrations derived using the current Bootstrap algorithm but using brightness temperatures from 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels. These effective emissivities are then used to calculate surface ice which in turn are used to convert the 18 GHz and 37 GHz brightness temperatures to emissivities. Ice concentrations are then derived using the same technique as with the Bootstrap algorithm but using emissivities instead of brightness temperatures. The results show significant improvement in the area where ice temperature is expected to vary considerably such as near the continental areas in the Antarctic, where the ice temperature is colder than average, and in marginal ice zones.

  6. Rethinking political correctness.

    PubMed

    Ely, Robin J; Meyerson, Debra E; Davidson, Martin N

    2006-09-01

    Legal and cultural changes over the past 40 years ushered unprecedented numbers of women and people of color into companies' professional ranks. Laws now protect these traditionally underrepresented groups from blatant forms of discrimination in hiring and promotion. Meanwhile, political correctness has reset the standards for civility and respect in people's day-to-day interactions. Despite this obvious progress, the authors' research has shown that political correctness is a double-edged sword. While it has helped many employees feel unlimited by their race, gender, or religion,the PC rule book can hinder people's ability to develop effective relationships across race, gender, and religious lines. Companies need to equip workers with skills--not rules--for building these relationships. The authors offer the following five principles for healthy resolution of the tensions that commonly arise over difference: Pause to short-circuit the emotion and reflect; connect with others, affirming the importance of relationships; question yourself to identify blind spots and discover what makes you defensive; get genuine support that helps you gain a broader perspective; and shift your mind-set from one that says, "You need to change," to one that asks, "What can I change?" When people treat their cultural differences--and related conflicts and tensions--as opportunities to gain a more accurate view of themselves, one another, and the situation, trust builds and relationships become stronger. Leaders should put aside the PC rule book and instead model and encourage risk taking in the service of building the organization's relational capacity. The benefits will reverberate through every dimension of the company's work.

  7. Our shared atmosphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our atmosphere is a precious and fascinating resource, providing air to breath, shielding us from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV), and maintaining a comfortable climate. Since the industrial revolution, people have significantly altered the composition of the atmosphere throu...

  8. Rings Through Atmosphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-26

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks toward the limb of Saturn and, on the right of this image, views part of the rings through the planet atmosphere. Saturn atmosphere can distort the view of the rings from some angles.

  9. Our shared atmosphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our atmosphere is a precious and fascinating resource, providing air to breath, shielding us from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV), and maintaining a comfortable climate. Since the industrial revolution, people have significantly altered the composition of the atmosphere throu...

  10. The atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars is essentially a pure carbon dioxide atmosphere that contains a small and seasonably varying amount of water vapor. A number of minor constituents which arise from the interactions of solar radiation with water vapor and carbon dioxide include carbon monoxide, atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, ozone, and atomic hydrogen. At the surface of Mars the atmospheric pressure is less than one hundredth of the pressure at the surface of the earth. Extensive cloud systems appear on Mars. The structure of the lower Martian atmosphere is discussed together with variations in the lower atmosphere and the characteristics of the upper atmosphere. Reactions of photochemistry are considered along with the atmospheric escape and interactions between the atmosphere and the polar caps.

  11. The Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. E. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Topics considered at the conference included the dynamics, structure, chemistry, and evolution of the Venus atmosphere, as well as cloud physics and motion. Infrared, ultraviolet, and radio occultation methods of analysis are discussed, and atmospheric models are described.

  12. Uranus' Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This computer enhancement of a Voyager 2 image, emphasizes the high-level haze in Uranus' upper atmosphere. Clouds are obscured by the overlying atmosphere.

    JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  13. Earth's changeable atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    Billions of years ago, high atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations were vital to life's tenuous foothold on Earth. Despite new constraints, the composition and evolution of Earth's early atmosphere remains hazy.

  14. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.

    2005-04-01

    The latest results from the Soudan 2, MACRO and SuperKamiokande experiments on atmospheric neutrino oscillations are summarised and discussed. In particular a discussion is made on the Monte Carlo simulations used for the atmospheric neutrino flux.

  15. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  16. Airplane wing vibrations due to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastel, R. L.; Caruthers, J. E.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude of error introduced due to wing vibration when measuring atmospheric turbulence with a wind probe mounted at the wing tip was studied. It was also determined whether accelerometers mounted on the wing tip are needed to correct this error. A spectrum analysis approach is used to determine the error. Estimates of the B-57 wing characteristics are used to simulate the airplane wing, and von Karman's cross spectrum function is used to simulate atmospheric turbulence. It was found that wing vibration introduces large error in measured spectra of turbulence in the frequency's range close to the natural frequencies of the wing.

  17. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    terms of motion not needed on Venus. When the Galileo Probe encountered Jupiter, analysis and interpretation of data commenced. The early contributions of the experiment were to define (1) the basic structure of the deep atmosphere, (2) the stability of the atmosphere, (3) the upper atmospheric profiles of density, pressure, and temperature. The next major task in the Galileo Probe project was to refine, verify and extend the analysis of the data. It was the verified, and corrected data, which indicated a dry abiabatic atmosphere within measurement accuracy. Temperature in the thermosphere was measured at 900 K. Participation in the Mars atmospheric research included: (1) work as a team member of the Mars Atmosphere Working Group, (2) contribution to the Mars Exobiology Instrument workshop, (3) asssistance in planning the Mars global network and (4) assitance in planning the Soviet-French Mars mission in 1994. This included a return to the Viking Lander parachute data to refine and improve the definition of winds between 1.5 and 4 kilometer altitude at the two entry sites. The variability of the structure of Mars atmosphere was addressed, which is known to vary with season, latitude, hemisphere and dust loading of the atmosphere. This led to work on the Pathfinder project. The probe had a deployable meteorology mast that had three temperature sensors, and a wind sensor at the tip of the mast. Work on the Titan atmospheric probe was also accomplished. This included developing an experiment proposal to the European Space Agency (ESA), which was not selected. However, as an advisor in the design and preparation of the selected experiment the researcher interacted with scientist on the Huygens Probe Atmosphere Structure Experiment. The researcher also participated in the planning for the Venus Chemical Probe. The science objectives of the probe were to resolve unanswered questions concerning the minor species chemistry of Venus' atmosphere that control cloud formation

  18. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    terms of motion not needed on Venus. When the Galileo Probe encountered Jupiter, analysis and interpretation of data commenced. The early contributions of the experiment were to define (1) the basic structure of the deep atmosphere, (2) the stability of the atmosphere, (3) the upper atmospheric profiles of density, pressure, and temperature. The next major task in the Galileo Probe project was to refine, verify and extend the analysis of the data. It was the verified, and corrected data, which indicated a dry abiabatic atmosphere within measurement accuracy. Temperature in the thermosphere was measured at 900 K. Participation in the Mars atmospheric research included: (1) work as a team member of the Mars Atmosphere Working Group, (2) contribution to the Mars Exobiology Instrument workshop, (3) asssistance in planning the Mars global network and (4) assitance in planning the Soviet-French Mars mission in 1994. This included a return to the Viking Lander parachute data to refine and improve the definition of winds between 1.5 and 4 kilometer altitude at the two entry sites. The variability of the structure of Mars atmosphere was addressed, which is known to vary with season, latitude, hemisphere and dust loading of the atmosphere. This led to work on the Pathfinder project. The probe had a deployable meteorology mast that had three temperature sensors, and a wind sensor at the tip of the mast. Work on the Titan atmospheric probe was also accomplished. This included developing an experiment proposal to the European Space Agency (ESA), which was not selected. However, as an advisor in the design and preparation of the selected experiment the researcher interacted with scientist on the Huygens Probe Atmosphere Structure Experiment. The researcher also participated in the planning for the Venus Chemical Probe. The science objectives of the probe were to resolve unanswered questions concerning the minor species chemistry of Venus' atmosphere that control cloud formation

  19. Atmospheric turbulence effects on the performance of the laser wireless power transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapranov, V. V.; Matsak, I. S.; Tugaenko, V. Yu.; Blank, A. V.; Suhareva, N. A.

    2017-02-01

    Application of adaptive correction is necessary to control wandering of the laser beam in wireless power transfer (WPT) system. In this paper we describe experimental results of using different adaptive correction techniques for both weak and strong turbulence conditions. All experiments were performed over a 1.5 km near-horizontal atmospheric path. Some criteria for choosing parameters of adaptive correction are given.

  20. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  1. The atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    Current information on the neutral atmosphere of Jupiter is reviewed, with approximately equal emphasis on composition and thermal structure on one hand, and markings and dynamics on the other. Studies based on Pioneer 10 and 11 data are used to refine the atmospheric model. Data on the interior are reviewed for the information they provide on the deep atmosphere. The markings and dynamics are discussed with emphasis on qualitative relationships and analogies with phenomena in earth's atmosphere.

  2. 75 FR 17055 - Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary Regulations on the Use of Spearfishing Gear; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 15 CFR Part 922 RIN 0648-AX37 Gray's Reef National Marine... inadvertently missing a word in Sec. 922.92(a)(11)(iii). This document corrects the final regulations by... notice corrects the grammatical error in Part 922.92 (a)(11)(iii) by adding the word ``it'' to...

  3. 76 FR 14299 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Species: Correction To Codify in the Code of Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Resident Killer Whales AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... correcting amendment to the Code of Federal Regulations to identify the Southern Resident killer whale... and Correcting Amendment We listed the Southern Resident killer whale DPS as an endangered...

  4. Observation-Corrected Precipitation Estimates in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Several GEOS-5 applications, including the GEOS-5 seasonal forecasting system and the MERRA-Land data product, rely on global precipitation data that have been corrected with satellite and or gauge-based precipitation observations. This document describes the methodology used to generate the corrected precipitation estimates and their use in GEOS-5 applications. The corrected precipitation estimates are derived by disaggregating publicly available, observationally based, global precipitation products from daily or pentad totals to hourly accumulations using background precipitation estimates from the GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system. Depending on the specific combination of the observational precipitation product and the GEOS-5 background estimates, the observational product may also be downscaled in space. The resulting corrected precipitation data product is at the finer temporal and spatial resolution of the GEOS-5 background and matches the observed precipitation at the coarser scale of the observational product, separately for each day (or pentad) and each grid cell.

  5. Atmospheric Propagation Analysis Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    of water vapor and carbon dioxide .......... 18 I 8. Atmospheric transmittance due to molecular absorption through a 10 -km horizontal path at sea level...n - 1.33) ........... 21 10 . Atmospheric transmission spectra ............................... 24 11. APA atmospheric data sheet...between LOWTRAN and actual data, Adak, AK (2/25/92) .................................................... 162 10 . Differences between LOWTRAN and actual

  6. Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-02-25

    A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

  7. Deconvolution with Correct Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magain, P.; Courbin, F.; Sohy, S.

    1998-02-01

    A new method for improving the resolution of astronomical images is presented. It is based on the principle that sampled data cannot be fully deconvolved without violating the sampling theorem. Thus, the sampled image should be deconvolved not by the total point-spread function but by a narrower function chosen so that the resolution of the deconvolved image is compatible with the adopted sampling. Our deconvolution method gives results that are, in at least some cases, superior to those of other commonly used techniques: in particular, it does not produce ringing around point sources superposed on a smooth background. Moreover, it allows researchers to perform accurate astrometry and photometry of crowded fields. These improvements are a consequence of both the correct treatment of sampling and the recognition that the most probable astronomical image is not a flat one. The method is also well adapted to the optimal combination of different images of the same object, as can be obtained, e.g., from infrared observations or via adaptive optics techniques.

  8. Thermodynamics of Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and work dissipated by the system during wrong incorporations. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics; hence, its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  9. Ground-Based Correction of Remote-Sensing Spectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alder-Golden, Steven M.; Rochford, Peter; Matthew, Michael; Berk, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Software has been developed for an improved method of correcting for the atmospheric optical effects (primarily, effects of aerosols and water vapor) in spectral images of the surface of the Earth acquired by airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing instruments. In this method, the variables needed for the corrections are extracted from the readings of a radiometer located on the ground in the vicinity of the scene of interest. The software includes algorithms that analyze measurement data acquired from a shadow-band radiometer. These algorithms are based on a prior radiation transport software model, called MODTRAN, that has been developed through several versions up to what are now known as MODTRAN4 and MODTRAN5 . These components have been integrated with a user-friendly Interactive Data Language (IDL) front end and an advanced version of MODTRAN4. Software tools for handling general data formats, performing a Langley-type calibration, and generating an output file of retrieved atmospheric parameters for use in another atmospheric-correction computer program known as FLAASH have also been incorporated into the present soft-ware. Concomitantly with the soft-ware described thus far, there has been developed a version of FLAASH that utilizes the retrieved atmospheric parameters to process spectral image data.

  10. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  11. Gravitational correction to vacuum polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the gravitational correction to (electronic) vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational background field. The Dirac propagators for the virtual fermions are modified to include the leading gravitational correction (potential term) which corresponds to a coordinate-dependent fermion mass. The mass term is assumed to be uniform over a length scale commensurate with the virtual electron-positron pair. The on-mass shell renormalization condition ensures that the gravitational correction vanishes on the mass shell of the photon, i.e., the speed of light is unaffected by the quantum field theoretical loop correction, in full agreement with the equivalence principle. Nontrivial corrections are obtained for off-shell, virtual photons. We compare our findings to other works on generalized Lorentz transformations and combined quantum-electrodynamic gravitational corrections to the speed of light which have recently appeared in the literature.

  12. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I.; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-02-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83-0714442.5, whose 4.5-5.2 μm spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 109 cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  13. A comparison of radiometric correction techniques in the evaluation of the relationship between LST and NDVI in Landsat imagery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Chooi; Lim, Hwee San; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric corrections for multi-temporal optical satellite images are necessary, especially in change detection analyses, such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) rationing. Abrupt change detection analysis using remote-sensing techniques requires radiometric congruity and atmospheric correction to monitor terrestrial surfaces over time. Two atmospheric correction methods were used for this study: relative radiometric normalization and the simplified method for atmospheric correction (SMAC) in the solar spectrum. A multi-temporal data set consisting of two sets of Landsat images from the period between 1991 and 2002 of Penang Island, Malaysia, was used to compare NDVI maps, which were generated using the proposed atmospheric correction methods. Land surface temperature (LST) was retrieved using ATCOR3_T in PCI Geomatica 10.1 image processing software. Linear regression analysis was utilized to analyze the relationship between NDVI and LST. This study reveals that both of the proposed atmospheric correction methods yielded high accuracy through examination of the linear correlation coefficients. To check for the accuracy of the equation obtained through linear regression analysis for every single satellite image, 20 points were randomly chosen. The results showed that the SMAC method yielded a constant value (in terms of error) to predict the NDVI value from linear regression analysis-derived equation. The errors (average) from both proposed atmospheric correction methods were less than 10%.

  14. Processor register error correction management

    DOEpatents

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Gupta, Meeta S.

    2016-12-27

    Processor register protection management is disclosed. In embodiments, a method of processor register protection management can include determining a sensitive logical register for executable code generated by a compiler, generating an error-correction table identifying the sensitive logical register, and storing the error-correction table in a memory accessible by a processor. The processor can be configured to generate a duplicate register of the sensitive logical register identified by the error-correction table.

  15. In Situ Mosaic Brightness Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Lorre, Jean J.

    2012-01-01

    In situ missions typically have pointable, mast-mounted cameras, which are capable of taking panoramic mosaics comprised of many individual frames. These frames are mosaicked together. While the mosaic software applies radiometric correction to the images, in many cases brightness/contrast seams still exist between frames. This is largely due to errors in the radiometric correction, and the absence of correction for photometric effects in the mosaic processing chain. The software analyzes the overlaps between adjacent frames in the mosaic and determines correction factors for each image in an attempt to reduce or eliminate these brightness seams.

  16. Measuring atmospheric composition change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, P.; Klausen, J.; Bilde, M.; Plaß-Duelmer, C.; Pappalardo, G.; Clerbaux, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Hjorth, J.; Simpson, D.; Reimann, S.; Coheur, P.-F.; Richter, A.; De Mazière, M.; Rudich, Y.; McFiggans, G.; Torseth, K.; Wiedensohler, A.; Morin, S.; Schulz, M.; Allan, J. D.; Attié, J.-L.; Barnes, I.; Birmili, W.; Cammas, J. P.; Dommen, J.; Dorn, H.-P.; Fowler, D.; Fuzzi, S.; Glasius, M.; Granier, C.; Hermann, M.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Kinne, S.; Koren, I.; Madonna, F.; Maione, M.; Massling, A.; Moehler, O.; Mona, L.; Monks, P. S.; Müller, D.; Müller, T.; Orphal, J.; Peuch, V.-H.; Stratmann, F.; Tanré, D.; Tyndall, G.; Abo Riziq, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Villani, P.; Wehner, B.; Wex, H.; Zardini, A. A.

    Scientific findings from the last decades have clearly highlighted the need for a more comprehensive approach to atmospheric change processes. In fact, observation of atmospheric composition variables has been an important activity of atmospheric research that has developed instrumental tools (advanced analytical techniques) and platforms (instrumented passenger aircrafts, ground-based in situ and remote sensing stations, earth observation satellite instruments) providing essential information on the composition of the atmosphere. The variability of the atmospheric system and the extreme complexity of the atmospheric cycles for short-lived gaseous and aerosol species have led to the development of complex models to interpret observations, test our theoretical understanding of atmospheric chemistry and predict future atmospheric composition. The validation of numerical models requires accurate information concerning the variability of atmospheric composition for targeted species via comparison with observations and measurements. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in instrumentation and methodologies for measuring atmospheric composition changes from space, aircraft and the surface as well as recent improvements in laboratory techniques that permitted scientific advance in the field of atmospheric chemistry. Emphasis is given to the most promising and innovative technologies that will become operational in the near future to improve knowledge of atmospheric composition. Our current observation capacity, however, is not satisfactory to understand and predict future atmospheric composition changes, in relation to predicted climate warming. Based on the limitation of the current European observing system, we address the major gaps in a second part of the paper to explain why further developments in current observation strategies are still needed to strengthen and optimise an observing system not only capable of responding to the requirements of

  17. Evaluation of the Vienna APL corrections using reprocessed GNSS series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, P.; Dach, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics of the Vienna University of Technology recently started an operational service to provide non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (APL) corrections. As the series is based on European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) pressure data, it is fully consistent with the Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) atmospheric delay correction model for microwave measurements. Whereas VMF1 is widely used for, e.g., observations of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), applying APL corrections is not yet a standard nowadays. The Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) - a joint venture between the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland), the Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo, Wabern, Switzerland), the Federal Office for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG, Frankfurt am Main, Germany), and the Insitute for Astronomical and Physical Geodesy, TU Muenchen (IAPG, Munich, Germany) - uses a recently generated series of reprocessed multi-GNSS data (considering GPS and GLONASS) to evaluate the APL corrections provided by the Vienna group. The results are also used to investigate the propagation of the APL effect in GNSS-derived results if no corrections are applied.

  18. Alternate corrections for estimating actual wetland evapotranspiration from potential evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barclay, Shoemaker W.; Sumner, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Corrections can be used to estimate actual wetland evapotranspiration (AET) from potential evapotranspiration (PET) as a means to define the hydrology of wetland areas. Many alternate parameterizations for correction coefficients for three PET equations are presented, covering a wide range of possible data-availability scenarios. At nine sites in the wetland Everglades of south Florida, USA, the relatively complex PET Penman equation was corrected to daily total AET with smaller standard errors than the PET simple and Priestley-Taylor equations. The simpler equations, however, required less data (and thus less funding for instrumentation), with the possibility of being corrected to AET with slightly larger, comparable, or even smaller standard errors. Air temperature generally corrected PET simple most effectively to wetland AET, while wetland stage and humidity generally corrected PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman most effectively to wetland AET. Stage was identified for PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman as the data type with the most correction ability at sites that are dry part of each year or dry part of some years. Finally, although surface water generally was readily available at each monitoring site, AET was not occurring at potential rates, as conceptually expected under well-watered conditions. Apparently, factors other than water availability, such as atmospheric and stomata resistances to vapor transport, also were limiting the PET rate. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  19. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  20. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    of motion of the atmosphere— "second order closure"—to such applications as the SCIPUFF -PC code for tracer dispersion (see Sykes, 1994). Now, for...Turbulence, Methuen, London, 2nd Ed., 1955. Sykes, R.I., "The SCIPUFF -PC Code," ARAP Draft Report, 1994. Tennekes, H., "The Atmospheric Boundary Layer