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Sample records for atom pyramidal gravimeter

  1. A cold atom pyramidal gravimeter with a single laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Q.; Merlet, S.; Malossi, N.; Dos Santos, F. Pereira; Bouyer, P.; Landragin, A.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for realizing a compact cold atom gravimeter. The use of a hollow pyramidal configuration allows to achieve all functions: trapping, interferometer and detection with a unique laser beam leading to a drastic reduction in complexity and volume. In particular, we demonstrate a relative sensitivity to acceleration of gravity (g) of 1.7×10-7 at one second, with a moderate laser power of 50 mW. This simple geometry combined to such a high sensitivity opens wide perspectives for practical applications.

  2. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    1552-1557 (QUANTUS-IV-Fallturm) and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the SFB 1128 geo-Q. [1] P. Berg et al., Composite-Light-Pulse Technique for High-Precision Atom Interferometry, Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 063002, 2015. [2] A. Peters et al., Measurement of gravitational acceleration by dropping atoms, Nature 400, 849, 1999. [3] D. Schlippert et al., Quantum Test of the Universality of Free Fall, Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 203002, 2014. [4] A. Louchet-Chauvet et al., The influence of transverse motion within an atomic gravimeter, New J. Phys. 13, 065026, 2011. [5] Q. Bodart et al., A cold atom pyramidal gravimeter with a single laser beam, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 134101, 2010. [6] H. Müntinga et al., Interferometry with Bose-Einstein Condensates in Microgravity, Phys. Rev. Lett., 110, 093602, 2013. [7] T. Kovachy et al., Matter Wave Lensing to Picokelvin Temperatures, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 143004, 2015. [8] J. Rudolph et al., A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers, New J. Phys. 17, 065001, 2015.

  3. Atom-Chip Fountain Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abend, S.; Gebbe, M.; Gersemann, M.; Ahlers, H.; Müntinga, H.; Giese, E.; Gaaloul, N.; Schubert, C.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Ertmer, W.; Schleich, W. P.; Rasel, E. M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate a quantum gravimeter by combining the advantages of an atom chip for the generation, delta-kick collimation, and coherent manipulation of freely falling Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with an innovative launch mechanism based on Bloch oscillations and double Bragg diffraction. Our high-contrast BEC interferometer realizes tens of milliseconds of free fall in a volume as little as a one centimeter cube and paves the way for measurements with sub-μ Gal accuracies in miniaturized, robust devices.

  4. Finite-speed-of-light perturbation in atom gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-07-01

    The finite-speed-of-light (FSL) effect is a systematic error in atom gravimeters arising from the time delay due to the propagation of the light. It includes the frequency-chirp-independent part and the frequency-chirp-dependent part, which were not considered completely. The FSL effect in atom gravimeters is different from that in corner-cube absolute gravimeters. In the past, this effect has been widely studied in corner-cube absolute gravimeters, whereas little has been discussed about and done with atom gravimeters. In this paper, we mainly propose a complete analytical study based on a coordinate transformation and on a "perturbation" approach to estimate this effect in an atom gravimeter. This also offers the potential to calculate the general relativistic effects in atom gravimeters. In addition, a comparison with a crude "average-path" analysis is given for a particular case of the FSL effect in atom gravimeters.

  5. Precision atomic gravimeter based on Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altin, P. A.; Johnsson, M. T.; Negnevitsky, V.; Dennis, G. R.; Anderson, R. P.; Debs, J. E.; Szigeti, S. S.; Hardman, K. S.; Bennetts, S.; McDonald, G. D.; Turner, L. D.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.

    2013-02-01

    We present a precision gravimeter based on coherent Bragg diffraction of freely falling cold atoms. Traditionally, atomic gravimeters have used stimulated Raman transitions to separate clouds in momentum space by driving transitions between two internal atomic states. Bragg interferometers utilize only a single internal state, and can therefore be less susceptible to environmental perturbations. Here we show that atoms extracted from a magneto-optical trap using an accelerating optical lattice are a suitable source for a Bragg atom interferometer, allowing efficient beamsplitting and subsequent separation of momentum states for detection. Despite the inherently multi-state nature of atom diffraction, we are able to build a Mach-Zehnder interferometer using Bragg scattering which achieves a sensitivity to the gravitational acceleration of Δg/g = 2.7 × 10-9 with an integration time of 1000 s. The device can also be converted to a gravity gradiometer by a simple modification of the light pulse sequence.

  6. Relativistic effects in atom gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-01-01

    Atom interferometry is currently developing rapidly, which is now reaching sufficient precision to motivate laboratory tests of general relativity. Thus, it is extremely significant to develop a general relativistic model for atom interferometers. In this paper, we mainly present an analytical derivation process and first give a complete vectorial expression for the relativistic interferometric phase shift in an atom interferometer. The dynamics of the interferometer are studied, where both the atoms and the light are treated relativistically. Then, an appropriate coordinate transformation for the light is performed crucially to simplify the calculation. In addition, the Bordé A B C D matrix combined with quantum mechanics and the "perturbation" approach are applied to make a methodical calculation for the total phase shift. Finally, we derive the relativistic phase shift kept up to a sensitivity of the acceleration ˜1 0-14 m/s 2 for a 10 -m -long atom interferometer.

  7. Development of an atomic gravimeter based on atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum; Park, Sang Eon; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Hong, Hyun-Gue; Park, Chang Yong; Lee, Won-Kyu; Yu, Dai-Hyuk

    2015-05-01

    We present an atomic gravimeter under development at KRISS in Korea for precise measurement of absolute gravity. It is based on atomic interference of laser cooled 87Rb atoms in free fall. The temperature of the atoms is cooled to about 5 μK in a magneto-optic trap. Three Raman light pulses are applied for splitting, reflecting and recombining the atoms clouds while the atoms are in free fall. The pulse width and spacing time of Raman pulses is 40 μs and about 50 ms, respectively. During the interferometry, the frequency difference between the two counter-propagating Raman beams is chirped to compensate for Doppler shift induced by gravitational acceleration. The interference signals are measured at different spacing times to find the chirping rate at which the phase of interference fringe is independent of the spacing time. The chirping rate (~ 25.1 MHz/s) corresponds to g .keff/2 π, where keff = k1 +k2 (k1 and k2 are wave numbers for two Raman beams). At present, we are going to introduce an anti-vibration platform and a magnetic shield for accuracy evaluation of the gravimeter. In the presentation, the preliminary results of the KRISS gravimeter will be discussed.

  8. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  9. A compact laser system for the cold atom gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyu; Wang, Zhaoying; Fu, Zhijie; Liu, Weiyong; Lin, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of the technologies in the field of laser cooling atoms, a portable and stable laser system is urgently required for the wide applications based on the cold atoms. In this paper, we report a modular laser system for a gravimeter based on atom interferometry, which enable us to realize high-precision gravity measurements outside of laboratory. The system is based on two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes of 1560 nm, which are used as the master laser and the reference laser respectively. The frequency of the reference laser is locked on a rubidium transition, the master laser is frequency locked on the reference one by the method of beat locking. The master laser is power amplified firstly by the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), and then frequency doubled by using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal to obtain 1 W laser output at 780 nm. The repumping and Raman lasers are generated by adding an electro-optic modulation on the master laser, featuring extremely low phase noise. With this laser system, we obtain a cloud of 87Rb atoms with a temperature of 5 μKin a magneto-optical trapping. And a gravity resolution of 1.0 ×10-8 g within 200 s integration time is reached.

  10. Investigation of the thermal adaptability for a mobile cold atom gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Yu; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Fu, Zhi-Jie; Lin, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The cold atom gravimeter offers the prospect of a new generation of inertial sensors for field applications. We accomplish a mobile atom gravimeter. With the compact and stable system, a sensitivity of 1.4×10-7 g·Hz-1/2 is achieved. Moreover, a continuous gravity monitoring of 80 h is carried out. However, the harsh outdoor environment is a big challenge for the atom gravimeter when it is for field applications. In this paper, we present the preliminary investigation of the thermal adaptability for our mobile cold atom gravimeter. Here, we focus on the influence of the air temperature on the performance of the atom gravimeter. The responses to different factors (such as laser power, fiber coupling efficiency, etc.) are evaluated when there is a great temperature shift of 10 °C. The result is that the performances of all the factors deteriorate to different extent, nevertheless, they can easily recover as the temperature comes back. Finally, we conclude that the variation of air temperature induces the increase of noise and the system error of the atom gravimeter as well, while the process is reversible with the recovery of the temperature. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174249 and 61475139), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA060504), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB329501), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2016FZA3004).

  11. Continuous absolute g monitoring of the mobile LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter - a new tool to calibrate superconducting gravimeters -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, Sébastien; Gillot, Pierre; Cheng, Bing; Pereira Dos Santos, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry allows for the realization of a new generation of instruments for inertial sensing based on laser cooled atoms. We have developed an absolute gravimeter (CAG) based on this technic, which can perform continuous gravity measurements at a high cycling rate. This instrument, operating since summer 2009, is the new metrological french standard for gravimetry. The CAG has been designed to be movable, so as to participate to international comparisons and on field measurements. It took part to several comparisons since ICAG'09 and operated in both urban environments and low noise underground facilities. The atom gravimeter operates with a high cycling rate of 3 Hz. Its sensitivity is predominantly limited by ground vibration noise which is rejected thanks to isolation platforms and correlation with other sensors, such as broadband accelerometers or sismometers. These developments allow us to perform continuous gravity measurements, no matter what the sismic conditions are and even in the worst cases such as during earthquakes. At best, a sensitivity of 5.6 μGal at 1 s measurement time has been demonstrated. The long term stability averages down to 0.1 μGal for long term measurements. Presently, the measurement accuracy is 4 μGal, which we plan to reduce to 1 μGal or below. I will present the instrument, the principle of the gravity acceleration measurement and its performances. I will focus on continuous gravity measurements performed over several years and compared with our superconducting gravimeter iGrav signal. This comparison allows us to calibrate the iGrav scale factor and follow its evolution. Especially, we demonstrate that, thanks to the CAG very high cycling rate, a single day gravity measurement allows to calibrate the iGrav scaling factor with a relative uncertainty as good as 4.10-4.

  12. Time delay and the effect of the finite speed of light in atom gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-08-01

    The propagation time delay due to the finite speed of light (FSL) in atom gravimeters introduces a bias in the gravity measurement, as well as that in classical free-falling corner-cube gravimeters, which is usually termed the FSL effect. For a typical atom gravimeter, the FSL time delay is about several nanoseconds, resulting in the FSL effect, a non-negligible bias in the gravity-acceleration measurement. However, a time delay of about several microseconds, achieved by controlling the Raman-pulse timing directly, contributes a negligible effect. This interesting phenomenon motivates us to make clear two questions: first, what are the origins of the FSL effect in atom gravimeters, and second, what is the difference between the two time delays? Our analysis shows that the FSL effect in atom gravimeters is not just a matter of FSL time delay to a great extent but also the change in the effective wave vector; moreover, the FSL time delay can be quantitatively regarded as the same as the pulse time delay since both actually affect the gravity measurement by changing the two interferometer pulse separations.

  13. Note: A three-dimension active vibration isolator for precision atom gravimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Xiong, Xin; Chen, Le-Le; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-04-15

    An ultra-low frequency active vibration isolator, simultaneously suppressing three-dimensional vibration noise, is demonstrated experimentally. The equivalent natural period of the isolator is 100 s and 12 s for the vertical and horizontal direction, respectively. The vibration noise in the vertical direction is about 50 times reduced during 0.2 and 2 Hz, and 5 times reduced in the other two orthogonal directions in the same frequency range. This isolator is designed for atom gravimeters, especially suitable for the gravimeter whose sensitivity is limited by vibration couplings.

  14. Demonstration of an ultrahigh-sensitivity atom-interferometry absolute gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhong-Kun; Sun, Bu-Liang; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Zhou, Min-Kang; Chen, Le-Le; Zhan, Su; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Luo, Jun

    2013-10-01

    We present an ultrahigh-sensitivity gravimeter based on an 87Rb atom interferometer using stimulated Raman transitions. Compared with our previous work, a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap is added in the new gravimeter to increase the atom number and improve the detection signal-to-noise ratio, and a better optical phase-locked loop system is used to reduce the phase noise of Raman beams. Benefiting from these efforts and the excellent performance of the active vibration isolator, a short-term sensitivity of about 4.2 μGal/Hz (1μGal=1×10-8 m/s2) is reached, which improves the sensitivity by a factor of 2 compared with the former best reported value. By a modulation experiment, we further indicate that the residual vibration noise contribution is about 1.2 μGal/Hz, which implies a possible improvement over the present absolute gravity measurement level by about one order of magnitude. Moreover, we demonstrate a calibration experiment to directly evaluate the sub-μGal resolution of our gravimeter.

  15. Performances and capabilities of the mobile LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, S.; Farah, T.; Lautier, J.; Landragin, A.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2013-12-01

    Atom interferometry technics allow for the realization of a new generation of instruments for inertial sensing based on laser cooled atoms. We have developped an absolute gravimeter (CAG) based on these technics, which can perform continuous gravity measurements at high cycling rate. This instrument, operating since summer 2009 is the new metrological french standard for gravimetry. The CAG has been developped to be movable to participate to international comparisons and on field measurement. It took part to several comparisons such as ICAG'09 and ECAG'11 and operated in urban environment and low noise underground laboratory. The atom gravimeter operates with a high cycling rate of 3 Hz. Its sensitivity is predominantly limited by ground vibration noise which can be rejected thanks to isolation platforms and/or correlation with other sensors such as broadband accelerometers or sismometers. These developments allow us to perform continuous gravity measurements, no matter what the sismic conditions are and even in the worst cases such as during earthquakes. At best, a sensitivity below 1 μGal after only 100 s measurement time without any ground vibration isolation system have been obtained. Presently, the measurement accuracy is 4 μGal, which we plan to reduce to 1 μGal or below. I will present the instrument, the principle of gravity acceleration measurement and its performances and results during comparisons, in different environmental conditions such as at LSBB, an underground laboratory, or during earthquakes. Comparison with our superconducting gravimeter iGrav recently installed in our laboratory will also be presented. Then I will be able to present other geometries for different applications.

  16. Mapping the absolute magnetic field and evaluating the quadratic Zeeman-effect-induced systematic error in an atom interferometer gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qing-Qing; Freier, Christian; Leykauf, Bastian; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Yang, Jun; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2017-09-01

    Precisely evaluating the systematic error induced by the quadratic Zeeman effect is important for developing atom interferometer gravimeters aiming at an accuracy in the μ Gal regime (1 μ Gal =10-8m /s2 ≈10-9g ). This paper reports on the experimental investigation of Raman spectroscopy-based magnetic field measurements and the evaluation of the systematic error in the gravimetric atom interferometer (GAIN) due to quadratic Zeeman effect. We discuss Raman duration and frequency step-size-dependent magnetic field measurement uncertainty, present vector light shift and tensor light shift induced magnetic field measurement offset, and map the absolute magnetic field inside the interferometer chamber of GAIN with an uncertainty of 0.72 nT and a spatial resolution of 12.8 mm. We evaluate the quadratic Zeeman-effect-induced gravity measurement error in GAIN as 2.04 μ Gal . The methods shown in this paper are important for precisely mapping the absolute magnetic field in vacuum and reducing the quadratic Zeeman-effect-induced systematic error in Raman transition-based precision measurements, such as atomic interferometer gravimeters.

  17. Pyramidal Magneto-Optical Atom Traps on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Samuel; Cotter, Joseph; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ramirez-Martinez, Fernando; Trupke, Michael; Hinds, Ed

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and development of scalable arrays of pyramidal magneto-optical micro-traps in silicon as an elegant and simple way of capturing atoms from a thermal vapour directly on the surface of atom chips. The integration of these devices offers good prospects for reducing the cost and complexity of atom-chip experiments. Potential applications range from using an array of small cold atom clouds to map local magnetic field variations or sensing inertial forces. The micropyramids could also serve as single-atom sources for loading integrated optical cavities, allowing for production of single photons on demand for applications in QIP. We form the pyramids using an anisotropic etching process, preferentially etching the 100 plane to produce hollow pyramids in the surface of the wafer. Further processes have been developed to effectively smooth the rough mirror surfaces resulting from the anisotropic etch whilst maintaining the planar structure. We have recently demonstrated that these microfabricated pyramids can trap atoms from a thermal vapour. We present experimental data and associated theoretical models to describe the capture and loss processes of the MOT, as well as the properties of the cold atomic sample in the sub-mm^3 trapping region of the micropyramids.

  18. Development of a portable matter-wave gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desruelle, B.; Menoret, V.; Bouyer, P.; Landragin, A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the research activities conducted by our company for the development of its Absolute Quantum Gravimeter. This instrument relies on the utilization of a free-falling cloud of cold rubidium atoms, whose vertical acceleration is characterized using advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques. In order to meet the tight requirements expressed by geophysicists for field utilization, we have implemented several technological innovations, which allow us to combine state-of-the-art performance with simple operation and excellent transportability. The architecture of our gravimeter is based on the following innovations: - a hollow pyramidal reflector allows us to achieve all the functions (trapping, cooling, atomic state selection, interferometry and detection) with a single laser beam [1]. This scheme leads to a drastic simplification of the sensor head, and a strong reduction of its mass and volume. - An all-fibered laser system based on the frequency doubling of a seed laser operating at 1560 nm [2]. With this approach, we are able to obtain a very compact, reliable and easy to use laser source capable of generating two optical frequencies in the 780.23 nm range with an output power in excess of 250 mW, an excellent polarization extinction ratio and a fast tunability. - a real-time system dedicated to the compensation of ground vibrations [3]. This technique is based on the operation of a low noise seismometer, whose AC acceleration signal is used to correct the atomic interferometer signal. We give a detailed presentation of the instrument architecture and summarize the experimental results we have obtained with our first generation prototype. [1] A cold atom pyramidal gravimeter with a single laser beam, Q. Bodart et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 134101 (2010) [2] "Light-pulse atom interferometry in microgravity", G. Stern et al, Eur. Phys. J. D 53, 353-357 (2009) [3]. "Limits in the sensitivity of a compact atomic interferometer ", J

  19. Generation of a Cold Atom Beam from a Pyramidal Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, J.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Maleki, L.; Bliss, J.; Libbrecht, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    Techniques to generate cold atom beams are of great interest in a variety of applications, from atomic frequency standards and atom optics to experimental studies of Bose-Einstein condensation. Cold atom beams have been produced by slowing thermal atomic beams using the Zeeman-slowing technique or chirped lasers, or using laser-cooling techniques to extract a slow atomic beam from the background gas in a low-pressure vapor cell. These laser-cooling techniques include "atomic funnels" or two-dimensional magneto-optical traps, as well as a variation of the conventional vapor cell magneto-optical trap called the "low-velocity intense source" (LVIS). Variations of the LVIS have been realized with unique trap geometries such as conical or pyramidal mirror traps. The present work implements a simple and robust design based on the pyramidal trap geometry and allows use of a single large diameter (atoms from the background vapor. The four 45 deg mirrors are truncated just before the apex of the pyramid, and the 1 sq cm region at the center of the incident laser beam is retro-reflected by lambda /4 plate with a high-reflectance gold coating on the second surface. A small (1 mm diameter) hole in this retro-optic forms an extraction column for the atoms while maintaining a low conductance between the source region and an adjacent UHV chamber.

  20. Educational Inductive Gravimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2014-01-01

    A simple inductive gravimeter constructed from a rigid plastic pipe and insulated copper wire is described. When a magnet is dropped through the vertically mounted pipe it induces small alternating voltages. These small signals are fed to the microphone input of a typical computer and sampled at a typical rate of 44.1 kHz using a custom computer…

  1. Educational Inductive Gravimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2014-01-01

    A simple inductive gravimeter constructed from a rigid plastic pipe and insulated copper wire is described. When a magnet is dropped through the vertically mounted pipe it induces small alternating voltages. These small signals are fed to the microphone input of a typical computer and sampled at a typical rate of 44.1 kHz using a custom computer…

  2. Traverse gravimeter experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    A semiautomatic self-leveling lunar gravimeter has been designed for the Apollo 17 mission. This traverse gravimeter, which is completely self-contained and powered by an internal battery, was used to measure gravity at predetermined stops along the route of the Lunar Rover Vehicle. The gravity sensor is a vibrating string accelerometer (VSA) enclosed in a temperature-controlled oven and gimballed leveling assembly. This instrument is capable of resolving gravity differences as small as 0.035 milligal (1 mgal = 0.001 cm/s) on the moon and yet also is able to measure the earth's gravity field of 980,000 milligals. Twenty-two measurements were taken on the moon during the Apollo 17 mission, during which the VSA temperature never varied more than 0.005 C. The flight results indicate an instrument accuracy of better than 2 mgal.

  3. Single-crystal diamond pyramids: synthesis and application for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyakova, Feruza T.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the results of investigations aimed at the development and testing of robust, chemically inert single-crystal diamond probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The probes were prepared by assembling common silicon probes with micrometer-sized pyramid-shaped single-crystal diamonds (SCD). The SCD were obtained by the selective thermal oxidation of the polycrystalline films grown by chemical vapor deposition. Electrostatic spray of adhesive coating onto silicon probes was used to attach individual SCD. Geometrical parameters of produced AFM SCD probes were revealed with transmission electron microscopy: the apex angle of the pyramidal diamond crystallite was ˜10 deg, and the curvature radius at the apex was ˜2 to 10 nm. The diamond AFM probes were used for surface imaging of deoxyribonucleic acid deposited on graphite substrate. Obtained results demonstrate high efficiency of the diamond AFM probes, allowing improvement of the image quality compared to standard silicon probes.

  4. Atomic Structure of Pyramidal Defects in GaN:Mg; Influence ofAnnealing

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Tomaszewicz, T.; Zakharov, D.; O'Keefe, M.; Hautakangas, S.; Saarinen, K.; Freitas, J.A.

    2005-10-03

    The atomic structure of the characteristic defects (Mg-rich hexagonal pyramids) in p-doped bulk and MOCVD GaN:Mg thin films grown with Ga polarity was determined at atomic resolution by direct reconstruction of the scattered electron wave in a transmission electron microscope. Small cavities were present inside the defects, confirmed also with positron annihilation. The inside walls of the cavities were covered by GaN of reverse polarity compared to the matrix. Defects in bulk GaN:Mg were almost one order of magnitude larger than in thin films. An exchange of Ga and N sublattices within the defect compared to the matrix lead to a 0.6 {+-} 0.2 {angstrom} displacement between the Ga sublattices of these two areas. A [1100]/3 shift with change from AB stacking in the matrix to BC within the entire pyramid was observed. Annealing of the MOCVD layers lead to slight increase of the defect size and an increase of the photoluminescence intensity. Positron annihilation confirms presence of vacancies of different sizes triggered by the Mg doping in as-grown samples and decrease of their concentration upon annealing at 900 and 1000 C.

  5. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, R P; Samarelli, A; Paul, D J; Hough, J; Rowan, S; Hammond, G D

    2016-03-31

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz(1/2)): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth's crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz(1/2) only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers--found in most smart phones--can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  6. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemiss, R. P.; Samarelli, A.; Paul, D. J.; Hough, J.; Rowan, S.; Hammond, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz1/2): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth’s crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz1/2 only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers—found in most smart phones—can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  7. Testing of a gravimeter LCR G 785

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaness, Pieter J.

    1987-05-01

    Measurements were performed and computer programs developed in order to test the drift of the gravimeter La Coste-Romberg Model G. Test measurements permitted determination of the accuracy of the instrument with respect to spring setting, flattening out, stopping, and gravimeter azimuth. The dynamic behavior of the gravimeter was analyzed with a view to microseism studies. The drift of the gravimeter was determined by tide measurements.

  8. Development of a Portable Matter Wave Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desruelle, B.; Menoret, V.; Vermeulen, P.; Bouyer, P.; Landragin, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present an updated status of the research program our company has been conducting for the development of its Absolute Quantum Gravimeter. This instrument relies on the utilization of advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques, which allow us to precisely characterize the vertical acceleration experienced by a cloud of cold atoms over a free-fall of 10 cm.We present the global conclusions of the results we have obtained with our first generation prototype. We have demonstrated that the technological innovations we have implemented in this instrument were relevant for the development of an absolute gravimeter, and present gravity measurements with a sensitivity lower than 10 μGal after 1000 s of data integration. We also present the results of a comparative measurement conducted with a FG5, which have shown a satisfactory agreement between both instruments.Several technological limitations were identified in our first prototype and we have started to develop a second generation instrument, that will integrate :- a longer fall time in order to improve the short-term sensitivity- an improved atomic detection for an increased signal-to-noise ratio- advanced processing techniques for the compensation of vibrations.This paper will present a detailed review of these innovations and will summarize the experimental characterizations we have performed to evaluate the short-term and long-term sensitivity. We will also present a complete analysis aiming at evaluating the thermal behavior of our instrument, preparing future field operation.

  9. Superatom-atom super-bonding in metallic clusters: a new look to the mystery of an Au20 pyramid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Longjiu; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Jin, Baokang; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-11-07

    Using the super valence bond model, a generalized chemical picture for the electronic shells of an Au20 pyramid is given. It is found that Au20 can be viewed to be a superatomic molecule, of which its superatomic 16c-16e core (T) is in D(3)S hybridization bonded with four vertical Au atoms for the molecule-like (TAu4) electronic shell-closure. Based on such a superatom-atom bonding model, TX4 (X = F, Cl, or Br) are predicted to be very stable. Such a superatom-atom T-Au/T-X bonding enriches the scope of chemistry.

  10. Erbium Doped Fiber Optic Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sánchez, G. G.; Pérez-Torres, J. R.; Flores-Bravo, J. A.; Álvarez-Chávez, J. A.; Martínez-Piñón, F.

    2017-01-01

    Gravimeters are devices that can be used in a wide range of applications, such as mining, seismology, geodesy, archeology, geophysics and many others. These devices have great sensibility, which makes them susceptible to external vibrations like electromagnetic waves. There are several technologies regarding gravimeters that are of use in industrial metrology. Optical fiber is immune to electromagnetic interference, and together with long period gratings can form high sensibility sensors of small size, offering advantages over other systems with different technologies. This paper shows the development of an optical fiber gravimeter doped with Erbium that was characterized optically for loads going from 1 to 10 kg in a bandwidth between 1590nm to 1960nm, displaying a weight linear response against power. Later on this paper, the experimental results show that the previous described behavior can be modeled as characteristic function of the sensor.

  11. Gravimeter using high-temperature superconductor bearing.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1998-09-11

    We have developed a sensitive gravimeter concept that uses an extremely low-friction bearing based on a permanent magnet (PM) levitated over a high-temperature superconductor (HTS). A mass is attached to the PM by means of a cantilevered beam, and the combination of PM and HTS forms a bearing platform that has low resistance to rotational motion but high resistance to horizontal, vertical, or tilting motion. The combination acts as a low-loss torsional pendulum that can be operated in any orientation. Gravity acts on the cantilevered beam and attached mass, accelerating them. Variations in gravity can be detected by time-of-flight acceleration, or by a control coil or electrode that would keep the mass stationary. Calculations suggest that the HTS gravimeter would be as sensitive as present-day superconducting gravimeters that need cooling to liquid helium temperatures, but the HTS gravimeter needs cooling only to liquid nitrogen temperatures.

  12. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon solar cells passivated by an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-10-07

    Inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon (BS) solar cells with an Al2O3 passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been demonstrated. A multi-scale textured BS surface combining silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and inverted pyramids was obtained for the first time by lithography and metal catalyzed wet etching. The reflectance of the as-prepared BS surface was about 2% lower than that of the more commonly reported upright pyramid-based SiNW BS surface over the whole of the visible light spectrum, which led to a 1.7 mA cm(-2) increase in short circuit current density. Moreover, the as-prepared solar cells were further passivated by an ALD-Al2O3 layer. The effect of annealing temperature on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells was investigated. It was found that the values of all solar cell parameters including short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and fill factor exhibit a further increase under an optimized annealing temperature. Minority carrier lifetime measurements indicate that the enhanced cell performance is due to the improved passivation quality of the Al2O3 layer after thermal annealing treatments. By combining these two refinements, the optimized SiNW BS solar cells achieved a maximum conversion efficiency enhancement of 7.6% compared to the cells with an upright pyramid-based SiNWs surface and conventional SiNx passivation.

  13. Calculation of the local density of states for a discrete pyramidal model of a diamond tip surmounted by a single atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskovsky, N. M.; Cutler, P. H.

    1999-09-01

    In a series of recent experiments, diamond cold cathodes have yielded high current at low power (μA to mA at about 10 V). These results, coupled with the extraordinary physical and electronic properties of this wide bandgap material ( Eg≈5.5 eV) make diamond cold cathodes promising candidates for use in flat panel displays, high frequency devices, sensors and other vacuum microelectronics applications. The experimental work on these cathodes has concentrated on thin film composites and needle geometries. It has been proposed that the emission originates from localized asperities (or crystallites) on the film (which can be of nanometer, or even atomic, size) or from very sharp tips approaching atomic size in the case of needle geometry. A quantity important in determining the origin of the tunneling electron states is the local density of states function. In the present work we have calculated the local density of states (LDOS) at an atomically sharp diamond asperity (or tip) using a tight binding model. A pyramidal shaped cluster of 159 atoms is constructed to model the tip. The forces are calculated and used to optimize the atomic geometry of the top six layers of atoms. The bottom layers are fixed to simulate the bulk diamond. The broken symmetry of the pyramidal tip gives rise to unique features in the LDOS compared to the slab or flat-surface geometry. In the tip geometry, there are unoccupied states just above the topmost occupied energy states which gives rise to a more 'metallic' like behavior in the presence of an applied electric field. Since the tunneling characteristics depend strongly on the local density of states at the 'surface', it is expected (without even considering field enhancement effects) that the field electron energy distribution from these tips will be significantly different from so called flat or 'blunt' field emitters.

  14. Building pyramids.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, C

    1999-05-01

    It is easy to build the population pyramids which demographers use to represent the age and sex distribution of a particular population at a specific point in time. With relatively high fertility, the population distribution in most developing countries conforms to the classic pyramid shape. Some developed countries, however, are beginning to show pillar-like shapes, while graphs for selected population subgroups may be considerably different. An inverted pyramid graph is used to illustrate the population distribution of Sun City, Arizona, with the largest population age group being over 79 years old. Instructions are given on how to create population pyramids using Microsoft Excel, a commonly available spreadsheet software program. Population pyramids can also be generated using Population Pyramids 98, a software utility from HPN Technologies, Inc.

  15. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  16. The new Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG): first results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, Sylvain; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Merlet, Sebastien; Desruelle, Bruno; Lautier-Gaud, Jean; Menoret, Vincent; Vermeulen, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Cold atom gravimetry represents one of the most innovative evolution in gravity instrumentation since the last 20 years. The concept of measuring the gravitational acceleration by dropping atoms and the development of the first instrumental devices during this last decade quickly revealed the promising perspectives of this new generation of gravity meters enabling accurate and absolute measurements of the Earth's gravity field for a wide range of applications (geophysics, geodesy, metrology, etc.). The Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG) gravity meter, developed by MUQUANS (Talence, France - http://www.muquans.com/) with the support of RESIF, the French Seismologic and Geodetic Network (http://www.resif.fr/) belongs to this new generation of instruments. It also represents the first commercial device based on the utilization of advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques, which allow to characterize precisely the vertical acceleration experienced by a cloud of cold atoms. Recently, the first operational unit (AQG01) has been achieved as a compact transportable gravimeter with the aim of satisfying absolute gravity measurements in laboratory conditions under the following specifications: measurements the μGal level at a few Hz cycling frequency, sensitivity of 50μGal/√Hz, immunity to ground vibrations, easy and quickness of operation, automated continuous data acquisition for several months, etc. In order to evaluate the current performances of the AQG01, several experiments are carried out in collaboration between RESIF user's teams and the MUQUANS manufacturer on different reference gravity sites and laboratories in France. These measurements performed in indoor conditions including simultaneous observations with classical reference gravity instruments (corner-cube absolute gravity meters, relative superconducting meters) as well with the Cold Atom Gravity meter (CAG) developed by LNE-SYRTE, lead to a first objective characterization of the performances of

  17. High precision tide spectroscopy. [using the superconducting gravimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodkind, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Diurnal and long period earth tides were measured to high accuracy and precision with the superconducting gravimeter. The results provide new evidence on the geophysical questions which have been attacked through earth tide measurements in the past. In addition, they raise new questions of potential interest. Slow fluctuations in gravity of order 10 micron gal over periods of 3 to 5 months were observed and are discussed.

  18. Testing ocean tide models using GGP superconducting gravimeter observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, T.; Bos, M.

    2003-04-01

    Observations from the global network of superconducting gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) are used to test 10 ocean tide models (SCHW; FES94.1, 95.2, 98, 99; CSR3.0, 4.0; TPXO.5; GOT99.2b; and NAO.99b). In addition, observations are used from selected sites with LaCoste and Romberg gravimeters with electrostatic feedback, where special attention has been given to achieving a calibration accuracy of 0.1%. In Europe, there are several superconducting gravimeter stations in a relatively small area and this can be used to advantage in testing the ocean (and body) tide models and in identifying sites with anomalous observations. At some of the superconducting gravimeter sites there are anomalies in the in-phase components of the main tidal harmonics, which are due to calibration errors of up to 0.3%. It is shown that the recent ocean tide models are in better agreement with the tidal gravity observations than were the earlier models of Schwiderski and FES94.1. However, no single ocean tide model gives completely satisfactory results in all areas of the world. For example, for M2 the TPXO.5 and NAO99b models give anomalous results in Europe, whereas the FES95.2, FES98 and FES99 models give anomalous results in China and Japan. It is shown that the observations from this improved set of tidal gravity stations will provide an important test of the new ocean tide models that will be developed in the next few years. For further details see Baker, T.F. and Bos, M.S. (2003). "Validating Earth and ocean tide models using tidal gravity measurements", Geophysical Journal International, 152.

  19. The Absolute Gravimeter FG5 - Adjustment and Residual Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlob, M.; Braun, A.; Henton, J.; Courtier, N.; Liard, J.

    2009-05-01

    The most widely used method of direct terrestrial gravity determination is performed by using a ballistic absolute gravimeter. Today, the FG5 (Micro-g LaCoste; Lafayette, CO) is the most common free-fall absolute gravimeter. It uses the Michelson-type interferometer to determine the absolute gravity value with accuracies up to one part- per-billion of g. Furthermore, absolute gravimeter measurements can be used to assist in the validation and interpretation of temporal variations of the global gravity field, e.g. from the GRACE mission. In addition, absolute gravimetry allows for monitoring gravity changes which are caused by subsurface mass redistributions and/or vertical displacements. In this study,adjustment software was developed and applied to the raw data sets of FG5#106 and FG5#236, made available by Natural Resources Canada. Both data sets have been collected at the same time and place which leads to an intercomparison of the instruments performance. The adjustment software was validated against the official FG5 software package developed by Micro-g Lacoste. In order to identify potential environmental or instrument disturbances in the observed time series, a Lomb- Scargle periodogram analysis was employed. The absolute gravimeter FG5 is particularly sensitive to low frequencies between 0-3Hz. Hence, the focus of the analysis is to detect signals in the band of 0-100 Hz. An artificial signal was added to the measurements for demonstration purposes. Both the performance of the adjustment software and the Lomb-Scargle analysis will be discussed.

  20. SGA-WZ: a new strapdown airborne gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yangming; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Wu, Meiping; Zhang, Kaidong

    2012-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems and gravimeters are now routinely used to map the regional gravitational quantities from an aircraft with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. However, airborne gravimeter of this kind is limited by the inaccuracy of the inertial sensor performance, the integrated navigation technique and the kinematic acceleration determination. As the GPS technique developed, the vehicle acceleration determination is no longer the limiting factor in airborne gravity due to the cancellation of the common mode acceleration in differential mode. A new airborne gravimeter taking full advantage of the inertial navigation system is described with improved mechanical design, high precision time synchronization, better thermal control and optimized sensor modeling. Apart from the general usage, the Global Positioning System (GPS) after differentiation is integrated to the inertial navigation system which provides not only more precise altitude information along with the navigation aiding, but also an effective way to calculate the vehicle acceleration. Design description and test results on the performance of the gyroscopes and accelerations will be emphasized. Analysis and discussion of the airborne field test results are also given.

  1. Testing Ocean Tide Models Using Superconducting Gravimeter Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, T. F.; Bos, M. S.

    2002-12-01

    Observations from the global network of superconducting gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) are used to test 10 recent ocean tide models. In addition, observations are used from selected sites with LaCoste and Romberg gravimeters with electrostatic feedback, where special attention has been given to achieving a calibration accuracy of 0.1%. At some superconducting gravimeter sites there are anomalies in the in-phase components of the main tidal harmonics, which are due to calibration errors of up to 0.3%. It is shown that the recent ocean tide models are in better agreement with the tidal gravity observations than were the earlier models of Schwiderski and FES94.1. However, no single ocean tide model gives completely satisfactory results in all areas of the world. For example, for M2 the TPXO.5 and NAO99b models give anomalous results in Europe, whereas the FES95.2, FES98 and FES99 models give anomalous results in China and Japan. It is shown that the observations from this improved set of tidal gravity stations will provide an important test of the new ocean tide models that will be developed in the next few years.

  2. Continuous gravity observations at active volcanoes through superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Greco, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous gravity measurements at active volcanoes are usually taken through spring gravimeters that are easily portable and do not require much power to work. However, intrinsic limitations dictate that, when used in continuous, these instruments do not provide high-quality data over periods longer than some days. Superconducting gravimeters (SG), that feature a superconducting sphere in a magnetic field as the proof mass, provide better-quality data than spring gravimeters, but are bigger and need mains electricity to work, implying that they cannot be installed close to the active structures of high volcanoes. An iGrav SG was installed on Mt. Etna (Italy) in September 2014 and has worked almost continuously since then. It was installed about 6km from the active craters in the summit zone of the volcano. Such distance is normally too much to observe gravity changes due to relatively fast (minutes to days) volcanic processes. Indeed, mass redistributions in the shallowest part of the plumbing system induce short-wavelength gravity anomalies, centered below the summit craters. Nevertheless, thanks to the high precision and long-term stability of SGs, it was possible to observe low-amplitude changes over a wide range of timescales (minutes to months), likely driven by volcanic activity. Plans are in place for the implementation of a mini-array of SGs at Etna.

  3. Comparisons of different observation methods of a LaCoste and Romberg G gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkola, L.

    The LaCoste and Romberg gravimeters can be observed by three different methods: optically, with the gravimeters' own galvanometers and with digital voltmeters together with electronic filters. Field measurements and laboratory tests have been made by these methods with LCR G600 in the Finnish Geodetic Institute for comparing the accuracy of the method.

  4. Remarks on superconducting gravimeter calibration by co-located gravity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurers, B.; Blaumoser, N.; Ullrich, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    Using absolute gravimetry for site by site recording of temporal gravity variations is the most common method to calibrate stationary relative gravimeters, specifically superconducting gravimeters. This method is based on the assumption that both sensors record the same gravity signal. Actually, this condition is never perfectly fulfilled, not even when absolute gravimeters are involved. Instrumental effects like drift are the main reason. Therefore the situation dramatically deteriorates if spring gravimeters are applied as reference due to their large and sometimes irregular drift. This paper investigates the role of instrumental drift at calibration experiments based both on absolute and spring gravimeters and how the calibration results improve if drift is considered even in case of absolute gravimeters. The question whether spring gravimeters can reliably support SG calibration is discussed especially under the aspect of appropriate drift modelling. The accuracy which is presently achievable with FG5 absolute gravimeters strongly depends on the drop-to-drop scatter and therefore on the site noise. E.g. at Conrad observatory (Austria) the difference between the mean calibration factor obtained when drift is or is not taken into account turns out to be in the same order of magnitude as the error, i.e. the improvement by a common drift adjustment is just at the error limit. Nevertheless, based on this result, adjusting the instrumental drift is recommended. This will especially hold when further instrumental improvements reduce the drop-to-drop scatter or even presently at low noise stations.

  5. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  6. High tilt susceptibility of the Scintrex CG-5 relative gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reudink, R.; Klees, R.; Francis, O.; Kusche, J.; Schlesinger, R.; Shabanloui, A.; Sneeuw, N.; Timmen, L.

    2014-06-01

    We report on the susceptibility of the Scintrex CG-5 relative gravimeters to tilting, that is the tendency of the instrument of providing incorrect readings after being tilted (even by small angles) for a moderate period of time. Tilting of the instrument can occur when in transit between sites usually on the backseat of a car even using the specially designed transport case. Based on a series of experiments with different instruments, we demonstrate that the readings may be offset by tens of Gal. In addition, it may take hours before the first reliable readings can be taken, with the actual time depending on how long the instrument had been tilted. This sensitivity to tilt in combination with the long time required for the instrument to provide reliable readings has not yet been reported in the literature and is not addressed adequately in the Scintrex CG-5 user manual. In particular, the inadequate instrument state cannot easily be detected by checking the readings during the observation or by reviewing the final data before leaving a site, precautions suggested by Scintrex Ltd. In regional surveys with car transportation over periods of tens of minutes to hours, the gravity measurements can be degraded by some 10 Gal. To obtain high-quality results in line with the CG-5 specifications, the gravimeters must remain in upright position to within a few degrees during transits. This requirement may often be unrealistic during field observations, particularly when observing in hilly terrain or when walking with the instrument in a backpack.

  7. Development of a submersible gravimeter on underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Kanazawa, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Shinohara, M.; Ishihara, T.; Araya, A.; Iizasa, K.; Tsukioka, S.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity is one of the powerful indices to profile underground structures. Surface ship gravimeters are popular tool for the purpose of collecting gravity values in marine region. They enable you to obtain gravity values from large area easily, while the resolutions are relatively low because of the distance between the sea surface and bottom. Otherwise, ocean bottom gravimeters are able to be observed gravity with high resolution, but they have still covered few limited sites so that they are designed to do observation in quiet only. In some cases, such as hydrothermal deposit survey, the medium performance both in resolution and size of survey area are required. This paper describes a gravimeter we have been developing for satisfying the requirements. Our target is to detect gravity anomalies less than 1 mgal by using an underwater vehicle. This setting is roughly equivalent to find a typical hydrothermal deposit with a dimension of 0.5 km x 0.5 km x 10 m and a density contrast of 1 g/cm3 when we set the sensor at 50 m high from the seafloor. There are some issues such as noise reduction, robustness and downsizing to clear the target. A gravity sensor (Micro-g LaCoste S-174) is mounted on a gimbal control unit with an inertial navigation sensor for the problems. These are stored in a sphere vessel made of titanium alloy (125 kgf in air, 32 kgf in water) and it is available in 3500 m below sea surface. Furthermore, in order to reduce high frequency noise due to mainly the vehicle motion through a low-pass filter, data are able to be stored at sampling rates of approximately 100 Hz. The logging system and control unit for communication to/from ship is stored another canister (22 kgf in air, 10 kgf in water). We made gravity measurement experiments to examine the effectiveness of the gimbal system and filtering application. The gravimeter was set on a machine simulating pitch and roll motions with a period of 16 s and an amplitude of 7.5 degrees, which is greater

  8. Effects of impedance mismatch and coaxial cable length on absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Křen, Petr; Pálinkáš, Vojtech; Mašika, Pavel; Vaľko, Miloš

    2017-04-01

    The systematic effects of absolute gravimeters have to be investigated to fully utilize their capabilities in metrology and geosciences. In Křen et al (2016 Metrologia 53 27–40) we found that for an FG5 gravimeter, even a few meter long coaxial cable used for transmission of fringe signal causes systematic features in residuals and errors at the level of 1–2 µGal. In this paper, we present experimental results and appropriate models to explain the effects that were found to be caused by impedance mismatches of electronic components and dispersion effects in coaxial cables of gravimeters. The experimental results have been obtained for analogue and transistor–transistor logic (TTL) compatible signals in the FG5-215 gravimeter and for a TTL signal in the FG5X-251 gravimeter. We found that dispersion and impedance mismatch effects are similar for both gravimeters. Furthermore, we describe a model of the dispersion that allows an evaluation of the effect/correction for a given range of the free-fall and thus it is also applicable to other gravimeters. The effect of impedance mismatch for the analogue fringe signal is modelled as an effect of the reflected electronic signal on the evaluation of zero-crossings. The applicability of this model for TTL signal is also discussed.

  9. Rebuilding the Food Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willet, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the old food guide pyramid released in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Contradicts the message that fat is bad, which was presented to the public by nutritionists, and the effects of plant oils on cholesterol. Introduces a new food pyramid. (YDS)

  10. Rebuilding the Food Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willet, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the old food guide pyramid released in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Contradicts the message that fat is bad, which was presented to the public by nutritionists, and the effects of plant oils on cholesterol. Introduces a new food pyramid. (YDS)

  11. Key technologies and applications of laser cooling and trapping {sup 87}Rb atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, Ning Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-06-28

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter. In this paper development and the important applications of laser cooling and trapping atoms are introduced, some key techniques which are used to obtain {sup 87}Rb cold atoms in our experiments are also discussed.

  12. Oxidation sharpening, template stripping, and passivation of ultra-sharp metallic pyramids and wedges.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyungsoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-26

    Ultra-sharp metallic pyramids and wedges with tunable tip angles and 5-nm tip radii are replicated from oxidation-sharpened silicon templates with high throughput (80 million pyramids per wafer). Atomic layer deposition of Al2 O3 shells can protect these sharp pyramidal tips for subsequent usage in near-field imaging.

  13. Monitoring Groundwater Variations Using a Portable Absolute Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Nishijima, Jun; Hasegawa, Takashi; Sofyan, Yayan; Taniguchi, Makoto; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Delinom, Robert M.

    2010-05-01

    In urbanized areas, one of the urgent problems is to monitor the groundwater variations especially connected with land subsidence. Although the groundwater variations are usually measured by water level meters, gravity measurements can provide us additional information about the water mass movements which should be beneficial for the analyses of groundwater flow and the managements of water resources as well. Therefore, in order to establish a new technique to monitor the groundwater variations by means of the gravity measurements, we investigated the applicability of a portable type absolute gravimeter (Micro-G LaCoste Inc. A10-017). We will report the results of some test measurements in Japan, and the outline of the surveys in Jakarta, Indonesia. As for the absolute gravity measurements, FG-5 of MGL would be more popular. FG-5 is a high precision absolute gravimeter with a 2ugal-accuracy for laboratory use, while the nominal accuracy of A-10 is 10ugal (measurement precision: ±5ugal). In spite of the disadvantage, A-10 is well suited for the field surveys because it is much smaller than FG-5 and can be operated with 12VDC power. The repeated measurements using A10-017 in Kyushu University show good correlations between the measured gravity values and the groundwater levels in nearby observation wells. In a geothermal plant of Takigami, we also observed the gravity changes associated with the cycle of the geothermal fluid. All these test measurements have proved that the gravimeter can achieve a 10ugal (10nm/s2) or better accuracy in the field surveys. In Jakarta, Indonesia, excess groundwater pumping is going on and it causes land subsidence. To reveal the associated gravity changes, we conducted the first gravity survey in August 2008 and the second survey in July 2009. Mainly due to the instrumental troubles during the 2008 surveys, we have not obtained enough reliable data yet. Nevertheless the result obtained so far suggested the gravity increases in the

  14. Comparisons of absolute gravimeters (COOMET.M.G-S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnichenko, Mr Alexander; Germak, Alessandro, Dr

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the results of the RMO supplementary comparison COOMET.M.G-S1 (also known as bilateral comparison COOMET 634/UA/14). The comparison measurements between the two participants NSC 'IM' (pilot laboratory) and INRIM were started in December 2015 and finished in January 2016. Participants of comparisons were conducted at their national standards the measurements of the free fall acceleration in gravimetric point laboratory of absolute gravimetry of INRIM named INRiM.2. Absolute measurements of gravimetric acceleration were conducted by ballistic gravimeters. The agreement between the two participants is good. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Marine gravimetry using the strapdown gravimeter SGA-WZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shaokun; Tie, Junbo; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang; Wu, Meiping

    2017-06-01

    Gravity can be measured in many ways, from static-point observations to dynamic measurement using land vehicles, ships, aircrafts and satellites. China has developed a gravimetry system based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System) named SGA-WZ. This system is the first strapdown gravimetry system in China. Some airborne gravimetry campaigns have been implemented using SGA-WZ. The flight tests indicate that the accuracy of SGA-WZ is 1.5 mGal at a 4.8 km resolution. To test the performance of SGA-WZ when installed on a ship, a marine gravimetry campaign was conducted in the South China Sea in August 2013. In the test, a state-of-the-art commercial sea gravimeter, the LaCoste & Romberg (L&R), was mounted side by side with SGA-WZ. The test contained 30 survey lines in the west-east direction and four groups of repeat lines in four directions; the evaluation of the repeatability was based on repeat lines. The measurement and in-movement alignment algorithm for strapdown gravimeters in the sea are discussed, and the results and analysis of this test are presented. The results from the repeated lines and the comparison with L&R showed that the accuracy of SGA-WZ is at the level of 1 mGal with a resolution between 0.4 and 0.8 km for shipborne gravimetry. These results indicate that the strapdown gravimetry system SGA-WZ can be used in marine gravimetry and the moving base alignment method can improve the computation efficiency greatly when using the strapdown gravimetry system.

  16. Lunar Surface Gravimeter Experiment. [characteristics of test equipment installed on lunar surface during Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giganti, J. J.; Larson, J. V.; Richard, J. P.; Weber, J.

    1973-01-01

    The lunar surface gravimeter which was emplaced on the moon by the Apollo 17 flight is described and a schematic diagram of the sensor is provided. The objective of the lunar surface gravimeter is to use the moon as an instrumented antenna to detect gravitational waves. Another objective is to measure tidal deformation of the moon. Samples of signals received during lunar sunrise activity and during quiet periods are presented in graph form based on power spectrum analysis

  17. Results of the first North American comparison of absolute gravimeters, NACAG-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerge, D.; Francis, O.; Henton, J.; Ingles, D.; Jones, D.; Kennedy, J.; Krauterbluth, K.; Liard, J.; Newell, D.; Sands, R.; Schiel, A.; Silliker, J.; van Westrum, D.

    2012-08-01

    The first North American Comparison of absolute gravimeters (NACAG-2010) was hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at its newly renovated Table Mountain Geophysical Observatory (TMGO) north of Boulder, Colorado, in October 2010. NACAG-2010 and the renovation of TMGO are part of NGS's GRAV-D project (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum). Nine absolute gravimeters from three countries participated in the comparison. Before the comparison, the gravimeter operators agreed to a protocol describing the strategy to measure, calculate, and present the results. Nine sites were used to measure the free-fall acceleration of g. Each gravimeter measured the value of g at a subset of three of the sites, for a total set of 27 g-values for the comparison. The absolute gravimeters agree with one another with a standard deviation of 1.6 μGal (1 Gal ≡ 1 cm s -2). The minimum and maximum offsets are -2.8 and 2.7 μGal. This is an excellent agreement and can be attributed to multiple factors, including gravimeters that were in good working order, good operators, a quiet observatory, and a short duration time for the experiment. These results can be used to standardize gravity surveys internationally.

  18. Results of the first North American comparison of absolute gravimeters, NACAG-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmerge, David; Francis, Olvier; Henton, J.; Ingles, D.; Jones, D.; Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Krauterbluth, K.; Liard, J.; Newell, D.; Sands, R.; Schiel, J.; Silliker, J.; van Westrum, D.

    2012-01-01

    The first North American Comparison of absolute gravimeters (NACAG-2010) was hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at its newly renovated Table Mountain Geophysical Observatory (TMGO) north of Boulder, Colorado, in October 2010. NACAG-2010 and the renovation of TMGO are part of NGS’s GRAV-D project (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum). Nine absolute gravimeters from three countries participated in the comparison. Before the comparison, the gravimeter operators agreed to a protocol describing the strategy to measure, calculate, and present the results. Nine sites were used to measure the free-fall acceleration of g. Each gravimeter measured the value of g at a subset of three of the sites, for a total set of 27 g-values for the comparison. The absolute gravimeters agree with one another with a standard deviation of 1.6 µGal (1 Gal = 1 cm s-2). The minimum and maximum offsets are -2.8 and 2.7 µGal. This is an excellent agreement and can be attributed to multiple factors, including gravimeters that were in good working order, good operators, a quiet observatory, and a short duration time for the experiment. These results can be used to standardize gravity surveys internationally.

  19. Pyramid image codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  20. A gyro-stabilized platform leveling loop for marine gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P. F.; Liu, L. T.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, M.; Zhou, Z. B.; Zou, Z.

    2017-06-01

    An ultra-low-frequency platform leveling loop based on a mixed sensitivity H∞ approach, which considers both the system bandwidth and response speed, was designed and applied to a prototype, two-axis gyro-stabilized platform marine gravimeter CHZ-II. The instrument was developed for regional surveys in deep ocean areas where high-resolution gravity measurements with accuracy 1 mGal are required. Horizontal accelerations in the surge and sway directions are suppressed about 60 dB in the frequency range 0.05 to 0.5 Hz. This typically improves the quality of the gravity data before any processing corrections. The time required for stabilizing the platform at the beginning of a survey line or course change is about 3 min, which improves the data collection efficiency. In May 2015, the first test was conducted in open sea conditions aboard the Chinese State Oceanic Administration's R/V Xiangyanghong 10. Sixteen traverses were run in the South China Sea to evaluate the loop performance. Platform motion tracks and gravity data from the survey were of satisfactory quality. According to analyses of 16 sets of calculated errors, the root mean square repeatability of the pitch and roll off-level angles were less than 10 and 20 arc sec, respectively, with a horizontal acceleration of about 50 Gal. Errors derived from the inability of the platform to maintain perfect sensor leveling during the survey cruise were less than 0.3 mGal.

  1. Using absolute gravimeter data to determine vertical gravity gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The position versus time data from a free-fall absolute gravimeter can be used to estimate the vertical gravity gradient in addition to the gravity value itself. Hipkin has reported success in estimating the vertical gradient value using a data set of unusually good quality. This paper explores techniques that may be applicable to a broader class of data that may be contaminated with "system response" errors of larger magnitude than were evident in the data used by Hipkin. This system response function is usually modelled as a sum of exponentially decaying sinusoidal components. The technique employed here involves combining the x0, v0 and g parameters from all the drops made during a site occupation into a single least-squares solution, and including the value of the vertical gradient and the coefficients of system response function in the same solution. The resulting non-linear equations must be solved iteratively and convergence presents some difficulties. Sparse matrix techniques are used to make the least-squares problem computationally tractable.

  2. Self-attraction effect and correction on the T-1 absolute gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Hu, H.; Wu, K.; Li, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The self-attraction effect (SAE) in an absolute gravimeter is a kind of systematic error due to the gravitation of the instrument to the falling object. This effect depends on the mass distribution of the gravimeter, and is estimated to be a few microgals (1 μGal  =  10-8 m s-2) for the FG5 gravimeter. In this paper, the SAE of a home-made T-1 absolute gravimeter is analyzed and calculated. Most of the stationary components, including the dropping chamber, the laser interferometer, the vibration isolation device and two tripods, are finely modelled, and the related SAEs are computed. In addition, the SAE of the co-falling carriage inside the dropping chamber is carefully calculated because the distance between the falling object and the co-falling carriage varies during the measurement. In order to get the correction of the SAE, two different methods are compared. One is to linearize the SAE curve, the other one is to calculate the perturbed trajectory. The results from these two methods agree with each other within 0.01 μGal. With an uncertainty analysis, the correction of the SAE of the T-1 gravimeter is estimated to be (-1.9  ±  0.1) μGal.

  3. Calibration results of different type spring gravimeters from the repeated measurements of Estonian calibration lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oja, T.; Nikolenko, T.; Türk, K.; Ellmann, A.; Jürgenson, H.

    2010-05-01

    Rigorous calibration of relative spring gravimeter is always needed for obtaining reliable results from the terrestial gravimetric surveys. This study was based on the data of relative gravimeters, observed repeatedly since 2001 on several specially designated calibration lines in Estonia. The two types of gravimeters - LaCoste&Romberg (LCR) G-type (metal spring) and Scintrex CG5 (quartz spring) systems - were investigated in this study. At first the calibration function of the gravimeter's manufacturer was used to convert the field gravity data into the centimetre-gram-second system (CGS) units. After the reduction of converted readings (corrected for the tides, atmosphere, observation elevation etc.), both the linear and nonlinear correctional components of calibration function were parameterized and estimated through the linearised least squares (LS) adjustment. The LS estimates were tested statistically and only the significant corrections of the calibration function were included to the subsequent data conversion. As a result of the study, remarkably improved uncertainty estimations for the results collected with LCR-G (No 4, 113, 115, 191) and CG5 (No 36, 10092) gravimeters in Estonia are presented.

  4. Characterization of the response of spring-based relative gravimeters during paroxysmal eruptions at Etna volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Filippo; Iafolla, Valerio; Pistorio, Antonio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Currenti, Gilda; Napoli, Rosalba; Bonaccorso, Alessandro; Del Negro, Ciro

    2014-12-01

    Gravity time sequences collected at Etna volcano by continuously recording spring-based relative gravimeters showed significant variations in temporal correspondence with paroxysmal eruptions. Since the observed gravity variations can only be partially related to subsurface mass redistribution phenomena, we investigated the instrumental effects due to ground vibrations such as those that accompany explosive activity. We simulated the performances of relative gravimeters with laboratory experiments to estimate their response to vertical and horizontal excitations. Laboratory tests were carried out using a vibrating platform capable of accelerating the instruments with intensities and frequencies, in both the vertical and horizontal directions, observed in the ground vibrations associated with paroxysmal events. The seismic signals recorded at Etna volcano during the 10 April 2011 lava fountain were analyzed to retrieve the parameters used to drive the vibration platform. We tested two gravimeters used for Etna volcano monitoring: the LaCoste & Romberg D#185 (Lafayette, CO, USA) and the Scintrex CG-3 M#9310234 (Concord, ON, Canada). The experiment results highlight that the vibrations resembling the seismic waves propagated during paroxysmal events cause an amplitude response in the gravity readings on the order of several hundred microgals (μGal). Generally, the relationship between the vibrations and the gravimeter response is nonlinear, with a fairly complex dependence on the frequencies and amplitudes of the signals acting on the gravimeters.

  5. Alternative pyramid wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kooten, Maaike; Veran, Jean Pierre; Bradley, Colin

    2017-04-01

    The feasibility of a lenslet-based pyramid wavefront sensor (L-PWFS) and a double roof prism-based PWFS (DR-PWFS) as alternatives to a classical PWFS are investigated in this work. Traditional PWFSs require shallow angles and strict apex tolerances, making them difficult to manufacture. Lenslet arrays and roof prisms, on the other hand, are both common optical components that can be used as a PWFS. Characterizing these alternative pyramids and understanding how they differ from a traditional pyramid will allow the PWFS to become more widely used. The sensitivity of the SUSS microOptics 300-4.7 array and two ios Optics roof prisms are compared with a double PWFS (D-PWFS), as well as the simulated performance of an idealized PWFS for varying amounts of modulation and induced wavefront error. In response to low-order Zernike modes, the L-PWFS shows much lower performance and quicker saturation for large amounts of wavefront errors. The DR-PWFS, on the other hand, performs as well as the D-PWFS for the tests conducted. We conclude from this that the DR-PWFS does provide a feasible alternative to the classical pyramid in a range of applications.

  6. Build a Sierpinski Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity on fractal geometry in which students built a 19-foot-tall Sierpinski pyramid in the Minneapolis Convention Center in conjunction with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) 75th Annual Meeting in April, 1997. Contains 13 references. (ASK)

  7. David Macaulay's Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frew, Andrew W.

    1997-01-01

    Integrating literature and mathematics can be meaningful using David Macaulay's "Pyramid." This article provides an annotated bibliography of picture books, fiction, folk tales, nonfiction, videotapes, audio books, and CD-ROMs for grades 1-12 to support a unit on Egypt. Describes related math activities; and highlights a catalog of…

  8. Monitoring water storage variations in the vadose zone with gravimeters - quantifying the influence of observatory buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Marvin; Güntner, Andreas; Mikolaj, Michal; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse ground-based measurements of gravity have been shown to be sensitive to water storage variations in the surroundings of the gravimeter. They thus have the potential to serve as an integrative observation of storage changes in the vadose zone. However, in almost all cases of continuous gravity measurements, the gravimeter is located within a building which seals the soil beneath it from natural hydrological processes like infiltration and evapotranspiration. As water storage changes in close vicinity of the gravimeter have the strongest influence on the measured signal, it is important to understand the hydrology in the unsaturated soil zone just beneath the impervious building. For this reason, TDR soil moisture sensors were installed in several vertical profiles up to a depth of 2 m underneath the planned new gravimeter building at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell (southeast Germany). In this study, we assess the influence of the observatory building on infiltration and subsurface flow patterns and thus the damping effect on gravimeter data in a two-way approach. Firstly, soil moisture time series of sensors outside of the building area are correlated with corresponding sensors of the same depth beneath the building. The resulting correlation coefficients, time lags and signal to noise relationships are used to find out how and where infiltrating water moves laterally beneath the building and towards its centre. Secondly, a physically based hydrological model (HYDRUS) with high discretization in space and time is set up for the 20 by 20 m area around and beneath the gravimeter building. The simulated spatial distribution of soil moisture in combination with the observed point data help to identify where and to what extent water storage changes and thus mass transport occurs beneath the building and how much this differs to the dynamics of the surroundings. This allows to define the umbrella space, i.e., the volume of the vadose zone where no mass

  9. Measurement time interval based on FPGA in NIM-3 absolute gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuqing; Li, Chunjian; Su, Duowu; Feng, Jinyang; Xu, Jinyi

    2015-02-01

    In order to perform gravity measurement with compact and portable instrument at several ten mGal accuracy level, a digital fringe signal processing method was proposed for the measurement time interval in a ballistic free-fall absolute gravimeter. This method based on the theory of digital phase-shift which was used in the SOPC system on a FPGA DE2 Electric Board and NIOS-II processor produced by Altera company. This method has been successfully used for the measurement of interference fringe numbers and time interval in NIM-3 ballistic free-fall absolute gravimeter.

  10. Set standard deviation, repeatability and offset of absolute gravimeter A10-008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmerge, D.; Francis, O.

    2006-01-01

    The set standard deviation, repeatability and offset of absolute gravimeter A10-008 were assessed at the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics (WULG) in Luxembourg. Analysis of the data indicates that the instrument performed within the specifications of the manufacturer. For A10-008, the average set standard deviation was (1.6 0.6) ??Gal (1Gal ??? 1 cm s -2), the average repeatability was (2.9 1.5) ??Gal, and the average offset compared to absolute gravimeter FG5-216 was (3.2 3.5) ??Gal. ?? 2006 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Compact and robust laser system for onboard atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraz, O.; Lienhart, F.; Charrière, R.; Cadoret, M.; Zahzam, N.; Bidel, Y.; Bresson, A.

    2009-10-01

    We propose a compact and robust laser system at 780 nm for onboard atomic inertial sensors based on rubidium atom interferometry. The principle of this system consists in doubling the frequency of a telecom fiber bench at 1560 nm. The same laser source is used to achieve a magneto-optical trap, matter-wave interferences, and the atomic detection. An atomic gravimeter has been realized and the laser system has been validated under hyper- and microgravity.

  12. PYRAMID ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey was conducted in the Pyramid Roadless Area, California. The area contains mineral showings, but no mineral-resource potential was identified during our studies. Three granodiorite samples on the west side of the roadless area contained weakly anomalous concentrations of uranium. Two samples of roof-pendant rocks, one metasedimentary rock and one metavolcanic rock, contain low concentrations of copper, and of copper and molybdenum, respectively. Although none was identified, the geologic terrane is permissive for mineral occurrences and large-scale, detailed geologic mapping of the areas of metasedimentary and metavolcanic roof pendants in the Pyramid Roadless Area could define a mineral-resource potential for tungsten and precious metals.

  13. Evolution of pyramid morphology during InAs(001) homoepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, J. Bubesh; Yoh, Kanji

    2010-08-16

    Growth of InAs(001) homoepitaxial layer has been carried out especially at the bistable region, where the coexistence of both In-stabilized (4x2) and As-stabilized (2x4) surface reconstruction are found to be predominant. The observation of pyramid morphology in this bistable region is reported here. Atomic force microscopy studies have been performed on such pyramids. The heights of the observed pyramids vary from 12 to 26 nm with their bases from 3.6x1.2 to 18x6.3 {mu}m{sup 2}. Formation of such pyramids in the bistable region is attributed to the unique anomalous As-desorption observed during the surface reconstruction.

  14. Gravimetric observations of water storage change - lysimeters and superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzfeldt, B.; Güntner, A.; Merz, B.; Wziontek, H.

    2009-12-01

    Water storage changes (WSC) are a key component in the water balance equation, but the estimation of local WSC in the subsurface is still a challenging task. Despite many advances of WSC measurement technique, in general, the measurement scale (point scale) differs to the scale of interest. Advances in lysimeter techniques enable the direct measurement of the soil water balance on the field scale, but exclude WSC in greater depths below the lysimeter. Superconducting gravimeter (SG) measurements are influenced by local water mass changes and thus, may allow for observing WSC in the vadose and saturated zone in an integrative way. Vice versa, lysimeters can contribute to the reduction of noise by hydrological surface processes in SG observations. The Geodetic Observatory Wettzell (Germany) is the only place where both systems - a state-of-the-art weighable, suction-controlled lysimeter and a dual sphere SG -measure in parallel at a distance of around 40 m. This gives the unique opportunity to observe in-situ gravimetric WSC at the field scale by two independent techniques. In this study we focus on assessing the WSC estimated by the lysimeter and its local effect (Newtonian attraction) on the SG. First, we evaluate the lysimeter measurements by comparing them to TDR soil profile data in and around the lysimeter, in terms of artificial conditions in the lysimeter and spatial variability. Then, the effect of local soil moisture change on the SG residuals measured directly with the lysimeter is identified. Finally, we use a hydrological 1D model to estimate WSC in the vadose zone below the lysimeter, whereas the upper boundary is defined by the drainage measured by the lysimeter and the lower boundary by groundwater level data. The estimated WSC are used to explain the sources of the SG signal. Results show that the lysimeter reproduces the soil water dynamics in the field. The results also highlight the importance of WSC in the vadose zone below the lysimeter and the

  15. Analysis of observations with dual sensor superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, C.; Dierks, O.; Neumeyer, J.; Wilmes, H.

    2005-12-01

    Among the 21 superconducting gravimeters presently operating worldwide four instruments exist that are equipped with two vertically aligned sensor units. Three of the instruments are installed in Germany (Bad Homburg, Moxa, Wettzell) and one in South Africa (Sutherland). Comparisons of the data sets obtained with the dual sensor systems yield information on instrumental effects and sensitivity as well as on the efficiency of reductions of environmental effects applied to the data. The latter is an important constraint when looking for small geodynamic signals like Slichter and core modes or aperiodic variations. From analyses of the two data sets of each instrument a small but significant difference of 1-3% in the response of the sensor units on barometric pressure variations is found. Likewise, the records of lower and upper sensor vary slightly but not systematically with regard to the noise levels in the different frequency ranges. The tidal analyses yield an agreement of the tidal parameters generally well within the standard deviations determined from the least squares adjustment in the tidal analysis. The deviations are in the range between 0×10-4 and 3×10-4 for the amplitude factor and the phases differ between 0.0005° and 0.01° for the four main tidal constituents O1, K1, M2, and S2. The comparison of the gravity residuals of the two sensors with each other as well as with their sum and difference in the time and frequency domain shows the existence of identical signals in the records of the two sensors in the whole range of observation. This probably means that either the environmental reductions applied are not sufficient or there are additional disturbing effects in the data which have not been taken care of yet. From the study it emerges that it is not possible to get entirely rid of the tidal signals in the data. This is probably also due to the fact that despite reductions the data sets contain additional signals and slightly different noise at

  16. Regional comparison of absolute gravimeters, EURAMET.M.G-K2 key comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálinkáš, V.; Francis, O.; Val'ko, M.; Kostelecký, J.; Van Camp, M.; Castelein, S.; Bilker-Koivula, M.; Näränen, J.; Lothhammer, A.; Falk, R.; Schilling, M.; Timmen, L.; Iacovone, D.; Baccaro, F.; Germak, A.; Biolcati, E.; Origlia, C.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; De Plaen, R.; Klein, G.; Seil, M.; Radinovic, R.; Reudink, R.; Dykowski, P.; Sȩkowski, M.; Próchniewicz, D.; Szpunar, R.; Mojzeš, M.; Jańk, J.; Papčo, J.; Engfeldt, A.; Olsson, P. A.; Smith, V.; van Westrum, D.; Ellis, B.; Lucero, B.

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the regional EURAMET.M.G-K2 comparison of absolute gravimeters, 17 gravimeters were compared in November 2015. Four gravimeters were from different NMIs and DIs, they were used to link the regional comparison to the CCM.G.K2 by means of linking converter. Combined least-squares adjustments with weighted constraint was used to determine KCRV. Several pilot solutions are presented and compared with the official solution to demonstrate influences of different approaches (e.g. definition of weights and the constraint) on results of the adjustment. In case of the official solution, all the gravimeters are in equivalence with declared uncertainties. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Lysimeter vs. superconducting gravimeter: Measuring the influence of local water storage changes on temporal gravity observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzfeldt, Benjamin; Güntner, Andreas; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    Temporal gravimeter observations, which are used in geodesy and geophysics to study changes in the Earth's gravity field like tidal or mass transfer effects, are influenced by local water storage change (WSC). This study presents the first comparison of lysimeter measurements with temporal gravimeter observations made by a superconducting gravimeter (SG). Lysimeter measurements in combination with complementary hydrological observations and a rigid hydrological 1D model give the unique opportunity to estimate WSC from the snow down to the groundwater at the field scale. At the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell (Germany), water storage changes in the snow pack, top soil, unsaturated saprolite and fractured aquifer are all important terms for the local water budget. The hydrological influence on SG measurements is estimated by calculating the gravity response of local WSC. We find a high correlation of local WSC and SG residuals on the event and seasonal scale. Lysimeter measurements significantly improve the estimation of WSC on the field scale and consequently provide a better reduction of local hydrological influence on temporal gravimeter measurements. Hence, at temporal gravity observation sites a lysimeter installation is recommended in case that the gravity signal should be reduced from local WSC.

  18. Final report on the Seventh International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters (ICAG 2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, Z.; Francis, O.; Vitushkin, L.; Palinkas, V.; Germak, A.; Becker, M.; D'Agostino, G.; Amalvict, M.; Bayer, R.; Bilker-Koivula, M.; Desogus, S.; Faller, J.; Falk, R.; Hinderer, J.; Gagnon, C.; Jakob, T.; Kalish, E.; Kostelecky, J.; Lee, C.; Liard, J.; Lokshyn, Y.; Luck, B.; Makinen, J.; Mizushima, S.; Le, Moigne N.; Origlia, C.; Pujol, E.R.; Richard, P.; Robertsson, L.; Ruess, D.; Schmerge, D.; Stus, Y.; Svitlov, S.; Thies, S.; Ullrich, C.; Van Camp, M.; Vitushkin, A.; Ji, W.; Wilmes, H.

    2011-01-01

    The Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), S??vres, France, hosted the 7th International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters (ICAG) and the associated Relative Gravity Campaign (RGC) from August to September 2005. ICAG 2005 was prepared and performed as a metrological pilot study, which aimed: To determine the gravity comparison reference values; To determine the offsets of the absolute gravimeters; and As a pilot study to accumulate experience for the CIPM Key Comparisons. This document presents a complete and extensive review of the technical protocol and data processing procedures. The 1st ICAG-RGC comparison was held at the BIPM in 1980-1981 and since then meetings have been organized every 4 years. In this paper, we present an overview of how the meeting was organized, the conditions of BIPM gravimetric sites, technical specifications, data processing strategy and an analysis of the final results. This 7th ICAG final report supersedes all previously published reports. Readings were obtained from participating instruments, 19 absolute gravimeters and 15 relative gravimeters. Precise levelling measurements were carried out and all measurements were performed on the BIPM micro-gravity network which was specifically designed for the comparison. ?? 2011 BIPM & IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Time stability of spring and superconducting gravimeters through the analysis of very long gravity records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Marta; Hinderer, Jacques; Rosat, Severine; Legros, Hilaire; Boy, Jean-Paul; Ducarme, Bernard; Zürn, Walter

    2014-10-01

    Long gravity records are of great interest when performing tidal analyses. Indeed, long series enable to separate contributions of near-frequency waves and also to detect low frequency signals (e.g. long period tides and polar motion). In addition to the length of the series, the quality of the data and the temporal stability of the noise are also very important. We study in detail some of the longest gravity records available in Europe: 3 data sets recorded with spring gravimeters in Black Forest Observatory (Germany, 1980-2012), Walferdange (Luxemburg, 1980-1995) and Potsdam (Germany, 1974-1998) and several superconducting gravimeters (SGs) data sets, with at least 9 years of continuous records, at different European GGP (Global Geodynamics Project) sites (Bad Homburg, Brussels, Medicina, Membach, Moxa, Vienna, Wettzell and Strasbourg). The stability of each instrument is investigated using the temporal variations of tidal parameters (amplitude factor and phase difference) for the main tidal waves (O1, K1, M2 and S2) as well as the M2/O1 factor ratio, the later being insensitive to the instrumental calibration. The long term stability of the tidal observations is also dependent on the stability of the scale factor of the relative gravimeters. Therefore we also check the time stability of the scale factor for the superconducting gravimeter C026 installed at the J9 Gravimetric Observatory of Strasbourg (France), using numerous calibration experiments carried out by co-located absolute gravimeter (AG) measurements during the last 15 years. The reproducibility of the scale factor and the achievable precision are investigated by comparing the results of different calibration campaigns. Finally we present a spectrum of the 25 years of SG records at J9 Observatory, with special attention to small amplitude tides in the semi-diurnal and diurnal bands, as well as to the low frequency part.

  20. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  1. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  2. [The food pyramid battle].

    PubMed

    Brasseur, D

    2000-09-01

    Two hundred years after Napoleon, nutritionists of the world are fighting against each other in front of the pyramids. In 1995, the USAD (US Agriculture Department) started the battle by publishing "new food recommendations" that should not be confounded with the recommended dietary allowances (RDA). The food choices proposed by the USAD aimed at improving the health of the general population and avoiding chronic diseases. Implicitly these proposals should also meet the RDA. In order to reach its target, the Committee has proposed two pre-requisites: to balance food consumption and energy expenditure and therefore control body weight and to eat among various food items.

  3. Experimental progress in gravity measurement with an atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Hu, Zhong-Kun; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Sun, Bu-Liang; Zhao, Jin-Bo; Luo, Jun

    2009-06-01

    Precisely determining gravity acceleration g plays an important role on both geophysics and metrology. For gravity measurements and high-precision gravitation experiments, a cold atom gravimeter with the aimed resolution of 10.-9g/Hz1/2 (1 g=9.8 m/s2) is being built in our cave laboratory. There will be four steps for our 87Rb atom gravimeter, Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) for cooling and trapping atoms, initial state preparation, π/2-π-π/2 Raman laser pulse interactions with cold atoms, and the final state detection for phase measurement. About 108 atoms have been trapped by our MOT and further cooled by moving molasses, and an atomic fountain has also been observed.

  4. Structured Pyramidal Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Soares, Alessandra M; Fernandes, Bruno J T; Bastos-Filho, Carmelo J A

    2017-02-09

    The Pyramidal Neural Networks (PNN) are an example of a successful recently proposed model inspired by the human visual system and deep learning theory. PNNs are applied to computer vision and based on the concept of receptive fields. This paper proposes a variation of PNN, named here as Structured Pyramidal Neural Network (SPNN). SPNN has self-adaptive variable receptive fields, while the original PNNs rely on the same size for the fields of all neurons, which limits the model since it is not possible to put more computing resources in a particular region of the image. Another limitation of the original approach is the need to define values for a reasonable number of parameters, which can turn difficult the application of PNNs in contexts in which the user does not have experience. On the other hand, SPNN has a fewer number of parameters. Its structure is determined using a novel method with Delaunay Triangulation and k-means clustering. SPNN achieved better results than PNNs and similar performance when compared to Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), but using lower memory capacity and processing time.

  5. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    SciTech Connect

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  6. Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    John Jackson

    2008-03-14

    The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized Tribe residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation in western Nevada. The funding for this project was used to identify blind geothermal systems disconnected from geothermal sacred sites and develop a Tribal energy corporation for evaluating potential economic development for profit.

  7. [The pyramid trap].

    PubMed

    Harzheim, E; Alvarez-Dardet, C

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of globalization on public health practice. Neoliberal supremacy has resulted in both greater interdependence between countries and increasing inequalities. Globalization of health risks and the dependence of local health conditions on external forces precludes the use of local/national solutions for global problems. In this context, the classical organization of public health services in a hierarchical pyramid based on geographically defined areas (from the local to the regional and national levels) no longer makes sense. We thus suggest some characteristics of a different type of organization based on new information technologies: a transnational network, horizontally shaped, more independent from political power, allowing for exchange of information and good practices, promoting dissemination of knowledge and producing "glocal" solutions. Through the creation of work opportunities between health professionals, the model will permit the creation of common strategies and increase the power of their political demands, perhaps allowing for the collective development of a more equitable world.

  8. A model for adjustment of differential gravity measurements with simultaneous gravimeter calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. J. S. S.; Escobar, Í. P.

    2001-05-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for adjustment of differential or relative gravity measurements, involving simultaneously instrumental readings, coefficients of the calibration function, and gravity values of selected base stations. Tests were performed with LaCoste and Romberg model G gravimeter measurements for a set of base stations located along a north-south line with 1750 mGal gravity range. This line was linked to nine control stations, where absolute gravity values had been determined by the free-fall method, with an accuracy better than 10 wGal. The model shows good consistence and stability. Results show the possibility of improving the calibration functions of gravimeters, as well as a better estimation of the gravity values, due to the flexibility admitted to the values of the calibration coefficients.

  9. Measurements by Ocean Bottom Gravimeter at Harima-nada in Seto Inland Sea, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshima, Masato; Ishihara, Takemi; Koizumi, Kin-Ichiro; Seama, Nobukazu; Oshida, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Toshihiko

    Gravity measurements on the sea bottom using an ocean bottom gravimeter(OBG) and a small survey vessel of 8.5 tons were performed at Harima-nada, in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan. Measurements at one bottom station were completed in about 30 minutes including 2 mile transit from the previous station, and 23 new data were obtained during 4 days. The measurement noise on the shallow sea-bottom was reduced considerably by attaching an anchor to the rope between the deployed ocean bottom gravimeter and the ship, and by keeping the ship almost fixed to the deployed anchor. The measurement accuracy is better than 0.005 mgal at the base station and is better than 0.05 mgal for the sea bottom measurements with the anchor. The new measurements combined with old data revealed the presence of high gravity anomaly zone running in Harima-nada sub-parallel to the Median Tectonic Line.

  10. Development of the superconducting gravimeter using a new type of diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, H.; Aoyama, Y.; Hayakawa, H.; Doi, K.; Shibuya, K.

    2011-11-01

    During the period from December 2009 to February 2010, a new superconducting gravimeter with a cryocooler was installed to replace the former one at Syowa Station on the Antarctica. It has a high sensitivity of one nano-gal enabling measurement inside the Earth for the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP network). A new type of diaphragm was confirmed to well isolate the vibration from refrigerator cold-head and to prevent the solid air contamination perfectly. The Dewar refrigeration system consists of a newly designed Dewar interfaced with a cryocooler capable of obtaining temperatures below the vaporization point of liquid helium. The system is based on the Coolpower 0.1 W, 4.2 K cryocooler manufactured by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. Real time remote monitoring system from Japan was also established. The recent large earthquake in the Republic of Chile was observed at Syowa Station with the superconducting gravimeter.

  11. On the effect of distortion and dispersion in fringe signal of the FG5 absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Křen, Petr; Pálinkáš, Vojtech; Mašika, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of absolute gravity acceleration at the level of 1  ×  10-9 is needed in geosciences (e.g. for monitoring crustal deformations and mass transports) and in metrology for watt balance experiments related to the new SI definition of the unit of kilogram. The gravity reference, which results from the international comparisons held with the participation of numerous absolute gravimeters, is significantly affected by qualities of instruments prevailing in the comparisons (i.e. at present, FG5 gravimeters). Therefore, it is necessary to thoroughly investigate all instrumental (particularly systematic) errors. This paper deals with systematic errors of the FG5#215 coming from the distorted fringe signal and from the electronic dispersion at several electronic components including cables. In order to investigate these effects, we developed a new experimental system for acquiring and analysing the data parallel to the FG5 built-in system. The new system based on the analogue-to-digital converter with digital waveform processing using the FFT swept band pass filter is developed and tested on the FG5#215 gravimeter equipped with a new fast analogue output. The system is characterized by a low timing jitter, digital handling of the distorted swept signal with determination of zero-crossings for the fundamental frequency sweep and also for its harmonics and can be used for any gravimeter based on the laser interferometry. Comparison of the original FG5 system and the experimental systems is provided on g-values, residuals and additional measurements/models. Moreover, advanced approach for the solution of the free-fall motion is presented, which allows to take into account a non-linear gravity change with height.

  12. Correction of vibration for classical free-fall gravimeters with correlation-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Hu, H.; Wu, K.; Wang, L. J.

    2017-03-01

    In a free-fall absolute gravimeter, a laser interferometer is used to track the falling retro-reflector. To buffer the reference retro-reflector from seismic noise, a low-frequency vertical vibration isolator is traditionally used. However, an isolation device is usually complicated and expensive. A strap-down system using a seismometer to record the vibration and correct the measurement resolves the issue, but the actual recorded vibration cannot be directly used because of signal transfer delay and amplitude attenuation. Nevertheless, by quadratically fitting the trajectory of the falling retro-reflector and the motion of the reference retro-reflector, we find that their residuals are significantly correlated. Moreover, the transfer delay and the amplitude attenuation can be calculated using correlation analysis. With this capability, a vibration correction method for absolute gravimeters is proposed and demonstrated. The transfer delay and the gain attenuation are determined from data of only 25 drops, and can be used to correct subsequent measurements. The method is also applied in the T-1 absolute gravimeter. The standard deviation of the measurement results is improved by a factor of 20 after correction in a noisy environment, and improved by a factor of 5 in a quiet environment. Compared with vibration isolators, the strap-down system using this correction method is much more compact, enabling its use in field conditions or even dynamic environments not suitable for vibration isolators.

  13. Top-down cellular pyramids

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.Y.; Rosenfeld, A.

    1982-07-01

    A cellular pyramid is an exponentially tapering stack of arrays of processors ('cells'), where each cell is connected to its neighbors ('siblings') on its own level, to a 'parent' on the level above, and to its 'children' on the level below. It is shown that in some situations, if information flows top-down only, from fathers to sons, then a cellular pyramid may be no faster than a one-level cellular array; but it may be possible to use simpler cells in the pyramid case.

  14. The spatial distribution characteristics of noise level based on the gPhone gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean storms are strong, local atmospheric disturbances and contain amounts of energy, which can be transferred from atmospheric energy to ocean gravitational wave energy. This is then partly transferred to elastic energy by interaction with the seafloor. Such elastic energy can make its footprint on seismic records and is part of recorded seismic noise. Research on seismic noise can be traced back as early as 1900s and was mainly focused on long-period noise called Earth's background free oscillations, or so called Earth's hum(2-7mHz) and relatively short-period noise microseisms(0.05-0.5Hz). Both Earth's hum and microseisms are actually ground motions recorded by seismic stations. Now a day, many 1Hz gPhone gravimeters have been located at some seismic stations and observed these ground motions recorded in Chinese mainland. So in this paper, Firstly, the 1Hz datum of the WUSHI seismic stations have been analyzed with wavelet and tidal correcting. It is shown that the noise level calculated by the db4 wavelet and larger 2 level are similar with the tidal corrected method. And the noise level which are estimated with the standard deviation of the gravity residual each day, shown the year periodic change. In spring and winter, the noise level is almost largest, and reaches the minimum in the summer. The noise level is about 10±5×10-8ms-2. Secondly, from 2007 to 2008, more than 2 years datum of 12 gPhone gravimeters are analyszed along with co-located each other by wavelet method. It is shown that, in Fig 1, there are only 1-3 ×10-8ms-2 difference amount all the gPhone gravimeter noise leve at the same time and more than 95% of the correlation amount all the time series of gPhone gravimeters noise level. So, at last, by analysized the station type and the noise level of the 12 seismic stations with gPhone gravimeter, it is shown that, the noise level of the cave stations is smaller than the basement or surface station's. And the noise level near the coastline is

  15. Pyramidical model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kay, S R; Sevy, S

    1990-01-01

    Research and treatment of schizophrenia have been impeded by its heterogeneity and the lack of well-standardized methods for a comprehensive assessment of symptoms, including positive and negative dimensions. To study symptom profiles, therefore, we standardized and administered a well-operationalized 30-item psychiatric symptom scale to 240 schizophrenic inpatients. Principal component analysis suggested a pyramidlike triangular model of uncorrelated but nonexclusive syndromes that encompassed the spectrum of psychopathology. Negative, positive, and depressive features constituted divergent points of a triangular base, and excitement made up a separate vertical axis. Paired syndromes could account for symptoms of the paranoid (positive-depressive), disorganized (positive-negative), and catatonic (negative-depressive) diagnostic subtypes. The transversal positions in this model suggested polarized dimensions in schizophrenia, including a prognostic axis (depression-cognitive dysfunction). The findings imply that (1) negative and positive syndromes show factorial validity and distinction from depression but, alone, are insufficient to accommodate the full diversity of symptoms; (2) schizophrenic subtypes derive from a hybrid between unrelated but co-occurring dimensions that may define the fundamental elements of psychopathology; and (3) the pyramidical model is of heuristic value. The results help to clarify the heterogeneity of schizophrenia and to illuminate the path toward syndrome-specific treatments.

  16. 300-days of parallel gravity record with the gPhone-054 spring gravimeter and the GWR-C026 superconducting gravimeter in Strasbourg (France): a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Umberto; Rosat, Severine; Hinderer, Jacques

    2010-05-01

    A wide set of geodynamical and hydrological phenomena, involving underground mass redistribution and/or change of the Earth's figure, affects the gravity field, sometimes inducing "slow" and "small" temporal gravity changes, the detection of which relies on instruments with high sensitivity, long-term stability and a very low drift. Here we report on the results of a comparative analysis carried out on more than ten months of co-located record collected with a new generation spring gravimeter, the gPhone-054, owned by the IGN of Madrid (Spain), and the GWR-C026 superconducting gravimeter (SG-C026) at the J9 gravity station in Strasbourg (France). The Microg-LaCoste gPhone is a portable Earth tide gravimeter equipped with a 0.1 µGal resolution feedback. The core sensor is the patented LaCoste & Romberg (LR) zero-length spring suspension system. The gPhone is essentially a LR, model G meter, but with significant upgrades: it has an improved thermal system (a double-oven) for increased temperature stability. Moreover the instrument should have a "true" vacuum seal making it almost insensitive to the buoyancy changes due to atmospheric pressure fluctuations. We test the performances of the gPhone-054 in terms of resolution, accuracy, noise level and long-term stability (drift) with respect to the SG-C026. Our comparative analysis is performed in a wide spectral domain, ranging from the body tides to the seismic band. This study demonstrates that the SGs have better performances in the whole analyzed spectral band. Focusing on the gPhone-054 instrumental drift observed during this study, it still remains a critical point preventing the study of the long-term gravity changes. In fact the drift was large and even not linear, sometimes requiring a high degree (> 4) polynomial fitting to be reduced; the latter makes hard to distinguish real time gravity changes from the instrumental drift. We observed a drift rate evolution characterized by a decrease from 50 µGal/day to

  17. Optimized Design of the SGA-WZ Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter Temperature Control System

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Juliang; Wang, Minghao; Cai, Shaokun; Zhang, Kaidong; Cong, Danni; Wu, Meiping

    2015-01-01

    The temperature control system is one of the most important subsystems of the strapdown airborne gravimeter. Because the quartz flexible accelerometer based on springy support technology is the core sensor in the strapdown airborne gravimeter and the magnet steel in the electromagnetic force equilibrium circuits of the quartz flexible accelerometer is greatly affected by temperature, in order to guarantee the temperature control precision and minimize the effect of temperature on the gravimeter, the SGA-WZ temperature control system adopts a three-level control method. Based on the design experience of the SGA-WZ-01, the SGA-WZ-02 temperature control system came out with a further optimized design. In 1st level temperature control, thermoelectric cooler is used to conquer temperature change caused by hot weather. The experiments show that the optimized stability of 1st level temperature control is about 0.1 °C and the max cool down capability is about 10 °C. The temperature field is analyzed in the 2nd and 3rd level temperature control using the finite element analysis software ANSYS. The 2nd and 3rd level temperature control optimization scheme is based on the foundation of heat analysis. The experimental results show that static accuracy of SGA-WZ-02 reaches 0.21 mGal/24 h, with internal accuracy being 0.743 mGal/4.8 km and external accuracy being 0.37 mGal/4.8 km compared with the result of the GT-2A, whose internal precision is superior to 1 mGal/4.8 km and all of them are better than those in SGA-WZ-01. PMID:26633407

  18. Optimized Design of the SGA-WZ Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter Temperature Control System.

    PubMed

    Cao, Juliang; Wang, Minghao; Cai, Shaokun; Zhang, Kaidong; Cong, Danni; Wu, Meiping

    2015-12-01

    The temperature control system is one of the most important subsystems of the strapdown airborne gravimeter. Because the quartz flexible accelerometer based on springy support technology is the core sensor in the strapdown airborne gravimeter and the magnet steel in the electromagnetic force equilibrium circuits of the quartz flexible accelerometer is greatly affected by temperature, in order to guarantee the temperature control precision and minimize the effect of temperature on the gravimeter, the SGA-WZ temperature control system adopts a three-level control method. Based on the design experience of the SGA-WZ-01, the SGA-WZ-02 temperature control system came out with a further optimized design. In 1st level temperature control, thermoelectric cooler is used to conquer temperature change caused by hot weather. The experiments show that the optimized stability of 1st level temperature control is about 0.1 °C and the max cool down capability is about 10 °C. The temperature field is analyzed in the 2nd and 3rd level temperature control using the finite element analysis software ANSYS. The 2nd and 3rd level temperature control optimization scheme is based on the foundation of heat analysis. The experimental results show that static accuracy of SGA-WZ-02 reaches 0.21 mGal/24 h, with internal accuracy being 0.743 mGal/4.8 km and external accuracy being 0.37 mGal/4.8 km compared with the result of the GT-2A, whose internal precision is superior to 1 mGal/4.8 km and all of them are better than those in SGA-WZ-01.

  19. Fractal analysis of Mesoamerican pyramids.

    PubMed

    Burkle-Elizondo, Gerardo; Valdez-Cepeda, Ricardo David

    2006-01-01

    A myth of ancient cultural roots was integrated into Mesoamerican cult, and the reference to architecture denoted a depth religious symbolism. The pyramids form a functional part of this cosmovision that is centered on sacralization. The space architecture works was an expression of the ideological necessities into their conception of harmony. The symbolism of the temple structures seems to reflect the mathematical order of the Universe. We contemplate two models of fractal analysis. The first one includes 16 pyramids. We studied a data set that was treated as a fractal profile to estimate the Df through variography (Dv). The estimated Fractal Dimension Dv = 1.383 +/- 0.211. In the second one we studied a data set to estimate the Dv of 19 pyramids and the estimated Fractal Dimension Dv = 1.229 +/- 0.165.

  20. A Rebuttal of NTL Institute's Learning Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letrud, Kare

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the learning pyramid corroborated by National Training Laboratories Institute. It present and compliment historical and methodological critique against the learning pyramid, and call upon NTL Institute ought to retract their model.

  1. A Rebuttal of NTL Institute's Learning Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letrud, Kare

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the learning pyramid corroborated by National Training Laboratories Institute. It present and compliment historical and methodological critique against the learning pyramid, and call upon NTL Institute ought to retract their model.

  2. Color center fluorescence and spin manipulation in single crystal, pyramidal diamond tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelz, Richard; Fuchs, Philipp; Opaluch, Oliver; Sonusen, Selda; Savenko, Natalia; Podgursky, Vitali; Neu, Elke

    2016-11-01

    We investigate bright fluorescence of nitrogen (NV)- and silicon-vacancy color centers in pyramidal, single crystal diamond tips, which are commercially available as atomic force microscope probes. We coherently manipulate NV electronic spin ensembles with T2 = 7.7(3) μs. Color center lifetimes in different tip heights indicate effective refractive index effects and quenching. Using numerical simulations, we verify enhanced photon rates from emitters close to the pyramid apex rendering them promising as scanning probe sensors.

  3. Mesoscale metallic pyramids with nanoscale tips.

    PubMed

    Henzie, Joel; Kwak, Eun-Soo; Odom, Teri W

    2005-07-01

    We report a simple procedure that can generate free-standing mesoscale metallic pyramids composed of one or more materials and having nanoscale tips (radii of curvature of less than 2 nm). Mesoscale holes (100-300 nm) in a chromium film are used as an etch mask to fabricate pyramidal pits and then as a deposition mask to form the metallic pyramids. We have fabricated two- and three-layered pyramids with control over their materials and chemical functionality.

  4. Integrated magneto-optical traps on a chip using silicon pyramid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, S.; Cotter, J. P.; Laliotis, A.; Hinds, E. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have integrated magneto-optical traps (MOTs) into an atom chip by etching pyramids into a silicon wafer. These have been used to trap atoms on the chip, directly from a room temperature vapor of rubidium. This new atom trapping method provides a simple way to integrate several atom sources on the same chip. It represents a substantial advance in atom chip technology and offers new possibilities for atom chip applications such as integrated single atom or photon sources and molecules on a chip.

  5. Integrated magneto-optical traps on a chip using silicon pyramid structures.

    PubMed

    Pollock, S; Cotter, J P; Laliotis, A; Hinds, E A

    2009-08-03

    We have integrated magneto-optical traps (MOTs) into an atom chip by etching pyramids into a silicon wafer. These have been used to trap atoms on the chip, directly from a room temperature vapor of rubidium. This new atom trapping method provides a simple way to integrate several atom sources on the same chip. It represents a substantial advance in atom chip technology and offers new possibilities for atom chip applications such as integrated single atom or photon sources and molecules on a chip.

  6. A magic pyramid of supergravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, A.; Borsten, L.; Duff, M. J.; Hughes, L. J.; Nagy, S.

    2014-04-01

    By formulating = 1, 2, 4, 8, D = 3, Yang-Mills with a single Lagrangian and single set of transformation rules, but with fields valued respectively in , it was recently shown that tensoring left and right multiplets yields a Freudenthal-Rosenfeld-Tits magic square of D = 3 supergravities. This was subsequently tied in with the more familiar description of spacetime to give a unified division-algebraic description of extended super Yang-Mills in D = 3, 4, 6, 10. Here, these constructions are brought together resulting in a magic pyramid of supergravities. The base of the pyramid in D = 3 is the known 4 × 4 magic square, while the higher levels are comprised of a 3 × 3 square in D = 4, a 2 × 2 square in D = 6 and Type II supergravity at the apex in D = 10. The corresponding U-duality groups are given by a new algebraic structure, the magic pyramid formula, which may be regarded as being defined over three division algebras, one for spacetime and each of the left/right Yang-Mills multiplets. We also construct a conformal magic pyramid by tensoring conformal supermultiplets in D = 3, 4, 6. The missing entry in D = 10 is suggestive of anexotic theory with G/ H duality structure F 4(4)/Sp(3) × Sp(1).

  7. A Flight Test of the Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter SGA-WZ in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Forsberg, René; Wu, Meiping; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang

    2015-06-05

    An airborne gravimeter is one of the most important tools for gravity data collection over large areas with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of several kilometers. In August 2012, a flight test was carried out to determine the feasibility and to assess the accuracy of the new Chinese SGA-WZ strapdown airborne gravimeter in Greenland, in an area with good gravity coverage from earlier marine and airborne surveys. An overview of this new system SGA-WZ is given, including system design, sensor performance and data processing. The processing of the SGA-WZ includes a 160 s length finite impulse response filter, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 6 km. For the primary repeated line, a mean r.m.s. deviation of the differences was less than 1.5 mGal, with the error estimate confirmed from ground truth data. This implies that the SGA-WZ could meet standard geophysical survey requirements at the 1 mGal level.

  8. The gravimeter "B-grave" for the in-situ surface gravity measurements of an asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruymbeke, Michel; karatekin, ozgur; rasson, jean; wielant, françois; dumont, Phillipe; Ritter, Birgit; zhu, Ping

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the preliminary study phase for the CubeSats supporting ESA's Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) to the Didymos, we investigate a miniaturized gravimeter as part of the geophysical instrument package for the Asteroid Geophysical Explorer (AGEX). AGEX intends to land a CubeSat on the secondary object in the Didymos system, Didymoon in order to characterize the asteroid surface and internal structure A 3D compact gravimeter is developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Its design allows to meter a weak 50 μm/sec² gravity field corresponding to 5 ppm of Earth gravity in a harsh environment. A system with three components mounted in an orthogonal geometry allows obtaining the gravity field in amplitude and in angular position without any requirement of levelling. B-GRAVES will use a in-situ calibration and multi-parameter approach for validation of the measurements. A laboratory simulation is induced with centrifugal forces applied to the pendulum set-up in a vertical position to reject the Earth gravity field. Signal treatment and uncertainties are discussed keeping in mind questions of thermal and vibration influence. The B-GRAVES can serve as a novel and robust instrument for future lander and rover missions .

  9. Development of an absolute gravimeter with a rotating vacuum pipe and study of gravity variation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, H.

    Absolute gravimetry has the possibility to be an important instrument in geophysics. The author developed an absolute gravimeter with a rotating vacuum pipe (AGRVP) which is capable of automatic operation. AGRVP determines the acceleration of a freely falling body in a vacuum by measuring the falling distance and time with an iodine stabilized He-Ne laser as a length standard and a rubidium clock as a time standard. A policy of a simple mechanism in the development is adopted. One rotates the vacuum pipe around the horizontal axis by 180 degrees with an angular velocity high enough to keep the falling object to the end of the pipe, and stops the motion when the pipe becomes vertical to let the object fall freely inside the pipe. Various mechanisms or methods are discussed in order to reduce systematic errors. As the results of the developments, one completed the original type of absolute gravimeter, and succeeded in automatic measurements every 15 minutes for longer than a week with a standard deviation of about 2×10-7m s-2 (20 μGal). It has become basically possible to discuss a gravity change of larger than 1×10-8m s-2 (1 μGal) by using a mean value of more than 400 data.

  10. Impact of ambient temperature on spring-based relative gravimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Moigne, N. Le; Chery, J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of ambient temperature changes on the gravity reading of spring-based relative gravimeters. Controlled heating experiments using two Scintrex CG5 gravimeters allowed us to determine a linear correlation ( R 2> 0.9) between ambient temperature and gravity variations. The relation is stable and constant for the two CG5 we used: -5 nm/s2/° C. A linear relation is also seen between gravity and residual sensor temperature variations ( R 2> 0.75), but contrary to ambient temperature, this relation is neither constant over time nor similar between the two instruments. The linear correction of ambient temperature on the controlled heating time series reduced the standard deviation at least by a factor of 2, to less than 10 nm/s2. The laboratory results allowed for reprocessing the data gathered on a field survey that originally aimed to characterize local hydrological heterogeneities on a karstic area. The correction of two years of monthly CG5 measurements from ambient temperature variations halved the standard deviation (from 62 to 32 nm/s2) and led us to a better hydrological interpretation. Although the origin of this effect is uncertain, we suggest that an imperfect control of the sensor temperature may be involved, as well as a change of the properties of an electronic component.

  11. Impact of ambient temperature on spring-based relative gravimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Moigne, N. Le; Chery, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of ambient temperature changes on the gravity reading of spring-based relative gravimeters. Controlled heating experiments using two Scintrex CG5 gravimeters allowed us to determine a linear correlation (R 2> 0.9) between ambient temperature and gravity variations. The relation is stable and constant for the two CG5 we used: -5 nm/s2/° C. A linear relation is also seen between gravity and residual sensor temperature variations (R 2> 0.75), but contrary to ambient temperature, this relation is neither constant over time nor similar between the two instruments. The linear correction of ambient temperature on the controlled heating time series reduced the standard deviation at least by a factor of 2, to less than 10 nm/s2 . The laboratory results allowed for reprocessing the data gathered on a field survey that originally aimed to characterize local hydrological heterogeneities on a karstic area. The correction of two years of monthly CG5 measurements from ambient temperature variations halved the standard deviation (from 62 to 32 nm/s2 ) and led us to a better hydrological interpretation. Although the origin of this effect is uncertain, we suggest that an imperfect control of the sensor temperature may be involved, as well as a change of the properties of an electronic component.

  12. A Flight Test of the Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter SGA-WZ in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Forsberg, René; Wu, Meiping; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Zhang, Kaidong; Cao, Juliang

    2015-01-01

    An airborne gravimeter is one of the most important tools for gravity data collection over large areas with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of several kilometers. In August 2012, a flight test was carried out to determine the feasibility and to assess the accuracy of the new Chinese SGA-WZ strapdown airborne gravimeter in Greenland, in an area with good gravity coverage from earlier marine and airborne surveys. An overview of this new system SGA-WZ is given, including system design, sensor performance and data processing. The processing of the SGA-WZ includes a 160 s length finite impulse response filter, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 6 km. For the primary repeated line, a mean r.m.s. deviation of the differences was less than 1.5 mGal, with the error estimate confirmed from ground truth data. This implies that the SGA-WZ could meet standard geophysical survey requirements at the 1 mGal level. PMID:26057039

  13. Comparison of three digital fringe signal processing methods in a ballistic free-fall absolute gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svitlov, S.; Masłyk, P.; Rothleitner, Ch; Hu, H.; Wang, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports results of comparison of three digital fringe signal processing methods implemented in the same free-fall absolute gravimeter. A two-sample zero-crossing method, a windowed second-difference method and a method of non-linear least-squares adjustment on the undersampled fringe signal are compared in numerical simulations, hardware tests and actual measurements with the MPG-2 absolute gravimeter, developed at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Germany. The two-sample zero-crossing method realizes data location schemes that are both equally spaced in distance and equally spaced in time (EST) along the free-fall trajectory. The windowed second-difference method and the method of non-linear least-squares adjustment with complex heterodyne demodulation operate with the EST data. Results of the comparison verify an agreement of the three methods within one part in 109 of the measured gravity value, provided a common data location scheme is considered.

  14. Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 1999 we proposed a Modified Food Guide Pyramid for 70+ Adults. It has been extensively used in a variety of settings and formats to highlight the unique dietary challenges of older adults. We now propose a Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults in a format consistent with the MyPyramid graphic. I...

  15. Investigation of the Great Pyramid of Giza.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace, Nigel; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which geometry and trigonometry are studied using pyramids. Identical model pyramids are constructed from card stock, along with pyramids of different proportions and cuboids to use as controls. Also includes an investigation of some apparently non-scientific claims. (DDR)

  16. a Mobile Atom Interferometer for High Precision Measurements of Local Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Senger, A.; Gorkhover, T.; Grede, S.; Kovalchuk, E. V.; Peters, A.

    2009-04-01

    We present a new design for the mobile and robust gravimeter GAIN (Gravimetric Atom Interferometer), which is based on interfering ensembles of laser cooled 87Rb atoms in an atomic fountain configuration. With a targeted accuracy of a few parts in 1010 for the measurement of local gravity, g, this instrument would offer about an order of magnitude improvement in performance over the best currently available absolute gravimeters. Together with the capability to perform measurements directly at sites of geophysical interest, this will open up the possibility for a number of interesting applications. We report on important subsystems of this atom interferometer, including a rack-mounted laser system and a compact vacuum chamber. Furthermore, a high flux 2-dimensional Magneto-optical trap capable of providing up to 1012 atoms/second and a high-power laser system providing 6.4 W at 780 nm are presented.

  17. Gravity sensing with Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlippert, Dennis; Albers, Henning; Richardson, Logan L.; Nath, Dipankar; Meiners, Christian; Wodey, Etienne; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2016-05-01

    Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry (VLBAI) has applications in high-accuracy absolute gravimetry, gravity-gradiometry, and for tests of fundamental physics. Extending the baseline of atomic gravimeters from tens of centimeters to meters opens the route towards competition with superconducting gravimeters. The VLBAI-test stand will consist of a 10m-baseline atom interferometer allowing for free fall times of seconds. In order to suppress environmental noise, the facility utilizes a state-of-the-art vibration isolation platform and a three-layer magnetic shield. We envisage a resolution of local gravitational acceleration of 5 .10-10 m/ s2 with sub-ppb inaccuracy. Operation as a gradiometer will allow to resolve the gravity gradient at a resolution of 5 .10-10 1/ s2. The operation of VLBAI as a differential dual-species gravimeter using ultracold mixtures of Yb and Rb atoms enables quantum tests of the universality of free fall (UFF) at an unprecedented level, with the potential to surpass the accuracy of the best experiments to date. We report on a quantum test of the UFF using two different chemical elements, 39 K and 87 Rb, reaching a 100 ppb inaccuracy and show the potential of UFF tests in VLBAI at an inaccuracy of 10-13 and beyond.

  18. Moving-mass gravimeter calibration in the Mátyáshegy Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory (Budapest)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Márta; Koppán, Andras; Kovács, Péter; Merényi, László

    2014-05-01

    A gravimeter calibration facility exists in the Mátyáshegy Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of Geological and Geophysical Institute in Hungary. During the calibration a cylindrical ring of 3200 kg mass is vertically moving around the equipment, generating gravity variations. The effect of the moving mass can be precisely calculated from the known mass and geometrical parameters. The main target of the calibration device was to reach a relative accuracy of 0.1-0.2% for the calibration of Earth-tide registering gravimeters. The maximum theoretical gravity variation produced by the vertical movement of the mass is ab. 110 microGal, so it provides excellent possibility for the fine calibration of gravimeters in the tidal range. The instrument was out of order for many years and in 2012 and 2013 it was renovated and automatized. The calibration process is aided by intelligent controller electronics. A new PLC-based system has been developed to allow easy control of the movement of the calibrating mass and to measure the mass position. It enables also programmed steps of movements (waiting positions and waiting times) for refined gravity changes. All parameters (position of the mass, CPI data, X/Y leveling positions) are recorded with 1/sec. sampling rate. The system can be controlled remotely through the internet. As it is well known that variations of the magnetic field can influence the measurements of metal-spring gravimeters, authors carried out magnetic experiments on the pillar of the calibration device as well, in order to analyze the magnetic effect of the moving stainless steel-mass. During the movements of the mass, the observed magnetic field has been changed significantly. According to the magnetic measurements, a correction for the magnetic effect was applied on the measured gravimetric data series. In this presentation authors show the facility in details and the numerical results of tests carried out by applying LCR G gravimeters.

  19. Superconducting gravimeter observation for identifying slow slip events at Ryukyu Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Y.; Nawa, K.; Tamura, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Miyaji, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of the data from the dense GPS network of Japan (GEONET) revealed quasi-periodic occurrences of long-term slow slip events at the Ryukyu Trench (Heki and Kataoka, 2008). The recurrence period of the events is about half a year, much shorter than typically found in other regions where slow slips are known to take place. Therefore, this region provides an interesting field for investigating the nature of slow slip events. In February 2012, we started gravity observation using a superconducting gravimeter (SG) at the VERA Ishigakijima Station, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The Ishigakijima island is located slightly east off the presumed fault area of the slow slip events. Our purpose is to detect gravity changes associated with the slow slip events by making full use of the high resolution of the SG. Of particular interest is the possible effect of water on the slow slip events, which might be identified from gravity observations. In addition to the SG, we installed an FG5 absolute gravimeter at the Iriomotejima island, located about 10 km west of the Ishigakijima island. The SG used in this study (serial number CT36) is the one which was in operation at the Inuyama Seismological Observatory, Nagoya University for about ten years. Before moving it to Ishigakijima, we made a thorough examination of the instruments. Because we found a serious problem in transferring liquid helium because of the ice inside, we warmed up the Dewar to initialize it. This not only solved the ice problem but also resulted in a significant decrease of the heater power for the gravity sensor. As of this writing, we have about six months worth of data from the SG. The condition of the gravimeter is good except for the first month when temperature control was unstable. Because of the ground vibrations caused by the movement of the 20-m VLBI antenna (about 30 m apart from the SG), the noise level is significantly enhanced compared with other domestic SG stations. Also we

  20. The Digital Von Fahrenheid Pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bura, M.; Janowski, J.; Wężyk, P.; Zięba, K.

    2017-08-01

    3D Scanners Lab from Digital Humanities Laboratory at the University of Warsaw initiated the scientific project, the purpose of which was to call attention to systematically penetrated and devastated pyramid-shaped tomb from the XVIII/XIX century, of family von Fahrenheid in Rapa in Banie Mazurskie commune (NE Poland). By conducting a series of non-invasive studies, such as 3D inventory using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), thermal imaging, georadar measurements (around and inside the tomb) and anthropological research of mummified remains as well - the complete dataset was collected. Through the integration of terrestrial (TLS) and airborne laser scanning (ALS) authors managed to analyse the surroundings of Fahrenheid pyriamid and influence of some objects (like trees) on the condition and visibility of the Pyramids in the landscape.

  1. Pyramidal Defects in GaN:Mg Grown with Ga Polarity

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Tomaszewicz, Tomasz; Zakharov, Dmitri; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2005-02-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show formation of different types of Mg-rich defects in GaN. Types of defects strongly depend on crystal growth polarity. For bulk crystals grown with N-polarity, the planar defects are distributed at equal distances (20 unit cells of GaN). For growth with Ga-polarity (for both bulk and MOCVD grown crystals) a different type of defects have been found. These defects are three-dimensional Mg-rich hexagonal pyramids (or trapezoids) with their base on the (0001) plane and six walls formed on 1123 planes. The defects appear in [1120] and [1100] cross-section TEM micrographs as triangular and trapezoidal with sides inclined at 43 and 47 degrees to the base depending on the above observation directions, respectively. The dimension of these pyramids varies depending on growth method (50-1000 Angstrom), but the angle between the base and their sides remain the same. The direction from the tip of the pyramid to its base (and from the shorter to the longer base for trapezoidal defects) is along the Ga to N matrix bond direction. Analysis of the reconstructed exit wave phase image from the pyramid side indicates a shift of Ga atomic column positions from the matrix to the N position within the pyramid. In this way a 0.6{+-}0.2 Angstrom displacement can be measured on the pyramid side between Ga positions in the matrix and within the pyramid.

  2. Superconducting Gravimeter Data for the IRIS Seismology Database: Application to Normal Modes from the Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, D.; Rivera, L.; Hinderer, J.; Rosat, S.

    2009-04-01

    For several years, it has been the goal of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) to convert high rate acceleration data recorded on superconducting gravimeters (SG) to a format compatible with the seismic data archived at IRIS. The problem for the GGP community has been to properly establish the metadata for characterizing the response of the instrument, particularly its phase characteristics. Although SG data exists at IRIS from the Membach GGP station in Belgium, up to now most of the data from the GGP network has been on hold until the response problem was solved. This we have now been able to do, and we hope to show that data from the Strasbourg SG station will be at IRIS and available. We will also upload all the data from the SGs from after the Sumatra earthquake and show some results on normal mode analysis that demonstrates the benefit of the good amplitude calibration feature and high precision of the SG instruments.

  3. Monitoring Water Storage Variations with a Superconducting Gravimeter in a Field Enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntner, A.; Mikolaj, M.; Reich, M.; Schröder, S.; Wziontek, H.

    2015-12-01

    Runoff generation often is a non-linear and hysteretic function of catchment water storage. Storage dynamics, in turn, are notoriously difficult to monitor in a comprehensive way beyond the point scale. Superconducting gravimeters (SG) measure temporal variations of the Earth's acceleration of gravity with very high precision and temporal resolution. They have been shown to be sensitive to mass variations induced by hydrological processes in their surroundings, typically within a radius of few 100 meters around the instrument. Thus, in turn, SGs are unique instruments for monitoring water storage variations in the landscape in an integrative way, accounting for soil moisture, vadose zone and groundwater storage, snow, and surface water bodies if existent. We present the measurement concept of SGs and expose its value for hydrological process research. We stress limitations, in particular that the hydrological application of SGs so far has often been hindered by the instruments being located in observatory buildings. This infrastructure disturbs the local hydrology and causes many uncertainties due to the often poorly known geometry of the construction, non-natural flow paths of water, and unknown water storage variations below and/or on top of the infrastructure. By deploying the SG in a small enclosure, these disturbances and unknowns are minimized. We report on the first experiences with exposing a SG of the latest generation (iGrav) in a small housing of less than 1 m2 footprint to temperate hydro-meteorological conditions. The system has been set up on a grassland site at the Geodetic Observatory in Wettzell, Bavarian Forest, Germany, in early 2015. We present the technical layout and challenges in running the gravimeter system. Additionally, we report on the quality of data acquired so far and present comparisons to in-situ soil moisture monitoring with TDR and TOMST sensors, a lysimeter, and groundwater observations. We discuss the value of SG observations

  4. Monitoring water storage variations with a superconducting gravimeter in a field enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güntner, Andreas; Mikolaj, Michal; Reich, Marvin; Schröder, Stephan; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Water storage dynamics are notoriously difficult to monitor in a comprehensive way beyond the point scale. Superconducting gravimeters (SG) measure temporal variations of the Earth's acceleration of gravity with very high precision and temporal resolution. They have been shown to be sensitive to mass variations induced by hydrological processes in their surroundings, typically within a radius of few 100 meters around the instrument. Thus, in turn, SGs are unique instruments for monitoring water storage variations in the landscape in an integrative way, accounting for soil moisture, vadose zone and groundwater storage, snow, and surface water bodies if existent. Nevertheless, hydrological applications of SGs so far have usually been hindered by the instruments being located in observatory buildings. This infrastructure disturbs the local hydrology and causes many uncertainties due to the often poorly known geometry of the construction, non-natural flow paths of water, and unknown water storage variations below and/or on top of the infrastructure. By deploying the SG in a small enclosure, these disturbances and unknowns are minimized. We report on the first experiences with exposing a SG of the latest generation (iGrav) in a small housing of less than 1 m2 footprint to temperate hydro-meteorological conditions. The system has been set up on a grassland site at the Geodetic Observatory in Wettzell, Bavarian Forest, Germany, in early 2015. We present the technical layout and challenges in running the gravimeter system. Additionally, we report on the quality of data acquired so far and present comparisons to in-situ soil moisture monitoring with TDR and TOMST sensors, a lysimeter, and groundwater observations, and two SGs located in nearby observatory buildings. We discuss the value of SG observations for estimating water storage variations, evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge beyond the point scale.

  5. Urban public health: is there a pyramid?

    PubMed

    Su, Meirong; Chen, Bin; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Wang, Jiao

    2013-01-28

    Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH). Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London) are compared from the point of view of five aspects, namely physical health, living conditions, social security, environmental quality, and education and culture. A pyramid structure was found in each city when focusing on 2000-2009 data. The pyramid of Beijing is relatively similar to that of Tokyo, and the pyramids of New York and London are similar to each other. A general development trend in UPH is proposed and represented by different pyramid modes. As a basic conjecture, the UPH pyramid model can be verified and developed with data of more cities over a longer period, and be used to promote healthy urban development.

  6. The pyramids of Greece: Ancient meridian observatories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, Efstratios; Manimanis, Vassilios N.; Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Katsiotis, Marco

    Pyramids, "Dragon Houses" ("Drakospita") and megalithic structures in general create always a special interest. We postulate that, as happens with the Drakospita of Euboea, the pyramid-like structures of Argolis (Eastern Peloponnese) were constructed by the Dryops. It is known that, in addition to Euboea and some Cyclades islands, this prehellenic people had also settled in Argolis, where they founded the city of Asine. We also propose that the pyramids of Argolis and in particular the pyramid of Hellinikon village were very likely, besides being a burial monument or guard house, might be served also for astronomical observations.

  7. Urban Public Health: Is There a Pyramid?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Meirong; Chen, Bin; Yang, Zhifeng; Cai, Yanpeng; Wang, Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH). Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London) are compared from the point of view of five aspects, namely physical health, living conditions, social security, environmental quality, and education and culture. A pyramid structure was found in each city when focusing on 2000–2009 data. The pyramid of Beijing is relatively similar to that of Tokyo, and the pyramids of New York and London are similar to each other. A general development trend in UPH is proposed and represented by different pyramid modes. As a basic conjecture, the UPH pyramid model can be verified and developed with data of more cities over a longer period, and be used to promote healthy urban development. PMID:23358233

  8. Virtual pyramid wavefront sensor for phase unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Akondi, Vyas; Vohnsen, Brian; Marcos, Susana

    2016-10-10

    Noise affects wavefront reconstruction from wrapped phase data. A novel method of phase unwrapping is proposed with the help of a virtual pyramid wavefront sensor. The method was tested on noisy wrapped phase images obtained experimentally with a digital phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer. The virtuality of the pyramid wavefront sensor allows easy tuning of the pyramid apex angle and modulation amplitude. It is shown that an optimal modulation amplitude obtained by monitoring the Strehl ratio helps in achieving better accuracy. Through simulation studies and iterative estimation, it is shown that the virtual pyramid wavefront sensor is robust to random noise.

  9. Update on the Pyramid Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Tom; Torres, T. J.

    2012-10-01

    We summarize recent work in which we attempt to make consistent models of LHC physics, from the Pyramid Scheme. The models share much with the NMSSM, in particular, enhanced tree level contributions to the Higgs mass and a preference for small tan β. There are three different singlet fields, and a new strongly coupled gauge theory, so the constraints of perturbative unification are quite different. We outline our general approach to the model, which contains a Kähler potential for three of the low energy fields, which is hard to calculate. Detailed calculations, based on approximations to the Kähler potential, will be presented in a future publication.

  10. Using Superconducting Gravimeter iGrav for detecting small mass change in field measurements (a case study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Ricky; Neumeyer, Juergen; Kabirzadeh, Hojjat; Sideris, Michael; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2013-04-01

    A number of geophysical and geodetic measuring techniques can be used to monitor phenomena related to geohazards and geodynamics at the earth surface, but are unable to observe subsurface mass transfer of man-made or natural origins. Because of drift and low signal resolution, a spring-type gravimeter has limited applications in areas such as monitoring geological CO2 storage, hydrocarbon reservoirs, and episodic tremor and slip (ETS). The drift and resolution problems make it even more complicated to detect non-periodic gravity signals that are associated with mass change. These limitations may be overcome by deploying a superconducting gravimeter (SG) such as i'Grav. i'Grav uses a magnetically levitated sphere as a test mass, and has considerably lower drift and a higher sensitivity in the time and frequency domains than conventional spring gravimeters. With these attributes, SG is able to record precise and continuous gravity variations over a long time for monitoring gravity change caused by geohazards and geodynamics activities. Parallel GPS and gravity records are necessary to explain the surface and subsurface movement. In order to determine offsets in the gravity signals due to horizontal and vertical movement of the gravity instruments, we performed various lab experiments with iGrav (#001) and Micro-g LaCoste's absolute gravimeter A10 in a quiet indoor environment (UofC). We used a professional camera dolly with a track and an electric lift table for a controlled movement to take gravity measurements at different locations. Offsets up to a 0.68 µGals due to the 210 pounds are placed on the top of iGrav. In our simulation, we concluded that the gravimetric method can be used to monitor surface gravity change at µGal level, which ETS is found to be associated with surface deformation at a few millimeters at a site Cascadia Subduction Zone.

  11. Active browsing using similarity pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jau-Yuen; Bouman, Charles A.; Dalton, John C.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to managing large image databases, which we call active browsing. Active browsing integrates relevance feedback into the browsing environment, so that users can modify the database's organization to suit the desired task. Our method is based on a similarity pyramid data structure, which hierarchically organizes the database, so that it can be efficiently browsed. At coarse levels, the similarity pyramid allows users to view the database as large clusters of similar images. Alternatively, users can 'zoom into' finer levels to view individual images. We discuss relevance feedback for the browsing process, and argue that it is fundamentally different from relevance feedback for more traditional search-by-query tasks. We propose two fundamental operations for active browsing: pruning and reorganization. Both of these operations depend on a user-defined relevance set, which represents the image or set of images desired by the user. We present statistical methods for accurately pruning the database, and we propose a new 'worm hole' distance metric for reorganizing the database, so that members of the relevance set are grouped together.

  12. Putting the Pyramid into Practice. Science Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Explains the new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide Pyramid, which can help children and adults visualize the basics of sound nutrition. The pyramid chart places five food groups from top to bottom in inverse proportion to the number of servings that should be consumed. Special symbols are used to indicate fat content and added…

  13. Challenges to rebuilding the US food pyramid.

    PubMed

    Kinney, John M

    2005-01-01

    Twelve years have passed since the US Department of Agriculture introduced the Food Guide Pyramid as a single visual expression of the major food groups and their relative amounts in a healthy diet. Unfortunately, no regular review has been conducted to incorporate new knowledge. Some feel that the pyramid format is too limited for modern use, while others wish it to continue with new information. It seems timely to review what features of the pyramid design have been useful over past years and how it can be improved with new concepts while maintaining ease of understanding by the average consumer. Examples are presented of adapting the pyramid to diets promoted by a special group or to support particular dietary beliefs, in contrast to the goal of seeking a single standardized format. Inherent limitations of the pyramid format are discussed. One proposal is discussed which seeks to redesign the pyramid into a modern educational tool presenting current concepts supported by recent studies and outcomes data. Popular beliefs about what is a healthy diet have perhaps never been as varied as now. This is partly due to sharply differing opinions about which highly publicized weight-loss diet is most effective. The educational benefits of the pyramid format need objective study in view of the inherent limitations of that configuration. Only when the specific visual advantages for the consumer are shown can a decision be made as to the benefit of major new efforts to construct a single modern pyramid.

  14. Putting the Pyramid into Practice. Science Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Explains the new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide Pyramid, which can help children and adults visualize the basics of sound nutrition. The pyramid chart places five food groups from top to bottom in inverse proportion to the number of servings that should be consumed. Special symbols are used to indicate fat content and added…

  15. Personalizing the Food Pyramid. Teaching Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Donna

    1996-01-01

    Presents a strategy for health and home economics teachers to use in evaluating secondary students' eating and nutritional patterns. Students keep two-day food journals then complete a colorful personal food pyramid with the results. This creates a personal pyramid of food choices that lets students explore their eating habits. (SM)

  16. Electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, Brian T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from pyramidal and wedge absorbers used to line the walls of modern anechoic chambers is measured and compared with theoretically predicted values. The theoretical performance for various angles of incidence is studied. It is shown that a pyramidal absorber scatters electromagnetic energy more as a random rough surface does. The apparent reflection coefficient from an absorber wall illuminated by a plane wave can be much less than the normal absorber specifications quoted by the manufacturer. For angles near grazing incidence, pyramidal absorbers give a large backscattered field from the pyramid side-faces or edges. The wedge absorber was found to give small backscattered fields for near-grazing incidence. Based on this study, some new guidelines for the design of anechoic chambers are advocated because the specular scattering models used at present do not appear valid for pyramids that are large compared to the wavelength.

  17. [Pallido-pyramidal syndrome: an unrecognized entity].

    PubMed

    Tranchant, C; Boulay, C; Warter, J M

    1991-01-01

    A female teenager, without familial history, presented, since the age of 13 years, with gradually worsening pyramidal signs and a parkinsonian syndrome controlled by L-Dopa in small doses. The clinical complex was suggestive of the pallido-pyramidal syndrome, an entity which was individualized in 1954 by Davison on the basis of 5 young patients who had pyramidal signs and a parkinsonian syndrome. In only one of these patients a pathological study was carried out, disclosing a non specific degeneration without inclusions, involving the pallidum, substantia nigra and pyramidal tract. We hope that this report will encourage other authors to report similar cases, since only the study of new cases will determine whether the pallido-pyramidal syndrome is a true entity.

  18. Monitoring the performance of relative gravimeters for quality control in Mexico's gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalos, D.

    2013-05-01

    Gravimetric surveying is the fundamental data source for geodetic and geophysical processes like gravity field modeling, geoid modeling and prospection among others. These applications require and often assume that the accuracy of all field data is homogeneous to the uncertainty level of a few microGal. Nonetheless, after taking care of the methodology, the data obtained can be systematically contaminated with errors at the level of hundreds of microGal due to sudden devise miss-calibration. At the Mexico's National Institute of Statistics and Geography, the program of gravimetric surveying targets to obtain a 100% of national coverage for geoid modeling while recent procedures are implemented to monitor the performance of measuring devices. By regularly testing the ability of relative gravimeters to obtain accurate results it has been proven that the data quality can be maintained at a regular level for the convenience of users. Activities like the re-calculation of scale factors, drift and tide corrections ensure not only the present and future databases but even allow improvement of past records.

  19. Earth's core and inner-core resonances from analysis of VLBI nutation and superconducting gravimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosat, S.; Lambert, S. B.; Gattano, C.; Calvo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical parameters of the deep Earth's interior can be evaluated through the resonance effects associated with the core and inner-core wobbles on the forced nutations of the Earth's figure axis, as observed by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), or on the diurnal tidal waves, retrieved from the time-varying surface gravity recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SGs). In this paper, we inverse for the rotational mode parameters from both techniques to retrieve geophysical parameters of the deep Earth. We analyse surface gravity data from 15 SG stations and VLBI delays accumulated over the last 35 yr. We show existing correlations between several basic Earth parameters and then decide to inverse for the rotational modes parameters. We employ a Bayesian inversion based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a Markov-chain Monte Carlo method. We obtain estimates of the free core nutation resonant period and quality factor that are consistent for both techniques. We also attempt an inversion for the free inner-core nutation (FICN) resonant period from gravity data. The most probable solution gives a period close to the annual prograde term (or S1 tide). However the 95 per cent confidence interval extends the possible values between roughly 28 and 725 d for gravity, and from 362 to 414 d from nutation data, depending on the prior bounds. The precisions of the estimated long-period nutation and respective small diurnal tidal constituents are hence not accurate enough for a correct determination of the FICN complex frequency.

  20. Earth's core and inner core resonances from analysis of VLBI nutation and superconducting gravimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosat, S.; Lambert, S. B.; Gattano, C.; Calvo, M.

    2016-10-01

    Geophysical parameters of the deep Earth's interior can be evaluated through the resonance effects associated with the core and inner-core wobbles on the forced nutations of the Earth's figure axis, as observed by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), or on the diurnal tidal waves, retrieved from the time-varying surface gravity recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SGs). In this paper, we inverse for the rotational mode parameters from both techniques to retrieve geophysical parameters of the deep Earth. We analyze surface gravity data from 15 SG stations and VLBI delays accumulated over the last 35 years. We show existing correlations between several basic Earth parameters and then decide to inverse for the rotational modes parameters. We employ a Bayesian inversion based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. We obtain estimates of the free core nutation (FCN) resonant period and quality factor that are consistent for both techniques. We also attempt an inversion for the free inner core nutation (FICN) resonant period from gravity data. The most probable solution gives a period close to the annual prograde term (or S1 tide). However the 95% confidence interval extend the possible values between roughly 28 days and 725 days for gravity, and from 362 to 414 days from nutation data, depending on the prior bounds. The precisions of the estimated long-period nutation and respective small diurnal tidal constituents are hence not accurate enough for a correct determination of the FICN complex frequency.

  1. A comparison of tidal ocean loading models using superconducting gravimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boy, J.-P.; Llubes, M.; Hinderer, Jacques; Florsch, Nicolas

    2003-04-01

    Errors in global ocean models have been shown to be larger than the accuracy of surface gravity measurements [, 2001] and also new space gravity missions [, 2001]. In this paper, we compare the tidal loading estimated using 10 different ocean tide models to the surface gravity variations observed with 12 superconducting gravimeters (SG) belonging to the Global Geodynamics Project [, 1999] worldwide network. Ocean tidal gravity variations are shown to be mostly dependent on tidal sea height variations within a radius of ˜5000 km. Precise surface gravity measurements are therefore another tool for validating ocean tidal models from short to long wavelengths in addition, for example, to tide gauge data. In this study we also compute the tidal loading using several different available computer codes. As for ocean tidal models, we show that the differences between tidal loading programs are frequently larger than the error estimates of SG measurements. Compared to previous models, both recent hydrodynamical and TOPEX-Poseidon derived tidal models allow a significant reduction of discrepancies between ocean tidal observations using SG and tidal loading estimates. There still remains, however, a nonnegligible in-phase discrepancy between ocean tidal loading estimates and surface gravity observations, whereas the out-of-phase component is much smaller. We have shown that the in-phase disagreement does not seem to be caused by an inaccurate determination of the SG calibration.

  2. Observing Gravity Change in the Fennoscandian Uplift Area with the Hanover Absolute Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmen, Ludger; Gitlein, Olga; Klemann, Volker; Wolf, Detlef

    2012-08-01

    The Nordic countries Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark are a key study region for research of glacial isostasy. In addition, such research offers a unique opportunity for absolute gravimetry to show its capability as a geodetic tool for geophysical research. Within a multi-national cooperation, annual absolute gravity measurements have been performed in Fennoscandia by IfE since 2003. For the Hanover gravimeter FG5-220, overall accuracy of ±30 nm/s2 is indicated for a single station determination. First results of linear gravity changes are derived for ten stations in the central and southern part of the uplift area. Comparing with the rates predicted by glacial rebound modelling, the gravity trends of the absolute measurements differ by 3.8 nm/s2 per year (root-mean-square discrepancy) from the uplift model. The mean difference between observed and predicted rates is 0.8 nm/s2 per year only. A proportionality factor of -1.63 ± 0.20 nm/s2 per mm has been obtained, which describes the mean ratio between the observational gravity and height rates.

  3. Estimation of the gravimetric pole tide by stacking long time-series of GGP superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Yann; Hinderer, Jacques; Rogister, Yves; Rosat, Séverine

    2016-04-01

    We compute the gravimetric factor at the Chandler wobble (CW) frequency using time-series from superconducting gravimeters (SG) longer than a decade. We first individually process the polar motion and data at each individual gravity station to estimate the gravimetric factor amplitude and phase, then we make a global analysis by applying a stacking method to different subsets of up to seven SG stations. The stacking is an efficient way of getting rid of local effects and improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the combined data sets. Using the stacking method, we find a gravimetric factor amplitude and phase of 1.118 ± 0.016 and -0.45 ± 0.66 deg, respectively, which is smaller in amplitude than expected. The sources of error are then carefully considered. For both local and global analyses, the uncertainties on our results are reliably constrained by computing the standard deviation of the estimates of the gravimetric factor amplitude and phase for increasing length of the time-series. Constraints on the CW anelastic dissipation can be set since any departure of the gravimetric factor from its elastic value may provide some insights into the dissipative processes that occur at the CW period. In particular, assuming given rheological models for the Earth's mantle enables us to make the link between the gravimetric factor phase and the CW quality factor.

  4. Optical properties of GaN pyramids

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, K.C.; Lin, J.Y.; Jiang, H.X.; Yang, W.

    1999-03-01

    Picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the optical properties of GaN pyramids overgrown on hexagonal-patterned GaN(0001) epilayers on sapphire and silicon substrates with AlN buffer layers. We found that: (i) the release of the biaxial compressive strain in GaN pyramids on GaN/AlN/sapphire substrate led to a 7 meV redshift of the spectral peak position with respect to the strained GaN epilayer grown under identical conditions; (ii) in the GaN pyramids on GaN/AlN/sapphire substrate, strong band edge transitions with much narrower linewidths than those in the GaN epilayer have been observed, indicating the improved crystalline quality of the overgrown pyramids; (iii) PL spectra taken from different parts of the pyramids revealed that the top of the pyramid had the highest crystalline quality; and (iv) the presence of strong band-to-impurity transitions in the pyramids were primarily due to the incorporation of the oxygen and silicon impurities from the SiO{sub 2} mask. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Porous hydrocarbon networks of pyramidal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorimachi, Jun-ya; Okada, Susumu

    2017-06-01

    Using the density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation, we theoretically design porous hydrocarbon networks by assembling pyramidal hydrocarbon molecules with S = 1/2 radical spin. Our calculation showed that the porous hydrocarbon networks have either metallic or semiconducting electronic properties depending on the mutual arrangement of the pyramidal molecules in the networks. Furthermore, owing to the radical spin on the pyramidal molecules, the porous hydrocarbon network exhibits magnetic spin ordering with various spin configurations for metastable states, because the polarized electron spin forms a Kagome lattice and prefers singlet spin-spin coupling.

  6. Maskless inverted pyramid texturization of silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Lixia; Liu, Yaoping; Mei, Zengxia; Chen, Wei; Li, Junqiang; Liang, Huili; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Xiaolong, Du

    2015-06-02

    We discovered a technical solution of such outstanding importance that it can trigger new approaches in silicon wet etching processing and, in particular, photovoltaic cell manufacturing. The so called inverted pyramid arrays, outperforming conventional pyramid textures and black silicon because of their superior light-trapping and structure characteristics, can currently only be achieved using more complex techniques involving lithography, laser processing, etc. Importantly, our data demonstrate a feasibility of inverted pyramidal texturization of silicon by maskless Cu-nanoparticles assisted etching in Cu(NO3)2 / HF / H2O2 / H2O solutions and as such may have significant impacts on communities of fellow researchers and industrialists.

  7. Facets formation mechanism of GaN hexagonal pyramids on dot-patterns via selective MOVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Kitamura, Shota; Sawaki, Nobuhiko

    1996-11-01

    Three-dimensional GaN pyramids have been successfully obtained on dot-patterned GaN(0001)/sapphire substrates by using the selective MOVPE technique. The dot-pattern is a hexagon arranged with a 5{micro}m width and a 10{micro}m spacing. The GaN structure comprises a hexagonal pyramid covered with six {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} pyramidal facets on the side or a frustum of a hexagonal pyramid having a (0001) facet on the top. The facet formation mechanism has been investigated by observing the facet structure with the growth time. The {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} facets are very stable during the growth. The (0001) facet growth is dominant at the initial growth but almost stops at a certain growth time and then the facet structure is maintained. The appearance of the self-limited (0001) facet is attributed to the balance of flux between incoming Ga atoms from the vapor phase to the (0001) surface and outgoing Ga atoms from the (0001) surface to the {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} surface via migration. The longer the diffusion length of the Ga atoms on the (0001) surface is, the more the surface migration is enhanced, resulting in the appearance of the wider (0001) facet on the top.

  8. Gravity sensing with Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlippert, Dennis; Albers, Henning; Richardson, Logan L.; Nath, Dipankar; Meiners, Christian; Wodey, Étienne; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2016-04-01

    Very Long Baseline Atom Interferometry (VLBAI) represents a new class of atom optics experiments with applications in high-accuracy absolute gravimetry, gravity-gradiometry, and for tests of fundamental physics. Extending the baseline of atomic gravimeters from tens of centimeters to several meters opens the route towards competition with superconducting gravimeters. The VLBAI-test stand will consist of a 10m-baseline atom interferometer allowing for free fall times on the order of seconds, which will implemented in the Hannover Institut für Technologie (HITec) of the Leibniz Universität Hannover. In order to suppress environmental noise, the facility utilizes a state-of-the-art vibration isolation platform and a three-layer magnetic shield. We envisage a resolution of local gravitational acceleration of 5 ṡ 10-10 m/s2 with an inaccuracy < 10-9 m/s2. Operation as a gravity-gradiometer will allow to resolve the first-order gravity gradient with a resolution of 5 ṡ 10-10 1/s2. The operation of VLBAI as a differential dual-species gravimeter using ultracold mixtures of ytterbium and rubidium atoms enables quantum tests of the universality of free fall (UFF) at an unprecedented level [1], with the potential to surpass the accuracy of the best experiments to date [2]. We report on the first quantum test of the UFF using two different chemical elements, 39K and 87Rb [3], reaching a 100 ppb inaccuracy and show the potential of UFF tests in VLBAI at an inaccuracy of 10-13 and beyond. References J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011- (2015) S. Schlamminger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 041101- (2008) D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 203002 (2014)

  9. Antireflective properties of pyramidally textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Deinega, Alexei; Valuev, Ilya; Potapkin, Boris; Lozovik, Yurii

    2010-01-15

    Antireflective properties of pyramidally textured surfaces at normal light incidence are studied by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Optimal parameters for the period of the texture and the pyramid height are found. The asymptotic behavior of the reflection coefficient with an increasing height-to-base size ratio for the pyramids is also estimated for two limiting approximations: the effective medium theory (EMT) and geometric optics. For calculations in the geometric optics limit the ray tracing method was applied. The FDTD results for these limits are in agreement with the EMT and with the ray tracing calculations. It was found that the key factor influencing the optimal scatterer size is the character of the substrate tiling by the pyramid bases.

  10. Measurement of gravitational acceleration by dropping atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Achim; Chung, Keng Yeow; Chu, Steven

    1999-08-01

    Laser-cooling of atoms and atom-trapping are finding increasing application in many areas of science. One important use of laser-cooled atoms is in atom interferometers. In these devices, an atom is placed into a superposition of two or more spatially separated atomic states; these states are each described by a quantum-mechanical phase term, which will interfere with one another if they are brought back together at a later time. Atom interferometers have been shown to be very precise inertial sensors for acceleration,, rotation and for the measurement of the fine structure constant. Here we use an atom interferometer based on a fountain of laser-cooled atoms to measure g, the acceleration of gravity. Through detailed investigation and elimination of systematic effects that may affect the accuracy ofthe measurement, we achieve an absolute uncertainty of Δg/g ~ 3 × 10-9, representing a million-fold increase in absoluteaccuracy compared with previous atom-interferometer experiments. We also compare our measurement with the value of g obtained at the same laboratory site using a Michelson interferometer gravimeter (a modern equivalent of Galileo's `leaning tower' experiment in Pisa). We show that the macroscopic glass object used in this instrument falls with the same acceleration, to within 7 parts in 109, as a quantum-mechanical caesium atom.

  11. Pyramids and roundtables: a reflection on leadership.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kenric M

    2014-12-01

    By the nature of their career choice, surgeons are leaders at a variety of levels. The rise to leadership positions in surgery often requires scaling a steep pyramid. Many young surgeons are poorly prepared for what is frequently a competition with their peers. Some of the qualities young surgeons must possess to ascend the leadership pyramid are summarized by the "HOPES" of leadership: Honesty, recognition of Opportunity, having a Plan, knowing your Environment, and Self-assessment.

  12. Work, gravitational energy and the Great Pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tort, A. C.

    2015-09-01

    According to the Greek historian Herodotus, it took a task force of 100 000 men and 20 years to build up the Great Pyramid of Gizeh or Khufu’s Pyramid. In this work we discuss an analytical solution obtained in the framework of basic Newtonian mechanics that allows us to check Herodotus’s statement. Numerical estimates are compared to more detailed calculations. An estimation of the dietary energy intake necessary to accomplish the task is also discussed.

  13. Hydro-gravimetry in West-Africa: First results from the Djougou (Benin) superconducting gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Basile; Hinderer, Jacques; Séguis, Luc; Boy, Jean-Paul; Calvo, Marta; Descloitres, Marc; Rosat, Séverine; Galle, Sylvie; Riccardi, Umberto

    2014-10-01

    The increasing number of hydro-gravimetry studies proves the rising interest of the hydrology community toward this monitoring method. The accuracy of superconducting gravimeters (SG) potentially allows the retrieval of small water storage changes (WSC) down to a few millimeters of equivalent water thickness. However, the importance of corrections applied to SG data to achieve such a precision in gravity residuals should be recalled. The Djougou permanent gravity station presented in this paper and located in northern Benin, West-Africa, provides a good opportunity to review these considerations. This station is equipped since July 2010 with the superconducting gravimeter SG-060 aimed at deriving WSC at different time-scales, daily to inter-annual. In this area, WSC are (1) part of the control system for evapotranspiration (ET) process, a key variable of the West-African monsoon cycle and (2) the state variable for resource management, a critical issue in storage-poor hard rock basement contexts such as in northern Benin. The potential for deriving WSC from time-lapse gravity data partly depends on environmental features such as topography and the instrument shelter. Therefore, this issue is addressed first, with the background idea that such sensitivity analysis should be undertaken before setting up any new instrument. In Djougou, local topography is quite flat leading to a theoretical straightforward relationship between gravity changes and WSC, close to the standard Bouguer value. However, the shelter plays a significant masking role, which is the principal limitation to the retrieval of fast hydrological processes such as ET following a rain event. Several issues concerning classical gravity corrections are also addressed in the paper. These include gap-filling procedures during rain-events and drift estimates for short time series. Special attention is provided to atmospheric corrections, and different approaches are tested: a simple scalar admittance, a

  14. V-pit to truncated pyramid transition in AlGaN-based heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilatenko, A.; Enslin, J.; Knauer, A.; Mehnke, F.; Bellmann, K.; Wernicke, T.; Weyers, M.; Kneissl, M.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of three-dimensional truncated pyramids after the deposition of AlN/GaN superlattices onto (0001) AlN/sapphire templates has been analysed by atomic force microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. V-pits in AlN layers and the formation of nano-mounds around the v-pit edges are suggested to be responsible for the pyramid formation. Keeping the individual AlN layer thickness at 2.5 nm in the 80xAlN/GaN superlattice, the transformation to the three-dimensional pyramids is observed when the individual GaN layer thickness exceeds 1.5 nm. A subsequent overgrowth of the pyramidal structures by AlGaN results in inhomogeneous Ga distribution in the layers and laterally inhomogeneous strain states. Nevertheless, compared to the growth on planar layers, the overgrowth of the truncated pyramids leads to a slight reduction in dislocation density from 1 · 1010 cm-2 (for GaN thickness of 1 nm in SL) to 7 · 109 cm-2 (for GaN thickness of 2 nm in SL). The non-planar growth front and thus the compositional inhomogeneity in AlGaN vanish gradually with increasing AlGaN thickness. As a result, homogeneous 4 μm thick Al0.5Ga0.5N buffer layers suitable for the fabrication of UV-B LED structures can be obtained.

  15. Self-decorated Au nanoparticles on antireflective Si pyramids with improved hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, C. P.; Barman, A.; Kanjilal, A.; Kumar, M.; Som, T.; Satpati, B.

    2016-04-07

    Post-deposition annealing mediated evolution of self-decorated Au nanoparticles (NPs) on chemically etched Si pyramids is presented. A distinct transformation of Si surfaces from hydrophilic to hydrophobic is initially found after chemical texturing, showing an increase in contact angle (CA) from 58° to 98° (±1°). Further improvement of hydrophobicity with CA up to ∼118° has been established after annealing a 10 nm thick Au-coated Si pyramids at 400 °C that led to the formation of Au NPs on Si facets along with self-ordering at the pyramid edges. Detailed x-ray diffraction studies suggest the evolution of crystalline Au NPs on strained Si facets. Microstructural studies, however, indicate no mixing of Au and Si atoms at the Au/Si interfaces, instead of forming Au nanocrystals at 400 °C. The improved hydrophobicity of Si pyramids, even with Au NPs can be explained in the light of a decrease in solid fractional surface area according to Wenzel's model. Moreover, a sharp drop in specular reflectance from Si pyramids in the range of 300–800 nm, especially in the ultraviolet region up to ∼0.4% is recorded in the presence of Au NPs by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, reflecting the possible use in photovoltaic devices with improved antireflection property.

  16. Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Alice H; Rasmussen, Helen; Yu, Winifred W; Epstein, Susanna R; Russell, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In 1999 we proposed a Modified Food Guide Pyramid for adults aged 70+ y. It has been extensively used in a variety of settings and formats to highlight the unique dietary challenges of older adults. We now propose a Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults in a format consistent with the MyPyramid graphic. It is not intended to substitute for MyPyramid, which is a multifunctional Internet-based program allowing for the calculation of individualized food-based dietary guidance and providing supplemental information on food choices and preparation. Pedagogic issues related to computer availability, Web access, and Internet literacy of older adults suggests a graphic version of MyPyramid is needed. Emphasized are whole grains and variety within the grains group; variety and nutrient density, with specific emphasis on different forms particularly suited to older adults' needs (e.g. frozen) in the vegetables and fruits groups; low-fat and non-fat forms of dairy products including reduced lactose alternatives in the milk group; low saturated fat and trans fat choices in the oils group; and low saturated fat and vegetable choices in the meat and beans group. Underlying themes stress nutrient- and fiber-rich foods within each group and food sources of nutrients rather than supplements. Fluid and physical activity icons serve as the foundation of MyPyramid for Older Adults. A flag to maintain an awareness of the potential need to consider supplemental forms of calcium, and vitamins D and B-12 is placed at the top of the pyramid. Discussed are newer concerns about potential overnutrition in the current food landscape available to older adults.

  17. Mass variations of the Baltic Sea compared to superconducting gravimeter and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, H.; Virtanen, J.; Nordman, M.; Bilker-Koivula, M.; Mäkinen, J.

    2009-04-01

    We study the gravity effect of Baltic Sea mass variations observed using different methods and time resolutions. We compare data from tide gauges, from superconductive gravimeter (SG) at Metsähovi, Finland and from the GRACE gravity satellite. The mass variation in the semi-enclosed Baltic Sea is due to both internal redistribution of the water mass and due to changes in the so-called fill level caused by water exchange with the North Sea. The monthly variation in the water mass is about 60 Gt over an area of 390000 km-2. Due to a dense network of tide gauges, the Baltic Sea is one of best monitored mass variations in this size in the world. For modeling the observed water mass, we have used both monthly PSMSL tide gauge records and hourly values from several sources. In addition, we have hydrodynamic models for comparisons. To calculate gravity effect, we have used Green's function formalism for modeled sea surface. We have previously used temporal gravity field data from GRACE satellite to show that GRACE can recover the total mass variation in the Baltic Sea on monthly scales. In addition to monthly GRACE solutions with different filters, we now also use 10-day mascon block solutions from Goddard Space Flight Center. As the GRACE solutions are already corrected for gravity changes due to oceans, we have restored the contribution due to the Baltic Sea. We have also corrected for an effect due to leakage of continental water storage using the GLDAS hydrology model. The fundamental station Metsähovi is located 10 km from the nearest bay of the Baltic Sea and 15 km from the open sea. Using a single tide gauge at the distance of 30 km from SG at Metsähovi, very clear correlation is found between gravity and sea level. Superconducting gravity data has been corrected by tides and polar motion, atmospheric mass redistribution, local groundwater and drift. Hourly mass variations of sea are clearly separable. Theoretically one-meter even-layer water cause 30 nms-2

  18. Corrigendum to ``Time stability of spring and superconducting gravimeters through the analysis of very long gravity record'' [J. Geodyn. 80, (2014) 20-33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M.; Hinderer, J.; Rosat, S.; Legros, H.; Boy, J.-P.; Ducarme, B.; Zürn, W.

    2017-05-01

    In the paper ;Time stability of spring and superconducting gravimeters through the analysis of very long gravity record; by M. Calvo et al. (J. Geodyn. Vol. 80, pp. 20-33, doi:10.1016/j.jog.2014.04.009), Figs. 13 and 16 are incorrect.

  19. Maskless inverted pyramid texturization of silicon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Lixia; Liu, Yaoping; Mei, Zengxia; Chen, Wei; Li, Junqiang; Liang, Huili; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Xiaolong, Du

    2015-01-01

    We discovered a technical solution of such outstanding importance that it can trigger new approaches in silicon wet etching processing and, in particular, photovoltaic cell manufacturing. The so called inverted pyramid arrays, outperforming conventional pyramid textures and black silicon because of their superior light-trapping and structure characteristics, can currently only be achieved using more complex techniques involving lithography, laser processing, etc. Importantly, our data demonstrate a feasibility of inverted pyramidal texturization of silicon by maskless Cu-nanoparticles assisted etching in Cu(NO3)2 / HF / H2O2 / H2O solutions and as such may have significant impacts on communities of fellow researchers and industrialists. PMID:26035520

  20. The pyramid system for multiscale raster analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Cola, L.; Montagne, N.

    1993-01-01

    Geographical research requires the management and analysis of spatial data at multiple scales. As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's global change research program a software system has been developed that reads raster data (such as an image or digital elevation model) and produces a pyramid of aggregated lattices as well as various measurements of spatial complexity. For a given raster dataset the system uses the pyramid to report: (1) mean, (2) variance, (3) a spatial autocorrelation parameter based on multiscale analysis of variance, and (4) a monofractal scaling parameter based on the analysis of isoline lengths. The system is applied to 1-km digital elevation model (DEM) data for a 256-km2 region of central California, as well as to 64 partitions of the region. PYRAMID, which offers robust descriptions of data complexity, also is used to describe the behavior of topographic aspect with scale. ?? 1993.

  1. Comparison of the Micro-g LaCoste gPhone-054 spring gravimeter and the GWR-C026 superconducting gravimeter in Strasbourg (France) using a 300-day time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, U.; Rosat, S.; Hinderer, J.

    2011-02-01

    We report on the results of a comparative analysis carried out on more than ten months of co-located records collected at the J9 gravity station in Strasbourg (France) with a new generation spring gravimeter, the Micro-g LaCoste, Inc. gPhone-054 and the GWR-C026 superconducting gravimeter (SG-C026). The gPhone is essentially a LaCoste & Romberg, model G meter, but with an improved thermal system (a double oven) for increased temperature stability, which should result in an unprecedented improvement in noise and drift of this mechanical gravimeter. We test the performances of the gPhone-054 in terms of resolution, accuracy, noise level and long-term stability (drift) with respect to the SG-C026. Our comparative analysis is performed in a wide spectral domain, ranging from the body tides to the seismic band. This study confirms that the SG has better performances over the whole analysed spectral band. The gPhone-054 instrumental drift observed during this study still remains a critical point preventing the study of long-term gravity changes. In fact, compared with the SG, the drift is large and even non-linear. We observed a drift rate evolution characterized by a decrease from 50 µGal/day to 15 µGal/day, after about 1 month of operation. This makes it hard to distinguish real-time gravity changes from the instrumental drift. We tried to improve the drift modelling by using frequent absolute gravity (AG) measurements, but unfortunately during that time no significant gravity changes have been detected which would have helped us to discriminate short-term drift excursions from real gravity changes. In terms of noise levels, the gPhone-054 turns out to be about 10 times noisier than the SG-C026 at seismic frequencies, while in the tidal band, it is twice as noisy. In between, at periods ranging from 1 h to 6 h, the gPhone-054 is about 3 times noisier than the SG-C026 but performs slightly better than the Scintrex CG5 in terms of noise level and precision.

  2. A Theoretical Model of Pyramidal InAs/inP Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Brian

    2002-03-01

    A quantum dot is an atomic-like system consisting of a semiconductor nanoparticle surrounded by an insulator. When an electron in the valence band of the semiconductor becomes excited, the electron-hole pair that is created (called an exiton) acts much like a hydrogen atom. Investigations have demonstrated the potential application of quantum dots for optical switching and optical memory. A model of a truncated pyramidal InAs quantum dot in an InP matrix will be presented and described. The model uses a single band envelope theory that accurately describes the truncated pyramidal shape of the dot. The matrix representation of the Hamiltonian is calculated in a basis consisting of kinetic energy eigenfunctions that vanish on the surface of a cube containing the dot. The eigenvalues of this matrix are the energy levels. These results will then be compared with photoluminescence measurements of energy levels conducted at the Microelectronics-Photonics Center at the University of Arkansas - Fayetteville

  3. Growth of oxygen-induced nanoscale-pyramidal facets on Rh(210) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govind; Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Hao; Madey, Theodore E.

    2010-02-01

    Oxygen-induced nanometer scale faceting of the atomically rough Rh(210) surface has been studied using Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When the Rh(210) surface is annealed at temperature ≥550K in oxygen (pressure ≥2×10-8Torr ), it becomes completely covered with nanometer-scale facets. LEED studies reveal that the faceted surface is characterized by three-sided nanoscale pyramids exposing one reconstructed (110) and two {731} faces on each pyramid. STM measurements confirm the LEED results and show that the average facet size ranges from 12 to 21nm when changing annealing temperature from 800 to 1600 K. Moreover, atomically resolved STM images show that the (110) face of faceted Rh(210) exhibits various reconstructions ( 1×n , n=2-4 ) depending on oxygen coverage. Faceted Rh(210) is a potential template for studies of structure sensitive reactions.

  4. Towards a test of Einstein's equivalence principle using a Rb-K atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlippert, Dennis; Hartwig, Jonas; Velte, Ulrich; Albers, Henning; Matthias, Jonas; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2013-05-01

    We report on our work directed towards a dual species matter-wave interferometer for performing a differential measurement of the acceleration of free falling 87Rb and 39K atoms with the aim to test the universality of free fall and hence Einstein's equivalence principle. According to the minimal Standard Model Extension such a test is very sensitive to composition based equivalence principle violating effects and complementary to classical tests. Simultaneous dual species operation guarantees high common noise suppression. We will show the environmental noise limited performance of the single species rubidium gravimeter (7 . 84 .10-6 m/s2 /√{H z } and 3 . 86 .10-8 m/s2 @ 49152 s) in comparison to a classical accelerometer and the implementation progress of the potassium gravimeter.

  5. Texturing a pyramid-like structure on a silicon surface via the synergetic effect of copper and Fe(III) in hydrofluoric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ming; Li, Shaoyuan; Deng, Jianxin; Li, Yuping; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang

    2016-05-01

    An innovative approach is proposed to texture a pyramid structure on a silicon surface via Cu-catalyzed chemical etching in the HF/FeCl3 system. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the formed pyramid structure were examined by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results revealed that numerous silicon pyramid-like structures with hemlines of 0.1 ∼ 3 μm and height of 0.1 ∼ 2 μm are close together, and the top angle of the pyramid structure is 90°. Additionally, the systematic study of the effects of the etching time and the concentration of FeCl3 on the pyramid-like structures by the atom configuration model of silicon crystal faces demonstrated that the etching proceeds preferentially along the <1 0 0> directions of silicon. A formation mechanism of the pyramid-like structure is proposed. The results imply that the synergetic effect of Cu nanoparticles and Fe(III) could conveniently generate a pyramid-like architecture on the surface of silicon in hydrofluoric acid solution.

  6. Seasonal and short time gravity changes due to monsoonal rainfall in West Africa using a superconducting gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Basile; Hinderer, Jacques; Séguis, Luc; Boy, Jean-Paul; Calvo, Marta; Descloitres, Marc; Rosat, Séverine; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    A superconducting gravimeter (SG) has been installed since 2010 in Djougou, northern Benin, within the framework of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project. This site was first measured with a FG5 absolute gravimeter four times a year from 2008 to 2011. It was then decided to install a superconducting gravimeter in order to monitor in a continuous way the strong annual monsoon signal with both local and non-local hydrological contributions within the humid sudanian zone of West-Africa. The area is also part of the long-term observing system AMMA-Catch, and thus under intense hydro-meteorological monitoring (rain, soil moisture, water table level, evapotranspiration, etc…). We present here the results of the first two years relative gravity monitoring with SG-060 from GWR Instruments. FG5 absolute gravity data are used for calibration and drift estimate of the SG. As everywhere on the GGP (Global Geodynamics project) stations, the signal includes solid earth tides, ocean loading, polar motion, atmospheric pressure effects, drift and water storage changes (WSC). The barometric corrections are more complicated than for mid-latitude stations; indeed pressure effects are of major concern in the equatorial band, because they are governed by S1 and S2 thermal pressure waves. These waves dominate both the local Newtonian effect (an increase in local pressure decreases the gravity) and the smaller non-local loading effect (an increase in regional pressure decreases the gravity mostly by a subsidence effect of the elastic earth) because of their coherency at the regional scale. We focus here on two predominant frequencies: first the seasonal cycle where we compare the seasonal gravity signal left in the residuals after correction for solid Earth and ocean tides, atmosphere, polar motion and long term drift to Water Storage Changes (WSC) computed from observations in soil moisture (using neutronic measurements) and water table variations. Second we investigate

  7. Comparison of Superconducting and Spring Gravimeters at the Mizusawa VLBI Observatory of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kim, Tae-Hee; Tamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Continuous microgravity monitoring is utilized to gain new insights into changes in the subsurface distribution of magma and/or fluid that commonly occur beneath active volcanoes. Rather new superconducting and spring gravimeters, iGrav#003 and gPhone#136 are collocated with a superconducting gravimeter, TT#70 at the Mizusawa VLBI Observatory of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, since the end of September, 2016 in order to evaluate those performances before field deployment planned in 2017. Calibration of iGrav#003 was carried out by collocation with an absolute gravimeter FG5 of the Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo (Okubo, 2016, personal comm.) at a Fundamental Gravity Station in Sendai in July, 2016. Based on the scale factors of iGrav#003 obtained by the calibration and of gPhone#136 provided by the manufacturer (Micro-g LaCoste, Inc.), tidal analyses are performed by means of BAYTAP-G (Tamura et al., 1991, GJI). Amplitudes and phases of each major tidal constituent mutually agree well within ±4 % and ±3 degrees, respectively. The instrumental drift rate of iGrav#003 is very low, about 5 micro-Gal/month, whereas that of gPhone#136 is very high, about 500 micro-Gal/month. The high drift rate of gPhone#136, however, is well approximated by a quadratic function at present and can be removed. The detrended time series of gPhone#136 shows good agreement with iGrav#003 time series in the overall feature: gravity fluctuations with amplitudes of about a few micro-Gal and with durations of a few days, which may be due to variations in the moisture content of the topmost unsaturated sedimentary layer and the water table height. It suggests that both instruments may capture volcanic signals associated with pressure changes in magma chambers, dike intrusion/withdrawing, and so on. iGrav#003 will be installed in the Zao volcanological observatory of Tohoku University located at about 3 km from the summit crater, and gPhone#136 will be

  8. Quantitation of the prominent medullary pyramid: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Paling, M R; Black, W C

    1986-06-01

    We propose a revised objective measurement of the size of the renal medullary pyramid in the assessment of the prominent renal pyramid: the medullary-renal ratio (MRR). (Formula: see text). This is a more accurate assessment of the size of the renal pyramid relative to the size of the kidney than the previously proposed medullary pyramid index, which fails to take into account the varying morphology of otherwise normal kidneys.

  9. Extracting Compact Objects Using Linked Pyramids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    IEEE Transactions Systems. Han. Cybernetics 11. 1981, 597-605. 7. M. D, Levine, Region analysis using a pyramid data structure. In Structured ... Computer Vision (S. Tanimoto and A. Klinger, eds.) Academic Press, New York, 1980, 57-100. 8. D. L. Milgram, Region extraction using con- vergent

  10. Modified Mean-Pyramid Coding Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming; Romer, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Modified mean-pyramid coding scheme requires transmission of slightly fewer data. Data-expansion factor reduced from 1/3 to 1/12. Schemes for progressive transmission of image data transmitted in sequence of frames in such way coarse version of image reconstructed after receipt of first frame and increasingly refined version of image reconstructed after receipt of each subsequent frame.

  11. Digital pyramid wavefront sensor with tunable modulation.

    PubMed

    Akondi, Vyas; Castillo, Sara; Vohnsen, Brian

    2013-07-29

    The pyramid wavefront sensor is known for its high sensitivity and dynamic range that can be tuned by mechanically altering its modulation amplitude. Here, a novel modulating digital scheme employing a reflecting phase only spatial light modulator is demonstrated. The use of the modulator allows an easy reconfigurable pyramid with digital control of the apex angle and modulation geometry without the need of any mechanically moving parts. Aberrations introduced by a 140-actuator deformable mirror were simultaneously sensed with the help of a commercial Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. The wavefronts reconstructed using the digital pyramid wavefront sensor matched very closely with those sensed by the Hartmann-Shack. It is noted that a tunable modulation is necessary to operate the wavefront sensor in the linear regime and to accurately sense aberrations. Through simulations, it is shown that the wavefront sensor can be extended to astronomical applications as well. This novel digital pyramid wavefront sensor has the potential to become an attractive option in both open and closed loop adaptive optics systems.

  12. Fast Feature Pyramids for Object Detection.

    PubMed

    Dollár, Piotr; Appel, Ron; Belongie, Serge; Perona, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Multi-resolution image features may be approximated via extrapolation from nearby scales, rather than being computed explicitly. This fundamental insight allows us to design object detection algorithms that are as accurate, and considerably faster, than the state-of-the-art. The computational bottleneck of many modern detectors is the computation of features at every scale of a finely-sampled image pyramid. Our key insight is that one may compute finely sampled feature pyramids at a fraction of the cost, without sacrificing performance: for a broad family of features we find that features computed at octave-spaced scale intervals are sufficient to approximate features on a finely-sampled pyramid. Extrapolation is inexpensive as compared to direct feature computation. As a result, our approximation yields considerable speedups with negligible loss in detection accuracy. We modify three diverse visual recognition systems to use fast feature pyramids and show results on both pedestrian detection (measured on the Caltech, INRIA, TUD-Brussels and ETH data sets) and general object detection (measured on the PASCAL VOC). The approach is general and is widely applicable to vision algorithms requiring fine-grained multi-scale analysis. Our approximation is valid for images with broad spectra (most natural images) and fails for images with narrow band-pass spectra (e.g., periodic textures).

  13. Toddler Teachers' Use of "Teaching Pyramid" Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Diane; Demchak, MaryAnn

    2011-01-01

    Effective strategies to promote social-emotional development and prevent occurrence of challenging behaviors in young children is critical. The "Teaching Pyramid", a framework for supporting social-emotional development and preventing and addressing challenging behaviors, was developed for preschool children. This mixed methods study…

  14. Ancient Pyramids Help Students Learn Math Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Courtney D.; Stump, Amanda M.; Lazaros, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an activity that allows students to use mathematics and critical-thinking skills to emulate processes used by the ancient Egyptians to prepare the site for the Pyramids of Giza. To accomplish this, they use three different methods. First, they create a square using only simple technological tools that were available to the…

  15. The Fruit Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating plenty of servings of fruit. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and…

  16. The Vegetable Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating plenty of vegetables. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  17. Vegetarian food guide pyramid: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Haddad, E H; Sabaté, J; Whitten, C G

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this article and the accompanying vegetarian food guide pyramid graphic is to provide the conceptual framework for the development of a new and unique food guide. Food guides for vegetarians have tended to be adaptations of guides developed for the general nonvegetarian population instead of being designed to emphasize the healthy components of vegetarian dietary patterns. A subcommittee of the organizers of the Third International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition began a process that led to the development of a pyramid-shaped graphic illustration and a supporting document, both of which were introduced at the congress. The 5 major plant-based food groups (whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruit, nuts, and seeds) form the trapezoid-shaped lower portion of the pyramid. Optional food groups, which may be avoided by some vegetarians (vegetable oils, dairy, eggs, and sweets), form the smaller, separate, triangle-shaped top portion of the pyramid. The supporting document discusses the concepts that affect vegetarian food guidance and the rationale for selecting the food groups. It is hoped that this framework will provide the impetus for further research and discussion and will lead to the development of a guide that is nutritionally adequate, is conducive to good health, and can be adopted by vegetarians of diverse eating practices.

  18. Eating Right. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the food groups of the food guide pyramid. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases helps early readers learn new words.…

  19. The Grain Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating sufficient servings of grains. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and…

  20. The Dairy Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the dairy group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  1. Ancient Pyramids Help Students Learn Math Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Courtney D.; Stump, Amanda M.; Lazaros, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an activity that allows students to use mathematics and critical-thinking skills to emulate processes used by the ancient Egyptians to prepare the site for the Pyramids of Giza. To accomplish this, they use three different methods. First, they create a square using only simple technological tools that were available to the…

  2. Pyramid Project: An Exemplary Staff Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardmore City Schools, OK.

    The Ardmore, Oklahoma, School District developed the 3-year Pyramid Project to implement the following recommendations of the Sid W. Richardson Foundation Study of exemplary programs for high ability students: (1) broaden the process for assessing student abilities, (2) adopt continuous progress and appropriate pacing, (3) cultivate students'…

  3. Traveling Salesman Problem: A Foveating Pyramid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Stefanov, Emil; Saalweachter, John; Li, Zheng; Haxhimusa, Yll; Kropatsch, Walter G.

    2006-01-01

    We tested human performance on the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem using problems with 6-50 cities. Results confirmed our earlier findings that: (a) the time of solving a problem is proportional to the number of cities, and (b) the solution error grows very slowly with the number of cities. We formulated a new version of a pyramid model. The…

  4. Food Pyramids and Bio-Accumulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    Students learn about marine food chains, bioaccumulation, the energy pyramid, and potential ocean pollutants and their effects on ocean ecosystems in this activity which involves having students pull drawings of marine organisms which include diatoms, copepods, anchovies, bonito, and killer whale out of a bag, then demonstrating the food chain by…

  5. Toddler Teachers' Use of "Teaching Pyramid" Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Diane; Demchak, MaryAnn

    2011-01-01

    Effective strategies to promote social-emotional development and prevent occurrence of challenging behaviors in young children is critical. The "Teaching Pyramid", a framework for supporting social-emotional development and preventing and addressing challenging behaviors, was developed for preschool children. This mixed methods study…

  6. Jonestown in the Shadow of Maslow's Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easley, Edgar M.; Wigglesworth, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the light of the Jonestown tragedy. Maintains that members of the People's Temple felt frustrated in attaining the lower levels in the world of reality, and so moved outside the pyramid in search of the top, self-actualization. In the process, their primary needs were met. Journal availability: see SO 507…

  7. The Dairy Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the dairy group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  8. The Grain Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating sufficient servings of grains. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and…

  9. Eating Right. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the food groups of the food guide pyramid. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases helps early readers learn new words.…

  10. The Vegetable Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating plenty of vegetables. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  11. The Fruit Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating plenty of servings of fruit. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and…

  12. Traveling Salesman Problem: A Foveating Pyramid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Stefanov, Emil; Saalweachter, John; Li, Zheng; Haxhimusa, Yll; Kropatsch, Walter G.

    2006-01-01

    We tested human performance on the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem using problems with 6-50 cities. Results confirmed our earlier findings that: (a) the time of solving a problem is proportional to the number of cities, and (b) the solution error grows very slowly with the number of cities. We formulated a new version of a pyramid model. The…

  13. Jonestown in the Shadow of Maslow's Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easley, Edgar M.; Wigglesworth, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the light of the Jonestown tragedy. Maintains that members of the People's Temple felt frustrated in attaining the lower levels in the world of reality, and so moved outside the pyramid in search of the top, self-actualization. In the process, their primary needs were met. Journal availability: see SO 507…

  14. Comparing Volumes of Prisms and Pyramids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    Students' experience in using formulas for volumes is often limited to substituting numbers into given formulas. An activity presented in this article may help students make connections between the formulas for volumes of prisms and volumes of pyramids. In addition, some interesting facts from number theory arise, demonstrating strong connections…

  15. Comparing Volumes of Prisms and Pyramids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    Students' experience in using formulas for volumes is often limited to substituting numbers into given formulas. An activity presented in this article may help students make connections between the formulas for volumes of prisms and volumes of pyramids. In addition, some interesting facts from number theory arise, demonstrating strong connections…

  16. Food Pyramids and Bio-Accumulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    Students learn about marine food chains, bioaccumulation, the energy pyramid, and potential ocean pollutants and their effects on ocean ecosystems in this activity which involves having students pull drawings of marine organisms which include diatoms, copepods, anchovies, bonito, and killer whale out of a bag, then demonstrating the food chain by…

  17. Pyramid Servings Database (PSDB) for NHANES III

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute developed a database to examine dietary data from the National Center for Health Statistics' Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in terms of servings from each of United States Department of Agriculture's The Food Guide Pyramid's major and minor food groups.

  18. Idea Bank: Assessing Your Curriculum with the Creative Rights Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a creative rights pyramid that was developed as part of the author's efforts to: (1) teach about copyright and intellectual property; and (2) increase students' awareness of their own intellectual property in and outside the music classroom. The pyramid is based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food pyramid to suggest…

  19. Using the Food Guide Pyramid: A Resource for Nutrition Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Anne; Fulton, Lois; Davis, Carole; Hogbin, Myrtle

    This booklet provides information to assist nutrition educators in helping their audiences use the Food Guide Pyramid to plan and prepare foods for a healthy diet. It reviews the objectives set in developing the Food Guide Pyramid and illustrates their impact on the application of the Food Guide Pyramid to planning menus. In particular, the…

  20. Idea Bank: Assessing Your Curriculum with the Creative Rights Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a creative rights pyramid that was developed as part of the author's efforts to: (1) teach about copyright and intellectual property; and (2) increase students' awareness of their own intellectual property in and outside the music classroom. The pyramid is based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food pyramid to suggest…

  1. LANDSAT-BASED WATER QUALITY MONITORING OF PYRAMID LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT) in cooperation with federal, state and local entities has been able to increase stream flow, establish water quality standards and improve fish habitat in the Truckee River, a primary source of water for pyramid Lake. In the past, pyramid Lake wat...

  2. Teacher Acquisition of Functional Analysis Methods Using Pyramidal Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, Sacha T.; St. Peter, Claire C.; Giles, Aimee F.

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal training involves an experienced professional training a subset of individuals who, in turn, train additional individuals. Pyramidal training is effective for training a variety of behavior-analytic skills with direct-care staff, parents, and teachers. As teachers' roles in behavioral assessment increase, pyramidal training may be…

  3. Teacher Acquisition of Functional Analysis Methods Using Pyramidal Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, Sacha T.; St. Peter, Claire C.; Giles, Aimee F.

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal training involves an experienced professional training a subset of individuals who, in turn, train additional individuals. Pyramidal training is effective for training a variety of behavior-analytic skills with direct-care staff, parents, and teachers. As teachers' roles in behavioral assessment increase, pyramidal training may be…

  4. LANDSAT-BASED WATER QUALITY MONITORING OF PYRAMID LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT) in cooperation with federal, state and local entities has been able to increase stream flow, establish water quality standards and improve fish habitat in the Truckee River, a primary source of water for pyramid Lake. In the past, pyramid Lake wat...

  5. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  6. The Lunar Surface Gravimeter as a Lunar Seismometer: New Identification of Unlocated Deep Moonquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Taichi; Kobayashi, Naoki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Lognonné, Philippe; Gagnepain-Beyneix, Jeannine

    2010-05-01

    The internal structure of the Moon is an essential piece of information to investigate its origin and evolution. The seismic analyses using the data from Apollo Passive Seismic Exploration (Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16) are one of the most successful methods carried out to estimate the inner structure of the Moon. From the seismic analyses, it was found that the Moon is still seismically active and the Moon has layered structure with 40~60 km crust with mantle below. However, because of the limitation of seismic network, only with 4 seismic stations all on the nearside, the experiment could not fully uncover the lunar interior, especially for the region deeper than 1000 km. This is still an important question of the lunar science and new data were desired. In our previous studies, we showed that the Lunar Surface Gravimeter on Apollo 17 can be used as a seismometer. We succeeded in relocating the known seismic event and improving its location by using the additional seismic data of the LSG. In this study, we attempted to locate deep moonquakes that could not be located with the previous data set by using the LSG data. Deep moonquakes are said to occur periodically, at certain seismic source or nests. It is known that seismic events of the same nest have almost identical waveforms at one station. This is the unique characteristic of deep moonquakes and classification by waveform cross-correlation is possible. In this way, more than 300 nests were identified. 106 of them provided sufficient data to locate their sources. Among the remaining unlocated deep moonquakes, 60 provided usable waveform data at more than one station. In this study we focused on these 60 nests and examined whether they are locatable by adding data of the LSG. First, we picked up data for seismic event whose LSG data were available. This leaves 40 nests to be examined with the additional data of LSG. We examined all the seismic events from the 40 nests and identified seismic events from 5 nests

  7. Assessing the precision of the iGrav superconducting gravimeter for hydrological models and karstic hydrological process identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Le Moigne, N.; Bayer, R.; Chéry, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the potential of a new compact superconducting gravimeter (GWR iGrav) designed for groundwater monitoring. At first, 3 yr of continuous gravity data are evaluated and the performance of the instrument is investigated. With repeated absolute gravity measurements using a Micro-g Lacoste FG5, the calibration factor (-894.8 nm s-2 V-1) and the long-term drift of this instrument (45 nm s-2 yr-1) are estimated for the first time with a high precision and found to be respectively constant and linear for this particular iGrav. The low noise level performance is found similar to those of previous superconducting gravimeters and leads to gravity residuals coherent with local hydrology. The iGrav is located in a fully instrumented hydrogeophysical observatory on the Durzon karstic basin (Larzac plateau, south of France). Rain gauges and a flux tower (evapo-transpiration measurements) are used to evaluate the groundwater mass balance at the local scale. Water mass balance demonstrates that the karst is only capacitive: all the rainwater is temporarily stored in the matrix and fast transfers to the spring through fractures are insignificant in this area. Moreover, the upper part of the karst around the observatory appears to be representative of slow transfer of the whole catchment. Indeed, slow transfer estimated on the site fully supports the low-flow discharge at the only spring which represents all groundwater outflows from the catchment. In the last part of the paper, reservoir models are used to characterize the water transfer and storage processes. Particular highlights are done on the advantages of continuous gravity data (compared to repeated campaigns) and on the importance of local accurate meteorological data to limit misinterpretation of the gravity observations. The results are complementary with previous studies at the basin scale and show a clear potential for continuous gravity time-series assimilation in hydrological simulations, even

  8. Assessing the precision of the iGrav superconducting gravimeter for hydrological models and karstic hydrological process identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Moigne, N. Le; Bayer, R.; Chéry, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we present the potential of a new compact superconducting gravimeter (GWR iGrav) designed for groundwater monitoring. At first, three years of continuous gravity data are evaluated and the performance of the instrument is investigated. With repeated absolute gravity measurements using a Micro-g Lacoste FG5, the calibration factor (-894.8 nm.s-2.V-1) and the long term drift of this instrument (45 nm.s-2 per year) are estimated for the first time with a high precision and found to be respectively constant and linear for this particular iGrav. The low noise level performance is found similar to those of previous superconducting gravimeters and leads to gravity residuals coherent with local hydrology. The iGrav is located in a fully instrumented hydro-geophysical observatory on the Durzon karstic basin (Larzac plateau, south of France). Rain gauges and a flux tower (evapo-transpiration measurements) are used to evaluate the groundwater mass balance at the local scale. Water mass balance demonstrates that the karst is only capacitive: all the rainwater is temporarily stored in the matrix and fast transfers to the spring through fractures are insignificant in this area. Moreover, the upper part of the karst around the observatory appears to be representative of slow transfer of the whole catchment. Indeed, slow transfer estimated on the site fully supports the low-flow discharge at the only spring which represents all groundwater outflows from the catchment. In the last part of the paper, reservoir models are used to characterize the water transfer and storage processes. Particular highlights are done on the advantages of continuous gravity data (compared to repeated campaigns) and on the importance of local accurate meteorological data to limit misinterpretation of the gravity observations. The results are complementary with previous studies at the basin scale and show a clear potential for continuous gravity time series assimilation in hydrological

  9. Least-squares self-coherency analysis of superconducting gravimeter records in search for the Slichter triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagiatakis, Spiros D.; Yin, Hui; El-Gelil, Mahmoud Abd

    2007-02-01

    We develop a new approach for the spectral analysis of the superconducting gravimeter data to search for the spheroidal oscillation 1S1 of the Earth solid inner core. The new method, which we call least- squares ( LS) self- coherency analysis, is based on the product of the least-squares spectra of segments of the time series under consideration. The statistical foundation of this method is presented in the new least- squares product spectrum theorem that establishes rigorously confidence levels for detecting significant peaks. We apply this approach along with a number of other innovative ideas to a 6-year long gravity series collected at the Canadian Superconducting Gravimeter Installation (CSGI) in Cantley, Canada, by splitting it into 72 statistically independent monthly records. Each monthly record is analysed spectrally and all monthly LS spectra are multiplied to construct the self- coherency spectrum of the 6-year gravity series. The self-coherency spectrum is then used to detect significant peaks in the band 3-7 h at various significant levels with the aim to identify a triplet of periods associated with the rotational/ellipsoidal splitting of 1S1 (Slichter triplet). From all the Slichter periods predicted by various researchers so far, Smylie's triplet appears to be the most supported one, albeit very weakly, both, before and after the atmospheric pressure effect is removed from the series. Using the viscous splitting law [Smylie, D.E., 1992. The inner core translational triplet and the density near Earth's center. Science 255, 1678-1682] as guide, we can also see one interesting and statistically significant triplet with periods A = {4.261 h, 4.516 h, 4.872 h}, which changes slightly to A' = {4.269 h, 4.516 h, 4.889 h} after the atmospheric pressure correction is applied to the gravity series.

  10. Self-assembly of colloidal pyramids in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Helseth, L E

    2005-08-02

    We study routes toward the construction of 2D colloidal pyramids. We find that magnetic beads may self-assemble into pyramids near a nonmagnetic 1D boundary as long as the number of beads in the pyramid does not exceed 10. We have also found that a strong magnetic field gradient could act as a boundary, thus assisting the self-assembly of magnetic colloids in water, and have observed the formation of stable microscopic pyramids within a certain magnetic field range. Our results indicate that colloidal pyramids can be formed in a number of ways by utilizing external fields.

  11. Sublingual pyramidal lobe. Complications of subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    A potential complication of subtotal thyroidectomy where a large pyramidal lobe is present is described. The pyramidal lobe normally is immobilized inferiorly by its attachment to the thyroidal isthmus. When the isthmus is removed and the pyramidal lobe is left in situ during subtotal thyroidectomy its superior attachments will allow the pyramidal lobe to become situated sublingually. This may produce gagging and nausea. To avoid the complication, it is recommended that the pyramidal lobe be removed during subtotal thyroidectomy. If the patient also is thyrotoxic, I-131 can be used to treat this complication successfully.

  12. Nociceptive Processing by Anterior Cingulate Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shyu, Bai-Chuang; Sikes, Robert W.; Vogt, Brent A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the cingulate cortex is frequently activated in acute human pain studies, postsynaptic responses are not known nor are links between nociceptive afferents, neuronal responses, and outputs to other structures. Intracellular potentials were recorded from neurobiotin-injected, pyramidal neurons in anterior cingulate area 24b following noxious stimulation of the sciatic nerve in anesthetized rabbits. Layer IIIc pyramids had extensive and horizontally oriented basal dendrites in layer IIIc where nociceptive afferents terminate. They had the longest excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs; 545 ms) that were modulated with hyperpolarizing currents. Pyramids in layer V had an intermediate tuft of oblique apical dendrites in layer IIIc that were 150–350 μm from somata in layer Va and 351–550 μm in layer Vb. Although average EPSP durations were short in layers II–IIIab (222 ± 31), Va (267 ± 65), and Vb (159 ± 31), there were five neurons in layers IIIab–Va that had EPSP durations lasting >300 ms (548 ± 63 ms). Neurons in layers IIIc, Va, and Vb had the highest amplitude EPSPs (6.25, 6.84 ± 0.58, and 6.4 ± 0.47 mV, respectively), whereas those in layers II–IIIab were 5 ± 0.56 mV. Nociceptive responses in layer Vb were complex and some had initial inhibitory postsynaptic potentials with shorter-duration EPSPs. Layers II–IIIab had dye-coupled pyramids and EPSPs in these layers had short durations (167 ± 33 ms) compared with those in layers IIIc–Va (487 ± 28 ms). In conclusion there are two populations of anterior cingulate cortex pyramids with EPSPs of significantly different durations, although their dendritic morphologies do not predict EPSP duration. Short-duration EPSPs are thalamic-mediated, nociceptive responses lasting ≤200 ms. Longer, “integrative” EPSPs are >350 ms and are likely modulated by intracortical axon collateral discharges. These findings suggest that links between nociception and projections to cortical and motor

  13. A progressively predictive image pyramid for efficient lossless coding.

    PubMed

    Qiu, G

    1999-01-01

    A low entropy pyramidal image data structure suited for lossless coding and progressive transmission is proposed in this work. The new coder, called the progressively predictive pyramid (PPP) is based on the well-known Laplacian pyramid. By introducing inter-resolution predictors into the original Laplacian pyramid, we show that the entropy level in the original pyramid can be reduced significantly. To take full advantage of progressive transmission, a scheme is introduced to create the predictor adaptively, thus eliminating the need to transmit the predictor and reducing the coding overheads. A method for designing the predictor is presented. Numerical results show that PPP is superior to traditional approaches to pyramid generation in the sense that the pyramids generated by PPP always have significantly lower entropy values.

  14. Pyramid-structure-based reversible fragile watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Fu-Hao; Lee, Greg C.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a novel reversible fragile watermarking scheme based on a pyramidal structure. The similarities among the detail components of a pyramid-structure image are exploited to select appropriate embedding areas, and then the cryptographic watermarks are embedded into selected wavelet coefficients using a difference-expansion method. An adaptive embedding method is proposed to avoid needing extra space to store parts of the original image and the watermark location map. The cryptographic signatures are created using a watermark generation function that comprises a hashing function and a public-key encryption function. To resist counterfeiting attack, block relationships are created using toral automorphism to increase the security and implementation practicability. Experimental results show that the proposed reversible fragile watermarking scheme can successfully obtain the original image if the protected image is unaltered, and unauthorized manipulations can be correctly identified and localized even when protected images undergo a cropping attack.

  15. Approximate particle spectra in the pyramid scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Tom; Torres, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    We construct a minimal model inspired by the general class of pyramid schemes [T. Banks and J.-F. Fortin, J. High Energy Phys. 07 (2009) 046JHEPFG1029-8479], which is consistent with both supersymmetry breaking and electroweak symmetry breaking. In order to do computations, we make unjustified approximations to the low energy Kähler potential. The phenomenological viability of the resultant mass spectrum is then examined and compared with current collider limits. We show that for certain regimes of parameters, the model, and thus generically the pyramid scheme, can accommodate the current collider mass constraints on physics beyond the standard model with a tree-level light Higgs mass near 125 GeV. However, in this regime the model exhibits a little hierarchy problem, and one must permit fine-tunings that are of order 5%.

  16. Compression asphyxia from a human pyramid.

    PubMed

    Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Ambade, Vipul Namdeorao; Biyabani, Naushad

    2015-12-01

    In compression asphyxia, respiration is stopped by external forces on the body. It is usually due to an external force compressing the trunk such as a heavy weight on the chest or abdomen and is associated with internal injuries. In present case, the victim was trapped and crushed under the falling persons from a human pyramid formation for a "Dahi Handi" festival. There was neither any severe blunt force injury nor any significant pathological natural disease contributing to the cause of death. The victim was unable to remove himself from the situation because his cognitive responses and coordination were impaired due to alcohol intake. The victim died from asphyxia due to compression of his chest and abdomen. Compression asphyxia resulting from the collapse of a human pyramid and the dynamics of its impact force in these circumstances is very rare and is not reported previously to the best of our knowledge.

  17. A hierarchical cellular logic for pyramid computers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, S.L.

    1984-11-01

    Hierarchical structure occurs in biological vision systems and there is good reason to incorporate it into a model of computation for processing binary images. A mathematical formalism is presented which can describe a wide variety of operations useful in image processing and graphics. The formalism allows for two kinds of simple transformations on the values (called pyramids) of a set of cells called a hierarchical domain: the first are binary operations on boolean values, and the second are neighborhood-matching operations. The implied model of computation is more structured than previously discussed pyramidal models, and is more readily realized in parallel hardware, while it remains sufficiently rich to provide efficient solutions to a wide variety of problems. The model has a simplicity which is due to the restricted nature of the operations and the implied synchronization across the hierarchical domain. A corresponding algebraic simplicity in the logic makes possible the concise representation of many cellular-data operations.

  18. Pyramidal growth of ceria nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bârcă, E. S.; Filipescu, M.; Luculescu, C.; Birjega, R.; Ion, V.; Dumitru, M.; Nistor, L. C.; Stanciu, G.; Abrudeanu, M.; Munteanu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report in this paper on the deposition and characterization of CeO2 nanostructured thin films with hierarchical morphology. Micro-sized ceria powder (CeO2, 99.9% purity) was pressed to obtain a ceramic target. An ArF laser working at 193 nm irradiated the target in controlled oxygen gas flow at constant pressure (0.1 mbar). Silicon wafers used as substrates for thin films were heated at different temperatures, up to 773 K. The influence of substrate temperature on the structure and surface morphology of ceria thin films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The refractive indices and information about roughness and thickness were revealed by spectroellipsometry. Crystalline cubic ceria thin films exhibiting a hierarchical structure that combines columnar and dendritic growth were obtained at temperatures above 473 K. For the samples obtained at 773 K, columns ending in pyramidal formations with sharp edges and sizes of hundreds of nanometers were observed, indicating a high crystallinity of the layer. XRD analysis reveals a consistent increase of the X-ray coherence length/crystallite size along the [111] direction with increasing temperature. Using a semi-empirical formula, Raman crystallites sizes were calculated and it was found that size increases with the temperature increasing. The spectroellipsometry investigations evidenced the increasing of refractive index with the substrate temperature increase. High surface roughness and pyramidal structures were noticed from the atomic force microscopy images for layers deposited at substrate temperature above 473 K.

  19. The Cydonia 'D&M Pyramid' Landform

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-17

    Images of the Cydonia region of Mars continue to be popular among visitors to the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC)web site. The two pictures (one annotated, the other not) are mosaics of two images from MGS MOC and one from the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System visible camera (THEMIS VIS). The mosaics highlight a Cydonia landform popularly known as the "D&M Pyramid." It is located near 40.7°N, 9.6°W. Although it is not really shaped like a pyramid, the Cydonia landform is one of thousands of massifs, buttes, mesas, knobs, and blocks that mark the transition from the far northwestern Arabia Terra cratered highlands down to the northeastern Acidalia Planitia lowlands. Each block, whether shaped like a face, a pyramid, or simply a mesa, massif, or knob, is a remnant of the bedrock of northeastern Arabia that was left behind as erosion slowly degraded the terrain along this zone between the highlands and the lowlands. A few outcroppings of layers in this ancient bedrock can be seen in the mosaic of the pyramid-like landform shown here; much of the landform is covered with eroded mantling material that was deposited long after this highlands remnant became an isolated feature in Cydonia. The mosaic was created from two MOC images obtained in June (R06-00469) and July (R07-00422) of 2003 and one THEMIS VIS image acquired in 2002 (V01024003). The mosaic is 8 km by 8 km (5 mi by 5 mi) across and each of the three images is illuminated from the lower left. North is up. The picture on the right shows the location of the two MOC images as black outlines; the THEMIS image not only covers the gap between the two MOC images, it also fills out the lower left and upper right corners. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04745

  20. A new gravimetric reference station in South America: The installation of the Superconducting Gravimeters SG038 at the Argentinian-German Geodetic Observatory AGGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Nowak, Ilona; Hase, Hayo; Häfner, Michael; Güntner, Andreas; Reich, Marvin; Brunini, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    In April 2015, the Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO) of BKG was moved from Concepcion / Chile to La Plata / Argentina and was inaugurated in July 2015 as the Argentinian-German Geodetic Observatory (AGGO). In December 2015 the superconducting gravimeter SG038 was set up. The new station is equipped with four stable pillars to serve as a reference station and comparison site for absolute gravimeters in the future. We report about the overland transportation of the SG with the sphere floating, its installation at the new site and the hydrological instrumentation to observe local water storage changes to model near field gravimetric effects. We give an outlook about the first months of gravity time series and assess the drift behaviour after transport.

  1. Continuous Gravity Monitoring in South America with Superconducting and Absolute Gravimeters: More than 12 years time series at station TIGO/Concepcion (Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Falk, Reinhard; Hase, Hayo; Armin, Böer; Andreas, Güntner; Rongjiang, Wang

    2016-04-01

    As part of the Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO) of BKG, the superconducting gravimeter SG 038 was set up in December 2002 at station Concepcion / Chile to record temporal gravity variations with highest precision. Since May 2006 the time series was supported by weekly observations with the absolute gravimeter FG5-227, proving the large seasonal variations of up to 30 μGal and establishing a gravity reference station in South America. With the move of the whole observatory to the new location near to La Plata / Argentina the series was terminated. Results of almost continuously monitoring gravity variations for more than 12 years are presented. Seasonal variations are interpreted with respect of global and local water storage changes and the impact of the 8.8 Maule Earthquake in February 2010 is discussed.

  2. An orthogonal oriented quadrature hexagonal image pyramid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An image pyramid has been developed with basis functions that are orthogonal, self-similar, and localized in space, spatial frequency, orientation, and phase. The pyramid operates on a hexagonal sample lattice. The set of seven basis functions consist of three even high-pass kernels, three odd high-pass kernels, and one low-pass kernel. The three even kernels are identified when rotated by 60 or 120 deg, and likewise for the odd. The seven basis functions occupy a point and a hexagon of six nearest neighbors on a hexagonal sample lattice. At the lowest level of the pyramid, the input lattice is the image sample lattice. At each higher level, the input lattice is provided by the low-pass coefficients computed at the previous level. At each level, the output is subsampled in such a way as to yield a new hexagonal lattice with a spacing sq rt 7 larger than the previous level, so that the number of coefficients is reduced by a factor of 7 at each level. The relationship between this image code and the processing architecture of the primate visual cortex is discussed.

  3. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Methods Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Results Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data. PMID:26044522

  4. The tufas of Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, Larry V.

    2004-01-01

    Pyramid Lake is the site of some of the Earth's most spectacular tufa deposits. The Tufas are composed of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The large tufa mounds, reef- and sheet-like tufas formed within Pyramid Lake, between 26,000 and 13,000 years (yr) ago, when the lake was part of pluvial Lake Lahontan. The mounds are composed of large interlocking spheres that contain multiple generations of a crystalline (thinolite) variety of tufa. Over time many of the mounds have fallen apart, exposing an internal network of tubes. The tubular structures are thought to have been created when springs discharged from the bottom of Pyramid Lake, supplying calcium that combined with carbonate dissolved in lake water to form the mounds. The reef- and sheet-like deposits contain pillow and pendant forms made up of a branching variety of tufa that often grades into dense layers or nodules. Dense layers of tufa also coat cobbles and boulders that were deposited in near-shore shallow-water areas. The thickest tufa deposits formed at lake-bottom sites of ground-water discharge and at overflow elevations1 where the lake was held at near-constant levels for long periods of time.

  5. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Sandhan, Tushar; Yoo, Youngjun; Choi, Jin; Kim, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data.

  6. Preserving the Pyramid of STI Using Buckets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The product of research projects is information. Through the life cycle of a project, information comes from many sources and takes many forms. Traditionally, this body of information is summarized in a formal publication, typically a journal article. While formal publications enjoy the benefits of peer review and technical editing, they are also often compromises in media format and length. As such, we consider a formal publication to represent an abstract to a larger body of work: a pyramid of scientific and technical information (STI). While this abstract may be sufficient for some applications, an in-depth use or analysis is likely to require the supporting layers from the pyramid. We have developed buckets to preserve this pyramid of STI. Buckets provide an archive- and protocol-independent container construct in which all related information objects can be logically grouped together, archived, and manipulated as a single object. Furthermore, buckets are active archival objects and can communicate with each other, people, or arbitrary network services. Buckets are an implementation of the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) DL model. In SODA, data objects are more important than the archives that hold them. Much of the functionality traditionally associated with archives is pushed down into the objects, such as enforcing terms and conditions, negotiating display, and content maintenance. In this paper, we discuss the motivation, design, and implication of bucket use in DLs with respect to grey literature.

  7. XAFS study of copper(II) complexes with square planar and square pyramidal coordination geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, A.; Klysubun, W.; Nitin Nair, N.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure of six Cu(II) complexes, Cu2(Clna)4 2H2O (1), Cu2(ac)4 2H2O (2), Cu2(phac)4 (pyz) (3), Cu2(bpy)2(na)2 H2O (ClO4) (4), Cu2(teen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (5) and Cu2(tmen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (6) (where ac, phac, pyz, bpy, na, teen, tmen = acetate, phenyl acetate, pyrazole, bipyridine, nicotinic acid, tetraethyethylenediamine, tetramethylethylenediamine, respectively), which were supposed to have square pyramidal and square planar coordination geometries have been investigated. The differences observed in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) features of the standard compounds having four, five and six coordination geometry points towards presence of square planar and square pyramidal geometry around Cu centre in the studied complexes. The presence of intense pre-edge feature in the spectra of four complexes, 1-4, indicates square pyramidal coordination. Another important XANES feature, present in complexes 5 and 6, is prominent shoulder in the rising part of edge whose intensity decreases in the presence of axial ligands and thus indicates four coordination in these complexes. Ab initio calculations were carried out for square planar and square pyramidal Cu centres to observe the variation of 4p density of states in the presence and absence of axial ligands. To determine the number and distance of scattering atoms around Cu centre in the complexes, EXAFS analysis has been done using the paths obtained from Cu(II) oxide model and an axial Cu-O path from model of a square pyramidal complex. The results obtained from EXAFS analysis have been reported which confirmed the inference drawn from XANES features. Thus, it has been shown that these paths from model of a standard compound can be used to determine the structural parameters for complexes having unknown structure.

  8. Pyramids: a platform for designing multifunctional plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeunghoon; Hasan, Warefta; Stender, Christopher L; Odom, Teri W

    2008-12-01

    This Account explores nanofabricated pyramids, a new class of nanoparticles with tunable optical properties at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. This system is ideally suited for designing multifunctional plasmonic materials for use in diagnostics, imaging, sensing, and therapeutics. The nanofabrication scheme that we developed (called PEEL) for these asymmetric metal particles is extremely versatile and offers several advantages over synthetic methodologies. The PEEL approach yields pyramids with variable sizes, thicknesses, and multimetal compositions, as well as blunt or ultrasharp tips or no tips. In addition, we have prepared pyramids with site-specific chemical and biological functionality on different portions of the pyramids. This is an important design feature for biological applications, as suggested by the generation of amphiphilic gold pyramids functionalized with alkanethiols on the hydrophobic portions and DNA on the hydrophilic portions. The optical characteristics of these pyramids depend on particle orientation, wavevector direction, and polarization direction and can be tuned. Using the multipolar surface plasmon resonances of large (>250 nm) pyramids, imaging and spectral identification of pyramid orientation in condensed media was possible. We were also able to direct pyramids to assemble into one- and two-dimensional arrays with interesting optical properties. Furthermore, modification of the PEEL fabrication scheme allowed the production of multimaterial pyramidal structures with complex attributes, highlighting the power of this platform for exacting nanometer-scale control over particle structure and composition.

  9. Centre of pressure correlates with pyramid performance in acrobatic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Floría, Pablo; Gómez-Landero, Luis Arturo; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Acrobatic gymnasts need excellent balance control to execute pyramids where one gymnast is supported by another. The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe balance performance by assessing the centre of pressure displacement in a group of acrobatic gymnasts executing pyramids; (2) to determine the relationship between the parameters describing the centre of pressure oscillations and pyramid score; and (3) to examine the role of each foot in providing a solid base of support to maintain the balance of the pyramid. Sixteen acrobatic gymnasts grouped in pairs performed a Half pyramid and a Straddle pyramid held for 7 s on two force platforms. Path length, variance, range trajectory, and surface area of the centre of pressure of each foot were examined to analyse the balance of the pyramid. The path length was correlated with the pyramid score (Straddle: p = 0.692 [large]; Half: p = 0.407 [moderate]). There were differences in the functions of each leg to maintain balance, with the non-preferred leg supporting a higher weight of the pyramid while the preferred leg performed control movements to maintain balance. The results suggested that quantitative analysis of balance can provide important information on pyramid performance.

  10. Active Control of Laser Wavefronts in Atom Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimeche, A.; Langlois, M.; Merlet, S.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2017-03-01

    Wavefront aberrations are identified as a major limitation in quantum sensors. They are today the main contribution in the uncertainty budget of the best cold-atom interferometers based on two-photon laser beam splitters and constitute an important limit for their long-term stability, impeding these instruments from reaching their full potential. Moreover, they will also remain a major obstacle in future experiments based on large-momentum beam splitters. In this article, we tackle this issue by using a deformable mirror to control actively the laser wavefronts in atom interferometry. In particular, we demonstrate in an experimental proof of principle the efficient correction of wavefront aberrations in an atomic gravimeter.

  11. New method for gravitational wave detection with atomic sensors.

    PubMed

    Graham, Peter W; Hogan, Jason M; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2013-04-26

    Laser frequency noise is a dominant noise background for the detection of gravitational waves using long-baseline optical interferometry. Amelioration of this noise requires near simultaneous strain measurements on more than one interferometer baseline, necessitating, for example, more than two satellites for a space-based detector or two interferometer arms for a ground-based detector. We describe a new detection strategy based on recent advances in optical atomic clocks and atom interferometry which can operate at long baselines and which is immune to laser frequency noise. Laser frequency noise is suppressed because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This new class of sensor allows sensitive gravitational wave detection with only a single baseline. This approach also has practical applications in, for example, the development of ultrasensitive gravimeters and gravity gradiometers.

  12. Atomistic study of pyramidal slips in pure magnesium single crystal under nano-compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-Zhi; Guo, Ya-Fang; Xu, Shuang; Wang, Yue-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Pyramidal slip mechanism plays an important role in c-axis micro-compression of hexagonal closed-packed metals. In this article, the detailed slip paths, respectively, on ? and ? planes in magnesium single crystal are given by molecular dynamics. The pyramidal slip on ? plane is suggested to consist of an edge-type partial dislocation and opposite basal movements on neighbouring basal planes, while the ? slip dissociation is achieved by two partial dislocations with a strip of stacking fault. Results imply that the slip on ? plane is more likely to nucleate with a relatively easy dissociation type comparing to the one on ? plane. No twinning is found under c-axis compression by examining the stepwise movement of atoms involved, fully supporting the recent experimental observations of micro-compression and the theoretical analysis on twinning formation proposed by our previous work.

  13. Long-term trends of terrestrial water storage in south-east Australia revealed by GRACE and superconducting gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takashi; Fukuda, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; McQueen, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    South-east Australia is experiencing a severe multi-year drought in this decade. In particular, historic drought struck this area in 2006. Australian Bureau of Meteorology reported that the year 2006 was one of the driest years and agriculture suffered extensive damage from the drought. To understand the severity of current water crisis in south-east Australia, monitoring terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes is demanded. For this purpose, we investigated gravity changes associated with the drought in south-east Australia using data from GRACE satellite gravimeter and superconducting gravimeter (SG) at Mt. Stromlo, Canberra, over the period from 2003 to 2008. In 2006 and 2007, GRACE gravity solutions released from CNES/GRGS showed significant TWS decreases at south-east Australia. Areal extent of the TWS decreases showed good consistence with that of rainfall deficiencies. Therefore, it is clear that the TWS decreases estimated from GRACE data are attributed to the 2006 drought. SG data from Canberra also indicated gravity decreases during the 2006 drought period, after correcting for effects of atmosphere, tides, height variations and instrumental drift and steps. Comparison of GRACE and SG data showed good agreements in interannual variations, although some differences were found in seasonal components. Furthermore, both GRACE and SG data indicated that TWS in 2008 still remained at low levels, although annual precipitation returned to average before the drought. It implies TWS is possibly decreasing with longer time scale due to recent climate changes. Finally, the results from GRACE and SG observations were compared with TWS estimates from Noah land surface model, forced by output from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) developed by NASA. The model TWS estimates were the sum of soil moisture (2m column depth) and snow water equivalent. The comparison showed that the model underestimated the TWS decreases due to the 2006 drought. The differences

  14. The Formation and Characterization of GaN Hexagonal Pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Ying; Xiu, Xiang-Qian; Lin, Zeng-Qin; Hua, Xue-Mei; Xie, Zi-Li; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Dou

    2013-05-01

    GaN with hexagonal pyramids is fabricated using the photo-assisted electroless chemical etching method. Defective areas of the GaN substrate are selectively etched in a mixed solution of KOH and K2S2O8 under ultraviolet illumination, producing submicron-sized pyramids. Hexagonal pyramids on the etched GaN with well-defined {101¯1¯} facets and very sharp tips are formed. High-resolution x-ray diffraction shows that etched GaN with pyramids has a higher crystal quality, and micro-Raman spectra reveal a tensile stress relaxation in GaN with pyramids compared with normal GaN. The cathodoluminescence intensity of GaN after etching is significantly increased by three times, which is attributed to the reduction in the internal reflection, high-quality GaN with pyramids and the Bragg effect.

  15. Optimizing pyramided transgenic Bt crops for sustainable pest management.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Yves; Crickmore, Neil; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2015-02-01

    Transgenic crop pyramids producing two or more Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins that kill the same insect pest have been widely used to delay evolution of pest resistance. To assess the potential of pyramids to achieve this goal, we analyze data from 38 studies that report effects of ten Bt toxins used in transgenic crops against 15 insect pests. We find that compared with optimal low levels of insect survival, survival on currently used pyramids is often higher for both susceptible insects and insects resistant to one of the toxins in the pyramid. Furthermore, we find that cross-resistance and antagonism between toxins used in pyramids are common, and that these problems are associated with the similarity of the amino acid sequences of domains II and III of the toxins, respectively. This analysis should assist in future pyramid design and the development of sustainable resistance management strategies.

  16. View up from portal level inside of pyramidal structure toward ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View up from portal level inside of pyramidal structure toward pintle. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 350-Ton Hammerhead Crane, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. How to put the Food Guide Pyramid into practice.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, C; McDonnell, E; Bagby, R

    1994-09-01

    The Food Guide Pyramid represents changes and challenges for nutrition educators. Nutrition educators will have to change the focus, content, and teaching expectations for lessons. Use of the Pyramid will also require changes in the way the concepts of good nutrition are related to different audiences. In contrast to previous food guides, which represented a foundation diet, the Food Guide Pyramid represents the total diet, addressing overnutrition as well as undernutrition. The Food Guide Pyramid is a graphic representation of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and illustrates the key concepts of variety, moderation, and proportionality. For practitioners, one challenge is to find ways to effectively use the Food Guide Pyramid to teach clients how to put the Dietary Guidelines into action. Another challenge involves designing materials that adapt the messages of the Food Guide Pyramid to a variety of audiences. Teaching materials and instructions should emphasize the key concepts of the Food Guide Pyramid and should be clear, consistent, motivational, and culturally sensitive. Few educational materials are available to help practitioners with these challenges. In this article we outline the key changes that the Food Guide Pyramid embodies, and provide ideas and suggestions for using the Pyramid in a practice setting.

  18. View looking up into pyramid ion from observation level ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking up into pyramid ion from observation level - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Effect of housing rats within a pyramid on stress parameters.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2003-11-01

    The Giza pyramids of Egypt have been the subject of much research. Pyramid models with the same base to height ratio as of the Great Pyramid of Giza, when aligned on a true north-south axis, are believed to generate, transform and transmit energy. Research done with such pyramid models has shown that they induced greater relaxation in human subjects, promoted better wound healing in rats and afforded protection against stress-induced neurodegnerative changes in mice. The present study was done to assess the effects of housing Wistar rats within the pyramid on the status of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense in their erythrocytes and cortisol levels in their plasma. Rats were housed in cages under standard laboratory conditions. Cages were left in the open (normal control), under a wooden pyramid model (experimental rats) or in a cubical box of comparable dimensions (6 hr/day for 14 days). Erythrocyte malondialdehyde and plasma cortisol levels were significantly decreased in rats kept within the pyramid as compared to the normal control and those within the square box. Erythrocyte reduced glutathione levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly increased in the rats kept in the pyramid as compared to the other two groups. There was no significant difference in any of the parameters between the normal control and rats kept in the square box. The results showed that exposure of adult female Wistar rats to pyramid environment reduces stress oxidative stress and increases antioxidant defense in them.

  1. Incidence of a pyramidal lobe on thyroid scans

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, H.A.; Sziklas, J.J.; Rosenberg, R.J.; Spencer, R.P.

    1982-12-01

    Gamma camera pertechnetate and radioiodine thyroid scans were reviewed to determine the incidence of recognition of a pyramidal lobe. Ten to 17% of normals and of patients with various thyroid disease states had a pyramidal lobe on their scans. However, in patients with diffuse toxic goiter, 43% had a pyramidal lobe on the thyroid images. There appears to be a correlation between elevated thyroid function studies (likely in thyroid mass) and the incidence of a pyramidal lobe on thyroid scans in diffuse toxic goiter.

  2. Revisiting static modulation in pyramid wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Vassallo, D.; Bergomi, M.; Biondi, F.; Farinato, J.; Greggio, D.; Magrin, D.; Viotto, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Pyramid Sensor (PS) is based on the Focault knife-edge test, yielding then, in geometrical approximation, only the sign of the wavefront slope. To provide linear measurements of the wavefront slopes the PS relies on a technique known as modulation, which also plays a central role to improve the linear range of the pyramid WFS, very small in the nonmodulated case. In the main PS using modulation so far, this task is achieved by moving optical components in the WFS, increasing the complexity of the system. An attractive idea to simplify the optical and mechanical design of a pyramid WFS is to work without any dynamic modulation. This concept was only merely described and functionally tested in the framework of MAD, and subsequently, with a holographic diffuser. The latter produce a sort of random distribution of the light coming out from the pupil plane, leading to sort of inefficient modulation, as most of the rays are focused in the central region of the light diffused by such device. The bi-dimensional original grating is, in contrast, producing a well defined deterministic distribution of the light onto a specifically shaped pattern. A crude option has been already discussed as a possibility, and it is here generalized to holographic plates leading to various distribution of lights, including a circle whose diameter would match the required modulation pattern, or more cost effective approaches like the one of a square pattern. These holographic diffusers would exhibit also zero-th and high order patterns and the actual size of the equivalent modulation would be linearly wavelength dependent, leading to colour effects that requires a careful handling in order to properly choose the right amount of equivalent modulation.

  3. GM2 ganglioside and pyramidal neuron dendritogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walkley, S U; Siegel, D A; Dobrenis, K

    1995-11-01

    GM2 ganglioside, although scarce in normal adult brain, is the predominant ganglioside accumulating in several types of lysosomal disorders, most notably Tay-Sachs disease. Pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex in Tay-Sachs, as well as many other types of neuronal storage disorders, are known to exhibit a phenomenon believed unique to storage disorders: growth of ectopic dendrites. Recent studies have shown that a common metabolic abnormality shared by storage diseases with ectopic dendrite growth is the abnormal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. The correlation between increased levels of GM2 and the presence of ectopic dendrites has been found in both ganglioside and nonganglioside storage disorders, the latter including sphingomyelin-cholesterol lipidosis, mucopolysaccharidosis, and alpha-mannosidosis. Quantitative HPTLC analysis has shown that increases in GM2 occur in proportion to the incidence of ectopic dendrite growth, whereas other gangliosides, including GM1, lack similar increases. Immunocytochemical studies of all nonganglioside storage diseases which exhibit ectopic dendritogenesis have revealed heightened GM2 ganglioside-immunoreactivity in the cortical pyramidal cell population, whereas nerurons in normal adult brain exhibit little or no staining for this ganglioside. Further, studies examining disease development have consistently shown that accumulation of GM2 ganglioside precedes growth of ectopic dendrites, indicating that it is not simply occurring secondary to new membrane production. These findings have prompted an examination for a similar relationship between GM2 ganglioside and dendritogenesis in cortical neurons of normal developing brain. Results show that GM2 ganglioside-immunoreactivity is consistently elevated in immature neurons during the period when they are undergoing active dendritic initiation, but this staining diminishes dramatically as the dendritic trees of these cells mature. Collectively, these studies on diseased and normal

  4. PyramidalExplorer: A New Interactive Tool to Explore Morpho-Functional Relations of Human Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Pablo; Robles, Oscar D; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Makarova, Julia; Galindo, Sergio E; Rodriguez, Angel; Pastor, Luis; Herreras, Oscar; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This work presents PyramidalExplorer, a new tool to interactively explore and reveal the detailed organization of the microanatomy of pyramidal neurons with functionally related models. It consists of a set of functionalities that allow possible regional differences in the pyramidal cell architecture to be interactively discovered by combining quantitative morphological information about the structure of the cell with implemented functional models. The key contribution of this tool is the morpho-functional oriented design that allows the user to navigate within the 3D dataset, filter and perform Content-Based Retrieval operations. As a case study, we present a human pyramidal neuron with over 9000 dendritic spines in its apical and basal dendritic trees. Using PyramidalExplorer, we were able to find unexpected differential morphological attributes of dendritic spines in particular compartments of the neuron, revealing new aspects of the morpho-functional organization of the pyramidal neuron.

  5. PyramidalExplorer: A New Interactive Tool to Explore Morpho-Functional Relations of Human Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toharia, Pablo; Robles, Oscar D.; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Makarova, Julia; Galindo, Sergio E.; Rodriguez, Angel; Pastor, Luis; Herreras, Oscar; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This work presents PyramidalExplorer, a new tool to interactively explore and reveal the detailed organization of the microanatomy of pyramidal neurons with functionally related models. It consists of a set of functionalities that allow possible regional differences in the pyramidal cell architecture to be interactively discovered by combining quantitative morphological information about the structure of the cell with implemented functional models. The key contribution of this tool is the morpho-functional oriented design that allows the user to navigate within the 3D dataset, filter and perform Content-Based Retrieval operations. As a case study, we present a human pyramidal neuron with over 9000 dendritic spines in its apical and basal dendritic trees. Using PyramidalExplorer, we were able to find unexpected differential morphological attributes of dendritic spines in particular compartments of the neuron, revealing new aspects of the morpho-functional organization of the pyramidal neuron. PMID:26778972

  6. Cosmological SUSY Breaking and the Pyramid Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Tom

    2014-12-01

    I review the ideas of holographic space-time (HST), Cosmological SUSY breaking (CSB), and the Pyramid Schemes, which are the only known models of Tera-scale physics consistent with CSB, current particle data, and gauge coupling unification. There is considerable uncertainty in the estimate of the masses of supersymmetric partners of the standard model particles, but the model predicts that the gluino is probably out of reach of the LHC, squarks may be in reach, and the NLSP is a right handed slepton, which should be discovered soon.

  7. Cosmological SUSY breaking and the pyramid scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Tom

    2015-04-01

    I review the ideas of holographic spacetime (HST), cosmological SUSY breaking (CSB), and the Pyramid Schemes, which are the only known models of Tera-scale physics consistent with CSB, current particle data, and gauge coupling unification. There is considerable uncertainty in the estimate of the masses of supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model particles, but the model predicts that the gluino is probably out of reach of the LHC, squarks may be in reach, and the NLSP is a right-handed slepton, which should be discovered soon.

  8. Building a pyramid to practice success.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger P

    2003-01-01

    Although decisions about the goals of the practice originate with the dentist and drive every other system, a successful dental practice looks like a pyramid. The bottom level includes the effective management of time and resources through efficient scheduling and patient communication. The second level ensures the ability of the practice to reach its goals through results-oriented case acceptance scripting, patient finance options and advanced customer service. The third level focuses on creating long-term relationships with patients and turning the hygiene department into a "WOW" experience profit-center. Dentists must set practice management and production/profitability goals before all others.

  9. Do the pyramids show continental drift?

    PubMed

    Pawley, G S; Abrahamsen, N

    1973-03-02

    The mystery of the orientation of the Great Pyramids of Giza has remained unexplained for many decades. The general alignment is 4 minutes west of north. It is argued that this is not a builders' error but is caused by movement over the centuries. Modern theories of continental drift do not predict quite such large movements, but other causes of polar wandering give even smaller shifts. Thus, continental drift is the most likely explanation, although somewhat implausible, especially as relevant measurements have been made over a 50-year period, whereas geophysical measurements of sea-floor spreading relate to million-year time scales.

  10. Nonlinear Harten's multiresolution on the quincunx pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat, Sergio; Busquier, S.; Trillo, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    Multiresolution transforms provide useful tools for image processing applications. For an optimal representation of the edges, it is crucial to develop nonlinear schemes which are not based on tensor product. This paper links the nonseparable quincunx pyramid and the nonlinear discrete Harten's multiresolution framework. In order to obtain the stability of these representations, an error-control multiresolution algorithm is introduced. A prescribed accuracy in various norms is ensured by these strategies. Explicit error bounds are presented. Finally, a nonlinear reconstruction is proposed and tested.

  11. Plasmonic Tipless Pyramid Arrays for Cell Poration.

    PubMed

    Courvoisier, Sébastien; Saklayen, Nabiha; Huber, Marinus; Chen, Jun; Diebold, Eric D; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Mazur, Eric

    2015-07-08

    Improving the efficiency, cell survival, and throughput of methods to modify and control the genetic expression of cells is of great benefit to biology and medicine. We investigate, both computationally and experimentally, a nanostructured substrate made of tipless pyramids for plasmonic-induced transfection. By optimizing the geometrical parameters for an excitation wavelength of 800 nm, we demonstrate a 100-fold intensity enhancement of the electric near field at the cell-substrate contact area, while the low absorption typical for gold is maintained. We demonstrate that such a substrate can induce transient poration of cells by a purely optically induced process.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Composite Pressure Vessel Performance and Joint Stiffness for Pyramid and Inverted Pyramid Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joseph M.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the suitability in the application of classical laminate theory analysis tools for filament wound pressure vessels with adhesive laminated joints in particular: pressure vessel wall performance, joint stiffness and failure prediction. Two 18-inch diameter 12-ply filament wound pressure vessels were fabricated. One vessel was fabricated with a 24-ply pyramid laminated adhesive double strap butt joint. The second vessel was fabricated with the same number of plies in an inverted pyramid joint. Results from hydrostatic tests are presented. Experimental results were used as input to the computer programs GENLAM and Laminate, and the output compared to test. By using the axial stress resultant, the classical laminate theory results show a correlation within 1% to the experimental results in predicting the pressure vessel wall pressure performance. The prediction of joint stiffness for the two adhesive joints in the axial direction is within 1% of the experimental results. The calculated hoop direction joint stress resultant is 25% less than the measured resultant for both joint configurations. A correction factor is derived and used in the joint analysis. The correction factor is derived from the hoop stress resultant from the tank wall performance investigation. The vessel with the pyramid joint is determined to have failed in the joint area at a hydrostatic pressure 33% value below predicted failure. The vessel with the inverted pyramid joint failed in the wall acreage at a hydrostatic pressure within 10% of the actual failure pressure.

  13. The Slichter mode of the Earth: Revisit with optimal stacking and autoregressive methods on full superconducting gravimeter data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Chao, Benjamin F.

    2015-10-01

    The Slichter mode is the triplet oscillational mode of the 3-D translation of the Earth's solid inner core; despite much effort it has so far eluded observation. Here we revisit the search by applying new data processing methods upon the latest set of available superconducting gravimeter (SG) data. The new methods are the AR-z spectrum that is sensitive in detecting weak harmonic signals, and the OSE data stacking scheme proven to be effective in identifying seismic normal mode singlets. The SG data consist of 19 records from 14 worldwide stations spanning up to 15 years. We arrive at three candidate sets of frequencies for the Slichter triplet that satisfy the theoretical splitting rule, namely (3.952, 4.432, 4.908) cpd, (5.136/5.032/5.020, 5.592, 6.040) cpd, and (5.704, 6.208, 6.748) cpd, of which the first set is regarded to be the more likely. A series of synthetic experiments shows that the Slichter triplet signals with RMS received amplitude of ~0.3 nGal (10-11m/s2) can be detected to the extent of the present combination of data and methodology.

  14. Virtual Reality Tumor Resection: The Force Pyramid Approach.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Robin; Bugdadi, Abdulgadir; Azarnoush, Hamed; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Alotaibi, Fahad E; Bajunaid, Khalid; AlZhrani, Gmaan A; Alsideiri, Ghusn; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2017-09-05

    The force pyramid is a novel visual representation allowing spatial delineation of instrument force application during surgical procedures. In this study, the force pyramid concept is employed to create and quantify dominant hand, nondominant hand, and bimanual force pyramids during resection of virtual reality brain tumors. To address 4 questions: Do ergonomics and handedness influence force pyramid structure? What are the differences between dominant and nondominant force pyramids? What is the spatial distribution of forces applied in specific tumor quadrants? What differentiates "expert" and "novice" groups regarding their force pyramids? Using a simulated aspirator in the dominant hand and a simulated sucker in the nondominant hand, 6 neurosurgeons and 14 residents resected 8 different tumors using the CAE NeuroVR virtual reality neurosurgical simulation platform (CAE Healthcare, Montréal, Québec and the National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, Québec). Position and force data were used to create force pyramids and quantify tumor quadrant force distribution. Force distribution quantification demonstrates the critical role that handedness and ergonomics play on psychomotor performance during simulated brain tumor resections. Neurosurgeons concentrate their dominant hand forces in a defined crescent in the lower right tumor quadrant. Nondominant force pyramids showed a central peak force application in all groups. Bimanual force pyramids outlined the combined impact of each hand. Distinct force pyramid patterns were seen when tumor stiffness, border complexity, and color were altered. Force pyramids allow delineation of specific tumor regions requiring greater psychomotor ability to resect. This information can focus and improve resident technical skills training.

  15. Mediterranean diet pyramids: towards the Italian model.

    PubMed

    del Balzo, V; Diolordi, L; Pinto, A; Giusti, A M; Vitiello, V; Cannella, C; Dernini, S; Donini, L M; Berry, E M

    2012-01-01

    There is a long history to the representation of the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid which may be seen as a form of cultural--culinary evolution as each country applies the foods best suited to its national diet. Different Mediterranean Diet pyramids have been designed for the population of Greece, Spain and Italy, tailored for their different food habits. These refer variously to portion sizes and frequency of consumption--daily, weekly and monthly and are not standardized. The 3rd CIISCAM Conference held in Parma, Italy was devoted to highlight the overall biodiversity and nutritional well being values and the sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet, recognised as one of the healthiest dietary pattern, and to reduce the rapid erosion of "lifestyle and food habits. It is necessary, therefore, to refer more to a Mediterranean Lifestyle of which diet is only a part. It should include physical and social activity, recreation and rest. It may be possible to construct a Mediterranean food lifestyle index both to assess such a holistic aspect and to correlate with improved morbidity & mortality.

  16. Pyramidal Wavefront Sensor Demonstrator at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Anctil, Geneviève; Bourqui, Pascal; Châteauneuf, François; Gauvin, Jonny; Goyette, Philippe; Lagacé, François; Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min

    2014-08-01

    Wavefront sensing is one of the key elements of an Adaptive Optics System. Although Shack-Hartmann WFS are the most commonly used whether for astronomical or biomedical applications, the high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range of the Pyramid-WFS (P-WFS) technology is promising and needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) applications. At INO, center for applied research in optics and technology transfer in Quebec City, Canada, we have recently set to develop a Pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS), an option for which no other research group in Canada had any experience. A first version had been built and tested in 2013 in collaboration with NRC-HIA Victoria. Here we present a second iteration of demonstrator with an extended spectral range, fast modulation capability and low-noise, fast-acquisition EMCCD sensor. The system has been designed with compactness and robustness in mind to allow on-sky testing at Mont Mégantic facility, in parallel with a Shack- Hartmann sensor so as to compare both options.

  17. Creating Gymnastic Pyramids and Balances. A Safe and Fun Approach!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodero, Joseph M.; Furblur, Ernest E.

    This guide to creating gymnastic pyramids and balances for physical educators, cheerleading coaches, and gymnastics instructors, has safety as its primary focus. It is pointed out that all pyramids and balances should meet the safety requirements of cheerleading and gymnastics organizations. The book provides thorough instructions and more than…

  18. Tribonacci-like sequences and generalized Pascal's pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called Pascal's pyramid. Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the Feinberg's triangle associated to a suitable generalized Pascal's pyramid. The results also extend similar properties of Fibonacci-like sequences.

  19. Commentary on "Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosile, Grace Ann

    2008-01-01

    This commentary asks some critical questions concerning the article "Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid" included in this special issue. Are "bottom of the pyramid" (BOP) multidisciplinary action project (MAP) students prepared to critically assess the impact of their interventions beyond a narrow definition of profit in complex and…

  20. Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Doing business at the base of the pyramid is a topic of increasing interest to business practitioners and academics. Base of the pyramid business offers the promise of great economic gains for companies and the possibility of a powerful new approach to alleviate poverty. At the same time, it may threaten local culture and independence while…

  1. Building influenza surveillance pyramids in near real time, Australia.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Craig B; Carlson, Sandra J; Butler, Michelle T; Elvidge, Elissa; Durrheim, David N

    2013-11-01

    A timely measure of circulating influenza virus severity has been elusive. Flutracking, the Australian online influenza-like illness surveillance system, was used to construct a surveillance pyramid in near real time for 2011/2012 participants and demonstrated a striking difference between years. Such pyramids will facilitate rapid estimation of attack rates and disease severity.

  2. Estimation of Food Guide Pyramid Serving Sizes by College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaust, Gretchen; Foster, Irene M.

    2000-01-01

    College students (n=158) used the Food Guide Pyramid to select serving sizes on a questionnaire (73% had been instructed in its use). Overall mean scores (31% correct) indicated they generally did not know recommended serving sizes. Those who had read about or received instruction in the pyramid had higher mean scores. (SK)

  3. The Alphabet Pyramid of Team Development and Situation Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Roy

    2001-01-01

    This pyramid model of team development has four sides--awareness, behavior, communication, and direction--on a foundation of evaluation. The four equal sides of a pyramid represent the equal importance of the different roles, including leader, within a team. All team members are involved in evaluation and deciding what is important, which empowers…

  4. 38 CFR 4.14 - Avoidance of pyramiding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Avoidance of pyramiding. 4.14 Section 4.14 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.14 Avoidance of pyramiding. The evaluation of...

  5. Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Doing business at the base of the pyramid is a topic of increasing interest to business practitioners and academics. Base of the pyramid business offers the promise of great economic gains for companies and the possibility of a powerful new approach to alleviate poverty. At the same time, it may threaten local culture and independence while…

  6. Commentary on "Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosile, Grace Ann

    2008-01-01

    This commentary asks some critical questions concerning the article "Management Education and the Base of the Pyramid" included in this special issue. Are "bottom of the pyramid" (BOP) multidisciplinary action project (MAP) students prepared to critically assess the impact of their interventions beyond a narrow definition of profit in complex and…

  7. Estimation of Food Guide Pyramid Serving Sizes by College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaust, Gretchen; Foster, Irene M.

    2000-01-01

    College students (n=158) used the Food Guide Pyramid to select serving sizes on a questionnaire (73% had been instructed in its use). Overall mean scores (31% correct) indicated they generally did not know recommended serving sizes. Those who had read about or received instruction in the pyramid had higher mean scores. (SK)

  8. Diffractive pyramid wave-front sensor used for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Ding, Xiaona; Wang, Kun; Wei, Hongyan; Yang, Huan; Cai, Dongmei

    2012-10-01

    Wave-front sensor, as the main component of Adaptive optics system, detects light from the astronomic object or reference sources. It aims to improve the utilization of light, especially for AO system work with the faint objects. Compared with Shack-Hartmann sensor, pyramid wave-front sensor is a relatively new one with increased pupil sampling and spatial resolution. Pyramid wave-front sensor uses a refractive element (the pyramid) to produce four images of the entrance pupil. Usually, Single pyramid prototypes are made using the classical figuring and polishing techniques. This approach, however, is not only very time consuming but also does not guarantee a uniform repeatability of the optical characteristics of the pyramids. The loss of low frequency component increases due to the roofs existing on its vertexes. Moreover, stray light is introduced in the four images. We therefore are investigating a modified pyramidal optical components based on the binary optical concept. In this article we describe the diffractive pyramid prototypes using the micro fabrication technique. The parameters of the pyramid are discussed.

  9. Building Influenza Surveillance Pyramids in Near Real Time, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Sandra J.; Butler, Michelle T.; Elvidge, Elissa; Durrheim, David N.

    2013-01-01

    A timely measure of circulating influenza virus severity has been elusive. Flutracking, the Australian online influenza-like illness surveillance system, was used to construct a surveillance pyramid in near real time for 2011/2012 participants and demonstrated a striking difference between years. Such pyramids will facilitate rapid estimation of attack rates and disease severity. PMID:24207165

  10. Atom interferometery on ground and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We give a brief survey on our latest activities in atom interferometry. This included the first quantum test of the principle of equivalence with two different species, namely potassium and rubidium. We have also shown that interferometers equipped with atom-chip based sources allow to realise compact quantum gravimeters for ground based measurements. These devices allow to achieve a high flux of ultra-cold atoms, extremely low expansion rates of these wave packets and make it possible to realise new interferometers. Last but not least, in 2014, we currently work on testing these devices in the catapult and on a sounding rocket mission to extend atom interferometry to unprecedented time scales. This project is supported by the German Space Agency Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWI) under grant number DLR 50 WM 0346. We thank the German Research Foundation for funding the Cluster of Excellence QUEST Centre for Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research.

  11. Conditions for Eltonian Pyramids in Lotka-Volterra Food Chains.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Tomas

    2017-09-07

    In ecological communities consumers (excluding parasites and parasitoids) are in general larger and less numerous than their resource. This results in a well-known observation known as 'Eltonian pyramids' or the 'pyramid of numbers', and metabolic arguments suggest that this pattern is independent of the number of trophic levels in a system. At the same time, Lotka-Volterra (LV) consumer-resource models are a frequently used tool to study many questions in community ecology, but their capacity to produce Eltonian pyramids has not been formally analysed. Here, I address this knowledge gap by investigating if and when LV food chain models give rise to Eltonian pyramids. I show that Eltonian pyramids are difficult to reproduce without density-dependent mortality in the consumers, unless biologically plausible relationships between mortality rate and interaction strength are taken into account.

  12. The 2005 Food Guide Pyramid: an opportunity lost?

    PubMed

    Chiuve, Stephanie E; Willett, Walter C

    2007-11-01

    Dietary quality has a vital role in the prevention of chronic disease. In 2005, the US Department of Agriculture released a new food guide, MyPyramid, because the previous pyramid was in substantial discordance with current scientific evidence. The US Department of Agriculture pyramids are the most visible source of US nutrition policy and dietary guidance and it is, therefore, imperative they provide scientifically derived recommendations for a healthy diet. Unfortunately, MyPyramid strays from much of the evidence generated through years of research and, in our opinion, fails to provide the public with clear information about healthy food choices. In this Review, we discuss the policy and process behind the development of MyPyramid, assess the current evidence linking diet to chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes, and suggest potential alternatives for dietary recommendations.

  13. Directional structures detection using steerable pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Florence; Baskurt, Atilla M.

    2003-04-01

    The object of the work described in this paper concerns directional structures detection for particular aspects of inspection, such as scratches and marbling defect detection in leather images. Because of the very specific geometry of these structures, we intend to apply a multiscale and orientation-shiftable method. Scratches and marbling have various shapes and sizes. Multiscale approaches using oriented filters have proved to be efficient to detect such curvilinear patterns. We first use the information given by the increase of gray levels in the image to locate suspicious regions. The detection is then based on steerable filters, which can be steered to any orientation fixed by the user, and are synthesized using a limited number of basic filters. These filters are used in a recursive multi-scale transform: the steerable pyramid. Then, the curvilinear structures are extracted from the directional images at different scales.

  14. Fractional differentiation by neocortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Brian Nils; Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J; Fairhall, Adrienne L

    2008-01-01

    Neural systems adapt to changes in stimulus statistics. However, it is not known how stimuli with complex temporal dynamics drive the dynamics of adaptation and the resulting firing rate. For single neurons, it has often been assumed that adaptation has a single time scale. Here, we show that single rat neocortical pyramidal neurons adapt with a time scale that depends on the time scale of changes in stimulus statistics. This multiple time scale adaptation is consistent with fractional order differentiation, such that the neuron’s firing rate is a fractional derivative of slowly varying stimulus parameters. Biophysically, even though neuronal fractional differentiation effectively yields adaptation with many time scales, we find that its implementation requires only a few, properly balanced known adaptive mechanisms. Fractional differentiation provides single neurons with a fundamental and general computation that can contribute to efficient information processing, stimulus anticipation, and frequency independent phase shifts of oscillatory neuronal firing. PMID:18931665

  15. The NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor for ERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Antichi, J.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.; Carbonaro, L.; Agapito, G.; Biliotti, V.; Briguglio, R.; Di Rico, G.; Dolci, M.; Ferruzzi, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Marchetti, E.; Fedrigo, E.; Le Louarn, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Amico, P.; Hubin, N.

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is the new Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for VLT in construction at ESO with the collaboration of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, ETH-Institute for Astronomy and INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. The ERIS AO system relies on a 40×40 sub-aperture Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) for two operating modes: a pure Natural Guide Star high-order sensing for high Strehl and contrast correction and a low-order visible sensing in support of the Laser Guide Star AO mode. In this paper we present in detail the preliminary design of the ERIS PWFS that is developed under the responsibility of INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in collaboration with ESO.

  16. Landscape-scale water balance monitoring with an iGrav superconducting gravimeter in a field enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güntner, Andreas; Reich, Marvin; Mikolaj, Michal; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin; Schroeder, Stephan; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2017-06-01

    In spite of the fundamental role of the landscape water balance for the Earth's water and energy cycles, monitoring the water balance and its components beyond the point scale is notoriously difficult due to the multitude of flow and storage processes and their spatial heterogeneity. Here, we present the first field deployment of an iGrav superconducting gravimeter (SG) in a minimized enclosure for long-term integrative monitoring of water storage changes. Results of the field SG on a grassland site under wet-temperate climate conditions were compared to data provided by a nearby SG located in the controlled environment of an observatory building. The field system proves to provide gravity time series that are similarly precise as those of the observatory SG. At the same time, the field SG is more sensitive to hydrological variations than the observatory SG. We demonstrate that the gravity variations observed by the field setup are almost independent of the depth below the terrain surface where water storage changes occur (contrary to SGs in buildings), and thus the field SG system directly observes the total water storage change, i.e., the water balance, in its surroundings in an integrative way. We provide a framework to single out the water balance components actual evapotranspiration and lateral subsurface discharge from the gravity time series on annual to daily timescales. With about 99 and 85 % of the gravity signal due to local water storage changes originating within a radius of 4000 and 200 m around the instrument, respectively, this setup paves the road towards gravimetry as a continuous hydrological field-monitoring technique at the landscape scale.

  17. Information on the Earth's Deep Interior Conveyed by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake Using Superconducting Gravimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosat, S.; Watada, S.; Sato, T.; Tamura, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The recent Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of magnitude Mw > 9 on 2004 December 26th has strongly excited the low-frequency seismic modes and, in particular, the degree one 2S1 mode is observed for the first time without any stacking. This mode corresponds to the first overtone of the sub-seismic mode 1S1, the so-called Slichter triplet (Slichter, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 1961). On the one hand, theoretical computations suggest that the Slichter modes could not have been excited with sufficient amplitude to be detected by superconducting gravimeters (SGs) on the Earth's surface. The maximum surface gravity effect of 1S1 after Sumatra event is 0.3 nGal, that is to say 0.3 10-12 g, where g is the mean absolute gravity value on the Earth's surface, corresponding to a free air displacement of 10-3 mm (1 nm). On the other hand, the core-sensitive mode 3S2 and the fundamental radial mode 0S0 were strongly excited, meaning that the earthquake radiated much energy toward the core. 0S0 is a radial fundamental spheroidal mode called "breathing mode" of the Earth and corresponds to changes in the Earth's circumference. The high stability of SG records has enabled us to follow the time decay of 0S0 amplitude till the second Sumatra event on March 28th 2005 and to estimate 0S0 quality factor at a value of 5513 +- 8 from the weighted mean of 12 SG record estimates. Amplitude measurements of 0S0 at most SG sites in the world reveal a latitude dependency that we try to explain by theory. The amplitude deviation of 0S0 reaches +- 2% while the calibration errors of SGs are usually less than 0.2%.

  18. Landscape-scale water balance monitoring with an iGrav superconducting gravimeter in a field enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güntner, Andreas; Reich, Marvin; Mikolaj, Michal; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin; Schroeder, Stephan; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2017-04-01

    In spite of the fundamental role of the landscape water balance for the Earth's water and energy cycles, monitoring the water balance and its components beyond the point scale is notoriously difficult due to the multitude of flow and storage processes and their spatial heterogeneity. Here, we present the first deployment of an iGrav superconducting gravimeter (SG) in a minimized field enclosure on a grassland site for integrative monitoring of water storage changes. Results of the field SG were compared to data provided by a nearby SG located in the controlled environment of an observatory building. For wet-temperate climate conditions, the system proves to provide gravity time series that are similarly precise as those of the observatory SG. At the same time, the field SG is more sensitive to hydrological variations than the observatory SG. We demonstrate that the gravity variations observed by the field setup are almost independent of the depth below the terrain surface where water storage changes occur (contrary to SGs in buildings), and thus the field SG system directly observes the total water storage change, i.e., the water balance, in its surroundings in an integrative way. We provide a framework to single out the water balance components actual evapotranspiration and lateral subsurface discharge from the gravity time series on annual to daily time scales. With about 99% and 85% of the gravity signal originating within a radius of 4000 and 200 meter around the instrument, respectively, this setup paves the road towards gravimetry as a continuous hydrological field monitoring technique at the landscape scale.

  19. Detailed Analysis of Marine Gravity Survey Data from Panama Canal Transits: Improving Error Models and Signal Processing for BGM-3 Marine Gravimeter Survey Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailor, R. V.; Medler, C. L.; Kinsey, J. C.; Zettergren, E. W.; Insanic, E.

    2015-12-01

    Our prior work (Sailor et al., 2015) showed that the Panama Canal locking operations impart a peak vertical acceleration of about 60 mGal (6 x 10-4 m/sec2) to ships as the individual lock chambers are filled or emptied. During a period of 8 to 12 minutes the ship's elevation changes by over 8 meters. This motion is very repeatable, since it is driven by gravity-fed hydraulics backed up by a huge mass of water. The novelty of the prior work was to demonstrate that the lock-driven vertical acceleration is significant, of relatively long duration, easily observed by the BGM-3 accelerometer/gravimeter, and is equivalent tothe gravity anomaly caused by a moderately-sized seamount. Thus, the lock-induced vertical acceleration is a known external acceleration input that falls within the amplitude and time duration band of interest for marine gravity as well as airborne gravity survey systems. Here we report an extension to the prior work, using BGM-3 gravimeter data from the RV Marcus G Langseth and the RV Melville, in addition to the previously-used two datasets from the RV Knorr. The new analysis allows us to compare the quality of the gravity data from these three ships in two ways, using: 1) Differences along nearly perfectly coincident gravity anomaly data profiles collected underway, during passage through calm and narrow channels with little or no vertical ship motion; and 2) Observed vertical-motion-induced accelerations, with no horizontal motion, experienced during lock operations. We use the raw 1-Hz output of the BGM-3 gravimeter and compare various filtering methods. Furthermore, good quality vertical channel GPS is used to compare to the output of our solution of a boundary value problem: Given the observed outputs of the gravimeter, solve for h(t), the elevation of the ship vs time and also for two parameters: initial gravity value prior to vertical motion in the lock and apparent vertical gravity gradient.

  20. Imaging a Pyramid Interior by ERT-3D Methods, Preliminar Results at El Castillo Pyramid, Chichen Itza, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R. E.; Tejero, A.; Cifuentes, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J. E.; Garcia-Serrano, A.

    2016-12-01

    The well known Pyramid El Castillo, located in the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, in the Yucatan Peninsula is the emblematic structure of this archaeological site and elected as one of the man-made world seven wonders. The archaeological team that restored this structure during the 1920's discovered a smaller pyramid inside this prehispanic body, which corresponded to an older Mayan period. The possibility of finding other constructive periods inside this edifice should be important to reconstruct the Mayan history. Previous geophysical studies carried out by us in 2014, employed novel Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) arrays that surrounded the pyramids surface with flat electrodes to obtain a 3D image of the subsoil. At that time, a low resistivity body was found beneath the pyramid, which was associated to a sinkhole filled with sweet water. Employing the same technique, a series of flat electrodes were deployed on each body conforming the pyramid, a total of 10 bodies were covered, employing a different number of electrodes trying to keep the distance between each electrode constant ( 3 m). Each body was treated as a single observation cube, where the apparent resistivity data measured was later inverted. A precise topographic control for each electrode was realized and introduced in the inversion process. 45,000 observation points within the pyramid were obtained. Initially, each working cube corresponding to a given pyramid's body was inverted. A composition of each inversion was assembled to form the resistivity distribution within the pyramid using a smooth interpolation method. A high resistivity anomaly was found towards the northern portion of the model that could be associated to the main stairway of the inner pyramid. The cavity detected during the 2014 survey was observed as a low resistivity anomaly found at the pyramid's base. At the moment, we are assembling the full observed resistivity data as a single file to compute an integrated

  1. Nonlinear multiresolution signal decomposition schemes--part I: morphological pyramids.

    PubMed

    Goutsias, J; Heijmans, H M

    2000-01-01

    Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This paper presents a general theory for constructing linear as well as nonlinear pyramid decomposition schemes for signal analysis and synthesis. The proposed theory is based on the following ingredients: 1) the pyramid consists of a (finite or infinite) number of levels such that the information content decreases toward higher levels and 2) each step toward a higher level is implemented by an (information-reducing) analysis operator, whereas each step toward a lower level is implemented by an (information-preserving) synthesis operator. One basic assumption is necessary: synthesis followed by analysis yields the identity operator, meaning that no information is lost by these two consecutive steps. Several examples of pyramid decomposition schemes are shown to be instances of the proposed theory: a particular class of linear pyramids, morphological skeleton decompositions, the morphological Haar pyramid, median pyramids, etc. Furthermore, the paper makes a distinction between single-scale and multiscale decomposition schemes, i.e., schemes without or with sample reduction. Finally, the proposed theory provides the foundation of a general approach to constructing nonlinear wavelet decomposition schemes and filter banks.

  2. Template-stripped asymmetric metallic pyramids for tunable plasmonic nanofocusing.

    PubMed

    Cherukulappurath, Sudhir; Johnson, Timothy W; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel scheme for plasmonic nanofocusing with internally illuminated asymmetric metallic pyramidal tips using linearly polarized light. A wafer-scale array of sharp metallic pyramids is fabricated via template stripping with films of different thicknesses on opposing pyramid facets. This structural asymmetry is achieved through a one-step angled metal deposition that does not require any additional lithography processing and when internally illuminated enables the generation of plasmons using a Kretschmann-like coupling method on only one side of the pyramids. Plasmons traveling toward the tip on one side will converge at the apex, forming a nanoscale "hotspot." The asymmetry is necessary for these focusing effects since symmetric pyramids display destructive plasmon interference at the tip. Computer simulations confirm that internal illumination with linearly polarized light at normal incidence on these asymmetric pyramids will focus optical energy into nanoscale volumes. Far-field optical experiments demonstrate large field enhancements as well as angle-dependent spectral tuning of the reradiated light. Because of the low background light levels, wafer-scale fabrication, and a straightforward excitation scheme, these asymmetric pyramidal tips will find applications in near-field optical microscopy and array-based optical trapping.

  3. Renal pyramids: focused sonography of normal and pathologic processes.

    PubMed

    Daneman, Alan; Navarro, Oscar M; Somers, Gino R; Mohanta, Arun; Jarrín, José R; Traubici, Jeffrey

    2010-09-01

    In neonates and children, sonographic examinations of the renal pyramids may depict a spectrum of unique changes in echogenicity due to the effects of physiologic processes or a wide variety of pathologic processes that may affect the collecting ducts or interstitium of the pyramids. Focused sonographic evaluation of the pyramids with high-frequency transducers produces the most detailed images of the pyramids, revealing some appearances not previously reported, to the authors' knowledge. The authors highlight the clinical settings in which they have documented detailed changes in the echogenicity of the pyramids. The patterns of altered echogenicity alone may reflect a specific cause but in many instances are nonspecific, with clinical and biochemical correlation required to establish a more precise diagnosis. However, there is a lack of histologic data to completely explain the mechanism of many of these changes in echogenicity in all of the processes. As the authors have expanded their use of the focused sonographic technique, they have been able to depict altered echogenicity in the pyramids in greater numbers of children in whom an explanation for the changes is not always immediately apparent; for now, the cause must be considered idiopathic. More work is required to expand the use of this focused technique together with clinical, biochemical, and histologic correlation in an attempt to offer more complete explanations for the changes in echogenicity of the pyramids.

  4. Relevance of the pyramidal syndrome in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, N; Díez, L; Avellaneda, C; Serra, M; Rubio, M Á

    2016-06-20

    Pyramidal signs (hyperreflexia, spasticity, Babinski sign) are essential for the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, these signs are not always present at onset and may vary over time, besides which their role in disease evolution is controversial. Our goal was to describe which pyramidal signs were present and how they evolved in a cohort of patients with ALS, as well as their role in prognosis. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected patients diagnosed with ALS in our centre from 1990 to 2015. Of a total of 130 patients with ALS, 34 (26.1%) patients showed no pyramidal signs at the first visit while 15 (11.5%) had a complete pyramidal syndrome. Of those patients without initial pyramidal signs, mean time of appearance of the first signs was 4.5 months. Babinski sign was positive in 64 (49.2%) patients, hyperreflexia in 90 (69.2%) and 22 (16.9%) patients had spasticity. Pyramidal signs tended to remain unchanged over time, although they seem to appear at later stages or even disappear with time in some patients. We found no association between survival and the presence of changes to pyramidal signs, although decreased spasticity was associated with greater clinical deterioration (ALSFR scale) (P<.001). A quarter of patients with ALS initially showed no pyramidal signs and in some cases they even disappear over time. These data support the need for tools that assess the pyramidal tract. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Atom interferometer as a selective sensor of rotation or gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dubetsky, B.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2006-08-15

    In the presence of Earth gravity and gravity-gradient forces, centrifugal and Coriolis forces caused by the Earth rotation, the phase of the time-domain atom interferometers is calculated with accuracy up to the terms proportional to the fourth degree of the time separation between pulses. We considered double-loop atom interferometers and found appropriate condition to eliminate their sensitivity to acceleration to get atomic gyroscope, or to eliminate the sensitivity to rotation to increase accuracy of the atomic gravimeter. Consequent use of these interferometers allows one to measure all components of the acceleration and rotation frequency projection on the plane perpendicular to gravity acceleration. Atom interference on the Raman transition driving by noncounterpropagating optical fields is proposed to exclude stimulated echo processes which can affect the accuracy of the atomic gyroscopes. Using noncounterpropagating optical fields allows one to get a new type of the Ramsey fringes arising in the unidirectional Raman pulses and therefore centered at the two-quantum line center. Density matrix in the Wigner representation is used to perform calculations. It is shown that in the time between pulses, in the noninertial frame, for atoms with fully quantized spatial degrees of freedom, this density matrix obeys classical Liouville equations.

  6. Applications of atom interferometry - from ground to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Atom interferometry is utilized for the measurement of rotations [1], accelerations [2] and for tests of fundamental physics [3]. In these devices, three laser light pulses separated by a free evolution time coherently manipulate the matter waves which resembles the Mach-Zehnder geometry in optics. Atom gravimeters demonstrated an accuracy of few microgal [2,4], and atom gradiometers showed a noise floor of 30 E Hz^{-1/2} [5]. Further enhancements of atom interferometers are anticipated by the integration of novel source concepts providing ultracold atoms, extending the free fall time of the atoms, and enhanced techniques for coherent manipulation. Sources providing Bose-Einstein condensates recently demontrated a flux compatible with precision experiments [6]. All of these aspects are studied in the transportable quantum gravimeter QG-1 and the very long baseline atom interferometry teststand in Hannover [7] with the goal of surpassing the microgal regime. Going beyond ground based setups, the QUANTUS collaboration exploits the unique features of a microgravity environment in drop tower experiments [8] and in a sounding rocket mission. The payloads are compact and robust atom optics experiments based on atom chips [6], enabling technology for transportable sensors on ground as a byproduct. More prominently, they are pathfinders for proposed satellite missions as tests of the universality of free fall [9] and gradiometry based on atom interferometers [10]. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM1552-1557 (QUANTUS-IV-Fallturm) and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the SFB 1128 geo-Q. [1] PRL 114 063002 2015 [2] Nature 400 849 1999 [3] PRL 112 203002 2014 [4] NJP 13 065026 2011 [5] PRA 65 033608 2002 [6] NJP 17 065001 2015 [7] NJP 17 035011 2015 [8] PRL 110 093602 2013 [9

  7. Mysterious hexagonal pyramids on the surface of Pyrobaculum cells.

    PubMed

    Rensen, Elena; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2015-11-01

    In attempts to induce putative temperate viruses, we UV-irradiated cells of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum oguniense. Virus replication could not be detected; however, we observed the development of pyramidal structures with 6-fold symmetry on the cell surface. The hexagonal basis of the pyramids was continuous with the cellular cytoplasmic membrane and apparently grew via the gradual expansion of the 6 triangular lateral faces, ultimately protruding through the S-layer. When the base of these isosceles triangles reached approximately 200 nm in length, the pyramids opened like flower petals. The origin and function of these mysterious nanostructures remain unknown.

  8. Ischemic stroke of the pyramidal decussation causing quadriplegia and anarthria.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Emilia G; Kamel, Hooman; Johnson, Eric C B; Shalev, Sarah M; Josephson, S Andrew

    2012-10-01

    A 52-year-old man with a history of hypertension and previously irradiated head and neck cancer presented with quadriplegia and anarthria sparing the face and sensory functions. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute infarction of the pyramidal decussation. We describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of infarction at the pyramidal decussation and review the arterial supply to this region in the lower brainstem. Although rare, infarction of the pyramidal decussation should be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients present with atraumatic pure motor quadriplegia.

  9. Derivation of gravity anomalies from airborne gravimeter and IMU recordings—Validation with regional analytic models using ground and satellite gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeyer, Jürgen; Schäfer, Uwe; Kremer, Jens; Pflug, Hartmut; Xu, Guochang

    2009-04-01

    For testing the performance of the upgraded LaCoste and Romberg airborne gravimeter S124 and evaluating the newly updated software, an airborne gravity test campaign has been carried out in the northern part of Germany by GFZ Potsdam in autumn 2006 using the aircraft Cessna 404 of "Hansa Luftbild" Company, Münster. We present the results of a profile flown SW-NE in both directions at a nearly constant mean altitude of ˜1100 m with a ground speed of ˜230 km/h, crossing one of the most pronounced gravity anomalies in Central Europe with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 70 mgal. The scalar gravity anomalies along the flight trajectories have been derived from the airborne gravimeter taking into account platform recordings and data from the GPS-controlled Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) Aerocontrol IIb. All common corrections have been performed on the raw gravity data. Due to problems in GPS recording, we used the IMU data only. To verify the airborne gravity results, ground-based and satellite-derived gravity data have been used to compute local analytical gravity field models in a new methodological approach that allows the calculation of gravity anomalies at flight altitudes. For the most part there is a good agreement between the INS-airborne-derived and the independently modelled gravity anomalies, yielding best results of about 3.5 mgal RMS.

  10. Rainfall, evapotranspiration and water storage changes effects on gravity. The case of the superconducting gravimeter in Djougou, Benin,West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Basile; Hinderer, Jacques; Séguis, Luc; Boy, Jean-Paul; Calvo, Marta; Descloitres, Marc; Rosat, Séverine

    2013-04-01

    We show the advantages of continuous gravity monitoring for analyzing different processes in the water cycle involved at various time scales. The rapid time scale in the gravity changes (a few hours) involves different contributions: rainfall itself, runoff, screening effect of the gravimeter building and local topography. We present the statistical results of a set of rain events recorded with a superconducting gravimeter (SG) installed since July 2010 in Djougou, northern Benin, within the framework of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project. The intermediate time scale of gravity changes (a few days) is caused by evapotranspiration and both vertical and horizontal water redistribution. The integrative nature of gravity measurements does not allow to separate these different contributions. However, rates derived from gravity variations are within the range of known values of evapotranspiration, close to the potential evapotranspiration during the wet season of the west-African monsoon. We finally investigate gravity changes at the seasonal time scale caused by water storage changes. We show the rather good agreement between the SG monitoring, repeated absolute gravity (AG) measurements and water storage changes estimated from hydrological monitoring (neutron probe and water table).

  11. A pyramid sensor based AO system for Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Pinna, E.; Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Rabien, S.

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of the pyramid wavefront sensor in the mid 90s, various authors have shown both theoretically and with the aid of simulations that pyramid sensors can achieve a better performance than traditional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Recently the First-Light AO system (FLAO) at the Large Binocular Telescope has demonstrated excellent on sky performance achieved with a pyramid based system. Motivated by these results, we will present in this paper a first heuristic analysis scaling up the FLAO performance to the case of an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). We support our arguments with preliminary numerical simulations for the case of the European ELT using the M4 adaptive corrector and a properly matched pyramid sensor. Such a system could be used as a first-light natural guide-star AO system for the European ELT offering the advantages of a demonstrated AO system with practically off-the-shelf technology.

  12. Residential solar-heating system uses pyramidal optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes reflective panels which optimize annual solar energy collection in attic installation. Subunits include collection, storage, distribution, and 4-mode control systems. Pyramid optical system heats single-family and multi-family dwellings.

  13. Existence of nitric oxide synthase in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B; Schweizer, F E; Ryan, T A; Nakane, M; Murad, F; Scheller, R H; Tsien, R W

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a key retrograde messenger during long-term potentiation at hippocampal synapses, linking induction of long-term potentiation in postsynaptic CA1 pyramidal cells to expression of long-term potentiation in presynaptic nerve terminals. However, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the proposed NO-generating enzyme, has not yet been detected in the appropriate postsynaptic cells. We here demonstrate specific NOS immunoreactivity in the CA1 region of hippocampal sections by using an antibody specific for NOS type I and relatively gentle methods of fixation. NOS immunoreactivity was found in dendrites and cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells also displayed specific immunostaining. Control experiments showed no staining with preimmune serum or immune serum that was blocked with purified NOS. These results demonstrate that CA1 pyramidal cells contain NOS, as required were NO involved in retrograde signaling during hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Images PMID:7510887

  14. Landau pole in the pyramid scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Tom; Fortin, Jean-François; Kathrein, Scott

    2010-12-01

    We revisit the problem of the hidden sector Landau pole in the pyramid scheme. There is a fixed line in the plane of hidden sector gauge coupling and Yukawa couplings between the trianon fields. We postulate that the couplings flow to this line, at a point where the hidden sector gauge coupling is close to the strong coupling edge of its perturbative regime. Below the masses of the heavier trianons, the model quickly flows to a confining NF=NC=3 supersymmetric gauge theory, as required by phenomenological considerations. We study possible discrete R symmetries, which guarantee, among other things, that the basin of attraction of the fixed line has full codimension in the space of R-allowed couplings. The Yukawa couplings required to get the fixed line violate the pyrma-baryon symmetries we invoked in previous work to find a dark matter candidate. Omitting one of them, we have a dark matter candidate, and an acceptable renormalization group flow down from the unification scale, if the confinement scale of the hidden sector group is lowered from 5 to 2 TeV. However, we cannot find anomaly-free symmetries, which guarantee a set of pyrma-baryon violating couplings that eliminate the Landau pole, but do not allow a supersymmetry preserving vacuum of the model. We can do this with only one pyrma-baryon violating coupling, but this lowers the confinement scale to 900 GeV, which may already be ruled out due to light hidden sector baryons.

  15. Disparity map estimation using image pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszkowski, Mikołaj

    2013-10-01

    The task of a short baseline stereo matching algorithm is to calculate the disparity map given two rectified images of one scene. Most algorithms assume that a maximal possible disparity exists and search all disparities in the range from 1 to this maximal disparity. In the case of large images and wide disparity search range this can be very computationally demanding. In this article a simple coarse to fine hierarchical matching method based on the Gaussian pyramid and local stereo matching is investigated. Such an approach allows significant reduction of the number of disparities searched compared to the full search algorithm. Moreover it is shown, that grouping pixels into simple square regions is in most cases sufficient to avoid significant errors that typically appear at disparity map discontinuities when hierarchical schemes are used. Finally, it is presented that in most cases the quality of the disparity map obtained using the investigated algorithm is of comparable quality to a disparity map obtained using full-search local stereo algorithm.

  16. Laboratory test of a pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Simone; Feeney, Orla; Riccardi, Armando

    2000-07-01

    A laboratory characterization of a new wavefront sensor for adaptive optics applications called a pyramid sensor is presented. This characterization is aimed at establishing the sensor accuracy and sensitivity. To investigate the operation of the sensor in low and high order correction adaptive optics systems, its behavior for different amplitudes of incoming wavefront aberrations is studied. The sensor characterization is carried out using a two arm optical set-up that allows the comparison of the PS measurements with those of a commercial Fizeau interferometer. This is done when a certain aberration is introduced into the optical path of both instruments via a deformable mirror. The experimental data are analyzed and discussed using both geometrical and diffractive optics theory. The closed loop sensor accuracy is investigated experimentally and demonstrates closed loop wavefront correction down to 30 nm root mean square for starting aberrations whose root mean square ranges from 170 nm to 300 nm. Modal noise propagation coefficients are determined and are compared with Shack-Hartmann sensor coefficients.

  17. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Hoffman, Dax A; Magee, Jeffrey C; Poolos, Nicholas P; Watanabe, Shigeo; Colbert, Costa M; Migliore, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 μm of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 μm from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials. PMID:10811726

  18. Pyramidal cells accumulate chloride at seizure onset

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Kyle P; Kramer, Mark A; Mertz, Jerome; Staley, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are thought to originate from a failure of inhibition to quell hyperactive neural circuits, but the nature of this failure remains unknown. Here we combine high-speed two-photon imaging with electrophysiological recordings to directly evaluate the interaction between populations of interneurons and principal cells during the onset of seizure-like activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Both calcium imaging and dual patch clamp recordings reveal that in vitro seizure-like events (SLEs) are preceded by pre-ictal bursts of activity in which interneurons predominate. Corresponding changes in intracellular chloride concentration were observed in pyramidal cells using the chloride indicator Clomeleon. These changes were measurable at SLE onset and became very large during the SLE. Pharmacological manipulation of GABAergic transmission, either by blocking GABAA receptors or by hyperpolarizing the GABAA reversal potential, converted SLEs to short interictal-like bursts. Together, our results support a model in which pre-ictal GABAA receptor-mediated chloride influx shifts EGABA to produce a positive feedback loop that contributes to the initiation of seizure activity. PMID:22677032

  19. How They (Should Have) Built the Pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Gregory; West, Joseph; Waters, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    A novel ``polygon method'' is proposed for moving large stone blocks. The method is implemented by the attachment of rods of analytically chosen radii to the block by means of rope. The chosen rods are placed on each side of the square-prism block in order to transform the square prism into a prism of higher order polygon, i.e. octagon, dodecagon etc. Experimental results are presented and compared to other methods proposed by the authors, including a dragging method and a rail method which includes the idea of dragging the block on rails made from arbitrarily chosen rod-shaped ``tracks,'' and to independent work by another group which utilized wooden attachments providing a cylindrical shape. It is found that the polygon method when used on small scale stone blocks across level open ground has an equivalent of a coefficient of friction order of 0.1. For full scale pyramid blocks, the wooden ``rods'' would need to be of order 30 cm in diameter, certainly within reason, given the diameter of wooden masts used on ships in that region during the relevant time period in Egypt. This project also inspired a ``spin-off'' project in which the behavior or rolling polygons is investigated and preliminary data is presented.

  20. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  1. Energy landscapes for shells assembled from pentagonal and hexagonal pyramids.

    PubMed

    Fejer, Szilard N; James, Tim R; Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Wales, David J

    2009-03-28

    We present new rigid body potentials that should favour efficient self-assembly of pentagonal and hexagonal pyramids into icosahedral shells over a wide range of temperature. By adding an extra repulsive site opposite the existing apex sites of the pyramids considered in a previously published model, frustrated energy landscapes are transformed into systems identified with self-assembling properties. The extra interaction may be considered analogous to a hydrophobic-hydrophilic repulsion, as in micelle formation.

  2. Solar concentrating properties of truncated hexagonal, pyramidal and circular cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, D. G.; Strobel, G. L.; Shealy, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The solar concentrating properties of specularly reflecting truncated pyramidal, hexagonal, and circular cones are evaluated. Pyramidal and hexagonal configurations are discussed with reference to the concentration factor as a function of half apex angle and the length of the side over the width, and to the irradiance distribution. Expressions are derived for the concentration factor and the irradiance at the base of a circular cone when the sunlight is incident normal to the aperture and for oblique incidence.

  3. Quantitative analysis of cortical pyramidal neurons after corpus callosotomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bob; Creswell, Johanna; Britt, Jonathan P; Ford, Kevin L; Bogen, Joseph E; Zaidel, Eran

    2003-07-01

    This study quantitatively explored the dendritic/spine extent of supragranular pyramidal neurons across several cortical areas in two adult male subjects who had undergone a callosotomy several decades before death. In all cortical areas, there were numerous atypical, supragranular pyramidal neurons with elongated "tap root" basilar dendrites. These atypical cells could be associated with an underlying epileptic condition and/or could represent a compensatory mechanism in response to deafferentation after callosotomy.

  4. Connecting a Quanterra Data Logger Q330 on the GWR C021 Superconducting Gravimeter for low Frequency Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steim, J.; van Camp, M.; Rivera, L.; Rapagnani, G.

    2008-12-01

    Reference instrumentation such as a superconducting gravimeter (SG), barometer, and absolute traceability of calibration and orientation are important components in modern networks. Array processing of seismic data is not related only to program computers: somebody has to pay attention to the measurement physics, operational accuracy and meaning of the acquired seismic data. SGs, benefiting from a calibration at the 0.1% level in amplitude and 0.01 s in phase, can play an important role for improved estimation of source parameters, in particular the magnitude of large earthquakes, as well as for investigating Earth's gravest free oscillations. Equally clearly, since the Q330 is a datalogger used not only by the largest open array in the world, the USArray Transportable Array and by the largest aperture array, the GSN, and in numerous smaller-scale deployments, the operation of core instrumentation with various types of sensors is a crucial design element of future instrumentation. In order to promote the SG data among the seismic community, a Q330 data logger was connected to the SG GWR C021 at the Membach station, Belgium, for at least two reasons: (1) the Q330 provides the data in the quite complex SEED (Standard for the Exchange of Earthquake Data) format directly and (2) the Q330 is a standard data system used for acquisition of continuous seismological data. So, integration of SG data into the global data distribution system using a Q330 and testing this data logger to monitor very low frequency signal from an SG become straightforward. This paper presents the solutions provided to optimize the Q330 data logger when connected to a SG to ensure a reliable DC level and a stable calibration factor (at the 0.1% level). The noise contribution of the data acquisition systems is below the noise affecting the SG in the 10-5 -0.01 Hz frequency band, which includes the tidal and seismic free oscillation frequencies. The Q330 data logger is also a valuable tool to

  5. Lessons learned for hydrogravimetry: the superconducting gravimeter observatories at Concepción (Chile) and Sutherland (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güntner, Andreas; Ritschel, Maiko; Blume, Theresa; Dobslaw, Henryk; Förste, Christoph; Klügel, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Julian; Mikolaj, Michal; Reich, Marvin; Rossel, Ghislaine; Synisch, Jan; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    Superconducting gravimeters (SGs) continuously measure temporal variations of the Earth's gravity with very high precision. As SGs are sensitive to water mass changes in their surroundings, they potentially provide unique measurements of total water storage variations (the sum of variations in snow, soil and groundwater storage) at scales of several hundreds of meters. However, other geophysical signals by mass attraction and loading effects (e.g., tides, atmosphere, ocean, regional and global hydrology) have to be adequately removed from SG observations. In addition, the local settings of SG deployment (e.g., topographic position and near-field observatory infrastructure) are important controls on SG is sensitivity to the hydrological signal of interest. In this study, we evaluate the hydrological value of SGs for two sites in contrasting climate regions, i.e., (1) the Geodetic Observatory TIGO in the Coast Range of Southern Chile in Concepción, and (2) the South African Geodynamic Observatory Sutherland (SAGOS) in the semidesert Karoo region. At both sites, gravimetric as well as independent hydro-meteorological observations are available for several years. We remove large-scale atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological gravity effects by an ensemble approach using several global models. For the highly seasonal sub-humid climate at TIGO, the residual gravity signals had a larger seasonal amplitude (300-400 nm/s2) and a later annual phase than the gravimetric signal estimated from near-surface soil moisture observations in previous analyses. The gravity observations alluded to important and delayed water storage variations in the deeper (20 meter) unsaturated zone. This has been corroborated by soil moisture observations in deeper soil horizons, monitoring of the groundwater level, and hydrological modelling. At the semi-arid site SAGOS, water storage variations are considerably smaller, as are variations of SG residuals (amplitudes smaller than 20 nm/s2). While some

  6. Formation of Self-Connected Si0.8Ge0.2 Lateral Nanowires and Pyramids on Rib-Patterned Si(1 1 10) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lei; Chen, Gang; Lu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    In this work, Si0.8Ge0.2 is deposited onto the rib-patterned Si (1 1 10) template oriented in the [1 -1 0] direction. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that the rib sidewalls reshape into pyramid-covered (0 0 1) and smooth {1 1 3} facets, respectively, while the {1 0 5} facets-bounded lateral SiGe nanowires dominate the rib top along the [5 5 -1] direction. At both the rib shoulder sites and the pyramid vacancy sites, self-connecting occurs between the meeting nanowire and pyramids to form elongated huts, which are driven by the minimization of the total energy density according to the finite-element simulations results. These results suggest a convenient solution to form lateral SiGe nanowires covering multi-faceted surfaces on the patterned template.

  7. Formation of Self-Connected Si0.8Ge0.2 Lateral Nanowires and Pyramids on Rib-Patterned Si(1 1 10) Substrate.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Chen, Gang; Lu, Wei

    2017-12-01

    In this work, Si0.8Ge0.2 is deposited onto the rib-patterned Si (1 1 10) template oriented in the [1 -1 0] direction. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that the rib sidewalls reshape into pyramid-covered (0 0 1) and smooth {1 1 3} facets, respectively, while the {1 0 5} facets-bounded lateral SiGe nanowires dominate the rib top along the [5 5 -1] direction. At both the rib shoulder sites and the pyramid vacancy sites, self-connecting occurs between the meeting nanowire and pyramids to form elongated huts, which are driven by the minimization of the total energy density according to the finite-element simulations results. These results suggest a convenient solution to form lateral SiGe nanowires covering multi-faceted surfaces on the patterned template.

  8. Pyramidal Neurons Are Not Generalizable Building Blocks of Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luebke, Jennifer I.

    2017-01-01

    A key challenge in cortical neuroscience is to gain a comprehensive understanding of how pyramidal neuron heterogeneity across different areas and species underlies the functional specialization of individual neurons, networks, and areas. Comparative studies have been important in this endeavor, providing data relevant to the question of which of the many inherent properties of individual pyramidal neurons are necessary and sufficient for species-specific network and areal function. In this mini review, the importance of pyramidal neuron structural properties for signaling are outlined, followed by a summary of our recent work comparing the structural features of mouse (C57/BL6 strain) and rhesus monkey layer 3 (L3) pyramidal neurons in primary visual and frontal association cortices and their implications for neuronal and areal function. Based on these and other published data, L3 pyramidal neurons plausibly might be considered broadly “generalizable” from one area to another in the mouse neocortex due to their many similarities, but major differences in the properties of these neurons in diverse areas in the rhesus monkey neocortex rules this out in the primate. Further, fundamental differences in the dendritic topology of mouse and rhesus monkey pyramidal neurons highlight the implausibility of straightforward scaling and/or extrapolation from mouse to primate neurons and cortical networks. PMID:28326020

  9. The "healthy lifestyle guide pyramid" for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    González-Gross, M; Gómez-Lorente, J J; Valtueña, J; Ortiz, J C; Meléndez, A

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that risk factors for chronic diseases are established during childhood and adolescence. Consensus about the need to increase prevention efforts makes the adoption of a healthy lifestyle seem desirable from early childhood onwards. After reviewing educational tools for children and adolescents aimed at promoting a healthy lifestyle, it was recognized that there was a need to develop a simple educational tool specifically designed for these age groups. Development of the healthy lifestyle pyramid for children and adolescents. We propose a three-dimensional, truncated and staggered pyramid with 4 faces and a base, which introduces a completely new concept that goes beyond other published pyramids. Each of the faces is oriented towards achieving a different goal. Two faces (faces 1 and 2) are formulated around achieving a goal on a daily basis (daily food intake, face 1, and daily activities, face 2). Face 3 is an adaptation of the traditional food guide pyramid, adapted to children's energy, nutritional and hydration needs. Face 4 deals with both daily and life-long habits. On the base of the pyramid, there is advice about adequate nutrition alternating with advice about physical activity and sports. The Healthy Lifestyle Pyramid is specifically developed for children and adolescents according to current scientific knowledge and evidence-based data and includes easy-to-follow advice and full colour pictures. Following these guidelines should improve health and reduce risk factors, promoting enjoyable and appropriate development towards adulthood.

  10. Influence of alignment of the pyramid on its beneficial effects.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2007-05-01

    The present study was aimed to find out whether a change in the alignment of the pyramid from the north-south axis causes any variation in the effects produced by it on plasma cortisol levels and markers of oxidative stress in erythrocytes of adult-female Wistar rats. Plasma cortisol and erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly lower whereas erythrocyte GSH was significantly higher in rats kept in pyramid that was aligned on the four cardinal points--north, east, south and west, as compared to normal control rats. Although there was a significant difference in the plasma cortisol level between normal control group and the group of rats kept in randomly aligned pyramid, there was no significant difference between these two groups for the other parameters. Erythrocyte TBARS levels in the group of rats kept in the randomly aligned pyramid was significantly higher than that in the group kept in the magnetically aligned pyramid. The results suggest that the north-south alignment of the pyramid is crucial for its expected effects.

  11. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  12. Housing under the pyramid reduces susceptibility of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to prenatal stress in the developing rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Krishna Dilip; George, Mitchel Constance; Ramasamy, Perumal; Mustapha, Zainal Arifin

    2013-12-01

    Mother-offspring interaction begins before birth. The foetus is particularly vulnerable to environmental insults and stress. The body responds by releasing excess of the stress hormone cortisol, which acts on glucocorticoid receptors. Hippocampus in the brain is rich in glucocorticoid receptors and therefore susceptible to stress. The stress effects are reduced when the animals are placed under a model wooden pyramid. The present study was to first explore the effects of prenatal restraint-stress on the plasma corticosterone levels and the dendritic arborisation of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of the offspring. Further, to test whether the pyramid environment would alter these effects, as housing under a pyramid is known to reduce the stress effects, pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were restrained for 9 h per day from gestation day 7 until parturition in a wire-mesh restrainer. Plasma corticosterone levels were found to be significantly increased. In addition, there was a significant reduction in the apical and the basal total dendritic branching points and intersections of the CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. The results thus suggest that, housing in the pyramid dramatically reduces prenatal stress effects in rats.

  13. A portable laser system for high-precision atom interferometry experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Prevedelli, M.; Giorgini, A.; Tino, G. M.; Peters, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a modular rack-mounted laser system for the cooling and manipulation of neutral rubidium atoms which has been developed for a portable gravimeter based on atom interferometry that will be capable of performing high-precision gravity measurements directly at sites of geophysical interest. This laser system is constructed in a compact and mobile design so that it can be transported to different locations, yet it still offers improvements over many conventional laboratory-based laser systems. Our system is contained in a standard 19″ rack and emits light at five different frequencies simultaneously on up to 12 fibre ports at a total output power of 800 mW. These frequencies can be changed and switched between ports in less than a microsecond. The setup includes two phase-locked diode lasers with a phase noise spectral density of less than 1 μrad/Hz1/2 in the frequency range in which our gravimeter is most sensitive to noise. We characterise this laser system and evaluate the performance limits it imposes on an interferometer.

  14. Semantic pyramids for gender and action recognition.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fahad Shahbaz; van de Weijer, Joost; Anwer, Rao Muhammad; Felsberg, Michael; Gatta, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    Person description is a challenging problem in computer vision. We investigated two major aspects of person description: 1) gender and 2) action recognition in still images. Most state-of-the-art approaches for gender and action recognition rely on the description of a single body part, such as face or full-body. However, relying on a single body part is suboptimal due to significant variations in scale, viewpoint, and pose in real-world images. This paper proposes a semantic pyramid approach for pose normalization. Our approach is fully automatic and based on combining information from full-body, upper-body, and face regions for gender and action recognition in still images. The proposed approach does not require any annotations for upper-body and face of a person. Instead, we rely on pretrained state-of-the-art upper-body and face detectors to automatically extract semantic information of a person. Given multiple bounding boxes from each body part detector, we then propose a simple method to select the best candidate bounding box, which is used for feature extraction. Finally, the extracted features from the full-body, upper-body, and face regions are combined into a single representation for classification. To validate the proposed approach for gender recognition, experiments are performed on three large data sets namely: 1) human attribute; 2) head-shoulder; and 3) proxemics. For action recognition, we perform experiments on four data sets most used for benchmarking action recognition in still images: 1) Sports; 2) Willow; 3) PASCAL VOC 2010; and 4) Stanford-40. Our experiments clearly demonstrate that the proposed approach, despite its simplicity, outperforms state-of-the-art methods for gender and action recognition.

  15. Characteristics of integrated magneto-optical traps for atom chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, S.; Cotter, J. P.; Laliotis, A.; Ramirez-Martinez, F.; Hinds, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the operation of pyramidal magneto-optical traps (MOTs) microfabricated in silicon. Measurements of the loading and loss rates give insights into the role of the nearby surface in the MOT dynamics. Studies of the fluorescence versus laser frequency and intensity allow us to develop a simple theory of operation. The number of 85Rb atoms trapped in the pyramid is approximately L6, where Llsim6 is the size of the pyramid opening in mm. This follows quite naturally from the relation between capture velocity and size and differs from the L3.6 often used for describing larger MOTs. Our results represent substantial progress towards fully integrated atomic physics experiments and devices.

  16. Polychromatic white LED using GaN nano pyramid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taek; Kim, Jusung; Yang, Moonseung; Park, Yongsoo; Chung, U.-In; Ko, Yongho; Cho, Yonghoon

    2013-03-01

    We have developed monolithic white light emitting diodes (LEDs) with a hybrid structure of planar c-planes and nano size hexagonal pyramids. The white spectrum is composed of blue and yellow emissions from the InGaN multi quantum wells (MQWs) on the planar c-planes and on the nano pyramids, respectively. The yellow emission is originated from quantum wells, wires, and dots that are formed at the sides, edges, and tops of the nano-pyramids, respectively. As a result, the emission peaks are different and the entire yellow spectrum is broad enough to make a white in combination with a blue emission. The longer wavelength from the InGaN on nano-pyramids than the wavelength from the InGaN on c-planes is explained by excess In supply from the dielectric selective growth mask. The color temperature is tuned from 3600K to 6400K by controlling the relative area ratio of c-plane and nano-pyramids.

  17. Stabilized Laser Gravimeter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    Schematic of mechanical sensor. - OSCILLOSCOPES OSLATOR OSCILLATOR WoW E IL Wo AMP~iFI ERAMPLIFIERI 4 l ’Z7 AMPLIFIER 1. CLAMPED BEAN 4. PIEZOELECTRIC...with damping. 29 I,3- /RESPONSE OF NONPARAMETRIC z Wj REPNEO A4* OCLAO L) 1 2i 5EPOS OF PARAETRI OSCILATOR 6 4 x - z W RESPONSE OF NONPARAME IC 41... OSCILLATOR DUE TO SAME NPUT 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 TIME, SECONDS SDISTORTION DUE TO DATA REDUTION PROCESS Figure 17. Low-pass~ filtered response of a

  18. Rainfall impact on gravity at annual and rapid time scales from a superconducting gravimeter record in Benin, West-Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, B.; Hinderer, J.; Séguis, L.; Boy, J.; Calvo, M.; Descloitres, M.; Rosat, S.; Riccardi, U.; Littel, F.

    2012-12-01

    A superconducting gravimeter (SG) has been installed since 2010 in Nalohou, northern Benin, within the framework of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project. This site was chosen to monitor the strong annual monsoon signal with both local and non-local hydrological contributions within the humid sudanian zone of West-Africa. The area is also part of the long-term observing system AMMA-Catch, and thus under intense hydrological monitoring. We present here the results of the first two years relative gravity monitoring. The signal includes predominantly solid earth tides, ocean loading, polar motion, atmospheric pressure effects, drift and water storage changes (WSC). Retrieving WSC needs thorough corrections of other components, and detailed tide and barometric analysis are thus undertaken. Pressure effects are of major concern in the equatorial band, because they are governed by S1 and S2 thermal pressure waves. These waves dominate both the local Newtonian effect (an increase in local pressure decreases the gravity) and the smaller non-local loading effect (an increase in regional pressure decreases the gravity by a subsidence effect of the elastic earth) because of their coherency at the regional scale. FG5 absolute gravity data are used for calibration and drift estimate of the SG. Residuals clearly show interesting WSC behaviors at two predominant frequencies for which different accuracies are involved: the seasonal and the rainfall event time-scales. The weathered hard rock shallow aquifer of the site is known to produce WSC only in the 0-7m depth range (7m being the lowest interannual level of the water table within our record). WSC are coming both from soil moisture and water table variations. These are monitored 1) by weekly neutronic measurements over the whole vertical profile (every 50cm) in a borehole close to the SG, and 2) by water table level observations for the saturated zone only. The contribution to gravity of the latter is evaluated

  19. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {2 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 2 } plane "slither" in the {01 1 ¯1 } plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } and {01 1 ¯1 } slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } planes.

  20. Contact-pressure reduction of pyramidal optical probe array on corrugated aluminium/silicon nitride membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jinhee; Oh, Seonghyeon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we develop an optical contact probe array for scanning near-field lithography. We fabricate the optical probes with a pyramidal tip array on an aluminium/silicon nitride composite membrane. Here, we reduce the contact pressure using the corrugations on the silicon nitride membrane and the flattened surface on top of the tip. After fabricating the 5  ×  5 probes in the array, we evaluate the contact pressure using the force–distance curve obtained by an atomic force microscope. The spring constants of the corrugated membranes are 10  ±  0.6 N m‑1. The contact pressure on a flattened 295 nm in-radius is calculated to be approximately 33 MPa for a 300 nm deflection. This value is 22 times smaller than that of a sharp pyramidal tip of 20 nm in-radius on a flat membrane.

  1. Time Changes of the European Gravity Field from GRACE: A Comparison with Ground Measurements from Superconducting Gravimeters and with Hydrology Model Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinderer, J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Crossley, D.; Boy, J.-P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the time-variable gravity changes in Europe retrieved from the initial GRACE monthly solutions spanning a 18 month duration from April 2002 to October 2003. Gravity anomaly maps are retrieved in Central Europe from the monthly satellite solutions we compare the fields according to various truncation levels (typically between degree 10 and 20) of the initial fields (expressed in spherical harmonics to degree 120). For these different degrees, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition of the time-variable gravity field leads us to its main spatial and temporal characteristics. We show that the dominant signal is found to be annual with an amplitude and a phase both in agreement with predictions in Europe modeled using snow and soil-moisture variations from recent hydrology models. We compare these GRACE gravity field changes to surface gravity observations from 6 superconducting gravimeters of the GGP (Global Geodynamics Project) European sub-network, with a special attention to loading corrections. Initial results suggest that all 3 data sets (GRACE, hydrology and GGP) are responding to annual changes in near-surface water in Europe of a few microGal (at length scales of approx.1000 km) that show a high value in winter and a summer minimum. We also point out that the GRACE gravity field evolution seems to indicate that there is a trend in gravity between summer 2002 and summer 2003 which can be related to the 2003 heatwave in Europe and its hydrological consequences (drought). Despite the limited time span of our analysis and the uncertainties in retrieving a regional solution from the network of gravimeters, the calibration and validation aspects of the GRACE data processing based on the annual hydrology cycle in Europe are in progress.

  2. Time Changes of the European Gravity Field from GRACE: A Comparison with Ground Measurements from Superconducting Gravimeters and with Hydrology Model Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinderer, J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Crossley, D.; Boy, J.-P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the time-variable gravity changes in Europe retrieved from the initial GRACE monthly solutions spanning a 18 month duration from April 2002 to October 2003. Gravity anomaly maps are retrieved in Central Europe from the monthly satellite solutions we compare the fields according to various truncation levels (typically between degree 10 and 20) of the initial fields (expressed in spherical harmonics to degree 120). For these different degrees, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition of the time-variable gravity field leads us to its main spatial and temporal characteristics. We show that the dominant signal is found to be annual with an amplitude and a phase both in agreement with predictions in Europe modeled using snow and soil-moisture variations from recent hydrology models. We compare these GRACE gravity field changes to surface gravity observations from 6 superconducting gravimeters of the GGP (Global Geodynamics Project) European sub-network, with a special attention to loading corrections. Initial results suggest that all 3 data sets (GRACE, hydrology and GGP) are responding to annual changes in near-surface water in Europe of a few microGal (at length scales of approx.1000 km) that show a high value in winter and a summer minimum. We also point out that the GRACE gravity field evolution seems to indicate that there is a trend in gravity between summer 2002 and summer 2003 which can be related to the 2003 heatwave in Europe and its hydrological consequences (drought). Despite the limited time span of our analysis and the uncertainties in retrieving a regional solution from the network of gravimeters, the calibration and validation aspects of the GRACE data processing based on the annual hydrology cycle in Europe are in progress.

  3. Potential application of the Scintrex CG-3M gravimeter for monitoring volcanic activity: results of field trials on Mt. Etna, Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budetta, G.; Carbone, D.

    1997-04-01

    A series of field trials have been conducted for 11 months on and around Mt. Etna (Sicily) to test the performance of the new automated Scintrex CG-3M gravimeter on active volcanoes. The results show that the data from the CG-3M compare favourably with those from the traditionally employed LaCoste and Romberg (L&R) model D gravimeter. Under severe field conditions the Scintrex meter, because of its greater ruggedness and fully automated capabilities, yields results superior to those from the L&R D models. Repeated measurements (568) in a wide range of field conditions yielded errors in Δ g between stations of ± 3.5 to ± 4.4 μGal. Our tests also showed that both the strong drift in stationary conditions (~ 1 mGald -1) and changes of the instrumental calibration factor with time (whose rate decreased from 6 to 1 ppmd -1 during the 11-month study) can be reduced by regular checks to acceptable standards. Thus, (a) using experimental data, the instrumental drift was forecasted and corrected (by the real-time automatical compensator of the instrument) to within about 20 μGald -1, and (b) using the measurements along an 18-station profile on Mt. Etna (total gravity range ≈ 300 mGal), and an 80-km-long calibration line away from the volcano (six stations, total gravity range = 365 mGal) the changes of the calibration factor were determined and corrected to within about 30 ppm.

  4. Can Pyramids and Seed Mixtures Delay Resistance to Bt Crops?

    PubMed

    Carrière, Yves; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    The primary strategy for delaying the evolution of pest resistance to transgenic crops that produce insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) entails refuges of plants that do not produce Bt toxins and thus allow survival of susceptible pests. Recent advances include using refuges together with Bt crop 'pyramids' that make two or more Bt toxins effective against the same pest, and planting seed mixtures yielding random distributions of pyramided Bt and non-Bt corn plants within fields. We conclude that conditions often deviate from those favoring the success of pyramids and seed mixtures, particularly against pests with low inherent susceptibility to Bt toxins. For these problematic pests, promising approaches include using larger refuges and integrating Bt crops with other pest management tactics.

  5. Ancient Egyptian chronology and the astronomical orientation of pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Kate

    2000-11-01

    The ancient Egyptian pyramids at Giza have never been accurately dated, although we know that they were built approximately around the middle of the third millennium BC. The chronologies of this period have been reconstructed from surviving lists of kings and the lengths of their reigns, but the lists are rare, seldom complete and contain known inconsistencies and errors. As a result, the existing chronologies for that period (the Old Kingdom) can be considered accurate only to about +/-100 years, a figure that radiocarbon dating cannot at present improve. Here I use trends in the orientation of Old Kingdom pyramids to demonstrate that the Egyptians aligned them to north by using the simultaneous transit of two circumpolar stars. Modelling the precession of these stars yields a date for the start of construction of the Great Pyramid that is accurate to +/-5 yr, thereby providing an anchor for the Old Kingdom chronologies.

  6. Closed-loop performance of pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Feeney, Orla

    2000-07-01

    We consider the performance of the wavefront reconstruction process when a Pyramid wavefront Sensor is used in a closed loop Adaptive Optics System. The Pyramid Sensor sensitivity in closed loop operations has been the subject of a first heuristic analysis showing that the sensor sensitivity is higher than that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor, at least when low order modes are considered. In this paper we evaluate the sensor accuracy by determining the closed loop reconstruction matrix. This is done using a diffractive analysis of the sensor behavior. Furthermore, knowledge of this matrix enables us to quantify the effect of error sources like sensor non linearity and photon noise on the reconstructed wavefront accuracy. Finally, a comparison of the performance of the Shack-Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors is given.

  7. Development of Pyramidal Type 2-AXES Analog Sun Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Sung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Nam, Myung-Ryong; Park, Dong-Jo

    2000-12-01

    PSS (Pyramidal type 2-axes Analog Sun Sensor) which will be used for KAISTSAT-4 is designed to be small, light, low in power consumption, and adequate for small satellite attitude sensor. The PSS for the KAISTSAT-4 consists of the pyramidal structure, solar cells and amplifier. The pyramidal structure is suitable for the 2-axes sensing, Solar cells are made up of a rectangular shape of crystal silicon. The PSS measures the angle of incident light and initial satellite attitude measurement, and provides an alarm for the sunlight-sensitive payloads. This paper explains the PSS structure and the characteristic test result about the PSS with 50o in FOV, less than 3o in accuracy.

  8. Space Station view of the Pyramids at Giza

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the world's most famous archaeological sites has been photographed in amazing detail by the astronauts onboard Space Station Alpha. This image, taken 15 August, 2001, represents the greatest detail of the Giza plateau captured from a human-occupied spacecraft (approximate 7 m resolution). Afternoon sun casts shadows that help the eye make out the large pyramids of Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure. Sets of three smaller queens' pyramids can be seen to the east of the Pyramid of Khufu and south of the Pyramid of Menkaure. The light-colored causeway stretching from the Mortuary Temple at the Pyramid of Khafre to the Valley Temple near the Sphinx (arrow) can also be seen. Because it is not tall enough to cast a deep shadow, the Sphinx itself cannot readily be distinguished. Although some commercial satellites, such as IKONOS, have imaged the Pyramids at Giza in greater detail (1 m resolution), this image highlights the potential of the International Space Station as a remote sensing platform. A commercial digital camera without space modifications was used to obtain this picture. Similarly, a variety of remote sensing instruments developed for use on aircraft can potentially be used from the Space Station. Currently, all photographs of Earth taken by astronauts from the Space Shuttle and Space Station are released to the public for scientific and educational benefit and can be accessed on the World Wide Web through the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth (http://eol/jsc.nasa.gov/sseop). Image ISS003-ESC-5120 was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov).

  9. Development of a Pyramid Wave-front Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hadi, Kacem; Vignaux, Mael; Fusco, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Within the framework of the E-ELT studies, several laboratories are involved on some instruments: HARMONY with its ATLAS adaptive optics [AO] system, EAGLE or EPICS. Most of the AO systems will probably integrate one or several pyramidal wavefront sensors, PWFS (R. Ragazzoni [1]). The coupling in an AO loop and the control in laboratory (then on sky) of this type of sensor is fundamental for the continuation of the projects related to OA systems on the E-ELT. LAM (Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) is involved in particular in the VLT-SPHERE, ATLAS, EPICS projects. For the last few years, our laboratory has been carrying out different R&D activities in AO instrumentation for ELTs. An experimental AO bench is designed and being developed to allow the validation of new wave-front sensing and control concepts [2]. One the objectives of this bench, is the experimental validation of a pyramid WFS. Theoretical investigations on its behavior have been already made. The world's fastest and most sensitive camera system (OCAM2) has been recently developed at LAM (J.L Gach [3], First Light Imaging). Conjugating this advantage with the pyramid concept, we plan to demonstrate a home made Pyramid sensor for Adaptive Optics whose the speed and the precision are the key points. As a joint collaboration with ONERA and Shaktiware, our work aims at the optimization (measurement process, calibration and operation) in laboratory then on the sky of a pyramid sensor dedicated to the first generation instruments for ELTs. The sensor will be implemented on the ONERA ODISSEE AO bench combining thus a pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. What would give the possibility to compare strictly these two WFS types and make this bench unique in France and even in Europe. Experimental work on laboratory demonstration is undergoing. The status of our development will presented at the conference.

  10. Axon diameters and conduction velocities in the macaque pyramidal tract

    PubMed Central

    Firmin, L.; Field, P.; Maier, M. A.; Kraskov, A.; Kirkwood, P. A.; Nakajima, K.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Small axons far outnumber larger fibers in the corticospinal tract, but the function of these small axons remains poorly understood. This is because they are difficult to identify, and therefore their physiology remains obscure. To assess the extent of the mismatch between anatomic and physiological measures, we compared conduction time and velocity in a large number of macaque corticospinal neurons with the distribution of axon diameters at the level of the medullary pyramid, using both light and electron microscopy. At the electron microscopic level, a total of 4,172 axons were sampled from 2 adult male macaque monkeys. We confirmed that there were virtually no unmyelinated fibers in the pyramidal tract. About 14% of pyramidal tract axons had a diameter smaller than 0.50 μm (including myelin sheath), most of these remaining undetected using light microscopy, and 52% were smaller than 1 μm. In the electrophysiological study, we determined the distribution of antidromic latencies of pyramidal tract neurons, recorded in primary motor cortex, ventral premotor cortex, and supplementary motor area and identified by pyramidal tract stimulation (799 pyramidal tract neurons, 7 adult awake macaques) or orthodromically from corticospinal axons recorded at the mid-cervical spinal level (192 axons, 5 adult anesthetized macaques). The distribution of antidromic and orthodromic latencies of corticospinal neurons was strongly biased toward those with large, fast-conducting axons. Axons smaller than 3 μm and with a conduction velocity below 18 m/s were grossly underrepresented in our electrophysiological recordings, and those below 1 μm (6 m/s) were probably not represented at all. The identity, location, and function of the majority of corticospinal neurons with small, slowly conducting axons remains unknown. PMID:24872533

  11. Pyramid electrode location in a cardiac micropotential study.

    PubMed

    Kepski, R; Walczak, F

    1989-06-01

    There are several electrode systems dealing with low noise, body surface, and ECG recordings that have been suggested by various investigators. In the last few years, the most developed system for late potential detection has been related to the uncorrected Frank XYZ leads. However, for His bundle detection many different electrode networks have been used. A pyramid-type electrode system has been used previously for His-Purkinje signal measurement and, with some modifications, for late ventricular activity recordings. This pyramid-type system was used to evaluate 300 adult patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or cardiomyopathy. In the proposed system, electrodes are located near the myocardium with their configuration consisting of three electrode pairs forming a pyramidal shape. Each electrode can also play the role of the top of the pyramid, with all measurement directions converging to a point. By changing the pyramidal top, signals can be detected in various chosen measurement directions. The pyramid system provides spatial averaging facility, allowing the whole measuring system (consisting of low noise multi-input amplifiers) to detect signals in the range of 1 microVp-p on a beat-to-beat basis. In the majority of cases in hospital environments, however, a number of digital averaging cycles is still necessary. Using this system, late potentials (LP) were found in 29% of the patients without myocardial infarction (MI) and in 86% of cases with remote MI and sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) and/or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Waveforms suspected to be of His-Purkinje System (HPS) origin were detected in 71% of subjects with normal or prolonged P-R segment.

  12. Understanding political radicalization: The two-pyramids model.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Clark; Moskalenko, Sophia

    2017-04-01

    This article reviews some of the milestones of thinking about political radicalization, as scholars and security officials struggled after 9/11 to discern the precursors of terrorist violence. Recent criticism of the concept of radicalization has been recognized, leading to a 2-pyramids model that responds to the criticism by separating radicalization of opinion from radicalization of action. Security and research implications of the 2-pyramids model are briefly described, ending with a call for more attention to emotional experience in understanding both radicalization of opinion and radicalization of action. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Repetition Pitch glide from the step pyramid at Chichen Itza.

    PubMed

    Bilsen, Frans A

    2006-08-01

    Standing at the foot of the Mayan step pyramid at Chichen Itza in Mexico, one can produce a pitchy "chirp" echo by handclapping. As exposed by Declercq et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3328-3335 (2004)], an acoustic model based on optical Bragg diffraction at a periodic structure cannot explain satisfactorily the chirp-echo sonogram. Alternatively, considering the echo as a sequence of reflections, and given the dimensions of the pyramid and source-receiver position, the chirp is predicted correctly as a Repetition Pitch glide of which the pitch height is continuously decreasing within 177 ms from 796 to 471 Hz-equivalent.

  14. [Arabian food pyramid: unified framework for nutritional health messages].

    PubMed

    Shokr, Adel M

    2008-01-01

    There are several ways to present nutritional health messages, particularly pyramidic indices, but they have many deficiencies such as lack of agreement on a unified or clear methodology for food grouping and ignoring nutritional group inter-relation and integration. This causes confusion for health educators and target individuals. This paper presents an Arabian food pyramid that aims to unify the bases of nutritional health messages, bringing together the function, contents, source and nutritional group servings and indicating the inter-relation and integration of nutritional groups. This provides comprehensive, integrated, simple and flexible health messages.

  15. Radial microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Bindu; Das, Mukul Kumar; Sen, Mrinal; Kumar, Subindu

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a theoretical model for radial p-n junction microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structures in the space between microwires has been developed. Incorporation of pyramidal structures results in reflection of light, which would otherwise be unused, and illuminates side walls of the microwires. This additional illumination enhances absorption and, hence, efficiency of the whole structure. Efficiency enhancement is analyzed by varying different device parameters e.g., radius and length of each microwire and packing fraction of the structure. Results show that the maximum fractional efficiency enhancement can be obtained as 30% by suitable choice of these parameters.

  16. Nitride-based micron-scale hexagonal pyramids array vertical light emitting diodes by N-polar wet etching.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Liancheng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Guodong; Ji, Xiaoli; Ma, Ping; Wang, Junxi; Yi, Xiaoyan; Wang, Guohong; Li, Jinmin

    2013-02-11

    In this work, we reported the fabrication of nitride-based hexagonal pyramids array (HPA) vertical-injection light emitting diodes (V-LEDs) by N-polar wet etching. The performance of HPA V-LEDs devices was significantly improved with 30% higher internal quantum efficiency compared with conventional roughened broad area V-LEDs. The simulated extraction efficiency by finite difference time domain method was 20% higher than typical roughened V-LEDs. The reversed leakage current of HPA V-LEDs was reduced due to better crystal quality, which was confirmed by conductive atomic force microscopy measurement. Furthermore, the efficiency droop for HPA V-LEDs were substantially alleviated.

  17. 76 FR 15358 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Before the Pyramids: The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Before the Pyramids: The Origins of... ``Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization'' imported from abroad for temporary...

  18. Cold-atom gravimetry with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debs, J. E.; Altin, P. A.; Barter, T. H.; Döring, D.; Dennis, G. R.; McDonald, G.; Anderson, R. P.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.

    2011-09-01

    We present a cold-atom gravimeter operating with a sample of Bose-condensed 87Rb atoms. Using a Mach-Zehnder configuration with the two arms separated by a two-photon Bragg transition, we observe interference fringes with a visibility of (83±6)% at T=3 ms. We exploit large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitting to increase the enclosed space-time area of the interferometer using higher-order Bragg transitions and Bloch oscillations. We also compare fringes from condensed and thermal sources and observe a reduced visibility of (58±4)% for the thermal source. We suspect the loss in visibility is caused partly by wave-front aberrations, to which the thermal source is more susceptible due to its larger transverse momentum spread. Finally, we discuss briefly the potential advantages of using a coherent atomic source for LMT, and we present a simple mean-field model to demonstrate that with currently available experimental parameters, interaction-induced dephasing will not limit the sensitivity of inertial measurements using freely falling, coherent atomic sources.

  19. Cold-atom gravimetry with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Debs, J. E.; Altin, P. A.; Barter, T. H.; Doering, D.; Dennis, G. R.; McDonald, G.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.; Anderson, R. P.

    2011-09-15

    We present a cold-atom gravimeter operating with a sample of Bose-condensed {sup 87}Rb atoms. Using a Mach-Zehnder configuration with the two arms separated by a two-photon Bragg transition, we observe interference fringes with a visibility of (83{+-}6)% at T=3 ms. We exploit large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitting to increase the enclosed space-time area of the interferometer using higher-order Bragg transitions and Bloch oscillations. We also compare fringes from condensed and thermal sources and observe a reduced visibility of (58{+-}4)% for the thermal source. We suspect the loss in visibility is caused partly by wave-front aberrations, to which the thermal source is more susceptible due to its larger transverse momentum spread. Finally, we discuss briefly the potential advantages of using a coherent atomic source for LMT, and we present a simple mean-field model to demonstrate that with currently available experimental parameters, interaction-induced dephasing will not limit the sensitivity of inertial measurements using freely falling, coherent atomic sources.

  20. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-09-01

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10(-11) in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10(-9) g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  1. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10{sup −11} in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10{sup −9} g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  2. Budding Architects: Exploring the Designs of Pyramids and Prisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavy, Aisling; Hourigan, Mairéad

    2015-01-01

    The context of students as architects is used to examine the similarities and differences between prisms and pyramids. Leavy and Hourigan use the Van Hiele Model as a tool to support teachers to develop expectations for differentiating geometry in the classroom using practical examples.

  3. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness.

  4. English Pyramids: Using Hierarchical Diagrams for Communication Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tia; Sheetz-Brunetti, Judy

    The pyramid, or hierarchical diagram, is used in teaching writing English as a second language (ESL) as a visual representation of the way English speakers and writers organize ideas, for comparison with discourse organization in other cultures. A common problem of ESL students is an inability to organize ideas hierarchically. One class activity…

  5. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  6. Budding Architects: Exploring the Designs of Pyramids and Prisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavy, Aisling; Hourigan, Mairéad

    2015-01-01

    The context of students as architects is used to examine the similarities and differences between prisms and pyramids. Leavy and Hourigan use the Van Hiele Model as a tool to support teachers to develop expectations for differentiating geometry in the classroom using practical examples.

  7. Using the Pyramid Approach to Teaching Marketing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Westfall, John; Ainscough, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    Underscores the need for teaching marketing research skills at the secondary level and shows how marketing research fits into marketing education. Provides an example of how to use the pyramid approach to research, which involves review of secondary sources, key informant interviews, focus groups, and quantitative research. (Author/JOW)

  8. The Meat and Protein Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the meat and protein group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words…

  9. Teach "5 a Day" and the Pyramid for Better Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Reviews Food Guide Pyramid for fruits and vegetables for 2- to 6-year-old children. Identifies standard of five daily servings, defines children's portion sizes, presents guidelines for choosing appropriate foods, and suggests learning activities that use fruits and vegetables. Recommends 31 children's books about fruits and vegetables. (DLH)

  10. Fats, Oils, and Sweets. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and avoiding excesses of fats, oils, and sweets. It presents appealing alternatives to these unhealthy foods. Colorful photographs support…

  11. The FINUT Healthy Lifestyles Guide: Beyond the Food Pyramid123

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The WHO has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national, and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, with its 3 lateral faces corresponding to the facets of food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into 2 triangles. These faces show the following: 1) food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2) recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social, and cultural issues; and 3) selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other 2 faces, would contribute to better health for people in a sustainable planet. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of noncommunicable chronic diseases. PMID:24829489

  12. Was the Great Pyramid Built with Simple Machines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Susan; Poynor, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    Recently one of the authors challenged her third-grade students to use their imagination and travel with her to Egypt. As they were exploring the Great Pyramid, she encouraged the students to speculate how ancient people could have built such a massive structure without the sophisticated machinery they have at our disposal today. This article…

  13. Up the Pyramid: New Leadership Opportunities for Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Helen B.

    1988-01-01

    Research on effective teaching, combined with findings of the effective schools movement, is calling for teacher empowerment and new leadership opportunities for principals. This article describes a leadership pyramid embodying symbolic, cultural, instructional, and managerial functions. Principals will still operate at the top (symbolic and…

  14. The Sphinx and the Pyramids at Giza. Educational Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliano, Sara; Rapport, Wendy

    This packet of materials was created to accompany the exhibit "The Sphinx and the Pyramids: 100 Years of American Archaeology at Giza" at the Semitic Museum of Harvard University. The lessons and teacher's guide focus on the following: (1) "The Mystery of the Secret Tomb" where students take on the role of an archaeologist by…

  15. The Meat and Protein Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the meat and protein group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words…

  16. Fats, Oils, and Sweets. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and avoiding excesses of fats, oils, and sweets. It presents appealing alternatives to these unhealthy foods. Colorful photographs support…

  17. Teach "5 a Day" and the Pyramid for Better Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Reviews Food Guide Pyramid for fruits and vegetables for 2- to 6-year-old children. Identifies standard of five daily servings, defines children's portion sizes, presents guidelines for choosing appropriate foods, and suggests learning activities that use fruits and vegetables. Recommends 31 children's books about fruits and vegetables. (DLH)

  18. The FINUT healthy lifestyles guide: Beyond the food pyramid.

    PubMed

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    The WHO has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national, and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, with its 3 lateral faces corresponding to the facets of food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into 2 triangles. These faces show the following: 1) food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2) recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social, and cultural issues; and 3) selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other 2 faces, would contribute to better health for people in a sustainable planet. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of noncommunicable chronic diseases.

  19. English Pyramids: Using Hierarchical Diagrams for Communication Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tia; Sheetz-Brunetti, Judy

    The pyramid, or hierarchical diagram, is used in teaching writing English as a second language (ESL) as a visual representation of the way English speakers and writers organize ideas, for comparison with discourse organization in other cultures. A common problem of ESL students is an inability to organize ideas hierarchically. One class activity…

  20. Potential shortfall of pyramided Bt cotton for resistance management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To delay evolution of pest resistance to transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the "pyramid" strategy uses plants that produce two or more toxins that kill the same pest. In the United States, two-toxin Bt cotton has replaced one-toxin Bt cotton. Althou...

  1. Multisynaptic activity in a pyramidal neuron model and neural code.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Francesco; Di Maio, Vito

    2006-01-01

    The highly irregular firing of mammalian cortical pyramidal neurons is one of the most striking observation of the brain activity. This result affects greatly the discussion on the neural code, i.e. how the brain codes information transmitted along the different cortical stages. In fact it seems to be in favor of one of the two main hypotheses about this issue, named the rate code. But the supporters of the contrasting hypothesis, the temporal code, consider this evidence inconclusive. We discuss here a leaky integrate-and-fire model of a hippocampal pyramidal neuron intended to be biologically sound to investigate the genesis of the irregular pyramidal firing and to give useful information about the coding problem. To this aim, the complete set of excitatory and inhibitory synapses impinging on such a neuron has been taken into account. The firing activity of the neuron model has been studied by computer simulation both in basic conditions and allowing brief periods of over-stimulation in specific regions of its synaptic constellation. Our results show neuronal firing conditions similar to those observed in experimental investigations on pyramidal cortical neurons. In particular, the variation coefficient (CV) computed from the inter-spike intervals (ISIs) in our simulations for basic conditions is close to the unity as that computed from experimental data. Our simulation shows also different behaviors in firing sequences for different frequencies of stimulation.

  2. Design data brochure for a pyramidal optics solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This Design Data Brochure provides information on a Pyramidal Optics Solar System for solar heating and domestic hot water. The system is made up of the collecting, storage, and distribution subsystems. Contained in the brochure are such items as system description, available accessories, installation arrangements, physical data, piping and wiring diagrams, and guide specifications.

  3. Was the Great Pyramid Built with Simple Machines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Susan; Poynor, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    Recently one of the authors challenged her third-grade students to use their imagination and travel with her to Egypt. As they were exploring the Great Pyramid, she encouraged the students to speculate how ancient people could have built such a massive structure without the sophisticated machinery they have at our disposal today. This article…

  4. Angles of Elevation of the Pyramids of Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur F.

    1982-01-01

    The nature and history of the construction of pyramids in Egypt is detailed. It is noted that one can only theorize about why the Egyptians used particular angles of elevation. It is thought, perhaps, that new clues will provide a clear solution to this mystery as additional artifacts and hieroglyphics are discovered. (MP)

  5. A Modern Myth - The "Pyramids" of Güímar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Esteban, César

    We discuss about the construction of a modern myth where archaeoastronomy has played an essential role: the Pyramids of Güímar, located in the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands). We summarize the results of archaeoastronomical, archaeological, historical, and ethnographic studies devoted to them as well as our hypothesis for explaining the motivation of their astronomical alignments.

  6. Design data brochure for a pyramidal optical solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A pyramidal optics solar system for solar heating and domestic hot water is described. The system is made up of the collecting, storage, and distribution subsystems. System description, available accessories, installation arrangements, physical data, piping and wiring diagrams, and guide specifications are included.

  7. Using the Pyramid Approach to Teaching Marketing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Westfall, John; Ainscough, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    Underscores the need for teaching marketing research skills at the secondary level and shows how marketing research fits into marketing education. Provides an example of how to use the pyramid approach to research, which involves review of secondary sources, key informant interviews, focus groups, and quantitative research. (Author/JOW)

  8. A phase-locked laser system based on double direct modulation technique for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Pan, Xiong; Song, Ningfang; Xu, Xiaobin; Lu, Xiangxiang

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a laser system based on phase modulation technology and phase feedback control. The two laser beams with frequency difference of 6.835 GHz are modulated using electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, respectively. Parasitic frequency components produced by the electro-optic modulator are filtered using a Fabry-Perot Etalon. A straightforward phase feedback system restrains the phase noise induced by environmental perturbations. The phase noise of the laser system stays below -125 rad2/Hz at frequency offset higher than 500 kHz. Overall phase noise of the laser system is evaluated by calculating the contribution of the phase noise to the sensitivity limit of a gravimeter. The results reveal that the sensitivity limited by the phase noise of our laser system is lower than that of a state-of-the-art optical phase-lock loop scheme when a gravimeter operates at short pulse duration, which makes the laser system a promising option for our future application of atom interferometer.

  9. The Learning Pyramid: Does It Point Teachers in the Right Direction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, James P.; Miller, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper raises serious questions about the reliability of the learning pyramid as a guide to retention among students. The pyramid suggests that certain teaching methods are connected with a corresponding hierarchy of student retention. No specific credible research was uncovered to support the pyramid, which is loosely associated with the…

  10. The Learning Pyramid: Does It Point Teachers in the Right Direction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, James P.; Miller, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper raises serious questions about the reliability of the learning pyramid as a guide to retention among students. The pyramid suggests that certain teaching methods are connected with a corresponding hierarchy of student retention. No specific credible research was uncovered to support the pyramid, which is loosely associated with the…

  11. The mammalian neocortex new pyramidal neuron: a new conception

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Padilla, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The new cerebral cortex (neocortex) and the new type of pyramidal neuron are mammalian innovations that have evolved for operating their increasing motor capabilities while essentially using analogous anatomical and neural makeups. The human neocortex starts to develop in 6-week-old embryos with the establishment of a primordial cortical organization, which resembles the primitive cortices of amphibian and reptiles. From the 8th to the 15th week of age, new pyramidal neurons, of ependymal origin, are progressively incorporated within this primordial cortex forming a cellular plate that divides its components into those above it (neocortex first layer) and those below it (neocortex subplate zone). From the 16th week of age to birth and postnatally, the new pyramidal neurons continue to elongate functionally their apical dendrite by adding synaptic membrane to incorporate the needed sensory information for operating its developing motor activities. The new pyramidal neuron’ distinguishing feature is the capacity of elongating anatomically and functionally its apical dendrite (its main receptive surface) without losing its original attachment to first layer or the location of its soma and, hence, retaining its essential nature. The number of pyramidal cell functional strata established in the motor cortex increases and reflects each mammalian species motor capabilities: the hedgehog needs two pyramidal cell functional strata to carry out all its motor activities, the mouse 3, cat 4, primates 5 and humans 6. The presence of six pyramidal cell functional strata distinguish the human motor cortex from that of others primates. Homo sapiens represent a new evolutionary stage that have transformed his primate brain for operating his unique motor capabilities, such as speaking, writing, painting, sculpturing and thinking as a premotor activity. Words used in language are the motor expression of thoughts and represent sounds produced by maneuvering the column of expiratory

  12. Wallerian degeneration of pyramidal tract after paramedian pons infarct.

    PubMed

    Grässel, David; Ringer, Thomas M; Fitzek, Clemens; Fitzek, Sabine; Kohl, Matthias; Kaiser, Werner A; Witte, Otto W; Axer, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    The intention of this study was the prospective analysis of Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract after paramedian pons infarction. Patients with paramedian pons infarct underwent MR imaging including diffusion tensor imaging at admission and got 1-3 MR scans up to 6 months of follow-up. Clinical scores and transcranial magnetic stimulation were acquired in the acute phase and 3-6 months later. The pyramidal tracts were manually segmented in fractional anisotropy (FA) color maps after coregistration of all MR datasets of each patient. FA as well as axial and radial diffusivity were measured in the volume of lesioned and contralateral pyramidal tracts distally to the ischemic lesion. From 11 patients studied, 7 developed Wallerian degeneration detected as statistically significant decrease in FA over time in the distal pyramidal tract. Wallerian degeneration could be detected at the earliest between the first and the third days after the onset of symptoms. A continuous decrease in FA and an increase in axial and radial diffusivity in degenerating pyramidal tracts over time were demonstrated. A significant correlation between NIHSS score on admission and the slope of relative axial diffusivity and a significant correlation between motor-evoked potential amplitudes of the arm on admission and the outcome relative FA was found. The initial MR image cannot predict the following Wallerian degeneration. However, the severity of motor disturbance and the motor-evoked potential of the arm on admission could be possible parameters to predict Wallerian degeneration. For estimation of Wallerian degeneration over time, at least 2 diffusion tensor imaging measurements have to be done at different time points. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Development and validation of a food pyramid for Swiss athletes.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Samuel; Mannhart, Christof; Colombani, Paolo C

    2009-10-01

    Food-guide pyramids help translate nutrient goals into a visual representation of suggested food intake on a population level. No such guidance system has ever been specifically designed for athletes. Therefore, the authors developed a Food Pyramid for Swiss Athletes that illustrates the number of servings per food group needed in relation to the training volume of an athlete. As a first step, an average energy expenditure of 0.1 kcal . kg(-1) . min(-1) for exercise was defined, which then was translated into servings of different food groups per hour of exercise per day. Variable serving sizes were defined for athletes' different body-mass categories. The pyramid was validated by designing 168 daily meal plans according to the recommendations of the pyramid for male and female athletes of different body-mass categories and training volumes of up to 4 hr/d. The energy intake of the meal plans met the calculated reference energy requirement by 97% +/- 9%. The carbohydrate and protein intakes were linearly graded from 4.6 +/- 0.6-8.5 +/- 0.8 g . kg(-1) . d(-1) and 1.6 +/- 0.2-1.9 +/- 0.2 g . kg(-1) . d(-1), respectively, for training volumes of 1-4 hr of exercise per day. The average micronutrient intake depended particularly on the dietary energy intake level but was well above the dietary reference intake values for most micronutrients. No tolerable upper intake level was exceeded for any micronutrient. Therefore, this Food Pyramid for Swiss Athletes may be used as a new tool in sports nutrition education (e.g., teaching and counseling).

  14. Analysis of soil images applying Laplacian Pyramidal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, F.; de Castro, J.; Tarquis, A. M.; Méndez, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Laplacian pyramid is a technique for image encoding in which local operators of many scales but identical shape are the basis functions. Our work describes some properties of the filters of the Laplacian pyramid. Specially, we pay attention to Gaussian and fractal behaviour of these filters, and we determine the normal and fractal ranges in the case of single parameter filters, while studying the influence of these filters in soil image processing. One usual property of any image is that neighboring pixels are highly correlated. This property makes inefficient to represent the image directly in terms of the pixel values, because most of the encoded information would be redundant. Burt and Adelson designed a technique, named Laplacian pyramid, for removing image correlation which combines features of predictive and transform methods. This technique is non causal, and its computations are simple and local. The predicted value for each pixel is computed as a local weighted average, using a unimodal weighting function centred on the pixel itself. Pyramid construction is equivalent to convolving the original image with a set of weighting functions determined by a parameter that defines the filter. According to the parameter values, these filters have a behaviour that goes from the Gaussian shape to the fractal. Previous works only analyze Gaussian filters, but we determine the Gaussian and fractal intervals and study the energy of the Laplacian pyramid images according to the filter types. The different behaviour, qualitatively, involves a significant change in statistical characteristics at different levels of iteration, especially the fractal case, which can highlight specific information from the images. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  15. Hybrid Atom Electrostatic System for Satellite Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahzam, Nassim; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The subject of this poster comes within the framework of new concepts identification and development for future satellite gravity missions, in continuation of previously launched space missions CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and ongoing and prospective studies like NGGM, GRACE 2 or E-GRASP. We were here more focused on the inertial sensors that complete the payload of such satellites. The clearly identified instruments for space accelerometry are based on the electrostatic technology developed for many years by ONERA and that offer a high level of performance and a high degree of maturity for space applications. On the other hand, a new generation of sensors based on cold atom interferometry (AI) is emerging and seems very promising in this context. These atomic instruments have already demonstrated on ground impressive results, especially with the development of state-of-the-art gravimeters, and should reach their full potential only in space, where the microgravity environment allows long interaction times. Each of these two types of instruments presents their own advantages which are, for the electrostatic sensors (ES), their demonstrated short term sensitivity and their high TRL, and for AI, amongst others, the absolute nature of the measurement and therefore no need for calibration processes. These two technologies seem in some aspects very complementary and a hybrid sensor bringing together all their assets could be the opportunity to take a big step in this context of gravity space missions. We present here the first experimental association on ground of an electrostatic accelerometer and an atomic accelerometer and underline the interest of calibrating the ES instrument with the AI. Some technical methods using the ES proof-mass as the Raman Mirror seem very promising to remove rotation effects of the satellite on the AI signal. We propose a roadmap to explore further in details and more rigorously this attractive hybridization scheme in order to assess its potential

  16. Relationships between morphology and physiology of pyramid-pyramid single axon connections in rat neocortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Deuchars, J; West, D C; Thomson, A M

    1994-01-01

    1. Double intracellular recordings were made from 1163 pairs of pyramidal neurones in layer V-VI of the rat somatomotor cortex in vitro using sharp electrodes filled with biocytin. Monosynaptically connected pairs of cells were identified when an action potential in one could elicit a constant latency excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) in the other and the cells were filled with biocytin. Labelled cells were subsequently identified histologically with avidin-horseradish peroxidase. 2. Thirty-four pairs of cells were found to be monosynaptically connected. Fifteen of these pairs were sufficiently stable for electrophysiological recordings and three of these were recovered sufficiently to permit full morphological reconstruction. 3. The EPSP recorded between the first pair of pyramids varied in amplitude between 0 and 3 mV (mean 1.33 +/- 1.06 mV) and fluctuated considerably (coefficient of variation, 0.796). This was largely due to a high incidence of apparent failures of transmission. On reconstruction two boutons from the presynaptic pyramid axon were in close apposition to the proximal portions of basal dendrites of the postsynaptic cell. 4. In the second pair of pyramids the EPSP had a mean amplitude of 1.06 mV, and displayed a 10-90% rise time of 2.8 ms and a width at half-amplitude of 23 ms. This EPSP did not alter significantly with changes in membrane potential at the soma. The presynaptic axon closely apposed the distal apical dendrite of the postsynaptic cell in eight places. 5. In the third pair of pyramids, the EPSPs, recorded at a relatively depolarized membrane potential, were long lasting and could elicit slow dendritic spikes with long and variable latencies. These slow spikes suggested that the postsynaptic recording site was dendritic and on reconstruction a possible location was identified on the apical dendrite. A total of five presynaptic boutons closely apposed three separate, proximal branches of the postsynaptic apical dendrite. 6. These

  17. Ecosystem ecology: size-based constraints on the pyramids of life.

    PubMed

    Trebilco, Rowan; Baum, Julia K; Salomon, Anne K; Dulvy, Nicholas K

    2013-07-01

    Biomass distribution and energy flow in ecosystems are traditionally described with trophic pyramids, and increasingly with size spectra, particularly in aquatic ecosystems. Here, we show that these methods are equivalent and interchangeable representations of the same information. Although pyramids are visually intuitive, explicitly linking them to size spectra connects pyramids to metabolic and size-based theory, and illuminates size-based constraints on pyramid shape. We show that bottom-heavy pyramids should predominate in the real world, whereas top-heavy pyramids indicate overestimation of predator abundance or energy subsidies. Making the link to ecological pyramids establishes size spectra as a central concept in ecosystem ecology, and provides a powerful framework both for understanding baseline expectations of community structure and for evaluating future scenarios under climate change and exploitation.

  18. Influence of noise on a magnetically sensitive atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desavage, Sara A.; Srinivasan, Arvind; Davis, Jon P.; Zimmermann, Matthias; Efremov, Maxim; Rasel, Ernst; Schleich, Wolfgang; Welch, George R.; Mimih, Jihane; Narducci, Frank A.

    2016-05-01

    The inherent sensitivity of atom interferometer sensors has been well established and much progress has been made in the development of atom interferometer gravimeters, gravity gradiometers and gyroscopes e.g.. These interferometers use the ``clock'' transition which is magnetically insensitive. When considering interferometers with magnetically sensitive transitions operating in unshielded environments additional noise sources must be considered. The frequency content of the noise from these sources can vary dramatically, depending on the environment. In this talk, we will discuss these various noise sources and their impact on the performance of magnetically sensitive interferometers. Specifically, we identify three ways by which noise can be introduced into the system and their effect: fluctuating detuning, leading to a randomness of the interference pattern; fluctuating Rabi frequency, leading to pulse errors; non-uniformity of the magnetic field across the atom cloud, which can, under certain circumstances lead to a complete washing out of the interference pattern. Implications for our current experiments will be discussed. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  19. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  20. Rotation-invariant texture retrieval with Gaussianized steerable pyramids.

    PubMed

    Tzagkarakis, George; Beferull-Lozano, Baltasar; Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents a novel rotation-invariant image retrieval scheme based on a transformation of the texture information via a steerable pyramid. First, we fit the distribution of the subband coefficients using a joint alpha-stable sub-Gaussian model to capture their non-Gaussian behavior. Then, we apply a normalization process in order to Gaussianize the coefficients. As a result, the feature extraction step consists of estimating the covariances between the normalized pyramid coefficients. The similarity between two distinct texture images is measured by minimizing a rotation-invariant version of the Kullback-Leibler Divergence between their corresponding multivariate Gaussian distributions, where the minimization is performed over a set of rotation angles.

  1. Structuring by multi-beam interference using symmetric pyramids.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Rupp, Romano A

    2006-06-12

    A method for producing optical structures using rotationally symmetric pyramids is proposed. Two-dimensional structures can be achieved using acute prisms. They form by multi-beam interference of plane waves that impinge from directions distributed symmetrically around the axis of rotational symmetry. Flat-topped pyramids provide an additional beam along the axis thus generating three-dimensional structures. Experimental results are consistent with the results of numerical simulations. The advantages of the method are simplicity of operation, low cost, ease of integration, good stability, and high transmittance. Possible applications are the fabrication of photonic micro-structures such as photonic crystals or array waveguides as well as multi-beam optical tweezers.

  2. [The finut healthy lifestyles guide: beyond the food pyramid].

    PubMed

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2015-05-01

    The World Health Organization has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active, healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberomerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, its three lateral faces corresponding to the binomials food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into two triangles. These faces show the following: 1. food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2. recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social and cultural issues; 3. selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other two faces, would contribute to better health and provide measures to promote environmental sustainability. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding the pyramidal growth of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, J.L.; Arlery, M.; Bourret, A.

    1996-11-01

    By a combination of conventional, HREM and CBED TEM experiments the authors have studied wurtzite GaN layers grown by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on (0001)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They experimentally determine the structure of the macroscopic hexagonal pyramids that are visible at the surface of the layers when no optimized buffer is introduced. These pyramids look like hexagonal volcanoes with one hexagonal microscopic chimney (up to 75 nm wide) at their core. The crystal inside the chimney is a pure GaN crystal with a polarity opposed to the one of the neighboring material: the GaN layers grown on (0001)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are everywhere Ga-terminated except in the chimneys where they are N-terminated. Some of the N-terminated chimneys grow faster and form macroscopic hexagonal pyramids. Chimneys bounded by Inversion Domains Boundaries (IDBs) originate from steps at the surface of the substrate and may be suppressed by an adapted buffer layer.

  4. Error-resilient pyramid vector quantization for image compression.

    PubMed

    Hung, A C; Tsern, E K; Meng, T H

    1998-01-01

    Pyramid vector quantization (PVQ) uses the lattice points of a pyramidal shape in multidimensional space as the quantizer codebook. It is a fixed-rate quantization technique that can be used for the compression of Laplacian-like sources arising from transform and subband image coding, where its performance approaches the optimal entropy-coded scalar quantizer without the necessity of variable length codes. In this paper, we investigate the use of PVQ for compressed image transmission over noisy channels, where the fixed-rate quantization reduces the susceptibility to bit-error corruption. We propose a new method of deriving the indices of the lattice points of the multidimensional pyramid and describe how these techniques can also improve the channel noise immunity of general symmetric lattice quantizers. Our new indexing scheme improves channel robustness by up to 3 dB over previous indexing methods, and can be performed with similar computational cost. The final fixed-rate coding algorithm surpasses the performance of typical Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) implementations and exhibits much greater error resilience.

  5. Fast modulation and dithering on a pyramid wavefront sensor bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kooten, Maaike; Bradley, Colin; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Herriot, Glen; Lardiere, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    A pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) bench has been setup at NRC-Herzberg (Victoria, Canada) to investigate, first, the feasibility of a double roof prism PWFS, and second, test the proposed pyramid wavefront sensing methodology to be used in NFIRAOS for the Thirty Meter Telescope. Traditional PWFS require shallow angles and strict apex tolerances, making them difficult to manufacture. Roof prisms, on the other hand, are common optical components and can easily be made to the desired specifications. Understanding the differences between a double roof prism PWFS and traditional PWFS will allow for the double roof prism PWFS to become more widely used as an alternative to the standard pyramid, especially in a laboratory setting. In this work, the response of the double roof prism PWFS as the amount of modulation is changed, is compared to an ideal PWFS modelled using the adaptive optics toolbox, OOMAO in MATLAB. The object oriented toolbox uses physical optics to model complete AO systems. Fast modulation and dithering using a PI mirror has been implemented using a micro-controller to drive the mirror and trigger the camera. The various trade offs of this scheme, in a controlled laboratory environment, are studied and reported.

  6. Toward a pyramidal neural network system for stereo fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Richard; Poussart, Denis

    1992-03-01

    A goal of computer vision is the construction of scene descriptions based on information extracted from one or more 2-D images. Stereo is one of the strategies used to recover 3-D information from two images. Intensity edges in the images correspond mostly to characteristic features in the 3-D scene and the stereo module attempt to match corresponding features in the two images. Edge detection makes explicit important information about the two-dimensional image but is scale-dependent: edges are visible only over a range of scales. One needs multiple scale analysis of the input image in order to have a complete description of the edges. We propose a compact pyramidal architecture for image representation at multiple spatial scales. A simple Processing Element (PE) is allocated at each pixel location at each level of the pyramid. A dense network of weighted links between each PE and PEs underneath is programmed to generate the levels of the pyramid. Lateral weighted links within a level compute edge localization and intensity gradient. Feedback between successive levels is used to reinforce and refine the position of true edges. A fusion channel matches the two edge channels to output a disparity map of the observed scene.

  7. Pyramidal ice crystal scattering phase functions and concentric halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Jonas, P. R.; Saunders, C. P. R.

    1996-11-01

    Phase functions have been calculated using the Monte Carlo/geometric ray tracing method for single hexagonal pyramidal ice crystals (such as solid and hollow bullets) randomly oriented in space and horizontal plane, in order to study the concentric halo formations. Results from three dimensional model calculations show that 9° halo can be as bright as the common 22° halo for pyramidal angle of 28°, and the 18°, 20°, 24° and 35° halos cannot be seen due to the strong 22° halo domination in the scattering phase function between 18° and 35°. For solid pyramidal ice crystals randomly oriented horizontally, the 35° arc can be produced and its intensity depends on the incident ray solar angle and the particle aspect ratio. Acknowledgements. The work done by P. Henelius and E. Vilenius in programme development is gratefully acknowledged. Topical Editor D. Alcayde thanks I. Pryse and A. Vallance-Jones for their help in evaluating this paper.--> Correspondence to: T. Nygrén-->

  8. Mediterranean diet pyramid: a cultural model for healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Willett, W C; Sacks, F; Trichopoulou, A; Drescher, G; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Helsing, E; Trichopoulos, D

    1995-06-01

    We present a food pyramid that reflects Mediterranean dietary traditions, which historically have been associated with good health. This Mediterranean diet pyramid is based on food patterns typical of Crete, much of the rest of Greece, and southern Italy in the early 1960s, where adult life expectancy was among the highest in the world and rates of coronary heart disease, certain cancers, and other diet-related chronic diseases were among the lowest. Work in the field or kitchen resulted in a lifestyle that included regular physical activity and was associated with low rates of obesity. The diet is characterized by abundant plant foods (fruit, vegetables, breads, other forms of cereals, potatoes, beans, nuts, and seeds), fresh fruit as the typical daily dessert, olive oil as the principal source of fat, dairy products (principally cheese and yogurt), and fish and poultry consumed in low to moderate amounts, zero to four eggs consumed weekly, red meat consumed in low amounts, and wine consumed in low to moderate amounts, normally with meals. This diet is low in saturated fat (< or = 7-8% of energy), with total fat ranging from < 25% to > 35% of energy throughout the region. The pyramid describes a dietary pattern that is attractive for its famous palatability as well as for its health benefits.

  9. Real-time quadtree analysis using HistoPyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Gernot; Dimitrov, Rouslan; Theobalt, Christian; Seidel, Hans-Peter

    2007-02-01

    Region quadtrees are convenient tools for hierarchical image analysis. Like the related Haar wavelets, they are simple to generate within a fixed calculation time. The clustering at each resolution level requires only local data, yet they deliver intuitive classification results. Although the region quadtree partitioning is very rigid, it can be rapidly computed from arbitrary imagery. This research article demonstrates how graphics hardware can be utilized to build region quadtrees at unprecedented speeds. To achieve this, a data-structure called HistoPyramid registers the number of desired image features in a pyramidal 2D array. Then, this HistoPyramid is used as an implicit indexing data structure through quadtree traversal, creating lists of the registered image features directly in GPU memory, and virtually eliminating bus transfers between CPU and GPU. With this novel concept, quadtrees can be applied in real-time video processing on standard PC hardware. A multitude of applications in image and video processing arises, since region quadtree analysis becomes a light-weight preprocessing step for feature clustering in vision tasks, motion vector analysis, PDE calculations, or data compression. In a sidenote, we outline how this algorithm can be applied to 3D volume data, effectively generating region octrees purely on graphics hardware.

  10. Spatio-temporal Laplacian pyramid coding for action recognition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Zhen, Xiantong; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2014-06-01

    We present a novel descriptor, called spatio-temporal Laplacian pyramid coding (STLPC), for holistic representation of human actions. In contrast to sparse representations based on detected local interest points, STLPC regards a video sequence as a whole with spatio-temporal features directly extracted from it, which prevents the loss of information in sparse representations. Through decomposing each sequence into a set of band-pass-filtered components, the proposed pyramid model localizes features residing at different scales, and therefore is able to effectively encode the motion information of actions. To make features further invariant and resistant to distortions as well as noise, a bank of 3-D Gabor filters is applied to each level of the Laplacian pyramid, followed by max pooling within filter bands and over spatio-temporal neighborhoods. Since the convolving and pooling are performed spatio-temporally, the coding model can capture structural and motion information simultaneously and provide an informative representation of actions. The proposed method achieves superb recognition rates on the KTH, the multiview IXMAS, the challenging UCF Sports, and the newly released HMDB51 datasets. It outperforms state of the art methods showing its great potential on action recognition.

  11. Amending Miller's Pyramid to Include Professional Identity Formation.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Steinert, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    In 1990, George Miller published an article entitled "The Assessment of Clinical Skills/Competence/Performance" that had an immediate and lasting impact on medical education. In his classic article, he stated that no single method of assessment could encompass the intricacies and complexities of medical practice. To provide a structured approach to the assessment of medical competence, he proposed a pyramidal structure with four levels, each of which required specific methods of assessment. As is well known, the layers are "Knows," "Knows How," "Shows How," and "Does." Miller's pyramid has guided assessment since its introduction; it has also been used to assist in the assessment of professionalism.The recent emphasis on professional identity formation has raised questions about the appropriateness of "Does" as the highest level of aspiration. It is believed that a more reliable indicator of professional behavior is the incorporation of the values and attitudes of the professional into the identity of the aspiring physician. It is therefore proposed that a fifth level be added at the apex of the pyramid. This level, reflecting the presence of a professional identity, should be "Is," and methods of assessing progress toward a professional identity and the nature of the identity in formation should be guided by currently available methods.

  12. MyPyramid.gov: assessment of literacy, cultural and linguistic factors in the USDA food pyramid web site.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, Linda; Rothschild, Rebeccah; Rodríguez, Fátima M

    2007-01-01

    MyPyramid.gov, a major national Web site about healthful eating and physical activity, was analyzed for literacy, cultural, and linguistic factors relevant to consumers. The assessment used 4 standardized readability tests, 1 navigational test, availability of non-English content, and new criteria for cultural factors. Readability scores averaged between grade levels 8.8 and 10.8, and half the navigation criteria were met. The Web site was available in Spanish, but it had little cultural tailoring for English speakers. It is recommended that MyPyramid's readability, navigation, and cultural tailoring be improved. References are provided to help educators learn more about assessing and using Internet communication with diverse audiences.

  13. Clinical characteristics of papillary thyroid carcinoma arising from the pyramidal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Gab; Yi, Jin Wook; Seong, Chan-Yong; Kim, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Su-Jin; Chai, Young Jun; Choi, June Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) arising from the pyramidal lobe is rare; therefore, clinicopathologic evaluation is lacking. In addition, the rate of occult malignancy in the pyramidal lobe after thyroid surgery is unclear. This study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics of PTCs that involve the pyramidal lobe. Methods The study enrolled 1,107 patients who underwent thyroid surgery for PTC at Seoul National University Hospital from 2006 to 2015. Pyramidal lobe status in pathologic reports was clear in all cases. “Pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC” was defined as single pyramidal lobe cancer or multifocal cancer with larger pyramidal lobe tumor. “Incidental pyramidal lobe PTC” was defined as occult cancer identified after thyroidectomy or as multifocal cancer with smaller pyramidal lobe tumor. Results Ten patients were included in the pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC group. The mean age was 58 ± 12.5 years, and the mean tumor size was 0.7 ± 0.7 cm. Cervical lymph node metastasis was found in 5 patients (50%). Three patients had microscopic lymphatic invasion, and 7 had advanced American Joint Comitee on Cancer (AJCC) stage disease (5 with stage III and 2 with stage IV). Compared with conventional PTC (n = 1,058), pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC was significantly associated with lymphatic invasion (P = 0.031) and advanced AJCC stage (P = 0.022). The prevalence of incidental pyramidal lobe PTC was 3.56%. Conclusion Pyramidal lobe PTC is relatively small in size; however, the rate of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node metastasis is high. Preoperative evaluation of nodal status is important, and the extent of surgery should be determined in accordance with the preoperative diagnosis. PMID:28289665

  14. Excitatory synapses from CA3 pyramidal cells onto neighboring pyramidal cells differ from those onto inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Aaron, G B; Dichter, M A

    2001-12-15

    The glutamatergic pyramidal cell (PYR) to pyramidal cell synapse was compared to the PYR to inhibitory interneuron (INT) synapse in area CA3 of rat hippocampal roller-tube cultures. Paired-pulses and tetanic stimulations of a presynaptic PYR were conducted utilizing dual whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of either two PYRs or of a PYR and visually identified stratum oriens INT. Differences in synaptic characteristics were observed, depending on the postsynaptic target cell. Across cell pairs the variation of EPSC amplitudes was much larger for postsynaptic PYRs than for INTs. EPSCs recorded from INTs had faster rise times and shorter decays than those recorded in PYRs. There were also differences in the short-term plasticity of these synapses. Dual PYR:PYR recordings during paired-pulse stimulation at 100 ms interstimulus intervals demonstrated no modulation of EPSC amplitudes, while PYR:INT synapses showed paired-pulse depression. During trains of action potentials, the PYR:PYR EPSCs followed the presynaptic action potential train reliably, with little depression of EPSCs, while PYR:INT EPSCs demonstrated failures of transmission or profound depression after the initial EPSC. These results indicate multiple differences at both the pre- and postsynaptic level in the characteristics of pyramidal cell synapses that depend on the postsynaptic target's identity as either PYR or INT.

  15. Evaluation of the Cost-Effectiveness of Pyramidal, Modified Pyramidal and Monoscreen Traps for the Control of the Tsetse Fly, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Abila, P.P.; Okello-Onen, J.; Okoth, J.O.; Matete, G.O.; Wamwiri, F.; Politzar, H.

    2007-01-01

    Several trap designs have been used for sampling and control of the tsetse fly, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, Newstead (Diptera: Glossinidae) based on preferences of individual researchers and program managers with little understanding of the comparative efficiency and cost-effectiveness of trap designs. This study was carried out to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of four commonly used trap designs: monoscreen, modified pyramidal and pyramidal, relative to the standard biconical trap. The study was performed under high tsetse challenge on Buvuma Island, Lake Victoria, Uganda, using a 4 × 4 Latin square design replicated 3 times, so as to separate the trap positions and day effects from the treatment effect. A total of 12 trap positions were tested over 4 days. The monoscreen trap caught significantly higher numbers of G. f. fuscipes (P<0.05) followed by biconical, modified pyramidal and pyramidal traps. Analysis of variance showed that treatment factor was a highly significant source of variation in the data. The index of increase in trap catches relative biconical were O.60 (pyramidal), 0.68 (modified pyramidal) and 1.25 (monoscreen). The monoscreen trap was cheaper (US$ 2.61) and required less material to construct than pyramidal trap (US$ 3.48), biconical and the modified pyramidal traps (US$ 4.06 each). Based on the number of flies caught per meter of material, the monoscreen trap proved to be the most cost-effective (232 flies/m) followed by the biconical trap (185 flies/m). The modified pyramidal and the pyramidal traps caught 112 and 125 flies/m, respectively. PMID:20345292

  16. Strain maps at the atomic scale below Ge pyramids and domes on a Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiteri, P.; Miglio, Leo; Valentinotti, F.; Celino, M.

    2002-05-01

    In this letter, the strain field below uncapped Ge islands of a different shape on a Si(001) substrate is estimated by molecular dynamics simulations at a realistic scale. Comparison to the Fourier transform maps of transmission electron micrographs, recently reported in literature, shows a very good agreement. We point out that the complex deformation in silicon, just below the edges of the Ge islands, is far from being uniaxial. The stress distribution generated by such a strain determines the range of interdot repulsion.

  17. Atomic Calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  18. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  19. Pyramidal and Chiral Groupings of Gold Nanocrystals Assembled Using DNA Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Claridge, Shelley; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructures constructed from metal and semiconductor nanocrystals conjugated to, and organized by DNA are an emerging class of material with collective optical properties. We created discrete pyramids of DNA with gold nanocrystals at the tips. By taking small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurments from solutions of these pyramids we confirmed that this pyramidal geometry creates structures which are more rigid in solution than linear DNA. We then took advantage of the tetrahedral symmetry to demonstrate construction of chiral nanostructures. PMID:19331419

  20. Pyramidal and Chiral Groupings of Gold Nanocrystals Assembled Using DNA Scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Claridge, Shelley; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-03-30

    Nanostructures constructed from metal and semiconductor nanocrystals conjugated to, and organized by DNA are an emerging class of material with collective optical properties. We created discrete pyramids of DNA with gold nanocrystals at the tips. By taking small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurments from solutions of these pyramids we confirmed that this pyramidal geometry creates structures which are more rigid in solution than linear DNA. We then took advantage of the tetrahedral symmetry to demonstrate construction of chiral nanostructures.

  1. A Sodium-Pump-Mediated Afterhyperpolarization in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Sameera; Onoue, Keita; Stephens, Emily K.; Hasse, J. Michael; Avesar, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The sodium-potassium ATPase (i.e., the “sodium pump”) plays a central role in maintaining ionic homeostasis in all cells. Although the sodium pump is intrinsically electrogenic and responsive to dynamic changes in intracellular sodium concentration, its role in regulating neuronal excitability remains unclear. Here we describe a physiological role for the sodium pump in regulating the excitability of mouse neocortical layer 5 and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Trains of action potentials produced long-lasting (∼20 s) afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) that were insensitive to blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels or chelation of intracellular calcium, but were blocked by tetrodotoxin, ouabain, or the removal of extracellular potassium. Correspondingly, the AHP time course was similar to the decay of activity-induced increases in intracellular sodium, whereas intracellular calcium decayed at much faster rates. To determine whether physiological patterns of activity engage the sodium pump, we replayed in vitro a place-specific burst of 15 action potentials recorded originally in vivo in a CA1 “place cell” as the animal traversed the associated place field. In both layer 5 and CA1 pyramidal neurons, this “place cell train” generated small, long-lasting AHPs capable of reducing neuronal excitability for many seconds. Place-cell-train-induced AHPs were blocked by ouabain or removal of extracellular potassium, but not by intracellular calcium chelation. Finally, we found calcium contributions to the AHP to be temperature dependent: prominent at room temperature, but largely absent at 35°C. Our results demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for the sodium-potassium ATPase in regulating the excitability of neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. PMID:23926257

  2. Tracking visual objects using pyramidal rotation invariant features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paheding, Sidike; Essa, Almabrok; Krieger, Evan; Asari, Vijayan

    2016-02-01

    Challenges in object tracking such as object deformation, occlusion, and background variations require a robust tracker to ensure accurate object location estimation. To address these issues, we present a Pyramidal Rotation Invariant Features (PRIF) that integrates Gaussian Ringlet Intensity Distribution (GRID) and Fourier Magnitude of Histogram of Oriented Gradients (FMHOG) methods for tracking objects from videos in challenging environments. In this model, we initially partition a reference object region into increasingly fine rectangular grid regions to construct a pyramid. Histograms of local features are then extracted for each level of pyramid. This allows the appearance of a local patch to be captured at multiple levels of detail to make the algorithm insensitive to partial occlusion. Then GRID and magnitude of discrete Fourier transform of the oriented gradient are utilized to achieve a robust rotation invariant feature. The GRID feature creates a weighting scheme to emphasize the object center. In the tracking stage, a Kalman filter is employed to estimate the center of the object search regions in successive frames. Within the search regions, we use a sliding window technique to extract the PRIF of candidate objects, and then Earth Mover's Distance (EMD) is used to classify the best matched candidate features with respect to the reference. Our PRIF object tracking algorithm is tested on two challenging Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) datasets, namely Columbus Large Image Format (CLIF) and Large Area Image Recorder (LAIR), to evaluate its robustness. Experimental results show that the proposed PRIF approach yields superior results compared to state-of-the-art feature based object trackers.

  3. A sodium-pump-mediated afterhyperpolarization in pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Allan T; Dasari, Sameera; Onoue, Keita; Stephens, Emily K; Hasse, J Michael; Avesar, Daniel

    2013-08-07

    The sodium-potassium ATPase (i.e., the "sodium pump") plays a central role in maintaining ionic homeostasis in all cells. Although the sodium pump is intrinsically electrogenic and responsive to dynamic changes in intracellular sodium concentration, its role in regulating neuronal excitability remains unclear. Here we describe a physiological role for the sodium pump in regulating the excitability of mouse neocortical layer 5 and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Trains of action potentials produced long-lasting (∼20 s) afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) that were insensitive to blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels or chelation of intracellular calcium, but were blocked by tetrodotoxin, ouabain, or the removal of extracellular potassium. Correspondingly, the AHP time course was similar to the decay of activity-induced increases in intracellular sodium, whereas intracellular calcium decayed at much faster rates. To determine whether physiological patterns of activity engage the sodium pump, we replayed in vitro a place-specific burst of 15 action potentials recorded originally in vivo in a CA1 "place cell" as the animal traversed the associated place field. In both layer 5 and CA1 pyramidal neurons, this "place cell train" generated small, long-lasting AHPs capable of reducing neuronal excitability for many seconds. Place-cell-train-induced AHPs were blocked by ouabain or removal of extracellular potassium, but not by intracellular calcium chelation. Finally, we found calcium contributions to the AHP to be temperature dependent: prominent at room temperature, but largely absent at 35°C. Our results demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for the sodium-potassium ATPase in regulating the excitability of neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  4. Potential shortfall of pyramided transgenic cotton for insect resistance management

    PubMed Central

    Brévault, Thierry; Heuberger, Shannon; Zhang, Min; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Ni, Xinzhi; Masson, Luke; Li, Xianchiun; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Carrière, Yves

    2013-01-01

    To delay evolution of pest resistance to transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the “pyramid” strategy uses plants that produce two or more toxins that kill the same pest. In the United States, this strategy has been adopted widely, with two-toxin Bt cotton replacing one-toxin Bt cotton. Although two-toxin plants are likely to be more durable than one-toxin plants, the extent of this advantage depends on several conditions. One key assumption favoring success of two-toxin plants is that they kill insects selected for resistance to one toxin, which is called “redundant killing.” Here we tested this assumption for a major pest, Helicoverpa zea, on transgenic cotton producing Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. Selection with Cry1Ac increased survival on two-toxin cotton, which contradicts the assumption. The concentration of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab declined during the growing season, which would tend to exacerbate this problem. Furthermore, analysis of results from 21 selection experiments with eight species of lepidopteran pests indicates that some cross-resistance typically occurs between Cry1A and Cry2A toxins. Incorporation of empirical data into simulation models shows that the observed deviations from ideal conditions could greatly reduce the benefits of the pyramid strategy for pests like H. zea, which have inherently low susceptibility to Bt toxins and have been exposed extensively to one of the toxins in the pyramid before two-toxin plants are adopted. For such pests, the pyramid strategy could be improved by incorporating empirical data on deviations from ideal assumptions about redundant killing and cross-resistance. PMID:23530245

  5. Determination of beam-position dependent transfer functions of LCR-G gravimeters by means of moving mass calibration device in the Mátyáshegy Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory, Budapest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppán, András; Kis, Márta; Merényi, László; Papp, Gábor; Benedek, Judit; Meurers, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    In this presentation authors propose a method for the determination of transfer characteristics and fine calibration of LCR relative gravimeters used for earth-tide recordings, by means of the moving-mass gravimeter calibration device of Budapest-Mátyáshegy Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory. Beam-position dependent transfer functions of four relative LCR G type gravimeters were determined and compared. In order to make these instruments applicable for observatory tidal recordings, there is a need for examining the unique characteristics of equipments and adequately correcting these inherent distorting effects. Thus, the sensitivity for the tilting, temporal changes of scale factors and beam-position dependent transfer characteristics are necessary to be determined for observatory use of these instruments. During the calibration a cylindrical ring of 3200 kg mass is vertically moving around the equipment, generating gravity variations. The effect of the moving mass can be precisely calculated from the known mass and geometrical parameters. The maximum theoretical gravity variation produced by the vertical movement of the mass is ab. 110 microGal, so it provides excellent possibility for the fine calibration of gravimeters in the tidal range. Magnetic experiments were also carried out on the pillar of the calibration device as well, in order to analyse the magnetic effect of the moving stainless steel-mass. According to the magnetic measurements, a correction for the magnetic effect was applied on the measured gravimetric data series. The calibration process is aided by intelligent controller electronics. A PLC-based system has been developed to allow easy control of the movement of the calibrating mass and to measure the mass position. It enables also programmed steps of movements (waiting positions and waiting times) for refined gravity changes. All parameters (position of the mass, CPI data, X/Y leveling positions) are recorded with 1/sec. sampling rate. The

  6. Pyramidal Image-Processing Code For Hexagonal Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Algorithm based on processing of information on intensities of picture elements arranged in regular hexagonal grid. Called "image pyramid" because image information at each processing level arranged in hexagonal grid having one-seventh number of picture elements of next lower processing level, each picture element derived from hexagonal set of seven nearest-neighbor picture elements in next lower level. At lowest level, fine-resolution of elements of original image. Designed to have some properties of image-coding scheme of primate visual cortex.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Pyramids and Palm Trees Test.

    PubMed

    Klein, Liesa A; Buchanan, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    The Pyramids and Palm Trees Test (PPT) is a nonverbal measure of semantic memory that has been frequently used in previous aphasia, agnosia, and dementia research. Very little psychometric information regarding the PPT is available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the PPT in a population of healthy college students. Results indicated that the PPT achieved poor test-retest reliability, failed to obtain adequate internal consistency, and demonstrated poor convergent validity, but showed acceptable discriminant validity. The results of this study suggest that the PPT lacks acceptable reliability and validity for use with a college student population.

  8. Dynamics of multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, D.; Andreev, K.; Boyko, P.; Ivanova, E.; Pritykin, D.; Sidorenko, V.; Tourneur, C.; Yarotsky, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the dynamics of a multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation rotating about its axis of symmetry in the nominal mode. Whereas the combination of rotation and gravity-gradient forces is insufficient to maintain the mutual positions of satellites, they are assumed to be equipped with low-thrust rocket engines. We propose a control strategy that allows the stabilization of the nominal spin state and demonstrate the system's proper operation by numerically simulating its controlled motion. The discussed multi-tethered formations could be employed, for example, to provide co-location of several satellites at a slot in geostationary orbit.

  9. Hexahedron, wedge, tetrahedron, and pyramid diffusion operator discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.M.

    1996-08-06

    The diffusion equation, {phi}({rvec x}), is solved by finding the extrema of the functional, {Gamma}[{phi}] = {integral}({1/2}D{rvec {nabla}}{phi}{center_dot}{rvec {nabla}}{phi} + {1/2}{sigma}{sub a}{phi}{sup 2} - {ital Q}{phi}){ital d}{sup 3}{ital x}. A matrix is derived that is investigated for hexahedron, wedge, tetrahedron, and pyramid cells. The first term of the diffusion integration was concentrated and the others dropped; these dropped terms are also considered. Results are presented for hexahedral meshes and three weighting methods.

  10. Pyramidal Image-Processing Code For Hexagonal Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Algorithm based on processing of information on intensities of picture elements arranged in regular hexagonal grid. Called "image pyramid" because image information at each processing level arranged in hexagonal grid having one-seventh number of picture elements of next lower processing level, each picture element derived from hexagonal set of seven nearest-neighbor picture elements in next lower level. At lowest level, fine-resolution of elements of original image. Designed to have some properties of image-coding scheme of primate visual cortex.

  11. A New Fuzzy System Based on Rectangular Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mingzuo; Yuan, Xuehai; Li, Hongxing; Wang, Jiaxia

    2015-01-01

    A new fuzzy system is proposed in this paper. The novelty of the proposed system is mainly in the compound of the antecedents, which is based on the proposed rectangular pyramid membership function instead of t-norm. It is proved that the system is capable of approximating any continuous function of two variables to arbitrary degree on a compact domain. Moreover, this paper provides one sufficient condition of approximating function so that the new fuzzy system can approximate any continuous function of two variables with bounded partial derivatives. Finally, simulation examples are given to show how the proposed fuzzy system can be effectively used for function approximation. PMID:25874253

  12. The disease pyramid for acute gastrointestinal illness in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lake, R J; Adlam, S B; Perera, S; Campbell, D M; Baker, M G

    2010-10-01

    The disease pyramid of under-ascertainment for surveillance of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in New Zealand has been estimated using 2005-2007 data on notifiable diseases, a community telephone survey, and a survey of diagnostic laboratories. For each notified case of AGI there were an estimated 222 cases in the community, about 49 of which visited a general practitioner. Faecal samples were requested from about 15 of these cases, and 13 samples were provided. Of the faecal samples, pathogens were detected in about three cases. These ratios are similar to those reported in other developed countries, and provide baseline measurements of the AGI burden in the New Zealand community.

  13. FPGA implementation of a pyramidal Weightless Neural Networks learning system.

    PubMed

    Al-Alawi, Raida

    2003-08-01

    A hardware architecture of a Probabilistic Logic Neuron (PLN) is presented. The suggested model facilitates the on-chip learning of pyramidal Weightless Neural Networks using a modified probabilistic search reward/penalty training algorithm. The penalization strategy of the training algorithm depends on a predefined parameter called the probabilistic search interval. A complete Weightless Neural Network (WNN) learning system is modeled and implemented on Xilinx XC4005E Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), allowing its architecture to be configurable. Various experiments have been conducted to examine the feasibility and performance of the WNN learning system. Results show that the system has a fast convergence rate and good generalization ability.

  14. Sensing wavefronts on resolved sources with pyramids on ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldt, Markus; Hippler, Stefan; Obereder, Andreas; Stuik, Remko; Bertram, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS) have been agreed to provide a superior faint-end performance with respect to Shack-Hartmann systems (SHS) quite some time ago. However, much of the advantage relies on the fact that PWFSs exploit the full resolution limit of the telescope. ELTs will thus confront PWFSs with an unprecedented number of resolved targets. To analyze the behavior of PWFS on extended targets in detail observationally is difficult. We will present the result of simulations representing the Single-Conjugated Adaptive Optics (SCAO) system of METIS on the European ELT (E-ELT).

  15. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  16. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  17. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  18. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  19. TRH regulates action potential shape in cerebral cortex pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, Víctor; Patiño, Javier; Vargas, Yamili; Sánchez-Jaramillo, Edith; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2014-07-07

    Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a neuropeptide with a wide neural distribution and a variety of functions. It modulates neuronal electrophysiological properties, including resting membrane potential, as well as excitatory postsynaptic potential and spike frequencies. We explored, with whole-cell patch clamp, TRH effect on action potential shape in pyramidal neurons of the sensorimotor cortex. TRH reduced spike and after hyperpolarization amplitudes, and increased spike half-width. The effect varied with dose, time and cortical layer. In layer V, 0.5µM of TRH induced a small increase in spike half-width, while 1 and 5µM induced a strong but transient change in spike half-width, and amplitude; after hyperpolarization amplitude was modified at 5µM of TRH. Cortical layers III and VI neurons responded intensely to 0.5µM TRH; layer II neurons response was small. The effect of 1µM TRH on action potential shape in layer V neurons was blocked by G-protein inhibition. Inhibition of the activity of the TRH-degrading enzyme pyroglutamyl peptidase II (PPII) reproduced the effect of TRH, with enhanced spike half-width. Many cortical PPII mRNA+ cells were VGLUT1 mRNA+, and some GAD mRNA+. These data show that TRH regulates action potential shape in pyramidal cortical neurons, and are consistent with the hypothesis that PPII controls its action in this region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sex differences in hippocampal area CA3 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, Helen E; MacLusky, Neil J

    2017-01-02

    Numerous studies have demonstrated differences between males and females in hippocampal structure, function, and plasticity. There also are many studies about the different predisposition of a males and females for disorders where the hippocampus plays an important role. Many of these reports focus on area CA1, but other subfields are also very important, and unlikely to be the same as area CA1 based on what is known. Here we review basic studies of male and female structure, function, and plasticity of area CA3 pyramidal cells of adult rats. The data suggest that the CA3 pyramidal cells of males and females are distinct in structure, function, and plasticity. These sex differences cannot be simply explained by the effects of circulating gonadal hormones. This view agrees with previous studies showing that there are substantial sex differences in the brain that cannot be normalized by removing the gonads and depleting peripheral gonadal hormones. Implications of these comparisons for understanding sex differences in hippocampal function and dysfunction are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chemical modulation of ephaptic activation of CA3 hippocampal pyramids.

    PubMed

    Dalkara, T; Krnjević, K; Ropert, N; Yim, C Y

    1986-02-01

    In rats under urethane anaesthesia, antidromic population spikes were evoked in CA3 pyramidal layer by fimbrial/commissural stimulation at a very low frequency (approximately 0.5 Hz). Submaximal population spikes--between 20 and 90% of maximum--were enhanced by 8-38% by applications of acetylcholine and bicuculline, or by medial septal stimulation. Noradrenaline had a less pronounced and regular facilitatory action, whereas gamma-aminobutyrate and glutamate only depressed population spikes. Maximal enhancement by acetylcholine or bicuculline was observed when the antidromic population spike was initially at 38-53% of maximum amplitude. A simple explanation of these results is that acetylcholine and bicuculline, by raising their excitability, facilitate the excitation of non-invaded pyramidal cells by antidromic field potentials. They are fully in keeping with previous intracellular observations on ephaptic interactions between CA3 neurons, and provide a further illustration, in situ, of the importance of increased excitability and disinhibition--whether caused by drugs or synaptic action--in promoting synchronized excitation by ephaptic currents.

  2. Electrotonic Coupling between Pyramidal Neurons in the Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Barakat, Amey; Zhou, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    Electrotonic couplings (i.e., electrical synapses or gap junctions) are fundamental to neuronal synchronization, and thus essential for many physiological functions and pathological disorders. Interneuron electrical synapses have been studied intensively. Although studies on electrotonic couplings between pyramidal cells (PCs) are emerging, particularly in the hippocampus, evidence is still rare in the neocortex. The electrotonic coupling of PCs in the neocortex is therefore largely unknown in terms of electrophysiological, anatomical and synaptological properties. Using multiple patch-clamp recording with differential interference contrast infrared videomicroscopy (IR-DIC) visualization, histochemical staining, and 3D-computer reconstruction, electrotonic coupling was recorded between close PCs, mainly in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the visual cortical regions of ferrets and rats. Compared with interneuron gap junctions, these electrotonic couplings were characterized by several special features. The recording probability of an electrotonic coupling between PCs is extremely low; but the junctional conductance is notably high, permitting the direct transmission of action potentials (APs) and even tonic firing between coupled neurons. AP firing is therefore perfectly synchronized between coupled PCs; Postjunctional APs and spikelets alternate following slight changes of membrane potentials; Postjunctional spikelets, especially at high frequencies, are summated and ultimately reach AP-threshold to fire. These properties of pyramidal electrotonic couplings largely fill the needs, as predicted by simulation studies, for the synchronization of a neuronal assembly. It is therefore suggested that the electrotonic coupling of PCs plays a unique role in the generation of neuronal synchronization in the neocortex. PMID:20436674

  3. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-14

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resistance has been lacking. Here, we developed near-isogenic experimental lines representing all possible combinations of four QTL alleles from a durably resistant cultivar. These lines enabled us to evaluate the QTLs singly and in combination in a homogeneous genetic background. We present evidence that pyramiding QTL alleles, each controlling a different response to M. oryzae, confers strong, non-race-specific, environmentally stable resistance to blast disease. Our results suggest that this robust defence system provides durable resistance, thus avoiding an evolutionary "arms race" between a crop and its pathogen.

  4. Nutritional pyramid for post-gastric bypass patients.

    PubMed

    Moizé, Violeta L; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Mochari, Heidi; Vidal, Josep

    2010-08-01

    Life-long nutrition education and diet evaluation are key to the long-term success of surgical treatment of obesity. Diet guidelines provided for bariatric surgery patients generally focus on a progression through dietary stages, from the immediate post-surgical period to 6 months after surgery. However, long-term dietary guidelines for those surgically treated for obesity are not readily available. Therefore, there is a need for dietary recommendations for meal planning and nutritional supplementation for bariatric surgery patients beyond the short-term, post-operative period. The purpose of this paper is to construct an educational tool to provide long-term nutritional and behavioral advice for the post-bariatric patient. The manuscript summarizes the current knowledge on dietary strategies and behaviors associated with beneficial nutritional outcomes in the long term of post-bariatric surgery patients. Dietary and nutritional recommendations are presented in the form of a "bariatric food pyramid" designed to be easily disseminated to patients. The development of educational tools that are easy to understand and follow is essential for effective patient management during the surgery follow-up period. The pyramid can be used as a tool to help both therapists and patients to understand nutrition recommendations and thus promote a healthy long-term post-op dietary pattern based on high-quality protein, balanced with nutrient-dense complex carbohydrates and healthy sources of essential fatty acids.

  5. Growth and morphology control of carbon nanotubes at the apexes of pyramidal silicon tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgeworth, J. P.; Burt, D. P.; Dobson, P. S.; Weaver, J. M. R.; Macpherson, J. V.

    2010-03-01

    We describe the development of catalysed chemical vapour deposition (cCVD) growth schemes suitable for the production of carbon nanotube atomic force microscopy (CNT-AFM) probes. Growth and sample processing conditions are utilized that both incorporate safety in the process, e.g. the use of ethanol (EtOH) vapour as a carbon feedstock and hydrogen at only 4% (flow proportion), and simplicity, e.g. no catalyst patterning is required. Cobalt is employed as the growth catalyst and thin films of aluminium on silicon as the substrate material. Purpose-fabricated silicon substrates containing large numbers of tip structures are used as models of AFM probes. This enables growth to be carried out on many tips at once, facilitating a thorough investigation of the effect of different growth schemes on yields. cCVD growth schemes are chosen which produce stabilizing high density networks of carbon nanotubes on the sidewalls of the pyramidal tips to aid in anchoring the apex protruding carbon nanotube(s) in place. This results in long-lasting AFM imaging tips. We demonstrate that through rational tailoring of cCVD conditions it is possible to tune the growth conditions such that CNTs which protrude straight from tip apexes can be obtained at yields of greater than or equal to 78%. Application of suitable growth schemes to CNT growth on commercially available AFM probes resulted in CNT-AFM probes which were found to be extremely useful for extended lifetime metrological profiling of complex structures.

  6. Ge island assembly on metal-patterned Si: truncated pyramids, nanorods, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J T; Dubon, O D

    2008-01-01

    The organization of semiconductor nanostructures into functional macroassemblies remains a fundamental challenge in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In the context of semiconductor epitaxial growth, efforts have focused on the application of advanced substrate patterning strategies for the directed assembly quantum-dot islands. We present a comprehensive investigation on the use of simple metal patterns to control the nucleation and growth of heteroepitaxial islands. In the Ge on Si model system, a square array of metal dots induces the assembly of Ge islands into an extensive two-dimensional lattice. The islands grow at sites between the metal dots and are characterized by unique shapes including truncated pyramids and nanorods, which are programmed prior to growth by the choices of metal species and substrate orientation. Our results indicate that ordering arises from the metal-induced oxidation of the Si surface; the oxide around each metal dot forms an array of periodic diffusion barriers that induce island ordering. The metals decorate the island surfaces and enhanced the growth of particular facets that are able to grow as a result of significant intermixing between deposited Ge and Si substrate atoms.

  7. A Preliminary Geochemical Description of the Geothermal Reservoir at Astor Pass, Northern Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Clay A.; Thomas, James M.; Lyles, Brad F.; Reeves, Donald M.; Pohll, Greg M.; Parashar, Rishi

    2012-10-01

    Samples from a well drilled in the Astor Pass area six-km north of the Needle Rocks area of Pyramid Lake indicate that the reservoir fluid is dominantly sodium, chloride, and sulfate, with a pH between 8.6 and 8.9. The total dissolved solids in the reservoir is approximately 1600 mg/l, about half that of the TDS of the fluids in the Needle Rocks area. One sample of dissolved gas from fluids produced during a well test in the reservoir had 4He value of 2.32 x 1014 atoms 4He/g water, or approximately 100 times the value of atmospheric 4He. This measurement, in conjunction with a R/Ra measurement of 0.28, suggests that most of the reservoir helium is derived from the crust, with possibly a small value (~3.3 percent) derived from the mantle. Tritium concentration of the sample was 0.09 TU, indicating that the reservoir fluid was recharged more than 60 years ago; a simple model based upon carbon-14 suggests recharge has occurred within the past 1500 years.

  8. Sources and distribution of organic and carbonate carbon in surface sediments of Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Tenzer, G.E.; Meyers, P.A.; Knoop, P.

    1997-09-01

    Surface sediment samples from 32 sites in Pyramid Lake, Nevada, have been studied to investigate the sources and distribution of carbon within a large, terminal lake basin. The origins of organic and inorganic carbon in the sediments of this lake are predominantly from in-lake sources. Dilution of these sedimentary materials by land-derived clastic components occurs near the mouth of the Truckee River, the only perennial river entering the lake. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and CaCO{sub 3} concentrations and {delta}{sup 18}O values increase while organic matter C/N atomic ratios and {delta}{sup 13}C values decrease with increasing distance from the river mouth as the proportion of river-derived components decreases. Aragonite precipitates from lake water and dominates CaCO{sub 3} deposition in most parts of the lake, except near underlake springs, where calcite precipitates. TOC concentrations increase as water depth increases, reflecting grain sorting as smaller particles are resuspended and focused toward the deep basin center.

  9. Sensory deprivation differentially impacts the dendritic development of pyramidal versus non-pyramidal neurons in layer 6 of mouse barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Tam, Danny; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2012-04-01

    Early postnatal sensory experience can have profound impacts on the structure and function of cortical circuits affecting behavior. Using the mouse whisker-to-barrel system we chronically deprived animals of normal sensory experience by bilaterally trimming their whiskers every other day from birth for the first postnatal month. Brain tissue was then processed for Golgi staining and neurons in layer 6 of barrel cortex were reconstructed in three dimensions. Dendritic and somatic parameters were compared between sensory-deprived and normal sensory experience groups. Results demonstrated that layer 6 non-pyramidal neurons in the chronically deprived group showed an expansion of their dendritic arbors. The pyramidal cells responded to sensory deprivation with increased somatic size and basilar dendritic arborization but overall decreased apical dendritic parameters. In sum, sensory deprivation impacted on the neuronal architecture of pyramidal and non-pyramidal neurons in layer 6, which may provide a substrate for observed physiological and behavioral changes resulting from whisker trimming.

  10. 1-(2,4,6-Trialkylphenyl)-1H-Phospholes with a Flattened P-Pyramid: Synthesis and Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keglevich, György

    The 1H-phospholes with a 2,4,6-trialkylphenyl substituent on the phosphorus atom synthesized in our laboratories are of aromatic character due to their flattened P-pyramid. Hence, they may undergo aromatic electrophilic substitution, such as Friedel-Crafts acylations. The arylphospholes were functionalized via the regioselective reaction with phosphorus tribromide to give substituted phospholes that may be ligands in rhodium complexes used in hydro-formylations. Despite their aromaticity, the arylphospholes may be involved in Diels-Alder cycloaddition with dienophiles to provide 7-phosphanorbornene derivatives useful in fragmentation - related phosphorylations. At elevated temperature, the aryl-1H-phospholes were converted to the 2H-derivatives by a sigmatropic rearrangement to furnish, after trapping, 1-phosphanorbornadienes. The complexation and the oxidation reactions of the sterically hindered arylphospholes are also discussed.

  11. SERS encoded silver pyramids for attomolar detection of multiplexed disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liguang; Yan, Wenjing; Ma, Wei; Kuang, Hua; Wu, Xiaoling; Liu, Liqaing; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2015-03-11

    Three disease biomarkers can simultaneously be detected at the attomolar level because of a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) encoded silver pyramid sensing system. This newly designed pyramidal sensor with well-controlled geometry exhibits highly sensitive, selective, and reproducible SERS signals, and holds promising potential for biodetection applications.

  12. MyPyramid.gov knowledge and access among rural southwest Mississippi African American adolescents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study used a qualitative approach to identify knowledge of food recommendations found on MyPyramid.gov and access to MyPyramid.gov among limited-income African American youth. We conducted 5 single-sex focus groups with 9 boys and 30 girls (grades 5th and 6th). Data processing and analysis incl...

  13. Integrating Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation with the Pyramid Model. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Deborah F.; Kaufmann, Roxane K.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of states and communities are implementing the Pyramid Model in early care and education settings, and in many of these places there are also early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) programs operating. This policy brief provides an overview of ECMHC, how it can support the implementation of the Pyramid Model and the…

  14. Pyramid of Interventions: Results of a School Counselor's Action Research Study at One Suburban Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the implementation of the Pyramid of Interventions (POI) at a suburban Georgia Middle School through an examination of teacher understanding, assessment of overall effectiveness, and the need for further professional development. The Pyramid of Interventions is the response to intervention (RTI) component of the Individuals…

  15. The Conflict Pyramid: A Holistic Approach to Structuring Conflict Resolution in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakvoort, Ilse

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how the conflict pyramid, originally defined and used by Richard Cohen, can be used as a model to describe the relations between different conflict resolution education programs and activities included in the programs. The central questions posed in the paper are: How can Richard Cohen's conflict pyramid be used as a model for…

  16. MyPyramid.gov knowledge and access among rural Southwest Mississippi African-American adolescents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our learning outcomes were: 1) To identify need for a culturally specific media campaign on the use of MyPyramid.gov targeting African-American adolescents, and 2) To identify need for nutrition education tools designed to reinforce food guide pyramid recommendations. This study used a qualitative ...

  17. The Teaching of Food Guide Pyramid Concepts by Nebraska Elementary School Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, H. Darlene; Driskell, Judy A.

    2001-01-01

    In an analysis of food selection education using the Food Guide Pyramid for students in grades 1-4, over two-thirds of teachers (n=464) responded that nutrition should be a high priority in the elementary curriculum. Fewer than half teach pyramid concepts consistently or frequently, younger teachers (20-29) more rarely than older teachers.…

  18. The Literacy Pyramid Organization of Reading/Writing Activities in a Whole Language Classroom (Early Childhood).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruneau, Beverly J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Literacy Pyramid (based on the United States Department of Agriculture food pyramid), a classification of eight instructional events, which is intended as a framework for teachers to think about the purpose of various instructional formats and about organizing time for language arts instruction. (SR)

  19. Effect of lures and colors on capture of lady beetles (coleoptera: coccinellidae) in tedders pyramidal traps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Purposeful attraction and/or aggregation of adult Coccinellidae at target sites would be useful for sampling purposes and/or pest suppression. We field-tested 1) lures in yellow and black pyramidal traps and 2) pyramidal traps that had been painted one or two colors (without lures) to determine if ...

  20. Tribonacci-Like Sequences and Generalized Pascal's Pyramids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called "Pascal's pyramid." Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the "Feinberg's triangle" associated to a suitable "generalized Pascal's pyramid."…

  1. The Teaching of Food Guide Pyramid Concepts by Nebraska Elementary School Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, H. Darlene; Driskell, Judy A.

    2001-01-01

    In an analysis of food selection education using the Food Guide Pyramid for students in grades 1-4, over two-thirds of teachers (n=464) responded that nutrition should be a high priority in the elementary curriculum. Fewer than half teach pyramid concepts consistently or frequently, younger teachers (20-29) more rarely than older teachers.…

  2. Effect of varying durations of pyramid exposure - an indication towards a possibility of overexposure.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2009-10-01

    Miniature replicas modeled after the Great Pyramid of Giza are believed to concentrate geoelectromagnetic energy within their cavities and hence act as antistressors in humans and animals. Although there are not many reports of adverse effects of 'overexposure' in the pyramid, subjects have claimed to feel uneasy after certain duration of staying in the pyramid. The present study was aimed to analyze the effects of prolonged pyramid exposure on plasma cortisol level, markers of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense in erythrocytes of adult female Wistar rats. Rats were divided into three groups, normal controls (NC, n=6) that were maintained under standard laboratory conditions in their home cages, pyramid exposed group-2 (PE-2, n=6) & pyramid exposed group-4 (PE-4, n=6) where the rats were housed under the pyramid for 6 hours/day for 2 weeks and 4 weeks respectively. Plasma cortisol and erythrocyte TBARS levels were significantly lower in both PE-2 and PE-4 rats and erythrocyte GSH levels and GSH-Px activity were significantly higher in them as compared to the NC rats. There was no significant difference in the results for these parameters between the PE-2 and PE-4 rats except for erythrocyte GSH-Px activity which was significantly more in the PE-2 rats than in the PE-4 rats. Although these results don't confirm any adverse effects of prolonged exposure in pyramids, they indicate a possibility of such adverse effects.

  3. Tribonacci-Like Sequences and Generalized Pascal's Pyramids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called "Pascal's pyramid." Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the "Feinberg's triangle" associated to a suitable "generalized Pascal's pyramid."…

  4. The Conflict Pyramid: A Holistic Approach to Structuring Conflict Resolution in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakvoort, Ilse

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how the conflict pyramid, originally defined and used by Richard Cohen, can be used as a model to describe the relations between different conflict resolution education programs and activities included in the programs. The central questions posed in the paper are: How can Richard Cohen's conflict pyramid be used as a model for…

  5. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  6. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  7. Left common basal pyramid torsion following left upper lobectomy/segmentectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Li; Cheng, Yen-Po; Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2015-05-01

    Lobar or segmental lung torsion is a severe complication of lung resection. To the best of our knowledge, common basal pyramid torsion has never been reported. We describe a case of left basal pyramid torsion after left upper lobectomy and superior segmentectomy, which was successfully treated by thoracoscopic surgery.

  8. Inverted pyramid of prenatal care - is it enough? Should it be - extended inverted pyramid of prenatal care?

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Aleksandar

    2017-04-07

    In recent years, the idea of the inverted pyramid of prenatal care and monitoring has emerged, for the purpose of prediction and prevention, early detection and treatment of health disorders of the fetus. Is this enough? If we analyze the period behind us, progress has been made in the field of detection of multiple pregnancies, dating of pregnancy and prenatal detection of chromosomal and structural fetal disorders, as well as a small amount of progress in terms of prediction and prevention of preeclampsia. If these disorders are the consequence of the disturbed or dysfunctional placentation, they are rooted at the time of implantation. This means that the changes that lead to the dysfunctional implantation should be sought in the pre-implantation period, in relation between the embryo and the endometrium. An extended inverted pyramid is necessary to find better results in perinatal medicine. This means that the interventions should be focused on the preconception and peri-implantation periods. The therapy should be on the subcellular and genetic level by applying the latest biotechnological procedures. It is possible that the time is approaching when the listed disorders of a pregnancy will be the indications for the application of a non stimulated in-vitro fertilization (IVF) (without ovary stimulating medication) with the use of new biotechnological achievements.

  9. Underground atom gradiometer array for mass distribution monitoring and advanced geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuel, B.

    2015-12-01

    After more than 20 years of fundamental research, atom interferometers have reached sensitivity and accuracy levels competing with or beating inertial sensors based on different technologies. Atom interferometers offer interesting applications in geophysics (gravimetry, gradiometry, Earth rotation rate measurements), inertial sensing (submarine or aircraft autonomous positioning), metrology (new definition of the kilogram) and fundamental physics (tests of the standard model, tests of general relativity). Atom interferometers already contributed significantly to fundamental physics by, for example, providing stringent constraints on quantum-electrodynamics through measurements of the hyperfine structure constant, testing the Equivalence Principle with cold atoms, or providing new measurements for the Newtonian gravitational constant. Cold atom sensors have moreover been established as key instruments in metrology for the new definition of the kilogram or through international comparisons of gravimeters. The field of atom interferometry (AI) is now entering a new phase where very high sensitivity levels must be demonstrated, in order to enlarge the potential applications outside atomic physics laboratories. These applications range from gravitational wave (GW) detection in the [0.1-10 Hz] frequency band to next generation ground and space-based Earth gravity field studies to precision gyroscopes and accelerometers. The Matter-wave laser Interferometric Gravitation Antenna (MIGA) presented here is a large-scale matter-wave sensor which will open new applications in geoscience and fundamental physics. The MIGA consortium gathers 18 expert French laboratories and companies in atomic physics, metrology, optics, geosciences and gravitational physics, with the aim to build a large-scale underground atom-interferometer instrument by 2018 and operate it till at least 2023. In this paper, we present the main objectives of the project, the status of the construction of the

  10. Dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Leguey, Ignacio; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rojo, Concepción; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of the structural design of cortical microcircuits is essential for understanding how they contribute to function in both health and disease. Since pyramidal neurons represent the most abundant neuronal type and their dendritic spines constitute the major postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the neocortex largely depends on the available knowledge regarding the structure of pyramidal cells. Previous studies have identified several apparently common rules in dendritic geometry. We study the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers to further shed light on the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells. We find that the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells from layers II-VI of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex suggest common design principles, despite the particular morphological and functional features that are characteristic of pyramidal cells in each cortical layer. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2567-2576, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Branching angles of pyramidal cell dendrites follow common geometrical design principles in different cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; López-Cruz, Pedro; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-08-01

    Unraveling pyramidal cell structure is crucial to understanding cortical circuit computations. Although it is well known that pyramidal cell branching structure differs in the various cortical areas, the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells are not fully understood. Here we analyzed and modeled with a von Mises distribution the branching angles in 3D reconstructed basal dendritic arbors of hundreds of intracellularly injected cortical pyramidal cells in seven different cortical regions of the frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex of the mouse. We found that, despite the differences in the structure of the pyramidal cells in these distinct functional and cytoarchitectonic cortical areas, there are common design principles that govern the geometry of dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells in all cortical areas.

  12. GaAs micro-pyramids serving as optical micro-cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.; Beck, T.; Li, S.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M.

    2010-01-04

    An efficient light-matter coupling requires high-quality (Q) micro-cavities with small mode volume. We suggest GaAs micro-pyramids placed on top of AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors to be promising candidates. The pyramids were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy, electron-beam lithography and a subsequent wet-chemical etching process using a sacrificial AlAs layer. Measured Q-factors of optical modes in single pyramids reach values up to 650. A finite-difference time-domain simulation assuming a simplified cone-shaped geometry suggests possible Q-factors up to 3600. To enhance the light confinement in the micro-pyramids we intend to overgrow the pyramidal facets with a Bragg mirror--results of preliminary tests are given.

  13. Branching angles of pyramidal cell dendrites follow common geometrical design principles in different cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; López-Cruz, Pedro; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling pyramidal cell structure is crucial to understanding cortical circuit computations. Although it is well known that pyramidal cell branching structure differs in the various cortical areas, the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells are not fully understood. Here we analyzed and modeled with a von Mises distribution the branching angles in 3D reconstructed basal dendritic arbors of hundreds of intracellularly injected cortical pyramidal cells in seven different cortical regions of the frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex of the mouse. We found that, despite the differences in the structure of the pyramidal cells in these distinct functional and cytoarchitectonic cortical areas, there are common design principles that govern the geometry of dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells in all cortical areas. PMID:25081193

  14. The architectonic encoding of the minor lunar standstills in the horizon of the Giza pyramids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossam, M. K. Aboulfotouh

    The paper is an attempt to show the architectonic method of the ancient Egyptian designers for encoding the horizontal-projections of the moon's declinations during two events of the minor lunar standstills, in the design of the site-plan of the horizon of the Giza pyramids, using the methods of descriptive geometry. It shows that the distance of the eastern side of the second Giza pyramid from the north-south axis of the great pyramid encodes a projection of a lunar declination, when earth's obliquity-angle was ~24.10°. Besides, it shows that the angle of inclination of the causeway of the second Giza pyramid, of ~13.54° south of the cardinal east, encodes the projection of another lunar declination when earth's obliquity-angle reaches ~22.986°. In addition, it shows the encoded coordinate system in the site-plan of the horizon of the Giza pyramids.

  15. The medullary pyramid index: an objective assessment of prominence in renal transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Fried, A M; Woodring, J H; Loh, F K; Lucas, B A; Kryscio, R J

    1983-12-01

    Prominence of the medullary pyramids at sonography has been considered a sign of renal transplant rejection. A search of the literature reveals no previously published objective assessment of this phenomenon. Medullary pyramids of 67 normal kidneys, 53 nonrejecting transplanted kidneys, and 71 transplanted kidneys in rejection were measured. The area of the pyramid was related to the thickness of the overlying renal cortex by a "medullary pyramid index" (MPI): MPI (formula; see text) The median MPI was 4.17 for normal kidneys, 6.0 for nonrejecting transplanted kidneys, and 7.50 for transplanted kidneys in rejection. The results are significantly different (P = 0.0001) for all possible pairs. Overlap between rejection and nonrejection distributions is, however, considerable, rendering the discriminatory value of an individual observation quite low (0.69). Prominence of the medullary pyramids is therefore of very limited predictive value in the determination of transplant rejection in an individual patient.

  16. Hypoechoic renal pyramids: sonographic visualization in older children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Einstein, D M; Singer, A A; Paushter, D M; Nasif, A; Nally, J V

    1992-01-01

    The frequency and degree of visualization of medullary pyramids in a normal population, aged 10-29 years, was analyzed. Hypoechoic pyramids were visualized in 42% of right kidneys in subjects aged 10-18 years and in 27% of subjects aged 19-29 years. Prominently hypoechoic pyramids, mimicking the appearance of neonatal kidneys, were seen in an additional 34% of subjects aged 10-18 years and in 16% aged 19-29 years. Prominent pyramids were present in 50% of subjects with renal cortical echogenicity (RCE) equal to liver, but also in 21% of subjects with RCE less than liver. Our study expands the age at which prominently hypoechoic medullary pyramids can be considered a normal finding. This may relate to recent improvements in ultrasound technology.

  17. Variation around a pyramid theme: optical recombination and optimal use of photons.

    PubMed

    Fauvarque, Olivier; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry; Sauvage, Jean-Francois

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new type of wave-front sensor (WFS) derived from the pyramid WFS (PWFS). This new WFS, called the flattened pyramid-WFS (FPWFS), has a reduced pyramid angle in order to optically overlap the four pupil images into an unique intensity. This map is then used to derive the phase information. In this Letter, this new WFS is compared to three existing WFSs, namely the PWFS, the modulated PWFS (MPWFS), and the Zernike WFS (ZWFS) following tests about sensitivity, linearity range, and low-photon-flux behavior. The FPWFS turns out to be more linear than a modulated pyramid for the high-spatial order aberrations, but it provides an improved sensitivity compared to the non-modulated pyramid. The noise propagation may even be as low as the ZWFS for some given radial orders. Furthermore, the pixel arrangement being more efficient than for the PWFS, the FPWFS seems particularly well suited for high-contrast applications.

  18. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  19. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2016-07-12

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  20. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  1. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  2. Intrinsic Oscillations of Neocortex Generated by Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Laurie R.; Amitai, Yael; Connors, Barry W.

    1991-01-01

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  3. Video coding scheme using DCT-pyramid vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Dalessandro, P; Lancini, R

    1995-01-01

    A new and effective video coding scheme for contribution quality is proposed. The CMTT/2, a joint committee of CCIR and CCITT, has proposed a video coding scheme (already approved at European level by ETS) working at 34-45 Mbit/s. Basically this proposal includes a DCT transform for spatial correlation removal and motion compensation for temporal correlation removal. The individual transform coefficients are then scalar quantized with a non uniform bit assignment. Starting from the CMTT/2 proposal, the study presents a new video coding scheme designed using a vector quantizer solution instead of the scalar one. Specifically, the pyramid vector quantization (PVQ) has been chosen as the vector quantization method as it is able to reduce the DCT coefficients Laplacian distribution. Simulation results show that the proposed video coding scheme gives the same contribution quality at 22 Mbit/s as the one obtained with the CMTT/2 proposal at 45 Mbit/s.

  4. Interrupted self-organization of SiGe pyramids.

    PubMed

    Aqua, Jean-Noël; Gouyé, Adrien; Ronda, Antoine; Frisch, Thomas; Berbezier, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the morphological evolution of SiGe quantum dots deposited on Si(100) during long-time annealing. At low strain, the dots' self-organization begins by an instability and interrupts when (105) pyramids form. This evolution and the resulting island density are quantified by molecular-beam epitaxy. A kinetic model accounting for elasticity, wetting, and anisotropy is shown to reproduce well the experimental findings with appropriate wetting parameters. In this nucleationless regime, a mean-field kinetic analysis explains the existence of nearly stationary states by the vanishing of the coarsening driving force. The island size distribution follows in both experiments and theory the scaling law associated with a single characteristic length scale.

  5. Electroosmotic flow rectification in pyramidal-pore mica membranes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pu; Mukaibo, Hitomi; Horne, Lloyd P; Bishop, Gregory W; Martin, Charles R

    2010-02-24

    We demonstrate here a new electrokinetic phenomenon, Electroosmotic flow (EOF) rectification, in synthetic membranes containing asymmetric pores. Mica membranes with pyramidally shaped pores prepared by the track-etch method were used. EOF was driven through these membranes by using an electrode in solutions on either side to pass a constant ionic current through the pores. The velocity of EOF depends on the polarity of the current. A high EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is such that EOF is driven from the larger base opening to the smaller tip opening of the pore. A smaller EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is reversed such that EOF goes from tip to base. We show that this rectified EOF phenomenon is the result of ion current-rectification observed in such asymmetric-pore membranes.

  6. Acetylcholine Mediates a Slow Synaptic Potential in Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, A. E.; Nicoll, R. A.

    1983-09-01

    The hippocampal slice preparation was used to study the role of acetylcholine as a synaptic transmitter. Bath-applied acetylcholine had three actions on pyramidal cells: (i) depolarization associated with increased input resistance, (ii) blockade of calcium-activated potassium responses, and (iii) blockade of accommodation of cell discharge. All these actions were reversed by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Stimulation of sites in the slice known to contain cholinergic fibers mimicked all the actions. Furthermore, these evoked synaptic responses were enhanced by the cholinesterase inhibitor eserine and were blocked by atropine. These findings provide electrophysiological support for the role of acetylcholine as a synaptic transmitter in the brain and demonstrate that nonclassical synaptic responses involving the blockade of membrane conductances exist in the brain.

  7. Electroosmotic Flow Rectification in Pyramidal-Pore Mica Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, P.; Mukaibo, H.; Horne, L.; Bishop, G.; Martin, C. R.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate here a new electrokinetic phenomenon, Electroosmotic flow (EOF) rectification, in synthetic membranes containing asymmetric pores. Mica membranes with pyramidally shaped pores prepared by the track-etch method were used. EOF was driven through these membranes by using an electrode in solutions on either side to pass a constant ionic current through the pores. The velocity of EOF depends on the polarity of the current. A high EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is such that EOF is driven from the larger base opening to the smaller tip opening of the pore. A smaller EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is reversed such that EOF goes from tip to base. We show that this rectified EOF phenomenon is the result of ion current-rectification observed in such asymmetric-pore membranes.

  8. Mediterranean diet pyramid: a proposal for Italian people.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2014-10-16

    Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI) and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top.

  9. Tilt correction method of text image based on wavelet pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mingyang; Zhu, Qiguo

    2017-04-01

    Text images captured by camera may be tilted and distorted, which is unfavorable for document character recognition. Therefore,a method of text image tilt correction based on wavelet pyramid is proposed in this paper. The first step is to convert the text image captured by cameras to binary images. After binarization, the images are layered by wavelet transform to achieve noise reduction, enhancement and compression of image. Afterwards,the image would bedetected for edge by Canny operator, and extracted for straight lines by Radon transform. In the final step, this method calculates the intersection of straight lines and gets the corrected text images according to the intersection points and perspective transformation. The experimental result shows this method can correct text images accurately.

  10. Mediterranean Diet Pyramid: A Proposal for Italian People

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI) and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top. PMID:25325250

  11. Development of the stapedius muscle and pyramidal eminence in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to systematize the key developmental phases of the stapedius muscle and the pyramidal eminence to clarify their formation, as well as to understand the variations and anomalies that can affect these structures. Sixty human embryos and fetuses between 38 days and 17 weeks of development were studied. The stapedius muscle is formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale, and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch medial to the facial nerve and near the interhyale but forming a completely independent anlage. In the interhyale, two segments were differentiated, these forming an angle; at the vertex, the belly of the stapedius muscle is attached. The internal segment is located from the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle to the anlage of the stapes, forming the anlage of the tendon of the stapedius muscle. The external segment completely disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The pyramidal eminence is formed by an anlage independent of Reichert’s cartilage, from the mesenchymal tissue of the tympanic cavity, which condenses around the belly of the stapedius muscle from 12 weeks of post-conception development. The length of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in adults varies, depending on the attachment site of the belly of the stapedius muscle in the interhyale, which would determine the length of the internal segment (anlage of the tendon) and consequently the tendon length. This variation depends on the greater or lesser persistence of the angulation observed during development, between the tendon and the belly of the stapedius muscle. PMID:19531086

  12. Development of the stapedius muscle and pyramidal eminence in humans.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to systematize the key developmental phases of the stapedius muscle and the pyramidal eminence to clarify their formation, as well as to understand the variations and anomalies that can affect these structures. Sixty human embryos and fetuses between 38 days and 17 weeks of development were studied. The stapedius muscle is formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale, and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch medial to the facial nerve and near the interhyale but forming a completely independent anlage. In the interhyale, two segments were differentiated, these forming an angle; at the vertex, the belly of the stapedius muscle is attached. The internal segment is located from the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle to the anlage of the stapes, forming the anlage of the tendon of the stapedius muscle. The external segment completely disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The pyramidal eminence is formed by an anlage independent of Reichert's cartilage, from the mesenchymal tissue of the tympanic cavity, which condenses around the belly of the stapedius muscle from 12 weeks of post-conception development. The length of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in adults varies, depending on the attachment site of the belly of the stapedius muscle in the interhyale, which would determine the length of the internal segment (anlage of the tendon) and consequently the tendon length. This variation depends on the greater or lesser persistence of the angulation observed during development, between the tendon and the belly of the stapedius muscle.

  13. Active appearance pyramids for object parametrisation and fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhalerao, Abhir; Dickenson, Edward; Hutchinson, Charles

    2016-08-01

    Object class representation is one of the key problems in various medical image analysis tasks. We propose a part-based parametric appearance model we refer to as an Active Appearance Pyramid (AAP). The parts are delineated by multi-scale Local Feature Pyramids (LFPs) for superior spatial specificity and distinctiveness. An AAP models the variability within a population with local translations of multi-scale parts and linear appearance variations of the assembly of the parts. It can fit and represent new instances by adjusting the shape and appearance parameters. The fitting process uses a two-step iterative strategy: local landmark searching followed by shape regularisation. We present a simultaneous local feature searching and appearance fitting algorithm based on the weighted Lucas and Kanade method. A shape regulariser is derived to calculate the maximum likelihood shape with respect to the prior and multiple landmark candidates from multi-scale LFPs, with a compact closed-form solution. We apply the 2D AAP on the modelling of variability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and validate its performance on 200 studies consisting of routine axial and sagittal MRI scans. Intervertebral sagittal and parasagittal cross-sections are typically used for the diagnosis of LSS, we therefore build three AAPs on L3/4, L4/5 and L5/S1 axial cross-sections and three on parasagittal slices. Experiments show significant improvement in convergence range, robustness to local minima and segmentation precision compared with Constrained Local Models (CLMs), Active Shape Models (ASMs) and Active Appearance Models (AAMs), as well as superior performance in appearance reconstruction compared with AAMs. We also validate the performance on 3D CT volumes of hip joints from 38 studies. Compared to AAMs, AAPs achieve a higher segmentation and reconstruction precision. Moreover, AAPs have a significant improvement in efficiency, consuming about half the memory and less than 10% of

  14. Spatial Pyramid Pooling in Deep Convolutional Networks for Visual Recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Kaiming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Ren, Shaoqing; Sun, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Existing deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) require a fixed-size (e.g., 224 × 224) input image. This requirement is "artificial" and may reduce the recognition accuracy for the images or sub-images of an arbitrary size/scale. In this work, we equip the networks with another pooling strategy, "spatial pyramid pooling", to eliminate the above requirement. The new network structure, called SPP-net, can generate a fixed-length representation regardless of image size/scale. Pyramid pooling is also robust to object deformations. With these advantages, SPP-net should in general improve all CNN-based image classification methods. On the ImageNet 2012 dataset, we demonstrate that SPP-net boosts the accuracy of a variety of CNN architectures despite their different designs. On the Pascal VOC 2007 and Caltech101 datasets, SPP-net achieves state-of-the-art classification results using a single full-image representation and no fine-tuning. The power of SPP-net is also significant in object detection. Using SPP-net, we compute the feature maps from the entire image only once, and then pool features in arbitrary regions (sub-images) to generate fixed-length representations for training the detectors. This method avoids repeatedly computing the convolutional features. In processing test images, our method is 24-102 × faster than the R-CNN method, while achieving better or comparable accuracy on Pascal VOC 2007. In ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) 2014, our methods rank #2 in object detection and #3 in image classification among all 38 teams. This manuscript also introduces the improvement made for this competition.

  15. Deformable appearance pyramids for anatomy representation, landmark detection and pathology classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhalerao, Abhir; Hutchinson, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Representation of anatomy appearance is one of the key problems in medical image analysis. An appearance model represents the anatomies with parametric forms, which are then vectorised for prior learning, segmentation and classification tasks. We propose a part-based parametric appearance model we refer to as a deformable appearance pyramid (DAP). The parts are delineated by multi-scale local feature pyramids extracted from an image pyramid. Each anatomy is represented by an appearance pyramid, with the variability within a population approximated by local translations of the multi-scale parts and linear appearance variations in the assembly of the parts. We introduce DAPs built on two types of image pyramids, namely Gaussian and wavelet pyramids, and present two approaches to model the prior and fit the model, one explicitly using a subspace Lucas-Kanade algorithm and the other implicitly using the supervised descent method (SDM). We validate the performance of the DAP instances with difference configurations on the problem of lumbar spinal stenosis for localising the landmarks and classifying the pathologies. We also compare them with classic methods such as active shape models, active appearance models and constrained local models. Experimental results show that the DAP built on wavelet pyramids and fitted with SDM gives the best results in both landmark localisation and classification. A new appearance model is introduced with several configurations presented and evaluated. The DAPs can be readily applied for other clinical problems for the tasks of prior learning, landmark detection and pathology classification.

  16. A fresh look at Miller's pyramid: assessment at the 'Is' and 'Do' levels.

    PubMed

    Al-Eraky, Mohamed; Marei, Hesham

    2016-12-01

    In its silver jubilee, we celebrate the ground-breaking pyramid of George Miller by submitting a fresh look at it. We discuss two questions. (i) Does the classical pyramidal structure perfectly portray the relationships of the four levels that were described by Miller? (ii) Can the model of Miller fulfill the unmet needs of assessors to measure evolving essential constructs and accommodate the increasingly sophisticated practice of assessment of health professionals? In response to the first question, Miller's pyramid is revisited in view of two assumptions for pyramidal structures, namely: hierarchy and tapering. Then we suggest different configurations for the same classical four levels and indicate when to use each one. With regard to the second question, we provide a rationale for amending the pyramid with two further dimensions to assess personal qualities of students at the 'Is' level and their performance in teams at the 'Do' (together) level. At the end of the article, we yearn to think outside the pyramid and suggest the Assessment Orbits framework to assess students as individuals and in teams. The five Assessment Orbits alert educators to assess the emerging cognitive and non-cognitive constructs, without implying features such as hierarchy or tapering that are ingrained in pyramidal structures. The 'Is' orbit attends to the personal qualities of graduates 'who' we may (or may not) trust to be our physicians. Assessment of teams at the 'Do' level (together) offers a paradigm shift in assessment from competitive ranking (storming) among students toward norming and performing as teams.

  17. Defects in p-GaN and their atomic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Tomaszewicz, T.; Zakharov, D.; Jasinski, J.; and O'Keefe, M.

    2004-10-08

    In this paper defects formed in p-doped GaN:Mg grown with Ga polarity will be discussed. The atomic structure of these characteristic defects (Mg-rich hexagonal pyramids and truncated pyramids) in bulk and thin GaN:Mg films grown with Ga polarity was determined at atomic resolution by direct reconstruction of the scattered electron wave in a transmission electron microscope. Small cavities were present inside the defects. The inside walls of the cavities were covered by GaN which grew with reverse polarity compared to the matrix. It was proposed that lateral overgrowth of the cavities restores matrix polarity on the defect base. Exchange of Ga and N sublattices within the defect compared to the matrix lead to a 0.6 {+-} 0.2 {angstrom} displacement between the Ga sublattices of these two areas. A [1{und 1}00]/3 shift with change from AB stacking in the matrix to BC within the entire pyramid is observed

  18. The 2005 USDA Food Guide Pyramid is associated with more adequate nutrient intakes within energy constraints than the 1992 Pyramid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wilde, Parke E; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Tucker, Katherine L

    2006-05-01

    The USDA issued the Food Guide Pyramid (FGP) to help Americans choose healthy diets. We examined whether adherence to the 1992 and 2005 FGP was associated with moderate energy and adequate nutrient intakes. We used data for 2138 men and 2213 women > 18 y old, from the 2001-2002 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Quadratic programming was used to generate diets with minimal departure from intakes reported for the NHANES 2001-02. We examined the effect of the number of servings/d of Food Pyramid groups set at 1992 and at 2005 FGP recommendations for 1600, 2200, and 2800 kcal (1 kcal = 4.184 kJ) levels. We calculated energy and nutrients provided by different FGP dietary patterns. Within current U.S. dietary practices, following the 1992 FGP without sodium restriction may provide 200 more kcal than recommended for each energy level. Although it can meet most of old nutrient recommendations (1989), it fails to meet the latest dietary reference intakes, especially for the 1600 kcal level. The 2005 FGP appears to provide less energy and more adequate nutrient intakes, with the exception of vitamin E and potassium for some groups. However, without discretionary energy restriction, Americans are at risk of having excessive energy intake even if they follow the 2005 FGP food serving recommendations. Our analysis suggests that following the 2005 FGP may be associated with lower energy and optimal nutrient intake. Careful restriction of discretionary calories appears necessary for appropriate energy intakes to be maintained.

  19. The force pyramid: a spatial analysis of force application during virtual reality brain tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Siar, Samaneh; Sawaya, Robin; Zhrani, Gmaan Al; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Alotaibi, Fahad Eid; Bugdadi, Abdulgadir; Bajunaid, Khalid; Marwa, Ibrahim; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman Jafar; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2016-09-30

    OBJECTIVE Virtual reality simulators allow development of novel methods to analyze neurosurgical performance. The concept of a force pyramid is introduced as a Tier 3 metric with the ability to provide visual and spatial analysis of 3D force application by any instrument used during simulated tumor resection. This study was designed to answer 3 questions: 1) Do study groups have distinct force pyramids? 2) Do handedness and ergonomics influence force pyramid structure? 3) Are force pyramids dependent on the visual and haptic characteristics of simulated tumors? METHODS Using a virtual reality simulator, NeuroVR (formerly NeuroTouch), ultrasonic aspirator force application was continually assessed during resection of simulated brain tumors by neurosurgeons, residents, and medical students. The participants performed simulated resections of 18 simulated brain tumors with different visual and haptic characteristics. The raw data, namely, coordinates of the instrument tip as well as contact force values, were collected by the simulator. To provide a visual and qualitative spatial analysis of forces, the authors created a graph, called a force pyramid, representing force sum along the z-coordinate for different xy coordinates of the tool tip. RESULTS Sixteen neurosurgeons, 15 residents, and 84 medical students participated in the study. Neurosurgeon, resident and medical student groups displayed easily distinguishable 3D "force pyramid fingerprints." Neurosurgeons had the lowest force pyramids, indicating application of the lowest forces, followed by resident and medical student groups. Handedness, ergonomics, and visual and haptic tumor characteristics resulted in distinct well-defined 3D force pyramid patterns. CONCLUSIONS Force pyramid fingerprints provide 3D spatial assessment displays of instrument force application during simulated tumor resection. Neurosurgeon force utilization and ergonomic data form a basis for understanding and modulating resident force

  20. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Cirrhosis Based on Preprocessing Using Pyramid Recurrent Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianming; Liu, Jiang; Zhao, Xueqin; Yahagi, Takashi

    In this paper, a pyramid recurrent neural network is applied to characterize the hepatic parenchymal diseases in ultrasonic B-scan texture. The cirrhotic parenchymal diseases are classified into 4 types according to the size of hypoechoic nodular lesions. The B-mode patterns are wavelet transformed , and then the compressed data are feed into a pyramid neural network to diagnose the type of cirrhotic diseases. Compared with the 3-layer neural networks, the performance of the proposed pyramid recurrent neural network is improved by utilizing the lower layer effectively. The simulation result shows that the proposed system is suitable for diagnosis of cirrhosis diseases.

  1. A pyramid-based approach to segmentation applied to region matching.

    PubMed

    Grosky, W I; Jain, R

    1986-05-01

    In this paper, we attempt to place segmentation schemes utilizing the pyramid architecture on a firm footing. We show that there are some images which cannot be segmented in principle. An efficient segmentation scheme is also developed using pyramid relinking. This scheme will normally have a time complexity which is a sublinear function of the image diameter, which compares favorably to other schemes. The efficacy of our approach to segmentation using pyramid schemes is demonstrated in the context of region matching. The global features we use are compared to those used in previous approaches and this comparison will indicate that our approach is more robust than the standard moment-based techniques.

  2. Introduction of a pyramid guiding process for general musculoskeletal physical rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Timothy W

    2006-01-01

    Successful instruction of a complicated subject as Physical Rehabilitation demands organization. To understand principles and processes of such a field demands a hierarchy of steps to achieve the intended outcome. This paper is intended to be an introduction to a proposed pyramid scheme of general physical rehabilitation principles. The purpose of the pyramid scheme is to allow for a greater understanding for the student and patient. As the respected Food Guide Pyramid accomplishes, the student will further appreciate and apply supported physical rehabilitation principles and the patient will understand that there is a progressive method to their functional healing process. PMID:16759396

  3. Introduction of a pyramid guiding process for general musculoskeletal physical rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Timothy W

    2006-06-08

    Successful instruction of a complicated subject as Physical Rehabilitation demands organization. To understand principles and processes of such a field demands a hierarchy of steps to achieve the intended outcome. This paper is intended to be an introduction to a proposed pyramid scheme of general physical rehabilitation principles. The purpose of the pyramid scheme is to allow for a greater understanding for the student and patient. As the respected Food Guide Pyramid accomplishes, the student will further appreciate and apply supported physical rehabilitation principles and the patient will understand that there is a progressive method to their functional healing process.

  4. Fabrication of Orientation-Tunable Si Nanowires on Silicon Pyramids with Omnidirectional Light Absorption.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhibin; Hu, Haibo; Li, Shuxin; Ye, Changhui

    2017-04-07

    In this work, the different orientation of SiNWs on Si pyramids by a two step MACE method have been fabricated. By tuning the structure of Ag catalyst film and controlling the concentration of H2O2 or the etching temperature, the tunability of the orientation of SiNWs from <111> to <100> on Si pyramids was realized. Si structures composed of Si pyramids and SiNWs exhibit better omnidirectional light-trapping ability by multiple reflections. Si structures with structural tunability and enhanced light harvesting performance will find a wide variety of significant applications in solar cells, photodetectors, and optoelectronic devices.

  5. Forelimb movements in cats with complete or partial bulbar pyramid lesions.

    PubMed

    Dalmeida, R E; Yu, J

    1981-01-01

    Adult cats were trained to use a forelimb to open a hinged door against resistance for a food reward. Normal cats performed the task with only toe or wrist motions. Cats with unilateral complete bulbar pyramid section showed persistent deficits in distal limb movements with toe fanning, wrist stiffness and pulling from elbow and shoulder. Partial medial or lateral pyramid lesions produced similar but less severe effects. These results suggest a significant role of the corticospinal system in distal limb movements and a lack of topographical localization of pyramid fibers related to these movements in cats.

  6. Modulation of hard x-ray beam profiles by Borrmann pyramid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Britten, J.

    2008-01-15

    Spatial modulation of hard x-ray beam profiles is reported, using the 'Borrmann pyramid' formed in dual Bragg diffraction of a single crystal, where a small angular change of the incident beam is magnified to span the entire pyramid base. As an attempt, it is demonstrated using hard x rays by (1) the linear shift of a micrometer sized mask; (2) the partial blockade of a two micron beam; and (3) the millimeter shadow of a nanoscale gold strip, which shows the potential application of Borrmann pyramids in the form of an enlarged x-ray image.

  7. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  8. Atomic rivals

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  9. Atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S.

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  10. Atomic Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Claudio

    2000-10-01

    Atomic and molecular data are required in a variety of fields ranging from the traditional astronomy, atmospherics and fusion research to fast growing technologies such as lasers, lighting, low-temperature plasmas, plasma assisted etching and radiotherapy. In this context, there are some research groups, both theoretical and experimental, scattered round the world that attend to most of this data demand, but the implementation of atomic databases has grown independently out of sheer necessity. In some cases the latter has been associated with the data production process or with data centers involved in data collection and evaluation; but sometimes it has been the result of individual initiatives that have been quite successful. In any case, the development and maintenance of atomic databases call for a number of skills and an entrepreneurial spirit that are not usually associated with most physics researchers. In the present report we present some of the highlights in this area in the past five years and discuss what we think are some of the main issues that have to be addressed.

  11. High power laser source for atom cooling based on reliable telecoms technology with all fibre frequency stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, Thomas; Farries, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cold atom interferometers are emerging as important tools for metrology. Designed into gravimeters they can measure extremely small changes in the local gravitational field strength and be used for underground surveying to detect buried utilities, mineshafts and sinkholes prior to civil works. To create a cold atom interferometer narrow linewidth, frequency stabilised lasers are required to cool the atoms and to setup and measure the atom interferometer. These lasers are commonly either GaAs diodes, Ti Sapphire lasers or frequency doubled InGaAsP diodes and fibre lasers. The InGaAsP DFB lasers are attractive because they are very reliable, mass-produced, frequency controlled by injection current and simply amplified to high powers with fibre amplifiers. In this paper a laser system suitable for Rb atom cooling, based on a 1560nm DFB laser and erbium doped fibre amplifier, is described. The laser output is frequency doubled with fibre coupled periodically poled LiNbO3 to a wavelength of 780nm. The output power exceeds 1 W at 780nm. The laser is stabilised at 1560nm against a fibre Bragg resonator that is passively temperature compensated. Frequency tuning over a range of 1 GHz is achieved by locking the laser to sidebands of the resonator that are generated by a phase modulator. This laser design is attractive for field deployable rugged systems because it uses all fibre coupled components with long term proven reliability.

  12. Phase ambiguity solution with the Pyramid Phasing Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, E.; Esposito, S.; Puglisi, A.; Pieralli, F.; Myers, R. M.; Busoni, L.; Tozzi, A.; Stefanini, P.

    2006-06-01

    In the technological development for the ELTs, one of the key activities is the phasing and alignment of the primary mirror segments. To achieve the phasing accuracy of a small fraction of the wavelength, an optical sensor is required. In 2005 has been demonstrated that the Pyramid Wavefront Sensor can be employed in closed loop to correct simultaneously piston, tip and tilt errors of segmented mirror. The Pyramid Phasing Sensor (PYPS) is based on the sensing of phase step on the segment edges; this kind of phasing sensors have the common limitation of the signal ambiguity induced by the phase periodicity of πδ/λ on the mirror surface step δ, when the wavelength λ is used for the sensing. In this paper we briefly describe three different techniques that allow to solve the phase ambiguity with PYPS. As first we present experimental results on the two wavelengths closed loop procedure proposed by Esposito in 2001; in the laboratory test the multi-wavelength procedure allowed to exceed the sensor capture range of +/-λ/2 and simultaneously retrieve the differential piston of the 32 mirror segments starting from random positions in a 3.2 λ wavefront range, the maximum allowed by the mirror stroke. Then we propose two new techniques based respectively on the segment and wavelength sweep. The Segment Sweep Technique (SST) has been successfully applied during the experimental tests of PYPS at the William Herschel Telescope, when 13 segments of the NAOMI DM has been phased starting from a random position in a 15λ range. The Wavelength Sweep Technique (WST) has been subject of preliminary tests in the Arcetri laboratories in order to prove the concept. Each technique has different capture range, accuracy and operation time, so that each can solve different tasks required to an optical phasing sensor in the ELT application. More in detail the WST and SST could be used combined for the first mirror phasing when the calibration required for the closed loop operations

  13. Breast cancer screening and the changing population pyramid of Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ken; Ohashi, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Satoki; Nogi, Hiroko; Kato, Kumiko; Toriumi, Yasuo; Yamashita, Akinori; Kamio, Makiko; Mimoto, Rei; Takeyama, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer has been the most prevalent cancer in Japan since the 1990s. The mortality from breast cancer is increasing in Japan, whereas in other industrialized countries it has been decreasing since 1990. On the other hand, Japan faces unparalleled growth in its aging population. The aim of this study was to report the mammography screening among Japanese women and the related upcoming changes in the population pyramid of Japan. The reference data for our study were obtained from the Center for Cancer Control and Information Services, Japan Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, the Japanese Cancer Society, and the National Institute of Population and Social Security. The survey data were obtained from breast cancer and mammography screenings in the Tokyo Prefecture in 2008. The following parameters were analyzed: annual breast cancer incidence, current screening rates, average life-span, and predicted demographic statistics. Our results showed that breast cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing annually in Japan. The average age of breast cancer patients increased to 58.40 years in 2010. The incidence of breast cancer in women aged 65 years and older increased from 25.3 to 32.9 % in the last 10 years and is expected to continue to increase in the future. The check-up rate was 16.0-20.0 % for women aged 65-74 years and 43.0-46.0 % for women aged 40-54 years. According to our questionnaire survey, concerns about breast cancer and mammography screening were high in the young and low in the elderly women. The Japanese population aged 65 years and older was 30,740 (24.1 %) in 2012 and is estimated to increase by 40 % over the next 20 years despite Japan's declining population size. Breast cancer incidence has increased in Japan, even among patients aged 65 years and older. Breast cancer has become increasingly prevalent in older Japanese women. As the population pyramid of Japan changes, women aged 65

  14. Rapid extraction of the phase shift of the cold-atom interferometer via phase demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Lin, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Generally, the phase of the cold-atom interferometer is extracted from the atomic interference fringe, which can be obtained by scanning the chirp rate of the Raman lasers at a given interrogation time T. If mapping the phase shift for each T with a series of measurements, the extraction time is limited by the protocol of each T measurement, and therefore increases dramatically when doing fine mapping with a small step of T. Here we present a new method for rapid extraction of the phase shift via phase demodulation. By using this method, the systematic shifts can be mapped though the whole interference area. This method enables quick diagnostics of the potential cause of the phase shift in specific time. We demonstrate experimentally that this method is effective for the evaluation of the systematic errors of the cold atomic gravimeter. The systematic phase error induced by the quadratic Zeeman effect in the free-falling region is extracted by this method. The measured results correspond well with the theoretic prediction and also agree with the results obtained by the fringe fitting method for each T. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174249 and 61475139), the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011AA060504), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB329501), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2015FZA3002).

  15. Check of Main Fracture Characteristics of the Wenchuan 8.0Ms Earthquake with EFO Modes Recorded by Three Superconducting Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xiange; Sun, Heping; Xu, Houze; Shi, Yaolin

    2010-05-01

    There was a large earthquake 8.0 Ms suddenly happened in the Wenchuan area of the Sichuan Province in China on May 12, 2008, which was one of the largest nature hazards in China in recent thirty years and resulted in the death of about seventy thousands of people. The effective rescue work needed to know the real position of the heavy disaster areas. As the geological structure is very complex in the area of the earthquake faults and the effect of possible multi-resolution problem, it was difficult to quickly determine the main fracture zones of the large earthquake with the seismic data of high-frequency P and S waves. Considering that the earthquake sources excited the Earth's free oscillations (EFO), we attempted to investigated the main fracture characteristics of the Wenchuan earthquake with the EFO modes recorded by the GGP superconducting gravimeters(SG). There was a distance of about 1242 km between the start epicenter of Wenchuan earthquake (30.94°N, 103.47°E)and the Wuhan SG station, which did not arrive at the near-earthquake condition for the P and S wave observation but satisfied the condition for the check of EFO modes. After the correction of gravity tides and atmospheric pressure, we gained the EFO data coming from the Wuhan SG station. The spectral peaks of EFO modes were obtained by applying the FFT technique to the EFO data. The spectral signals were very strong for the mid-class normal modes from 0S20 to 0S30 and we accurately investigated the frequencies and qualities of the mid-class modes, which were basically according to the predictions provided by PREM model. The epicenter of Wenchuan earthquake was an exciting pole for the Earth's free oscillations. If a station was located in the wave ridge of an EFO mode namely the epicentral distance of N+1/4 or N+3/4 multiple of wave length , the EFO mode would have the higher peak than other modes nearby. It was noticed that both 0S22 and 0S28 modes had this kind of phenomena at Wuhan station

  16. Student-Centered Science Enrichment: A Pyramid Scheme That Really Pays Off.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menelly, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a middle school science enrichment program which focused on encouraging highly motivated students to take leadership roles in selecting and developing science experiments and activities based on a pyramid approach building on regular classroom lessons. (DB)

  17. Pyramid shape of polymer solar cells: a simple solution to triple efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuxin; Hou, Lintao; Ma, Kaijie; Wang, Biao; Xiong, Kang; Liu, Pengyi; Liao, Jihai; Wen, Shangsheng; Wang, Ergang

    2013-07-01

    Pyramid-shaped polymer solar cells fabricated on flexible substrates were investigated. Effective light trapping can be realized due to light reflection in all 360° directions, and 100% space utilization is achieved when assembled into arrays. The power conversion efficiency is enhanced by 200% ([60]PCBM as the acceptor) and 260% ([70]PCBM as the acceptor) with a dihedral angle of 30° between the opposite sides of the pyramid compared with a planar device, and a high Voc of 3.5 V in series connection is obtained. Considering the material utilization, an angle of 90° for pyramid-shaped polymer solar cells is proposed. Pyramid-shaped polymer solar cells are particularly suitable for installation on roof of vehicles and houses, which have limited surface area.

  18. Promoting good nutrition: using the food guide pyramid in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Keithley, J K; Keller, A; Vazquez, M G

    1996-12-01

    The Food Guide Pyramid graphically depicts how Americans can eat a balanced, healthy diet. Medical-surgical nurses can use the guideline and individually tailored strategies to get the message out about "eating right for life."

  19. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2013-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic domains. In the proximal domain, action potentials initiated in the axon backpropagate actively with large amplitude and fast time course. In the distal domain, Na+ channel–mediated dendritic spikes are efficiently initiated by waveforms mimicking synaptic events. CA3 pyramidal neuron dendrites showed a high Na+-to-K+ conductance density ratio, providing ideal conditions for active backpropagation and dendritic spike initiation. Dendritic spikes may enhance the computational power of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal network. PMID:22388958

  20. Multi-toxin resistance enables pink bollworm survival on pyramided Bt cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins kill key insect pests, providing economic and environmental benefits. However, the evolution of pest resistance threatens the continued success of such Bt crops. To delay or counter resistance, transgenic plant "pyramids" producing tw...