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Sample records for atom probe field-ion

  1. Atom probe field ion microscopy characterizations of VVER steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Othen, P.J.; Brauer, G.

    1993-07-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) characterization of Soviet types 15Kh2MFA Cr-Mo-V (VVER 440) and 15Kh2NMFA Ni-Cr-Mo-V (VVER 1000) pressure vessel steels has been performed. Field ion microscopy has revealed that the lath boundaries in unirradiated VVER 440 and VVER 1000 steels are decorated with a thin film of brightly-imaging molybdenum carbonitride precipitates and some coarser vanadium carbides. Atom probe analysis has revealed significant enrichments of phosphorous at the lath boundaries.

  2. Atom probe field ion microscopy of titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Titanium aluminides have a number of potential high temperature applications due to their good elevated-temperature mechanical properties, low density, and good creep and oxidation resistance. However, fabrication of commercial components of these materials has been impeded by their poor mechanical properties at ambient temperatures. Significant efforts with various degrees of success have been made to improve the mechanical properties of these TiAl alloys by doping them with a variety of different elements including B, C, Cr, Er, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Nb, P, Si, Ta, V and W. One of the optimum analytical tools for investigating the effects of these additions on the microstructure is the atom probe field ion micro scope. However, relatively few studies of titanium aluminides, compared to some other intermetallic compounds, have performed by atom probe field ion microscopy. This lack of attention can be attributed to the brittle nature of the material, in-situ transformations that occur during the field ion microscopy and preferential evaporation problems that were encountered in some of the early studies. The atom probe field ion microscope used for the current experiments has a low base pressure ({approximately} 2 {times} 10{sup 9} Pa) and careful attention was paid to optimizing the experimental parameters. All the examples shown were obtained from specimens prepared by standard electropolishing techniques. To demonstrate the suitability of the technique to these materials, several different titanium aluminides have been characterized in the atom probe.

  3. Atom probe field ion microscopy of high resistivity materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sibrandij, S.J.; Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-02-01

    Over the last 30 years the atom probe has proved to be a powerful tool for studying nanometer-sized compositional fluctuations in a wide range of metallic alloys but has had only limited applications to semiconductors and ceramics. One of the primary reasons for this difference is the higher resistivity of semiconducting and ceramic specimens. Because of this high resistivity, the high voltage field evaporation pulse is attenuated before it reaches the apex of the specimen thereby making the pulse ineffective for field evaporation. Experiments have demonstrated that both variants of the voltage-pulsed atom probe (i.e., those instruments in which the field evaporation pulse is applied directly to the specimen and those in which the negative pulse is applied to a counter electrode in front of the specimen) are equally affected. In this overview, the limits of applicability of the voltage-pulsed atom probe to high resistivity materials are examined. In this study, a wide range of materials have been examined to determine whether field ion microscopy and voltage-pulsed field evaporation can be achieved and the results are summarized in the report. Field ion microscopy including dc field evaporation was possible for all materials except bulk ceramic insulators and glasses. Field ion microscopy requires some conductivity both to achieve a high electric field at the apex of the specimen, and also to support the field ion current. In contrast, voltage-pulsed field evaporation requires transmission of the pulse to the apex of the specimen. All metallic alloys including high resistance alloys and metallic glasses were successfully field evaporated with a voltage pulse. Specimens that were produced from bulk material of several conducting ceramics including MoSi, TiB and TiC were also successfully field evaporated with a voltage pulse.

  4. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  5. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations of books, conference proceedings, journals, and patents published in 1992 on the following types of microscopy: atom probe field ion microscopy (108 items); field emission microscopy (101 items); and field ion microscopy (48 items). An addendum of 34 items missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  6. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: field-ion microscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), and liquid metal ion sources (LMIS). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles.

  7. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  8. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  11. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  12. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F.

    1994-10-01

    This bibliography, covering the period 1993, includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field emission (FE), and field ion microscopy (FIM). Technique-oriented studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references are listed alphabetically by authors, an Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  13. A high-resolution pulsed-laser atom-probe field-ion microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelikov, Dmitriy V.

    2001-10-01

    The atom-probe field-ion microscope is a unique instrument for the analysis of materials on an atom-by- atom and atomic layer-by-atomic layer basis. It combines a point projection microscope, which allows one to observe individual atoms in direct lattice space on the surface of a sharply pointed tip under a high positive voltage, with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can measure mass-to-charge ratios of individual atoms field- evaporated from the surface of a tip during a few nanosecond wide high-voltage or laser pulse. The ability to distinguish atomic isotopes and molecular clusters of one species from the other is crucial in the atom-probe analysis of multi-component materials. One of the main sources of errors in such an analysis is energy deficits of field-evaporated ions inherent to the pulsed high- voltage evaporation process. Therefore, in this study the task of designing and fabricating an atom-probe field-ion microscope capable of compensating these energy deficits, and versatile enough to be able to analyze a wide spectrum of engineering materials, was undertaken. The instrument has the following features: (a)ultrahigh vacuum (UHV); (b)a specimen exchange device that will store up to 10 specimens and allows transferring specimens directly from atmospheric pressure to UHV conditions; (c)a closed cycle helium refrigerator with a temperature regulator capable of cooling the specimen to 10 K; (d)a 3D goniometer with +/-30° tilt in the horizontal and vertical planes; (e)a variable distance, high gain MCP assembly for field-ion microscopy; (f)a single stage reflectron lens; (g)a 1500 Hz solid-state high voltage pulser; (h)a 20 Hz, 300 μJ/pulse, 4 ns pulsed nitrogen laser analysis capability. The mass resolution of this instrument is D(/) /= / at full-width half-maximum (FWHM) with high-voltage pulsing and D(/) /= / at FWHM with laser pulsing.

  14. Atom probe field-ion microscopy characterization of nickel and titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    2000-02-01

    A review of the contributions of atom probe field-ion microscopy to the characterization of nickel and titanium aluminides is presented. The nickel aluminide systems studied include boron-doped Ni{sub 3}Al and boron-, carbon-, beryllium-, zirconium-, molybdenum-, and hafnium-doped NiAl. These systems have been characterized in terms of solute segregation to boundaries, dislocations, and other defects, matrix solubilities, precipitation, and site-occupation probabilities. The partitioning behavior of impurities and alloying additions, matrix solubilities, precipitate compositions, and interfacial segregation in several of {alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma} titanium aluminides and related alloys are also reviewed.

  15. Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy of Zr-Doped Polysynthetically Twinned Titanium Aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, H.; Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1999-02-28

    Interracial segregation and partitioning in a polysynthetically twinned Ti-48.4 at.% Al-0.6% Zr alloy were investigated by atom probe field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography. The compositions of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases were determined to be Ti-47.5% Al-O.71% Zr-0.06% O and Ti-31.6% Al-0.68% Zr-2.4% O, respectively. These results indicate a high concentration of zirconium in both matrix phases, confirming a strength increase through solid-solution strengthening, but no significant zirconium partitioning to either phase. Although zirconium additions produced a refined lamellar microstructure in this material, compositional analysis of {gamma}/{gamma} and {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} interfaces showed no evidence of significant zirconium segregation. This suggests that zirconium additions may produce a refined lamellar microstructure, but may not be effective at providing resistance to growth and coarsening.

  16. Implementation of atomically defined field ion microscopy tips in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, William; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The field ion microscope (FIM) can be used to characterize the atomic configuration of the apices of sharp tips. These tips are well suited for scanning probe microscope (SPM) use since they predetermine the SPM resolution and the electronic structure for spectroscopy. A protocol is proposed for preserving the atomic structure of the tip apex from etching due to gas impurities during the period of transfer from the FIM to the SPM, and estimations are made regarding the time limitations of such an experiment due to contamination with ultra-high vacuum rest gases. While avoiding any current setpoint overshoot to preserve the tip integrity, we present results from approaches of atomically defined tungsten tips to the tunneling regime with Au(111), HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) and Si(111) surfaces at room temperature. We conclude from these experiments that adatom mobility and physisorbed gas on the sample surface limit the choice of surfaces for which the tip integrity is preserved in tunneling experiments at room temperature. The atomic structure of FIM tip apices is unchanged only after tunneling to the highly reactive Si(111) surface.

  17. Atom probe field ion microscopy of Type 308 CRE stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Miller, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Addition of controlled residual elements (CRE), such as 0.007 wt % B, to type 308 stainless steel welds, improved creep-rupture properties. In this paper, B distribution and microstructure development were studied. The microstructural evolution during high-temperature aging was found to similar to that of commercial SS308 welds. Atom probe analysis showed that B and C segregate to the ferrite-austenite interface. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the segregation is due to preferential partitioning of B and C to the liquid during solidification. Further work is needed to study B redistribution in aging stages.

  18. Microstructural evolution and age hardening in aluminium alloys: Atom probe field-ion microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ringer, S.P.; Hono, K.

    2000-02-01

    This paper examines the microstructural evolution in selected aluminum alloys based on commercial age hardenable 2000, 6000, and 7000 series alloys. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and transmission electron microscopy have been used to examine the effects of microalloying and the origins of hardening. The combined application of these techniques is particularly important in the study of nanoscale precipitation processes. It is shown that the nature and kinetics of the precipitation process depend on the solute-solute interactions that produce solute clusters. The solute clusters precede the formation of GP zones or precipitation, and have a defining role on the nature and kinetics of the subsequent precipitation processes. Moreover, interactions between solute clustering and dislocations can have a significant hardening effect, the origins of which seem to be distinctly different from the conventional notion of precipitation hardening.

  19. Nanocrystalline Ni-3.6 at.% P and its transformation sequence studied by atom-probe field-ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hentschel, T.; Isheim, D.; Kirchheim, R.; Mueller, F.; Kreye, H.

    2000-02-25

    The transformation sequence of electroless plated nanocrystalline Ni-3.6 at.% P layers upon different heat treatments is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM). APFIM reveals P segregation at the grain boundaries in the as-plated nanocrystalline alloy. DSC shows two heat releases upon isochronic heat treatment. During the first heat release, starting at about 136 C for a heating rate of 20 C/min, structural relaxation occurs first, followed by slight crystal growth and segregation enhancement, as shown by XRD and APFIM. Nucleation of the equilibrium phase Ni{sub 3}P starts in the transition to the second heat release. This second heat release, with a sharp onset at 417 C for heating at a rate of 20 C/min, is related to the major part of Ni{sub 3}P-phase formation and substantial grain growth. The transformation sequence is compared with the one observed on amorphous Ni-P alloys and discussed in terms of a thermodynamic model.

  20. Field ion microscopy and 3-D atom probe analysis of Al3Zr particles in 7050 Al alloy.

    PubMed

    Sha, G; Cerezo, A

    2005-01-01

    Field ion microscope images have been used to measure the local evaporation field of a Al3Zr particle in 7050 Al alloy. Using the matrix Al evaporation field (19 V/nm) as a reference, the evaporation field of Al3Zr has been estimated to be 36 V/nm, similar to the theoretical value for the field evaporation of Al2+ or Zr3+ ions. A strong local magnification effect from the large difference in evaporation fields between the particle and matrix has been found to cause a severe distortion of the apparent particle morphology in a three-dimensional atom probe reconstruction when using parameters based on the Al matrix. Use of the measured evaporation field for Al3Zr has allowed accurate reconstruction of the morphology of the particle. A simple worst-case analysis predicts that trajectory overlaps increase with increasing cross-section of particle, and the calculated overlaps agree well with experimental estimates of approximately 1.4-2.0 nm for variations in the particle cross-section from 7 to 12 nm. The chemical composition of Al3Zr in a 7050 Al alloy has been measured to be 64.8-67.7 at% Al, 23.6-24.8 at% Zr, 6.9-9.1 at% Zn, 0.4-0.7 at% Cu, 0.5-1.2 at% Mg, with a (Al+Zn)/Zr ratio close to 3. Specimen analysis temperatures of either 25 or 80 K show little effect on the measured chemical compositions of the particle.

  1. A system for systematically preparing atom-probe field-ion-microscope specimens for the study of internal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakauer, B. W.; Hu, J. G.; Kuo, S.-M.; Mallick, R. L.; Seki, A.; Seidman, D. N.; Baker, J. P.; Loyd, R. J.

    1990-11-01

    A versatile system has been designed and fabricated to prepare atom-probe field-ion-microscope (APFIM) specimens in a systematic manner, such that internal interfaces can be positioned in the tips of these wire specimens for subsequent analysis of their chemical composition. This system incorporates both beaker electrolytic and zone electrolytic cell configurations, a specially constructed power supply, and a special transmission electron microscope holder for wires. The power supply enables ac electroetching or dc electropolishing in the automated or manual modes. The ac wave forms available are sine (0.002 Hz-200 kHz) or square (10 Hz-20 kHz). Triggering and gating are performed manually or with a pulse generator. The dc output is gated manually to produce a continuous output or with a pulse generator to produce single pulses with widths in the range 50 μs-1 s. A counter indicates the number of periods of voltage applied, and the total charge transferred in the electrolytic cell is integrated in the range 10 μA s-1 kA s. The power supply provides 0 to ±48 V peak at 1 A peak. A double-tilt stage for an Hitachi H-700H 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) was radically modified to hold APFIM specimens; this stage is vibrationless at 310 000× magnification. It has a tilting range of ±30° and ±27° for the x and y tilts, respectively. Examples are given of the controlled backpolishing of W-3 at. % Re, W-25 at. % Re, Mo-5.4 at. % Re, and Fe-3 at. % Si specimens, and their observation by TEM, to selectively place grain boundaries in the tip region. The analysis of the chemical composition of a grain boundary, which is first located in a W-25 at. % Re specimen via TEM, by the APFIM technique is presented.

  2. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  3. Automated Atom-By-Atom Three-Dimensional (3D) Reconstruction of Field Ion Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Michal; Gault, Baptiste; Smith, George D W; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-03-20

    An automated procedure has been developed for the reconstruction of field ion microscopy (FIM) data that maintains its atomistic nature. FIM characterizes individual atoms on the specimen's surface, evolving subject to field evaporation, in a series of two-dimensional (2D) images. Its unique spatial resolution enables direct imaging of crystal defects as small as single vacancies. To fully exploit FIM's potential, automated analysis tools are required. The reconstruction algorithm developed here relies on minimal assumptions and is sensitive to atomic coordinates of all imaged atoms. It tracks the atoms across a sequence of images, allocating each to its respective crystallographic plane. The result is a highly accurate 3D lattice-resolved reconstruction. The procedure is applied to over 2000 tungsten atoms, including ion-implanted planes. The approach is further adapted to analyze carbides in a steel matrix, demonstrating its applicability to a range of materials. A vast amount of information is collected during the experiment that can underpin advanced analyses such as automated detection of "out of sequence" events, subangstrom surface displacements and defects effects on neighboring atoms. These analyses have the potential to reveal new insights into the field evaporation process and contribute to improving accuracy and scope of 3D FIM and atom probe characterization.

  4. A single-atom sharp iridium tip as an emitter of gas field ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hong-Shi; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Hwang, Ying-Siang; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Hou, Jin-Long; Tsong, Tien T.

    2009-08-01

    We report a reliable method for preparing a pure Ir single-atom tip by thermal treatment in oxygen. The atomic structure of the tip apex and its ion emission characteristics are investigated with field ion microscopy. We have shown that the Ir single-atom tip can be a good field ion emitter, capable of emitting a variety of gas ion beams, such as He+, H2+, N2+, and O2+, with high brightness and stability. In addition, this tip can easily be maintained and regenerated in vacuum, ensuring it has sufficient lifetime for practical applications.

  5. Xenon gas field ion source from a single-atom tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Chiao; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Chang, Wei-Tse; Li, Po-Chang; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Chang, Chia-Seng; Tsong, T. T.; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2017-06-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems have become powerful diagnostic and modification tools for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gas field ion sources (GFISs) built from atomic-size emitters offer the highest brightness among all ion sources and thus can improve the spatial resolution of FIB systems. Here we show that the Ir/W(111) single-atom tip (SAT) can emit high-brightness Xe+ ion beams with a high current stability. The ion emission current versus extraction voltage was analyzed from 150 K up to 309 K. The optimal emitter temperature for maximum Xe+ ion emission was ˜150 K and the reduced brightness at the Xe gas pressure of 1 × 10-4 torr is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of a Ga liquid metal ion source, and four to five orders of magnitude higher than that of a Xe inductively coupled plasma ion source. Most surprisingly, the SAT emitter remained stable even when operated at 309 K. Even though the ion current decreased with increasing temperature, the current at room temperature (RT) could still reach over 1 pA when the gas pressure was higher than 1 × 10-3 torr, indicating the feasibility of RT-Xe-GFIS for application to FIB systems. The operation temperature of Xe-SAT-GFIS is considerably higher than the cryogenic temperature required for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which offers great technical advantages because only simple or no cooling schemes can be adopted. Thus, Xe-GFIS-FIB would be easy to implement and may become a powerful tool for nanoscale milling and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  6. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source.

    PubMed

    Pitters, Jason L; Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A

    2012-04-21

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  7. Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2012-06-25

    Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

  8. Atom probe tomography in nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavette, Didier; Duguay, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    The role of laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) in microelectronics is discussed on the basis of various illustrations related to SiGe epitaxial layers, bipolar transistors or MOS nano-devices including gate all around (GAA) devices that were carried out at the Groupe de Physique des Matériaux of Rouen (France). 3D maps as provided by APT reveal the atomic-scale distribution of dopants and nanostructural features that are vital for nanoelectronics. Because of trajectory aberrations, APT images are subjected to distortions and local composition at the nm scale may either be biased. Procedures accounting for these effects were applied so that to correct images.

  9. Probing a Device's Active Atoms.

    PubMed

    Studniarek, Michał; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Schleicher, Filip; Taudul, Beata; Urbain, Etienne; Boukari, Samy; Hervé, Marie; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Hamadeh, Abbass; Petit-Watelot, Sebastien; Zill, Olivia; Lacour, Daniel; Joly, Loïc; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schmerber, Guy; Da Costa, Victor; Dixit, Anant; Guitard, Pierre André; Acosta, Manuel; Leduc, Florian; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Montaigne, François; Monteblanco, Elmer Nahuel; Arabski, Jacek; Ohresser, Philippe; Beaurepaire, Eric; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mébarek; Hehn, Michel; Bowen, Martin

    2017-03-13

    Materials science and device studies have, when implemented jointly as "operando" studies, better revealed the causal link between the properties of the device's materials and its operation, with applications ranging from gas sensing to information and energy technologies. Here, as a further step that maximizes this causal link, the paper focuses on the electronic properties of those atoms that drive a device's operation by using it to read out the materials property. It is demonstrated how this method can reveal insight into the operation of a macroscale, industrial-grade microelectronic device on the atomic level. A magnetic tunnel junction's (MTJ's) current, which involves charge transport across different atomic species and interfaces, is measured while these atoms absorb soft X-rays with synchrotron-grade brilliance. X-ray absorption is found to affect magnetotransport when the photon energy and linear polarization are tuned to excite FeO bonds parallel to the MTJ's interfaces. This explicit link between the device's spintronic performance and these FeO bonds, although predicted, challenges conventional wisdom on their detrimental spintronic impact. The technique opens interdisciplinary possibilities to directly probe the role of different atomic species on device operation, and shall considerably simplify the materials science iterations within device research.

  10. Atom Probe Tomography of Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Gorman, B.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Jaeger, D.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present atom probe tomographic (APT) analyses of natural olivine. APT provides three-dimensional trace element and isotopic analysis with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. It has been used for many years in engineering and materials science, but has not been applied to geological materials because traditional APT can only be used on conducting (usually metal) samples. The recent development of laser assisted APT has changed this situation, and now semi-conductors and insulators can be analyzed (Marquis et al., 2009, Kelly et al 2007). Potentially, this opens APT to extensive use in geoscience as many Fe-bearing silicates are semi-conductors. In this study, we explore the capability of the new class of APT instrumentation to analyze geological materials. APT involves the controlled evaporation of small, cylindrical specimens (100's nm in diameter) within an electric field. Specimens are typically prepared using in-situ focused-ion-beam (FIB) liftout and shaping techniques. Evaporated atoms are accelerated to a detector plate that records the position of the atom with sub-nm precision. Evaporated atoms are measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, allowing both elemental and isotopic determination. Since the method progressively ablates into the needle, the final analytical result is a nm-scale 3-dimensional image in which the position and identity of each detected atom is known. Typical mass resolution is between 200 and 1200 (full-width at half maximum) and typical concentration detection limits are 10 ppm. The number of potential applications of APT to igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary materials is large, ranging from studies of mineral and melt inclusions, to fine scale layering in minerals, to reaction surfaces and diffusion profiles. Much recent progress in the geochemical and petrologic fields has been driven by the increasing spatial resolution of the ion probe and laser ablation ICPMS. The ability of APT to provide atom-scale mass

  11. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  12. The Future of Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Kelly, T. F.; Rajan, Krishna; Ringer, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    The dream of the microscopy and materials science communities is to see, identify, accurately locate, and determine the fundamental physical properties of every atom in a specimen. With this knowledge together with modern computer models and simulations, a full understanding of the properties of a material can be determined. This fundamental knowledge leads to the design and development of more advanced materials for solving the needs of society. The technique of atom probe tomography is the closest to fulfilling this dream but is still significantly short of the goal. The future of atomic probe tomography, and the prospects for achieving this ultimate goal are outlined.

  13. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors Using Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, B. P.; Norman, A. G.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.; Guthrey, H.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2011-01-01

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  14. Optical probing of cold trapped atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. W.; Gilbert, S. L.; Hollberg, L.; Marquardt, J. H.; Robinson, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Transitions between excited states of laser-cooled and laser-trapped rubidium and cesium atoms are probed by use of fiber and diode lasers. High-resolution Doppler-free spectra are detected by observation of the absorption and fluorescence of light from the intermediate level of two-step cascade systems. The optical double-resonance spectra show Autler-Townes splitting in the weak probe limit and more complicated spectra for a strongly coupled three-level system.

  15. Modeling Atom Probe Tomography: A review.

    PubMed

    Vurpillot, F; Oberdorfer, C

    2015-12-01

    Improving both the precision and the accuracy of Atom Probe Tomography reconstruction requires a correct understanding of the imaging process. In this aim, numerical modeling approaches have been developed for 15 years. The injected ingredients of these modeling tools are related to the basic physic of the field evaporation mechanism. The interplay between the sample nature and structure of the analyzed sample and the reconstructed image artefacts have pushed to gradually improve and make the model more and more sophisticated. This paper reviews the evolution of the modeling approach in Atom Probe Tomography and presents some future potential directions in order to improve the method.

  16. Creating and probing coherent atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. |; Frey, M.T.; Dunning, F.B.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical time resolved studies of the evolution of atomic wavepackets. In particular, wavepackets comprising a superposition of very-high-lying Rydberg states which are created either using a short half-cycle pulse (HCP) or by rapid application of a DC field. The properties of the wavepackets are probed using a second HCP that is applied following a variable time delay and ionizes a fraction of the atoms, much like a passing-by ion in atomic collisions.

  17. The Rouen energy-compensated atom probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrau, J. M.; Danoix, F.; Deconihout, B.; Bouet, M.; Menand, A.; Blavette, D.

    1994-03-01

    The energy-compensated atom probe developed in Rouen is based on the original instrument built in 1978. Since, several improvements were added. Some extensions, among which a Poschenrieder-type energy compensator and a spatial resolution controlling diaphragm, have been adapted to it. The main characteristics of this instrument are presented.

  18. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  19. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Scherrer, Barbara; Demeulemeester, Jelle; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm(2) of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal-ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET.

  20. Atom probe tomography analysis of WC powder.

    PubMed

    Weidow, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    A tantalum doped tungsten carbide powder, (W,Ta)C, was prepared with the purpose to maximise the amount of Ta in the hexagonal mixed crystal carbide. Atom probe tomography (APT) was considered to be the best technique to quantitatively measure the amount of Ta within this carbide. As the carbide powder consisted in the form of very small particles (<1 μm), a method to produce APT specimens of such a powder was developed. The powder was at first embedded in copper and a FIB-SEM workstation was used to make an in-situ lift-out from a selected powder particle. The powder particle was then deposited on a post made from a WC-Co based cemented carbide specimen. With the use of a laser assisted atom probe, it was shown that the method is working and the Ta content of the (W,Ta)C could be measured quantitatively.

  1. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  2. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  3. Atom probe tomography investigation of assisted precipitation of secondary hardening carbides in a medium carbon martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Danoix, R; Akre, J; Grellier, A; Delagnes, D

    2011-12-01

    A medium carbon martensitic steel containing nanometer scale secondary hardening carbides and intermetallic particles is investigated by field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography. The interaction between the concomitant precipitations of both types of particles is investigated. It is shown that the presence of the intermetallic phase affects the nucleation mechanism and the spatial distribution of the secondary hardening carbides, which shifts from heterogeneous on dislocations to heterogeneous on the intermetallic particles.

  4. Atom Probe Tomography Characterization of a Gas Atomized Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Venkataraman, Shankar; Eckert, Jurgen; Schultz, Ludwig; Sordelet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Summary form only given. A number of metallic glasses that exhibit a wide supercooled liquid region before crystallization and a high glass-forming ability have been discovered. These metallic glasses exhibit useful properties such as high strength and high stiffness and can be fabricated from the melt in a bulk form with a thickness of {approx} 10 mm. The high glass-forming ability facilitates the formation of metallic glass powders by conventional gas-atomization technique. Subsequent consolidation of the powders to any dimensions is possible due to the viscous flow of the material in the supercooled liquid region. Hence, the synthesis of bulk metallic glasses using gas atomization coupled with subsequent consolidation holds a promising future. Atom probe tomography, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) characterizations of gas atomized powder particles of a Cu{sub 47}Ti{sub 33}Zr{sub 11}Ni{sub 8}Si{sub 1} metallic glass have been performed. The needle-shaped specimens required for the local electrode atom probe were fabricated from individual 10-40 mum diameter particles with the use of a dual beam focused ion beam miller. The microstructure of the alloy was investigated from the as-atomized powder and annealing treatments up to the completion of the first and second exothermic events at 785 and 838 K. Atom probe tomography revealed that the microstructure consisted of an interconnected network structure of two amorphous phases after an annealing treatment of 360 min. at 623 K. A fine-scale multiphase microstructure of an irregularly shaped copper-enriched and titanium-, nickel- and silicon-depleted phase that was 10-20 nm in extent, a higher number density of smaller, {approx}10 nm diameter, and roughly spherical titanium-enriched and copper- and zirconium-depleted phase and a matrix phase was found after continuous heating in a DSC to 785 and 838 K. The scanning electron microscope also revealed 4 distinct coarser phases consistent

  5. Probing and manipulating cold atoms on an atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto Su, Pedro Antonio

    Microscopic scale atom optics can be realized by bringing cold atoms close to nanostructured material objects, this combination of atoms and microstructures has been called the atom chip. This dissertation focuses on two experiments: a study of the trap loss rate coefficients in a Two Species Mirror Magneto - Optical Trap (TSMMOT) and the implementation of an optical on-chip detector. We also discuss planar wire configurations that will be used in the future for magnetic trapping. In the TSMMOT, Cs and 85,87Rb were confined in the proximity of a reflective surface. This was the first mixed species surface trap reported to our knowledge. We measured the trap loss rate coefficients and found an isotopic difference. The loss in Rb due to the presence of Cs was the highest measured for a mixed RbCs trap. The on-chip optical detector consists of a pair of optical fibers bonded to the surface of the chip. One of the fibers is coupled to a probe laser, part of the output of this fiber is coupled into the second fiber, which takes the fight out of the vacuum chamber and into a detector. By measuring differences in the transmitted power we can detect atoms trapped in a mirror magneto-optical trap.

  6. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-01-30

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  7. Invited Review Article: Atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Miller, Michael K.

    2007-03-15

    The technique of atom probe tomography (APT) is reviewed with an emphasis on illustrating what is possible with the technique both now and in the future. APT delivers the highest spatial resolution (sub-0.3-nm) three-dimensional compositional information of any microscopy technique. Recently, APT has changed dramatically with new hardware configurations that greatly simplify the technique and improve the rate of data acquisition. In addition, new methods have been developed to fabricate suitable specimens from new classes of materials. Applications of APT have expanded from structural metals and alloys to thin multilayer films on planar substrates, dielectric films, semiconducting structures and devices, and ceramic materials. This trend toward a broader range of materials and applications is likely to continue.

  8. Preparation of Regular Specimens for Atom Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kim; Wishard, James

    2003-01-01

    A method of preparation of specimens of non-electropolishable materials for analysis by atom probes is being developed as a superior alternative to a prior method. In comparison with the prior method, the present method involves less processing time. Also, whereas the prior method yields irregularly shaped and sized specimens, the present developmental method offers the potential to prepare specimens of regular shape and size. The prior method is called the method of sharp shards because it involves crushing the material of interest and selecting microscopic sharp shards of the material for use as specimens. Each selected shard is oriented with its sharp tip facing away from the tip of a stainless-steel pin and is glued to the tip of the pin by use of silver epoxy. Then the shard is milled by use of a focused ion beam (FIB) to make the shard very thin (relative to its length) and to make its tip sharp enough for atom-probe analysis. The method of sharp shards is extremely time-consuming because the selection of shards must be performed with the help of a microscope, the shards must be positioned on the pins by use of micromanipulators, and the irregularity of size and shape necessitates many hours of FIB milling to sharpen each shard. In the present method, a flat slab of the material of interest (e.g., a polished sample of rock or a coated semiconductor wafer) is mounted in the sample holder of a dicing saw of the type conventionally used to cut individual integrated circuits out of the wafers on which they are fabricated in batches. A saw blade appropriate to the material of interest is selected. The depth of cut and the distance between successive parallel cuts is made such that what is left after the cuts is a series of thin, parallel ridges on a solid base. Then the workpiece is rotated 90 and the pattern of cuts is repeated, leaving behind a square array of square posts on the solid base. The posts can be made regular, long, and thin, as required for samples

  9. Level set methods for modelling field evaporation in atom probe.

    PubMed

    Haley, Daniel; Moody, Michael P; Smith, George D W

    2013-12-01

    Atom probe is a nanoscale technique for creating three-dimensional spatially and chemically resolved point datasets, primarily of metallic or semiconductor materials. While atom probe can achieve local high-level resolution, the spatial coherence of the technique is highly dependent upon the evaporative physics in the material and can often result in large geometric distortions in experimental results. The distortions originate from uncertainties in the projection function between the field evaporating specimen and the ion detector. Here we explore the possibility of continuum numerical approximations to the evaporative behavior during an atom probe experiment, and the subsequent propagation of ions to the detector, with particular emphasis placed on the solution of axisymmetric systems, such as isolated particles and multilayer systems. Ultimately, this method may prove critical in rapid modeling of tip shape evolution in atom probe tomography, which itself is a key factor in the rapid generation of spatially accurate reconstructions in atom probe datasets.

  10. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  11. Comparison of the quantitative analysis performance between pulsed voltage atom probe and pulsed laser atom probe.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, J; Kawakami, K; Raabe, D

    2017-01-31

    The difference in quantitative analysis performance between the voltage-mode and laser-mode of a local electrode atom probe (LEAP3000X HR) was investigated using a Fe-Cu binary model alloy. Solute copper atoms in ferritic iron preferentially field evaporate because of their significantly lower evaporation field than the matrix iron, and thus, the apparent concentration of solute copper tends to be lower than the actual concentration. However, in voltage-mode, the apparent concentration was higher than the actual concentration at 40K or less due to a detection loss of matrix iron, and the concentration decreased with increasing specimen temperature due to the preferential evaporation of solute copper. On the other hand, in laser-mode, the apparent concentration never exceeded the actual concentration, even at lower temperatures (20K), and this mode showed better quantitative performance over a wide range of specimen temperatures. These results indicate that the pulsed laser atom probe prevents both detection loss and preferential evaporation under a wide range of measurement conditions.

  12. Characterization of Akiyama probe applied to dual-probes atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hequn; Gao, Sitian; Li, Wei; Shi, Yushu; Li, Qi; Li, Shi; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of nano-scale line-width has always been important and difficult in the field of nanometer measurements, while the rapid development of integrated circuit greatly raises the demand again. As one kind of scanning probe microscope (SPM), atomic force microscope (AFM) can realize quasi three-dimensional measurement, which is widely used in nanometer scale line-width measurement. Our team researched a dual-probes atomic force microscope, which can eliminate the prevalent effect of probe width on measurement results. In dual-probes AFM system, a novel head are newly designed. A kind of self-sensing and self-exciting probes which is Nanosensors cooperation's patented probe—Akiyama probe, is used in this novel head. The Akiyama probe applied to dual-probe atomic force microscope is one of the most important issues. The characterization of Akiyama probe would affect performance and accuracy of the whole system. The fundamental features of the Akiyama probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an Akiyama probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. We hope that the characterization of the Akiyama probe described in this paper will guide application for dual-probe atomic force microscope.

  13. An environmental transfer hub for multimodal atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Perea, Daniel E; Gerstl, Stephan S A; Chin, Jackson; Hirschi, Blake; Evans, James E

    2017-01-01

    Environmental control during transfer between instruments is required for samples sensitive to air or thermal exposure to prevent morphological or chemical changes prior to analysis. Atom probe tomography is a rapidly expanding technique for three-dimensional structural and chemical analysis, but commercial instruments remain limited to loading specimens under ambient conditions. In this study, we describe a multifunctional environmental transfer hub allowing controlled cryogenic or room-temperature transfer of specimens under atmospheric or vacuum pressure conditions between an atom probe and other instruments or reaction chambers. The utility of the environmental transfer hub is demonstrated through the acquisition of previously unavailable mass spectral analysis of an intact organic molecule made possible via controlled cryogenic transfer into the atom probe using the hub. The ability to prepare and transfer specimens in precise environments promises a means to access new science across many disciplines from untainted samples and allow downstream time-resolved in situ atom probe studies.

  14. Advances in the calibration of atom probe tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P.; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Stephenson, Leigh T.; Haley, Daniel; Ringer, Simon P.; Geuser, Frederic de; Tsafnat, Guy

    2009-02-01

    Modern wide field-of-view atom probes permit observation of a wide range of crystallographic features that can be used to calibrate the tomographic reconstruction of the analyzed volume. In this study, methodologies to determine values of the geometric parameters involved in the tomographic reconstruction of atom probe data sets are presented and discussed. The influence of the tip to electrode distance and specimen temperature on these parameters is explored. Significantly, their influence is demonstrated to be very limited, indicating a relatively wide regime of experimental parameters space for sound atom probe tomography (APT) experiments. These methods have been used on several specimens and material types, and the results indicate that the reconstruction parameters are specific to each specimen. Finally, it is shown how an accurate calibration of the reconstruction enables improvements to the quality and reliability of the microscopy and microanalysis capabilities of the atom probe.

  15. Review of atom probe FIB-based specimen preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F; Thompson, Keith; Alvis, Roger; Larson, David J

    2007-12-01

    Several FIB-based methods that have been developed to fabricate needle-shaped atom probe specimens from a variety of specimen geometries, and site-specific regions are reviewed. These methods have enabled electronic device structures to be characterized. The atom probe may be used to quantify the level and range of gallium implantation and has demonstrated that the use of low accelerating voltages during the final stages of milling can dramatically reduce the extent of gallium implantation.

  16. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterisation of materials microstructures usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analysing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. While ionic mobility is undesired when aiming for materials characterisation it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in-situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor Lithium-Manganese-Oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that at a temperature of 30K characterisation of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Contrary, we show that at 298K the material can be deintercalated in-situ in the atom probe without changing the Manganese-Oxide host structure. Combining in-situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterisation we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  17. Grain boundary segregation in boron added interstitial free steels studied by 3-dimensional atom probe

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, K.; Larson, D.J.; Warren, P.J.; Smith, G.D.W.

    1999-04-09

    The development of deep-drawable sheet steels is of particular significance for the automotive industry. Titanium and/or niobium added extra-low carbon interstitial free (IF) steels are key materials. The virtually complete removal of carbon and nitrogen should lead to superior forming properties. However, the lack of solute carbon at grain boundaries significantly decreases the bonding force at the interfaces, which often causes intergranular brittle fracture when deeply drawn steel sheets are subjected to impact deformation at low temperature. This phenomenon is called secondary working embrittlement (SWE), and is a major problem when solute atoms such as phosphorus, manganese or silicon are added to increase the tensile strength of the steels. Small amounts of boron, which does not affect the formability of the steels significantly, are usually added as a remedial measure in such cases. The 3-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) combined with field ion microscopy (FIM) has the ability to produce 3-dimensional images from regions approximately 20nm*20nm*100nm in size, and identify each atomic species and the relative location of each atom with nearly lattice resolution. In this study, a combination of these methods was applied to produce FIM tips of IF steel containing grain boundaries. The authors report here the first observations of the segregation of boron in IF steels using 3DAP.

  18. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, D. J.; Prosa, T. J.; Olson, D.; Lefebvre, W.; Lawrence, D.; Clifton, P. H.; Kelly, T. F.

    2013-11-01

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device.

  19. Improvements in three-dimensional atom probe design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerezo, A.; Godfrey, T. J.; Hyde, J. M.; Sijbrandij, S. J.; Smith, G. D. W.

    1994-03-01

    An improved position-sensitive atom probe has been designed which uses a combination of a parallel timing system and a silicon photodiode array camera. The use of two separate data acquisition systems allows the two functions of accurate positioning and flight time determination to be divorced, thus removing the compromises which must be made when these functions are carried out with only a single detector. The resulting instrument is able to determine flight times and positions of impacts straightforwardly, even when multiple ions are evaporated on a single pulse, and should be capable of operating at evaporation rates close to that of a conventional probe-hole atom probe.

  20. Digital field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sijbrandij, S.J.; Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.; Thomson, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, there is a trend to avoid the use of chemicals needed to develop negatives and to process photographic paper, and to use digital technologies instead. Digital technology also offers the advantages that it is convenient, as it enables quick access to the end result, allows image storage and processing on computer, allows rapid hard copy output, and simplifies electronic publishing. Recently significant improvements have been made to the performance and cost of camera-sensors and printers. In this paper, field ion images recorded with two digital cameras of different resolution are compared to images recorded on standard 35 mm negative film. It should be noted that field ion images exhibit low light intensity and high contrast. Field ion images were recorded from a standard microchannel plate and a phosphor screen and had acceptance angles of {approximately} 60{degree}. Digital recordings were made with a Digital Vision Technologies (DVT) MICAM VHR1000 camera with a resolution of 752 x 582 pixels, and a Kodak DCS 460 digital camera with a resolution of 3,060 x 2,036 pixels. Film based recordings were made with Kodak T-MAX film rated at 400 ASA. The resolving power of T-MAX film, as specified by Kodak, is between 50 and 125 lines per mm, which corresponds to between 1,778 x 1,181 and 4,445 x 2,953 pixels, i.e. similar to that from the DCS 460 camera. The intensities of the images were sufficient to be recorded with standard fl:1.2 lenses with exposure times of less than 2 s. Many digital cameras were excluded from these experiments due to their lack of sensitivity or the inability to record a full frame image due to the fixed working distance defined by the vacuum system. The digital images were output on a Kodak Digital Science 8650 PS dye sublimation color printer (300 dpi). All field ion micrographs presented were obtained from a Ni-Al-Be specimen.

  1. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E.A. E-mail: Edmund.Copeland@nottingham.ac.uk

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  2. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  3. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-03-14

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  4. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (<20 nm), tips display a curved surface and a significantly larger thickness. As far as a correlative approach aims at analysing the same specimen by both techniques, it is mandatory to explore the limits and advantages imposed by the particular geometry of atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography.

  5. Probing the heliosphere with energetic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Shih, K. L.; Jokipii, J. R.; Grzedzielski, S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of using energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and ambient neutral atoms, as a diagnostic tool to investigate planetary magnetospheres from a distance has been extended to the investigation of the heliosphere. The paper explores what one can reasonably expect of the heliospheric ENA (HSENA) and what criteria would be imposed on HSENA instruments by concentrating on 10-10 exp 3 keV protons in quiet-time interplanetary space, solar-flare events, corotating interaction regions, and populations have distinctive signatures and that the detection of these particles can reveal energy spatial and propagation of ions in 3D interplanetary space, including the solar-wind termination shock. Such breadth of information could not be gained by in situ means.

  6. Tomographic Atom Probe: New Dimension in Materials Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deconihout; Pareige; Pareige; Blavette; Menand

    1999-01-01

    : Materials science requires the use of increasingly powerful tools in materials analysis. The last 20 years have witnessed the development of a number of analytical techniques. However, among these techniques, only a few allow observation and analysis of materials at the nanometer level. The tomographic atom probe (TAP) is a three-dimensional atom-probe (3-DAP) developed at the University of Rouen. In this instrument, the specimen is field evaporated, atomic layer by atomic layer, and the use of a position-sensing system makes it possible to map out the chemical identity of individual atoms within each field-evaporated layer on a nearly atomic scale. After analysis, the volume of matter removed from the specimen can be reconstructed atom by atom in the three dimensions of real space. The main advantages of the 3-DAP is its single-atom sensitivity and very high spatial resolution. In addition to 3-D visual information on chemical heterogeneity, 3-D images give an accurate measurement of the composition of any feature without any convolution bias. This study first describes the history of the 3-DAP technique. Its main features and the latest developments of the TAP are then detailed. The performance of this instrument is illustrated through two recent applications in materials science. Possible ways to further improve the technique are also discussed.

  7. Tomographic Atom Probe: New Dimension in Materials Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconihout, B.; Pareige, C.; Pareige, P.; Blavette, D.; Menand, A.

    1999-01-01

    Materials science requires the use of increasingly powerful tools in materials analysis. The last 20 years have witnessed the development of a number of analytical techniques. However, among these techniques, only a few allow observation and analysis of materials at the nanometer level. The tomographic atom probe (TAP) is a three-dimensional atom-probe (3-DAP) developed at the University of Rouen. In this instrument, the specimen is field evaporated, atomic layer by atomic layer, and the use of a position-sensing system makes it possible to map out the chemical identity of individual atoms within each field-evaporated layer on a nearly atomic scale. After analysis, the volume of matter removed from the specimen can be reconstructed atom by atom in the three dimensions of real space. The main advantages of the 3-DAP is its single-atom sensitivity and very high spatial resolution. In addition to 3-D visual information on chemical heterogeneity, 3-D images give an accurate measurement of the composition of any feature without any convolution bias. This study first describes the history of the 3-DAP technique. Its main features and the latest developments of the TAP are then detailed. The performance of this instrument is illustrated through two recent applications in materials science. Possible ways to further improve the technique are also discussed.

  8. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    SciTech Connect

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  9. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGES

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; ...

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  10. Atom probe tomography of lithium-doped network glasses.

    PubMed

    Greiwe, Gerd-Hendrik; Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido

    2014-06-01

    Li-doped silicate and borate glasses are electronically insulating, but provide considerable ionic conductivity. Under measurement conditions of laser-assisted atom probe tomography, mobile Li ions are redistributed in response to high electric fields. In consequence, the direct interpretation of measured composition profiles is prevented. It is demonstrated that composition profiles are nevertheless well understood by a complex model taking into account the electronic structure of dielectric materials, ionic mobility and field screening. Quantitative data on band bending and field penetration during measurement are derived which are important in understanding laser-assisted atom probe tomography of dielectric materials.

  11. Nanoscale Probe of Magnetism Based on Artificial Atoms in Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0165 (YIP 11) Nanoscale probe of magnetism based on artificial atoms in diamond Ania Bleszynski Jayich UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...06-30-2014 Final Report 04-01-2011 To 03-31-2014 Nanoscale probe of magnetism based on artificial atoms in diamond FA9550-11-1-0013 AFOSR-BAA-2010-3...sensing using a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond . Significant accomplishments funded by this award include 1) characterization of the surface

  12. Neuron Biomechanics Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  13. Atom probe tomographic mapping directly reveals the atomic distribution of phosphorus in resin embedded ferritin

    DOE PAGES

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah A. G.; ...

    2016-02-29

    In this study, we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces using atom probe tomography. Embedding the protein ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualize atomic distributions and distinguish organic-organic and organic-inorganic interfaces. The sample preparation method can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment.

  14. Atom probe tomographic mapping directly reveals the atomic distribution of phosphorus in resin embedded ferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah A. G.; Dicken, Quinten G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-02-29

    In this study, we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces using atom probe tomography. Embedding the protein ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualize atomic distributions and distinguish organic-organic and organic-inorganic interfaces. The sample preparation method can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment.

  15. Atom-Probe Measurements of Meteoritic Nanodiamonds and Terrestrial Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. B.; Isheim, D.; Floss, C.; Daulton, T. L.; Seidman, D. N.; Heck, P. R.; Davis, A. M.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; Hiller, J.; Mane, A.; Elam, J. W.; Stephan, T.

    2013-09-01

    We present new data from the novel application of atom-probe tomography to the study of nanodiamonds from the meteorite Allende. The mean meteoritic ^12C/^13C peak ratio is higher than that of our standards, but there are instrumental artifacts.

  16. Atom probe trajectory mapping using experimental tip shape measurements.

    PubMed

    Haley, D; Petersen, T; Ringer, S P; Smith, G D W

    2011-11-01

    Atom probe tomography is an accurate analytical and imaging technique which can reconstruct the complex structure and composition of a specimen in three dimensions. Despite providing locally high spatial resolution, atom probe tomography suffers from global distortions due to a complex projection function between the specimen and detector which is different for each experiment and can change during a single run. To aid characterization of this projection function, this work demonstrates a method for the reverse projection of ions from an arbitrary projection surface in 3D space back to an atom probe tomography specimen surface. Experimental data from transmission electron microscopy tilt tomography are combined with point cloud surface reconstruction algorithms and finite element modelling to generate a mapping back to the original tip surface in a physically and experimentally motivated manner. As a case study, aluminium tips are imaged using transmission electron microscopy before and after atom probe tomography, and the specimen profiles used as input in surface reconstruction methods. This reconstruction method is a general procedure that can be used to generate mappings between a selected surface and a known tip shape using numerical solutions to the electrostatic equation, with quantitative solutions to the projection problem readily achievable in tens of minutes on a contemporary workstation.

  17. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

    2011-07-01

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  18. Mechanical gate control for atom-by-atom cluster assembly with scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Yurtsever, Ayhan; Hirayama, Naoki; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2014-07-11

    Nanoclusters supported on substrates are of great importance in physics and chemistry as well as in technical applications, such as single-electron transistors and nanocatalysts. The properties of nanoclusters differ significantly from those of either the constituent atoms or the bulk solid, and are highly sensitive to size and chemical composition. Here we propose a novel atom gating technique to assemble various atom clusters composed of a defined number of atoms at room temperature. The present gating operation is based on the transfer of single diffusing atoms among nanospaces governed by gates, which can be opened in response to the chemical interaction force with a scanning probe microscope tip. This method provides an alternative way to create pre-designed atom clusters with different chemical compositions and to evaluate their chemical stabilities, thus enabling investigation into the influence that a single dopant atom incorporated into the host clusters has on a given cluster stability.

  19. New approaches to nanoparticle sample fabrication for atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Felfer, P; Li, T; Eder, K; Galinski, H; Magyar, A P; Bell, D C; Smith, G D W; Kruse, N; Ringer, S P; Cairney, J M

    2015-12-01

    Due to their unique properties, nano-sized materials such as nanoparticles and nanowires are receiving considerable attention. However, little data is available about their chemical makeup at the atomic scale, especially in three dimensions (3D). Atom probe tomography is able to answer many important questions about these materials if the challenge of producing a suitable sample can be overcome. In order to achieve this, the nanomaterial needs to be positioned within the end of a tip and fixed there so the sample possesses sufficient structural integrity for analysis. Here we provide a detailed description of various techniques that have been used to position nanoparticles on substrates for atom probe analysis. In some of the approaches, this is combined with deposition techniques to incorporate the particles into a solid matrix, and focused ion beam processing is then used to fabricate atom probe samples from this composite. Using these approaches, data has been achieved from 10-20 nm core-shell nanoparticles that were extracted directly from suspension (i.e. with no chemical modification) with a resolution of better than ± 1 nm.

  20. Detecting Clusters in Atom Probe Data with Gaussian Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Zelenty, Jennifer; Dahl, Andrew; Hyde, Jonathan; Smith, George D W; Moody, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    Accurately identifying and extracting clusters from atom probe tomography (APT) reconstructions is extremely challenging, yet critical to many applications. Currently, the most prevalent approach to detect clusters is the maximum separation method, a heuristic that relies heavily upon parameters manually chosen by the user. In this work, a new clustering algorithm, Gaussian mixture model Expectation Maximization Algorithm (GEMA), was developed. GEMA utilizes a Gaussian mixture model to probabilistically distinguish clusters from random fluctuations in the matrix. This machine learning approach maximizes the data likelihood via expectation maximization: given atomic positions, the algorithm learns the position, size, and width of each cluster. A key advantage of GEMA is that atoms are probabilistically assigned to clusters, thus reflecting scientifically meaningful uncertainty regarding atoms located near precipitate/matrix interfaces. GEMA outperforms the maximum separation method in cluster detection accuracy when applied to several realistically simulated data sets. Lastly, GEMA was successfully applied to real APT data.

  1. Manipulations of atoms and molecules by scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ampere A; Li, Zhuang

    2007-08-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM), including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), has become a powerful tool in building nanoscale structures required by modern industry. In this article, the use of SPM for the manipulation of atoms and molecules for patterning nanostructures for opt-electronic and biomedical applications is reviewed. The principles and procedures of manipulation using STM and AFM-based technologies are presented with an emphasis on their ability to create a wide variety of nanostructures for different applications. The interaction among the atoms/molecules, surface, and tip are discussed. The approaches for positioning the atom/molecule from and to the desired locations and for precisely controlling its movement are elaborated for each specific manipulation technique. As an AFM-based technique, the dip-pen nanolithography is also included. Finally, concluding remarks on technological improvement and future research is provided.

  2. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2016-12-22

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  3. Probing the improbable: imaging carbon atoms in alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, E A; Yahia, Noor; Larson, David J.; Miller, Michael K; Todd, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography has proven very powerful to analyze the detailed structure and chemistry of metallic alloys and semiconductor structures while ceramic materials have remained outside its standard purview. In the current work, we demonstrate that bulk alumina can be quantitatively analyzed and microstructural features observed. The analysis of grain boundary carbon segregation - barely achievable by electron microscopy - opens the possibility of understanding the mechanistic effects of dopants on mechanical properties, fracture and wear properties of bulk oxides.

  4. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  5. Using attosecond pulses to probe ultrafast electronic motions inside atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, L. A.; Hu, S. X.

    2006-05-01

    With using an efficient and accurate parallel solver for the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation, we have performed full-dimensional numerical simulations of the proposed attosecond pump-probe for exploring the extremely fast motion of an electronic wave packet inside atoms. Pumped by a broadband femtosecond UV pulse, one electron of ground-state Helium can be launched into a superposition of low-lying excited states, thus forming a bound wavepacket oscillating relative to the atomic core. A time-delayed attosecond EUV (probe) pulse then ionizes the atom causing three-body breakup. Measuring either the energy sharing of the ionized electrons or the total ionization probability as a function of the time delay traces out the internal motion of the excited electron. Our simulations have shown that an ultrashort oscillating period of 2 fs can be followed for several cylces. This opens the prospect of a wealth of similar pump-probe experiments to examine ultrafast electronic motions.

  6. Atom-probe investigation of precipitation in 12% Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Lundin, Lars; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1994-03-01

    The microstructure of two types of 12% Cr steel weld metals, one with the composition of a common 12% Cr steel and the other with a higher nitrogen content, was studied using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and APFIM (atom-probe field-ion microscopy) in post-weld heat-treated condition. The microstructure of the 12% Cr weld metals consisted of tempered martensite, retained δ-ferrite, an irregular low-dislocation α-ferrite and precipitates. Precipitates in the weld metals were dominantly M 23C 6 on different boundaries. Plate-like and fine cubic MN and M 2N were found inside the α-ferrite. APFIM analysis showed that M 23C 6 was almost a pure carbide and MN was almost a pure nitride. Carbon and nitrogen in the weld metals mainly existed in the precipitates. High nitrogen content did not change the composition of the precipitates, but increased the quantity of nitrides. Therefore, in the high nitrogen weld metal, the content of strong nitride-forming elements in the matrix decreased. These results are important in order to understand the strengthening mechanism of the high Cr steel weld metals, as well as of other high Cr heat-resistant steels.

  7. Combined atom-probe and electron microscopy characterization of fine scale structures in aged primary coolant pipe stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Miller, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities and complementary nature of atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) for the characterization of fine-scale microstructures are illustrated by examination of the changes that occur after long term thermal aging of cast CF 8 and CF 8M duplex stainless steels. In material aged at 300 or 400/sup 0/C for up to 70,000 h, the ferrite had spinodally decomposed into a modulated fine-scaled interconnected network consisting of an iron-rich ..cap alpha.. phase and a chromium-enriched ..cap alpha..' phase with periodicities of between 2 and 9 nm. G-phase precipitates 2 to 10 nm in diameter were also observed in the ferrite at concentrations of more than 10/sup 21/ m/sup -3/. The reported degradation in mechanical properties is most likely a consequence of the spinodal decomposition in the ferrite.

  8. Vitreous ice as a cryoprotectant for imaging atom-probe studies of adsorption phenomena at a solid--liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J. A.

    1989-07-01

    A novel approach is outlined for studying adsoption phenomena at a solid--liquid interface in the imaging atom-probe mass spectrometer. An interface is preserved for analysis by embedding it within a thin, conducting layer of vitreous ice formed from its native environment. The ice is controllably sublimed at 20 K using a high electric field to dissect the layer, and to map the distribution of species within the layer as a function of depth from its surface. Procedures are described for creating a layer of ice believed to be vitreous in nature, and for transporting an interface embedded within the ice layer into high vacuum without damage (and without contamination from laboratory ambient). Field-ion imaging suggests these procedures are effective for preserving the surface structure of a solid on a subnanometer scale.

  9. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-21

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  10. Nanoscale Cluster Detection in Massive Atom Probe Tomography Data

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Yoginath, Srikanth B; Miller, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in atom probe tomography (APT) have led to unprecedented data acquisition capabilities that routinely generate data sets containing hundreds of millions of atoms. Detecting nanoscale clusters of different atom types present in these enormous amounts of data and analyzing their spatial correlations with one another are fundamental to understanding the structural properties of the material from which the data is derived. Extant algorithms for nanoscale cluster detection do not scale to large data sets. Here, a scalable, CUDA-based implementation of an autocorrelation algorithm is presented. It isolates spatial correlations amongst atomic clusters present in massive APT data sets in linear time using a linear amount of storage. Correctness of the algorithm is demonstrated using large synthetically generated data with known spatial distributions. Benefits and limitations of using GPU-acceleration for autocorrelation-based APT data analyses are presented with supporting performance results on data sets with up to billions of atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first nanoscale cluster detection algorithm that scales to massive APT data sets and executes on commodity hardware.

  11. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, S K; Felfer, P J; Araullo-Peters, V J; Cao, Y; Liao, X Z; Cairney, J M

    2013-09-01

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping.

  12. Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L

    2011-11-03

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated systems will enable the predicative design of the next generation of supermaterials. In this program, we are harnessing recent advances in the quantum manipulation of ultracold atomic gases to expand our ability to probe these technologically important materials in heretofore unexplored regions of temperature, resolution, and sensitivity parameter space. We are working to demonstrate the use of atom chips to enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux at the 10^-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology developed here will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques---such as scanning SQUIDs---by a factor of 10--1000. We are testing the utility of this technique by using rubidium BECs to image the magnetic fields emanating from charge transport and magnetic domain percolation in strongly correlated materials as they undergo temperature-tuned metal--to--insulator phase transitions. Cryogenic atom chip microscopy introduces three very important features to the toolbox of high-resolution, strongly correlated material microscopy: simultaneous detection of magnetic and electric fields (down to the sub-single electron charge level); no invasive large magnetic fields or gradients; simultaneous micro- and macroscopic spatial resolution; freedom from 1/f flicker noise at low frequencies; and, perhaps most importantly, the complete decoupling of probe and sample temperatures. The first of these features will play an important role in studying the interplay between magnetic and electric domain structure. The last two are crucial for low frequency magnetic noise detection in, e.g., the cuprate pseudogap region and for precision measurements of transport in the high temperature, technologically relevant regime inaccessible to other techniques

  13. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-05-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe--the key actuating element--has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices.

  14. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses.

  15. Study of proper conditions for quantitative atom-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolander, Ulf; Andrén, Hans-Olof

    1994-03-01

    Atom-probe microanalysis is a truly quantitative method only if certain requirements are fulfilled. Field evaporation must only happen when the detector system is active; ions must travel from specimen to detector without being obstructed; and ions must be detected with the same probability regardless of mass and energy. Designs and methods to achieve these requirements are presented in the paper, such as a controlled high-voltage pulser, a detector with good and variable multi-hit resolution, ion optical alignment procedures, and a method to statistically correct for pile-up in the detector.

  16. Atomic force microscopy probing in the measurement of cell mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Kirmizis, Dimitrios; Logothetidis, Stergios

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used incrementally over the last decade in cell biology. Beyond its usefulness in high resolution imaging, AFM also has unique capabilities for probing the viscoelastic properties of living cells in culture and, even more, mapping the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties, providing thus an indirect indicator of the structure and function of the underlying cytoskeleton and cell organelles. AFM measurements have boosted our understanding of cell mechanics in normal and diseased states and provide future potential in the study of disease pathophysiology and in the establishment of novel diagnostic and treatment options. PMID:20463929

  17. Two-axis probing system for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jayanth, G R; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2008-02-01

    A novel two-axis probing system is proposed for multiaxis atomic force microscopy (AFM). It employs a compliant manipulator that is optimally designed in terms of geometries and kinematics, and is actuated by multiple magnetic actuators to simultaneously control tip position and change tip orientation to achieve greater accessibility of the sample surface when imaging surfaces having large geometric variations. It leads to the creation of a multiaxis AFM system, which is a three-dimensional surface tool rather than a two-dimensional planar surface tool. The use of the system to scan the bottom corner of a grating step is reported.

  18. Towards an accurate volume reconstruction in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Beinke, Daniel; Oberdorfer, Christian; Schmitz, Guido

    2016-06-01

    An alternative concept for the reconstruction of atom probe data is outlined. It is based on the calculation of realistic trajectories of the evaporated ions in a recursive refinement process. To this end, the electrostatic problem is solved on a Delaunay tessellation. To enable the trajectory calculation, the order of reconstruction is inverted with respect to previous reconstruction schemes: the last atom detected is reconstructed first. In this way, the emitter shape, which controls the trajectory, can be defined throughout the duration of the reconstruction. A proof of concept is presented for 3D model tips, containing spherical precipitates or embedded layers of strongly contrasting evaporation thresholds. While the traditional method following Bas et al. generates serious distortions in these cases, a reconstruction with the proposed electrostatically informed approach improves the geometry of layers and particles significantly.

  19. Encapsulation method for atom probe tomography analysis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Larson, D J; Giddings, A D; Wu, Y; Verheijen, M A; Prosa, T J; Roozeboom, F; Rice, K P; Kessels, W M M; Geiser, B P; Kelly, T F

    2015-12-01

    Open-space nanomaterials are a widespread class of technologically important materials that are generally incompatible with analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) due to issues with specimen preparation, field evaporation and data reconstruction. The feasibility of encapsulating such non-compact matter in a matrix to enable APT measurements is investigated using nanoparticles as an example. Simulations of field evaporation of a void, and the resulting artifacts in ion trajectory, underpin the requirement that no voids remain after encapsulation. The approach is demonstrated by encapsulating Pt nanoparticles in an ZnO:Al matrix created by atomic layer deposition, a growth technique which offers very high surface coverage and conformality. APT measurements of the Pt nanoparticles are correlated with transmission electron microscopy images and numerical simulations in order to evaluate the accuracy of the APT reconstruction.

  20. Atom Probe Tomographic Mapping Directly Reveals the Atomic Distribution of Phosphorus in Resin Embedded Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah; Dicken, Quinten; Thevuthasan, S. Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces within the ferritin protein using atom probe tomography that is facilitated by an advanced specimen preparation approach. Embedding ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualise atomic distributions and distinguish the inorganic-organic interface of the ferrihydrite mineral core and protein shell, as well as the organic-organic interface between the ferritin protein shell and embedding resin. In addition, we definitively show the atomic-scale distribution of phosphorus as being at the surface of the ferrihydrite mineral with the distribution of sodium mapped within the protein shell environment with an enhanced distribution at the mineral/protein interface. The sample preparation method is robust and can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment. PMID:26924804

  1. Atom Probe Tomography Characterization of the Solute Distributions in a Neutron-Irradiated and Annealed Pressure Vessel Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.

    2001-01-30

    A combined atom probe tomography and atom probe field ion microscopy study has been performed on a submerged arc weld irradiated to high fluence in the Heavy-Section Steel irradiation (HSSI) fifth irradiation series (Weld 73W). The composition of this weld is Fe - 0.27 at. % Cu, 1.58% Mn, 0.57% Ni, 0.34% MO, 0.27% Cr, 0.58% Si, 0.003% V, 0.45% C, 0.009% P, and 0.009% S. The material was examined after five conditions: after a typical stress relief treatment of 40 h at 607 C, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 23} n m{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV), and after irradiation and isothermal anneals of 0.5, 1, and 168 h at 454 C. This report describes the matrix composition and the size, composition, and number density of the ultrafine copper-enriched precipitates that formed under neutron irradiation and the change in these parameters with post-irradiation annealing treatments.

  2. Mapping magnetism with atomic resolution using aberrated electron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan; Rusz, Ján; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, we report a direct experimental real-space mapping of magnetic circular dichroism with atomic resolution in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an aberrated electron probe with customized phase distribution, we reveal with electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The aberrated probes allow the collection of EEL spectra using the transmitted beam, which results in a magnetic circular dichroic signal with intrinsically larger signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained via nanodiffraction techniques (where most of the transmitted electrons are discarded). The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution. This research was supported by DOE SUFD MSED, by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US DOE, and by the Swedish Research Council and Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (NSC center)

  3. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe—the key actuating element—has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  4. Probing modified gravity with atom-interferometry: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlögel, Sandrine; Clesse, Sébastien; Füzfa, André

    2016-05-01

    Refined constraints on chameleon theories are calculated for atom-interferometry experiments, using a numerical approach consisting in solving for a four-region model the static and spherically symmetric Klein-Gordon equation for the chameleon field. By modeling not only the test mass and the vacuum chamber but also its walls and the exterior environment, the method allows one to probe new effects on the scalar field profile and the induced acceleration of atoms. In the case of a weakly perturbing test mass, the effect of the wall is to enhance the field profile and to lower the acceleration inside the chamber by up to 1 order of magnitude. In the thin-shell regime, results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical estimations, when measurements are realized in the immediate vicinity of the test mass. Close to the vacuum chamber wall, the acceleration becomes negative and potentially measurable. This prediction could be used to discriminate between fifth-force effects and systematic experimental uncertainties, by doing the experiment at several key positions inside the vacuum chamber. For the chameleon potential V (ϕ )=Λ4 +α/ϕα and a coupling function A (ϕ )=exp (ϕ /M ), one finds M ≳7 ×1016 GeV , independently of the power-law index. For V (ϕ )=Λ4(1 +Λ /ϕ ), one finds M ≳1014 GeV . A sensitivity of a ˜10-11 m /s2 would probe the model up to the Planck scale. Finally, a proposal for a second experimental setup, in a vacuum room, is presented. In this case, Planckian values of M could be probed provided that a ˜10-10 m /s2 , a limit reachable by future experiments. Our method can easily be extended to constrain other models with a screening mechanism, such as symmetron, dilaton and f(R) theories.

  5. Development of Tuning Fork Based Probes for Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilian, Romaneh; Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M.; Torrez, Neil; Alizadeh, Amirali; Askari, Davood

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the development of tuning fork-based AFM/STM probes in NaugaNeedles LLC for use in atomic force microscopy. These probes can be mounted on different carriers per customers' request. (e.g., RHK carrier, Omicron carrier, and tuning fork on a Sapphire disk). We are able to design and engineer tuning forks on any type of carrier used in the market. We can attach three types of tips on the edge of a tuning fork prong (i.e., growing Ag2Ga nanoneedles at any arbitrary angle, cantilever of AFM tip, and tungsten wire) with lengths from 100-500 μm. The nanoneedle is located vertical to the fork. Using a suitable insulation and metallic coating, we can make QPlus sensors that can detect tunneling current during the AFM scan. To make Qplus sensors, the entire quartz fork will be coated with an insulating material, before attaching the nanoneedle. Then, the top edge of one prong is coated with a thin layer of conductive metal and the nanoneedle is attached to the fork end of the metal coated prong. The metal coating provides electrical connection to the tip for tunneling current readout and to the electrodes and used to read the QPlus current. Since the amount of mass added to the fork is minimal, the resonance frequency spectrum does not change and still remains around 32.6 KHz and the Q factor is around 1,200 in ambient condition. These probes can enhance the performance of tuning fork based atomic microscopy.

  6. The influence of voxel size on atom probe tomography data.

    PubMed

    Torres, K L; Daniil, M; Willard, M A; Thompson, G B

    2011-05-01

    A methodology for determining the optimal voxel size for phase thresholding in nanostructured materials was developed using an atom simulator and a model system of a fixed two-phase composition and volume fraction. The voxel size range was banded by the atom count within each voxel. Some voxel edge lengths were found to be too large, resulting in an averaging of compositional fluctuations; others were too small with concomitant decreases in the signal-to-noise ratio for phase identification. The simulated methodology was then applied to the more complex experimentally determined data set collected from a (Co(0.95)Fe(0.05))(88)Zr(6)Hf(1)B(4)Cu(1) two-phase nanocomposite alloy to validate the approach. In this alloy, Zr and Hf segregated to an intergranular amorphous phase while Fe preferentially segregated to a crystalline phase during the isothermal annealing step that promoted primary crystallization. The atom probe data analysis of the volume fraction was compared to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) dark-field imaging analysis and a lever rule analysis of the volume fraction within the amorphous and crystalline phases of the ribbon.

  7. Local density probing of atomic gas via cold Li-Ca+ inelastic collisions in an atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Haze, Shinsuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Kyuno, Kazuki; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in a harmonic trap inevitably has an inhomogeneous density distribution, which makes an atomic gas an ensemble of atoms in different physical phases. Recent technical advances in the determination of local physical quantities in an atomic gas overcome this complexity and make it possible to directly compare experimental results with many-body theories of a homogeneous atomic gas. A laser-cooled ion can be used as a high-spatial resolution probe of physical quantities of an atomic gas. The spatial spread of an ion can be reduced to sub-microns, which is even small enough for the application of the local probe of atoms in optical lattices. In our experiment, we constructed Li and Ca+ ultracold hybrid system and observed inelastic collisions as a loss of ions. The inelastic collision is confirmed to be a charge-exchange process, whose rate depends linearly on the local atomic density. From the measurement of the rate of the charge-exchange, we can reproduce an atomic density profile. This is an important step toward a local probe of physical quantities of atoms with cold ions. In this presentation, we report on the observation of charge-exchange collisions between Li atom and Ca+ ions, and discuss the feasibility of the ions as a probe of the atoms.

  8. Wafer scale tilt-compensated silicon nanowire atomic force microscopy probes for high aspect ratio geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, Brian A.; Ilic, B. Robert; Reuter, Mark C.; Tiwari, Sandip

    2014-09-01

    Using site controlled growth of single vapor-liquid-solid silicon nanowires, high aspect ratio tilt-compensated atomic force microscope probes are fabricated on a wafer scale. Methods are developed to sculpt the tips of these probes for desirable performance attributes. Probe performance is explored by imaging high aspect ratio structures using an atomic force microscope. Wafer scale tilt-compensated silicon nanowire probes are an excellent mass producible platform for non-destructive topographic imaging of high aspect ratio features.

  9. Characterization of Nanoporous Materials with Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Erichsen, Torben; Epler, Eike; Volkert, Cynthia A; Trompenaars, Piet; Nowak, Carsten

    2015-06-01

    A method to characterize open-cell nanoporous materials with atom probe tomography (APT) has been developed. For this, open-cell nanoporous gold with pore diameters of around 50 nm was used as a model system, and filled by electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) to obtain a compact material. Two different EBID precursors were successfully tested-dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co2(CO)8] and diiron nonacarbonyl [Fe2(CO)9]. Penetration and filling depth are sufficient for focused ion beam-based APT sample preparation. With this approach, stable APT analysis of the nanoporous material can be performed. Reconstruction reveals the composition of the deposited precursor and the nanoporous material, as well as chemical information of the interfaces between them. Thus, it is shown that, using an appropriate EBID process, local chemical information in three dimensions with sub-nanometer resolution can be obtained from nanoporous materials using APT.

  10. Atom-probe analyses of nanodiamonds from Allende

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Philipp R.; Stadermann, Frank J.; Isheim, Dieter; Auciello, Orlando; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Davis, Andrew M.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Floss, Christine; Hiller, Jon; Larson, David J.; Lewis, Josiah B.; Mane, Anil; Pellin, Michael J.; Savina, Michael R.; Seidman, David N.; Stephan, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) is currently the only analytical technique that, due to its spatial resolution and detection efficiency, has the potential to measure the carbon isotope ratios of individual nanodiamonds. We describe three different sample preparation protocols that we developed for the APT analysis of meteoritic nanodiamonds at sub-nm resolution and present carbon isotope peak ratios of meteoritic and synthetic nanodiamonds. The results demonstrate an instrumental bias associated with APT that needs to be quantified and corrected to obtain accurate isotope ratios. After this correction is applied, this technique should allow determination of the distribution of 12C/13C ratios in individual diamond grains, solving the decades-old question of the origin of meteoritic nanodiamonds: what fraction, if any, formed in the solar system and in presolar environments? Furthermore, APT could help us identify the stellar sources of any presolar nanodiamonds that are detected.

  11. Accuracy of analyses of microelectronics nanostructures in atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurpillot, F.; Rolland, N.; Estivill, R.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2016-07-01

    The routine use of atom probe tomography (APT) as a nano-analysis microscope in the semiconductor industry requires the precise evaluation of the metrological parameters of this instrument (spatial accuracy, spatial precision, composition accuracy or composition precision). The spatial accuracy of this microscope is evaluated in this paper in the analysis of planar structures such as high-k metal gate stacks. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the in-depth accuracy of reconstructed APT images is perturbed when analyzing this structure composed of an oxide layer of high electrical permittivity (higher-k dielectric constant) that separates the metal gate and the semiconductor channel of a field emitter transistor. Large differences in the evaporation field between these layers (resulting from large differences in material properties) are the main sources of image distortions. An analytic model is used to interpret inaccuracy in the depth reconstruction of these devices in APT.

  12. Atomic force microscope based on vertical silicon probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Benjamin; Mairiaux, Estelle; Faucher, Marc

    2017-06-01

    A family of silicon micro-sensors for Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is presented that allows to operate with integrated transducers from medium to high frequencies together with moderate stiffness constants. The sensors are based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems technology. The vertical design specifically enables a long tip to oscillate perpendicularly to the surface to be imaged. The tip is part of a resonator including quasi-flexural composite beams, and symmetrical transducers that can be used as piezoresistive detector and/or electro-thermal actuator. Two vertical probes (Vprobes) were operated up to 4.3 MHz with stiffness constants 150 N/m to 500 N/m and the capability to oscillate from 10 pm to 90 nm. AFM images of several samples both in amplitude modulation (tapping-mode) and in frequency modulation were obtained.

  13. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  14. Quantitative laser atom probe analyses of hydrogenation-disproportionated Nd-Fe-B powders.

    PubMed

    Sepehri-Amin, H; Ohkubo, T; Nishiuchi, T; Hirosawa, S; Hono, K

    2011-05-01

    We report a successful atom probe tomography of hydrides in hydrogenation-disproportionated Nd-Fe-B powder using a green femtosecond laser. The atom probe specimens were prepared from one particle of powder using the focused ion beam lift-out method. The atom probe tomography taken from an α-Fe/NdH(2) structure suggested that B and Ga (trace added element) were partitioned in the NdH(2) phase. The hydrogen concentration of 64 at% determined from the atom probe analysis was in excellent agreement with the stoichiometry of the NdH(2) phase.

  15. Atom-probe for FinFET dopant characterization.

    PubMed

    Kambham, A K; Mody, J; Gilbert, M; Koelling, S; Vandervorst, W

    2011-05-01

    With the continuous shrinking of transistors and advent of new transistor architectures to keep in pace with Moore's law and ITRS goals, there is a rising interest in multigate 3D-devices like FinFETs where the channel is surrounded by gates on multiple surfaces. The performance of these devices depends on the dimensions and the spatial distribution of dopants in source/drain regions of the device. As a result there is a need for new metrology approach/technique to characterize quantitatively the dopant distribution in these devices with nanometer precision in 3D. In recent years, atom probe tomography (APT) has shown its ability to analyze semiconductor and thin insulator materials effectively with sub-nm resolution in 3D. In this paper we will discuss the methodology used to study FinFET-based structures using APT. Whereas challenges and solutions for sample preparation linked to the limited fin dimensions already have been reported before, we report here an approach to prepare fin structures for APT, which based on their processing history (trenches filled with Si) are in principle invisible in FIB and SEM. Hence alternative solutions in locating and positioning them on the APT-tip are presented. We also report on the use of the atom probe results on FinFETs to understand the role of different dopant implantation angles (10° and 45°) when attempting conformal doping of FinFETs and provide a quantitative comparison with alternative approaches such as 1D secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and theoretical model values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Filtering Method to Reveal Crystalline Patterns from Atom Probe Microscopy Desorption Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-26

    reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps Lan Yao Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann...reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. Themethod filters atoms based on the time difference...between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom . Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of

  17. Chemical mapping of mammalian cells by atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Kedar; Prosa, Ty; Fu, Jing; Kelly, Thomas F; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), a technique that has been used to determine 3D maps of ion compositions of metals and semiconductors at sub-nanometer resolution, controlled emissions of ions can be induced from needle-shaped specimens in the vicinity of a strong electric field. Detection of these ions in the plane of a position sensitive detector provides two-dimensional compositional information while the sequence of ion arrival at the detector provides information in the third dimension. However, the applicability of APT to imaging unstained cells has not been explored. Here, we report the use of APT to obtain 3D spatial distributions of cellular ions and metabolites from unstained, freeze-dried mammalian cells. Multiple peaks were reliably obtained in the mass spectrum from tips with diameters of ~ 50 nm and heights of ~ 200 nm, with mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) ranging from 1 to 80. Peaks at m/z 12, 23, 28 and 39, corresponding to carbon, sodium, carbonyl and potassium ions respectively, showed distinct patterns of spatial distribution within the cell. Our studies establish that APT could become a powerful tool for mapping the sub-cellular distribution of atomic species, such as labeled metabolites, at 3D spatial resolutions as high as ~ 1 nm. PMID:22245777

  18. Boron atomic-scale mapping in advanced microelectronics by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estivill, Robert; Juhel, Marc; Servanton, Germain; Gregoire, Magali; Lorut, Fréderic; Clement, Laurent; Chevalier, Pascal; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2017-06-01

    Two types of industrial transistor technologies have been studied using atom probe tomography (APT). Both 14 nm node high-K metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) on ultrathin body and buried oxide and 320 GHz Ft Si/SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBT) embedded in a 55-nm BiCMOS chip have been analysed and their atomic distribution has been mapped. Due to the limitations of routine characterisation techniques, boron can remain invisible in such nanometric sized structures. Also, size effects can induce differences between the actual device and larger test zones used for monitoring these technologies. This paper presents results obtained by APT from two advanced nodes, in contrast to complementary techniques. Using different methodologies, including specific APT-friendly test structures and multiple-impact data filtering, the dopant behaviour in these structures can be better understood. An unexpected boron distribution in both the MOSFET source/drain and HBT base regions has been highlighted.

  19. Strategies for fabricating atom probe specimens with a dual beam FIB.

    PubMed

    Miller, M K; Russell, K F; Thompson, G B

    2005-03-01

    A FIB-based lift-out method for preparing atom probe specimens at site specific locations such as coarse precipitates, grain boundaries, interphase interfaces, denuded zones, heat affected zones, implanted, near surface and subsurface regions, shear bands, etc. has been developed. FIB-based methods for the fabrication of atom probe specimens from thin ribbons, sheet stock, and powders have been developed.

  20. Probing physical properties at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditzler, Lindsay Rachel

    Techniques that measure physical properties at the nanoscale with high sensitivity are significantly limited considering the number of new nanomaterials being developed. The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has lead to significant advancements in the ability to characterize physical properties of materials in all areas of science: chemistry, physics, engineering, and biology have made great scientific strides do to the versatility of the AFM. AFM is used for quantification of many physical properties such as morphology, electrical, mechanical, magnetic, electrochemical, binding interactions, and protein folding. This work examines the electrical and mechanical properties of materials applicable to the field of nano-electronics. As electronic devices are miniaturized the demand for materials with unique electrical properties, which can be developed and exploited, has increased. For example, discussed in this work, a derivative of tetrathiafulvalene, which exhibits a unique loss of conductivity upon compression of the self-assembled monolayer could be developed into a molecular switch. This work also compares tunable organic (tetraphenylethylene tetracarboxylic acid and bis(pyridine)s assemblies) and metal-organic (Silver-stilbizole coordination compounds) crystals which show high electrical conductivity. The electrical properties of these materials vary depending on their composition allowing for the development of compositionally tunable functional materials. Additional work was done to investigate the effects of molecular environment on redox active 11-ferroceneyl-1 undecanethiol (Fc) molecules. The redox process of mixed monolayers of Fc and decanethiol was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. As the concentration of Fc increased large, variations in the force were observed. Using these variations the number of oxidized molecules in the monolayer was determined. AFM is additionally capable of investigating

  1. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K; Orozco, Luis A; Rolston, S L

    2017-06-15

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  2. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Orozco, Luis A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  3. Measuring correlations of cold-atom systems using multiple quantum probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streif, Michael; Buchleitner, Andreas; Jaksch, Dieter; Mur-Petit, Jordi

    2016-11-01

    We present a nondestructive method to probe a complex quantum system using multiple-impurity atoms as quantum probes. Our protocol provides access to different equilibrium properties of the system by changing its coupling to the probes. In particular, we show that measurements with two probes reveal the system's nonlocal two-point density correlations, for probe-system contact interactions. We illustrate our findings with analytic and numerical calculations for the Bose-Hubbard model in the weakly and strongly interacting regimes, under conditions relevant to ongoing experiments in cold-atom systems.

  4. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V). Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated. PMID:21711623

  5. Probing the Lipid Membrane Dipole Potential by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Wickremasinghe, Nissanka S.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2008-01-01

    The electrostatic properties of biological membranes can be described by three parameters: the transmembrane potential, the membrane surface potential, and the membrane dipole potential. The first two are well characterized in terms of their magnitudes and biological effects. The dipole potential, however, is not well characterized. Various methods to measure the membrane dipole potential indirectly yield different values, and there is not even agreement on the source of the membrane dipole moment. This ambiguity impedes investigations into the biological effects of the membrane dipole moment, which should be substantial considering the large interfacial fields with which it is associated. Electrostatic analysis of phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes with the atomic force microscope reveals a repulsive force between the negatively charged probe tips and the zwitterionic lipids. This unexpected interaction has been analyzed quantitatively to reveal that the repulsion is due to a weak external field created by the internal membrane dipole potential. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported phosphatidylcholine membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole moment in a noninvasive manner with nanometer scale spatial resolution will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. PMID:18805919

  6. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The studies reported were conducted to gain a fundamental understanding of adhesion and dynamic friction on an atomic or microscopic level. Fundamental aspects of low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger emission spectroscopy (AES), and field ion microscopy (FIM) are discussed. Typical results of studies conducted are considered, giving attention to LEED-AES experiments, pin and disk experiments, and field ion microscope investigations.

  7. Atomic-scale characterization of germanium isotopic multilayers by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y.; Takamizawa, H.; Toyama, T.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Itoh, K. M.; Haller, E. E.

    2013-01-14

    We report comparison of the interfacial sharpness characterization of germanium (Ge) isotopic multilayers between laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). An alternating stack of 8-nm-thick naturally available Ge layers and 8-nm-thick isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge layers was prepared on a Ge(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The APT mass spectra consist of clearly resolved peaks of five stable Ge isotopes ({sup 70}Ge, {sup 72}Ge, {sup 73}Ge, {sup 74}Ge, and {sup 76}Ge). The degree of intermixing at the interfaces between adjacent layers was determined by APT to be around 0.8 {+-} 0.1 nm which was much sharper than that obtained by SIMS.

  8. An atom probe study of carbon distribution in martensite in 2[1/4]Cr1Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, R.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy); Miller, M.K. . Metals and Ceramics Division)

    1995-01-15

    2[1/4]Cr1Mo steel is used widely for superheater tubing in power plants, and as a filler material for joining [1/2]Cr[1/2]Mo[1/4]V steam piping. Components in power plants can be massive and therefore differences in cooling rates can result in a mixed microstructure of allotriomorphic ferrite, bainite and martensite. The creep strength of the steel is critically dependent on the carbide distribution within the microstructure. The position and nature of carbides within the microstructure is itself a critical function of the movement of carbon through the microstructure during the early stages of tempering. In this paper, atom probe field ion microscopy has been used to examine carbon segregation to lath boundaries in martensite in 2[1/4]Cr1Mo steel. Significant carbon enrichment was observed at the lath boundaries. This enrichment is consistent with the observation of retained austenite films at the lath boundaries in the transmission electron microscope, and with carbon levels previously found in retained austenite in low alloy ferrous martensites.

  9. Optimisation of specimen temperature and pulse fraction in atom probe microscopy experiments on a microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Yao, L; Cairney, J M; Zhu, C; Ringer, S P

    2011-05-01

    This paper details the effects of systematic changes to the experimental parameters for atom probe microscopy of microalloyed steels. We have used assessments of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), compositional measurements and field desorption images to establish the optimal instrumental parameters. These corresponded to probing at the lowest possible temperature (down to 20K) with the highest possible pulse fraction (up to 30%). A steel containing a fine dispersion of solute atom clusters was used as an archetype to demonstrate the importance of running the atom probe at optimum conditions.

  10. C12/C13-ratio determination in nanodiamonds by atom-probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Josiah B; Isheim, Dieter; Floss, Christine; Seidman, David N

    2015-12-01

    The astrophysical origins of ∼ 3 nm-diameter meteoritic nanodiamonds can be inferred from the ratio of C12/C13. It is essential to achieve high spatial and mass resolving power and minimize all sources of signal loss in order to obtain statistically significant measurements. We conducted atom-probe tomography on meteoritic nanodiamonds embedded between layers of Pt. We describe sample preparation, atom-probe tomography analysis, 3D reconstruction, and bias correction. We present new data from meteoritic nanodiamonds and terrestrial standards and discuss methods to correct isotopic measurements made with the atom-probe tomograph. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.; Russell, K.F.; Stoller, R.E.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of unaged (as-fabricated) and long-term thermally aged ({approximately} 100,000 h at 280 C) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed. This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal-aging effects. This microstructural study focused on the quantification of the compositions of the matrix and carbides. The APFIM results indicate that there was no significant microstructural evolution after a long-term thermal exposure in weld, plate, or forging materials. The matrix depletion of copper that was observed in weld materials was consistent with the copper concentration in the matrix after the stress-relief heat treatment. The compositions of cementite carbides aged for 100,000 h were compared with the Thermocalc{trademark} prediction. The APFIM comparisons of materials under these conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties such as the Charpy transition temperature.

  12. Geochemical Proxy Distribution at the Atomic-Scale: Atom Probe Tomography of Foraminiferal Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branson, O.; Perea, D. E.; Winters, M. A.; Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Russell, A. D.; Spero, H. J.; Gagnon, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Biomineral composition reflects a complex interplay between minute-scale biological control, mineral growth processes, and the influence of environmental conditions. For this reason, the mechanisms responsible for the formation of these minerals, as well as the incorporation of trace elements during biomineral growth, are poorly understood. Potential mechanisms governing the production and composition of biominerals can be organized into two distinct groups: a) biological mechanisms controlling the calcifying environment and b) mineral growth processes from this controlled environment. Despite significant advances in both these areas, critical gaps remain in our understanding of biomineral production and geochemical tracer incorporation. We are adapting Atom Probe Tomography (APT), a technique that maps the arrangement and identity of individual atoms within a bulk material, to analyze foraminiferal calcite for the first time. These data-rich atom-scale chemical maps provide a unique opportunity to deconvolve the effects of biological and crystal growth processes in the incorporation of geochemical tracers. Our first experiments have examined the influence of the biological-mineral interface on geochemical proxy element incorporation. Preliminary measurements show that (1) we can successfully map impurities in calcite biominerals, while also distinguishing between mineral and organic zones, overcoming a major technical hurdle; and (2) that elements like sodium appear to be recruited to the organic-mineral interface. The high-resolution chemical data from the APT will further allow us to investigate the fundamental basis for geochemical proxy behavior. For example, we can determine for a certain set of conditions whether the substitution of trace elements into the calcite follows ideal solid-solution behavior, as tacitly assumed in many geochemical proxy systems, or is modulated by intra-shell organics, or coupled-substitution interactions. Collectively, the

  13. Probing Atomic Dynamics and Structures Using Optical Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Pattern formation is a widely studied phenomenon that can provide fundamental insights into nonlinear systems. Emergent patterns in cold atoms are of particular interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because one can relate optical patterns to spatial structures in the atoms. In our experimental system, we study multimode optical patterns generated from a sample of cold, thermal atoms. We observe this nonlinear optical phenomenon at record low input powers due to the highly nonlinear nature of the spatial bunching of atoms in an optical lattice. We present a detailed study of the dynamics of these bunched atoms during optical pattern formation. We show how small changes in the atomic density distribution affect the symmetry of the generated patterns as well as the nature of the nonlinearity that describes the light-atom interaction. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  14. Theoretical Study of the Effect of Probe Shape on Adhesion Force Between Probe and Substrate in Atomic Force Microscope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Hu, Junhui; Kong, Lingjiang

    2013-12-01

    The quantitative description of adhesion force dependence on the probe shape is of importance in many scientific and industrial fields. We performed a theoretical study on the influences of the probe shape (the sphere and parabolic probe) on the adhesion force at different humidity in order to elucidate how the adhesion force varied with the probe shape in atomic force microscope manipulation experiment. We found that the combined action of the triple point and the Kelvin radius is the guiding trend of the adhesion force, and these two fundamental parameters are closely related to the probe shape. Meanwhile, the theoretical results demonstrated that the adhesion force are in a good agreement with the experiment data if the van der Waals force is take into account.

  15. H atom probes of radiation chemistry: Solids and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Shkrob, I.A.

    1998-12-31

    H atoms are ubiquitous in radiation chemistry. Radiolysis of most substances yield H atoms and studies of the mechanisms of their production are as old as the field of radiation chemistry. The problem is that study or products does not easily reveal the chemical mechanisms involved even with the clever use of isotopes. Time-resolved pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to study formation and decay kinetics of spin-polarized mobile H atoms in radiolysis of wet fused silica containing {approximately} 1,200 ppm of SiOH groups. Two reactions of H atoms can be distinguished: a slow component corresponding to scavenging of H atoms by metastable paramagnetic centers and a fast component which is ascribed to a reaction of a short-lived small polaron (intrinsic hole) with H atoms.

  16. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    DOE PAGES

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2016-04-21

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales – from single atoms to macroscopic devices. Our short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. In this discussion we present the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  17. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    DOE PAGES

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-24

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of a electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. Here we present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  18. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-04-21

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales – from single atoms to macroscopic devices. Our short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. In this discussion we present the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  19. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-24

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of a electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. Here we present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  20. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    PubMed Central

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales – from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent works dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. Discussion presents advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:27146961

  1. Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography of Deformed Minerals: A Zircon Case Study.

    PubMed

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Piazolo, Sandra; Trimby, Patrick; Yang, Limei; Cairney, Julie M

    2017-01-30

    The application of atom probe tomography to the study of minerals is a rapidly growing area. Picosecond-pulsed, ultraviolet laser (UV-355 nm) assisted atom probe tomography has been used to analyze trace element mobility within dislocations and low-angle boundaries in plastically deformed specimens of the nonconductive mineral zircon (ZrSiO4), a key material to date the earth's geological events. Here we discuss important experimental aspects inherent in the atom probe tomography investigation of this important mineral, providing insights into the challenges in atom probe tomography characterization of minerals as a whole. We studied the influence of atom probe tomography analysis parameters on features of the mass spectra, such as the thermal tail, as well as the overall data quality. Three zircon samples with different uranium and lead content were analyzed, and particular attention was paid to ion identification in the mass spectra and detection limits of the key trace elements, lead and uranium. We also discuss the correlative use of electron backscattered diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to map the deformation in the zircon grains, and the combined use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and focused ion beam sample preparation to assist preparation of the final atom probe tip.

  2. Preparation of nanowire specimens for laser-assisted atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Blumtritt, H; Isheim, D; Senz, S; Seidman, D N; Moutanabbir, O

    2014-10-31

    The availability of reliable and well-engineered commercial instruments and data analysis software has led to development in recent years of robust and ergonomic atom-probe tomographs. Indeed, atom-probe tomography (APT) is now being applied to a broader range of materials classes that involve highly important scientific and technological problems in materials science and engineering. Dual-beam focused-ion beam microscopy and its application to the fabrication of APT microtip specimens have dramatically improved the ability to probe a variety of systems. However, the sample preparation is still challenging especially for emerging nanomaterials such as epitaxial nanowires which typically grow vertically on a substrate through metal-catalyzed vapor phase epitaxy. The size, morphology, density, and sensitivity to radiation damage are the most influential parameters in the preparation of nanowire specimens for APT. In this paper, we describe a step-by-step process methodology to allow a precisely controlled, damage-free transfer of individual, short silicon nanowires onto atom probe microposts. Starting with a dense array of tiny nanowires and using focused ion beam, we employed a sequence of protective layers and markers to identify the nanowire to be transferred and probed while protecting it against Ga ions during lift-off processing and tip sharpening. Based on this approach, high-quality three-dimensional atom-by-atom maps of single aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires are obtained using a highly focused ultraviolet laser-assisted local electrode atom probe tomograph.

  3. Preparation of nanowire specimens for laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumtritt, H.; Isheim, D.; Senz, S.; Seidman, D. N.; Moutanabbir, O.

    2014-10-01

    The availability of reliable and well-engineered commercial instruments and data analysis software has led to development in recent years of robust and ergonomic atom-probe tomographs. Indeed, atom-probe tomography (APT) is now being applied to a broader range of materials classes that involve highly important scientific and technological problems in materials science and engineering. Dual-beam focused-ion beam microscopy and its application to the fabrication of APT microtip specimens have dramatically improved the ability to probe a variety of systems. However, the sample preparation is still challenging especially for emerging nanomaterials such as epitaxial nanowires which typically grow vertically on a substrate through metal-catalyzed vapor phase epitaxy. The size, morphology, density, and sensitivity to radiation damage are the most influential parameters in the preparation of nanowire specimens for APT. In this paper, we describe a step-by-step process methodology to allow a precisely controlled, damage-free transfer of individual, short silicon nanowires onto atom probe microposts. Starting with a dense array of tiny nanowires and using focused ion beam, we employed a sequence of protective layers and markers to identify the nanowire to be transferred and probed while protecting it against Ga ions during lift-off processing and tip sharpening. Based on this approach, high-quality three-dimensional atom-by-atom maps of single aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires are obtained using a highly focused ultraviolet laser-assisted local electrode atom probe tomograph.

  4. Characterization of conductive probes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkler, Thomas; Hantschel, Thomas; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Hellemans, Louis; Kulisch, Wilhelm; Oesterschulze, Egbert; Niedermann, Philippe; Sulzbach, T.

    1999-03-01

    The availability of very sharp, wear-proof, electrically conductive probes is one crucial issue for conductive AFM techniques such as SCM, SSRM and Nanopotentiometry. The purpose of this systematic study is to give an overview of the existing probes and to evaluate their performance for the electrical techniques with emphasis on applications on Si at high contact forces. The suitability of the characterized probes has been demonstrated by applying conductive AFM techniques to test structures and state-of- the-art semiconductor devices. Two classes of probes were examined geometrically and electrically: Si sensors with a conductive coating and integrated pyramidal tips made of metal or diamond. Structural information about the conductive materials was obtained by optical and electron microscopy as well as by AFM roughness measurements. Swift and non-destructive procedures to characterize the geometrical electrical properties of the probes prior to the actual AFm experiment have been developed. A number of analytical tools have been used to explain the observed electrical behavior of the tested probes.

  5. Scanning probe microscopy of atoms and molecules on insulating films: from imaging to molecular manipulation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gerhard; Gross, Leo; Mohn, Fabian; Repp, Jascha

    2012-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) of single atoms and molecules on ultrathin insulating films have led to a wealth of novel observations and insights. Based on the reduced electronic coupling to the metallic substrate, these techniques allow the charge state of individual atoms to be controlled, orbitals of individual molecules to be imaged and metal-molecule complexes to be built up. Near-contact AFM adds the unique capabilities of imaging and probing the chemical structure of single molecules with atomic resolution. With the help of atomic/molecular manipulation techniques, chemical binding processes and molecular switches can be studied in detail.

  6. Understanding proton-conducting perovskite interfaces using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel R.

    Proton-conducting ceramics are under intense scientific investigation for a number of exciting applications, including fuel cells, electrolyzers, hydrogen separation membranes, membrane reactors, and sensors. However, commercial application requires deeper understanding and improvement of proton conductivity in these materials. It is well-known that proton conductivity in these materials is often limited by highly resistive grain boundaries (GBs). While these conductivity-limiting GBs are still not well understood, it is hypothesized that their blocking nature stems from the formation of a positive (proton-repelling) space-charge zone. Furthermore, it has been observed that the strength of the blocking behavior can change dramatically depending on the fabrication process used to make the ceramic. This thesis applies laser-assisted atom probe tomography (LAAPT) to provide new insights into the GB chemistry and resulting space-charge behavior of BaZr0.9Y0.1O 3--delta (BZY10), a prototypical proton-conducting ceramic. LAAPT is an exciting characterization technique that allows for three-dimensional nm-scale spatial resolution and very high chemical resolution (up to parts-per-million). While it is challenging to quantitatively apply LAAPT to complex, multi-cation oxide materials, this thesis successfully develops a method to accurately quantify the stoichiometry of BZY10 and maintain minimal quantitative cationic deviation at a laser energies of approximately 10--20 pJ. With the analysis technique specifically optimized for BZY10, GB chemistry is then examined for BZY10 samples prepared using four differing processing methods: (1) spark plasma sintering (SPS), (2) conventional sintering using powder prepared by solid-state reaction followed by high-temperature annealing (HT), (3) conventional sintering using powder prepared by solid-state reaction with NiO used as a sintering aid (SSR-Ni), and (4) solid-state reactive sintering directly from BaCO3, ZrO2, and Y2O3

  7. Development of atom probe specimen preparation techniques for specific regions in steel materials.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun; Kawakami, Kazuto; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Sugiyama, Masaaki

    2007-09-01

    More elaborated specimen preparation techniques for atom probe analysis were developed using a focused ion beam with a sample lift-out system so as to expand the application field in steel materials. The techniques enable atom probe analysis of sample steel at site-specific regions of interest. The preferable form of the needle specimen was provided by electrostatic field calculation using a finite element method. The new techniques were applied to the observation of a bainite-ferrite interface in a low carbon steel, and atomic-scale partitioning and segregation of alloying elements at the phase interface were directly observed in three dimensions.

  8. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew J; Moody, Michael P; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data.

  9. Atom Probe Analysis of Ex Situ Gas-Charged Stable Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Haley, Daniel; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-01-30

    In this work, we report on the atom probe tomography analysis of two metallic hydrides formed by pressurized charging using an ex situ hydrogen charging cell, in the pressure range of 200-500 kPa (2-5 bar). Specifically we report on the deuterium charging of Pd/Rh and V systems. Using this ex situ system, we demonstrate the successful loading and subsequent atom probe analysis of deuterium within a Pd/Rh alloy, and demonstrate that deuterium is likely present within the oxide-metal interface of a native oxide formed on vanadium. Through these experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of ex situ hydrogen analysis for hydrides via atom probe tomography, and thus a practical route to three-dimensional imaging of hydrogen in hydrides at the atomic scale.

  10. Quantitative binomial distribution analyses of nanoscale like-solute atom clustering and segregation in atom probe tomography data.

    PubMed

    Moody, Michael P; Stephenson, Leigh T; Ceguerra, Anna V; Ringer, Simon P

    2008-07-01

    The applicability of the binomial frequency distribution is outlined for the analysis of the evolution nanoscale atomic clustering of dilute solute in an alloy subject to thermal ageing in 3D atom probe data. The conventional chi(2) statistics and significance testing are demonstrated to be inappropriate for comparison of quantity of solute segregation present in two or more different sized system. Pearson coefficient, mu, is shown to normalize chi(2) with respect to sample size over an order of magnitude. A simple computer simulation is implemented to investigate the binomial analysis and infer meaning in the measured value of mu over a series of systems at different solute concentrations and degree of clustering. The simulations replicate the form of experimental data and demonstrate the effect of detector efficiency to significantly underestimate the measured segregation. The binomial analysis is applied to experimental atom probe data sets and complementary simulations are used to interpret the results.

  11. Two-probe atomic-force microscope manipulator and its applications.

    PubMed

    Zhukov, A A; Stolyarov, V S; Kononenko, O V

    2017-06-01

    We report on a manipulator based on a two-probe atomic force microscope (AFM) with an individual feedback system for each probe. This manipulator works under an upright optical microscope with 3 mm focal distance. The design of the microscope helps us tomanipulate nanowires using the microscope probes as a two-prong fork. The AFM feedback is realized based on the dynamic full-time contact mode. The applications of the manipulator and advantages of its two-probe design are presented.

  12. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D.

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  13. Probing dynamic protein ensembles with atomic proximity measures.

    PubMed

    Gáspári, Zoltán; Angyán, Annamária F; Dhir, Somdutta; Franklin, Dino; Perczel, András; Pintar, Alessandro; Pongor, Sándor

    2010-11-01

    The emerging role of internal dynamics in protein fold and function requires new avenues of structure analysis. We analyzed the dynamically restrained conformational ensemble of ubiquitin generated from residual dipolar coupling data, in terms of protruding and buried atoms as well as interatomic distances, using four proximity-based algorithms, CX, DPX, PRIDE and PRIDE-NMR (http://hydra.icgeb.trieste.it/protein/). We found that Ubiquitin, this relatively rigid molecule has a highly diverse dynamic ensemble. The environment of protruding atoms is highly variable across conformers, on the other hand, only a part of buried atoms tends to fluctuate. The variability of the ensemble cautions against the use of single conformers when explaining functional phenomena. We also give a detailed evaluation of PRIDE-NMR on a wide dataset and discuss its usage in the light of the features of available NMR distance restraint sets in public databases.

  14. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  15. A model to predict image formation in Atom probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Vurpillot, F; Gaillard, A; Da Costa, G; Deconihout, B

    2013-09-01

    A model devoted to the modelling of the field evaporation of a tip is presented in this paper. The influence of length scales from the atomic scale to the macroscopic scale is taken into account in this approach. The evolution of the tip shape is modelled at the atomic scale in a three dimensional geometry with cylindrical symmetry. The projection law of ions is determined using a realistic representation of the tip geometry including the presence of electrodes in the surrounding area of the specimen. This realistic modelling gives a direct access to the voltage required to field evaporate, to the evolving magnification in the microscope and to the understanding of reconstruction artefacts when the presence of phases with different evaporation fields and/or different dielectric permittivity constants are modelled. This model has been applied to understand the field evaporation behaviour in bulk dielectric materials. In particular the role of the residual conductivity of dielectric materials is addressed.

  16. Probing Single Vacancies in Black Phosphorus at the Atomic Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Brian; Hauptmann, Nadine; Rudenko, Alexander N.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Khajetoorians, Alexander A.

    2017-06-01

    Utilizing a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and electronic structure calculations, we characterize the structural and electronic properties of single atomic vacancies within several monolayers of the surface of black phosphorus. We illustrate, with experimental analysis and tight-binding calculations, that we can depth profile these vacancies and assign them to specific sublattices within the unit cell. Measurements reveal that the single vacancies exhibit strongly anisotropic and highly delocalized charge density, laterally extended up to 20 atomic unit cells. The vacancies are then studied with STS, which reveals in-gap resonance states near the valence band edge and a strong p-doping of the bulk black phosphorus crystal. Finally, quasiparticle interference generated near these vacancies enables the direct visualization of the anisotropic band structure of black phosphorus.

  17. Probing Single Vacancies in Black Phosphorus at the Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Brian; Hauptmann, Nadine; Rudenko, Alexander N; Katsnelson, Mikhail I; Khajetoorians, Alexander A

    2017-06-14

    Utilizing a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and electronic structure calculations, we characterize the structural and electronic properties of single atomic vacancies within several monolayers of the surface of black phosphorus. We illustrate, with experimental analysis and tight-binding calculations, that we can depth profile these vacancies and assign them to specific sublattices within the unit cell. Measurements reveal that the single vacancies exhibit strongly anisotropic and highly delocalized charge density, laterally extended up to 20 atomic unit cells. The vacancies are then studied with STS, which reveals in-gap resonance states near the valence band edge and a strong p-doping of the bulk black phosphorus crystal. Finally, quasiparticle interference generated near these vacancies enables the direct visualization of the anisotropic band structure of black phosphorus.

  18. Probing starch-iodine interaction by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiongwei; An, Hongjie; Liu, Zhongdong; Yang, Hongshun; Wei, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    We explored the interaction of iodine with three crystalline type starches, corn, potato, and sweet potato starches using atomic force microscopy. Results revealed that starch molecules aggregated through interaction with iodine solution as well as iodine vapor. Detailed fine structures such as networks, chains, and super-helical structures were found in iodide solution tests. The nanostructures formed due to iodine adsorption could help to understand the formation and properties of the starch-iodine complex. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Preparation and Analysis of Atom Probe Tips by Xenon Focused Ion Beam Milling.

    PubMed

    Estivill, Robert; Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2016-06-01

    The damage and ion distribution induced in Si by an inductively coupled plasma Xe focused ion beam was investigated by atom probe tomography. By using predefined patterns it was possible to prepare the atom probe tips with a sub 50 nm end radius in the ion beam microscope. The atom probe reconstruction shows good agreement with simulated implantation profiles and interplanar distances extracted from spatial distribution maps. The elemental profiles of O and C indicate co-implantation during the milling process. The presence of small disc-shaped Xe clusters are also found in the three-dimensional reconstruction. These are attributed to the presence of Xe nanocrystals or bubbles that open during the evaporation process. The expected accumulated dose points to a loss of >95% of the Xe during analysis, which escapes undetected.

  20. Bringing Standardized Processes in Atom-Probe Tomography: I Establishing Standardized Terminology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ian M; Danoix, F; Forbes, Richard; Gault, Baptiste; Kelly, T. F.; Marquis, E A; Miller, Michael K; Moody, M. P.; Vurpillot, F

    2011-01-01

    Defining standardized methods requires careful consideration of the entire field and its applications. The International Field Emission Society (IFES) has elected a Standards Committee, whose task is to determine the needed steps to establish atom-probe tomography as an accepted metrology technique. Specific tasks include developing protocols or standards for: terminology and nomenclature; metrology and instrumentation, including specifications for reference materials; test methodologies; modeling and simulations; and science-based health, safety, and environmental practices. The Committee is currently working on defining terminology related to atom-probe tomography with the goal to include terms into a document published by the International Organization for Standards (ISO). A lot of terms also used in other disciplines have already been defined) and will be discussed for adoption in the context of atom-probe tomography.

  1. Atom probe tomographic assessment of the distribution of germanium atoms implanted in a silicon matrix through nano-apertures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Y; Han, B; Shimizu, Y; Inoue, K; Fukui, Y; Yano, M; Tanii, T; Shinada, T; Nagai, Y

    2017-09-20

    Ion implantation through nanometer-scale apertures (nano-apertures) is a promising method to precisely position ions in silicon matrices, which is a requirement for next generation electronic and quantum computing devices. This paper reports the application of atom probe tomography (APT) to investigate the three-dimensional distribution of germanium atoms in silicon after implantation through nano-aperture of 10 nm in diameter, for evaluation of the amount and spatial distribution of implanted dopants. The experimental results obtained by APT are consistent with a simple simulation with consideration of several effects during lithography and ion implantation, such as channeling and resist flow.

  2. Atom probe tomographic assessment of the distribution of germanium atoms implanted in a silicon matrix through nano-apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Y.; Han, B.; Shimizu, Y.; Inoue, K.; Fukui, Y.; Yano, M.; Tanii, T.; Shinada, T.; Nagai, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Ion implantation through nanometer-scale apertures (nano-apertures) is a promising method to precisely position ions in silicon matrices, which is a requirement for next generation electronic and quantum computing devices. This paper reports the application of atom probe tomography (APT) to investigate the three-dimensional distribution of germanium atoms in silicon after implantation through nano-aperture of 10 nm in diameter, for evaluation of the amount and spatial distribution of implanted dopants. The experimental results obtained by APT are consistent with a simple simulation with consideration of several effects during lithography and ion implantation, such as channeling and resist flow.

  3. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Saz, J.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Duguay, S.; Philippe, T.; Gonzalez, M.; Abell, J.; Walters, R. J.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  4. Distributed force probe bending model of critical dimension atomic force microscopy bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, Vladimir A.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Fu, Joseph; Silver, Rick M.

    2013-04-01

    Critical dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology technique. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, small and flexible probes, often 15 to 20 nm in diameter, are used. Recent studies have reported uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements. To understand the source of these variations, tip-sample interactions between high aspect ratio features and small flexible probes, and their influence on measurement bias, should be carefully studied. Using theoretical and experimental procedures, one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) models of cylindrical probe bending relevant to carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM probes were developed and tested. An earlier 1-D bending model was refined, and a new 2-D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Contributions from several factors were considered, including: probe misalignment, CNT tip apex diameter variation, probe bending before snapping, and distributed van der Waals-London force. A method for extracting Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe-bending data was developed. Comparison of the new 2-D model with 1-D single point force (SPF) model revealed a difference of about 28% in probe bending. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1-D SPF and 2-D DF models was found. The results suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and can partially explain the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe variation. New 2-D and three-dimensional CD-AFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  5. Tailored probes for atomic force microscopy fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göring, Gerald; Dietrich, Philipp-Immanuel; Blaicher, Matthias; Sharma, Swati; Korvink, Jan G.; Schimmel, Thomas; Koos, Christian; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-08-01

    3D direct laser writing based on two-photon polymerization is considered as a tool to fabricate tailored probes for atomic force microscopy. Tips with radii of 25 nm and arbitrary shape are attached to conventionally shaped micro-machined cantilevers. Long-term scanning measurements reveal low wear rates and demonstrate the reliability of such tips. Furthermore, we show that the resonance spectrum of the probe can be tuned for multi-frequency applications by adding rebar structures to the cantilever.

  6. Optimizing Atom Probe Analysis with Synchronous Laser Pulsing and Voltage Pulsing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Normand, Antoine; Houard, Jonathan; Blum, Ivan; Delaroche, Fabien; Latry, Olivier; Ravelo, Blaise; Vurpillot, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Atom probe has been developed for investigating materials at the atomic scale and in three dimensions by using either high-voltage (HV) pulses or laser pulses to trigger the field evaporation of surface atoms. In this paper, we propose an atom probe setup with pulsed evaporation achieved by simultaneous application of both methods. This provides a simple way to improve mass resolution without degrading the intrinsic spatial resolution of the instrument. The basic principle of this setup is the combination of both modes, but with a precise control of the delay (at a femtosecond timescale) between voltage and laser pulses. A home-made voltage pulse generator and an air-to-vacuum transmission system are discussed. The shape of the HV pulse presented at the sample apex is experimentally measured. Optimizing the delay between the voltage and the laser pulse improves the mass spectrum quality.

  7. Imaging of arsenic Cottrell atmospheres around silicon defects by three-dimensional atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keith; Flaitz, Philip L; Ronsheim, Paul; Larson, David J; Kelly, Thomas F

    2007-09-07

    Discrete control of individual dopant or impurity atoms is critical to the electrical characteristics and fabrication of silicon nanodevices. The unavoidable introduction of defects into silicon during the implantation process may prevent the uniform distribution of dopant atoms. Cottrell atmospheres are one such nonuniformity and occur when interstitial atoms interact with dislocations, pinning the dislocation and trapping the interstitial. Atom probe tomography has been used to quantify the location and elemental identity of the atoms proximate to defects in silicon. We found that Cottrell atmospheres of arsenic atoms form around defects after ion implantation and annealing. Furthermore, these atmospheres persist in surrounding dislocation loops even after considerable thermal treatment. If not properly accommodated, these atmospheres create dopant fluctuations that ultimately limit the scalability of silicon devices.

  8. Magnetoencephalography with a two-color pump probe atomic magnetometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-07-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with a compact, fiber-coupled rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer. Optical pumping is performed on the D1 transition and Faraday rotation is measured on the D2 transition. The beams share an optical axis, with dichroic optics preparing beam polarizations appropriately. A sensitivity of <5 fT/{radical}Hz is achieved. Evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer. Recordings were validated by comparison with those taken by a commercial magnetoencephalography system. The design is amenable to arraying sensors around the head, providing a framework for noncryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  9. Probing non-Hermitian physics with flying atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jianming; Xiao, Yanhong; Peng, Peng; Cao, Wanxia; Shen, Ce; Qu, Weizhi; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hermtian optical systems with parity-time (PT) symmetry provide new means for light manipulation and control. To date, most of experimental demonstrations on PT symmetry rely on advanced nanotechnologies and sophisticated fabrication techniques to manmade solid-state materials. Here, we report the first experimental realization of optical anti-PT symmetry, a counterpart of conventional PT symmetry, in a warm atomic-vapor cell. By exploiting rapid coherence transport via flying atoms, we observe essential features of anti-PT symmetry with an unprecedented precision on phase-transition threshold. Moreover, our system allows nonlocal interference of two spatially-separated fields as well as anti-PT assisted four-wave mixing. Besides, another intriguing feature offered by the system is refractionless (or unit-refraction) light propagation. Our results thus represent a significant advance in non-Hermitian physics by bridging a firm connection with the AMO field, where novel phenomena and applications in quantum and nonlinear optics aided by (anti-)PT symmetry can be anticipated.

  10. A detailed guideline for the fabrication of single bacterial probes used for atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thewes, Nicolas; Loskill, Peter; Spengler, Christian; Hümbert, Sebastian; Bischoff, Markus; Jacobs, Karin

    2015-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) evolved as a standard device in modern microbiological research. However, its capability as a sophisticated force sensor is not used to its full capacity. The AFM turns into a unique tool for quantitative adhesion research in bacteriology by using "bacterial probes". Thereby, bacterial probes are AFM cantilevers that provide a single bacterium or a cluster of bacteria as the contact-forming object. We present a step-by-step protocol for preparing bacterial probes, performing force spectroscopy experiments and processing force spectroscopy data. Additionally, we provide a general insight into the field of bacterial cell force spectroscopy.

  11. Nanometer scale composition study of MBE grown BGaN performed by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonef, Bastien; Cramer, Richard; Speck, James S.

    2017-06-01

    Laser assisted atom probe tomography is used to characterize the alloy distribution in BGaN. The effect of the evaporation conditions applied on the atom probe specimens on the mass spectrum and the quantification of the III site atoms is first evaluated. The evolution of the Ga++/Ga+ charge state ratio is used to monitor the strength of the applied field. Experiments revealed that applying high electric fields on the specimen results in the loss of gallium atoms, leading to the over-estimation of boron concentration. Moreover, spatial analysis of the surface field revealed a significant loss of atoms at the center of the specimen where high fields are applied. A good agreement between X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography concentration measurements is obtained when low fields are applied on the tip. A random distribution of boron in the BGaN layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy is obtained by performing accurate and site specific statistical distribution analysis.

  12. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiandong; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Li

    2015-12-01

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe's characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude's sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  13. Mapping thermal conductivity using bimetallic atomic force microscopy probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ranjan; McCarthy, Brendan; Sarid, Dror; Guven, Ibrahim

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate a technique to measure local thermal conductivity of materials using an atomic force microscope equipped with a commercial silicon cantilever coated by a thin metal film. This bimaterial cantilever acts as a bimetallic strip that bends when heated by a focused laser beam. The bending is apparent as a topographic distortion, which varies with the amount of heat flowing from the cantilever's tip into the sample. By comparing the surface topographies of the sample, as measured with heated and unheated cantilevers, the local thermal conductivity of the tip-sample contact area can be determined. Experimental results with this system are presented and found to be in good agreement with a finite element model.

  14. A Meshless Algorithm to Model Field Evaporation in Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Nicolas; Vurpillot, François; Duguay, Sébastien; Blavette, Didier

    2015-12-01

    An alternative approach for simulating the field evaporation process in atom probe tomography is presented. The model uses the electrostatic Robin's equation to directly calculate charge distribution over the tip apex conducting surface, without the need for a supporting mesh. The partial ionization state of the surface atoms is at the core of the method. Indeed, each surface atom is considered as a point charge, which is representative of its evaporation probability. The computational efficiency is ensured by an adapted version of the Barnes-Hut N-body problem algorithm. Standard desorption maps for cubic structures are presented in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  15. Modern Focused-Ion-Beam-Based Site-Specific Specimen Preparation for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2017-02-06

    Approximately 30 years after the first use of focused ion beam (FIB) instruments to prepare atom probe tomography specimens, this technique has grown to be used by hundreds of researchers around the world. This past decade has seen tremendous advances in atom probe applications, enabled by the continued development of FIB-based specimen preparation methodologies. In this work, we provide a short review of the origin of the FIB method and the standard methods used today for lift-out and sharpening, using the annular milling method as applied to atom probe tomography specimens. Key steps for enabling correlative analysis with transmission electron-beam backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography are presented, and strategies for preparing specimens for modern microelectronic device structures are reviewed and discussed in detail. Examples are used for discussion of the steps for each of these methods. We conclude with examples of the challenges presented by complex topologies such as nanowires, nanoparticles, and organic materials.

  16. Probing atomic structure and Majorana wavefunctions in mono-atomic Fe chains on superconducting Pb surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Rémy; Kisiel, Marcin; Klinovaja, Jelena; Meier, Tobias; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Loss, Daniel; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the striking promise of quantum computation, Majorana bound states (MBSs) in solid-state systems have attracted wide attention in recent years. In particular, the wavefunction localisation of MBSs is a key feature and is crucial for their future implementation as qubits. Here we investigate the spatial and electronic characteristics of topological superconducting chains of iron atoms on the surface of Pb(110) by combining scanning tunnelling microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate that the Fe chains are mono-atomic, structured in a linear manner and exhibit zero-bias conductance peaks at their ends, which we interpret as signature for a MBS. Spatially resolved conductance maps of the atomic chains reveal that the MBSs are well localised at the chain ends (≲25 nm), with two localisation lengths as predicted by theory. Our observation lends strong support to use MBSs in Fe chains as qubits for quantum-computing devices.

  17. Probing the conformal Calabrese-Cardy scaling with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unmuth-Yockey, J.; Zhang, Jin; Preiss, P. M.; Yang, Li-Ping; Tsai, S.-W.; Meurice, Y.

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that current experiments using cold bosonic atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices and designed to measure the second-order Rényi entanglement entropy S2 can be used to verify detailed predictions of conformal field theory (CFT) and estimate the central charge c . We discuss the adiabatic preparation of the ground state at half filling and small hopping parameter J /U , where we expect a CFT with c =1 . We provide two complementary methods to estimate and subtract the classical entropy generated by the experimental preparation and imaging processes. We compare numerical calculations for the classical O(2) model with a chemical potential on a (1 +1 )-dimensional lattice, and the quantum Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian implemented in the experiments. S2 is very similar for the two models and follows closely the Calabrese-Cardy scaling, (c /8 ) ln(Ns) , for Ns sites with open boundary conditions, provided that the large subleading corrections are taken into account.

  18. Probing Single Membrane Proteins by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, S.; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Müller, Daniel J.

    In this book chapter, we describe the working principle of the atomic force microscope (AFM), followed by the applications of AFM in high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. In the imaging mode, AFM allows observing the assembly of membrane proteins directly in native membranes approaching a resolution of ~0.5 nm with an outstanding signal-to-noise ratio. Conformational deviations of individual membrane proteins can be observed and their functional states directly imaged. Time-lapse AFM can image membrane proteins at work. In conjunction with high- resolution imaging, the use of the AFM as a single-molecule force spectroscope (SMFS) has gained tremendous importance in recent years. This combination allows to locate the inter- and intramolecular interactions of single membrane proteins. SMFS allows characterization of interactions that guide the folding of proteins and describe the parameters that lead to their destabilization, malfunction and misfolding. Moreover, it enables to measure the interactions established by ligand- and inhibitor-binding and in membrane protein assemblies. Because of its practical use in characterizing various parameters of membrane proteins in their native environment, AFM can be aptly described as a `lab on a tip' device.

  19. Submolecular Imaging by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy with an Oxygen Atom Rigidly Connected to a Metallic Probe.

    PubMed

    Mönig, Harry; Hermoso, Diego R; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Todorović, Milica; Timmer, Alexander; Schüer, Simon; Langewisch, Gernot; Pérez, Rubén; Fuchs, Harald

    2016-01-26

    In scanning probe microscopy, the imaging characteristics in the various interaction channels crucially depend on the chemical termination of the probe tip. Here we analyze the contrast signatures of an oxygen-terminated copper tip with a tetrahedral configuration of the covalently bound terminal O atom. Supported by first-principles calculations we show how this tip termination can be identified by contrast analysis in noncontact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (NC-AFM, STM) on a partially oxidized Cu(110) surface. After controlled tip functionalization by soft indentations of only a few angstroms in an oxide nanodomain, we demonstrate that this tip allows imaging an organic molecule adsorbed on Cu(110) by constant-height NC-AFM in the repulsive force regime, revealing its internal bond structure. In established tip functionalization approaches where, for example, CO or Xe is deliberately picked up from a surface, these probe particles are only weakly bound to the metallic tip, leading to lateral deflections during scanning. Therefore, the contrast mechanism is subject to image distortions, artifacts, and related controversies. In contrast, our simulations for the O-terminated Cu tip show that lateral deflections of the terminating O atom are negligible. This allows a detailed discussion of the fundamental imaging mechanisms in high-resolution NC-AFM experiments. With its structural rigidity, its chemically passivated state, and a high electron density at the apex, we identify the main characteristics of the O-terminated Cu tip, making it a highly attractive complementary probe for the characterization of organic nanostructures on surfaces.

  20. Probing parity nonconservation effects with laser cooled and trapped francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Mukut; Aubin, Seth; Behr, John; Collister, Robert; Dehart, Austin; Gorelov, Alexandre; Garcia, Eduardo; Gwinner, Gerald; Kossin, Michael; Livermore, David; Orozco, Luis; Pearson, Matt; FrPNC Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of parity nonconservation (PNC) effects in atomic systems test the Standard Model at low energies. We are developing an experiment to probe PNC effect in neutral francium atoms. Francium ions produced at the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF are neutralized using a zirconium foil. The foil is momentarily heated and the released atoms are first trapped in a capture magneto optical trap (MOT). Then, the atoms are transported with about 50% efficiency to another MOT in a science chamber. In this chamber, in one experiment the 7S to 8S atomic transition will be probed using a laser beam, and in another experiment the ground state hyperfine transition will be probed using a microwave beam. In this talk I will report on recent developments towards the measurements. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work is also supported by NSERC from Canada, the DOE and NSF from the USA and CONACYT from Mexico.

  1. A variable-width harmonic probe for multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li; Xia, Qi E-mail: michael.wang@nus.edu.sg; Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu E-mail: michael.wang@nus.edu.sg

    2015-02-16

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simultaneously measure topography and material properties of specimens, it is highly desirable that the higher order resonance frequencies of the cantilever probe are assigned to be integer harmonics of the excitation frequency. The harmonic resonances are essential for significant enhancement of the probe's response at the specified harmonic frequencies. In this letter, a structural optimization technique is employed to design cantilever probes so that the ratios between one or more higher order resonance frequencies and the fundamental natural frequency are ensured to be equal to specified integers and, in the meantime, that the fundamental natural frequency is maximized. Width profile of the cantilever probe is the design variable in optimization. Thereafter, the probes were prepared by modifying a commercial probe through the focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The resonance frequencies of the FIB fabricated probes were measured with an AFM. Results of the measurement show that the optimal design of probe is as effective as design prediction.

  2. In situ site-specific specimen preparation for atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K; Lawrence, D; Larson, D J; Olson, J D; Kelly, T F; Gorman, B

    2007-01-01

    Techniques for the rapid preparation of atom-probe samples extracted directly from a Si wafer are presented and discussed. A systematic mounting process to a standardized microtip array allows approximately 12 samples to be extracted from a near-surface region and mounted for subsequent focused-ion-beam sharpening in a short period of time, about 2h. In addition, site-specific annular mill extraction techniques are demonstrated that allow specific devices or structures to be removed from a Si wafer and analyzed in the atom-probe. The challenges presented by Ga-induced implantation and damage, particularly at a standard ion-beam accelerating voltage of 30 keV, are shown and discussed. A significant reduction in the extent of the damaged regions through the application of a low-energy "clean-up" ion beam is confirmed by atom-probe analysis of the damaged regions. The Ga+ penetration depth into {100} Si at 30 keV is approximately 40 nm. Clean-up with either a 5 or 2 keV beam reduces the depth of damaged Si to approximately 5 nm and <1 nm, respectively. Finally, a NiSi sample was extracted from a Si wafer, mounted to a microtip array, sharpened, cleaned up with a 5 keV beam and analyzed in the atom probe. The current results demonstrate that specific regions of interest can be accessed and preserved throughout the sample-preparation process and that this preparation method leads to high-quality atom probe analysis of such nano-structures.

  3. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Breen, Andrew; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Ringer, Simon P; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed.

  4. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-12-15

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe’s characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude’s sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  5. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, Mikhail Golubok, Alexander; Gulyaev, Nikolai

    2016-06-17

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  6. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  7. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V C; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  8. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2014-04-15

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  9. Conductive transparent fiber probes for shear-force atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Tooru

    2006-01-01

    New conductive transparent (CT) probes that can inject currents into nanometer-sized regions and collect light from them have been developed for shear-force atomic force microscopy (SF-AFM) of partially isolative regions. The CT probe consists of a straight elastic silica fiber with one end tapered to a point. The taper is coated with an indium-tin-oxide film as a transparent electrode, and the probe apex has a nanometer-scale radius. The essential feature of the CT probes is coaxial nickel plating on the shaft of the isolative silica fiber, which is adjusted to obtain suitable elasticity for smooth shear-force feedback as well as for supplying currents to the transparent electrode. Experimental results clarified that nickel thickness between 0.5 and 15 microm on 20 mm-long fibers makes resistance low enough for supplying current to the probe apex and also makes the Q curves smooth enough for shear-force feedback. Clear SF-AFM and current images were successfully obtained for a sample containing both conductive and isolative regions. The CT probes for SF-AFM can expand applications of probe-current-induced luminescence measurements to samples that contain highly resistive and isolative regions, for which scanning tunneling microscopy cannot be applied.

  10. Probing/Manipulating the Interfacial Atomic Bonding between High k Dielectrics and InGaAs for Ultimate CMOS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-24

    prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with the precursors as tetrakis[ethylmethylamino] Hafnium (TEMAHf) and water. Samples were kept under ultra-high...probed by synchrotron radiation photoemission. The dielectric film was prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with the precursors as tetrakis...in-situ HfO2 on In0.53Ga0.47As(001)-4x2 probed by synchrotron radiation photoemission. The dielectric film was prepared by atomic layer deposition

  11. Development of atomic radical monitoring probe and its application to spatial distribution measurements of H and O atomic radical densities in radical-based plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Shunji; Takashima, Seigo; Yamakawa, Koji; Den, Shoji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Hori, Masaru

    2009-09-01

    Atomic radicals such as hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) play important roles in process plasmas. In a previous study, we developed a system for measuring the absolute density of H, O, nitrogen, and carbon atoms in plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a compact light source using an atmospheric pressure microplasma [microdischarge hollow cathode lamp (MHCL)]. In this study, we developed a monitoring probe for atomic radicals employing the VUVAS with the MHCL. The probe size was 2.7 mm in diameter. Using this probe, only a single port needs to be accessed for radical density measurements. We successfully measured the spatial distribution of the absolute densities of H and O atomic radicals in a radical-based plasma processing system by moving the probe along the radial direction of the chamber. This probe allows convenient analysis of atomic radical densities to be carried out for any type of process plasma at any time. We refer to this probe as a ubiquitous monitoring probe for atomic radicals.

  12. Correlating Atom Probe Tomography with Atomic-Resolved Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy: Example of Segregation at Silicon Grain Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Stoffers, Andreas; Barthel, Juri; Liebscher, Christian H; Gault, Baptiste; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Scheu, Christina; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-04-01

    In the course of a thorough investigation of the performance-structure-chemistry interdependency at silicon grain boundaries, we successfully developed a method to systematically correlate aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The correlative approach is conducted on individual APT and TEM specimens, with the option to perform both investigations on the same specimen in the future. In the present case of a Σ9 grain boundary, joint mapping of the atomistic details of the grain boundary topology, in conjunction with chemical decoration, enables a deeper understanding of the segregation of impurities observed at such grain boundaries.

  13. Dynamics of Hollow Atom Formation in Intense X-Ray Pulses Probed by Partial Covariance Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, L. J.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Siano, M.; Eland, J. H. D.; Linusson, P.; v. d. Meulen, P.; Salén, P.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Foucar, L.; Ullrich, J.; Motomura, K.; Mondal, S.; Ueda, K.; Osipov, T.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B. F.; Berrah, N.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Schorb, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Cryan, J. P.; Coffee, R. N.; Takahashi, O.; Wada, S.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Feifel, R.

    2013-08-01

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called “partial covariance mapping” to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  14. A filtering method to reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan

    2016-01-01

    A filtering method to reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. The method filters atoms based on the time difference between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom. Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of the evaporating atoms on the surface, it can be used to reveal any crystallographic information contained within APM data. The demonstration of this method is illustrated on: •A pure Al specimen for which crystallographic poles are clearly visible on the desorption patterns easily indexed.•Three Fe-15at.% Cr datasets where crystallographic patterns are less obvious and require this filtering method.

  15. Tailored probes for atomic force microscopy fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Göring, Gerald; Dietrich, Philipp-Immanuel; Blaicher, Matthias; Koos, Christian; Sharma, Swati; Korvink, Jan G.; Hölscher, Hendrik; Schimmel, Thomas

    2016-08-08

    3D direct laser writing based on two-photon polymerization is considered as a tool to fabricate tailored probes for atomic force microscopy. Tips with radii of 25 nm and arbitrary shape are attached to conventionally shaped micro-machined cantilevers. Long-term scanning measurements reveal low wear rates and demonstrate the reliability of such tips. Furthermore, we show that the resonance spectrum of the probe can be tuned for multi-frequency applications by adding rebar structures to the cantilever.

  16. Probing quasiparticle states in strongly interacting atomic gases by momentum-resolved Raman photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam; Carusotto, Iacopo; Georges, Antoine

    2009-08-01

    We investigate a momentum-resolved Raman spectroscopy technique which is able to probe the one-body spectral function and the quasiparticle states of a gas of strongly interacting ultracold atoms. This technique is inspired by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, a powerful experimental probe of electronic states in solid-state systems. Quantitative examples of experimentally accessible spectra are given for the most significant regimes along the BEC-BCS crossover. When the theory is specialized to rf spectroscopy, agreement is found with recent experimental data. The main advantages of this Raman spectroscopy over existing techniques are pointed out.

  17. Towards Corrected and Completed Atomic Site Occupancy Analysis of Superalloys Using Atom Probe Tomography Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-17

    Ag and Cu alloy (b) the missing atoms of the rectified reconstruction with...Mg- Cu alloy before lattice rectification (left) and after lattice rectification (right). (b) Partial RDFs before and after rectification Radial...and Next Steps: Rectify -Si -Sb A B Ag Cu + Restored Ag and Cu Detected Ag and Cu Ag Cu 30 x 30 x 120 nm Completed Reconstruc on A

  18. Acoustic Attenuation Probe for Fermion Superfluidity in Ultracold-Atom Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudio, Sergio; Mihaila, Bogdan; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Timmermans, Eddy; Bedell, Kevin S.

    2007-03-16

    Dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC's), currently used to cool fermionic atoms in atom traps, can also probe the superfluidity of these fermions. The damping rate of BEC-acoustic excitations (phonon modes), measured in the middle of the trap as a function of the phonon momentum, yields an unambiguous signature of BCS-like superfluidity, provides a measurement of the superfluid gap parameter, and gives an estimate of the size of the Cooper pairs in the BEC-BCS crossover regime. We also predict kinks in the momentum dependence of the damping rate which can reveal detailed information about the fermion quasiparticle dispersion relation.

  19. A computational geometry framework for the optimisation of atom probe reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Cairney, Julie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present pathways for improving the reconstruction of atom probe data on a coarse (>10nm) scale, based on computational geometry. We introduce a way to iteratively improve an atom probe reconstruction by adjusting it, so that certain known shape criteria are fulfilled. This is achieved by creating an implicit approximation of the reconstruction through a barycentric coordinate transform. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the compensation of trajectory aberrations and the iterative improvement of the reconstruction of a dataset containing a grain boundary. We also present a method for obtaining a hull of the dataset in both detector and reconstruction space. This maximises data utilisation, and can be used to compensate for ion trajectory aberrations caused by residual fields in the ion flight path through a 'master curve' and correct for overall shape deviations in the data.

  20. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    DOE PAGES

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strongmore » as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.« less

  1. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strong as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.

  2. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinke, Nicolai ten; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  3. Atom probe microscopy of zinc isotopic enrichment in ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ironside, C. N.; Saxey, D. W.; Rickard, W. D. A.; Gray, C.; McGlynn, E.; Reddy, S. M.; Marks, N. A.

    2017-02-01

    We report on atomic probe microscopy (APM) of isotopically enriched ZnO nanorods that measures the spatial distribution of zinc isotopes in sections of ZnO nanorods for natural abundance natZnO and 64Zn and 66Zn enriched ZnO nanorods. The results demonstrate that APM can accurately quantify isotopic abundances within these nanoscale structures. Therefore the atom probe microscope is a useful tool for characterizing Zn isotopic heterostructures in ZnO. Isotopic heterostructures have been proposed for controlling thermal conductivity and also, combined with neutron transmutation doping, they could be key to a novel technology for producing p-n junctions in ZnO thin films and nanorods.

  4. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phase decomposition and ordering in Ni-11.3 at.% Ti studied with atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Al-Kassab, T; Kompatscher, M; Kirchheim, R; Kostorz, G; Schönfeld, B

    2014-09-01

    The decomposition behavior of Ni-rich Ni-Ti was reassessed using Tomographic Atom Probe (TAP) and Laser Assisted Wide Angle Tomographic Atom Probe. Single crystalline specimens of Ni-11.3 at.% Ti were investigated, the states selected from the decomposition path were the metastable γ″ and γ' states introduced on the basis of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and the two-phase model for evaluation. The composition values of the precipitates in these states could not be confirmed by APT data as the interface of the ordered precipitates may not be neglected. The present results rather suggest to apply a three-phase model for the interpretation of SANS measurements, in which the width of the interface remains nearly unchanged and the L12 structure close to 3:1 stoichiometry is maintained in the core of the precipitates from the γ″ to the γ' state.

  6. Atom probe tomography of reactor pressure vessel steels: an analysis of data integrity.

    PubMed

    Hyde, J M; Burke, M G; Gault, B; Saxey, D Wf; Styman, P; Wilford, K B; Williams, T J

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the importance of optimising experimental conditions for the analysis of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels using atom probe tomography is explored. The quality of the resultant atom probe data is assessed in terms of detection efficiency, noise levels and mass resolution. It is demonstrated that artefacts can exist even when experimental conditions have been optimised. In particular, it is shown that surface diffusion of some minority species, including P and Si, to major poles prior to field evaporation can be an issue. The effects were most noticeable during laser pulsing. The impact of surface migration on the characterisation of dislocations and grain boundaries is assessed. The importance of selecting appropriate regions of the reconstructed data for subsequent re-analysis is emphasised.

  7. Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradyan, Gevorg; Muradyan, Atom Zh.

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation traveling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the pump field’s generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: nonsaturating dependence of refractive index on dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation term contribution in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO2 laser) or larger.

  8. Quantification of in-contact probe-sample electrostatic forces with dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Carmichael, Ben; Baris Okatan, M.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods utilizing resonant mechanical vibrations of cantilevers in contact with a sample surface have shown sensitivities as high as few picometers for detecting surface displacements. Such a high sensitivity is harnessed in several AFM imaging modes. Here, we demonstrate a cantilever-resonance-based method to quantify electrostatic forces on a probe in the probe-sample junction in the presence of a surface potential or when a bias voltage is applied to the AFM probe. We find that the electrostatic forces acting on the probe tip apex can produce signals equivalent to a few pm of surface displacement. In combination with modeling, the measurements of the force were used to access the strength of the electrical field at the probe tip apex in contact with a sample. We find an evidence that the electric field strength in the junction can reach ca. 1 V nm-1 at a bias voltage of a few volts and is limited by non-ideality of the tip-sample contact. This field is sufficiently strong to significantly influence material states and kinetic processes through charge injection, Maxwell stress, shifts of phase equilibria, and reduction of energy barriers for activated processes. Besides, the results provide a baseline for accounting for the effects of local electrostatic forces in electromechanical AFM measurements as well as offer additional means to probe ionic mobility and field-induced phenomena in solids.

  9. Quantification of In-Contact Probe-Sample Electrostatic Forces with Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Carmichael, Ben; Okatan, M; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-12-13

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) methods utilizing resonant mechanical vibrations of cantilevers in contact with a sample surface have shown sensitivities as high as few picometers for detecting surface displacements. Such a high sensitivity is harnessed in several AFM imaging modes. Here, we demonstrate a cantilever-resonance-based method to quantify electrostatic forces on a probe in the probe-sample junction in the presence of a surface potential or when a bias voltage is applied to the AFM probe. We find that the electrostatic forces acting on the probe tip apex can produce signals equivalent to a few pm of surface displacement. In combination with modeling, the measurements of the force were used to access the strength of the electrical field at the probe tip apex in contact with a sample. We find an evidence that the electric field strength in the junction can reach ca. 1 V/nm at a bias voltage of a few volts and is limited by non-ideality of the tip-sample contact. This field is sufficiently strong to significantly influence material states and kinetic processes through charge injection, Maxwell stress, shifts of phase equilibria, and reduction of energy barriers for activated processes. Besides, the results provide a baseline for accounting for the effects of local electrostatic forces in electromechanical AFM measurements as well as offer additional means to probe ionic mobility and field-induced phenomena in solids.

  10. Quantification of in-contact probe-sample electrostatic forces with dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Carmichael, Ben; Okatan, M Baris; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kalinin, Sergei V; Tselev, Alexander

    2017-01-04

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods utilizing resonant mechanical vibrations of cantilevers in contact with a sample surface have shown sensitivities as high as few picometers for detecting surface displacements. Such a high sensitivity is harnessed in several AFM imaging modes. Here, we demonstrate a cantilever-resonance-based method to quantify electrostatic forces on a probe in the probe-sample junction in the presence of a surface potential or when a bias voltage is applied to the AFM probe. We find that the electrostatic forces acting on the probe tip apex can produce signals equivalent to a few pm of surface displacement. In combination with modeling, the measurements of the force were used to access the strength of the electrical field at the probe tip apex in contact with a sample. We find an evidence that the electric field strength in the junction can reach ca. 1 V nm(-1) at a bias voltage of a few volts and is limited by non-ideality of the tip-sample contact. This field is sufficiently strong to significantly influence material states and kinetic processes through charge injection, Maxwell stress, shifts of phase equilibria, and reduction of energy barriers for activated processes. Besides, the results provide a baseline for accounting for the effects of local electrostatic forces in electromechanical AFM measurements as well as offer additional means to probe ionic mobility and field-induced phenomena in solids.

  11. Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Baik, Sung-Il; Bertolucci-Coelho, Leonardo; Mazzaferro, Lucca; Ramirez, Giovanni; Erdemir, Ali; Seidman, D K

    2016-01-15

    Correlative characterization using atom-probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on a tribofilm formed during sliding frictional testing with a fully formulated engine oil, which also contains a boron-based additive. The tribofilm formed is ~15 nm thick and consists of oxides of iron and compounds of B, Ca, P, and S, which are present in the additive. This study provides strong evidence for boron being embedded in the tribofilm, which effectively reduces friction and wear losses.

  12. Controlling residual hydrogen gas in mass spectra during pulsed laser atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Kolli, R Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Residual hydrogen (H2) gas in the analysis chamber of an atom probe instrument limits the ability to measure H concentration in metals and alloys. Measuring H concentration would permit quantification of important physical phenomena, such as hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, hydrogen trapping, and grain boundary segregation. Increased insight into the behavior of residual H2 gas on the specimen tip surface in atom probe instruments could help reduce these limitations. The influence of user-selected experimental parameters on the field adsorption and desorption of residual H2 gas on nominally pure copper (Cu) was studied during ultraviolet pulsed laser atom probe tomography. The results indicate that the total residual hydrogen concentration, HTOT, in the mass spectra exhibits a generally decreasing trend with increasing laser pulse energy and increasing laser pulse frequency. Second-order interaction effects are also important. The pulse energy has the greatest influence on the quantity HTOT, which is consistently less than 0.1 at.% at a value of 80 pJ.

  13. Accurate noncontact calibration of colloidal probe sensitivities in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Shaw, Gordon A; Pratt, Jon R

    2009-06-01

    The absolute force sensitivities of colloidal probes comprised of atomic force microscope, or AFM, cantilevers with microspheres attached to their distal ends are measured. The force sensitivities are calibrated through reference to accurate electrostatic forces, the realizations of which are described in detail. Furthermore, the absolute accuracy of a common AFM force calibration scheme, known as the thermal noise method, is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the thermal noise method can be applied with great success to colloidal probe calibration in air and in liquid to yield force measurements with relative standard uncertainties below 5%. Techniques to combine the electrostatics-based determination of the AFM force sensitivity with measurements of the colloidal probe's thermal noise spectrum to compute noncontact estimates of the displacement sensitivity and spring constant are also developed.

  14. Accurate noncontact calibration of colloidal probe sensitivities in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Shaw, Gordon A.; Pratt, Jon R.

    2009-06-15

    The absolute force sensitivities of colloidal probes comprised of atomic force microscope, or AFM, cantilevers with microspheres attached to their distal ends are measured. The force sensitivities are calibrated through reference to accurate electrostatic forces, the realizations of which are described in detail. Furthermore, the absolute accuracy of a common AFM force calibration scheme, known as the thermal noise method, is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the thermal noise method can be applied with great success to colloidal probe calibration in air and in liquid to yield force measurements with relative standard uncertainties below 5%. Techniques to combine the electrostatics-based determination of the AFM force sensitivity with measurements of the colloidal probe's thermal noise spectrum to compute noncontact estimates of the displacement sensitivity and spring constant are also developed.

  15. Resistance of single polyaniline fibers and their junctions measured by double-probe atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Rintaro; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2016-08-01

    Electrical properties of polyaniline (PANI) fibers are of our interest as a component of network materials. Using a multiple-probe atomic force microscope with tuning fork probes, we investigated the resistance of single PANI fibers and their cross-point junction where the fibers contact each other. The resistivity of single PANI fibers was measured to be on the order of 10 Ω cm, and the contact resistance between PANI fibers was on the order of GΩ. The resistances through single cross-point junctions between two PANI fibers were very much dependent on the experimental condition, that is, the cross-point junction is stabilized or destabilized by physically placing the probes onto the two fibers. This suggests the nanomechanical instability of the cross-point junctions and a possibility to construct strain-responsive PANI fiber networks.

  16. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16-42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  17. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction.

    PubMed

    Baykara, Mehmet Z; Dagdeviren, Omur E; Schwendemann, Todd C; Mönig, Harry; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation.In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface.

  18. Three-dimensional doping and diffusion in nano scaled devices as studied by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Kambham, Ajay Kumar; Kumar, Arul; Florakis, Antonios; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2013-07-12

    Nowadays, technological developments towards advanced nano scale devices such as FinFETs and TFETs require a fundamental understanding of three-dimensional doping incorporation, activation and diffusion, as these details directly impact decisive parameters such as gate overlap and doping conformality and thus the device performance. Whereas novel doping methods such as plasma doping are presently exploited to meet these goals, their application needs to be coupled with new metrology approaches such as atom probe tomography, which provides the 3D-dopant distribution with atomic resolution. In order to highlight the relevant processes in terms of dopant conformality, 3D-diffusion, dopant activation and dopant clustering, in this paper we report on 3D-doping and diffusion phenomena in silicon FinFET devices. Through the use of atom probe tomography we determine the dopant distribution in a fully completed device which has been doped using the concept of self-regulatory plasma doping (SRPD). We extract the dopant conformality and spatial extent of this doping process and demonstrate that after annealing the resulting 3D-doping profiles and gate overlap are dependent on the details of the plasma doping process. We also demonstrate that the concentration-dependent 3D-diffusion process leads to concentration gradients which are different for the vertical versus the lateral direction. Through a statistical analysis of the dopant atom distributions we can identify dopant clustering in high concentration regions and correlate this with details of the dopant activation and, eventually, the device performance.

  19. Atomic species recognition on oxide surfaces using low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zong Min; Shi, Yun Bo; Mu, Ji Liang; Qu, Zhang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Qin, Li; Liu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the chemical properties and sharpness of the tips of the cantilever greatly influence the scanning of a sample surface. Variation in the chemical properties of the sharp tip apex can induce transformation of the SPM images. In this research, we explore the relationship between the tip and the structure of a sample surface using dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a Cu(110)-O surface under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (78 K). We observed two different c(6 × 2) phase types in which super-Cu atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of O atoms and O atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of Cu atoms. We also found that the electronic state of the tip has a serious effect on the resolution and stability of the sample surface, and provide an explanation for these phenomena. This technique can be used to identify atom species on sample surfaces, and represents an important development in the SPM technique.

  20. Electron Affinity Calculations for Atoms: Sensitive Probe of Many-Body Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-electron correlations and core-polarization interactions are crucial for the existence and stability of most negative ions. Therefore, they can be used as a sensitive probe of many-body effects in the calculation of the electron affinities (EAs) of atoms. The importance of relativistic effects in the calculation of the EAs of atoms has recently been assessed to be insignificant up to Z of 85. Here we use the complex angular momentum (CAM) methodology wherein is embedded fully the electron-electron correlations, to investigate core-polarization interactions in low-energy electron elastic scattering from the atoms In, Sn, Eu, Au and At through the calculation of their EAs. For the core-polarization interaction we use the rational function approximation of the Thomas-Fermi potential, which can be analytically continued into the complex plane. The EAs are extracted from the large resonance peaks in the CAM calculated low-energy electron-atom scattering total cross sections and compared with those from measurements and sophisticated theoretical methods. It is concluded that when the electron-electron correlations and core polarization interactions (both major many-body effects) are accounted for adequately the importance of relativity on the calculation of the EAs of atoms can be assessed. Even for the high Z (85) At atom relativistic effects are estimated to contribute a maximum of 3.6% to its EA calculation.

  1. Detecting and extracting clusters in atom probe data: a simple, automated method using Voronoi cells.

    PubMed

    Felfer, P; Ceguerra, A V; Ringer, S P; Cairney, J M

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of the formation of clusters in solid solutions is one of the most common uses of atom probe tomography. Here, we present a method where we use the Voronoi tessellation of the solute atoms and its geometric dual, the Delaunay triangulation to test for spatial/chemical randomness of the solid solution as well as extracting the clusters themselves. We show how the parameters necessary for cluster extraction can be determined automatically, i.e. without user interaction, making it an ideal tool for the screening of datasets and the pre-filtering of structures for other spatial analysis techniques. Since the Voronoi volumes are closely related to atomic concentrations, the parameters resulting from this analysis can also be used for other concentration based methods such as iso-surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Probing interactions of thermal Sr Rydberg atoms using simultaneous optical and ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Ryan K.; Bounds, Alistair D.; Huillery, Paul; Keegan, Niamh C.; Faoro, Riccardo; Bridge, Elizabeth M.; Weatherill, Kevin J.; Jones, Matthew P. A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for probing interaction effects in a thermal beam of strontium atoms using simultaneous measurements of Rydberg EIT and spontaneously created ions or electrons. We present a Doppler-averaged optical Bloch equation model that reproduces the optical signals and allows us to connect the optical coherences and the populations. We use this to determine that the spontaneous ionization process in our system occurs due to collisions between Rydberg and ground state atoms in the EIT regime. We measure the cross section of this process to be 0.6+/- 0.2 {σ }{geo}, where {σ }{geo} is the geometrical cross section of the Rydberg atom. This result adds complementary insight to a range of recent studies of interacting thermal Rydberg ensembles.

  3. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  4. Role of geometry on the frequency spectra of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) is a specific technique that is used to determine elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials. The success of this technique is highly dependent on the accuracy of frequency spectra that must be measured for both noncontact and the case in which the tip is in contact with the sample of interest. Thus, choosing the right probe is crucial for accurate experiments. U-shaped probes also offer new opportunities for CR-AFM measurements because of certain specific modes that have tip motion parallel to the sample surface such that these resonances can access in-plane sample properties. However, analysis of the spectra from U-shaped probes is much more challenging due to these modes. The geometry of these probes is the main driver for the spectral response. Here, this influence on the resonance frequencies of the commercially fabricated U-shaped probe AN2-300 is evaluated with respect to geometry in terms of leg width, crossbeam width, and crossbeam length. Both noncontact and contact cases are examined with respect to variations of the nominal geometry. An energy distribution approach is also presented to assist with the identification of modes that have close resonances. Finally, this analysis allows recommendations to be made in order to minimize the convergence of multiple resonances for a specific range of measurement parameters.

  5. Probing Grain-Boundary Chemistry and Electronic Structure in Proton-Conducting Oxides by Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daniel R; Zhu, Huayang; Diercks, David R; Ricote, Sandrine; Kee, Robert J; Almansoori, Ali; Gorman, Brian P; O'Hayre, Ryan P

    2016-11-09

    A laser-assisted atom-probe-tomographic (LAAPT) method has been developed and applied to measure and characterize the three-dimensional atomic and electronic nanostructure at an yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BaZr0.9Y0.1O3-δ, BZY10) grain boundary. Proton-conducting perovskites, such as BZY10, are attracting intense interest for a variety of energy conversion applications. However, their implementation has been hindered, in part, because of high grain-boundary (GB) resistance that is attributed to a positive GB space-charge layer (SCL). In this study, LAAPT is used to analyze BZY10 GB chemistry in three dimensions with subnanometer resolution. From this analysis, maps of the charge density and electrostatic potential arising at the GBs are derived, revealing for the first time direct chemical evidence that a positive SCL indeed exists at these GBs. These maps reveal new insights on the inhomogeneity of the SCL region and produce an average GB potential barrier of approximately 580 mV, agreeing with previous indirect electrochemical measurements.

  6. A theoretical study of dopant atom detection and probe behavior in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Anudha

    functional-based tight-binding model revealed that a stress-free single-walled (14,6) MoS2 nanotube has a torsional deformation of 0.87 °/nm. Comparison between simulated electron diffraction patterns and atomic-resolution ADF-STEM images of nanotubes with and without the small twist suggested that these experimental techniques are viable routes for detecting presence of the torsional deformation. 2. Development of theory to cast light on aspects of scattering behavior that affect STEM data.. STEM probe intensity oscillates as the probe transmits through a crystalline sample. The oscillatory behavior of the probe is extremely similar during transmission through 3-D crystals and the hypothetical structure of an isolated column of atoms, a 1-D crystal. This indicates that the physical origin of oscillation in intensity is not due to scattering of electrons away from one atomic column and subsequent scattering back from neighboring columns. It leaves in question what the physical origin or intensity oscillation is. This question was answered here by analysis of electron beam behavior in isolated atomic columns, examined via multislice-based simulations. Two physical origins, changes in angular distribution of the probe and phase shift between the angular components, were shown to cause oscillation in beam intensity. Sensitivity of frequency of oscillation to different probe and sample parameters was used to better understand the influence of the two physical origins on probe oscillation. 3. Acquisition of atomic-scale STEM data to answer specific questions about a material.. Graphene, due to its 2-Dimensionality, and due to its thermal, optical, electrical, and mechanical properties, which are conducive to providing a unique material for incorporation in devices, has gained a lot of interest in the research world and even spurred start-ups. There are several feasible routes of graphene synthesis, among which chemical exfoliation of graphite is a promising method for mass

  7. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  8. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  9. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  10. Atomic force microscope controlled topographical imaging and proximal probe thermal desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nanothermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 μm × 0.8 μm) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 μm × 2.0 μm), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  11. Atomic Force Microscope Controlled Topographical Imaging and Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nano-thermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 m x 0.8 m) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 m x 2.0 m), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  12. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Li; Dong, Ri-Chang; Deng, Jian-Liao; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Absorption spectra of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere under the influence of a diffuse laser field have been systematically investigated. A pronounced dispersionlike structure centered at the light-shifted pump frequency is observed with a subnatural linewidth. In particular, two clearly resolved absorption resonances on the 5 S1 /2(F =2 ) →5 P3 /2(F'=3 ) transitions occur with variable probe beam intensity, which is consistent with our proposed theoretical model. Based on the two absorption resonances,we measure the dependence of light shifts, from which we can directly extract the effective Rabi frequency in a diffuse laser field, on the probe laser intensity, pump laser intensity, and pump laser detuning. Our work helps to identify the physical mechanisms behind these spectral features and is beneficial for studying the corresponding effect in a cold sample.

  13. Atom probe study of grain boundary segregation in technically pure molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Babinsky, K.; Weidow, J.; Knabl, W.; Lorich, A.; Leitner, H.; Primig, S.

    2014-01-15

    Molybdenum, a metal with excellent physical, chemical and high-temperature properties, is an interesting material for applications in lighting-technology, high performance electronics, high temperature furnace construction and coating technology. However, its applicability as a structural material is limited because of the poor oxidation resistance at high temperatures and a brittle-to-ductile transition around room temperature, which is influenced by the grain size and the content of interstitial impurities at the grain boundaries. Due to the progress of the powder metallurgical production during the last decades, the amount of impurities in the current quality of molybdenum has become so small that surface sensitive techniques are not applicable anymore. Therefore, the atom probe, which allows the detection of small amounts of impurities as well as their location, seems to be a more suitable technique. However, a site-specific specimen preparation procedure for grain boundaries in refractory metals with a dual focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope is still required. The present investigation describes the development and successful application of such a site-specific preparation technique for grain boundaries in molybdenum, which is significantly improved by a combination with transmission electron microscopy. This complimentary technique helps to improve the visibility of grain boundaries during the last preparation steps and to evidence the presence of grain and subgrain boundaries without segregants in atom probe specimens. Furthermore, in industrially processed and recrystallized molybdenum sheets grain boundary segregation of oxygen, nitrogen and potassium is successfully detected close to segregated regions which are believed to be former sinter pores. - Highlights: • First study of grain boundary segregation in molybdenum by atom probe • Site-specific preparation technique by FIB and TEM successfully developed • Grain boundary segregation of

  14. Probing Non-Abelian Statistics of Majorana Fermions in Ultracold Atomic Superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shiliang; Shao, L.-B.; Wang, Z. D.; Duan, L.-M.

    2011-03-11

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana fermions by braiding them in an s-wave superfluid of ultracold atoms. We show that different orders of braiding operations give orthogonal output states that can be distinguished through Raman spectroscopy. Realization of Majorana states in an s-wave superfluid requires strong spin-orbital coupling and a controllable Zeeman field in the perpendicular direction. We present a simple laser configuration to generate the artificial spin-orbital coupling and the required Zeeman field in the dark-state subspace.

  15. Investigation of dopant clustering and segregation to defects in semiconductors using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavette, D.; Duguay, S.

    2016-05-01

    The role of atom probe tomography in the investigation of clustering and segregation of dopants to lattice defects in semiconductors is highlighted on the basis of some selected salient illustrations obtained at the Groupe de Physique des Matériaux of Rouen (France). The instrument is shown to be able to map out the 3D distribution of chemical species in the three dimensions of space at the ultimate scale. Results related to clustering, segregation of dopants (As, B, and P) to grain boundaries, dislocation loops, and extended defects in silicon are discussed.

  16. Nano is the next big thing: Revealing geochemical processes with atom probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven; Saxey, David; Rickard, William; Fougerouse, Denis; Peterman, Emily; van Riessen, Arie; Johnson, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Characterizing compositional variations in minerals at the nanometre scale has the potential to yield fundamental insights into a range of geological processes associated with nucleation and mineral growth and the subsequent modification of mineral compositions by processes such as diffusion, deformation and recrystallization. However, there are few techniques that allow the quantitative measurement of low abundance trace elements and isotopes signatures at the nanometre scale. Atom probe microscopy is one such technique that has been widely used in the study of metals and, in the last decade, semiconductors. However, the development and application of atom probe microscopy to minerals is in its infancy and only a handful of published studies exist in the literature. Here, we provide an introduction to atom probe microscopy and its potential use in geological studies using two examples from both undeformed and deformed zircon (ZrSiO4). In the first example, we use atom probe microscopy to show that discordant data from the core of an undeformed 2.1 Ga zircon, metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions 150 Myr ago, contains distinct Pb reservoirs that represent both the crystallisation and metamorphic 207Pb/206Pb ages. Crystallisation ages are preserved within ˜10 nm diameter dislocation loops that formed during annealing of radiation-damaged zircon during the prograde path of the metamorphic event. The results highlight the potential for resolving the chronology of multiple, distinct Pb reservoirs within isotopically complex zircon and provide an explanation for varying amounts of discordance within individual zircon grains. In the second example, we illustrate complex trace element distributions associated with near-instantaneous deformation of a shocked zircon during the ˜1.17 Ga Stac Fada bolide impact. Substitutional and interstitial ions show correlated segregation, indicating coupling between different mobility mechanisms associated with the rapid

  17. Conducting-tip atomic force microscopy for injection and probing of localized charges in silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Souri; Salem, Mohamed Ali; Oda, Shunri

    2003-11-01

    A conducting-tip atomic force microscopy (AFM) is utilized to inject localized charges in an ensemble of closely packed nanocrystalline Si dots prepared by plasma decomposition of SiH4. A noncontact-mode topography imaging carried out to probe the charging effect indicates an increase in the apparent height of the Si nanocrystal. A generalized tip-sample force interaction model is also developed to quantitatively evaluate the deposited charge. The study prescribes that the presence of surface charges might result in an overestimation of the actual height of an object measured by AFM, which could be nontrivial for a nanomaterial in particular.

  18. The mystery of missing species in atom probe tomography of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Karahka, M.; Xia, Y.; Kreuzer, H. J.

    2015-08-10

    There is a serious problem in atom probe tomography of composite materials such as oxides that even from stoichiometric samples one observes non-stoichiometric ion yields. We present a quantitative model that explains the non-stoichiometry allowing a fit to experimental data of ion yields as a function of applied field to extract activation barriers and prefactors. The numbers are confirmed by density functional theory. We also show that for oxides the missing oxygen is thermally desorbed as neutral O{sub 2}, either directly or associatively. Finally, we suggest methods to improve the experimental setup.

  19. Investigation of dopant clustering and segregation to defects in semiconductors using atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Blavette, D. Duguay, S.

    2016-05-14

    The role of atom probe tomography in the investigation of clustering and segregation of dopants to lattice defects in semiconductors is highlighted on the basis of some selected salient illustrations obtained at the Groupe de Physique des Matériaux of Rouen (France). The instrument is shown to be able to map out the 3D distribution of chemical species in the three dimensions of space at the ultimate scale. Results related to clustering, segregation of dopants (As, B, and P) to grain boundaries, dislocation loops, and extended defects in silicon are discussed.

  20. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  1. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  2. Influence of laser power on atom probe tomographic analysis of boron distribution in silicon.

    PubMed

    Tu, Y; Takamizawa, H; Han, B; Shimizu, Y; Inoue, K; Toyama, T; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Nagai, Y

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between the laser power and the three-dimensional distribution of boron (B) in silicon (Si) measured by laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is investigated. The ultraviolet laser employed in this study has a fixed wavelength of 355nm. The measured distributions are almost uniform and homogeneous when using low laser power, while clear B accumulation at the low-index pole of single-crystalline Si and segregation along the grain boundaries in polycrystalline Si are observed when using high laser power (100pJ). These effects are thought to be caused by the surface migration of atoms, which is promoted by high laser power. Therefore, for ensuring a high-fidelity APT measurement of the B distribution in Si, high laser power is not recommended.

  3. The growth cones of living neurons probed by the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Davide; Grattarola, Massimo; Tedesco, Mariateresa

    2011-01-01

    A detailed report of experimental findings concerning the use of atomic force microscopy to probe growth cones of chick embryo spinal cord neurons under vital conditions is given.The role played by indentation in the making of images and force-versus-distance curves is critically discussed. As a result, the thickness of growth cone regions is quantitatively estimated. By comparing the obtained images with descriptions given in the literature on the basis of other microscopy techniques, a central (C) region and a peripheral (P) region are identified, characterized by a different thickness and a different structural organization. Moreover, clusters of adhesion molecules are tentatively identified in regions where neuron arborizations were challenged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip.

  4. Appropriate Probe Condition for Absorption Imaging of Ultracold 6Li Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikoshi, Munekazu; Ito, Aki; Ikemachi, Takuya; Aratake, Yukihito; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto; Koashi, Masato

    2017-10-01

    One of the readily accessible observables in trapped cold-atom experiments is the column density, which is determined from the optical depth (OD) obtained from absorption imaging and the absorption cross section (σabs). Here, we report on a simple and accurate determination of OD for dense gases of light atoms such as lithium-6. We investigate theoretically and experimentally an appropriate condition for the probe intensity and duration to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio by considering the effects of photon recoils and photon shot noises. As a result, we have succeeded in measuring OD, which reached 2.5 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 under a spatial resolution of 1.7 µm.

  5. Probing spin-orbit-interaction-induced electron dynamics in the carbon atom by multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, H. F.; van der Hart, H. W.

    2014-09-01

    We use R-matrix theory with time dependence (RMT) to investigate multiphoton ionization of ground-state atomic carbon with initial orbital magnetic quantum number ML=0 and ML=1 at a laser wavelength of 390 nm and peak intensity of 1014W/cm2. Significant differences in ionization yield and ejected-electron momentum distribution are observed between the two values for ML. We use our theoretical results to model how the spin-orbit interaction affects electron emission along the laser polarization axis. Under the assumption that an initial C atom is prepared at zero time delay with ML=0, the dynamics with respect to time delay of an ionizing probe pulse modeled by using RMT theory is found to be in good agreement with available experimental data.

  6. Atom probe, AFM, and STM studies on vacuum-fired stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Stupnik, A; Frank, P; Leisch, M

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology of grades 304L and 316LN stainless steels, after low-temperature bake-out process and vacuum annealing, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The local elemental composition on the surface before and after thermal treatment has been investigated by atom probe (AP) depth profiling measurements. After vacuum annealing, AFM and STM show significant changes in the surface structure and topology. Recrystallization and surface reconstruction is less pronounced on the 316LN stainless steel. AP depth profiling analyses result in noticeable nickel enrichment on the surface of grade 304L samples. Since hydrogen recombination is almost controlled by surface structure and composition, a strong influence on the outgassing behaviour by the particular surface microstructure can be deduced.

  7. Resolving the morphology of niobium carbonitride nano-precipitates in steel using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew J; Xie, Kelvin Y; Moody, Michael P; Gault, Baptiste; Yen, Hung-Wei; Wong, Christopher C; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2014-08-01

    Atom probe is a powerful technique for studying the composition of nano-precipitates, but their morphology within the reconstructed data is distorted due to the so-called local magnification effect. A new technique has been developed to mitigate this limitation by characterizing the distribution of the surrounding matrix atoms, rather than those contained within the nano-precipitates themselves. A comprehensive chemical analysis enables further information on size and chemistry to be obtained. The method enables new insight into the morphology and chemistry of niobium carbonitride nano-precipitates within ferrite for a series of Nb-microalloyed ultra-thin cast strip steels. The results are supported by complementary high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Impact of Atomic Corrugation on Sliding Friction as Probed by QCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Tonya; Lee, Sang; Krim, Jacqueline

    2004-03-01

    At the atomic scale, friction is believed to originate primarily via sliding induced excitation of phonons. [1] Theoretical predictions of the magnitude of phononic dissipation have been related to the atomic corrugation of the adsorbate/substrate potential. [2] Braun and colleagues [3] measured a corrugation of 1.9 meV for xenon on a copper(111) surface using helium atom scattering. Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM), we have measured the sliding friction of Xe/Cu(111) adsorbed at 77 K. The QCM probe of sliding friction is the sliptime, which measures the slippage of the adsorbate atop the oscillating surface of the QCM. For monolayer coverages, we observed a sliptime of 10 ns for Xe/Cu(111). We also discuss theoretical predictions for the impact of atomic corrugation on sliding friction. [1] Fundamentals of Friction; Macroscopic and Microscopic Processes, ed. I.L. Singer and H.M. Pollock, Kluwer, Dordrecht (1992). [2] M. Cieplak, E.D. Smith, and M.O. Robbins, Science 265 (1994) 1209. [3] J. Braun et al., PRL 80 (1998) 125.

  9. Study of characteristic fragmentation of nanocarbon by the scanning atom probe

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro; Saito, Yahachi

    2008-07-15

    Six nine purity graphite and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT), multiple-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) are mass analyzed by the scanning atom probe. Surface atoms well exposed to the external field are field evaporated and individual evaporated fragment ions are detected. Each specimen exhibits a characteristic mass spectrum of fragmented cluster ions. The SWCNT exhibits the cleanest mass spectrum with a small amount of hydrogen. The commercially available DWCNT shows two types of mass spectra: one is fairly clean and the other with many C{sub 15}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} clusters. The laboratory grown MWCNT shows various doubly and triply ionized cluster ions indicating strong bonding between the atoms forming the clusters. The sharper the mass peak is and the higher the multiplicity of charge is, the stronger the binding between atoms forming the clusters. The commercially available pure graphite shows three types of mass spectra, fairly clean spectra without large C-H clusters, spectra with various C-H clusters with a large mass peak of C{sub 28}H{sub 4}, and spectra with larger clusters such as C{sub 38}H{sub n}. The magic number forming the clusters is discussed.

  10. SISGR: Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    2014-05-31

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating the order manifest in condensed matter materials. Up until now, however, no attempts have been made to use modern techniques of ultracold atomic physics to directly explore properties of strongly correlated or topologically protected materials. Our current program is focused on introducing a novel magnetic field microscopy technique into the toolbox of imaging probes. Our prior DOE ESPM program funded the development of a novel instrument using a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a scanning probe capable of measuring tiny magnetic (and electric) DC and AC fields above materials. We successfully built the world's first “scanning cryogenic atom chip microscope” [1], and we now are in the process of characterizing its performance before using the instrument to take the first wide-area images of transport flow within unconventional superconductors, pnictides and oxide interfaces (LAO/STO), topological insulators, and colossal magnetoresistive manganites. We will do so at temperatures outside the capability of scanning SQUIDs, with ~10x better resolution and without 1/f-noise. A notable goal will be to measure the surface-to-bulk conductivity ratio in topological insulators in a relatively model-independent fashion [2]. We have completed the construction of this magnetic microscope, shown in Figure 1. The instrument uses atom chips—substrates supporting micron-sized current-carrying wires that create magnetic microtraps near surfaces for ultracold thermal gases and BECs—to enable single-shot and raster-scanned large-field-of-view detection of magnetic fields. The fields emanating from electronic transport may be detected at the 10-7 flux quantum (Φ0) level and below (see Fig. 2); that is, few to sub-micron resolution of sub-nanotesla fields over single-shot, millimeter-long detection lengths. By harnessing the extreme

  11. Probing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate)/cell interactions by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Natalia, Becerra; Henry, Andrade; Betty, López; Marina, Restrepo Luz; Roberto, Raiteri

    2015-01-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) based hydrogels have been proposed as cell culture supports in cell sheet engineering. Toward this goal, we characterized the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer thermo-sensitivity and the cell/copolymer interactions above and below the copolymer lower critical solution temperature. We did that by direct force measurements at different temperatures using an atomic force microscope with either a polystyrene or a glass microbead as probes. We used a copolymer-coated microbead to measure adhesion after a short contact time with a single fibroblast in culture. Statistical analysis of the maximum adhesion force and the mechanical work necessary to separate the probe from the cell surface confirmed the hydrophilic/hydrophobic behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) as a function of temperature in the range 20-37°C and, consequently, a reversible increase/decrease in cell adhesion with the copolymer. As control experiments we measured interactions between uncoated microbeads with the copolymer hydrogel or cells as well as interaction of the Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) homopolymer with cells. These results show the potential of an assay based on atomic force microscopy for an in situ and quantitative assessment of cell/substrate interactions and support the use of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer as an efficient culture substrate in cell sheet engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Attosecond probing of state-resolved ionization and superpositions of atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses in the extreme ultraviolet are used to probe strong field ionization and to initiate electronic and vibrational superpositions in atoms and small molecules. Few-cycle 800 nm pulses produce strong-field ionization of Xe atoms, and the attosecond probe is used to measure the risetimes of the two spin orbit states of the ion on the 4d inner shell transitions to the 5p vacancies in the valence shell. Step-like features in the risetimes due to the subcycles of the 800 nm pulse are observed and compared with theory to elucidate the instantaneous and effective hole dynamics. Isolated attosecond pulses create massive superpositions of electronic states in Ar and nitrogen as well as vibrational superpositions among electronic states in nitrogen. An 800 nm pulse manipulates the superpositions, and specific subcycle interferences, level shifting, and quantum beats are imprinted onto the attosecond pulse as a function of time delay. Detailed outcomes are compared to theory for measurements of time-dynamic superpositions by attosecond transient absorption. Supported by DOE, NSF, ARO, AFOSR, and DARPA.

  13. Overcoming challenges in the study of nitrided microalloyed steels using atom probe.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kelvin Y; Breen, Andrew J; Yao, Lan; Moody, Michael P; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    Nitrided steels are widely used in the engineering field due to their superior hardness and other attractive properties. Atom probe tomography (APT) was employed to study two Nb-microalloyed CASTRIP steels with different N contents. A major challenge of using APT to study this group of materials is the presence of tails after Fe peaks in the mass spectra, which overestimates the composition for alloying elements such as Nb and Cu in the steels. One important factor that contributes to the tails is believed to be delayed field evaporation from Fe²⁺. This artefact of the mass spectrum was observed to be the most severe when voltage pulsing was used. The application of laser pulses with energy ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 nJ successfully reduced the tails and lead to better compositional measurement accuracy. Spatial resolution in the z-direction (along the tip direction) was observed to be less affected by changing laser energy but deteriorates in x-y direction with increasing laser energy. This investigation suggests that pulsed-laser atom probe with ∼0.4 nJ laser energy can be used to study this group of materials with improved mass resolution while still maintaining high spatial resolution.

  14. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-09-01

    The middle- and upper-atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket project WADIS (WAve propagation and DISsipation in the middle atmosphere). It includes, amongst others, our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX: Pyrometric Heat Flux Experiment) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX: Flux φ(Phi) Probe Experiment) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source of atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability, the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS project comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented, which was successfully launched in June 2013 from the Andøya Space Center, Norway. FIPEX data were sampled at 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 9 m. This allows density variations to be studied on very small spatial scales. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for the up- and downleg, respectively.

  15. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Rius, Gemma; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Matsui, Soichiro; Tanemura, Masaki; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO) is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT)-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency.

  16. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished. PMID:25161320

  17. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  18. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni, Matteo; Matsui, Soichiro; Tanemura, Masaki; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO) is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT)-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency. PMID:25671165

  19. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-07-02

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Ultimately, using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.

  20. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; ...

    2015-07-02

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Ultimately, using a nearest-neighbour statisticalmore » analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.« less

  1. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming. PMID:26133270

  2. Atom probe study of Cu-poor to Cu-rich transition during Cu(In,Ga)Se2 growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzinie-Devy, F.; Cadel, E.; Barreau, N.; Arzel, L.; Pareige, P.

    2011-12-01

    Atomic scale chemistry of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film has been characterized at key points of the 3-stage process using atom probe tomography. 3D atom distributions have been reconstructed when the layer is Cu-poor ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) < 1), Cu-rich ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) > 1), and at the end of the process. Particular attention has been devoted to grain boundary composition and Na atomic distribution within the CIGSe layer. Significant variation of composition is highlighted during the growing process, providing fundamental information helping the understanding of high efficiency CIGSe formation.

  3. Development of dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with obliquely incident laser beams.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a dual-probe (DP) atomic force microscopy (AFM) system that has two independently controlled probes. The deflection of each cantilever is measured by the optical beam deflection (OBD) method. In order to keep a large space over the two probes for an objective lens with a large numerical aperture, we employed the OBD sensors with obliquely incident laser beams. In this paper, we describe the details of our developed DP-AFM system, including analysis of the sensitivity of the OBD sensor for detection of the cantilever deflection. We also describe a method to eliminate the crosstalk caused by the vertical translation of the cantilever. In addition, we demonstrate simultaneous topographic imaging of a test sample by the two probes and surface potential measurement on an α-sexithiophene (α-6T) thin film by one probe while electrical charges were injected by the other probe.

  4. Development of dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with obliquely incident laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a dual-probe (DP) atomic force microscopy (AFM) system that has two independently controlled probes. The deflection of each cantilever is measured by the optical beam deflection (OBD) method. In order to keep a large space over the two probes for an objective lens with a large numerical aperture, we employed the OBD sensors with obliquely incident laser beams. In this paper, we describe the details of our developed DP-AFM system, including analysis of the sensitivity of the OBD sensor for detection of the cantilever deflection. We also describe a method to eliminate the crosstalk caused by the vertical translation of the cantilever. In addition, we demonstrate simultaneous topographic imaging of a test sample by the two probes and surface potential measurement on an α-sexithiophene (α-6T) thin film by one probe while electrical charges were injected by the other probe.

  5. Characterization of Minerals of Geochronological Interest by EPMA and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeyenbos, D.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Reinhard, D. A.; Hombourger, C.

    2012-12-01

    Isotopic and chemical dating techniques for zircon and monazite rely on several assumptions: that initial common Pb is low to nonexistent, that the analyzed domain is chronologically homogeneous, and that any relative migration of radiogenic Pb and its parent isotopes has not exceeded the analyzed domain. Yet, both zircon and monazite commonly contain significant submicron heterogeneities that may challenge these assumptions and can complicate the interpretation of chemical and isotopic data. Compositional mapping and submicron quantitative analysis by EPMA and FE-EPMA have been found to be useful techniques both for the characterization of these heterogeneities, and for quantitative geochronological determinations within the analytical limits of these techniques and the statistics of submicron sampling. Complementary to high-resolution EPMA techniques is Atom Probe Tomography (APT), wherein a specimen with dimensions of a few hundreds of nanometers is field evaporated atom by atom. The original position of each atom is identified, along with its atomic species and isotope. The result is a reconstruction allowing quantitative three-dimensional study of the specimen at the atomic scale, with low detection limits and high mass resolution. With the introduction of laser-induced thermal pulsing to achieve field evaporation, the technique is no longer limited to conductive specimens. There exists the capability to explore the compositional and isotopic structure of insulating materials at sub-nanometer resolution. Minerals of geochronological interest have been studied by an analytical method involving first compositional mapping and submicron quantitative analysis by EPMA and FE-EPMA, and subsequent use of these data to select specific sites for APT specimen extraction by FIB. Examples presented include 1) zircon from the Taconian of New England, USA, containing a fossil resorption front included between an unmodified igneous core, and a subsequent metamorphic

  6. Simulating compact quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atoms: probing confinement and nonperturbative effects.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2012-09-21

    Recently, there has been much interest in simulating quantum field theory effects of matter and gauge fields. In a recent work, a method for simulating compact quantum electrodynamics (CQED) using Bose-Einstein condensates has been suggested. We suggest an alternative approach, which relies on single atoms in an optical lattice, carrying 2l + 1 internal levels, which converges rapidly to CQED as l increases. That enables the simulation of CQED in 2 + 1 dimensions in both the weak and the strong coupling regimes, hence, allowing us to probe confinement as well as other nonperturbative effects of the theory. We provide an explicit construction for the case l = 1 which is sufficient for simulating the effect of confinement between two external static charges.

  7. Probing dark energy with an atom interferometer in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Matthew; Haslinger, Philipp; Hamilton, Paul; Mueller, Holger; Khoury, Justin; Elder, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    If dark energy -- which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe -- consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a ``fifth force'' between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms can evade such tests by suppressing this force in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Our experiments constrain these dark energy models using atoms in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber as probes to expose the screened fields. Using a cesium matter wave interferometer in an optical cavity, we set stringent bounds on coupling screened theories to matter. A further 4 to 5 orders of magnitude would completely rule out chameleon and f(R) theories. I will describe this first tabletop dark energy search, and present the hundredfold boost in sensitivity we have since achieved.

  8. High-sensitivity quantitative Kelvin probe microscopy by noncontact ultra-high-vacuum atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerhalter, Ch.; Matthes, Th. W.; Glatzel, Th.; Jäger-Waldau, A.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.

    1999-07-01

    We present quantitative measurements of the work function of semiconductor and metal surfaces prepared in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using a combination of UHV noncontact atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. High energetic and lateral resolution is achieved by using the second resonance frequency of the cantilever to measure the electrostatic forces, while the first resonance frequency is used to simultaneously obtain topographic images by the frequency modulation technique. Spatially resolved work-function measurements reveal a reduced work function in the vicinity of steps on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. On the GaAs(110) surface it could be demonstrated that defect states in the forbidden band gap cause a local pinning of the Fermi level along monolayer steps. On p-WSe2(0001) work-function variations due to the Coulomb potential of single dopant sites were resolved.

  9. An analytical model accounting for tip shape evolution during atom probe analysis of heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Rolland, N; Larson, D J; Geiser, B P; Duguay, S; Vurpillot, F; Blavette, D

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model describing the field evaporation dynamics of a tip made of a thin layer deposited on a substrate is presented in this paper. The difference in evaporation field between the materials is taken into account in this approach in which the tip shape is modeled at a mesoscopic scale. It was found that the non-existence of sharp edge on the surface is a sufficient condition to derive the morphological evolution during successive evaporation of the layers. This modeling gives an instantaneous and smooth analytical representation of the surface that shows good agreement with finite difference simulations results, and a specific regime of evaporation was highlighted when the substrate is a low evaporation field phase. In addition, the model makes it possible to calculate theoretically the tip analyzed volume, potentially opening up new horizons for atom probe tomographic reconstruction.

  10. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of the Distribution of Rhenium in Nickel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mottura, A.; Warnken, N; Miller, Michael K; Reed, R. C.; Finnis, M.

    2010-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is used to characterise the distributions of rhenium in a binary Ni-Re alloy and the nickel-based single-crystal CMSX-4 superalloy. A purpose-built algorithm is developed to quantify the size distribution of solute clusters, and applied to the APT datasets to critique the hypothesis that rhenium is prone to the formation of clusters in these systems. No evidence is found to indicate that rhenium forms solute clusters above the level expected from random fluctuations. In CMSX-4, enrichment of Re is detected in the matrix phase close to the matrix/precipitate ({gamma}/{gamma}{prime}) phase boundaries. Phase field modelling indicates that this is due to the migration of the {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} interface during cooling from the temperature of operation. Thus, neither clustering of rhenium nor interface enrichments can be the cause of the enhancement in high temperature mechanical properties conferred by rhenium alloying.

  11. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-01

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites.

  12. Probing Micromechanical Properties of the Extracellular Matrix of Soft Tissues by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Ignasi; Uriarte, Juan J; Campillo, Noelia; Farré, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) determines 3D tissue architecture and provides structural support and chemical and mechanical cues to the cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has unique capabilities to measure ECM mechanics at the scale at which cells probe the mechanical features of their microenvironment. Moreover, AFM measurements can be readily combined with bright field and fluorescence microscopy. Performing reliable mechanical measurements with AFM requires accurate calibration of the device and correct computation of the mechanical parameters. A suitable approach to isolate ECM mechanics from cell contribution is removing the cells by means of an effective decellularization process that preserves the composition, structure and mechanical properties of the ECM. AFM measurement of ECM micromechanics provides important insights into organ biofabrication, cell-matrix mechanical crosstalk and disease-induced tissue stiffness alterations. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 19-26, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Three-dimensional chemical imaging of embedded nanoparticles using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Shutthanandan, V; Prosa, T J; Adusumilli, P; Arey, B; Buxbaum, A; Wang, Y C; Tessner, T; Ulfig, R; Wang, C M; Thevuthasan, S

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of nanoparticles is often challenging especially when they are embedded in a matrix. Hence, we have used laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) to analyze the Au nanoclusters synthesized in situ using ion-beam implantation in a single crystal MgO matrix. APT analysis along with scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (STEM-EDX) indicated that the nanoparticles have an average size ~8-12 nm. While it is difficult to analyze the composition of individual nanoparticles using STEM, APT analysis can give three-dimensional compositions of the same. It was shown that the maximum Au concentration in the nanoparticles increases with increasing particle size, with a maximum Au concentration of up to 50%.

  14. Status Summary of FY16 Atom Probe Tomography Studies on UCSB ATR-2 Irradiated RPV Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Peter; Odette, G. Robert

    2016-05-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara-2 RPV Steel Irradiation experiment was awarded in 2010 by the Nuclear Science User Facility (formerly ATR NSUF) through a competitive peer review proposal process. The experiment involved irradiation of nearly 1300 samples distributed over 13 capsules. The major objective of this experiment was to better understand embrittlement behavior of reactor pressure steels at doses beyond which available data exists yet may be achieved if reactor operating licenses are extended beyond 60 years. The experiment was instrumented during irradiation and active temperature control was used to maintain the temperature at the design temperature. Six samples were selected from a large matrix of materials to perform atom probe tomography (APT) to look at formation of high dose phases. The nature and formation behavior of these phases is discussed.

  15. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of Precipitation during Tempering of a Nanostructured Bainitic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Francesca G.; Miller, Michael K; Garcia-Mateo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon distribution during tempering of a nanostructured bainitic steel was analyzed by atom probe tomography (APT). Three different types of particles are detected on samples tempered at 673 K (400 C) for 30 minutes: lower bainite cementite with a carbon content of {approx}25 at. pct, {var_epsilon}-carbides with a carbon content close to 30 at. pct, and carbon clusters, small features with a carbon content of {approx}14 at. pct indicative of a stage of tempering prior to precipitation of {var_epsilon}-carbide. After tempering at 773 K (500 C) for 30 minutes, the {var_epsilon}-carbide-to-cementite transition was observed. Solute concentration profiles across carbide/ferrite interfaces showed the distribution of substitutional elements in {var_epsilon}-carbide and cementite for all the tempering conditions.

  16. THERMAL EFFECTS ON MASS AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION DURING LASER PULSE ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY OF CERIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Kirchhofer; Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman

    2013-05-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) is an ideal surrogate material for trans-uranic elements and fission products found in nuclear fuels due to similarities in their thermal properties; therefore, cerium oxide was used to determine the best run condition for atom probe tomography (APT). Laser pulse APT is a technique that allows for spatial resolution in the nm scale and isotopic/elemental chemical identification. A systematic study of the impact of laser pulse energy and specimen base temperature on the mass resolution, measurement of stoichiometry, multiples, and evaporation mechanisms are reported in this paper. It was demonstrated that using laser pulse APT stoichiometric field evaporation of cerium oxide was achieved at 1 pJ laser pulse energy and 20 K specimen base temperature.

  17. Probing the viscoelastic response of glassy polymer films using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanwen; Rao, Nanxia; Yin, Zejie; Zhu, Da-Ming

    2006-05-01

    The mechanical properties of glassy films and glass surfaces have been studied using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through various imaging modes and measuring methods. In this paper, we discuss the viscoelastic response of a glassy surface probed using an AFM. We analyzed the force-distance curves measured on a glassy film or a glassy surface at temperatures near the glass transition temperature, Tg, using a Burgers model. We found that the material's characteristics of reversible anelastic response and viscous creep can be extracted from a force-distance curve. Anelastic response shifts the repulsive force-distance curve while viscous creep strongly affects the slope of the repulsive force-distance curve. When coupled with capillary force, due to the condensation of a thin layer of liquid film at the tip-surface joint, the anelasticity and viscous creep can alter the curve significantly in the attractive region.

  18. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuliang Bi, Shusheng; Wang, Huimin

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  19. Nanogeochronology of discordant zircon measured by atom probe microscopy of Pb-enriched dislocation loops

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, Emily M.; Reddy, Steven M.; Saxey, David W.; Snoeyenbos, David R.; Rickard, William D. A.; Fougerouse, Denis; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic discordance is a common feature in zircon that can lead to an erroneous age determination, and it is attributed to the mobilization and escape of radiogenic Pb during its post-crystallization geological evolution. The degree of isotopic discordance measured at analytical scales of ~10 μm often differs among adjacent analysis locations, indicating heterogeneous distributions of Pb at shorter length scales. We use atom probe microscopy to establish the nature of these sites and the mechanisms by which they form. We show that the nanoscale distribution of Pb in a ~2.1 billion year old discordant zircon that was metamorphosed c. 150 million years ago is defined by two distinct Pb reservoirs. Despite overall Pb loss during peak metamorphic conditions, the atom probe data indicate that a component of radiogenic Pb was trapped in 10-nm dislocation loops that formed during the annealing of radiation damage associated with the metamorphic event. A second Pb component, found outside the dislocation loops, represents homogeneous accumulation of radiogenic Pb in the zircon matrix after metamorphism. The 207Pb/206Pb ratios measured from eight dislocation loops are equivalent within uncertainty and yield an age consistent with the original crystallization age of the zircon, as determined by laser ablation spot analysis. Our results provide a specific mechanism for the trapping and retention of radiogenic Pb during metamorphism and confirm that isotopic discordance in this zircon is characterized by discrete nanoscale reservoirs of Pb that record different isotopic compositions and yield age data consistent with distinct geological events. These data may provide a framework for interpreting discordance in zircon as the heterogeneous distribution of discrete radiogenic Pb populations, each yielding geologically meaningful ages. PMID:27617295

  20. Nanogeochronology of discordant zircon measured by atom probe microscopy of Pb-enriched dislocation loops.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Emily M; Reddy, Steven M; Saxey, David W; Snoeyenbos, David R; Rickard, William D A; Fougerouse, Denis; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R C

    2016-09-01

    Isotopic discordance is a common feature in zircon that can lead to an erroneous age determination, and it is attributed to the mobilization and escape of radiogenic Pb during its post-crystallization geological evolution. The degree of isotopic discordance measured at analytical scales of ~10 μm often differs among adjacent analysis locations, indicating heterogeneous distributions of Pb at shorter length scales. We use atom probe microscopy to establish the nature of these sites and the mechanisms by which they form. We show that the nanoscale distribution of Pb in a ~2.1 billion year old discordant zircon that was metamorphosed c. 150 million years ago is defined by two distinct Pb reservoirs. Despite overall Pb loss during peak metamorphic conditions, the atom probe data indicate that a component of radiogenic Pb was trapped in 10-nm dislocation loops that formed during the annealing of radiation damage associated with the metamorphic event. A second Pb component, found outside the dislocation loops, represents homogeneous accumulation of radiogenic Pb in the zircon matrix after metamorphism. The (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratios measured from eight dislocation loops are equivalent within uncertainty and yield an age consistent with the original crystallization age of the zircon, as determined by laser ablation spot analysis. Our results provide a specific mechanism for the trapping and retention of radiogenic Pb during metamorphism and confirm that isotopic discordance in this zircon is characterized by discrete nanoscale reservoirs of Pb that record different isotopic compositions and yield age data consistent with distinct geological events. These data may provide a framework for interpreting discordance in zircon as the heterogeneous distribution of discrete radiogenic Pb populations, each yielding geologically meaningful ages.

  1. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Meher, Subhashish; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Nandwana, Peeyush; ...

    2015-04-28

    In this study, the analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered g precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr(at.%) alloy. Interestingly, the additionmore » of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within g precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes.« less

  2. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Meher, Subhashish; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Nandwana, Peeyush; Tiley, Jamie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2015-04-28

    In this study, the analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered g precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr(at.%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within g precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes.

  3. Analysis conditions of an industrial Al-Mg-Si alloy by conventional and 3D atom probes.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Miller, M K; Bigot, A

    2001-10-01

    Industrial 6016 Al-Mg-Si(Cu) alloys are presently regarded as attractive candidates for heat treatable sheet materials. Their mechanical properties can be adjusted for a given application by age hardening of the alloys. The resulting microstructural evolution takes place at the nanometer scale, making the atom probe a well suited instrument to study it. Accuracy of atom probe analysis of these aluminium alloys is a key point for the understanding of the fine scale microstructural evolution. It is known to be strongly dependent on the analysis conditions (such as specimen temperature and pulse fraction) which have been widely studied for ID atom probes. The development of the 3D instruments, as well as the increase of the evaporation pulse repetition rate have led to different analysis conditions, in particular evaporation and detection rates. The influence of various experimental parameters on the accuracy of atom probe data, in particular with regard to hydride formation sensitivity, has been reinvestigated. It is shown that hydrogen contamination is strongly dependent on the electric field at the specimen surface, and that high evaporation rates are beneficial. Conversely, detection rate must be limited to smaller than 0.02 atoms/pulse in order to prevent drastic pile-up effect.

  4. Probing dark excitons in atomically thin semiconductors via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Scuri, Giovanni; Wild, Dominik S.; High, Alexander A.; Dibos, Alan; Jauregui, Luis A.; Shu, Chi; de Greve, Kristiaan; Pistunova, Kateryna; Joe, Andrew Y.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kim, Philip; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Park, Hongkun

    2017-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers with a direct bandgap feature tightly bound excitons, strong spin-orbit coupling and spin-valley degrees of freedom. Depending on the spin configuration of the electron-hole pairs, intra-valley excitons of TMD monolayers can be either optically bright or dark. Dark excitons involve nominally spin-forbidden optical transitions with a zero in-plane transition dipole moment, making their detection with conventional far-field optical techniques challenging. Here, we introduce a method for probing the optical properties of two-dimensional materials via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). This coupling selectively enhances optical transitions with dipole moments normal to the two-dimensional plane, enabling direct detection of dark excitons in TMD monolayers. When a WSe2 monolayer is placed on top of a single-crystal silver film, its emission into near-field-coupled SPPs displays new spectral features whose energies and dipole orientations are consistent with dark neutral and charged excitons. The SPP-based near-field spectroscopy significantly improves experimental capabilities for probing and manipulating exciton dynamics of atomically thin materials, thus opening up new avenues for realizing active metasurfaces and robust optoelectronic systems, with potential applications in information processing and communication.

  5. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    SciTech Connect

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro Milani, Paolo

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  6. Probing dark excitons in atomically thin semiconductors via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Scuri, Giovanni; Wild, Dominik S; High, Alexander A; Dibos, Alan; Jauregui, Luis A; Shu, Chi; De Greve, Kristiaan; Pistunova, Kateryna; Joe, Andrew Y; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kim, Philip; Lukin, Mikhail D; Park, Hongkun

    2017-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers with a direct bandgap feature tightly bound excitons, strong spin-orbit coupling and spin-valley degrees of freedom. Depending on the spin configuration of the electron-hole pairs, intra-valley excitons of TMD monolayers can be either optically bright or dark. Dark excitons involve nominally spin-forbidden optical transitions with a zero in-plane transition dipole moment, making their detection with conventional far-field optical techniques challenging. Here, we introduce a method for probing the optical properties of two-dimensional materials via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). This coupling selectively enhances optical transitions with dipole moments normal to the two-dimensional plane, enabling direct detection of dark excitons in TMD monolayers. When a WSe2 monolayer is placed on top of a single-crystal silver film, its emission into near-field-coupled SPPs displays new spectral features whose energies and dipole orientations are consistent with dark neutral and charged excitons. The SPP-based near-field spectroscopy significantly improves experimental capabilities for probing and manipulating exciton dynamics of atomically thin materials, thus opening up new avenues for realizing active metasurfaces and robust optoelectronic systems, with potential applications in information processing and communication.

  7. Local Electronic Characterization of Conjugated Polymer Films using Conducting-Probe Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, G.; Quinn, A. J.; Redmond, G.

    2004-03-01

    Correlation of local electronic properties with film morphology is a key challenge to be addressed in order to understand (and therefore control) charge injection, transport and recombination in organic electronic devices. We present a flexible method, Conducting-Probe Atomic Force Microscopy (CP-AFM), which can be used as a local probe of both film morphology and spectroscopy. MEH-PPV layers with thickness values comparable to films used in organic electronic devices (60 nm) are spun onto gold substrates under inert conditions. Tip-height vs bias voltage (z-V) sweeps taken at constant tunnel current (50 pA) show clear charge injection thresholds at both positive and negative bias (E_+,E_-). Statistical analysis of measured single-particle gap energies, E_gsp=E_+-E_-, reveals a distribution across the surface with peaks corresponding to (extracted) exciton binding energies of 100 meV and 400 meV respectively. Analysis of measured E_gsp values for films prepared under ambient conditions show a large density of mid-gap states confirming that the preparation route is critical for organic electronic devices.

  8. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-03

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  9. Hadean age for a post-magma-ocean zircon confirmed by atom-probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John W.; Cavosie, Aaron J.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Reinhard, David A.; Lawrence, Daniel F.; Larson, David J.; Clifton, Peter H.; Kelly, Thomas F.; Wilde, Simon A.; Moser, Desmond E.; Spicuzza, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    The only physical evidence from the earliest phases of Earth's evolution comes from zircons, ancient mineral grains that can be dated using the U-Th-Pb geochronometer. Oxygen isotope ratios from such zircons have been used to infer when the hydrosphere and conditions habitable to life were established. Chemical homogenization of Earth's crust and the existence of a magma ocean have not been dated directly, but must have occurred earlier. However, the accuracy of the U-Pb zircon ages can plausibly be biased by poorly understood processes of intracrystalline Pb mobility. Here we use atom-probe tomography to identify and map individual atoms in the oldest concordant grain from Earth, a 4.4-Gyr-old Hadean zircon with a high-temperature overgrowth that formed about 1 Gyr after the mineral's core. Isolated nanoclusters, measuring about 10 nm and spaced 10-50 nm apart, are enriched in incompatible elements including radiogenic Pb with unusually high 207Pb/206Pb ratios. We demonstrate that the length scales of these clusters make U-Pb age biasing impossible, and that they formed during the later reheating event. Our tomography data thereby confirm that any mixing event of the silicate Earth must have occurred before 4.4 Gyr ago, consistent with magma ocean formation by an early moon-forming impact about 4.5 Gyr ago.

  10. Surface point defects on bulk oxides: atomically-resolved scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Setvín, Martin; Wagner, Margareta; Schmid, Michael; Parkinson, Gareth S; Diebold, Ulrike

    2017-03-17

    Metal oxides are abundant in nature and they are some of the most versatile materials for applications ranging from catalysis to novel electronics. The physical and chemical properties of metal oxides are dramatically influenced, and can be judiciously tailored, by defects. Small changes in stoichiometry introduce so-called intrinsic defects, e.g., atomic vacancies and/or interstitials. This review gives an overview of using Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), in particular Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), to study the changes in the local geometric and electronic structure related to these intrinsic point defects at the surfaces of metal oxides. Three prototypical systems are discussed: titanium dioxide (TiO2), iron oxides (Fe3O4), and, as an example for a post-transition-metal oxide, indium oxide (In2O3). Each of these three materials prefers a different type of surface point defect: oxygen vacancies, cation vacancies, and cation adatoms, respectively. The different modes of STM imaging and the promising capabilities of non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM) techniques are discussed, as well as the capability of STM to manipulate single point defects.

  11. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal–plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials. PMID:26868040

  12. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; Guo, Wei; Jimenez, Jose A.; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon content in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.

  13. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    DOE PAGES

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon contentmore » in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.« less

  14. Probing molecular adsorption and mechanics at the atomic scale: The Nanocar family of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgood, Andrew J.

    Molecular machines, typically thought to be only the fanciful imaginings of speculative fiction, have taken great strides in recent years towards real-world viability and usefulness. Under variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, (STM) one family of these nascent devices is characterized with atomic resolution, and probed and manipulated with sub-angstrom precision, adding to the growing body of knowledge of how molecular devices behave and react at nanometer scales. Evidence of temperature-dependent rolling of wheel-like fullerene constituents on the Nanocar is discussed in light of newly developed image analysis techniques. Additionally, charge-transfer mediated behavior at step edges, both static and dynamic, is investigated on a Au(111) surface for a more complete understanding of translation and surface diffusion. Molecular flexibility is thought to aid in this three-dimensional atomic-step-crossing diffusion, and is explored and discussed across many species in the Nanocar family of molecules. In all, many similar molecules have been characterized and explored via STM with an eye towards their dynamic capabilities and surface behaviors, in the hopes that future, more complex versions can build on the nascent knowledge base beginning to be established here.

  15. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M

    2016-02-12

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials.

  16. Mapping energetics of atom probe evaporation events through first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Joaquín; Broderick, Scott R; Rajan, Krishna

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to use atomistic modeling to determine accurate inputs into the atom probe tomography (APT) reconstruction process. One of these inputs is evaporation field; however, a challenge occurs because single ions and dimers have different evaporation fields. We have calculated the evaporation field of Al and Sc ions and Al-Al and Al-Sc dimers from an L1₂-Al₃Sc surface using ab initio calculations and with a high electric field applied to the surface. The evaporation field is defined as the electric field at which the energy barrier size is calculated as zero, corresponding to the minimum field that atoms from the surface can break their bonds and evaporate from the surface. The evaporation field of the surface atoms are ranked from least to greatest as: Al-Al dimer, Al ion, Sc ion, and Al-Sc dimer. The first principles results were compared with experimental data in the form of an ion evaporation map, which maps multi-ion evaporations. From the ion evaporation map of L1₂-Al₃Sc, we extract relative evaporation fields and identify that an Al-Al dimer has a lower evaporation field than an Al-Sc dimer. Additionally, comparatively an Al-Al surface dimer is more likely to evaporate as a dimer, while an Al-Sc surface dimer is more likely to evaporate as single ions. These conclusions from the experiment agree with the ab initio calculations, validating the use of this approach for modeling APT energetics.

  17. Atom probe tomography of apatites and bone-type mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Tran, Lawrence; Joester, Derk

    2012-12-21

    Nanocrystalline biological apatites constitute the mineral phase of vertebrate bone and teeth. Beyond their central importance to the mechanical function of our skeleton, their extraordinarily large surface acts as the most important ion exchanger for essential and toxic ions in our body. However, the nanoscale structural and chemical complexity of apatite-based mineralized tissues is a formidable challenge to quantitative imaging. For example, even energy-filtered electron microscopy is not suitable for detection of small quantities of low atomic number elements typical for biological materials. Herein we show that laser-pulsed atom probe tomography, a technique that combines subnanometer spatial resolution with unbiased chemical sensitivity, is uniquely suited to the task. Common apatite end members share a number of features, but can clearly be distinguished by their spectrometric fingerprint. This fingerprint and the formation of molecular ions during field evaporation can be explained based on the chemistry of the apatite channel ion. Using end members for reference, we are able to interpret the spectra of bone and dentin samples, and generate the first three-dimensional reconstruction of 1.2 × 10(7) atoms in a dentin sample. The fibrous nature of the collagenous organic matrix in dentin is clearly recognizable in the reconstruction. Surprisingly, some fibers show selectivity in binding for sodium ions over magnesium ions, implying that an additional, chemical level of hierarchy is necessary to describe dentin structure. Furthermore, segregation of inorganic ions or small organic molecules to homophase interfaces (grain boundaries) is not apparent. This has implications for the platelet model for apatite biominerals.

  18. Probe spectroscopy in an operating magneto-optical trap: The role of Raman transitions between discrete and continuum atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Brzozowski, Tomasz M.; Brzozowska, Maria; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Zawada, Michal; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    We report on cw measurements of probe beam absorption and four-wave-mixing spectra in a {sup 85}Rb magneto-optical trap taken while the trap is in operation. The trapping beams are used as pump light. We concentrate on the central feature of the spectra at small pump-probe detuning and attribute its narrow resonant structures to the superposition of Raman transitions between light-shifted sublevels of the ground atomic state and to atomic recoil processes. These two contributions have different dependencies on trap parameters and we show that the former is inhomogeneously broadened. The strong dependence of the spectra on the probe-beam polarization indicates the existence of large optical anisotropy of the cold-atom sample, which is attributed to the recoil effects. We point out that the recoil-induced resonances can be isolated from other contributions, making pump-probe spectroscopy a highly sensitive diagnostic tool for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap.

  19. Direct atomic-scale imaging of hydrogen and oxygen interstitials in pure niobium using atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Tao, Runzhe; Klie, Robert F; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-22

    Imaging the three-dimensional atomic-scale structure of complex interfaces has been the goal of many recent studies, due to its importance to technologically relevant areas. Combining atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we present an atomic-scale study of ultrathin (~5 nm) native oxide layers on niobium (Nb) and the formation of ordered niobium hydride phases near the oxide/Nb interface. Nb, an elemental type-II superconductor with the highest critical temperature (T(c) = 9.2 K), is the preferred material for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in next-generation particle accelerators. Nb exhibits high solubilities for oxygen and hydrogen, especially within the RF-field penetration depth, which is believed to result in SRF quality factor losses. STEM imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy followed by ultraviolet laser-assisted local-electrode atom-probe tomography on the same needle-like sample reveals the NbO(2), Nb(2)O(5), NbO, Nb stacking sequence; annular bright-field imaging is used to visualize directly hydrogen atoms in bulk β-NbH.

  20. Quantitative chemical-structure evaluation using atom probe tomography: Short-range order analysis of Fe-Al.

    PubMed

    Marceau, R K W; Ceguerra, A V; Breen, A J; Raabe, D; Ringer, S P

    2015-10-01

    Short-range-order (SRO) has been quantitatively evaluated in an Fe-18Al (at%) alloy using atom probe tomography (APT) data and by calculation of the generalised multicomponent short-range order (GM-SRO) parameters, which have been determined by shell-based analysis of the three-dimensional atomic positions. The accuracy of this method with respect to limited detector efficiency and spatial resolution is tested against simulated D03 ordered data. Whilst there is minimal adverse effect from limited atom probe instrument detector efficiency, the combination of this with imperfect spatial resolution has the effect of making the data appear more randomised. The value of lattice rectification of the experimental APT data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated through improved information sensitivity.

  1. Tomographic atom probe characterization of the microstructure of a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steel after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, A.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Massoud, J.-P.; Pokor, C.

    2008-11-01

    For the first time, chemical analyses using Atom Probe Tomography were performed on a bolt made of cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steel, extracted from the internal structures of a pressurized water reactor after 17 years of reactor service. The irradiation temperature of these samples was 633 K and the irradiation dose was estimated to 12 dpa (7.81 × 10 25 neutrons.m -2, E > 1 MeV). The samples were analysed with a laser assisted tomographic atom probe. These analyses have shown that neutron irradiation has a strong effect on the intragranular distribution of solute atoms. A high number density (6 × 10 23 m -3) of Ni-Si enriched and Cr-Fe depleted clusters was detected after irradiation. Mo and P segregations at the interfaces of these clusters were also observed. Finally, Si enriched atmospheres were seen.

  2. A reproducible method for damage-free site-specific preparation of atom probe tips from interfaces.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter Johann; Alam, Talukder; Ringer, Simon Peter; Cairney, Julie Marie

    2012-04-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry method with atomic-scale spatial resolution that can be used for the investigation of a wide range of materials. The main limiting factor with respect to the type of problems that can be addressed is the small volume investigated and the randomness of common sample preparation methods. With existing site-specific specimen preparation methods it is still challenging to rapidly and reproducibly produce large numbers of successful samples from specifically selected grain boundaries or interfaces for systematic studies. A new method utilizing both focused ion beam (FIB) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented that can be used to reproducibly produce damage-free atom probe samples with features of interest at any desired orientation with an accuracy of better than 50 nm from samples that require very little prior preparation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Optimisation of mass ranging for atom probe microanalysis and application to the corrosion processes in Zr alloys.

    PubMed

    Hudson, D; Smith, G D W; Gault, B

    2011-05-01

    Atom probe tomography uses time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the chemical nature of atoms from their mass-to-charge-state ratios. Within a mass spectrum, ranges are defined so as to attribute a chemical identity to each peak. The accuracy of atom probe microanalysis relies on the definition of these ranges. Here we propose and compare several automated ranging techniques, tested against simulated mass spectra. The performance of these metrics compare favourably with a trial of users asked to manually range a simplified simulated dataset. The optimised automated ranging procedure was then used to precisely evaluate the very low iron concentration (0.003-0.018 at%) in a zirconium alloy to reveal its behaviour in the matrix during corrosion; oxygen is injected into solution and has the effect of increasing the local iron concentration near the oxide-metal interface, which in turn affects the corrosion properties of the metal substrate.

  4. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  5. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe-Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α‧) phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe-Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100-10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni-Mn-Si-Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α‧ interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni-Mn-Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core-shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby-Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30-36). ).

  6. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel A.; ...

    2016-05-16

    Here, three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101more » alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36).« less

  7. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel A.; Young, George A.; Guo, Wei; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-16

    Here, three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36).

  8. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel A.; Young, George A.; Guo, Wei; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-16

    Here, three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36).

  9. Pump-probe study of atoms and small molecules with laser driven high order harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei

    A commercially available modern laser can emit over 1015 photons within a time window of a few tens of femtoseconds (10-15second), which can be focused into a spot size of about 10 mum, resulting in a peak intensity above 1014W/cm2. This paves the way for table-top strong field physics studies such as above threshold ionization (ATI), non-sequential double ionization (NSDI), high order harmonic generation (HHG), etc.. Among these strong laser-matter interactions, high order harmonic generation, which combines many photons of the fundamental laser field into a single photon, offers a unique way to generate light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region. High order harmonic photons are emitted within a short time window from a few tens of femtoseconds down to a few hundreds of attoseconds (10 -18second). This highly coherent nature of HHG allows it to be synchronized with an infrared (IR) laser pulse, and the pump-probe technique can be adopted to study ultrafast dynamic processes in a quantum system. The major work of this thesis is to develop a table-top VUV(EUV) light source based on HHG, and use it to study dynamic processes in atoms and small molecules with the VUV(EUV)-pump IR-probe method. A Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) apparatus is used for momentum imaging of the interaction products. Two types of high harmonic pump pulses are generated and applied for pump-probe studies. The first one consists of several harmonics forming a short attosecond pulse train (APT) in the EUV regime (around 40 eV). We demonstrate that, (1) the auto-ionization process triggered by the EUV in cation carbon-monoxide and oxygen molecules can be modified by scanning the EUV-IR delay, (2) the phase information of quantum trajectories in bifurcated high harmonics can be extracted by performing an EUV-IR cross-correlation experiment, thus disclosing the macroscopic quantum control in HHG. The second type of high harmonic source

  10. Criteria and considerations for preparing atom-probe tomography specimens of nanomaterials utilizing an encapsulation methodology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Hazut, Ori; Yerushalmi, Roie; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Seidman, David N

    2017-09-23

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) is a powerful method for characterization of nanomaterials due to its atomic-ppm level detection limit and Angstrom spatial resolution. Sample preparation for nanomaterials is, however, challenging because of their small dimensions and complicated geometries. Nanowires, with their high geometrical aspect ratio and nanowire length, 10 to 100 times their typical diameters, are highly suitable specimens for APT analyses, which can be transferred to silicon microposts using a nanomanipulator for direct APT measurements. This method is, however, prone to poor alignment and a limited field-of-view (FOV). Most importantly, direct implementation of APT with high aspect ratio nanowires may yield a low success rate of ∼30%, due to the high electric fields (10-40 V nm(-1)) associated with APT. While this is acceptable for samples analyzed solely by APT, a low sample yield makes it challenging to perform correlative experiments on the same nanowire specimen, utilizing other sophisticated characterization instruments. Herein, we introduce a general strategy for preparing high-yield APT specimens by encapsulating the nanowires utilizing a conformal atomic-layer deposition (ALD) coating followed by site-specific lift-out using a dual-beam focused-ion beam microscope. The ALD deposited coating forms strong chemical bonds with the Si nanowires yielding a high-quality and robust interface. The evaporation electric fields of the ALD coating and the nanowires are tuned by changing laser energy to obtain a uniform evaporation rate. The strong adhesion of the ALD-coating/nanowire interface and uniform evaporation rate produce a >90% specimen yield, with small concentration of reconstruction artifacts in 3-D. Simultaneously, the field-of-view is enhanced and the surface of the nanowire becomes visible, which makes the study of surface adsorption, segregation and oxidation possible. We utilized ALD-ZnO coated silicon nanowires as an example for

  11. Reliable measurements of interfacial slip by colloid probe atomic force microscopy. I. Mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liwen; Attard, Phil; Neto, Chiara

    2011-06-07

    We developed a stable spread-sheet algorithm for the calculation of the hydrodynamic forces measured by colloid probe atomic force microscopy to be used in investigations of interfacial slip. The algorithm quantifies the effect on the slip hydrodynamic force for factors commonly encountered in experimental measurements such as nanoparticle contamination, nonconstant drag force due to cantilever bending that varies with different cantilevers, flattening of the microsphere, and calibration at large separations. We found that all of these experimental factors significantly affect the fitted slip length, approximately in the order listed. Our modeling is applied to fit new experimental data reproducibly. Using this new algorithm, it is shown that the fitting of hydrodynamic theories to experimental data is reliable and the fitted slip length is accurate. A "blind test" protocol was developed that produces a reliable estimate of the fitting error in the determination of both the slip length and spring constant. By this blind test, we estimate that our modeling determines the fitted slip length with an average systematic error of 2 nm and the fitted spring constant with a 3% error. Our exact calculation of the drag force may explain previous reports that the fitted slip length depends upon the shape and spring constant of the cantilever used to perform the measurements.

  12. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  13. Interface Segregation and Nitrogen Measurement in Fe-Mn-N Steel by Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Brian; Van Landeghem, Hugo P; Botton, Gianluigi A; Zurob, Hatem S

    2017-03-21

    Improved understanding of the interactions between solutes and the austenite/ferrite interface can benefit modeling of ferrite growth during austenite decomposition, as the transformation kinetic is significantly affected by solutes that influence interface mobility. Solute-interface interactions dominate solute segregation at the interface in binary systems, but in multi-component alloys, solute-solute interactions may also affect segregation. In this study, interface segregation in Fe-Mn-N is examined and compared with Fe-Mn-C, to reveal the extent to which C affects the segregation of Mn. Atom probe tomography (APT) is well-suited to analyze solute concentrations across the interface, as this technique combines high spatial resolution and compositional sensitivity. Measurements of Mn show that segregation is only observed for Fe-Mn-C. This demonstrates that Mn segregation is primarily driven by an affinity for C, which also segregates to the interface. However, the measurement of N in steels by APT may be affected by a variety of experimental factors. Therefore, in verifying the Fe-Mn-N result, systematic examination is conducted on the influence of pulsing method (voltage versus laser), sample preparation (ion milling versus electropolishing), and vacuum storage on the measured N concentration. Both laser pulsing and focused ion beam sample preparation are observed to decrease the apparent N concentration.

  14. Atom Probe Tomography Examination of Carbon Redistribution in Quenched and Tempered 4340 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Miller, Michael K.; Alexander, David J.; Field, Robert D.; Clarke, Kester D.

    2012-08-07

    Quenching and tempering produces a wide range of mechanical properties in medium carbon, low alloyed steels - Study fragmentation behavior as a function of heat-treatment. Subtle microstructural changes accompany the mechanical property changes that result from quenching and tempering - Characterize the location and distribution of carbon and alloying elements in the microstructure using atom probe tomography (APT). Perform complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tempering influences the mechanical properties and fragmentation of quenched 4340 (hemi-shaped samples). APT revealed carbon-enriched features that contain a maximum of {approx}12-14 at.% carbon after quenching to RT (the level of carbon is perhaps associated with the extent of autotempering). TEM confirmed the presence of twinned martensite and indicates {var_epsilon} ({eta}) transition carbides after oil quenching to RT. Tempering at 325 C resulted in carbon-enriched plates (> 25 at.% C) with no significant element partitioning (transition carbides?). Tempering at 450 C and 575 C resulted in cementite ({approx} 25 at.% C) during late stage tempering; Cr, Mn, Mo partitioned to cementite and Si partitioned to ferrite. Tempering at 575 C resulted in P segregation at cementite interfaces and the formation of Cottrell atmospheres.

  15. Nonlocal response of metallic nanospheres probed by light, electrons, and atoms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie-Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii. For selected metals, we predict hydrodynamic multipolar plasmons to be measurable on single nanospheres.

  16. Some aspects of atom probe specimen preparation and analysis of thin film materials.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G B; Miller, M K; Fraser, H L

    2004-07-01

    Some of the factors in the preparation of atom probe specimens of metallic multilayer thin films have been investigated. A series of Ti/Nb multilayer films were sputtered deposited on n-doped Si [001] substrates with either 5 or 0.05Omega cm resistivity. Each wafer was pre-fabricated into a series of 5 microm x 5 microm x approximately 80 microm island posts by photolithography and reactive ion etching. Once the film was grown on the wafer, a Si post was mounted to either a tungsten or stainless steel fine tip needle that was mechanically crimped to a Cu tube for handling. The specimen was then loaded into a Focus Ion Beam instrument where a sacrificial Pt cap was in situ deposited onto the surface of the film and subsequently annularly ion milled into the appropriate geometry. The Pt cap was found to be an effective method in reducing Ga ion damage and implantation into the film during milling. The multilayers deposited on the high resistivity Si exhibited uncontrolled field evaporation which lead to high mass tails in the mass spectra, a reduction in the mass resolution, high background noise, propensity for "flash-failure", and a variation in the apparent layer thickness as the experiment elapsed in time. The multilayers deposited on lower resistivity Si did not suffer from these artifacts.

  17. Compact metal probes: a solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R D; Sheremet, E; Müller, S; Gordan, O D; Villabona, A; Schulze, S; Hietschold, M; Zahn, D R T

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  18. Morphology and Growth of Thin Films Probed by Atomic Beam Reflectivity Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrich, D. J.; Wetterer, S. M.; Schwartz, P. V.; Fenter, P.; Schreiber, F.; Scoles, G.

    1997-03-01

    The technique of probing metal film growth on metal substrates with thermal energy atom scattering (TEAS) has been well demonstrated and therefore shows promise for the investigation of the growth of organic thin films on metal surfaces. He beam specular reflectivity, which is typically 30% for a surface such as Au(111), drops to very low values during the early stages of monolayer formation rising again when the layer is completed. Unfortunately, most organic layers are soft and do not show large specularity increases at monolayer completion. However, we have been able to study in this way the growth of a decanethiol monolayer on Au(111) detecting the formation of both the low density 'striped' phase and the final equilibrium close-packed "standing-up" phase. Furthermore in growing PTCDA (3,4,9,10- perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) films we have seen the specularity drop to much higher final values without going through an intermediate minimum, which is consistent with the growth of these films into "mesa" type crystallites as detected independently by X-ray scattering and AFM.

  19. Atomic force microscopy deep trench and sidewall imaging with an optical fiber probe.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Hussain, Danish; Yang, Feng; Sun, Lining

    2014-12-01

    We report a method to measure critical dimensions of micro- and nanostructures using the atomic force microscope (AFM) with an optical fiber probe (OFP). This method is capable of scanning narrow and deep trenches due to the long and thin OFP tip, as well as imaging of steep sidewalls with unique profiling possibilities by laterally tilting the OFP without any modifications of the optical lever. A switch control scheme is developed to measure the sidewall angle by flexibly transferring feedback control between the Z- and Y-axis, for a serial scan of the horizontal surface (raster scan on XY-plane) and sidewall (raster scan on the YZ-plane), respectively. In experiments, a deep trench with tapered walls (243.5 μm deep) and a microhole (about 14.9 μm deep) have been imaged with the orthogonally aligned OFP, as well as a silicon sidewall (fabricated by deep reactive ion etching) has been characterized with the tilted OFP. Moreover, the sidewall angle of TGZ3 (AFM calibration grating) was accurately measured using the switchable scan method.

  20. A beginner's guide to atomic force microscopy probing for cell mechanics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atomic Force microscopy (AFM) is becoming a prevalent tool in cell biology and biomedical studies, especially those focusing on the mechanical properties of cells and tissues. The newest generation of bio‐AFMs combine ease of use and seamless integration with live‐cell epifluorescence or more advanced optical microscopies. As a unique feature with respect to other bionanotools, AFM provides nanometer‐resolution maps for cell topography, stiffness, viscoelasticity, and adhesion, often overlaid with matching optical images of the probed cells. This review is intended for those about to embark in the use of bio‐AFMs, and aims to assist them in designing an experiment to measure the mechanical properties of adherent cells. In addition to describing the main steps in a typical cell mechanics protocol and explaining how data is analysed, this review will also discuss some of the relevant contact mechanics models available and how they have been used to characterize specific features of cellular and biological samples. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:75–84, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27676584

  1. Atom probe tomography investigation of lath boundary segregation and precipitation in a maraging stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Thuvander, Mattias; Andersson, Marcus; Stiller, Krystyna

    2013-09-01

    Lath boundaries in a maraging stainless steel of composition 13Cr-8Ni-2Mo-2Cu-1Ti-0.7Al-0.3Mn-0.2Si-0.03C (at%) have been investigated using atom probe tomography following aging at 475 °C for up to 100 h. Segregation of Mo, Si and P to the lath boundaries was observed already after 5 min of aging, and the amount of segregation increases with aging time. At lath boundaries also precipitation of η-Ni₃(Ti, Al) and Cu-rich 9R, in contact with each other, takes place. These co-precipitates grow with time and because of coarsening the area number density decreases. After 100 h of aging a ∼5 nm thick film-like precipitation of a Mo-rich phase was observed at the lath boundaries. From the composition of the film it is suggested that the phase in question is the quasicrystalline R' phase. The film is perforated with Cu-rich 9R and η-Ni₃(Ti, Al) co-precipitates. Not all precipitate types present in the matrix do precipitate at the lath boundaries; the Si-containing G phase and γ'-Ni₃(Ti, Al, Si) and the Cr-rich α' phase were not observed at the lath boundaries.

  2. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of Gallium-Nitride-Based Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosa, Ty J.; Olson, David; Giddings, A. Devin; Clifton, Peter H.; Larson, David J.; Lefebvre, Williams

    2014-03-01

    Thin-film light-emitting diodes (LEDs) composed of GaN/InxGa1-xN/GaN quantum well (QW) structures are integrated into modern optoelectronic devices because of the tunable InGaN band-gap enabling emission of the full visible spectrum. Atom probe tomography (APT) offers unique capabilities for 3D device characterization including compositional mapping of nano-volumes (>106 nm3) , high detection efficiency (>50%), and good sensitivity. In this study, APT is used to understand the distribution of dopants as well as Al and In alloying agents in a GaN device. Measurements using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) have also been made to improve the accuracy of the APT analysis by correlating the information content of these complimentary techniques. APT analysis reveals various QW and other optoelectronic structures including a Mg p-GaN layer, an Al-rich electron blocking layer, an In-rich multi-QW region, and an In-based super-lattice structure. The multi-QW composition shows good quantitative agreement with layer thickness and spacing extracted from a high resolution TEM image intensity analysis.

  3. Nanoscale Stoichiometric Analysis of a High-Temperature Superconductor by Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzini, Stella; London, Andrew J; Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David; Speller, Susannah; Grovenor, Chris R M; Danaie, Mohsen; Moody, Michael P; Edmondson, Philip D; Bagot, Paul A J

    2017-01-31

    The functional properties of the high-temperature superconductor Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ (Y-123) are closely correlated to the exact stoichiometry and oxygen content. Exceeding the critical value of 1 oxygen vacancy for every five unit cells (δ>0.2, which translates to a 1.5 at% deviation from the nominal oxygen stoichiometry of Y7.7Ba15.3Cu23O54-δ ) is sufficient to alter the superconducting properties. Stoichiometry at the nanometer scale, particularly of oxygen and other lighter elements, is extremely difficult to quantify in complex functional ceramics by most currently available analytical techniques. The present study is an analysis and optimization of the experimental conditions required to quantify the local nanoscale stoichiometry of single crystal yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) samples in three dimensions by atom probe tomography (APT). APT analysis required systematic exploration of a wide range of data acquisition and processing conditions to calibrate the measurements. Laser pulse energy, ion identification, and the choice of range widths were all found to influence composition measurements. The final composition obtained from melt-grown crystals with optimized superconducting properties was Y7.9Ba10.4Cu24.4O57.2.

  4. Nano-scale stoichiometry analysis of a high temperature superconductor by atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Pedrazzini, Stella; London, Andrew J.; Gault, Baptiste; ...

    2017-01-31

    The functional properties of the high-temperature superconductor Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ (Y-123) are closely correlated to the exact stoichiometry and oxygen content. Exceeding the critical value of 1 oxygen vacancy for every five unit cells (δ>0.2, which translates to a 1.5 at% deviation from the nominal oxygen stoichiometry of Y7.7Ba15.3Cu23O54-δ ) is sufficient to alter the superconducting properties. Stoichiometry at the nanometer scale, particularly of oxygen and other lighter elements, is extremely difficult to quantify in complex functional ceramics by most currently available analytical techniques. The present study is an analysis and optimization of the experimental conditions required to quantify the local nanoscalemore » stoichiometry of single crystal yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) samples in three dimensions by atom probe tomography (APT). APT analysis required systematic exploration of a wide range of data acquisition and processing conditions to calibrate the measurements. Laser pulse energy, ion identification, and the choice of range widths were all found to influence composition measurements. The final composition obtained from melt-grown crystals with optimized superconducting properties was Y7.9Ba10.4Cu24.4O57.2.« less

  5. Fusion boundary precipitation in thermally aged dissimilar metal welds studied by atom probe tomography and nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seunghyun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical characterizations were performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the fusion boundary region between low-alloy steel and Nickel-based weld metal in dissimilar metal welds used in operating power plant systems. The effects of thermal aging treatment on the low-alloy steel side near the fusion boundary were an increase in the ratio of Cr constituents and Cr-rich precipitates and the formation and growth of Cr23C6. Cr concentrations were calculated using atom probe tomography. The accuracy of simulations of thermal aging effects of heat treatment was verified, and the activation energy for Cr diffusion in the fusion boundary region was calculated. The mechanical properties of fusion boundary region changed based on the distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, where the material initially hardened with the formation of Cr-rich precipitates and then softened because of the reduction of residual strain or coarsening of Cr-rich precipitates.

  6. Isotopic analysis of individual refractory metal nuggets using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, L.; Bland, P.; Schaefer, B. F.; Saxey, D. W.; Reddy, S.; Fougerouse, D.; William, R. D. A.; Forman, L. V.; Trimby, P.; La Fontaine, A.; Yang, L.; Cairney, J.; Ringer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Sub-micrometre metallic alloys of the highly siderophile elements, known as refractory metal nuggets (RMNs), can be found in primitive carbonaceous chondrites. There has been some suggestion that these grains may have a pre-solar origin, however their <1 µm size has meant that isotopic analysis of individual grains has not previously been possible. Atom probe microscopy has sufficient spatial resolution to quantify the isotopic compositions, across the entire mass range, of small sample volumes (<0.02 µm3) with high sensitivity and precision. We present analyses of four individual RMNs from the same refractory inclusion within the ALH 77307 meteorite. The results indicate that these RMNs have significant isotopic deviations from solar relative isotope abundances and therefore preserve a pre-solar isotopic signature. All RMNs exhibit large p-process enrichments in 98Ru and depletions in s-process 186Os. Two RMNs have a similar isotopic signature, suggesting formation in the same stellar environment. This similarity between two RMNs indicates that there may be a significant contribution of material to our solar system from a single source. The other two RMNs are isotopically dissimilar. Finally, three of the RMNs plot on a 187Re -187Os isochron from which we can derive a galactic age of 12.5 Ga ±1.8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first direct determination of the age of the Milky Way through physical analysis of non-solar material.

  7. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-28

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites. Published by AIP Publishing.

  8. Single-Ion Deconvolution of Mass Peak Overlaps for Atom Probe Microscopy.

    PubMed

    London, Andrew J; Haley, Daniel; Moody, Michael P

    2017-03-16

    Due to the intrinsic evaporation properties of the material studied, insufficient mass-resolving power and lack of knowledge of the kinetic energy of incident ions, peaks in the atom probe mass-to-charge spectrum can overlap and result in incorrect composition measurements. Contributions to these peak overlaps can be deconvoluted globally, by simply examining adjacent peaks combined with knowledge of natural isotopic abundances. However, this strategy does not account for the fact that the relative contributions to this convoluted signal can often vary significantly in different regions of the analysis volume; e.g., across interfaces and within clusters. Some progress has been made with spatially localized deconvolution in cases where the discrete microstructural regions can be easily identified within the reconstruction, but this means no further point cloud analyses are possible. Hence, we present an ion-by-ion methodology where the identity of each ion, normally obscured by peak overlap, is resolved by examining the isotopic abundance of their immediate surroundings. The resulting peak-deconvoluted data are a point cloud and can be analyzed with any existing tools. We present two detailed case studies and discussion of the limitations of this new technique.

  9. Practical Issues for Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of III-Nitride Semiconductor Materials.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fengzai; Moody, Michael P; Martin, Tomas L; Bagot, Paul A J; Kappers, Menno J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2015-06-01

    Various practical issues affecting atom probe tomography (APT) analysis of III-nitride semiconductors have been studied as part of an investigation using a c-plane InAlN/GaN heterostructure. Specimen preparation was undertaken using a focused ion beam microscope with a mono-isotopic Ga source. This enabled the unambiguous observation of implantation damage induced by sample preparation. In the reconstructed InAlN layer Ga implantation was demonstrated for the standard "clean-up" voltage (5 kV), but this was significantly reduced by using a lower voltage (e.g., 1 kV). The characteristics of APT data from the desorption maps to the mass spectra and measured chemical compositions were examined within the GaN buffer layer underlying the InAlN layer in both pulsed laser and pulsed voltage modes. The measured Ga content increased monotonically with increasing laser pulse energy and voltage pulse fraction within the examined ranges. The best results were obtained at very low laser energy, with the Ga content close to the expected stoichiometric value for GaN and the associated desorption map showing a clear crystallographic pole structure.

  10. Atomic force microscopy deep trench and sidewall imaging with an optical fiber probe

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hui Hussain, Danish; Yang, Feng; Sun, Lining

    2014-12-15

    We report a method to measure critical dimensions of micro- and nanostructures using the atomic force microscope (AFM) with an optical fiber probe (OFP). This method is capable of scanning narrow and deep trenches due to the long and thin OFP tip, as well as imaging of steep sidewalls with unique profiling possibilities by laterally tilting the OFP without any modifications of the optical lever. A switch control scheme is developed to measure the sidewall angle by flexibly transferring feedback control between the Z- and Y-axis, for a serial scan of the horizontal surface (raster scan on XY-plane) and sidewall (raster scan on the YZ-plane), respectively. In experiments, a deep trench with tapered walls (243.5 μm deep) and a microhole (about 14.9 μm deep) have been imaged with the orthogonally aligned OFP, as well as a silicon sidewall (fabricated by deep reactive ion etching) has been characterized with the tilted OFP. Moreover, the sidewall angle of TGZ3 (AFM calibration grating) was accurately measured using the switchable scan method.

  11. Atom probe tomography analysis of high dose MA957 at selected irradiation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nathan A.; Stergar, Erich; Toloczko, Mychailo; Hosemann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are meritable structural materials for nuclear reactor systems due to the exemplary resistance to radiation damage and high temperature creep. Summarized in this work are atom probe tomography (APT) investigations on a heat of MA957 that underwent irradiation in the form of in-reactor creep specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility-Materials Open Test Assembly (FFTF-MOTA) for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. The oxide precipitates appear stable under irradiation at elevated temperature over extended periods of time. Nominally, the precipitate chemistry is unchanged by the accumulated dose; although, evidence suggests that ballistic dissolution and reformation processes are occurring at all irradiation temperatures. At 412 °C-109 dpa, chromium enrichments - consistent with the α‧ phase - appear between the oxide precipitates, indicating radiation induced segregation. Grain boundaries, enriched with several elements including nickel and titanium, are observed at all irradiation conditions. At 412 °C-109 dpa, the grain boundaries are also enriched in molecular titanium oxide (TiO).

  12. Atomistic Study of Metastable Phases in an A1-3wt.%-Li0 .12wt.%-Zr Alloy. A Preliminary Study of A1-Li Alloys Using Atom-Probe Field Ion Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-02

    miscibility gap has been obtained by Nozato and Nakai (5), Spooner ir al.(6), Rioja ind Ludwiczak (7), Papzian et al.(8). However, direct imaging of the a...International Conference on Al-Li Alloys, The Institute of Metals, London, in press. 626 ALUMINUM ALLOYS - PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 7. Rioja , R. J

  13. TEM (transmission electron microscopy), APFIM (atom-probe field ion microscopy), and SANS (small-angle neutron scattering) examination of aged duplex stainless steel components from some decommissioned reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1987-12-01

    The present investigation indicates that the primary embrittlement processes of the CF-8 grade cast stainless steel components during extended reactor service are spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase and M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ carbide precipitation on the austenite-ferrite boundaries. The ferrite hardness measured for the Shippingport reactor valves appears to reflect the different extent of spinodal decomposition among the different valves which contain slightly different Cr contents. G-phase precipitation was minimal compared to that during accelerated aging of CF-8 steel in the laboratory (i.e., near 400/degree/C). This indicates that the activation energy may be strongly influenced by the synergism among the G-phase precipitation, carbide formation, and spinodal decomposition. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Ultrastrong Carbon Thin Films from Diamond to Graphene under Extreme Conditions: Probing Atomic Scale Interfacial Mechanisms to Achieve Ultralow Friction and Wear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-08

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0101 Ultrastrong Carbon Thin Films from Diamond to Graphene under Extreme Conditions: Probing Atomic -Scale Interfacial...to 21 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrastrong Carbon Thin Films from Diamond to Graphene under Extreme Conditions: Probing Atomic -Scale...nanotribometry that enables nanoscale visualization and quantification of atomic -level processes of sliding contacts inside the transmission electron

  15. Atomic arrangement at ZnTe/CdSe interfaces determined by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bonef, Bastien; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Gérard, Lionel; Mariette, Henri; André, Régis; Bougerol, Catherine; Grenier, Adeline

    2015-02-02

    High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography experiments reveal the presence of an intermediate layer at the interface between two binary compounds with no common atom, namely, ZnTe and CdSe for samples grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy under standard conditions. This thin transition layer, of the order of 1 to 3 atomic planes, contains typically one monolayer of ZnSe. Even if it occurs at each interface, the direct interface, i.e., ZnTe on CdSe, is sharper than the reverse one, where the ZnSe layer is likely surrounded by alloyed layers. On the other hand, a CdTe-like interface was never observed. This interface knowledge is crucial to properly design superlattices for optoelectronic applications and to master band-gap engineering.

  16. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  17. Computer simulation of field ion images of nanoporous structure in the irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, E. V.; Alexandrova, S. S.; Belykh, T. A.

    2012-02-01

    Computer simulation and interpretation of field ion microscopy images of ion irradiated platinum are discussed. Field ion microscopy technique provides direct precise atomic scale investigation of crystal lattice defects of atomically pure surface of material; at the same time it allows to analyze the structural defects in volume by controlled and sequential removal of surface atoms by electric field. Defects identification includes the following steps: at the first stage the type of crystalline structure and spatial orientation of crystallographic directions were determined. Thus, we obtain the data about exact position of all atoms of the given volume, i.e. the model image of an ideal crystal. At the second stage, the ion image was processed used the program to obtain the data about real arrangement of atoms of the investigated sample. At the third stage the program compares these two data sets, with a split-hair accuracy revealing a site of all defects in a material. Results of the quantitative analysis show that shape of nanopores are spherical or cylindrical, diameter on nanopores was varied from 1 to 5 run, their depth was fond to be from 1 to 9 nm. It was observed that nearly 40% of nanopores are concentrated in the subsurface layer 10 nm thick, the concentration of nanopores decreased linearly with the distance from the irradiated surface.

  18. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-21

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces.

  19. Voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed atom probe tomography of a multiphase high-strength low-carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Michael D; Seidman, David N

    2011-12-01

    The differences in artifacts associated with voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed (wavelength = 532 or 355 nm) atom-probe tomographic (APT) analyses of nanoscale precipitation in a high-strength low-carbon steel are assessed using a local-electrode atom-probe tomograph. It is found that the interfacial width of nanoscale Cu precipitates increases with increasing specimen apex temperatures induced by higher laser pulse energies (0.6-2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm). This effect is probably due to surface diffusion of Cu atoms. Increasing the specimen apex temperature by using pulse energies up to 2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm is also found to increase the severity of the local magnification effect for nanoscale M2C metal carbide precipitates, which is indicated by a decrease of the local atomic density inside the carbides from 68 ± 6 nm(-3) (voltage pulsing) to as small as 3.5 ± 0.8 nm(-3). Methods are proposed to solve these problems based on comparisons with the results obtained from voltage-pulsed APT experiments. Essentially, application of the Cu precipitate compositions and local atomic density of M2C metal carbide precipitates measured by voltage-pulsed APT to 532 or 355 nm wavelength laser-pulsed data permits correct quantification of precipitation.

  20. Comparison of TALIF and catalytic probes for the determination of nitrogen atom density in a nitrogen plasma afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaboriau, F.; Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M.; Erradi, A.; Rouffet, B.

    2009-03-01

    The density of neutral nitrogen atoms in a glass reactor was measured by two absolute methods: two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) and catalytic probes. The source of N atoms was nitrogen plasma created in a quartz tube by surfatron microwave generator operating at 2.45 GHz and adjustable output power up to 300 W. The TALIF measurements were performed using a dye laser which was pumped by a YAG laser. At the exit of the dye laser, the beam frequency was doubled through a KDP crystal and then mixed in a BBO crystal. The wavelength of the output laser beam was chosen at 206.65 nm so two-photon absorption was suitable to excite nitrogen atoms from the ground state to the 5d 2D state. Absolute N density was determined by using calibration with krypton. Simultaneously, the N atom density was measured with a fiber optics catalytic probe (FOCP) with a well-activated iron catalytic tip. Measurements were performed by both methods at nitrogen flows between 0.2 and 2 l min-1, and discharge powers between 60 and 300 W. At rather high nitrogen flows, the N atom density increased monotonically with increasing discharge power, while at lower flow saturation was observed. TALIF showed somewhat higher values than FOCP which was attributed to the accuracy of both methods. The main advantage of TALIF is a broader detection range, while FOCP is an extremely simple and inexpensive technique.

  1. Experimental simulation of spallation elements production in a 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel: 3D atom probe characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadel, E.; Pareige, P.; Ruault, M.-O.

    2002-09-01

    The irradiation damage in the target window of a demonstrator of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) consists of atomic displacements (dpa) and spallation element production that will affect the in-service properties of the structural material of the target. The atomic displacements (about 100 dpa/year) will promote the formation of point defect clusters, dislocation loops and the precipitation of various phases that contribute to hardening and embrittlement of the structural material. As an example, the Ca and Ti production should harden the material via precipitation, in parallel to embrittlement due to P and S segregation. The purpose of this work was to simulate the spallation element loading, via ion implantation (using the IRMA implanter at CSKSM) and to study at the atomic scale, with the 3D atom probe, their evolution in the 9Cr-1Mo reference martensitic steel. In order to realize this, specific experiments, performed at 300°C, were camed out using low energy ions (Ca, Ti or S) implanted in the extremely small atom probe specimens (needles of 100 nanometers thickness).

  2. Phosphorus segregation in nanocrystalline Ni-3.6 at.% P alloy investigated with the tomographic atom probe (TAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Faerber, B.; Cadel, E.; Menand, A.; Schmitz, G.; Kirchheim, R.

    2000-02-09

    The microstructures of electroless plated and thermally aged nanocrystalline nickel-3.6 at.% phosphorus layers were investigated on an atomic scale with a tomographic atom probe (TAP). After heat treatments at 250 and 400 C, a continuous P-segregation in the grain boundaries of the nanocrystalline structure was directly proved for the first time. This segregation effect explains the comparatively high thermal stability of the material. Assuming the existence of a metastable equilibrium, a simple mass balance calculation, which uses experimentally determined data exclusively, makes it possible to predict grain sizes of other NiP alloys within the thermal stability region.

  3. Investigation of material property influenced stoichiometric deviations as evidenced during UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography in fluorite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy; Henderson, Hunter B.; Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Gan, Jian; Allen, Todd R.; Manuel, Michele V.

    2015-09-01

    Oxide materials are used in numerous applications such as thermal barrier coatings, nuclear fuels, and electrical conductors and sensors, all applications where nanometer-scale stoichiometric changes can affect functional properties. Atom probe tomography can be used to characterize the precise chemical distribution of individual species and spatially quantify the oxygen to metal ratio at the nanometer scale. However, atom probe analysis of oxides can be accompanied by measurement artifacts caused by laser-material interactions. In this investigation, two technologically relevant oxide materials with the same crystal structure and an anion to cation ratio of 2.00, pure cerium oxide (CeO2) and uranium oxide (UO2) are studied. It was determined that electronic structure, optical properties, heat transfer properties, and oxide stability strongly affect their evaporation behavior, thus altering their measured stoichiometry, with thermal conductance and thermodynamic stability being strong factors.

  4. Analysis of Radiation Damage in Light Water Reactors: Comparison of Cluster Analysis Methods for the Analysis of Atom Probe Data.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jonathan M; DaCosta, Gérald; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Weekes, Hannah; Radiguet, Bertrand; Styman, Paul D; Vurpillot, Francois; Pareige, Cristelle; Etienne, Auriane; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas; Malerba, Lorenzo; Pareige, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes the formation of nanoscale microstructural features (termed radiation damage), which affect the mechanical properties of the vessel. A key tool for characterizing these nanoscale features is atom probe tomography (APT), due to its high spatial resolution and the ability to identify different chemical species in three dimensions. Microstructural observations using APT can underpin development of a mechanistic understanding of defect formation. However, with atom probe analyses there are currently multiple methods for analyzing the data. This can result in inconsistencies between results obtained from different researchers and unnecessary scatter when combining data from multiple sources. This makes interpretation of results more complex and calibration of radiation damage models challenging. In this work simulations of a range of different microstructures are used to directly compare different cluster analysis algorithms and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

  5. Atom probe analysis of AlN interlayers in AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Kaun, Stephen W.; Speck, James S.; Lu, Jing; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2013-03-18

    Atom probe tomography was used to characterize AlN interlayers in AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE), NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE), and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The PAMBE-grown AlN interlayer had the highest purity, with nearly 100% of group-III sites occupied by Al. The group-III site concentrations of Al for interlayers grown by NH{sub 3}-MBE and MOCVD were {approx}85% and {approx}47%, respectively. Hall measurements were performed to determine the two-dimensional electron gas mobility and sheet concentration. Sheet concentrations were {approx}25%-45% higher with molecular beam epitaxy than with MOCVD, and these results matched well with atom probe data.

  6. Using Atom-Probe Tomography to Understand Zn O ∶Al /SiO 2/Si Schottky Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, R.; Youssef, Amanda; Akey, Austin; Schoofs, Frank; Ramanathan, Shriram; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-09-01

    We use electronic transport and atom-probe tomography to study Zn O ∶Al /SiO 2/Si Schottky diodes on lightly doped n - and p -type Si. We vary the carrier concentration in the ZnO ∶Al films by 2 orders of magnitude, but the Schottky barrier height remains nearly constant. Atom-probe tomography shows that Al segregates to the interface, so that the ZnO ∶Al at the junction is likely to be metallic even when the bulk of the ZnO ∶Al film is semiconducting. We hypothesize that the observed Fermi-level pinning is connected to the insulator-metal transition in doped ZnO. This implies that tuning the band alignment at oxide/Si interfaces may be achieved by controlling the transition between localized and extended states in the oxide, thereby changing the orbital hybridization across the interface.

  7. Focused ion beam-assisted fabrication of soft high-aspect ratio silicon nanowire atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Peter; Hibst, Nicolas; Mizaikoff, Boris; Strehle, Steffen; Kranz, Christine

    2017-03-28

    In this study, high-aspect ratio silicon nanowire (SiNW) - modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes are fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) microfabrication technology and vapor-solid-solid synthesis. Commercially available soft silicon nitride probes are used for localized nanowire growth yielding soft high-aspect ratio AFM probes. The SiNW-modified cantilevers are used here for imaging in PeakForce Tappingۛ (PFT) mode, which offers high force control along with valuable information about tip-sample adhesion. A platinum catalyst, deposited accurately at a truncated AFM tip by ion beam-induced deposition (IBID), was used for localized nanowire synthesis. It could be shown that the deposition of a thin silicon dioxide layer prior to the catalyst deposition resulted in controlled SiNW growth on silicon as well as silicon nitride probes. In addition, a FIB-based method for post-growth alignment of the fabricated SiNW tips is presented, which allows tilt-compensation specifically tailored to the specifications of the used AFM instrumentation. To demonstrate the capability of such soft, high-aspect ratio AFM probes, optical gratings fabricated in GaAs and silver halide fibers were imaged in PFT mode. Additionally, the mechanical stability of these high-aspect AFM probes was evaluated on a sapphire substrate.

  8. Atom probe tomography characterisation of a laser diode structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Samantha E.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Smeeton, Tim M.; Hooper, Stewart E.; Heffernan, Jonathan; Saxey, David W.; Smith, George D. W.

    2012-03-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to achieve three-dimensional characterization of a III-nitride laser diode (LD) structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Four APT data sets have been obtained, with fields of view up to 400 nm in depth and 120 nm in diameter. These data sets contain material from the InGaN quantum well (QW) active region, as well as the surrounding p- and n-doped waveguide and cladding layers, enabling comprehensive study of the structure and composition of the LD structure. Two regions of the same sample, with different average indium contents (18% and 16%) in the QW region, were studied. The APT data are shown to provide easy access to the p-type dopant levels, and the composition of a thin AlGaN barrier layer. Next, the distribution of indium within the InGaN QW was analyzed, to assess any possible inhomogeneity of the distribution of indium (''indium clustering''). No evidence for a statistically significant deviation from a random distribution was found, indicating that these MBE-grown InGaN QWs do not require indium clusters for carrier localization. However, the APT data show steps in the QW interfaces, leading to well-width fluctuations, which may act to localize carriers. Additionally, the unexpected presence of a small amount (x = 0.005) of indium in a layer grown intentionally as GaN was revealed. Finally, the same statistical method applied to the QW was used to show that the indium distribution within a thick InGaN waveguide layer in the n-doped region did not show any deviation from randomness.

  9. Probing nanoscale interactions on biocompatible cluster-assembled titanium oxide surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Varun; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    We report on the investigation of the adhesive properties of cluster-assembled nanostructured TiO(x) (ns-TiO(x)) films against a Si3N4 AFM tip, in air and in water. The interacting AFM tip apex represents a model nanometer-sized probe, carrying both silanol (Si-OH) and silamine (Si2-NH) groups: it is therefore well suited to investigate biologically relevant molecular interactions with the biocompatible ns-TiO(x) surface. Coupling nanosphere lithography with supersonic cluster beam deposition we produced sub-micrometer patterns of ns-TiO(x) on a reference amorphous silica surface. These devices are ideal platforms for conducting comparative nanoscale investigations of molecular interactions between surfaces and specific groups. We have found that in the aqueous medium the adhesion is enhanced on ns-TiO(x) with respect to amorphous silica, opposed to the case of humid air. A comparative analysis of the different interactions channels (van der Waals, electrostatic, chemical bonding) led to the conclusion that the key for understanding this behavior can be the ability of incoming nucleophiles like nitrogen or oxygen on the Si3N4 tip to displace adsorbed molecules on ns-TiO(x) and link to Ti atoms via co-ordinate (dative covalent) bonding. This effect is likely enhanced on nanostructured TiO(x) with respect to crystalline or micro-porous TiO2, due to the greatly increased effective area and porosity. This study provides a clue for the understanding of interaction mechanisms of proteins with biocompatible ns-TiO(x), and in general with metal-oxide surfaces.

  10. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography of Ti/TiN films deposited on Si.

    PubMed

    Sanford, N A; Blanchard, P T; White, R; Vissers, M R; Diercks, D R; Davydov, A V; Pappas, D P

    2017-03-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (L-APT) was used to examine superconducting TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer films with nominal respective thicknesses of 5/5/5 (nm). Such materials are of interest for applications that require large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors. The trilayers were deposited on Si substrates by reactive sputtering. Electron energy loss microscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM/EELS) was used to corroborate the L-APT results and establish the overall thicknesses of the trilayers. Three separate batches were studied where the first (bottom) TiN layer was deposited at 500°C (for all batches) and the subsequent TiN/Ti bilayer was deposited at ambient temperature, 250°C, and 500°C, respectively. L-APT rendered an approximately planar TiN/Si interface by making use of plausible mass-spectral assignments to N3(1+), SiN(1+), and SiO(1+). This was necessary since ambiguities associated with the likely simultaneous occurrence of Si(1+) and N2(1+) prevented their use in rendering the TiN/Si interface upon reconstruction. The non-superconducting Ti2N phase was also revealed by L-APT. Neither L-APT nor STEM/EELS rendered sharp Ti/TiN interfaces and the contrast between these layers diminished with increased film deposition temperature. L-APT also revealed that hydrogen was present in varying degrees in all samples including control samples that were composed of single layers of Ti or TiN. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Probing Deviations From Traditional Colloid Filtration Theory by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R. S.; Reno, M. D.; Altman, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding colloid transport through saturated media is an integral component of predicting the fate and transport of groundwater contaminants. Developing sound predictive capabilities and establishing effective methodologies for remediation relies heavily on our ability to understand the physical and chemical mechanisms controlling colloid attachment and detachment. Colloid filtration theory (CFT) has been ubiquitously employed to describe particle advection, dispersion, and deposition in saturated media and predicts an exponential decrease in colloid concentration with travel distance from the source. Colloid depositional behavior can be further understood through consideration of Derjaguin Landau Verwey Overbeek (DLVO) interactions. Recent studies give evidence for significant deviations from traditional CFT in the presence of repulsive DLVO interactions. Deposition in the secondary energy minimum has been suggested as a mechanism to explain the observed deviations. This work reports on attempts to quantify the secondary energy minimum as predicted by DLVO theory using direct measurements obtained by atomic force microscopy. The colloid probe technique is used to directly measure the force of interaction between a single carboxylate modified polystyrene latex microsphere and a model collector surface in electrolyte solutions of varying ionic strength. Systematic variations in the size of the microsphere and the ionic strength of the electrolyte solutions yield force measurements that are compared to theoretical predictions and the experimental results of others. The importance of proper sample characterization and cleaning in obtaining meaningful measurements is emphasized. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  12. Corrigendum to ;Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R.E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    In our recent paper entitled ;Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel;[1], we make reference to a table within the article as providing the average compositions of the precipitates, when in fact the bulk compositions were given. In this correction, we present the average precipitate compositions for the data presented in Ref. [1]. These correct compositions are provided for information and do not alter the conclusions of the original manuscript.

  13. Piezoelectric tuning fork probe for atomic force microscopy imaging and specific recognition force spectroscopy of an enzyme and its ligand.

    PubMed

    Makky, Ali; Viel, Pascal; Chen, Shu-wen Wendy; Berthelot, Thomas; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Piezoelectric quartz tuning fork has drawn the attention of many researchers for the development of new atomic force microscopy (AFM) self-sensing probes. However, only few works have been done for soft biological materials imaging in air or aqueous conditions. The aim of this work was to demonstrate the efficiency of the AFM tuning fork probe to perform high-resolution imaging of proteins and to study the specific interaction between a ligand and its receptor in aqueous media. Thus, a new kind of self-sensing AFM sensor was introduced to realize imaging and biochemical specific recognition spectroscopy of glucose oxidase enzyme using a new chemical functionalization procedure of the metallic tips based on the electrochemical reduction of diazonium salt. This scanning probe as well as the functionalization strategy proved to be efficient respectively for the topography and force spectroscopy of soft biological materials in buffer conditions.

  14. Combining colloidal probe atomic force and reflection interference contrast microscopy to study the compressive mechanics of hyaluronan brushes.

    PubMed

    Attili, Seetharamaiah; Richter, Ralf P

    2012-02-14

    We describe a method that combines colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) to characterize the mechanical properties of thin and solvated polymer films. When analyzing polymer films, a fundamental problem in colloidal probe AFM experiments is to determine the distance at closest approach between the probe and the substrate on which the film is deposited. By combining AFM and RICM in situ, forces and absolute distances can be measured simultaneously. Using the combined setup, we quantify the compressive mechanics of films of the polysaccharide hyaluronan that is end-grafted to a supported lipid bilayer. The experimental data, and comparison with polymer theory, show that hyaluronan films are well-described as elastic, very soft and highly solvated polymer brushes. The data on these well-defined films should be a useful reference for the investigation of the more complex hyaluronan-rich coats that surround many living cells.

  15. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  16. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmaier, A.; Aboulfadl, H.; Pfaff, M.; Mücklich, F.; Motz, C.

    2015-02-15

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. - Highlights: • Structural evolution in a deformed Cu–Co composite is studied on all length scales. • Amount of intermixing is examined by atom-probe tomography. • Supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in Cu are observed.

  17. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; ...

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  18. Simulation of field-induced molecular dissociation in atom-probe tomography: Identification of a neutral emission channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanuttini, David; Blum, Ivan; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Vurpillot, François; Douady, Julie; Jacquet, Emmanuelle; Anglade, Pierre-Matthieu; Gervais, Benoit

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of dicationic metal-oxide molecules under large electric-field conditions, on the basis of ab initio calculations coupled to molecular dynamics. Applied to the case of ZnO2 + in the field of atom probe tomography (APT), our simulation reveals the dissociation into three distinct exit channels. The proportions of these channels depend critically on the field strength and on the initial molecular orientation with respect to the field. For typical field strength used in APT experiments, an efficient dissociation channel leads to emission of neutral oxygen atoms, which escape detection. The calculated composition biases and their dependence on the field strength show remarkable consistency with recent APT experiments on ZnO crystals. Our work shows that bond breaking in strong static fields may lead to significant neutral atom production, and therefore to severe elemental composition biases in measurements.

  19. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  20. Inhomogeneous distribution of manganese atoms in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films on InP revealed by three-dimensional atom probe investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Uchitomi, Naotaka Inoue, Hiroaki; Kato, Takahiro; Toyota, Hideyuki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2015-05-07

    Atomic-scale Mn distributions in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films grown on InP substrates have been studied by applying three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) microscopy. It is found that Mn atoms in cross-sectional 3DAP maps show the presence of inhomogeneities in Mn distribution, which is characteristic patterns of a spinoidal decomposition phase with slightly high and low concentration regions. The high Mn concentration regions are expected to be coherently clustered MnAs in the zinc-blende structure, resulting in the formation of Mn-As random connecting patterns. The origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn on InP can be well explained by the formation of atomic-scale magnetic clustering by spinoidal decomposition without breaking the continuity of the zinc-blende structure, which has been suggested by previous theoretical works. The lattice-matching between magnetic epi-layers and substrates should be one of the most important factors to avoid the formation of secondary hexagonal MnAs phase precipitates in preparing ferromagnetic semiconductor thin films.

  1. Investigation of olivine and orthopyroxene grain boundaries by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, M.; Skemer, P. A.; Bachhav, M.; Dong, Y.; Marquis, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate chemical analysis at grain boundaries is challenging by traditional microscopic techniques, especially for poor conducting geological samples. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a unique technique that can elucidate chemistry and 3-D distribution of elements within a sample volume at the sub-nanometer length scale. With advances in laser and sample preparation techniques in the last decade, APT is now successfully applied to a wide range of poor conducting materials like metal oxides, ceramics, and biological minerals. In this study, we apply the APT technique to investigate the grain boundary chemistry of orthopyroxene (opx) and olivine. These minerals are the most abundant in the upper mantle and their grain boundaries may be important geochemical reservoirs in Earth. Moreover, physical properties such as grain boundary diffusivity, conductivity, and mobility, are likely influenced by the presence or absence of impurities. Single crystals of opx and olivine grains, separated from a San Carlos xenolith, were deformed at 1 GPa and 1500 K. Plastic deformation promoted dynamic recrystallization, creating new grain boundaries within a chemically homogeneous medium. Needle shaped specimens of opx-opx and olivine-olivine grain boundaries were prepared using standard lift out techniques and a dual beam focused ion beam (FIB). APT analyses were performed in laser mode with laser energy of 50 pJ/pulse, repetition rate of 200 kHz, and detection rate of 1%. A 3-D distribution of elements was reconstructed and 1-D profiles across the grain boundary have been calculated. Fe, Al, and Ca show enrichments at the grain boundaries for both phases, consistent with previous studies that used STEM/EDX or EPMA techniques. Although qualitatively similar, the spatial resolution of the APT method is significantly better than other methods, and our data show that the grain-boundary enrichment of minor elements in both olivine and pyroxene compositions is limited to a region no greater

  2. Investigations of ion-irradiated uranium dioxide nuclear fuel with laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy

    Performance in commercial light water reactors is dictated by the ability of its fuel material, uranium dioxide (UO2), to transport heat generated during the fission process. It is widely known that the service lifetime is limited by irradiation-induced microstructural changes that degrade the thermal performance of UO2. Studying the role of complex, often interacting mechanisms that occur during the early stages of microstructural evolution presents a challenge. Phenomena of particular interest are the segregation of fission products to form bubbles and their resultant effect on grain boundary (GB) mobility, and the effect of irradiation on fuel stoichiometry. Each mechanism has a profound consequence on fuel thermal conductivity. Several advanced analytical techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etc. have been used to study these mechanisms. However, they each have limitations and cannot individually provide the necessary information for deeper understanding. One technique that has been under utilized is atom probe tomography (APT), which has a unique ability to spatially resolve small-scale chemical variations. APT uses the principle of field ionization to evaporate surface ions for chemical analysis. For low electrical conductivity systems, a pulsed laser is used to thermally assist in the evaporation process. One factor complicating the analysis is that laser-material interactions are poorly understood for oxide materials and literature using this technique with UO2 is lacking. Therefore, an initial systematic study to identify the optimal conditions for the analysis of UO2 using laser-assisted APT was conducted. A comparative study on the evaporation behavior between CeO2 and UO2 was followed. CeO2 was chosen due to its technological relevancy and availability of comparative studies with laser-assisted APT. Dissimilar evaporation behavior between these materials was identified and attributed

  3. Probing quantum confinement at the atomic scale with optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, James G.

    2001-09-01

    Near-band-gap circularly polarized excitation in III-V semiconductors provides spin-polarized electrons that transfer spin order to lattice nuclei via fluctuations in the contact hyperfine interaction. This process of optical nuclear polarization and the complementary technique of optical detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide extreme sensitivity enhancement and spatial selectivity in structured samples, enabling collection of NMR spectra from samples such as single quantum wells or dots containing as few as ˜105 nuclei. Combining these advances with novel techniques for high spectral resolution, we have probed quantum-confined electronic states near the interface of a single epitaxially grown Al1-x As/GaAs (x = 0.36) heterojunction. Using a novel strategy that we refer to as POWER (p&barbelow;erturbations o&barbelow;bserved w&barbelow;ith e&barbelow;nhanced ṟesolution) NMR, multiple-pulse time suspension is synchronized with bandgap optical irradiation to reveal spectra of effective spin Hamiltonians that are differences between those of the occupied and unoccupied photoexcited electronic state. The underlying NMR linewidth is reduced by three orders of magnitude in these experiments, enabling resolution of an asymmetric line shape due to light-induced hyperfine interactions. The results are successfully fit with the coherent nuclear spin evolution and relaxation theoretically expected for sites distributed over the volume of an electronic excitation weakly localized at a point defect. This analysis establishes a one-to-one relationship, which can be used to follow nuclear spin diffusion, between optical Knight shift and the radial position of lattice nuclei. We have also introduced POWER NMR techniques to characterize the change in electric field associated with cycling from light-on to light-off states via a linear quadrupole Stark effect (LQSE) of the nuclear spins. Simulations of these NMR spectra in terms of the radial electric fields of

  4. The effect orientation of features in reconstructed atom probe data on the resolution and measured composition of T1 plates in an A2198 aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Maria A; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Artefacts in atom probe tomography can impact the compositional analysis of microstructure in atom probe studies. To determine the integrity of information obtained, it is essential to understand how the positioning of features influences compositional analysis. By investigating the influence of feature orientation within atom probe data on measured composition in microstructural features within an AA2198 Al alloy, this study shows differences in the composition of T1 (Al2CuLi) plates that indicates imperfections in atom probe reconstructions. The data fits a model of an exponentially-modified Gaussian that scales with the difference in evaporation field between solutes and matrix. This information provides a guide for obtaining the most accurate information possible.

  5. Probing nanoconfined water in zeolite cages: H atom dynamics and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemerisov, S. D.; Trifunac, A. D.

    2001-10-01

    Time-resolved and CW EPR were used to study radiolytically generated H atoms in water/ice nanoclusters in NaA, NaX, NaY, and HY zeolites. H atoms dynamic properties and spectroscopy parameters are sensitive to the structural changes of water due to the nanoconfinement. Transient H atoms in HY and NaY zeolites segregate into two different domains: sodalite and super cages. In NaX zeolite only H atoms from super cages were observed. H atoms are created in both silica phase and adsorbed water by radiolytic processes. The decay of H atoms occurs predominantly via reaction with the radiation-induced defects in silica.

  6. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-26

    Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

  7. Experimental artefacts occurring during atom probe tomography analysis of oxide nanoparticles in metallic matrix: Quantification and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzoglou, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2017-08-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising candidates for future nuclear reactors, partly due to the fine dispersion of the nanoparticles they contain. Until now, there was no consensus as to the nature of the nanoparticles because their analysis pushed the techniques to their limits and in consequence, introduced some artefacts. In this study, the artefacts that occur during atom probe tomography analysis are quantified. The artefacts quantification reveals that the particles morphology, chemical composition and atomic density are biased. A model is suggested to correct these artefacts in order to obtain a fine and accurate characterization of the nanoparticles. This model is based on volume fraction calculation and an analytical expression of the atomic density. Then, the studied ODS steel reveals nanoparticles, pure in Y, Ti and O, with a core/shell structure. The shell is rich in Cr. The Cr content of the shell is dependent on that of the matrix by a factor of 1.5. This study also shows that 15% of the atoms that were initially in the particles are not detected during the analysis. This only affects O atoms. The particle stoichiometry evolves from YTiO2 for the smallest observed (<2 nm) to Y2TiO5 for the biggest (>8 nm).

  8. Application of colloid probe atomic force microscopy to the adhesion of thin films of viscous and viscoelastic silicone fluids.

    PubMed

    Bowen, James; Cheneler, David; Andrews, James W; Avery, Andrew R; Zhang, Zhibing; Ward, Michael C L; Adams, Michael J

    2011-09-20

    The adhesive characteristics of thin films (0.2-2 μm) of linear poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) liquids with a wide range of molecular weights have been measured using an atomic force microscope with a colloid probe (diameters 5 and 12 μm) for different separation velocities. The data were consistent with a residual film in the contact region having a thickness of ∼6 nm following an extended dwell time before separation of the probe. It was possible to estimate the maximum adhesive force as a function of the capillary number, Ca, by applying existing theoretical models based on capillary interactions and viscous flow except at large values of Ca in the case of viscoelastic fluids, for which it was necessary to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model. The compliance of the atomic force microscope colloid beam was an important factor in governing the retraction velocity of the probe and therefore the value of the adhesive force, but the inertia of the beam and viscoelastic stress overshoot effects were not significant in the range of separation velocities investigated.

  9. Advancement of Compositional and Microstructural Design of Intermetallic γ-TiAl Based Alloys Determined by Atom Probe Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas; Clemens, Helmut; Mayer, Svea

    2016-01-01

    Advanced intermetallic alloys based on the γ-TiAl phase have become widely regarded as most promising candidates to replace heavier Ni-base superalloys as materials for high-temperature structural components, due to their facilitating properties of high creep and oxidation resistance in combination with a low density. Particularly, recently developed alloying concepts based on a β-solidification pathway, such as the so-called TNM alloy, which are already incorporated in aircraft engines, have emerged offering the advantage of being processible using near-conventional methods and the option to attain balanced mechanical properties via subsequent heat-treatment. Development trends for the improvement of alloying concepts, especially dealing with issues regarding alloying element distribution, nano-scale phase characterization, phase stability, and phase formation mechanisms demand the utilization of high-resolution techniques, mainly due to the multi-phase nature of advanced TiAl alloys. Atom probe tomography (APT) offers unique possibilities of characterizing chemical compositions with a high spatial resolution and has, therefore, been widely used in recent years with the aim of understanding the materials constitution and appearing basic phenomena on the atomic scale and applying these findings to alloy development. This review, thus, aims at summarizing scientific works regarding the application of atom probe tomography towards the understanding and further development of intermetallic TiAl alloys. PMID:28773880

  10. Atom probe tomography study of alloying element distributions in Zr alloys and their oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan; Motta, Arthur T.; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.

    2013-11-01

    A detailed study of alloying element distributions in the metal and oxygen rich regions of corroded Zr alloys and of the phases formed ahead of the oxide front was conducted using atom probe tomography (APT). A consistent sequence of sub-oxide phases is observed ahead of the ZrO2 oxide front, consisting of (i) a thin layer of equiatomic ZrO (occasionally slightly over and under stoichiometric) (ii) saturated solid solution Zr(O)sat, and (iii) a slowly decreasing oxygen profile into the metal. The results also show that the distribution of the alloying elements in the metal is more inhomogeneous than previously thought and that in the oxygen-rich phases enhanced segregation is observed, compared to the metal. the stable oxide ZrO2 (which is in contact with water), the equiatomic suboxide ZrO (both slightly sub and superstoichiometric, denoted here ZrO1+x and ZrO1-x), a saturated solution of constant oxygen content at about 30% O, denoted Zr(O)sat, and an undersaturated solid solution of O in Zr, denoted Zr(O), the oxygen content of which decreases with distance from the oxide-metal interface. As stated above, the field evaporation behavior of these phases is drastically different, resulting in characteristic ions being evaporated from each phase. As a result, the phases can be identified both by atomic concentrations and by the nature of the ionic species evaporating from each phase. The latter method was also used to visualize the distribution of phases within needles. For example, it was found in the present study that oxygen was evaporated as O+, O2+, ZrO2+, ZrO3+, ZrO2+,ZrO22+,ZrO3+ with occasional instances of ZrO23+ and ZrO33+ observed. Zr ions (Zr2+, Zr3+) become significant in the Zr(O)sat phase. O2+ is only observed in the oxide (ZrO2) phase, so it is considered a marker for that phase. ZrO2+ and ZrO22+ are present both in the ZrO2 and ZrO1+x phases but absent in the ZrO1-x, Zr(O)sat and Zr(O) phase. the equiatomic ZrO phase (observed as both ZrO1+x and Zr

  11. Ultrafast probing of ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Bünermann, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg; Haxton, Daniel J; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-12-07

    The ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets are studied with time-resolved extreme ultraviolet ion imaging spectroscopy. At excitation energies of 23.6 ± 0.2 eV, Rydberg atoms in n = 3 and n = 4 states are ejected on different time scales and with significantly different kinetic energy distributions. Specifically, n = 3 Rydberg atoms are ejected with kinetic energies as high as 0.85 eV, but their appearance is delayed by approximately 200 fs. In contrast, n = 4 Rydberg atoms appear within the time resolution of the experiment with considerably lower kinetic energies. Major features in the Rydberg atom kinetic energy distributions for both principal quantum numbers can be described within a simple elastic scattering model of localized perturbed atomic Rydberg atoms that are expelled from the droplet due to their repulsive interaction with the surrounding helium bath. Time-dependent kinetic energy distributions of He(2) (+) and He(3) (+) ions are presented that support the formation of molecular ions in an indirect droplet ionization process and the ejection of neutral Rydberg dimers on a similar time scale as the n = 3 Rydberg atoms.

  12. Effect of the tip state during qPlus noncontact atomic force microscopy of Si(100) at 5 K: Probing the probe

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Sam; Danza, Rosanna; Moriarty, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now regularly produces atomic-resolution images on a wide range of surfaces, and has demonstrated the capability for atomic manipulation solely using chemical forces. Nonetheless, the role of the tip apex in both imaging and manipulation remains poorly understood and is an active area of research both experimentally and theoretically. Recent work employing specially functionalised tips has provided additional impetus to elucidating the role of the tip apex in the observed contrast. Results: We present an analysis of the influence of the tip apex during imaging of the Si(100) substrate in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at 5 K using a qPlus sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Data demonstrating stable imaging with a range of tip apexes, each with a characteristic imaging signature, have been acquired. By imaging at close to zero applied bias we eliminate the influence of tunnel current on the force between tip and surface, and also the tunnel-current-induced excitation of silicon dimers, which is a key issue in scanning probe studies of Si(100). Conclusion: A wide range of novel imaging mechanisms are demonstrated on the Si(100) surface, which can only be explained by variations in the precise structural configuration at the apex of the tip. Such images provide a valuable resource for theoreticians working on the development of realistic tip structures for NC-AFM simulations. Force spectroscopy measurements show that the tip termination critically affects both the short-range force and dissipated energy. PMID:22428093

  13. Effect of the tip state during qPlus noncontact atomic force microscopy of Si(100) at 5 K: Probing the probe.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Adam; Jarvis, Sam; Danza, Rosanna; Moriarty, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now regularly produces atomic-resolution images on a wide range of surfaces, and has demonstrated the capability for atomic manipulation solely using chemical forces. Nonetheless, the role of the tip apex in both imaging and manipulation remains poorly understood and is an active area of research both experimentally and theoretically. Recent work employing specially functionalised tips has provided additional impetus to elucidating the role of the tip apex in the observed contrast. We present an analysis of the influence of the tip apex during imaging of the Si(100) substrate in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at 5 K using a qPlus sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Data demonstrating stable imaging with a range of tip apexes, each with a characteristic imaging signature, have been acquired. By imaging at close to zero applied bias we eliminate the influence of tunnel current on the force between tip and surface, and also the tunnel-current-induced excitation of silicon dimers, which is a key issue in scanning probe studies of Si(100). A wide range of novel imaging mechanisms are demonstrated on the Si(100) surface, which can only be explained by variations in the precise structural configuration at the apex of the tip. Such images provide a valuable resource for theoreticians working on the development of realistic tip structures for NC-AFM simulations. Force spectroscopy measurements show that the tip termination critically affects both the short-range force and dissipated energy.

  14. Probing the quantum vacuum with an artificial atom in front of a mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, I.-C.; Kockum, A. F.; Tornberg, L.; Pourkabirian, A.; Johansson, G.; Delsing, P.; Wilson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the vacuum are both a surprising and fundamental phenomenon of nature. Understood as virtual photons, they still have a very real impact, for instance, in the Casimir effects and the lifetimes of atoms. Engineering vacuum fluctuations is therefore becoming increasingly important to emerging technologies. Here, we shape vacuum fluctuations using a superconducting circuit analogue of a mirror, creating regions in space where they are suppressed. Moving an artificial atom through these regions and measuring the spontaneous emission lifetime of the atom provides us with the spectral density of the vacuum fluctuations. Using the paradigm of waveguide quantum electrodynamics, we significantly improve over previous studies of the interaction of an atom with its mirror image, observing a spectral density as low as 0.02 quanta, a factor of 50 below the mirrorless result. This demonstrates that we can hide the atom from the vacuum, even though it is exposed in free space.

  15. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon films: insulation material for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Wiedemair, Justyna; Balu, Balamurali; Moon, Jong-Seok; Hess, Dennis W; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2008-07-01

    Pinhole-free insulation of micro- and nanoelectrodes is the key to successful microelectrochemical experiments performed in vivo or in combination with scanning probe experiments. A novel insulation technique based on fluorocarbon insulation layers deposited from pentafluoroethane (PFE, CF3CHF2) plasmas is presented as a promising electrical insulation approach for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) probes. The deposition allows reproducible and uniform coating, which is essential for many analytical applications of micro- and nanoelectrodes such as, e.g., in vivo experiments and SECM experiments. Disk-shaped microelectrodes and frame-shaped AFM tip-integrated electrodes have been fabricated by postinsulation focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The thin insulation layer for combined AFM-SECM probes renders this fabrication technique particularly useful for submicro insulation providing radius ratios of the outer insulation versus the disk electrode (RG values) suitable for SECM experiments. Characterization of PFE-insulated AFM-SECM probes will be presented along with combined AFM-SECM approach curves and imaging.

  16. Cross-Sectional Investigations on Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells by Kelvin and Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Illumination.

    PubMed

    Narchi, Paul; Alvarez, Jose; Chrétien, Pascal; Picardi, Gennaro; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Prod'homme, Patricia; Kleider, Jean-Paul; I Cabarrocas, Pere Roca

    2016-12-01

    Both surface photovoltage and photocurrent enable to assess the effect of visible light illumination on the electrical behavior of a solar cell. We report on photovoltage and photocurrent measurements with nanometer scale resolution performed on the cross section of an epitaxial crystalline silicon solar cell, using respectively Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Even though two different setups are used, the scans were performed on locations within 100-μm distance in order to compare data from the same area and provide a consistent interpretation. In both measurements, modifications under illumination are observed in accordance with the theory of PIN junctions. Moreover, an unintentional doping during the deposition of the epitaxial silicon intrinsic layer in the solar cell is suggested from the comparison between photovoltage and photocurrent measurements.

  17. Probing the nanoscale Schottky barrier of metal/semiconductor interfaces of Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sangku; Lee, Seon Joo; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Youngkeun; Song, Hyunjoon; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-08-07

    The electrical nature of the nanoscale contact between metal nanodots and semiconductor rods has drawn significant interest because of potential applications for metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures in energy conversion or heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we studied the nanoscale electrical character of the Pt/CdSe junction in Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells on connected Au islands by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy under ultra-high vacuum. Current-voltage plots measured in contact mode revealed Schottky barrier heights of individual nanojunctions of 0.41 ± 0.02 eV. The measured value of the Schottky barrier is significantly lower than that of planar thin-film diodes because of a reduction in the barrier width and enhanced tunneling probability at the interface.

  18. Role of Photoexcitation and Field Ionization in the Measurement of Accurate Oxide Stoichiometry by Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Hess, Wayne P.; Perea, Daniel E.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-03-06

    Pulsed lasers extend the high spatial and mass resolution of atom probe tomography (APT) to non-conducting materials, such as oxides. For prototypical metal oxide MgO, measured stoichiometry depends strongly upon pulse energy and applied voltage. Very low laser energies (0.02 pJ) and high electric fields yield optimal stoichiometric accuracy, attributed to the field-dependent ionization of photo-desorbed O or O2 neutrals. This emphasizes the importance of considering electronic excitations in APT analysis of oxides ionic materials.

  19. Nanofabrication technique based on localized photocatalytic reactions using a TiO2-coated atomic force microscopy probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takayuki; Iio, Naohiro; Furukawa, Hiromi; Nagai, Moeto

    2017-02-01

    We performed a fundamental study on the photocatalytic degradation of fluorescently labeled DNA molecules immobilized on titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films under ultraviolet irradiation. The films were prepared by the electrochemical anodization of Ti thin films sputtered on silicon substrates. We also confirmed that the photocurrent arising from the photocatalytic oxidation of DNA molecules can be detected during this process. We then demonstrated an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanofabrication technique by employing TiO2-coated AFM probes to penetrate living cell membranes under near-physiological conditions for minimally invasive intracellular delivery.

  20. Toward an accurate quantification in atom probe tomography reconstruction by correlative electron tomography approach on nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Isabelle; Printemps, Tony; Grenier, Adeline; Gambacorti, Narciso; Pinna, Elisa; Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Vacca, Annalisa; Mula, Guido

    2017-11-01

    In this contribution, we propose a protocol for analysis and accurate reconstruction of nanoporous materials by atom probe tomography (APT). The existence of several holes in porous materials makes both the direct APT analysis and reconstruction almost inaccessible. In the past, a solution has been proposed by filling pores with electron beam-induced deposition. Here, we present an alternative solution using an electro-chemical method allowing to fill even small and dense pores, making APT analysis possible. Concerning the 3D reconstruction, the microstructural features observed by electron tomography are used to finely calibrate the APT reconstruction parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Predoping effects of boron and phosphorous on arsenic diffusion along grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicon investigated by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Nozawa, Yasuko; Toyama, Takeshi; Yano, Fumiko; Inoue, Masao; Nishida, Akio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effect of P or B predoping on As diffusion in polycrystalline Si was investigated by atom probe tomography. In all samples, a high concentration of As was found at grain boundaries, indicating that such boundaries are the main diffusion path. However, As grain-boundary diffusion was suppressed in the B-doped sample and enhanced in the P-doped sample. In a sample codoped with both P and B, As diffusion was somewhat enhanced, indicating competition between the effects of the two dopants. The results suggest that As grain-boundary diffusion can be controlled by varying the local concentration of P or B.

  2. Long-term thermal stability of nanoclusters in ODS-Eurofer steel: An atom probe tomography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilnyk, K. D.; Pradeep, K. G.; Choi, P.; Sandim, H. R. Z.; Raabe, D.

    2017-08-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened materials are important candidates for several high-temperature structural applications in advanced nuclear power plants. Most of the desirable mechanical properties presented by these materials are due to the dispersion of stable nanoparticles in the matrix. Samples of ODS-Eurofer steel were annealed for 4320 h (6 months) at 800 °C. The material was characterized using atom probe tomography in both conditions (prior and after heat treatment). The particles number density, size distribution, and chemical compositions were determined. No significant changes were observed between the two conditions indicating a high thermal stability of the Y-rich nanoparticles at 800 °C.

  3. Probing the dynamic structure factor of a neutral Fermi superfluid along the BCS-BEC crossover using atomic impurity qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchison, Mark T.; Johnson, Tomi H.; Jaksch, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    We study an impurity atom trapped by an anharmonic potential, immersed within a cold atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions that realizes the crossover from a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluid to a Bose-Einstein condensate. Considering the qubit comprising the lowest two vibrational energy eigenstates of the impurity, we demonstrate that its dynamics probes the equilibrium density fluctuations encoded in the dynamic structure factor of the superfluid. Observing the impurity's evolution is thus shown to facilitate nondestructive measurements of the superfluid order parameter and the contact between collective and single-particle excitation spectra. Our setup constitutes a model of an open quantum system interacting with a thermal reservoir, the latter supporting both bosonic and fermionic excitations that are also coupled to each other.

  4. Variation of local atomic structure due to devitrification of Ni-Zr alloy thin films probed by EXAFS measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Debarati Basu, S.; Tiwari, Nidhi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S. N.

    2016-05-23

    Thin film metallic glasses (TFMGs) exhibit properties superior to their bulk counterparts allowing them to be potentially useful in many practical applications. Apart from their technological interest, when converted to crystallized state (devitrification) TFMGs can also act as precursors for partially crystallized or fully crystallized forms. Such devitrified forms are attractive due to their novel structural and magnetic properties. The amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of co-sputtered Ni-Zr alloy thin films through annealing was studied using EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements. Investigation through an atomic probe gives a better insight into the local environment of the atomic species, rendering a deeper understanding of thermal evolution of such materials.

  5. Pure and conformal CVD nickel and nickel monosilicide in high-aspect-ratio structures analyzed by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kecheng; Feng, Jun; Kwak, Junkeun; Yang, Jing; Gordon, Roy G.

    2017-05-01

    Low-resistance and uniform contacts are needed for modern 3-D silicon transistors. The formation of high-quality and conformal nickel silicide at the interface between silicon and metal contacts is a possible solution. Direct-liquid-evaporation chemical vapor deposition is used to deposit nickel films conformally inside narrow silicon trenches. The deposited Ni is then reacted with a silicon substrate to form nickel monosilicide. Atom probe tomography (APT) is used to find and count the atoms in nanoscale regions inside these 3-D structures. APT shows that these NiSi films are stoichiometrically pure, single-phase, and conformal even inside trenches with high aspect ratios. The APT technique measures all impurities, including carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, to have concentrations less than 0.1 at. %.

  6. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: probing atomic structure in situ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R; Reiche, Helmut M; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  7. Atom probe study on microstructure change in severely deformed pearlitic steels: application to rail surfaces and drawn wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Pearlitic steel is used as the material for high tensile steel wires, rails and wheels due to its high work hardening and wear resistance. These properties arise from a layered structure comprising deformable lamellar ferrite and hard lamellar cementite. This paper reviews the microstructural change in heavily drawn pearlitic steels wires and worn surfaces of pearlitic rails using atom probe tomography analysis. The cementite decomposition mechanism was elucidated for heavily drawn pearlitic steel wires. For pearlitic rail steels, atomic scale characterization of worn surfaces and of the white etching layer (WEL) were performed, and a mechanism for the formation of the WEL was proposed. The differences and similarities in microstructure and in the state of the cementite in these severely deformed pearlitic steels are discussed.

  8. Mg I as a probe of the solar chromosphere - The atomic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a complete atomic model for Mg I line synthesis, where all the atomic parameters are based on recent experimental and theoretical data. It is shown how the computed profiles at 4571 A and 5173 A are influenced by the choice of these parameters and the number of levels included in the model atom. In addition, observed profiles of the 5173 A b2 line and theoretical profiles for comparison (based on a recent atmospheric model for the average quiet sun) are presented.

  9. Mg I as a probe of the solar chromosphere - The atomic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a complete atomic model for Mg I line synthesis, where all the atomic parameters are based on recent experimental and theoretical data. It is shown how the computed profiles at 4571 A and 5173 A are influenced by the choice of these parameters and the number of levels included in the model atom. In addition, observed profiles of the 5173 A b2 line and theoretical profiles for comparison (based on a recent atmospheric model for the average quiet sun) are presented.

  10. Return to the Origin as a Probe of Atomic Phase Coherence.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, Clément; Manai, Isam; Chicireanu, Radu; Clément, Jean-François; Zemmouri, Samir; Garreau, Jean Claude; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Lemarié, Gabriel; Cherroret, Nicolas; Delande, Dominique

    2017-05-05

    We report on the observation of the coherent enhancement of the return probability ["enhanced return to the origin" (ERO)] in a periodically kicked cold-atom gas. By submitting an atomic wave packet to a pulsed, periodically shifted, laser standing wave, we induce an oscillation of ERO in time that is explained in terms of a periodic, reversible dephasing in the weak-localization interference sequences responsible for ERO. Monitoring the temporal decay of ERO, we exploit its quantum-coherent nature to quantify the decoherence rate of the atomic system.

  11. Atomic probe microscopy of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckl, A. J.; Roth, M. D.; Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The surface of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates has been studied by atomic probe microscopy in air. Atomic-scale images of the 3C SiC surface have been obtained by STM which confirm the 111 line type orientation of the cubic 3C layer grown on the 0001 plane type surface of the hexagonal 6H substrate. The nearest-neighbor atomic spacing for the 3C layer has been measured to be 3.29 +/- 0.2 A, which is within 7 percent of the bulk value. Shallow terraces in the 3C layer have been observed by STM to separate regions of very smooth growth in the vicinity of the 3C nucleation point from considerably rougher 3C surface regions. These terraces are oriented at right angles to the growth direction. Atomic force microscopy has been used to study etch pits present on the 6H substrate due to high temperature HCl cleaning prior to CVD growth of the 3C layer. The etch pits have hexagonal symmetry and vary in depth from 50 nm to 1 micron.

  12. Probing Electronic States of Magnetic Semiconductors Using Atomic Scale Microscopy & Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor can be used as a versatile platform for creating a topological superconductor . These initial...topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in a chain of magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor Students and postdocs supported...of this grant: 1. H. Beidenkopf, P . Roushan, and A. Yazdani, “Visualizing topological surface states and their novel properties using scanning

  13. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Amirifar, Nooshin; Lardé, Rodrigue Talbot, Etienne; Pareige, Philippe; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lorenzo; Houard, Jonathan; Castro, Celia; Sallet, Vincent; Zehani, Emir; Hassani, Said; Sartel, Corine; Ziani, Ahmed; Portier, Xavier

    2015-12-07

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials.

  14. Coaxial atomic force microscope probes for dielectrophoresis of DNA under different buffer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yinglei; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a coaxial AFM nanoprobe device for dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of DNA molecules in Tris-EDTA (TE) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffers. The DEP properties of 20 nm polystyrene beads were studied with coaxial probes in media with different conductivities. Due to the special geometry of our DEP probe device, sufficiently high electric fields were generated at the probe end to focus DNA molecules with positive DEP. DEP trapping for both polystyrene beads and DNA molecules was quantitatively analyzed over the frequency range from 100 kHz to 50 MHz and compared with the Clausius-Mossotti theory. Finally, we discussed the negative effect of medium salinity during DEP trapping.

  15. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-08

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  16. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  17. Parameters affecting the adhesion strength between a living cell and a colloid probe when measured by the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Cathy E; Pyo, Nayoung; Tanaka, Saaya; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kanda, Yoichi; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-03-15

    In this study, we used the colloid probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to investigate the adhesion force between a living cell and a silica colloid particle in a Leibovitz's L-15 medium (L-15). The L-15 liquid maintained the pharmaceutical conditions necessary to keep the cells alive in the outside environment during the AFM experiment. The force curves in such a system showed a steric repulsion in the compression force curve, due to the compression of the cells by the colloid probe, and an adhesion force in the decompression force curve, due to binding events between the cell and the probe. We also investigated for the first time how the position on the cell surface, the strength of the pushing force, and the residence time of the probe at the cell surface individually affected the adhesion force between a living cell and a 6.84 microm diameter silica colloid particle in L-15. The position of measuring the force on the cell surface was seen not to affect the value of the maximum adhesion force. The loading force was also seen not to notably affect the value of the maximum adhesion force, if it was small enough not to pierce and damage the cell. The residence time of the probe at the cell surface, however, clearly affected the adhesion force, where a longer residence time gave a larger maximum force. From these results, we could conclude that the AFM force measurements should be made using a loading force small enough not to damage the cell and a fixed residence time, when comparing results of different systems.

  18. An atomic force microscopy study of DNA hairpin probes monolabelled with gold nanoparticle: Grafting and hybridization on oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalley, V.; Chaudouët, P.; Stambouli, V.

    2007-12-01

    First and original results are reported regarding the surface evolution of two kinds of oxide film after covalent grafting and hybridization of hairpin oligonucleotide probes. These hairpin probes were monolabelled with a 1.4 nm gold nanoparticle. One kind of oxide film was rough Sb doped SnO 2 oxide film and the other kind was smooth SiO 2 film. Same process of covalent grafting, involving a silanization step, was performed on both oxide surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the evolution of each oxide surface after different steps of the process: functionalization, probe grafting and hybridization. In the case of rough SnO 2 films, a slight decrease of the roughness was observed after each step whereas in the case of smooth SiO 2 films, a maximum of roughness was obtained after probe grafting. Step height measurements of grafted probes could be performed on SiO 2 leading to an apparent thickness of around 3.7 ± 1.0 nm. After hybridization, on the granular surface of SnO 2, by coupling AFM with SEM FEG analyses, dispersed and well-resolved groups of gold nanoparticles linked to DNA duplexes could be observed. Their density varied from 6.6 ± 0.3 × 10 10 to 2.3 ± 0.3 × 10 11 dots cm -2. On the contrary, on smooth SiO 2 surface, the DNA duplexes behave like a dense carpet of globular structures with a density of 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10 11 globular structures cm -2.

  19. An atom-probe investigation of some correlated phase transformations in Cr, Ni, Mo containing supersaturated ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danoix, F.; Auger, P.; Blavette, D.

    1992-04-01

    At 300-400°C aged ferrite of duplex stainless steels may undergo complex demixing processes which depend on the alloying element nature and content. In addition to the spinodal decomposition of the δ ferrite solid-solution into α (Fe-rich) and α' (Cr-rich) domains, which characterizes the unmixing process, variations in the alloying element content lead to a more or less important precipitation of an intermetallic G-phase. For a given Cr-content, at least four elements (C, Si, Ni and Mo) induce a particular sensitivity to G-phase precipitation. Two duplex stainless steels, the ferrite of which exhibits almost the same C, Si and Cr but different Ni and Mo contents have been carefully studied by atom probe. Because of its high spatial resolution, the atom probe is an attractive tool for the investigation of the fine-scale spinodal decomposition and precipitation process. In order to get both reliable chemical and spatial information, technical improvements as well as refinements in the statistical analysis of the experimental data were implemented. Characterization of both the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation was carried out. Pertinent microstructural aging parameters were defined in such a way as to follow both kinetics. The investigations we conducted, demonstrate that G-phase precipitation is induced by the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase. The influence of Ni and Mo contents on G-phase precipitation is discussed.

  20. Atom probe tomography evaporation behavior of C-axis GaN nanowires: Crystallographic, stoichiometric, and detection efficiency aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, David R. Gorman, Brian P.; Kirchhofer, Rita; Sanford, Norman; Bertness, Kris; Brubaker, Matt

    2013-11-14

    The field evaporation behavior of c-axis GaN nanowires was explored in two different laser-pulsed atom probe tomography (APT) instruments. Transmission electron microscopy imaging before and after atom probe tomography analysis was used to assist in reconstructing the data and assess the observed evaporation behavior. It was found that the ionic species exhibited preferential locations for evaporation related to the underlying crystal structure of the GaN and that the species which evaporated from these locations was dependent on the pulsed laser energy. Additionally, the overall stoichiometry measured by APT was significantly correlated with the energy of the laser pulses. At the lowest laser energies, the apparent composition was nitrogen-rich, while higher laser energies resulted in measurements of predominantly gallium compositions. The percent of ions detected (detection efficiency) for these specimens was found to be considerably below that shown for other materials, even for laser energies which produced the expected Ga:N ratio. The apparent stoichiometry variation and low detection efficiency appear to be a result of evaporation of Ga ions between laser pulses at the lowest laser energies and evaporation of neutral N{sub 2} species at higher laser energies. All of these behaviors are tied to the formation of nitrogen-nitrogen bonds on the tip surface, which occurred under all analysis conditions. Similar field evaporation behaviors are therefore expected for other materials where the anionic species readily form a strong diatomic bond.

  1. Atom probe tomography evaporation behavior of C-axis GaN nanowires: Crystallographic, stoichiometric, and detection efficiency aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diercks, David R.; Gorman, Brian P.; Kirchhofer, Rita; Sanford, Norman; Bertness, Kris; Brubaker, Matt

    2013-11-01

    The field evaporation behavior of c-axis GaN nanowires was explored in two different laser-pulsed atom probe tomography (APT) instruments. Transmission electron microscopy imaging before and after atom probe tomography analysis was used to assist in reconstructing the data and assess the observed evaporation behavior. It was found that the ionic species exhibited preferential locations for evaporation related to the underlying crystal structure of the GaN and that the species which evaporated from these locations was dependent on the pulsed laser energy. Additionally, the overall stoichiometry measured by APT was significantly correlated with the energy of the laser pulses. At the lowest laser energies, the apparent composition was nitrogen-rich, while higher laser energies resulted in measurements of predominantly gallium compositions. The percent of ions detected (detection efficiency) for these specimens was found to be considerably below that shown for other materials, even for laser energies which produced the expected Ga:N ratio. The apparent stoichiometry variation and low detection efficiency appear to be a result of evaporation of Ga ions between laser pulses at the lowest laser energies and evaporation of neutral N2 species at higher laser energies. All of these behaviors are tied to the formation of nitrogen-nitrogen bonds on the tip surface, which occurred under all analysis conditions. Similar field evaporation behaviors are therefore expected for other materials where the anionic species readily form a strong diatomic bond.

  2. Probing the Quantum States of a Single Atom Transistor at Microwave Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe Carlo; Hile, Samuel James; House, Matthew Gregory; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2017-03-28

    The ability to apply gigahertz frequencies to control the quantum state of a single P atom is an essential requirement for the fast gate pulsing needed for qubit control in donor-based silicon quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this with nanosecond accuracy in an all epitaxial single atom transistor by applying excitation signals at frequencies up to ≈13 GHz to heavily phosphorus-doped silicon leads. These measurements allow the differentiation between the excited states of the single atom and the density of states in the one-dimensional leads. Our pulse spectroscopy experiments confirm the presence of an excited state at an energy ≈9 meV, consistent with the first excited state of a single P donor in silicon. The relaxation rate of this first excited state to the ground state is estimated to be larger than 2.5 GHz, consistent with theoretical predictions. These results represent a systematic investigation of how an atomically precise single atom transistor device behaves under radio frequency excitations.

  3. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  4. Probing interactions between Rydberg atoms with large electric dipole moments in amplitude-modulated electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkova, V.; Hogan, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions between helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n =53 and approximately linear Stark energy shifts, resulting from induced electric dipole moments of approximately 7900 D, have been investigated experimentally. The experiments were performed in pulsed supersonic metastable helium beams, with particle number densities of up to ˜109cm-3 . In the presence of amplitude-modulated, radio-frequency electric fields, changes in the spectral intensity distributions associated with the transitions to these states that are attributed to dipole-dipole interactions within the ensembles of excited atoms have been observed. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with calculations of the Rydberg energy level structure carried out using Floquet methods, and excitations shared by up to four atoms. The use of these Rydberg-Stark states as sensors for nonresonant broadband radio-frequency electrical noise is also discussed.

  5. Characterization of local hydrophobicity on sapphire (0001) surfaces in aqueous environment by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Kenji; Isono, Toshinari; Ogino, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    Sapphire (0001) surfaces exhibit a phase-separation into hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains upon high-temperature annealing, which were previously distinguished by the thickness of adsorbed water layers in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To characterize their local surface hydrophobicity in aqueous environment, we used AFM equipped with a colloidal probe and measured the local adhesive force between each sapphire domain and a hydrophilic SiO2 probe surface, or a hydrophobic polystyrene one. Two data acquisition modes for statistical analyses were used: one is force measurements at different positions of the surface and the other repeated measurement at a fixed position. We found that adhesive force measurements using the polystyrene probe allow us to distinctly separate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. The dispersion in the force measurement data at different positions of the surface is larger than that in the repeated measurements at a fixed position. It indicates that the adhesive force measurement is repeatable although their data dispersion for the measurement positions is relatively large. From these results, we can conclude that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on the sapphire (0001) surfaces are distinguished by a difference in their hydration degrees.

  6. Intra-atomic spin asphericity of Pr and Dy in the dialuminides probed by x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, H.; Kawata, H.; Ito, M.

    2004-06-01

    While the theoretical framework of physics today is inevitably accompanied by the concept of electron spin, there has been no useful means to directly see the spatial distribution in solids or atoms so far. We have applied the so-called magnetic x-ray diffraction and succeeded in detecting the aspherical nature of the spin polarization for the atomic electrons of Pr and Dy in the dialuminides. An agreement with the theoretical estimate using the operator technique is fairly good. The present approach may provide unique and valuable data for basic physics and future spin technologies.

  7. Stability of nanoscale co-precipitates in a superalloy: A combined first-principles and atom probe tomography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, W. T.; Ping, D. H.; Gu, Y. F.; Cui, C. Y.; Harada, H.

    2007-12-01

    Inconel 718 is a nickel-iron based superalloy widely used in the aerospace industry. Its high temperature strength is attributed to the thermal stability of dense nanoscale precipitates γ' [Ni3Al] and γ″ [Ni3Nb] . There is experimental evidence that γ' and γ″ often form co-precipitates γ'/γ″ or sandwichlike structure γ'/γ″/γ' or γ″/γ'/γ″ . But how they stabilize under heat treatment or in service is still not well-understood. We have investigated the interfacial structure and chemistry of fine co-precipitates Ni3(Al,Ti,Nb)/Ni3Nb(γ'/γ″) in Inconel 718, using both first-principles density functional theory calculation and the three-dimensional atom probe technique. Our calculations confirm that Al atoms in the γ' phase segregate to the γ'/γ″ interface. The enrichment of Al helps to impede the assimilation of Nb from γ' to γ″ and reject Al from γ″ to γ' , and therefore keeps such secondary precipitates at fine size. In the absence of Ti in the γ' phase, our calculations predict an enhanced driving force for Al to accumulate at the interface. We have also characterized the microstructure of the γ'/γ″ interface for an Inconel 718 sample taken from a commercial compressor blade serviced in an airplane engine for over 10000h at a temperature up to 600°C using three-dimensional atom probe analysis. Interestingly, we find that Al enrichment sustains long-term service, suggesting that the coarsening of secondary precipitates is interface-controlled. The success of first-principles density functional theory computation in reproducing the experimental observation encourages extensive application of this powerful tool in the study of precipitates in superalloys.

  8. Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene: tropospheric probes for Cl- and Br-atom reactions during the polar sunrise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariya, P. A.; Catoire, V.; Sander, R.; Niki, H.; Harris, G. W.

    1997-11-01

    We report the results of laboratory and modeling investigations of the atmospheric fate of chlorinated ethenes and their rôle as indicators of halogen reactions in the springtime Arctic troposphere. The kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase reactions of Cl- and Br-atoms with tetrachloroethene were studied using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) in 93.3kPa air and T = 296± 2 K. Along with our previous study on Cl and Br atom reactions of trichloroethene, using the known rate of the Cl + ethane reaction as reference, the values of 7.2±0.2×10-11 and 3.8±0.2×10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 were obtained for the Cl-atom reaction rate constants of tri- and tetrachloroethene, respectively. For the Br-atom reactions, using ethene and propane as the reference molecules, we report the absolute values of 1.1±0.1×10-13 and 9.0±0.1×10-17 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for the rates of Br attack on tri- and tetrachloroethene. The major products were XCl2C-C(O)Cl (X = H in trichloroethene and X = Cl in tetrachloroethene) and XBrClC-C(O)Cl in Cl-atom and Br-atom initiated reactions, respectively. We also observed phosgene and formyl chloride in the reactions of trichloroethene and phosgene in the tetrachloroethene reactions and report the branching ratios for these

  9. On the interplay between relaxation, defect formation, and atomic Sn distribution in Ge{sub (1−x)}Sn{sub (x)} unraveled with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A. Bran, J. Melkonyan, D. Shimura, Y. Vandervorst, W.; Demeulemeester, J. Bogdanowicz, J. Fleischmann, C. Loo, R.; Gencarelli, F. Wang, W.

    2015-07-14

    Ge{sub (1−x)}Sn{sub (x)} has received a lot of interest for opto-electronic applications and for strain engineering in advanced complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, because it enables engineering of the band gap and inducing strain in the alloy. To target a reliable technology for mass application in microelectronic devices, the physical problem to be addressed is to unravel the complex relationship between strain relaxation (as induced by the growth of large layer thicknesses or a thermal anneal) and defect formation, and/or stable Sn-cluster formation. In this paper, we study the onset of Sn-cluster formation and its link to strain relaxation using Atom Probe Tomography (APT). To this end, we also propose a modification of the core-linkage [Stephenson et al., Microsc. Microanal. 13, 448 (2007)] cluster analysis method, to overcome the challenges of limited detection efficiency and lateral resolution of APT, and the quantitative assessment for very small clusters (<40 atoms) embedded in a random distribution of Sn-atoms. We concluded that the main relaxation mechanism for these layers is defect generation (misfit dislocations, threading dislocations, etc.), irrespective of the cause (thickness of layer or thermal anneal) of relaxation and is independent of the cluster formation. The low thermodynamic solubility limit of Sn in Ge seems to be the driving force for Sn-cluster formation. Finally, we also discuss the spatial distribution of Sn in clusters and relate them to the theoretically predicted stable Sn clusters [Ventura et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 155202 (2009)].

  10. Probe of hydrogen atom in plasmas with magnetic, electric, and Aharonov-Bohm flux fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, for the first time, the combined effects of external magnetic, electric, and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by the more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential are investigated within cylindrical coordinate formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The corresponding Schrödinger equation is solved numerically in order to examine both strong and weak regimes and confinement effects of external fields. The influence of screening parameters of the MGECSC potential on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom is also studied in detail in the presence of external magnetic, electric, and AB flux fields. As it is possible to model both Debye and quantum plasmas by using screening parameters in the MGECSC potential, the effects of each plasma environment on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom are also considered in the external fields. It is observed that there are important results of external fields on the total interaction potential profile, and the most dominant one in these fields is the magnetic field. Furthermore, the effects of confinement on the physical state of the plasma environment is a subject of this study. These details would be important in experimental and theoretical investigations in plasma and atomic physics fields.

  11. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu-Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Bachmaier, A; Aboulfadl, H; Pfaff, M; Mücklich, F; Motz, C

    2015-02-01

    A Cu-Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu-26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain.

  12. Subnanometer three-dimensional atom-probe investigation of segregation at MgO/Cu ceramic/metal heterophase interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, J T; Rüsing, J; Hellman, O C; Seidman, D N; Vriesendorp, W; Kooi, B J; De Hosson JTh

    2001-10-01

    Three-dimensional atom-probe (3DAP) microscopy has been applied to the study of segregation at ceramic/metal (C/M) interfaces. In this article, results on the MgO/Cu(X) (where X = Ag or Sb) systems are summarized. Nanometer-size MgO precipitates with atomically clean and atomically sharp interfaces were prepared in these systems by internal oxidation. Segregation of the ternary component (Ag or Sb) at the MgO/Cu heterophase interface was enhanced by extended low-temperature anneals. Magnesia precipitates in the 3DAP reconstructions were delineated as isoconcentration surfaces, and segregation of each ternary component at the C/M interfaces was analyzed with the proximity histogram method developed at Northwestern University. This method allows the direct extraction of the Gibbsian interfacial excess of solute at the C/M interfaces from the experimental data. A value of (3.2+/-2.0) x 10(17)m(-2) at 500 degrees C is obtained for the segregation of Ag at a MgO/Cu(Ag) interface, while a value of (2.9+/-0.9) x 10(18) m(-2) at 500 degrees C is obtained for the segregation of Sb at a MgO/Cu(Sb) interface. The larger Gibbsian excess for Sb segregation at this ceramic/metal heterophase interface is most likely due to the so-called pdeltaV effect.

  13. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bachmaier, A.; Aboulfadl, H.; Pfaff, M.; Mücklich, F.; Motz, C.

    2015-01-01

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. PMID:26523113

  14. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen in SiO2/SiN/SiO2 stacks using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunimune, Yorinobu; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Sakurai, Yusuke; Inoue, Masao; Nishida, Akio; Han, Bin; Tu, Yuan; Takamizawa, Hisashi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yano, Fumiko; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Katayama, Toshiharu; Ide, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We have demonstrated that it is possible to reproducibly quantify hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer of a SiO2/SiN/SiO2 (ONO) stack structure using ultraviolet laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). The concentration of hydrogen atoms detected using APT increased gradually during the analysis, which could be explained by the effect of hydrogen adsorption from residual gas in the vacuum chamber onto the specimen surface. The amount of adsorbed hydrogen in the SiN layer was estimated by analyzing another SiN layer with an extremely low hydrogen concentration (<0.2 at. %). Thus, by subtracting the concentration of adsorbed hydrogen, the actual hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer was quantified as approximately 1.0 at. %. This result was consistent with that obtained by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), which confirmed the accuracy of the APT quantification. The present results indicate that APT enables the imaging of the three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen atoms in actual devices at a sub-nanometer scale.

  15. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-03-01

    The atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket campaign WADIS. It includes, amongst others, two of our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source for atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS campaign comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented which was successfully launched in June 2013 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. FIPEX data was sampled with 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 10 m. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for up- and downleg respectively.

  16. Atom probe study of Cu-poor to Cu-rich transition during Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} growth

    SciTech Connect

    Couzinie-Devy, F.; Cadel, E.; Pareige, P.; Barreau, N.; Arzel, L.

    2011-12-05

    Atomic scale chemistry of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) thin film has been characterized at key points of the 3-stage process using atom probe tomography. 3D atom distributions have been reconstructed when the layer is Cu-poor ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) < 1), Cu-rich ([Cu]/([Ga] + [In]) > 1), and at the end of the process. Particular attention has been devoted to grain boundary composition and Na atomic distribution within the CIGSe layer. Significant variation of composition is highlighted during the growing process, providing fundamental information helping the understanding of high efficiency CIGSe formation.

  17. The extended wedge method: Atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, H. S.; Burris, D. L.

    2013-05-15

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS{sub 2} to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS{sub 2} had friction coefficients of {mu}= 0.20 {+-} 0.04 and {mu}= 0.006 {+-} 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS{sub 2} had a friction coefficient of {mu}= 0.005 {+-} 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  18. Hard X-rays as pump and probe of atomic motion in oxide glasses.

    PubMed

    Ruta, B; Zontone, F; Chushkin, Y; Baldi, G; Pintori, G; Monaco, G; Rufflé, B; Kob, W

    2017-06-21

    Nowadays powerful X-ray sources like synchrotrons and free-electron lasers are considered as ultimate tools for probing microscopic properties in materials. However, the correct interpretation of such experiments requires a good understanding on how the beam affects the properties of the sample, knowledge that is currently lacking for intense X-rays. Here we use X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy to probe static and dynamic properties of oxide and metallic glasses. We find that although the structure does not depend on the flux, strong fluxes do induce a non-trivial microscopic motion in oxide glasses, whereas no such dependence is found for metallic glasses. These results show that high fluxes can alter dynamical properties in hard materials, an effect that needs to be considered in the analysis of X-ray data but which also gives novel possibilities to study materials properties since the beam can not only be used to probe the dynamics but also to pump it.

  19. Laser spectroscopic probing of coexisting superfluid and insulating states of an atomic Bose–Hubbard system

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shinya; Inaba, Kensuke; Sugawa, Seiji; Shibata, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Ryuta; Yamashita, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    A system of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice has been regarded as an ideal quantum simulator for a Hubbard model with extremely high controllability of the system parameters. While making use of the controllability, a comprehensive measurement across the weakly to strongly interacting regimes in the Hubbard model to discuss the quantum many-body state is still limited. Here we observe a great change in the excitation energy spectra across the two regimes in an atomic Bose–Hubbard system by using a spectroscopic technique, which can resolve the site occupancy in the lattice. By quantitatively comparing the observed spectra and numerical simulations based on sum rule relations and a binary fluid treatment under a finite temperature Gutzwiller approximation, we show that the spectra reflect the coexistence of a delocalized superfluid state and a localized insulating state across the two regimes. PMID:27094083

  20. Laser spectroscopic probing of coexisting superfluid and insulating states of an atomic Bose-Hubbard system.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Inaba, Kensuke; Sugawa, Seiji; Shibata, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Ryuta; Yamashita, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-04-20

    A system of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice has been regarded as an ideal quantum simulator for a Hubbard model with extremely high controllability of the system parameters. While making use of the controllability, a comprehensive measurement across the weakly to strongly interacting regimes in the Hubbard model to discuss the quantum many-body state is still limited. Here we observe a great change in the excitation energy spectra across the two regimes in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system by using a spectroscopic technique, which can resolve the site occupancy in the lattice. By quantitatively comparing the observed spectra and numerical simulations based on sum rule relations and a binary fluid treatment under a finite temperature Gutzwiller approximation, we show that the spectra reflect the coexistence of a delocalized superfluid state and a localized insulating state across the two regimes.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Pore-Spanning Lipid Bilayers Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Müller, Martin Michael; Deserno, Markus; Hennesthal, Christian; Steinem, Claudia; Janshoff, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We measure the elastic response of a free-standing lipid membrane to a local indentation by using an atomic force microscope. Starting point is a planar gold-coated alumina substrate with a chemisorbed 3-mercaptopropionic acid monolayer displaying circular pores of very well defined and tunable size, over which bilayers composed of N,N,-dimethyl-N,N,-dioctadecylammonium bromide or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane chloride were spread. Centrally indenting these “nanodrums” with an atomic force microscope tip yields force-indentation curves, which we quantitatively analyze by solving the corresponding shape equations of continuum curvature elasticity. Since the measured response depends in a known way on the system geometry (pore size, tip radius) and on material parameters (bending modulus, lateral tension), this opens the possibility to monitor local elastic properties of lipid membranes in a well-controlled setting. PMID:16617084

  2. Probing the lignin nanomechanical properties and lignin lignin interactions using the atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micic, Miodrag; Benitez, Ivan; Ruano, Melanie; Mavers, Melissa; Jeremic, Milorad; Radotic, Ksenija; Moy, Vincent; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2001-10-01

    By combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force and environmental scanning electron microscopies (ESEMs), herein we present an evidence for the existence of strong intermolecular forces, which are responsible for holding lignin globules together in higher ordered structures. Based on this observation, we provide a support for the hypothesis that lignin globules consist of at least two individual spherical layers, with space in between filled with solvent or gas.

  3. Probing the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of two interacting atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Tim; Fogarty, Thomás

    2016-12-01

    We study the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of two interacting atoms in a one-dimensional harmonic trap after a quench by a tightly pinned impurity atom. We make use of an approximate variational calculation called the Lagrange-mesh method to solve the Schrödinger equation as a function of interparticle interaction and impurity quench strength. We investigate the out-of-equilibrium dynamics by calculating the Loschmidt echo which quantifies the irreversibility of the system following the quench, while its probability distribution after long times can be used to identify distinct dynamical regimes. These quantities are related to the spectral function which describes the full dynamical spectrum, and we show through a thorough examination of the parameter space the existence of distinct scattering states and collective oscillations. This work demonstrates how these dynamics are strongly dependent on the interaction strength between the atoms and may be tuned to observe the establishment of the orthogonality catastrophe in few-body systems.

  4. Three-dimensional atom probe characterization of alloy element partitioning in cementite during tempering of alloy steel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Xiong, X Y; Cerezo, A; Hardwicke, R; Krauss, G; Smith, G D W

    2007-09-01

    Hardness measurements confirm that the martensitic microstructure of an alloy steel, AISI/SAE 4340, is significantly more resistant to softening, compared to the martensitic microstructure of a high-purity Fe-0.4% C alloy, at tempering temperatures, 300-400 degrees C, just above the temperatures where cementite replaces transition carbides in the martensitic matrix. Three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) analyses of the 4340 steel show that Si rejection from the cementite is first detected after low-temperature tempering for times of 1 h. After 10-h tempering at 400 degrees C, Mn and Cr contents are increased, and Ni contents decreased, in cementite according to their carbide- and non-carbide-forming tendencies, respectively. The results are discussed with respect to the diffusivity of the substitutional alloying elements in the 4340 steel, and the effect that such diffusion-controlled redistribution would have on maintaining fine distributions of cementite that resist softening during tempering.

  5. Fabrication of high-aspect ratio Si pillars for atom probe 'lift-out' and field ionization tips.

    PubMed

    Morris, R A; Martens, R L; Zana, I; Thompson, G B

    2009-04-01

    A process for fabricating high-aspect ratio ( approximately 1:20), micron-sized Si [001] pillars using mechanical and chemical size reduction is presented. A dicing saw was used for mechanically patterning an array of square pillars with side lengths of >20mum. These pillars were then reduced in size using an aqueous NaOH and KOH solution heated to 100 degrees C. The chemical etch reduces the pillar size within the time range amenable for focus ion beam milling and/or attachment for atom probe 'lift-out' specimens. The pillars can be formed with either a flat top surface or into <100nm tip points for direct field ionization.

  6. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy probes of self-assembled, physisorbed monolayers: peeking at the peaks.

    PubMed

    Giancarlo, L C; Flynn, G W

    1998-01-01

    The imaging and control of self-assembled, physisorbed monolayers have been the subject of numerous scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy investigations. The successful interpretation of the structures observed in scanning probe images of molecules self-assembled at liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces has benefited greatly from recent experimental and theoretical work. These studies are converging on a general tunneling mechanism that accounts for the images of weakly bound, insulating adsorbates. Experiments in which the dynamical behavior of these monolayers has been monitored as a function of time both statically and after the introduction of an external perturbation are described, and novel studies of the selective control of monolayer structure that make use of internal and external electric fields, photons, and solvent coadsorption are reviewed.

  7. Electrical transport and mechanical properties of alkylsilane self-assembled monolayers on silicon surfaces probed by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Young; Qi, Yabing; Ashby, Paul D.; Hendriksen, Bas L.M.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-06

    The correlation between molecular conductivity and mechanical properties (molecular deformation and frictional responses) of hexadecylsilane self-assembled monolayers was studied with conductive probe atomic force microscopy/friction force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Current and friction were measured as a function of applied pressure, simultaneously, while imaging the topography of self-assembled monolayer molecule islands and silicon surfaces covered with a thin oxide layer. Friction images reveal lower friction over the molecules forming islands than over the bare silicon surface, indicating the lubricating functionality of alkylsilane molecules. By measuring the tunneling current change due to changing of the height of the molecular islands by tilting the molecules under pressure from the tip, we obtained an effective conductance decay constant ({beta}) of 0.52/{angstrom}.

  8. Comparison of NO titration and fiber optics catalytic probes for determination of neutral oxygen atom concentration in plasmas and postglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozetič, Miran; Ricard, Andre; Babič, Dušan; Poberaj, Igor; Levaton, Jacque; Monna, Virginie; Cvelbar, Uroš

    2003-03-01

    A comparative study of two different absolute methods NO titration and fiber optics catalytic probe (FOCP) for determination of neutral oxygen atom density is presented. Both methods were simultaneously applied for measurements of O density in a postglow of an Ar/O2 plasma created by a surfatron microwave generator with the frequency of 2.45 GHz an adjustable output power between 30 and 160 W. It was found that the two methods gave similar results. The advantages of FOCP were found to be as follows: it is a nondestructive method, it enables real time measuring of the O density, it does not require any toxic gas, and it is much faster than NO titration. The advantage of NO titration was found to be the ability to measure O density in a large range of dissociation of oxygen molecules.

  9. Atom-probe tomographic study of interfaces of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, S. Asahi, R.; Itoh, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Ohishi, K.; Isheim, D.; Seidman, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The heterophase interfaces between the CdS buffer layer and the Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) absorption layers are one of the main factors affecting photovoltaic performance of CZTS cells. We have studied the compositional distributions at heterophase interfaces in CZTS cells using three-dimensional atom-probe tomography. The results demonstrate: (a) diffusion of Cd into the CZTS layer; (b) segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface; and (c) a change of oxygen and hydrogen concentrations in the CdS layer depending on the heat treatment. Annealing at 573 K after deposition of CdS improves the photovoltaic properties of CZTS cells probably because of the formation of a heterophase epitaxial junction at the CdS/CZTS interface. Conversely, segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface after annealing at a higher temperature deteriorates the photovoltaic properties.

  10. The limit of time resolution in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy by a pump-probe approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Zeno; Spielhofer, Andreas; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely achieves structural information in the sub-nm length scale. Measuring time resolved properties on this length scale to understand kinetics at the nm scale remains an elusive goal. We present a general analysis of the lower limit for time resolution in AFM. Our finding suggests that the time resolution in AFM is ultimately limited by the well-known thermal limit of AFM and not as often proposed by the mechanical response time of the force sensing cantilever. We demonstrate a general pump-probe approach using the cantilever as a detector responding to the averaged signal. This method can be applied to any excitation signal such as electrical, thermal, magnetic or optical. Experimental implementation of this method allows us to measure a photocarrier decay time of ˜1 ps in low temperature grown GaAs using a cantilever with a resonant frequency of 280 kHz.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition Alumina-Passivated Silicon Nanowires: Probing the Transition from Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor to Electrolytic Capacitor.

    PubMed

    Gaboriau, Dorian; Boniface, Maxime; Valero, Anthony; Aldakov, Dmitry; Brousse, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Sadki, Said

    2017-04-10

    Silicon nanowires were coated by a 1-5 nm thin alumina layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to replace poorly reproducible and unstable native silicon oxide by a highly conformal passivating alumina layer. The surface coating enabled probing the behavior of symmetric devices using such electrodes in the EMI-TFSI electrolyte, allowing us to attain a large cell voltage up to 6 V in ionic liquid, together with very high cyclability with less than 4% capacitance fade after 10(6) charge/discharge cycles. These results yielded fruitful insights into the transition between an electrochemical double-layer capacitor behavior and an electrolytic capacitor behavior. Ultimately, thin ALD dielectric coatings can be used to obtain hybrid devices exhibiting large cell voltage and excellent cycle life of dielectric capacitors, while retaining energy and power densities close to the ones displayed by supercapacitors.

  12. Stability of nanoclusters in 14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened steel under heavy ion-irradiation by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; V. Shutthanandan; Y.Q. Wu

    2014-12-01

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 C, 450 C, and 600 C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 1023 to 3.6 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  13. Probing topology by “heating”: Quantized circular dichroism in ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Duc Thanh; Dauphin, Alexandre; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Zoller, Peter; Goldman, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    We reveal an intriguing manifestation of topology, which appears in the depletion rate of topological states of matter in response to an external drive. This phenomenon is presented by analyzing the response of a generic two-dimensional (2D) Chern insulator subjected to a circular time-periodic perturbation. Because of the system’s chiral nature, the depletion rate is shown to depend on the orientation of the circular shake; taking the difference between the rates obtained from two opposite orientations of the drive, and integrating over a proper drive-frequency range, provides a direct measure of the topological Chern number (ν) of the populated band: This “differential integrated rate” is directly related to the strength of the driving field through the quantized coefficient η0 = ν/ℏ2, where h = 2π ℏ is Planck’s constant. Contrary to the integer quantum Hall effect, this quantized response is found to be nonlinear with respect to the strength of the driving field, and it explicitly involves interband transitions. We investigate the possibility of probing this phenomenon in ultracold gases and highlight the crucial role played by edge states in this effect. We extend our results to 3D lattices, establishing a link between depletion rates and the nonlinear photogalvanic effect predicted for Weyl semimetals. The quantized circular dichroism revealed in this work designates depletion rate measurements as a universal probe for topological order in quantum matter. PMID:28835930

  14. Impact of Dynamic Specimen Shape Evolution on the Atom Probe Tomography Results of Doped Epitaxial Oxide Multilayers: Comparison of Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Bao, Jie; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Xu, Zhijie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Devaraj, Arun

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and side-ways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was correlated with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-theory correlation explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the need and importance of correlating experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using atom probe tomography for studying oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  15. DNA flexibility on short length scales probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Alexey K; Maaloum, Mounir

    2014-02-14

    Unusually high bending flexibility has been recently reported for DNA on short length scales. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in solution to obtain a direct estimate of DNA bending statistics for scales down to one helical turn. It appears that DNA behaves as a Gaussian chain and is well described by the wormlike chain model at length scales beyond 3 helical turns (10.5 nm). Below this threshold, the AFM data exhibit growing noise because of experimental limitations. This noise may hide small deviations from the Gaussian behavior, but they can hardly be significant.

  16. Magnetoencephalography with a two-color pump-probe, fiber-coupled atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Cort; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Weisend, Michael

    2010-12-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with a compact, fiber-coupled rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer. Optical pumping is performed on the D1 transition and Faraday rotation is measured on the D2 transition. The beams share an optical axis, with dichroic optics preparing beam polarizations appropriately. A sensitivity of <5 fT/√Hz is achieved. Evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer. Recordings were validated by comparison with those taken by a commercial magnetoencephalography system. The design is amenable to arraying sensors around the head, providing a framework for noncryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  17. Probing characteristics of collagen molecules on various surfaces via atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao-Wei; Ho, Mon-Shu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2012-06-01

    We examine, herein, specific dynamic responses of collagen molecules (i.e., observations of self-assembly and nanometric adhesion force measurements of type-I collagen molecules) as they interact with either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic surface at two distinct temperatures, using a liquid-type atomic force microscope. We conclude that, regardless of surface hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, assembled microfibrils eventually distribute homogeneously in accordance with changes in surface-related mechanical properties of collagen molecules at different self-assembly stages.

  18. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Surface research tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, and field ion microscopy are discussed. Examples of their use in studying adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication presented. These tools have provided considerable insight into the basic nature of solid surface interactions. The transfer of metals from one surface to another at the atomic level has been observed and studied with each of these devices. The field ion microscope has been used to study polymer-metal interactions and Auger analysis to study the mechanism of polymer adhesion to metals. LEED and Auger analysis have identified surface segregation of alloying elements and indicated the influence of these elements in metallic adhesion. LEED and Auger analysis have assisted in adsorption studies in determining the structural arrangement and quantity of adsorbed species present in making an understanding of the influence of these species on adhesion possible. These devices are assisting in the furtherance of understanding of the fundamental mechanism involved in the adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication processes.

  19. Fabrication of nano-sized magnetic tunnel junctions using lift-off process assisted by atomic force probe tip.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ku Youl; Min, Byoung-Chul; Ahn, Chiyui; Choi, Gyung-Min; Shin, Il-Jae; Park, Seung-Young; Rhie, Kungwon; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    We present a fabrication method for nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), employing e-beam lithography and lift-off process assisted by the probe tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). It is challenging to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates because it is difficult to use chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. The AFM-assisted lift-off process enables us to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates (12.5 mm x 12.5 mm) without CMP process. The e-beam patterning has been done using bi-layer resist, the poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)/ hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ). The PMMA/HSQ resist patterns are used for both the etch mask for ion milling and the self-aligned mask for top contact formation after passivation. The self-aligned mask buried inside a passivation oxide layer, is readily lifted-off by the force exerted by the probe tip. The nano-MTJs (160 nm x 90 nm) fabricated by this method show clear current-induced magnetization switching with a reasonable TMR and critical switching current density.

  20. Pretransition and progressive softening of bovine carbonic anhydrase II as probed by single molecule atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Afrin, Rehana; Alam, Mohammad T.; Ikai, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    To develop a simple method for probing the physical state of surface adsorbed proteins, we adopted the force curve mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to extract information on the mechanical properties of surface immobilized bovine carbonic anhydrase II under native conditions and in the course of guanidinium chloride–induced denaturation. A progressive increase in the population of individually softened molecules was probed under mildly to fully denaturing conditions. The use of the approach regime of force curves gave information regarding the height and rigidity of the molecule under compressive stress, whereas use of the retracting regime of the curves gave information about the tensile characteristics of the protein. The results showed that protein molecules at the beginning of the transition region possessed slightly more flattened and significantly more softened conformations compared with that of native molecules, but were still not fully denatured, in agreement with results based on solution studies. Thus the force curve mode of an AFM was shown to be sensitive enough to provide information concerning the different physical states of single molecules of globular proteins. PMID:15929995

  1. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions.

    PubMed

    Thaicharoen, N; Gonçalves, L F; Raithel, G

    2016-05-27

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C_{3} coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  2. Probing deviations from traditional colloid filtration theory by atomic forces microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Marissa Devan

    2005-12-01

    Colloid transport through saturated media is an integral component of predicting the fate and transport of groundwater contaminants. Developing sound predictive capabilities and establishing effective methodologies for remediation relies heavily on our ability to understand the pertinent physical and chemical mechanisms. Traditionally, colloid transport through saturated media has been described by classical colloid filtration theory (CFT), which predicts an exponential decrease in colloid concentration with travel distance. Furthermore, colloid stability as determined by Derjaguin-Landau-Veney-Overbeek (DLVO) theory predicts permanent attachment of unstable particles in a primary energy minimum. However, recent studies show significant deviations from these traditional theories. Deposition in the secondary energy minimum has been suggested as a mechanism by which observed deviations can occur. This work investigates the existence of the secondary energy minimum as predicted by DLVO theory using direct force measurements obtained by Atomic Forces Microscopy. Interaction energy as a function of separation distance between a colloid and a quartz surface in electrolyte solutions of varying ionic strength are obtained. Preliminary force measurements show promise and necessary modifications to the current experimental methodology have been identified. Stringent surface cleaning procedures and the use of high-purity water for all injectant solutions is necessary for the most accurate and precise measurements. Comparisons between direct physical measurements by Atomic Forces Microscopy with theoretical calculations and existing experimental findings will allow the evaluation of the existence or absence of a secondary energy minimum.

  3. Applications of a versatile modelling approach to 3D atom probe simulations.

    PubMed

    Oberdorfer, Christian; Eich, Sebastian Manuel; Lütkemeyer, Martin; Schmitz, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The article addresses application examples of a flexible simulation approach, which is based on an irregular mesh of Voronoi cells. The detailed atomic structure of APT field emitters is represented by Wigner-Seitz cells. In this way, arbitrary crystal structures can be modelled. The electric field results from the solution of the Poisson equation. The evaporation sequence of atoms from the emitter surface is enabled by calculation of the field-induced force, which acts on the surface cells. Presented examples show simulated field desorption maps of a cubic fcc <111> structure in comparison to the close-packed hcp <0001> structure. Additionally, the desorption maps of the cubic sc, bcc, and fcc lattices in <011> orientation are presented. The effect of inhomogeneous evaporation conditions on the emitter apex curvature is demonstrated. Reconstructions derived from the simulation of Σ5 GBs differently inclined with respect to the emitter axis are analyzed. Finally, the stress exerted on an embedded nano-particle during the simulated evaporation with inhomogeneous evaporation thresholds is estimated.

  4. Probing Strong Interaction with Kaonic Atoms — from DAΦNE to J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmeskal, J.; Sato, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bosnar, D.; Bragadireanu, M.; Buehler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Curceanu, C.; D'uffizi, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Golser, R.; Guaraldo, C.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Iliescu, M.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Marton, J.; Moskal, P.; Ohnishi, H.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Poli Lener, M.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tucakovic, I.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.

    The study of the antikaon nucleon system at very low energies plays a key role to study strong interaction with strangeness, touching one of the fundamental problems in hadron physic today — the still unsolved question of how hadron masses are generated. Exotic atoms offer a unique possibility to determine s-wave kaon-nucleon scattering lengths at vanishing energy. At the DAΦNE electron positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati in the SIDDHARTA experiment kaonic atoms were formed with Z = 1 (K-p) and Z = 2 (K-He), which were measured with up to now unrivalled precision. This experiment is taking advantage of the low-energy charged kaons from ϕ-mesons decaying nearly at rest. Finally, using the experience gained with SIDDHARTA, a proposal to measure kaonic deuterium for the first time was submitted to J-PARC with the goal to determine the isospin dependent scattering lengths, which is only possible by combining the K-p and the upcoming K-d results.

  5. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  6. Atom probe tomographic analysis of high dose oxide-dispersion strengthened steel (alloy MA957) at selected irradiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nathan Alexander

    In an effort to understand the effect of high dose neutron irradiation on fast reactor cladding candidate materials, oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy MA957 was irradiated to doses exceeding 100 displacements per atom (dpa) at various irradiation temperatures. The finely distributed Y-Ti-O particles, which provide MA957 its attractive properties, were examined by atom probe tomography (APT). Significant increases in oxide cluster number density and reductions in oxide cluster size were observed in specimens irradiated at 412 °C and below. A substantial hardness increase, measured by nanoindentation, was also observed at these low irradiation temperatures. It was found that the increase in oxide cluster number density, reduction in oxide cluster size, and associated increase in hardness is due to the inhibition of reformation processes of the Y-Ti-O particles following ballistic dissolution by incident radiation. Redistribution of oxide particle material along the grain boundaries is also observed at the low irradiation temperatures. The intermetallic phase alpha' was observed in the low temperature samples. This observation of this phase provides additional experimental evidence for the location of the phase boundary for this low temperature precipitate. The conclusion of this work is that MA957 is microstructurally stable under neutron irradiation at and above 495 °C.

  7. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hsiu -Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; ...

    2014-12-24

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2measurements. Asmore » a result, the new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.« less

  8. Probing the initiation of voltage decay in Li-rich layered cathode materials at the atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Yang, Jihui; Li, Zicheng; Allard, Jr., Lawrence Frederick; Liang, Chengdu; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Li-rich layered oxides hold great promise for improving the energy density of present-day Li-ion batteries. However, their application is limited by the voltage decay upon cycling, and the origin of such a phenomenon is poorly understood. A major issue is determining the voltage range over which detrimental reactions originate. In the present study, a unique yet effective approach was employed to probe this issue. Instead of studying the materials during the first cycle, electrochemical behavior and evolution of the atomic structures were compared in extensively cycled specimens under varied charge/discharge voltages. With the upper cutoff voltage lowered from 4.8 to 4.4 V, the voltage decay ceased to occur even after 60 cycles. In the meantime, the material maintained its layered structure without any spinel phase emerging at the surface, which is unambiguously shown by the atomic-resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These results have conclusively demonstrated that structural/chemical changes responsible for the voltage decay began between 4.4 and 4.8 V, where the layered-to-spinel transition was the most dramatic structural change observed. Thus, this discovery lays important groundwork for the mechanistic understanding of the voltage decay in Li-rich layered cathode materials.

  9. Simulation of Heterogeneous Atom Probe Tip Shapes Evolution during Field Evaporation Using a Level Set Method and Different Evaporation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Xu, Wei; Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Geiser, B. P.; Larson, David J.

    2015-04-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), accurate reconstruction of the spatial positions of field evaporated ions from measured detector patterns depends upon a correct understanding of the dynamic tip shape evolution and evaporation laws of component atoms. Artifacts in APT reconstructions of heterogeneous materials can be attributed to the assumption of homogeneous evaporation of all the elements in the material in addition to the assumption of a steady state hemispherical dynamic tip shape evolution. A level set method based specimen shape evolution model is developed in this study to simulate the evaporation of synthetic layered-structured APT tips. The simulation results of the shape evolution by the level set model qualitatively agree with the finite element method and the literature data using the finite difference method. The asymmetric evolving shape predicted by the level set model demonstrates the complex evaporation behavior of heterogeneous tip and the interface curvature can potentially lead to the artifacts in the APT reconstruction of such materials. Compared with other APT simulation methods, the new method provides smoother interface representation with the aid of the intrinsic sub-grid accuracy. Two evaporation models (linear and exponential evaporation laws) are implemented in the level set simulations and the effect of evaporation laws on the tip shape evolution is also presented.

  10. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Valderrama, B.; Henderson, H.B.; Gan, J.; Manuel, M.V.

    2015-04-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially, with high accuracy. However, it is known that compositional accuracy can be affected by experimental conditions. A study of the effect of laser energy, specimen base temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide (UO2). In laser-assisted mode, tip geometry and standing voltage also contribute to the evaporation behavior. In this investigation, it was determined that modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect the evaporation behavior as significantly as laser energy. It was also determined that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO2. Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser-assisted field evaporation characteristic and high laser energy induces thermal effects, negatively altering the evaporation behavior. The need for UO2 to be analyzed under moderate laser energies to produce accurate stoichiometry distinguishes it from other oxides. The following experimental conditions providing the best combination of mass resolving power, accurate stoichiometry, and uniform evaporation behavior: 50 K, 10 pJ laser energy, a detection rate of 0.003 atoms per pulse, and a 100 kHz repetition rate.

  11. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan; ...

    2017-06-20

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. In this paper, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with themore » IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe2O3)-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Finally, tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.« less

  12. Resolving mass spectral overlaps in atom probe tomography by isotopic substitutions - case of TiSi(15)N.

    PubMed

    Engberg, David L J; Johnson, Lars J S; Jensen, Jens; Thuvander, Mattias; Hultman, Lars

    2017-08-12

    Mass spectral overlaps in atom probe tomography (APT) analyses of complex compounds typically limit the identification of elements and microstructural analysis of a material. This study concerns the TiSiN system, chosen because of severe mass-to-charge-state ratio overlaps of the (14)N(+) and (28)Si(2+) peaks as well as the (14)N2(+) and (28)Si(+) peaks. By substituting (14)N with (15)N, mass spectrum peaks generated by ions composed of one or more N atoms will be shifted toward higher mass-to-charge-state ratios, thereby enabling the separation of N from the predominant Si isotope. We thus resolve thermodynamically driven Si segregation on the nanometer scale in cubic phase Ti1-xSix(15)N thin films for Si contents 0.08 ≤ x ≤ 0.19 by APT, as corroborated by transmission electron microscopy. The APT analysis yields a composition determination that is in good agreement with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection analyses. Additionally, a method for determining good voxel sizes for visualizing small-scale fluctuations is presented and demonstrated for the TiSiN system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan; Leonard, Donovan N; Qu, Jun; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2017-07-12

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. Here, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with the IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe2O3)-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.

  14. Indium clustering in a-plane InGaN quantum wells as evidenced by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Fengzai; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Fu, Wai Yuen; Griffiths, James T.; Massabuau, Fabien C.-P.; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P.

    2015-02-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to characterize the distribution of In atoms within non-polar a-plane InGaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on a GaN pseudo-substrate produced using epitaxial lateral overgrowth. Application of the focused ion beam microscope enabled APT needles to be prepared from the low defect density regions of the grown sample. A complementary analysis was also undertaken on QWs having comparable In contents grown on polar c-plane sample pseudo-substrates. Both frequency distribution and modified nearest neighbor analyses indicate a statistically non-randomized In distribution in the a-plane QWs, but a random distribution in the c-plane QWs. This work not only provides insights into the structure of non-polar a-plane QWs but also shows that APT is capable of detecting as-grown nanoscale clustering in InGaN and thus validates the reliability of earlier APT analyses of the In distribution in c-plane InGaN QWs which show no such clustering.

  15. Probing the initiation of voltage decay in Li-rich layered cathode materials at the atomic scale

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Yang, Jihui; ...

    2015-01-01

    Li-rich layered oxides hold great promise for improving the energy density of present-day Li-ion batteries. However, their application is limited by the voltage decay upon cycling, and the origin of such a phenomenon is poorly understood. A major issue is determining the voltage range over which detrimental reactions originate. In the present study, a unique yet effective approach was employed to probe this issue. Instead of studying the materials during the first cycle, electrochemical behavior and evolution of the atomic structures were compared in extensively cycled specimens under varied charge/discharge voltages. With the upper cutoff voltage lowered from 4.8 tomore » 4.4 V, the voltage decay ceased to occur even after 60 cycles. In the meantime, the material maintained its layered structure without any spinel phase emerging at the surface, which is unambiguously shown by the atomic-resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These results have conclusively demonstrated that structural/chemical changes responsible for the voltage decay began between 4.4 and 4.8 V, where the layered-to-spinel transition was the most dramatic structural change observed. Thus, this discovery lays important groundwork for the mechanistic understanding of the voltage decay in Li-rich layered cathode materials.« less

  16. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert; Vurpillot, François; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-04-17

    Oxide-supported metal nanoparticles are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis. The increasingly detailed design of such catalysts necessitates three-dimensional characterization with high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is uniquely suited to the task but faces challenges with the evaporation of metal/insulator systems. Correlation of APT with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO, reveals preferential evaporation of the MgO and an inaccurate assessment of nanoparticle composition. Finite element field evaporation modeling is used to illustrate the evolution of the evaporation front. Nanoparticle composition is most accurately predicted when the MgO is treated as having a locally variable evaporation field, indicating the importance of considering laser-oxide interactions and the evaporation of various molecular oxide ions. These results demonstrate the viability of APT for analysis of oxide-supported metal nanoparticles, highlighting the need for developing a theoretical framework for the evaporation of heterogeneous materials.

  17. Probing electrical transport across oxide interfaces by noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Rui; Bonnell, Dawn A.

    2004-11-22

    An approach for determining surface potential based on noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) has been used to acquire the potential profile of the grain boundary in a 24 deg. 0.05 wt % Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} bicrystal under lateral bias. The breakdown voltage of the grain boundary is found to be 1.2 V. The current-voltage characteristics obtained from this surface potentiometry have been compared with standard four-point measurement. The exponential dependence of the current on voltage indicates a Schottky-type transport mechanism. In addition, we found that NC-AFM topography is affected by the nonuniform potential distribution across the boundary, and this effect is especially strong at large lateral biases, resulting in a spurious step feature, which implies that true topography of an inhomogeneous surface cannot be obtained without first nullifying electrostatic interaction between tip and sample.

  18. Detection of atomic spin labels in a lipid bilayer using a single-spin nanodiamond probe.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Simpson, David A; Hall, Liam T; Perunicic, Viktor; Senn, Philipp; Steinert, Steffen; McGuinness, Liam P; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Caruso, Frank; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Scholten, Robert E; Mulvaney, Paul; Hollenberg, Lloyd

    2013-07-02

    Magnetic field fluctuations arising from fundamental spins are ubiquitous in nanoscale biology, and are a rich source of information about the processes that generate them. However, the ability to detect the few spins involved without averaging over large ensembles has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate the detection of gadolinium spin labels in an artificial cell membrane under ambient conditions using a single-spin nanodiamond sensor. Changes in the spin relaxation time of the sensor located in the lipid bilayer were optically detected and found to be sensitive to near-individual (4 ± 2) proximal gadolinium atomic labels. The detection of such small numbers of spins in a model biological setting, with projected detection times of 1 s [corresponding to a sensitivity of ∼5 Gd spins per Hz(1/2)], opens a pathway for in situ nanoscale detection of dynamical processes in biology.

  19. 158 micrometers (CII) mapping of NGC 6946: Probing the atomic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, S. C.; Geis, N.; Genzel, R.; Herrmann, F.; Jackson, J. M.; Poglitsch, A.; Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The strong 158 micrometers (C2) cooling line of the NGC 6946 galaxy is investigated. The data was acquired with a far infrared imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer with 55 minutes resolution. About 1 percent of the total far infrared luminosity of the galaxy is analyzed. The (C2) emission comes from a mizture of components of interstellar gas. The brightest emission is associated with the nucleus, a second component traces the spiral arms and the largest star forming/H2 regions contained within them, and a third extended component of low brightness can be detected at least 12 kpc from the nucleus. The nuclear and spiral arm components are most likely associated with dense photon dominated regions at molecular cloud surfaces that are exposed to ultraviolet radiation produced by young massive stars. The (C2) emission is analyzed and the cooling rate in the atomic medium is consistent with photoelectric heating by diffuse ultraviolet radiation.

  20. Carbon nanotube modified probes for stable and high sensitivity conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, Ashley D.; Shearer, Cameron J.; Gibson, Christopher T.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Lewis, David A.; Stapleton, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is used to characterise the nanoscale electrical properties of many conducting and semiconducting materials. We investigate the effect of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) modification of commercial Pt/Ir cantilevers on the sensitivity and image stability during C-AFM imaging. Pt/Ir cantilevers were modified with small bundles of SWCNTs via a manual attachment procedure and secured with a conductive platinum pad. AFM images of topography and current were collected from heterogeneous polymer and nanomaterial samples using both standard and SWCNT modified cantilevers. Typically, achieving a good current image comes at the cost of reduced feedback stability. In part, this is due to electrostatic interaction and increased tip wear upon applying a bias between the tip and the sample. The SWCNT modified tips displayed superior current sensitivity and feedback stability which, combined with superior wear resistance of SWCNTs, is a significant advancement for C-AFM.

  1. Measuring adhesion on rough surfaces using atomic force microscopy with a liquid probe.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan V; Garza, Cristina; Castillo, Rolando

    2017-01-01

    We present a procedure to perform and interpret pull-off force measurements during the jump-off-contact process between a liquid drop and rough surfaces using a conventional atomic force microscope. In this method, a micrometric liquid mercury drop is attached to an AFM tipless cantilever to measure the force required to pull this drop off a rough surface. We test the method with two surfaces: a square array of nanometer-sized peaks commonly used for the determination of AFM tip sharpness and a multi-scaled rough diamond surface containing sub-micrometer protrusions. Measurements are carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere to avoid water capillary interactions. We obtain information about the average force of adhesion between a single peak or protrusion and the liquid drop. This procedure could provide useful microscopic information to improve our understanding of wetting phenomena on rough surfaces.

  2. Probing the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyu; Qian, Yong; Deng, Yonghong; Liu, Di; Li, Hao; Qiu, Xueqing

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides has both fundamental and practical importance in industrial and energy fields. In this work, the specific interactions between alkali lignin (AL) and three inorganic oxide substrates in aqueous environment are quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the average adhesion force between AL and metal oxide such as Al2O3 or MgO is nearly two times bigger than that between AL and nonmetal oxide such as SiO2 due to the electrostatic difference and cation-π interaction. When 83% hydroxyl groups of AL is blocked by acetylation, the adhesion forces between AL and Al2O3, MgO and SiO2 decrease 43, 35 and 75% respectively, which indicate hydrogen bonds play an important role between AL and inorganic oxides, especially in AL-silica system.

  3. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  4. Heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in Rydberg atom collisions: Probing dissociative electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Buathong, Sitti; Dunning, F. Barry

    2015-05-01

    While electron transfer in Rydberg atom collisions with attaching targets forms a valuable technique with which to create heavy-Rydberg ion pairs to examine their properties, we demonstrate here that measurements of their velocity distributions can also provide insights into the behavior of the excited intermediates formed through initial electron transfer. The experimental results are analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models the details of electron transfer reactions. Results for a variety of targets are presented that demonstrate the use of this approach to examine the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment, the lifetimes of the intermediates created, and the channels by which they decay. Research supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation under Grant C-0734.

  5. Nanoscale isotope mapping of terrestrial and lunar zircons by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Reinhard, D. A.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Olson, D.; Coble, M. A.; Cavosie, A. J.; Ushikubo, T.; Larson, D. J.; Kelly, T. F.; Valley, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Microscopic mobility of atoms in minerals controls macroscopic metamorphic and tectonic processes in Earth's crust. Deformation and diffusion, each an expression of this mobility, are both processes of breaking and reforming bonds and take energy to proceed. Deformation can facilitate diffusion by supplying strain energy that facilitates breaking bonds and enhance diffusion rates by mobilizing dislocations, which localize atomic migration. Deformation-enhanced diffusion may therefore lower closure temperatures for geochronometers and thermobarometers. If the effect of deformation on diffusion is measurable, we must reevaluate these tools for deformed rocks. We explore this effect and its potential as the basis for estimating duration and rate of strain in the rock record. We focus on feldspar, a rheologically and modally dominant mineral in Earth's crust for which deformation and diffusion parameters are well known. Different elements have different diffusion rates within each mineral, which are differentially accelerated by a deformation-induced reduction of their activation energies for diffusion. We present the first comprehensive study of strain enhancement of diffusion in plagioclase, a combination of km-scale, thin-section-scale, and grain-scale strain and chemical measurements for major and trace elements in naturally deformed plagioclase phenocrysts from the San José Pluton, Peninsular Ranges Batholith, México. Our samples had low initial compositional contrasts and experienced low strain. Under these conditions, the effect of strain-enhanced element mobility, as predicted from our model, is below analytical detection limits. For these rocks, a static diffusion model is sufficient, and thermobarometers and geochronometers can still be applied to yield accurate results.

  6. Modeling and In-situ Probing of Surface Reactions in Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanxia; Hong, Sungwook; Psofogiannakis, George M; Rayner, G Bruce; Datta, Suman; van Duin, Adri C T; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2017-04-05

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has matured into a preeminent and highly scalable thin film deposition technique, offering an economic route to integrate chemically dissimilar materials with excellent thickness control down to the sub-nanometer regime. Contrary to its extensive applications, a quantitative and comprehensive understanding of the reaction processes seems intangible. Complex and manifold reaction pathways are possible which are strongly affected by the surface chemical state. Here we report a combined modeling and experimental approach utilizing ReaxFF reactive force field simulation and in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsome-try to gain insights into the ALD process of Al2O3 from trimethylaluminum and water on hy-drogenated and oxidized Ge(100) surfaces. We deciphered the origin for the different peculiari-ties during initial ALD cycles for the deposition on both surfaces. While simulations predicted a nucleation delay for hydrogenated Ge(100), a self-cleaning effect was discovered on oxidized Ge(100) surfaces, forming an intermixed Al2O3/GeOx layer that effectively suppressed oxygen diffusion into Ge. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry in tandem with ex-situ atomic force mi-croscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed these simulation results. Electrical impedance characterizations evidenced the critical role of the intermixed Al2O3/GeOx layer to achieve electrically well behaved dielectric/Ge interfaces with low interface trap density. The combined approach can be generalized to comprehend the deposition and reaction kinetics of other ALD precursor and surface chemistry, offering a path towards a theory-aided rational de-sign of ALD processes at a molecular level.

  7. Micro-wilhelmy and related liquid property measurements using constant-diameter nanoneedle-tipped atomic force microscope probes.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M; Hosseini, Mahdi; Pabba, Santosh; Berry, Scott M; Dobrokhotov, Vladimir V; Safir, Abdelilah; Keynton, Robert S; Cohn, Robert W

    2008-12-02

    The micro-Wilhelmy method is a well-established method of determining surface tension by measuring the force of withdrawing a tens of microns to millimeters in diameter cylindrical wire or fiber from a liquid. A comparison of insertion force to retraction force can also be used to determine the contact angle with the fiber. Given the limited availability of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes that have long constant diameter tips, force-distance (F-D) curves using probes with standard tapered tips have been difficult to relate to surface tension. In this report, constant diameter metal alloy nanowires (referred to as "nanoneedles") between 7.2 and 67 microm in length and 108 and 1006 nm in diameter were grown on AFM probes. F-D and Q damping AFM measurements of wetting and drag forces made with the probes were compared against standard macroscopic models of these forces on slender cylinders to estimate surface tension, contact angle, meniscus height, evaporation rate, and viscosity. The surface tensions for several low molecular weight liquids that were measured with these probes were between -4.2% and +8.3% of standard reported values. Also, the F-D curves show well-defined stair-step events on insertion and retraction from partial wetting liquids, compared to the continuously growing attractive force of standard tapered AFM probe tips. In the AFM used, the stair-step feature in F-D curves was repeatably monitored for at least 0.5 h (depending on the volatility of the liquid), and this feature was then used to evaluate evaporation rates (as low as 0.30 nm/s) through changes in the surface height of the liquid. A nanoneedle with a step change in diameter at a known distance from its end produced two steps in the F-D curve from which the meniscus height was determined. The step features enable meniscus height to be determined from distance between the steps, as an alternative to calculating the height corresponding to the AFM measured values of surface tension and

  8. Parameter sensitivity analysis of nonlinear piezoelectric probe in tapping mode atomic force microscopy for measurement improvement

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Rachael; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2014-02-21

    The equations of motion for a piezoelectric microcantilever are derived for a nonlinear contact force. The analytical expressions for natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, the method of multiple scales is used to analyze the analytical frequency response of the piezoelectric probe. The effects of nonlinear excitation force on the microcantilever beam's frequency and amplitude are analytically studied. The results show a frequency shift in the response resulting from the force nonlinearities. This frequency shift during contact mode is an important consideration in the modeling of AFM mechanics for generation of more accurate imaging. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the system parameters on the nonlinearity effect is performed. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that it is possible to choose parameters such that the frequency shift minimizes. Certain parameters such as tip radius, microcantilever beam dimensions, and modulus of elasticity have more influence on the nonlinearity of the system than other parameters. By changing only three parameters—tip radius, thickness, and modulus of elasticity of the microbeam—a more than 70% reduction in nonlinearity effect was achieved.

  9. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, Martin; Stefanos Fasoulas, -; Loehle, Stefan; Steinbeck, Andreas

    Local atomic oxygen (AOX) density is an important information in the physics and energy balance of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. In consequence, determination of AOX density profiles is fundamental for understanding and modelling of the underlying processes. We present two rocket-borne techniques based on solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX) and on the analysis of catalytic effects (PHLUX) that provide in-situ measurement of AOX along the flight trajectory. FIPEX sensors feature both gold and platinum electrodes to distinguish atomic from molecular oxygen. The PHLUX gauge determines temperature differences between surfaces with different catalytic efficiencies towards AOX recombination. All FIPEX sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma source in combination with a mass spectrometer reference measurement. The spectrometer in turn was calibrated for AOX with a method based on a CH _{4} reference. For PHLUX, only a theoretical analysis was applied to derive densities from the measured temperatures. Both sensor systems were launched in June 2012 from Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, as a part of the joint WADIS campaign. Led by the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn this project aims at determining turbulence structures and AOX concentrations in altitudes between 60 and 120km. In total 6 FIPEX and 4 PHLUX sensors were positioned on the forward and aft instrument decks and were operated during up- and downleg. PHLUX was originally designed for operation in darkness and had to be adapted to daylight conditions during the flight. A sapphire window was placed on one of the gauges to separate temperature changes due to sunlight. Data was sampled with 100Hz which represents a minimal altitude resolution of around 10 meters. Sensor data renders number density profiles that peak at 1E11cm (-3) in 95km altitude and agree reasonably well to the literature. Within this paper, the sensing principles and the applied calibration methods

  10. Probing atomic structure in magnetic core/shell nanoparticles using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Thornton, S C; Qureshi, M; Binns, C

    2010-09-29

    Core/shell Fe/Cu and Fe/Au nanoparticles were prepared directly by deposition from the gas phase. A detailed study of the atomic structure in both the cores and shells of the nanoparticles was undertaken by means of extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements. For Fe/Cu nanoparticles, a Cu shell ∼ 20 monolayers thick appears similar in structure to bulk Cu and is sufficient to cause the structure in the Fe core to switch from body centred cubic (bcc; as in bulk Fe) to face centred cubic. This is not the case for thinner Cu shells, 1-2 monolayers in thickness, in which there is a considerable contraction in nearest-neighbour interatomic distance as the shell structure changes to bcc. In Fe/Au nanoparticles, the crystal structure in the Fe core remains bcc for all Au thicknesses although there is some stretching of the lattice. In thin Au shells ∼ 2 monolayers thick, there is strong contraction in interatomic distances. There does not appear to be significant alloying at the Fe/Au interface.

  11. 158 micron forbidden C II mapping of NGC 6946 - Probing the atomic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, S. C.; Geis, N.; Genzel, R.; Herrmann, F.; Jackson, J.; Poglitsch, A.; Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    A well-sampled map (23 x 17 kpc) of the strong 158 micron forbidden C II cooling line in the Scd galaxy NGC 6946 at 55 arcsec resolution is presented which was taken with the MPE/UCB Far-infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FIFI) in the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. It is concluded that the line emission in NGC 6946 is present in three spatially distinct components including nucleus, spiral arms, and extended region. An extended emission region is a source of most of the forbidden C II luminosity in NGC 6946. The 1 arcmin nuclear component has a line luminosity of 1.5 x 10 exp 7 solar luminosity and contributes 0.15 percent of the galaxy's total FIR luminosity. An extended component of forbidden C II emission is found to exist past the molecular extent of the galaxy and to be present to at least the full dimensions of the map. This component is attributed to a mixture of neutral and atomic clouds.

  12. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marina; Te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m(-1), force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  13. Regulation of muscle contraction by Drebrin-like protein 1 probed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Renata; Butkevich, Eugenia; Platen, Mitja; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Biophysics Team

    Sarcomeres are the fundamental contractile units of striated muscle cells. They are composed of a variety of structural and regulatory proteins functioning in a precisely orchestrated fashion to enable coordinated force generation in striated muscles. Recently, we have identified a C. elegans drebrin-like protein 1 (DBN-1) as a novel sarcomere component, which stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction. To further characterize the function of DBN-1 in muscle cells, we generated a new dbn-1 loss-of-function allele. Absence of DBN-1 resulted in a unique worm movement phenotype, characterized by hyper-bending. It is not clear yet if DBN-1 acts to enhance or reduce the capacity for contraction. We present here an experimental mechanical study on C. elegans muscle mechanics. We measured the stiffness of the worm by indenting living C. eleganswith a micron-sized sphere adhered to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Modeling the worm as a pressurized elastic shell allows us to monitor the axial tension in the muscle through the measured stiffness. We compared responses of wild-type and mutant C. elegans in which DBN-1 is not expressed..

  14. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marina; te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m-1, force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  15. Schottky nanocontact of one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures probed by using conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Ah; Rok Lim, Young; Jung, Chan Su; Choi, Jun Hee; Im, Hyung Soon; Park, Kidong; Park, Jeunghee; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2016-10-01

    To develop the advanced electronic devices, the surface/interface of each component must be carefully considered. Here, we investigate the electrical properties of metal-semiconductor nanoscale junction using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Single-crystalline CdS, CdSe, and ZnO one-dimensional nanostructures are synthesized via chemical vapor transport, and individual nanobelts (or nanowires) are used to fabricate nanojunction electrodes. The current-voltage (I -V) curves are obtained by placing a C-AFM metal (PtIr) tip as a movable contact on the nanobelt (or nanowire), and often exhibit a resistive switching behavior that is rationalized by the Schottky (high resistance state) and ohmic (low resistance state) contacts between the metal and semiconductor. We obtain the Schottky barrier height and the ideality factor through fitting analysis of the I-V curves. The present nanojunction devices exhibit a lower Schottky barrier height and a higher ideality factor than those of the bulk materials, which is consistent with the findings of previous works on nanostructures. It is shown that C-AFM is a powerful tool for characterization of the Schottky contact of conducting channels between semiconductor nanostructures and metal electrodes.

  16. Two-color probe of high harmonic generation from argon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zengxiu; Yuan, Jianmin; Meng, Chao; Chen, Wenbo

    2014-05-01

    Two-color control of high harmonic generation has been proven a powerful in situ tool to characterize the intrinsic chirp of attosecond bursts. The weak second harmonic pulse introduces a phase modulation of the strong field quantum processes, leading to the generation of even-order harmonic. We measure the yields of even-order harmonics from argon gases as a function of the phase delay between the fundamental and its second harmonic pulse. We found that the modulation of even-order harmonics exhibits a phase jump around the 28th harmonic (48eV), closely resembling the result from. However, we show by varying laser intensity that the phase jump is unlikely to be attributed to the switching from short to long trajectories of HHG near the cut-off. In addition, we demonstrate that the phase of jump depends on the driving laser wavelength. Single-active-electron simulation fails to reproduce the experimental observation. We therefore suspect that multielectron response comes into play for the two-color control of HHG from Argon. Preliminary analysis suggests that there exists competing pathways of HHG from inner orbitals, even for argon atoms whose interaction with strong laser fields is usually assumed well described by SAE approximation.

  17. Chemical probing of RNA with the hydroxyl radical at single-atom resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Shakti; Azad, Robert N.; Jain, Swapan S.; Tullius, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    While hydroxyl radical cleavage is widely used to map RNA tertiary structure, lack of mechanistic understanding of strand break formation limits the degree of structural insight that can be obtained from this experiment. Here, we determine how individual ribose hydrogens of sarcin/ricin loop RNA participate in strand cleavage. We find that substituting deuterium for hydrogen at a ribose 5′-carbon produces a kinetic isotope effect on cleavage; the major cleavage product is an RNA strand terminated by a 5′-aldehyde. We conclude that hydroxyl radical abstracts a 5′-hydrogen atom, leading to RNA strand cleavage. We used this approach to obtain structural information for a GUA base triple, a common tertiary structural feature of RNA. Cleavage at U exhibits a large 5′ deuterium kinetic isotope effect, a potential signature of a base triple. Others had noted a ribose-phosphate hydrogen bond involving the G 2′-OH and the U phosphate of the GUA triple, and suggested that this hydrogen bond contributes to backbone rigidity. Substituting deoxyguanosine for G, to eliminate this hydrogen bond, results in a substantial decrease in cleavage at G and U of the triple. We conclude that this hydrogen bond is a linchpin of backbone structure around the triple. PMID:25313156

  18. Indirect modulation of nonmagnetic probes for force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-02-15

    Frequency-dependent changes for phase and amplitude images are demonstrated with test platforms of organosilane ring patterns, using force modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with an alternate instrument configuration. The imaging setup using indirect magnetic modulation (IMM) is based on indirect oscillation of soft, nonmagnetic cantilevers, with spring constants <1 N m(-1). The tip is driven to vibrate by the motion of a tip holder assembly which contains ferromagnetic materials. The entire tip assembly is induced to vibrate with the flux of an external ac electromagnetic field, supplied by a wire coil solenoid placed underneath the sample plate. With the use of IMM, dynamic parameters of the driving frequencies and amplitude of the tip motion can be optimized to sensitively map the elastic response of samples. An advantage of this instrument setup is that a magnetic coating is not required to drive the periodic oscillation of the tip. The instrument configuration for IMM may not be practical for intermittent imaging modes, which often work best with stiff cantilevers. However, indirect actuation provides an effective approach for imaging with low force setpoints and is well-suited for dynamic AFM modes using continuous contact imaging.

  19. Probing the mechanical properties of TNF-α stimulated endothelial cell with atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sei-Young; Zaske, Ana-Maria; Novellino, Tommaso; Danila, Delia; Ferrari, Mauro; Conyers, Jodie; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates the permeability of blood and lymphatic vessels. The plasma concentration of TNF-α is elevated (> 1 pg/mL) in several pathologies, including rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, pre-eclampsia; in obese individuals; and in trauma patients. To test whether circulating TNF-α could induce similar alterations in different districts along the vascular system, three endothelial cell lines, namely HUVEC, HPMEC, and HCAEC, were characterized in terms of 1) mechanical properties, employing atomic force microscopy; 2) cytoskeletal organization, through fluorescence microscopy; and 3) membrane overexpression of adhesion molecules, employing ELISA and immunostaining. Upon stimulation with TNF-α (10 ng/mL for 20 h), for all three endothelial cells, the mechanical stiffness increased by about 50% with a mean apparent elastic modulus of E ~5 ± 0.5 kPa (~3.3 ± 0.35 kPa for the control cells); the density of F-actin filaments increased in the apical and median planes; and the ICAM-1 receptors were overexpressed compared with controls. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sufficiently high levels of circulating TNF-α have similar effects on different endothelial districts, and provide additional information for unraveling the possible correlations between circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and systemic vascular dysfunction. PMID:21499414

  20. Chemical probing of RNA with the hydroxyl radical at single-atom resolution.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Shakti; Azad, Robert N; Jain, Swapan S; Tullius, Thomas D

    2014-11-10

    While hydroxyl radical cleavage is widely used to map RNA tertiary structure, lack of mechanistic understanding of strand break formation limits the degree of structural insight that can be obtained from this experiment. Here, we determine how individual ribose hydrogens of sarcin/ricin loop RNA participate in strand cleavage. We find that substituting deuterium for hydrogen at a ribose 5'-carbon produces a kinetic isotope effect on cleavage; the major cleavage product is an RNA strand terminated by a 5'-aldehyde. We conclude that hydroxyl radical abstracts a 5'-hydrogen atom, leading to RNA strand cleavage. We used this approach to obtain structural information for a GUA base triple, a common tertiary structural feature of RNA. Cleavage at U exhibits a large 5' deuterium kinetic isotope effect, a potential signature of a base triple. Others had noted a ribose-phosphate hydrogen bond involving the G 2'-OH and the U phosphate of the GUA triple, and suggested that this hydrogen bond contributes to backbone rigidity. Substituting deoxyguanosine for G, to eliminate this hydrogen bond, results in a substantial decrease in cleavage at G and U of the triple. We conclude that this hydrogen bond is a linchpin of backbone structure around the triple. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Directly probing anisotropy in atom-molecule collisions through quantum scattering resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Ayelet; Shagam, Yuval; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Pawlak, Mariusz; Janssen, Liesbeth M. C.; Moiseyev, Nimrod; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; van der Avoird, Ad; Koch, Christiane P.; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropy is a fundamental property of particle interactions. It occupies a central role in cold and ultracold molecular processes, where orientation-dependent long-range forces have been studied in ultracold polar molecule collisions. In the cold collisions regime, quantization of the intermolecular degrees of freedom leads to quantum scattering resonances. Although these states have been shown to be sensitive to details of the interaction potential, the effect of anisotropy on quantum resonances has so far eluded experimental observation. Here, we directly measure the anisotropy in atom-molecule interactions via quantum resonances by changing the quantum state of the internal molecular rotor. We observe that a quantum scattering resonance at a collision energy of kB × 270 mK appears in the Penning ionization of molecular hydrogen with metastable helium only if the molecule is rotationally excited. We use state-of-the-art ab initio theory to show that control over the rotational state effectively switches the anisotropy on or off, disentangling the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the interaction.

  2. Interaction between amyloid-β peptide and heme probed by electrochemistry and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Wang, Jing; Liu, Lantao; Wang, Rongrong; Lai, Xinhe; Xu, Maotian

    2013-04-17

    Heme binds to amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, thus forming Aβ-heme complexes and leading the characteristic pathological features of AD. The interaction between heme and Aβ might have important biological relevance to AD etiology. In this work, the electrochemical performances of heme after incubation with Aβ1-42, Aβ fragments, and mutated Aβ were systematically investigated using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Our results indicated that His13 and His14 were possible binding sites, and Aβ bound two molecules of heme with a binding constant of K(a1) = 7.27 × 10(6) M(-1) (n(1) = 1.5) and K(a2) = 2.89 × 10(6) M(-1) (n(1) = 1.8). Detailed analysis with atomic force microscopy (AFM) of Aβ1-42 in the absence or presence of heme under the same incubation conditions showed that heme inhibited the formation of Aβ fibrils. According to results of the spectroscopic characterization, Arg5 was the key residue in making the heme-Aβ1-42 complex as a peroxidase.

  3. Probing the resonance potential in the F atom reaction with hydrogen deuteride with spectroscopic accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zefeng; Che, Li; Qiu, Minghui; Wang, Xingan; Dong, Wenrui; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Xiuyan; Yang, Xueming; Sun, Zhigang; Fu, Bina; Lee, Soo-Y.; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Dong H.

    2008-01-01

    Reaction resonances are transiently trapped quantum states along the reaction coordinate in the transition state region of a chemical reaction that could have profound effects on the dynamics of the reaction. Obtaining an accurate reaction potential that holds these reaction resonance states and eventually modeling quantitatively the reaction resonance dynamics is still a great challenge. Up to now, the only viable way to obtain a resonance potential is through high-level ab initio calculations. Through highly accurate crossed-beam reactive scattering studies on isotope-substituted reactions, the accuracy of the resonance potential could be rigorously tested. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the resonance-mediated F + HD → HF + D reaction at the full quantum state resolved level, to probe the resonance potential in this benchmark system. The experimental result shows that isotope substitution has a dramatic effect on the resonance picture of this important system. Theoretical analyses suggest that the full-dimensional FH2 ground potential surface, which was believed to be accurate in describing the resonance picture of the F + H2 reaction, is found to be insufficiently accurate in predicting quantitatively the resonance picture for the F + HD → HF + D reaction. We constructed a global potential energy surface by using the CCSD(T) method that could predict the correct resonance peak positions as well as the dynamics for both F + H2 → HF + H and F + HD → HF + D, providing an accurate resonance potential for this benchmark system with spectroscopic accuracy. PMID:18687888

  4. Self-organization of Cu-based immiscible alloys under irradiation: An atom-probe tomography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumphy, Brad D.

    The stability of materials subjected to prolonged irradiation has been a topic of renewed interest in recent years due to the projected growth of nuclear power as an alternative energy source. The irradiating particles impart energy into the material, thereby causing atomic displacements to occur. These displacements result in the creation of point defects and the random ballistic mixing of the atoms. Consequently, the material is driven away from its equilibrium structure. The supersaturation of defects can lead to the degradation of mechanical properties, but a high density of internal interfaces, which act as defect sinks, will suppress the supersaturation and long-range transport of defects. The microstructural evolution of the material is controlled by the ballistic mixing as well as the mobility of the point defects. In immiscible alloys, these two processes compete against one another, as the ballistic mixing acts to solutionize the alloy components, and the thermal diffusion of the large number of defects acts to phase separate the components. The work presented in this dissertation examines the effect of heavy-ion irradiation on immiscible, binary Cu-based alloys. Dilute alloys of Cu-Fe, Cu-V, and V-Cu have been subjected to irradiation, and atom-probe tomography has been utilized in order to better understand the complex nature of the response of these simple model systems to an irradiation environment. The results show that a steady-state, nano-scale patterning structure, with a high density of unsaturable defect sinks, can be maintained under prolonged irradiation. Additionally, precipitation from a supersaturated solid solution is shown to be a function of both the thermal diffusion and the ballistic mixing. Solvent-rich secondary precipitates, termed "cherry-pits," are observed inside of the solute-rich primary precipitates. Through a combination of simulation work and analyzing multiple alloys experimentally, it was determined that this cherry

  5. Comparative atom probe study of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells deposited on soda-lime glass and mild steel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Wuerz, Roland; Raabe, Dierk

    2011-12-01

    We report on a comparative study of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells deposited on soda-lime glass and mild steel substrates, using atom probe tomography in conjunction with secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence, current density-voltage, and external quantum efficiency measurements. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films deposited on soda-lime glass substrates and on steel substrates with a NaF precursor layer on top of the Mo back contact contain a significant amount of Na impurities and yield an enhanced open circuit voltage and fill factor. Using atom probe tomography, Na atoms are found to be segregated at grain boundaries and clustered in both bulk and grain boundaries. The atom probe data indicate that NaCu point defects are most likely formed at grain boundaries, reducing the number of compensating InCu point defects and thus contributing to an enhanced cell efficiency. However, for steel substrates the positive effect of Na on the cell performance is counterbalanced by the incorporation of Fe impurities into the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 film. Fe atoms are homogeneously distributed inside the grains suggesting that Fe introduces point defects in the bulk

  6. O(3P) atoms as a chemical probe of surface ordering in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Waring, Carla; Bagot, Paul A J; Slattery, John M; Costen, Matthew L; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2010-04-15

    The reactivity of photolytically generated, gas-phase, ground-state atomic oxygen, O((3)P), with the surfaces of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([NTf(2)]) ionic liquids has been investigated. The liquids differ only in the length of the linear C(n)H(2n+1) alkyl side chain on the cation, with n = 2, 4, 5, 8, and 12. Laser-induced fluorescence was used to detect gas-phase OH v' = 0 radicals formed at the gas-liquid interface. The reactivity of the ionic liquids increases nonlinearly with n, in a way that cannot simply be explained by stoichiometry. We infer that the alkyl chains must be preferentially exposed at the interface to a degree that is dependent on chain length. A relatively sharp onset of surface segregation is apparent in the region of n = 4. The surface specificity of the method is confirmed through the nonthermal characteristics of both the translational and rotational distributions of the OH v' = 0. These reveal that the dynamics are dominated by a direct, impulsive scattering mechanism at the outer layers of the liquid. The OH v' = 0 yield is effectively independent of the bulk temperature of the longest-chain ionic liquid in the range 298-343 K, also consistent with a predominantly direct mechanism. These product attributes are broadly similar to those of the benchmark pure hydrocarbon liquid, squalane, but a more detailed analysis suggests that the interface may be microscopically smoother for the ionic liquids.

  7. Probing anisotropic surface properties and interaction forces of chrysotile rods by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dingzheng; Xie, Lei; Bobicki, Erin; Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-09-16

    Understanding the surface properties and interactions of nonspherical particles is of both fundamental and practical importance in the rheology of complex fluids in various engineering applications. In this work, natural chrysotile, a phyllosilicate composed of 1:1 stacked silica and brucite layers which coil into cylindrical structure, was chosen as a model rod-shaped particle. The interactions of chrysotile brucite-like basal or bilayered edge planes and a silicon nitride tip were measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The force-distance profiles were fitted using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, which demonstrates anisotropic and pH-dependent surface charge properties of brucite-like basal plane and bilayered edge surface. The points of zero charge (PZC) of the basal and edge planes were estimated to be around pH 10-11 and 6-7, respectively. Rheology measurements of 7 vol % chrysotile (with an aspect ratio of 14.5) in 10 mM NaCl solution showed pH-dependent yield stress with a local maximum around pH 7-9, which falls between the two PZC values of the edge and basal planes of the rod particles. On the basis of the surface potentials of the edge and basal planes obtained from AFM measurements, theoretical analysis of the surface interactions of edge-edge, basal-edge, and basal-basal planes of the chrysotile rods suggests the yield stress maximum observed could be mainly attributed to the basal-edge attractions. Our results indicate that the anisotropic surface properties (e.g., charges) of chrysotile rods play an important role in the particle-particle interaction and rheological behavior, which also provides insight into the basic understanding of the colloidal interactions and rheology of nonspherical particles.

  8. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-01-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips. PMID:27840664

  9. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  10. Probing surface adhesion forces of Enterococcus faecalis to medical-grade polymers using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Annie; Carrigan, Shawn D; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2004-05-11

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial adhesion forces of the uropathogen Enterococcus faecalis with the medical-grade polymers polyurethane (PU), polyamide (PA), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE). To quantify the cell-substrate adhesion forces, a method was developed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid that allows for the detachment of individual live cells from a polymeric surface through the application of increasing force using unmodified cantilever tips. Results show that the lateral force required to detach E. faecalis cells from a substrate differed depending on the nature of the polymeric surface: a force of 19 +/- 4 nN was required to detach cells from PU, 6 +/- 4 nN from PA, and 0.7 +/- 0.3 nN from PTFE. Among the unfluorinated polymers (PU and PA), surface wettability was inversely proportional to the strength of adhesion. AFM images also demonstrated qualitative differences in bacterial adhesion; PU was covered by clusters of cells with few cell singlets present, whereas PA was predominantly covered by individual cells. Moreover, extracellular material could be observed on some clusters of PU-adhered cells as well as in the adjacent region surrounding cells adhered on PA. E. faecalis adhesion to the fluorinated polymer (PTFE) showed different characteristics; only a few individual cells were found, and bacteria were easily damaged, and thus detached, by the tip. This work demonstrates the utility of AFM for measurement of cell-substrate lateral adhesion forces and the contribution these forces make toward understanding the initial stages of bacterial adhesion. Further, it suggests that initial adhesion can be controlled, through appropriate biomaterial design, to prevent subsequent formation of aggregates and biofilms.

  11. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  12. Atomic force microscope based near-field imaging for probing cell surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Sina

    Near-membrane and trans-membrane proteins and their interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can yield valuable information about cell dynamics. However, advances in the field of nanoscale cellular processes have been hindered, in part, due to limits imposed by current technology. In this work, a novel evanescent field (EF) imaging technique is designed, modeled, created and tested for near-field imaging in the apical surface of cells. This technique and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) were used to investigate interactions between integrins on the cell surface and the ECM protein, fibronectin. The goal was to monitor changes in the integrin density at the cell surface as a function of clustering after binding to fibronectin on the microsphere surface. For the EF technique, quantum dot (QD)-embedded polystyrene microspheres were used to couple light into whispering gallery modes (WGMs) inside the microspheres; the resulting EF at the surface of the microsphere was used as a near-field excitation source with ~50 nm axial resolution for exciting fluorescently-labeled integrins. For FRET measurements (~10 nm axial resolution), QDs (donors) were coated on the surface of microspheres and energy transfer to red fluorescent protein (RFP)-integrin constructs (acceptors) studied. In both techniques, the QD-modified microspheres were mounted on atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, functionalized with fibronectin, and brought into contact with fluorescently-labeled HeLa or vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. The results obtained from both methods show the clustering and activity of the integrins and are in good agreement with each other. Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA) was used to study the effects of inhomogeneous surrounding refractive index on the quality factor and position of the WGMs due to the attachment of a microsphere to an AFM cantilever. WGMs of various QD-embedded microspheres mounted on AFM cantilevers were experimentally

  13. A novel approach for site-specific atom probe specimen preparation by focused ion beam and transmission electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Babinsky, K; De Kloe, R; Clemens, H; Primig, S

    2014-09-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a suitable technique for chemical analyses with almost atomic resolution. However, the time-consuming site-specific specimen preparation can be improved. Recently, transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) has been established for high resolution crystallographic analyses of thin foils. In this paper we present the first successful application of a combined focused ion beam (FIB)/t-EBSD preparation of site-specific APT specimens using the example of grain boundary segregation in technically pure molybdenum. It will be shown that the preparation of a grain boundary can be substantially accelerated by t-EBSD analyses in-between the annular milling FIB procedure in the same microscope. With this combined method, a grain boundary can easily be recognized and positioned in the first 220nm of an APT sample much faster than e.g. with complementary investigations in a transmission electron microscope. Even more, the high resolution technique of t-EBSD gives the opportunity to get crystallographic information of the mapped area and, therefore, an analysis of the grain boundary character to support the interpretation of the APT data files. To optimize this newly developed technique for the application on needle-shaped APT specimens, a parameter study on enhanced background correction, acceleration voltage, and tilt angle was carried out. An acceleration voltage of 30kV at specimen surface tilt angles between -45° and -35° from horizontal plane leads to the best results. Even for molybdenum the observation of crystal orientation data up to about 200nm specimen thickness is possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Gold-decorated highly ordered self-organized grating-like nanostructures on Ge surface: Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Mollick, Safiul Alam; Kumar, Mohit; Singh, Ranveer; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghose, Debabrata; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-10-28

    Nanoarchitecture by atomic manipulation is considered to be one of the emerging trends in advanced functional materials. It has a gamut of applications to offer in nanoelectronics, chemical sensing, and nanobiological science. In particular, highly ordered one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures fabricated by self-organization methods are in high demand for their high aspect ratios and large number of applications. An efficient way of fabricating semiconductor nanostructures is by molecular beam epitaxy, where atoms are added to a crystalline surface at an elevated temperature during growth, yielding the desired structures in a self-assembled manner. In this article, we offer a room temperature process, in which atoms are sputtered away by ion impacts. Using gold ion implantation, the present study reports on the formation of highly ordered self-organized long grating-like nanostructures, with grooves between them, on a germanium surface. The ridges of the patterns are shown to have flower-like protruding nanostructures, which are mostly decorated by gold atoms. By employing local probe microscopic techniques like Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe a spatial variation in the work function and different nanoscale electrical conductivity on the ridges of the patterns and the grooves between them, which can be attributed to gold atom decorated ridges. Thus, the architecture  presented offers the advantage of using the patterned germanium substrates as periodic arrays of conducting ridges and poorly conducting grooves between them.

  15. Gold-decorated highly ordered self-organized grating-like nanostructures on Ge surface: Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam Mollick, Safiul; Kumar, Mohit; Singh, Ranveer; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghose, Debabrata; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-10-01

    Nanoarchitecture by atomic manipulation is considered to be one of the emerging trends in advanced functional materials. It has a gamut of applications to offer in nanoelectronics, chemical sensing, and nanobiological science. In particular, highly ordered one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures fabricated by self-organization methods are in high demand for their high aspect ratios and large number of applications. An efficient way of fabricating semiconductor nanostructures is by molecular beam epitaxy, where atoms are added to a crystalline surface at an elevated temperature during growth, yielding the desired structures in a self-assembled manner. In this article, we offer a room temperature process, in which atoms are sputtered away by ion impacts. Using gold ion implantation, the present study reports on the formation of highly ordered self-organized long grating-like nanostructures, with grooves between them, on a germanium surface. The ridges of the patterns are shown to have flower-like protruding nanostructures, which are mostly decorated by gold atoms. By employing local probe microscopic techniques like Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe a spatial variation in the work function and different nanoscale electrical conductivity on the ridges of the patterns and the grooves between them, which can be attributed to gold atom decorated ridges. Thus, the architecture presented offers the advantage of using the patterned germanium substrates as periodic arrays of conducting ridges and poorly conducting grooves between them.

  16. Synthesis of atom probe experiments on irradiation-induced solute segregation in French ferritic pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Welzel, S.; Van Duysen, J.-C.

    2000-08-01

    Microstructural changes due to neutron irradiation cause an evolution of the mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steels. This paper aims at identifying and characterising the microstructural changes which have been found to be responsible in part for the observed embrittlement. This intensive work relies principally on an atom probe (AP) study of a low Cu-level French RPV steel (Chooz A). This material has been irradiated in in-service conditions for 0-16 years in the frame of the surveillance program. Under this aging condition, solute clustering occurs (Cu, Ni, Mn, Si, P, …). In order to identify the role of copper, experiments were also carried out on Fe-Cu model alloys submitted to different types of irradiations (neutron, electron, ion). Cu-cluster nucleation appears to be directly related to the presence of displacement cascades during neutron (ion) irradiation. The operating basic physical process is not clearly identified yet. A recovery of the mechanical properties of the irradiated material can be achieved by annealing treatments (20 h at 450°C in the case of the RPV steel under study, following microhardness measurements). It has been shown that the corresponding microstructural evolution was a rapid dissolution of the high number density of irradiation-induced solute clusters and the precipitation of a very low number density of Cu-rich particles.

  17. Atom probe tomography of a Ti-Si-Al-C-N coating grown on a cemented carbide substrate.

    PubMed

    Thuvander, M; Östberg, G; Ahlgren, M; Falk, L K L

    2015-12-01

    The elemental distribution within a Ti-Si-Al-C-N coating grown by physical vapour deposition on a Cr-doped WC-Co cemented carbide substrate has been investigated by atom probe tomography. Special attention was paid to the coating/substrate interface region. The results indicated a diffusion of substrate binder phase elements into the Ti-N adhesion layer. The composition of this layer, and the Ti-Al-N interlayer present between the adhesion layer and the main Ti-Si-Al-C-N layer, appeared to be sub-stoichiometric. The analysis of the interlayer showed the presence of internal surfaces, possibly grain boundaries, depleted in Al. The composition of the main Ti-Al-Si-C-N layer varied periodically in the growth direction; layers enriched in Ti appeared with a periodicity of around 30 nm. Laser pulsing resulted in a good mass resolution that made it possible to distinguish between N(+) and Si(2+) at 14 Da. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of deformation-induced trace element migration in zircon resolved by atom probe and correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven M.; van Riessen, Arie; Saxey, David W.; Johnson, Tim E.; Rickard, William D. A.; Fougerouse, Denis; Fischer, Sebastian; Prosa, Ty J.; Rice, Katherine P.; Reinhard, David A.; Chen, Yimeng; Olson, David

    2016-12-01

    The widespread use of zircon in geochemical and geochronological studies of crustal rocks is underpinned by an understanding of the processes that may modify its composition. Deformation during tectonic and impact related strain is known to modify zircon trace element compositions, but the mechanisms by which this occurs remain unresolved. Here we combine electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction and atom probe microscopy to investigate trace element migration associated with a ∼20 nm wide, 2° low-angle subgrain boundary formed in zircon during a single, high-strain rate, deformation associated with a bolide impact. The low-angle boundary shows elevated concentrations of both substitutional (Y) and interstitial (Al, Mg and Be) ions. The observed compositional variations reflect a dynamic process associated with the recovery of shock-induced vacancies and dislocations into lower energy low-angle boundaries. Y segregation is linked to the migration and localisation of oxygen vacancies, whilst the interstitial ions migrate in association with dislocations. These data represent the direct nanoscale observation of geologically-instantaneous, trace element migration associated with crystal plasticity of zircon and provide a framework for further understanding mass transfer processes in zircon.

  19. High Resolution Dopant Profiles Revealed by Atom Probe Tomography and STEM-EBIC for CdTe Based Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba; ...

    2016-01-01

    Segregated elements and their diffusion profiles within grain boundaries and interfaces resulting from post deposition heat treatments are revealed using atom probe tomography (APT), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques. The results demonstrate how these techniques complement each other to provide conclusive evidence for locations of space charge regions and mechanisms that create them at the nanoscale. Most importantly, a Cl dopant profile that extends ~5 nm into CdTe grains interfacing the CdS is shown using APT and STEM synergy, which has been shown to push the pn-junction into the CdTe layer indicative ofmore » a homojunction (revealed by STEM EBIC). In addition, Cu and Cl concentrations within grain boundaries within several nms and µms from the CdS/CdTe interface are compared, Na segregation of <0.1% is detected, and S variations of ~1–3% are witnessed between CdTe grains close to the CdS/CdTe interface. The segregation and diffusion of these elements directly impacts on the material properties, such as band gap energy and n/p type properties. Optimization of the interfacial and grain boundary doping will lead to higher efficiency solar cells.« less

  20. High Resolution Dopant Profiles Revealed by Atom Probe Tomography and STEM-EBIC for CdTe Based Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba; Guo, Wei; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Segregated elements and their diffusion profiles within grain boundaries and interfaces resulting from post deposition heat treatments are revealed using atom probe tomography (APT), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques. The results demonstrate how these techniques complement each other to provide conclusive evidence for locations of space charge regions and mechanisms that create them at the nanoscale. Most importantly, a Cl dopant profile that extends ~5 nm into CdTe grains interfacing the CdS is shown using APT and STEM synergy, which has been shown to push the pn-junction into the CdTe layer indicative of a homojunction (revealed by STEM EBIC). In addition, Cu and Cl concentrations within grain boundaries within several nms and µms from the CdS/CdTe interface are compared, Na segregation of <0.1% is detected, and S variations of ~1–3% are witnessed between CdTe grains close to the CdS/CdTe interface. The segregation and diffusion of these elements directly impacts on the material properties, such as band gap energy and n/p type properties. Optimization of the interfacial and grain boundary doping will lead to higher efficiency solar cells.