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Sample records for atom ssa dan

  1. SSA Sensor Calibration Best Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    Best practices for calibrating orbit determination sensors in general and space situational awareness (SSA) sensors in particular are presented. These practices were developed over the last ten years within AGI and most recently applied to over 70 sensors in AGI's Commercial Space Operations Center (ComSpOC) and the US Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) Space Surveillance Network (SSN) to evaluate and configure new sensors and perform on-going system calibration. They are generally applicable to any SSA sensor and leverage some unique capabilities of an SSA estimation approach using an optimal sequential filter and smoother. Real world results are presented and analyzed.

  2. NASA SSA for Robotic Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri K.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) activities as preparation for robotic missions and Goddard's role in this work. The presentation includes the preparations that Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has made to provide consolidated space systems protection indluding consolidating GSFC support for Orbit Debris analysis, conjunction assessment and collision avoidance, commercial and foreign support, and protection of GSFC managed missions.

  3. Pompage optique et violation de parité dans l'atome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, M.-A.

    , polarized and unpolarized, produced by mirror symmetries with respect to three orthogonal planes. In this way, it is possible to disentangle the different interference terms and to discriminate the one involving parity violation. In practice, this is done by reversing various parameters of the experiment. The control of the quality of these reversals is obviously the crucial part of the whole experimental procedure. Moreover consistency tests and various cross-checks have to be devised and carefully carried out. They contribute to reliability of the result. In the Cesium experiment, the uncertainty associated with possible systematic effects is estimated to 8 % and the eqm statistical uncertainty, after combination of two independent measurements which satisfactorily crosscheck one another, is 11%. The parity violation can be readily interpreted in terms of the short range electronnucleon interaction associated with the exchange of the neutral vector boson Z0 recently observed with the CERN p-p collider. This new type of interaction, also known under the generic name of « neutral currents » was one of the most important predictions of electroweak theory which unifies, within the frame of gauge field theories, electromagnetic and weak interactions. This experiment, originally designed as a test of electroweak theory, gives information on the structure of neutral currents which complement those obtained by high energy experiments. First, the explored energy range is obviously very different. Secondly, the quarks acting coherently in Atomic Physics experiment but incoherently in accelerator experiments, the basic electroweak parameters extracted from the two kinds of experiments are different. Entre les travaux initiaux de Kastler sur la polarisation de la lumière de fluorescence émise par une vapeur de mercure (1936) et la violation de la parité dans le césium (1982), il existe un lien de parenté dans les méthodes d'investigation et dans la nature des probl

  4. The Case for GEO Hosted SSA Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, C.; Armand, B.; Repp, M.; Robinson, A.

    2014-09-01

    Space situational awareness (SSA) in the geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) belt presents unique challenges, and given the national importance and high value of GEO satellites, is increasingly critical as space becomes more congested and contested. Space situational awareness capabilities can serve as an effective deterrent against potential adversaries if they provide accurate, timely, and persistent information and are resilient to the threat environment. This paper will demonstrate how simple optical SSA payloads hosted on GEO commercial and government satellites can complement the SSA mission and data provided by Space-Based Space Surveillance (SBSS) and the Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program (GSSAP). GSSAP is built by Orbital Sciences Corporation and launched on July 28, 2014. Analysis performed for this paper will show how GEO hosted SSA payloads, working in combination with SBSS and GSSAP, can increase persistence and timely coverage of high value assets in the GEO belt. The potential to further increase GEO object identification and tracking accuracy by integrating SSA data from multiple sources across different viewing angles including GEO hosted SSA sources will be addressed. Hosting SSA payloads on GEO platforms also increases SSA mission architecture resiliency as the sensors are by distributed across multiple platforms including commercial platforms. This distributed architecture presents a challenging target for an adversary to attempt to degrade or disable. We will present a viable concept of operations to show how data from hosted SSA sensors could be integrated with SBSS and GSSAP data to present a comprehensive and more accurate data set to users. Lastly, we will present an acquisition approach using commercial practices and building on lessons learned from the Commercially Hosted Infra Red Payload CHIRP to demonstrate the affordability of GEO hosted SSA payloads.

  5. BOREAS TGB-9 Above-canopy NMHC at SSA-OBS, SSA-OJP, and SSA-OA Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiser, B. N.; Niki, H.; Young, V. L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-9 team collected data in order to inventory and quantify the anthropogenic and biogenic NMHCs over the BOREAS study areas. This data set contains concentration and mixing ratio values for several NMHCs collected at the BOREAS SSA from 27-May-1994 to 15-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  6. BMDS/SSA Integrated Sensing Demonstration (BISD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, T.; Springford, K.; Grimaldi, L.

    2011-09-01

    This demonstration is intended to provide a near-term prototype, leave-behind capability for integrating Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) ground sensors for use in the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) mission. Closed-loop tasking and cueing capability will be implemented, and a demonstration of net-centric space data dissemination using the BMDS sensors will be undertaken using various SSA mission threads. The demonstration is designed to highlight the implications of modifying software and/or hardware at the BMDS command and control node so that cost, risk, and schedule for an operational implementation can be fully understood. Additionally, this demonstration is intended to assess the impacts to both mission areas as a multi-mission, non-traditional sensor capability is integrated into the SSA mission. A successful demonstration will have many leave-behind capabilities and first-of-its-kind achievements to include: a) an extensible SSA operational prototype configuration for BMDS X-Band radars such as AN/TPY-2 and Sea-Based X-Band (SBX) b) a prototype SSA tasking and cueing capability between the Joint Functional Component Command for Space (JFCC Space) Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) and the Command, Control, Battle Management, and Communications (C2BMC) Experimental Laboratory (X-Lab), extensible to the Combatant Commands (COCOMS), and out to BMDS sensors c) a capability for a twoway, net-centric, interface for JSpOC space operations, to include translation from net-centric communications to legacy systems and d) processing of BMDS X-Band Radar tracks in the Space Defense Operations Center (SPADOC).

  7. 20 CFR 422.710 - Procedures SSA will follow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 422.710 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES Use of SSA Telephone Lines § 422.710 Procedures SSA will follow. SSA component(s) that plan to listen-in to or record... written certification of need to the Commissioner of Social Security or designee at least 30 days before...

  8. 20 CFR 422.710 - Procedures SSA will follow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 422.710 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES Use of SSA Telephone Lines § 422.710 Procedures SSA will follow. SSA component(s) that plan to listen-in to or record... written certification of need to the Commissioner of Social Security or designee at least 30 days before...

  9. Evolution of ESA's SSA Conjunction Prediction Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, D.; Sancho, A. Tirado, J.; Agueda, A.; Martin, L.; Luque, F.; Fletcher, E.; Navarro, V.

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents the recent evolution of ESA's SSA Conjunction Prediction Service (CPS) as a result of an on-going activity in the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Segment of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Programme. The CPS is one of a number of precursor services being developed as part of the SST segment. It has been implemented as a service to provide external users with web-based access to conjunction information and designed with a service-oriented architecture. The paper encompasses the following topics: service functionality enhancements, integration with a live objects catalogue, all vs. all analyses supporting an operational concept based on low and high fidelity screenings, and finally conjunction detection and probability algorithms.

  10. Standardized Photometric Calibrations for Panchromatic SSA Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, P.; Payne, T.; Battle, A.; Cole, Z.; Moody, J.; Gregory, S.; Dao, P.

    2016-09-01

    Panchromatic sensors used for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) have no standardized method for transforming the net flux detected by a CCD without a spectral filter into an exo-atmospheric magnitude in a standard magnitude system. Each SSA data provider appears to have their own method for computing the visual magnitude based on panchromatic brightness making cross-comparisons impossible. We provide a procedure in order to standardize the calibration of panchromatic sensors for the purposes of SSA. A technique based on theoretical modeling is presented that derives standard panchromatic magnitudes from the Johnson-Cousins photometric system defined by Arlo Landolt. We verify this technique using observations of Landolt standard stars and a Vega-like star to determine empirical panchromatic magnitudes and compare these to synthetically derived panchromatic magnitudes. We also investigate color terms caused by differences in the quantum efficiency (QE) between the Landolt standard system and panchromatic systems. We evaluate calibrated panchromatic satellite photometry by observing several GEO satellites and standard stars using three different sensors. We explore the effect of satellite color terms by comparing the satellite signatures. In order to remove other variables affecting the satellite photometry, two of the sensors are at the same site using different CCDs. The third sensor is geographically separate from the first two allowing for a definitive test of calibrated panchromatic satellite photometry.

  11. Open-Filter Optical SSA Analysis Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J.

    2016-09-01

    Optical Space Situational Awareness (SSA) sensors used for space object detection and orbit refinement measurements are typically operated in an "open-filter" mode without any spectral filters to maximize sensitivity and signal-to-noise. These same optical brightness measurements are often also employed for size determination (e.g., for orbital debris), object correlation, and object status change. These functions, especially when performed using multiple sensors, are highly dependent on sensor calibration for measurement accuracy. Open-filter SSA sensors are traditionally calibrated against the cataloged visual magnitudes of solar-type stars which have similar spectral distributions as the illuminating source, the Sun. The stellar calibration is performed to a high level of accuracy, a few hundredths of a magnitude, by observing many stars over a range of elevation angles to determine sensor, telescope, and atmospheric effects. However, space objects have individual color properties which alter the reflected solar illumination producing spectral distributions which differ from those of the calibration stars. When the stellar calibrations are applied to the space object measurements, visual magnitude values are obtained which are systematically biased. These magnitudes combined with the unknown Bond albedos of the space objects result in systematically biased size determinations which will differ between sensors. Measurements of satellites of known sizes and surface materials have been analyzed to characterize these effects. The results have combined into standardized Bond albedos to correct the measured magnitudes into object sizes. However, the actual albedo values will vary between objects and represent a mean correction subject to some uncertainty. The objective of this discussion is to characterize the sensor spectral biases that are present in open-filter optical observations and examine the resulting brightness and albedo uncertainties that should accompany

  12. BOREAS TE-21 SSA Site Characteristics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Robert; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-20 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets for use in developing and testing models of forest ecosystem dynamics. This data set contains measurements of site characteristics conducted in the Southern Study Area (SSA) from 18 Jul 1994 to 30 Jul 1994. The data are stored in CSV files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  13. BOREAS TE-1 SSA Soil Lab Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Nerbas, Tim; Anderson, Darwin

    2000-01-01

    This data set was collected by TE-1 to provide a set of soil properties for BOREAS investigators in the SSA. The soil samples were collected at sets of soil pits in 1993 and 1994. Each set of soil pits was in the vicinity of one of the five flux towers in the BOREAS SSA. The collected soil samples were sent to a lab, where the major soil properties were determined. These properties include, but are not limited to, soil horizon; dry soil color; pH; bulk density; total, organic, and inorganic carbon; electric conductivity; cation exchange capacity; exchangeable sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen; water content at 0.01, 0.033, and 1.5 MPascals; nitrogen; phosphorus; particle size distribution; texture; pH of the mineral soil and of the organic soil; extractable acid; and sulfur. The data are stored in tabular ASCII text files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. BOREAS TE-12 SSA Shoot Geometry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Mesarch, Mark A.; Cheng, L.; Yang, Litao

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-12 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected shoot geometry data in 1993 and 1994 from aspen, jack pine, and black spruce trees. Collections were made at the Southern Study Area Nipawin Fen Site (SSA FEN), Young Jack Pine (YJP), Old Jack Pine (OJP), Old Aspen (OA), Young Aspen (YA), Mixed Site (MIX), and Old Black Spruce (OBS) sites. A caliper was used to measure shoot and needle lengths and widths. A volume displacement procedure was used to measure the weight of the shoot or twig submerged in water. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  15. 76 FR 41685 - Electronic Substitutions for Form SSA-538

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Part 416 [Docket No. SSA-2009-0027] RIN 0960-AH02 Electronic Substitutions for Form SSA-538 AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final rule with request for... children alleging disability or continuing disability under title XVI of the Social Security Act (Act...

  16. Dynamique et interférence de paquets d'ondes dans les atomes et dimères d'alcalins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchene, M. A.

    2002-11-01

    (saturation regime, chirped pulse, ...) that allow us to determine the advantages and limits of this technique. In the case of molecules, the interaction of the two-pulse sequence leads to the interference of vibrational wave packets. We analyse and discuss in this case the effects of a thermal distribution of initial states on the temporal coherent control signal. Ce travail porte sur l'étude expérimentale résolue en temps de la dynamique atomique et moléculaire prenant place sur une échelle de temps femtoseconde. Il présente deux orientations distinctes et complémentaires. La première concerne l'étude de la dynamique de paquets d'ondes dans des atomes et dimères d'alcalins (K, K2) par des méthodes pompe-sonde. Dans le cas du potassium atomique le paquet d'ondes est une superposition des états de structure fine de l'état 4p et représente un paquet de spin électronique. Nous observons la dynamique de ce paquet d'ondes au cours du temps et montrons que celle-ci correspond à une inversion du sens d'orientation du spin. Le formalisme théorique des états brillants et noirs est particulièrement adapté à la description de ce type de dynamique. Nous présentons alors une méthode originale qui, tirant avantage du mouvement d'inversion du spin, permet de produire des électrons polarisés en spin à l'échelle femtoseconde. Dans le cas des molécules, le paquet d'ondes créé est une superposition d'états vibrationnels. Nous présentons les résultats d'une étude systématique de la dynamique de paquet d'ondes vibrationnel dans les états électroniques A^1Σ^+_u et 2^1Pi_g. Le signal pompe-sonde dépend alors de la compétition entre les dynamiques associées aux paquets d'ondes créés dans les deux états électroniques. La deuxième partie traite d'expériences d'interférences de paquets d'ondes dans des systèmes similaires (K, Cs, Cs2). Cette technique, complémentaire de la première, consiste à faire interagir une séquence de deux impulsions

  17. 77 FR 38880 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Railroad Retirement Board (SSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching program that... regarding protections for such persons. The Privacy Act, as amended, regulates the use of computer matching... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2012-0002] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended...

  18. COMPARISON OF LAPAROSCOPIC SKILLS PERFORMANCE USING SINGLE-SITE ACCESS (SSA) DEVICES VS. AN INDEPENDENT-PORT SSA APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Schill, Matthew R.; Varela, J. Esteban; Frisella, Margaret M.; Brunt, L. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background We compared performance of validated laparoscopic tasks on four commercially available single site access (SSA) access devices (AD) versus an independent port (IP) SSA set-up. Methods A prospective, randomized comparison of laparoscopic skills performance on four AD (GelPOINT™, SILS™ Port, SSL Access System™, TriPort™) and one IP SSA set-up was conducted. Eighteen medical students (2nd–4th year), four surgical residents, and five attending surgeons were trained to proficiency in multi-port laparoscopy using four laparoscopic drills (peg transfer, bean drop, pattern cutting, extracorporeal suturing) in a laparoscopic trainer box. Drills were then performed in random order on each IP-SSA and AD-SSA set-up using straight laparoscopic instruments. Repetitions were timed and errors recorded. Data are mean ± SD, and statistical analysis was by two-way ANOVA with Tukey HSD post-hoc tests. Results Attending surgeons had significantly faster total task times than residents or students (p< 0.001), but the difference between residents and students was NS. Pair-wise comparisons revealed significantly faster total task times for the IP-SSA set-up compared to all four AD-SSA’s within the student group only (p<0.05). Total task times for residents and attending surgeons showed a similar profile, but the differences were NS. When data for the three groups was combined, the total task time was less for the IP-SSA set-up than for each of the four AD-SSA set-ups (p < 0.001). Similarly,, the IP-SSA set-up was significantly faster than 3 of 4 AD-SSA set-ups for peg transfer, 3 of 4 for pattern cutting, and 2 of 4 for suturing. No significant differences in error rates between IP-SSA and AD-SSA set-ups were detected. Conclusions When compared to an IP-SSA laparoscopic set-up, single site access devices are associated with longer task performance times in a trainer box model, independent of level of training. Task performance was similar across different SSA

  19. The development of the MELiSSA Pilot Plant Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godia, Francesc; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Dixon, Mike; Peiro, Enrique; Fossen, Arnaud; Lamaze, Brigitte; Brunet, Jean; Demey, Dries; Mas-Albaigès, Joan L.

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a closed artificial ecosystem intended as a tool for the development of a bio-regenerative life support system for longterm manned missions. The MELiSSA loop is formed by five interconnected compartments, organized in three different loops (solid, liquid and gas). This compartments are microbial bioreactors and higher plant chambers. The MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility has been designed to achieve the preliminary terrestrial demonstration of the MELiSSA concept at pilot scale, using animals as a model for the crew compartent. The experience gained in the operation of such a facility will be highly relevant for planning future life support systems in Space. In this communication, the latests developments in the MELiSSA Pilot Plant will be reported. Particularly, the completion of the design phase and instalation of all the different compartments will be discussed in detail. Each of the compartments had to be designed and constructed according to very specific characteristics, associated to the biological systems to be cultured, as part of the complete MELiSSA loop (anerobic, oxygenic, thermophilic, heterotrophic, autotrophic, axenic, photosynthetic, etc.). Additionally, the sizing of each reactor (ranging from 8 to 100 Liters, depending of each particular compartment) should compile with the global integration scenario proposed, and with the final goal of connection of all compartments to provide a demonstration of the MELiSSA concept, and generate data for the design and operation of future biological life support systems.

  20. Enabling GEODSS for Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, S.

    2016-09-01

    The Ground-Based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) System has been in operation since the mid-1980's. While GEODSS has been the Space Surveillance Network's (SSN's) workhorse in terms of deep space surveillance, it has not undergone a significant modernization since the 1990's. This means GEODSS continues to operate under a mostly obsolete, legacy data processing baseline. The System Program Office (SPO) responsible for GEODSS, SMC/SYGO, has a number of advanced Space Situational Awareness (SSA)-related efforts in progress, in the form of innovative optical capabilities, data processing algorithms, and hardware upgrades. Each of these efforts is in various stages of evaluation and acquisition. These advanced capabilities rely upon a modern computing environment in which to integrate, but GEODSS does not have one—yet. The SPO is also executing a Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) to modernize the various subsystems within GEODSS, along with a parallel effort to implement a complete, modern software re-architecture. The goal is to use a modern, service-based architecture to provide expedient integration as well as easier and more sustainable expansion. This presentation will describe these modernization efforts in more detail and discuss how adopting such modern paradigms and practices will help ensure the GEODSS system remains relevant and sustainable far beyond 2027.

  1. BOREAS TF-9 SSA-OBS Branch Level Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayment, Mark B.; Jarvis, Paul G.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-9 team collected data that describe carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes from foliage at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site from 07-April through 23-November-1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  2. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains single-leaf gas exchange data from the SSA-Fen site during 1994 and 1995. These leaf gas exchange properties were measured for the dominant vascular plants using portable gas exchange systems. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  3. BOREAS TGB-8 Photosynthetic Rate Data over the SSA-OBS and the SSA-OJP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Lerdau, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-8 team collected data to investigate the controls over NMHC fluxes from boreal forest tree species. This data set includes measurements of photosynthetic rates at mature jack pine and black spruce sites. The data were collected at the OJP and OBS tower flux locations in the BOREAS SSA. These areas contained mature stands of jack pine and black spruce and were the focal sites in the BOREAS program for studies of biosphere/atmosphere exchange from these two habitat types. The OBS site is situated in a black spruce/sphagnum bog with the largest trees 155 years old and 10-15 m tall. The OJP site is in a jack pine forest, 80 to 120 years old, which lies on a sandy bench of glacial outwash with the largest tree standing 15 m tall. Temporally, the data cover the period of 24-May-1994 to 19-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  4. ESA SSA Space Weather Services Supporting Space Surveillance and Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, Juha-Pekka; Glover, Alexi; Hilgers, Alain; Fletcher, Emmet

    2012-07-01

    ESA Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Preparatory Programme was started in 2009. The objective of the programme is to support the European independent utilisation of and access to space research or services. This will be performed through providing timely and quality data, information, services and knowledge regarding the environment, the threats and the sustainable exploitation of the outer space surrounding the planet Earth. SSA serves the implementation of the strategic missions of the European Space Policy based on the peaceful uses of the outer space by all states, by supporting the autonomous capacity to securely and safely operate the critical European space infrastructures. The Space Weather (SWE) Segment of the SSA will provide user services related to the monitoring of the Sun, the solar wind, the radiation belts, the magnetosphere and the ionosphere. These services will include near real time information and forecasts about the characteristics of the space environment and predictions of space weather impacts on sensitive spaceborne and ground based infrastructure. The SSA SWE system will also include establishment of a permanent database for analysis, model development and scientific research. These services are will support a wide variety of user domains including spacecraft designers, spacecraft operators, human space flights, users and operators of transionospheric radio links, and space weather research community. The precursor SWE services to be established starting in 2010. This presentation provides an overview of the ESA SSA SWE services focused on supporting the Space Surveillance and Tracking users. This services include estimates of the atmospheric drag and archive and forecasts of the geomagnetic and solar indices. In addition, the SSA SWE system will provide nowcasts of the ionospheric group delay to support mitigation of the ionospheric impact on radar signals. The paper will discuss the user requirements for the services, the data

  5. ESA SSA Programme in support of Space Weather forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, J.; Glover, A.; Hilgers, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 European Space Agency (ESA) started a new programme called Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Preparatory Programme. The objective of the programme is to support the European independent utilisation of and access to space research or services. This will be performed through providing timely and quality data, information, services and knowledge regarding the environment, the threats and the sustainable exploitation of the outer space surrounding the planet Earth. SSA serves the implementation of the strategic missions of the European Space Policy based on the peaceful uses of the outer space by all states, by supporting the autonomous capacity to securely and safely operate the critical European space infrastructures. The SSA Preparatory Program will establish the initial elements that will eventually lead into the full deployment of the European SSA services. The SWE Segment of the SSA will provide user services related to the monitoring of the Sun, the solar wind, the radiation belts, the magnetosphere and the ionosphere. These services will include near real time information and forecasts about the characteristics of the space environment and predictions of space weather impacts on sensitive spaceborne and ground based infrastructure. The SSA SWE system will also include establishment of a permanent database for analysis, model development and scientific research. These services are will support a wide variety of user domains including spacecraft designers, spacecraft operators, human space flights, users and operators of transionospheric radio links, and space weather research community. The precursor SWE services to be established starting in 2010 will include a selected subset of these services based on pre-existing space weather applications and services in Europe. This paper will present the key characteristics of the SSA SWE system that is currently being designed. The presentation will focus on the system characteristics that support space weather

  6. Sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) vs. traditional serrated adenoma (TSA).

    PubMed

    Torlakovic, Emina Emilia; Gomez, Jose D; Driman, David K; Parfitt, Jeremy R; Wang, Chang; Benerjee, Tama; Snover, Dale C

    2008-01-01

    The morphologic distinction between various serrated polyps of the colorectum may be challenging. The distinction between sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) and traditional serrated adenoma (TSA) may be difficult using currently available criteria mostly based on cytologic characteristics. We have evaluated 66 serrated polyps including 29 SSA, 18 TSA, and 19 hyperplastic polyps for overall shape of the polyps, architectural features of individual crypts, the presence of eosinophilic cytoplasm, size and distribution of the proliferation and maturation zones, as well as Ki-67 and CK20 expression. The extent of the expression of CK20 and Ki-67 could not distinguish between the 3 types of serrated polyps, but the distribution of their expression was very helpful and differences were statistically significant. The distribution of Ki-67+ cells was the single most helpful distinguishing feature of the serrated polyp type (P<0.0001, chi test). Hyperplastic polyps had regular, symmetric, and increased Ki-67 expression. SSA had irregular, asymmetric, and highly variable expression of Ki-67. TSA had low Ki-67 expression, which was limited to "ectopic crypts" and admixed tubular adenomalike areas. In serrated polyps, ectopic crypt formation (ECF) defined by the presence of ectopic crypts with their bases not seated adjacent to the muscularis mucosae was nearly exclusive to TSA and was found in all cases, while the presence of cytologic atypia and eosinophilia of the cytoplasm were characteristic, but not limited to TSA. No evidence of ECF, but nevertheless abnormal distribution of proliferation zone was characteristic of SSA, whereas HP had neither. The presence of the ECF defines TSA in a more rigorous fashion than previous diagnostic criteria and also explains the biologic basis of exuberant protuberant growth associated with TSA and the lack of such growth in SSA. Recognition of this phenomenon may also help in exploring the genetic and molecular basis for differences between

  7. Preliminary approach of the MELiSSA loop energy balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, Lucie; Lamaze, Brigitte; Lebrun, Jean

    Long duration missions, such as the establishment of permanent bases on the lunar surface or the travel to Mars, require a huge amount of life support consumables (e.g. food, water and oxygen). Current rockets are at the moment unable to launch such a mass from Earth. Consequently Regenerative Life Support Systems are necessary to sustain long-term manned space mission to increase recycling rates and so reduce the launched mass. Thus the European and Canadian research has been concentrating on the MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) project over the last 20 years. MELiSSA is an Environmental Controlled Life Support System (ECLSS), i.e. a closed regenerative loop inspired of a lake ecosystem. Using light as a source of energy, MELiSSA's goal is the recovery of food, water and oxygen from CO2 and organic wastes, using microorganisms and higher plants. The architecture of a ECLSS depends widely on the mission scenario. To compare several ECLSS architectures and in order to be able to evaluate them, ESA is developing a multi criteria evaluation tool: ALISSE (Advanced LIfe Support System Evaluator). One of these criteria is the energy needed to operate the ECLSS. Unlike other criteria like the physical mass, the energy criterion has not been investigated yet and needs hence a detailed analysis. It will consequently be the focus of this study. The main objective of the work presented here is to develop a dynamic tool able to estimate the energy balance for several configurations of the MELiSSA loop. The first step consists in establishing the energy balance using concrete figures from the MELiSSA Pilot Plant (MPP). This facility located at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) is aimed at the ground demonstration of the MELiSSA loop. The MELiSSA loop is structured on several subsystems; each of them is characterized by supplies, exhausts and process reactions. For the purpose of this study (i.e. a generic tool) the solver EES (Engineering

  8. Theoretical White Dwarf Spectra on Demand: TheoSSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringat, E.; Rauch, T.

    2010-11-01

    In the last decades, a lot of progress was made in spectral analysis. The quality (e.g. resolution, S/N ratio) of observed spectra has improved much and several model-atmosphere codes were developed. One of these is the ``Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package'' (TMAP), that is a highly developed program for the calculation of model atmospheres of hot, compact objects. In the framework of the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO), theoretical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be downloaded via TheoSSA. In a pilot phase, TheoSSA is based on TMAP model atmospheres. We present the current state of this VO service.

  9. Game-theoretic homological sensor resource management for SSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Sang Peter

    2009-05-01

    We present a game-theoretic approach to Level 2/3/4 fusion for the purpose of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) along with prototypical SW implementation of this approach to demonstrate its effectiveness for possible future space operations. Our approach is based upon innovative techniques that we are developing to solve dynamic games and Nperson cooperative/non-cooperative games, as well as a new emerging homological sensing algorithms which we apply to control disparate network of space sensors in order to gain better SSA.

  10. Lupus systémique et atteinte rénale: apport des anticorps anti-SSA

    PubMed Central

    Baline, Kenza; Zaher, Karim; Fellah, Hassan; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2015-01-01

    Le but de notre travail est de déterminer le profil des auto-anticorps chez 30 patients ayant un lupus systémique avec ou sans atteinte rénale afin d’établir une corrélation clinico-immunologique entre la néphropathie lupique et ces auto-anticorps. Il s'agit d'une étude transversale de 30 patients atteints de lupus érythémateux systémique diagnostiqués au service de dermatologie durant la période de Décembre 2010 à Décembre 2012 et réalisée conjointement avec le laboratoire d'immunologie. Les anticorps anti-ADN étaient retrouvés chez 17 patients (56.7%) suivis des anti-SSA dans 12 cas (40%). Cinq patients (62.5%) ayant une atteinte rénale avaient des anticorps anti DNA négatifs. Parmi ces patients avec atteinte rénale, 37.5% avaient des anticorps anti SSA sans anticorps anti DNA. La moitié des patients ayant une atteinte rénale (50%) avaient des anticorps anti SSA positifs. Notre série montre l'importance des anticorps anti-SSA surtout chez des patients avec des anticorps anti-DNA négatifs non seulement pour le diagnostic du lupus systémique mais aussi pour déceler certaines manifestations systémiques comme l'atteinte rénale. PMID:26029328

  11. BOREAS TGB-8 Starch Concentration Data Over the SSA-OBS and the SSA-OJP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerdau, Manuel; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-8 team collected data to investigate the controls over NMHC fluxes from boreal forest tree species. This data set includes measurements of starch concentrations in foliar samples at mature jack pine and black spruce sites. The data were collected at the OJP and OBS tower flux locations in the BOREAS SSA. These areas contained mature stands of jack pine and black spruce and were the focal sites in the BOREAS program for studies of biosphere/atmosphere exchange from these two habitat types. The OBS site is situated in a black spruce/sphagnum bog with the largest trees 155 years old and 10-15 m tall. The OJP site is in a jack pine forest, 80 to 120 years old, which lies on a sandy bench of glacial outwash with the largest tree standing 15 m tall. Temporally, the data cover the period of 24-May-1994 to 19-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  12. 20 CFR 422.705 - When SSA employees may listen-in to or record telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When SSA employees may listen-in to or record... ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES Use of SSA Telephone Lines § 422.705 When SSA employees may listen-in to or record telephone conversations. SSA employees may listen-in to or record telephone conversations on SSA telephone...

  13. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Soil Characteristics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z; Nesic, Z.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret soil information at the SSA-OA tower site in 1994 as part of BOREAS. Data sets collected include soil respiration, temperature, moisture, and gravimetric data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII format.

  14. BOREAS TGB-10 Volatile Organic Carbon Data over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westberg, Hal; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Brad; Jackson, Andrea V.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-10 team collected several trace gas data sets in its efforts to determine the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions with respect to boreal forest carbon cycles. This data set contains measured VOC concentrations. These data were obtained at the SSA-OJP site from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  15. 20 CFR 411.660 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.660 Section 411.660 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Employment Networks and Program Managers § 411...

  16. 20 CFR 411.630 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.630 Section 411.630 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Beneficiaries and Employment Networks § 411...

  17. 20 CFR 411.630 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.630 Section 411.630 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Beneficiaries and Employment Networks § 411...

  18. 20 CFR 411.660 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.660 Section 411.660 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Employment Networks and Program Managers § 411...

  19. 20 CFR 411.630 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.630 Section 411.630 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Beneficiaries and Employment Networks § 411...

  20. 20 CFR 411.660 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.660 Section 411.660 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Employment Networks and Program Managers § 411...

  1. 20 CFR 411.630 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.630 Section 411.630 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Beneficiaries and Employment Networks § 411...

  2. 20 CFR 411.660 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.660 Section 411.660 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Employment Networks and Program Managers § 411...

  3. 20 CFR 411.660 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.660 Section 411.660 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Employment Networks and Program Managers § 411...

  4. 20 CFR 411.630 - Is SSA's decision final?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Is SSA's decision final? 411.630 Section 411.630 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Ticket to Work Program Dispute Resolution Disputes Between Beneficiaries and Employment Networks § 411...

  5. Evaluating Options for Civil Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, B.; Carioscia, S. A.

    In recent years, the number of active satellites and human-made orbital space debris has increased dramatically. An expansion of activities in space, as is currently being proposed by many commercial and international entities, is expected to further exacerbate this challenge. The 18th Space Control Squadron under the Department of Defense (DOD) United States Strategic Command provides space situational awareness (SSA) services to users outside the national security community at no cost. International and commercial users demand better SSA service than is currently feasible, and the demand comes at a time when DOD is under pressure to better prepare for and respond to growing space-based threats to national security. Concerned about the possibility of overextending across conflicting missions in a fiscally constrained environment, some DOD officials have publicly noted a desire to move SSA services not related to national security out of DOD purview. Responding to a request from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST), researchers at the Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI) identified and evaluated potential approaches for providing SSA services for civil and commercial operations in space. In this paper, we summarize the report [1] and present the pros and cons of four approaches to the provision of civil SSA services in the United States: (1) maintaining status quo through continued provision by DOD; (2) provision by a civil government entity; (3) industry self-provision; and (4) provision by an international organization. Within the second approach, assuming the provision of SSA by a civil agency, STPI further identified and discussed four options: (1) civil agency service capability embedded within DOD; (2) independent civil service capability, using DOD software and systems; (3) independent civil service capability, using commercial software and systems; and (4) the government certifies non

  6. Non-traditional Sensor Tasking for SSA: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, A.; Herz, E.; Center, K.; Martinez, I.; Favero, N.; Clark, C.; Therien, W.; Jeffries, M.

    Industry has recognized that maintaining SSA of the orbital environment going forward is too challenging for the government alone. Consequently there are a significant number of commercial activities in various stages of development standing-up novel sensors and sensor networks to assist in SSA gathering and dissemination. Use of these systems will allow government and military operators to focus on the most sensitive space control issues while allocating routine or lower priority data gathering responsibility to the commercial side. The fact that there will be multiple (perhaps many) commercial sensor capabilities available in this new operational model begets a common access solution. Absent a central access point to assert data needs, optimized use of all commercial sensor resources is not possible and the opportunity for coordinated collections satisfying overarching SSA-elevating objectives is lost. Orbit Logic is maturing its Heimdall Web system - an architecture facilitating “data requestor” perspectives (allowing government operations centers to assert SSA data gathering objectives) and “sensor operator” perspectives (through which multiple sensors of varying phenomenology and capability are integrated via machine -machine interfaces). When requestors submit their needs, Heimdall’s planning engine determines tasking schedules across all sensors, optimizing their use via an SSA-specific figure-of-merit. ExoAnalytic was a key partner in refining the sensor operator interfaces, working with Orbit Logic through specific details of sensor tasking schedule delivery and the return of observation data. Scant preparation on both sides preceded several integration exercises (walk-then-run style), which culminated in successful demonstration of the ability to supply optimized schedules for routine public catalog data collection – then adapt sensor tasking schedules in real-time upon receipt of urgent data collection requests. This paper will provide a

  7. 78 FR 40541 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA)-Match Number 1014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2013-0019] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA)--Match Number 1014 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). [[Page 40542

  8. BOREAS TE-18 Biomass Density Image of the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team focused its efforts on using remotely sensed data to characterize the successional and disturbance dynamics of the boreal forest for use in carbon modeling. This biomass density image covers almost the entire BOREAS SSA. The pixels for which biomass density is computed include areas, that are in conifer land cover classes only. The biomass density values represent the amount of overstory biomass (i.e., tree biomass only) per unit area. It is derived from a Landsat-5 TM image collected on 02-Sep-1994. The technique that was used to create this image is very similar to the technique that was as used to create the physical classification of the SSA. The data are provided in a binary image file format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. International and NASA SSA and Safety of Flight Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas K,

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the international and NASA interests in Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and space debris as it affects space flight safety. The international interesrt has increased since the collision of the Iridium and Cosmos satellites in 2009. The United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) has commenced a multi-year effort to review the long-term sustainability of outer space activities.

  10. AO Images of Asteroids, Inverting their Lightcurves, and SSA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    telescopes, we have recently obtained images of Main- Belt asteroids with adaptive optics (AO) on the Keck-II 10 meter telescope, the world’s largest...telescopes, we have recently obtained images of Main- Belt asteroids with adaptive optics (AO) on the Keck-II 10 meter telescope, the world’s largest...AO Images of Asteroids , Inverting their Lightcurves, and SSA Jack Drummond a and Julian Christoub,c aStarfire Optical Range, Directed Energy

  11. Systematic Sustainability Assessment (SSA) Tool for Hydroelectric Project in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turan, Faiz Mohd; Johan, Kartina

    2017-08-01

    Sustainably developed and managed hydropower has enormous potential to contribute to global sustainability goals. It is known that hydroelectricity contributing small amounts to greenhouse gas emissions and other atmospheric pollutants. However, developing the remaining hydroelectric potential offers many challenges, and public pressure and expectations on the environmental and social performance of hydroelectric tend to increase over time. This paper aims to develop Systematic Sustainability Assessment (SSA) Tool that promotes and guides more sustainable hydroelectric projects in the context of Malaysia. The proposed SSA tool which not only provide a quality and quantitative report of sustainability performance but also act as Self-Assessment Report (SAR) to provide roadmap to achieve greater level of sustainability in project management for continuous improvement. It is expected to provide a common language that allow government, civil society, financial institutions and the hydroelectric sector to talk about and evaluate sustainability issues. The advantage of SSA tool is it can be used at any stage of hydroelectric development, from the earliest planning stages right through to operation.

  12. Daytime Sky Brightness Characterization for Persistent GEO SSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G.; Cobb, R. G.

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is fundamental to operating in space. SSA for collision avoidance ensures safety of flight for both government and commercial spacecraft through persistent monitoring. A worldwide network of optical and radar sensors gather satellite ephemeris data from the nighttime sky. Current practice for daytime satellite tracking is limited exclusively to radar as the brightening daytime sky prevents the use of visible-band optical sensors. Radar coverage is not pervasive and results in significant daytime coverage gaps in SSA. To mitigate these gaps, optical telescopes equipped with sensors in the near-infrared band (0.75-0.9m) may be used. The diminished intensity of the background sky radiance in the near-infrared band may allow for daylight tracking further into the twilight hours. To determine the performance of a near-infrared sensor for daylight custody, the sky background radiance must first be characterized spectrally as a function of wavelength. Using a physics-based atmospheric model with access to near-real time weather, we developed a generalized model for the apparent sky brightness of the Geostationary satellite belt. The model results are then compared to measured data collected from Dayton, OH through various look and Sun angles for model validation and spectral sky radiance quantification in the visible and near-infrared bands.

  13. BOREAS TE-12 SSA Leaf Water Potential Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Mesarch, Mark A.; Chen, L.; Yang, Litao

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-12 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected water potential data in 1993 and 1994 from aspen, jack pine, and black spruce leaves/needles. Collections were made at the Southern Study Area Nipawin Fen Site (SSA FEN), Young Jack Pine (YJP), Young Aspen (YA), Old Aspen (OA), and Old Black Spruce (OBS) sites. Measurements were made using a pressure chamber on a platform in the field. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. BOREAS TF-11 Biomass Data over the SSA-Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, David W.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team collected several data sets in its efforts to fully describe the flux and site characteristics at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains plant cover, standing crop of plant biomass, and estimated net primary productivity at each chamber site at the end of the 1994 field season. The measurements were conducted as part of a 2 x 2 factorial experiment in which we added carbon (300 g/sq m as wheat straw) and nitrogen (6 g/sq m as urea) to four replicate locations in the vicinity of the TF-11 tower. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  15. Architectures Analysis for the Future European SSA System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, Th.; Saunders, C.; Martinot, V.; Elluin, E.; Benayas, J. Rey

    2009-03-01

    As defined by ESA, Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is the understanding and maintained awareness of the Earth orbital population, the space environment (including NEOs) and possible threats to space assets. At the moment, European SSA is relatively poor and many studies are performed in that domain to propose an autonomous European system. At the last Ministerial Council held in November 2008, a SSA preparatory programme has been decided in order to propose the way forward in such domain and to envisage a common framework for addressing space weather (SW) and space surveillance (SS) user needs.This paper will present the analysis of the possible architectures for such system focusing on its incremental development (with respect to the services available to the users) and on the correlations between the SW and SS domains which appear when proposing cost-efficient solutions.These correlations are mainly due to the fact that some space-based assets may be required for both domains, especially Sun-Synchronous platforms or sub-GEO platforms. Sun-Synchronous platforms are interesting for space objects survey and tracking in high altitude orbits, Sun X-ray imagery, solar UV flux measurement, electrons and protons radiations or ionospheric TEC measurements. Sub-GEO platforms may be used for GEO objects imaging and environment as solar related measurements. The feasibility of such space-based assets will be presented.Other correlations are due to the fact that the future European SSA system has to be considered as an information system acquiring, processing and providing data to users. The data policy and security aspects for such system will be especially important to be analysed. This paper will present the possible relations with the Users of such system depending on available data and subscribed services and depending also on their profiles. Another important point to be managed by the system is the access to resources which will also depend on the users' profiles. At

  16. BOREAS TF-11 Decomposition Data over the SSA-Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, David W.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team collected several data sets in its efforts to fully describe the flux and site characteristics at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains decomposition rates of a standard substrate (wheat straw) across treatments. The measurements were conducted in 1994 as part of a 2 x 2 factorial experiment in which we added carbon (300 g/sq m as wheat straw) and nitrogen (6 g/sq m as urea) to four replicate locations in the vicinity of the TF-11 tower. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  17. BOREAS TE-1 SSA-Fen Soil Profile Nutrient Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papagno, Andrea; Anderson, Darwin; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. Particular emphasis was placed on nutrient biochemistry, the stores and transfers of organic carbon, and how the characteristics were related to measured methane fluxes. The overall traniect in the Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) included the major plant communities and related soils that occurred in that section of the boreal forest. Soil physical, chemical, and biological measurements along the transect were used to characterize the static environment, which allowed them to be related to methane fluxes. Chamber techniques were used to provide a measure of methane production/uptake. Chamber measurements coupled with flask sampling were used to determine the seasonality of methane fluxes. This particular data set contains soil profile measurements of various nutrients at the SSA-Fen site. The data were collected from 23-May to 21-Oct- 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  18. BOREAS RS-12 Automated Ground Sunphotometer Measurements in the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Wrigley, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-12 team collected both ground and airborne sunphotometer measurements for use in characterizing the aerosol optical properties of the atmosphere during the BOREAS data collection activities. These measurements are to be used to: 1) measure the magnitude and variability of the aerosol optical depth in both time and space; 2) determine the optical properties of the boreal aerosols; and 3) atmospherically correct some remotely sensed data acquired during BOREAS. These data cover selected days and times from May to September 1994 and were taken from one of two ground sites near Candle Lake in the SSA. The data described in this document are from the field sunphotometer data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. Human Decision Processes: Implications for SSA Support Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picciano, P.

    2013-09-01

    Despite significant advances in computing power and artificial intelligence (AI), few critical decisions are made without a human decision maker in the loop. Space Situational Awareness (SSA) missions are both critical and complex, typically adhering to the human-in-the-loop (HITL) model. The collection of human operators injects a needed diversity of expert knowledge, experience, and authority required to successfully fulfill SSA tasking. A wealth of literature on human decision making exists citing myriad empirical studies and offering a varied set of prescriptive and descriptive models of judgment and decision making (Hastie & Dawes, 2001; Baron, 2000). Many findings have been proven sufficiently robust to allow information architects or system/interface designers to take action to improve decision processes. For the purpose of discussion, these concepts are bifurcated in two groups: 1) vulnerabilities to mitigate, and 2) capabilities to augment. These vulnerabilities and capabilities refer specifically to the decision process and should not be confused with a shortcoming or skill of a specific human operator. Thus the framing of questions and orders, the automated tools with which to collaborate, priming and contextual data, and the delivery of information all play a critical role in human judgment and choice. Evaluating the merits of any decision can be elusive; in order to constrain this discussion, ‘rational choice' will tend toward the economic model characteristics such as maximizing utility and selection consistency (e.g., if A preferred to B, and B preferred to C, than A should be preferred to C). Simple decision models often encourage one to list the pros and cons of a decision, perhaps use a weighting schema, but one way or another weigh the future benefit (or harm) of making a selection. The result (sought by the rationalist models) should drive toward higher utility. Despite notable differences in researchers' theses (to be discussed in the full

  20. MELiSSA Food Characterization general approach and current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihreter, Martin; Chaerle, Laury; Secco, Benjamin; Molders, Katrien; van der Straeten, Dominique; Duliere, Eric; Pieters, Serge; Maclean, Heather; Dochain, Denis; Quinet, Muriel; Lutts, Stanley; Graham, Thomas; Stasiak, Michael; Rondeau Vuk, Theresa; Zheng, Youbin; Dixon, Mike; Laniau, Martine; Larreture, Alain; Timsit, Michel; Aronne, Giovanna; Barbieri, Giancarlo; Buonomo, Roberta; Veronica; Paradiso, Roberta; de Pascale, Stafania; Galbiati, Massimo; Troia, A. R.; Nobili, Matteo; Bucchieri, Lorenzo; Page, Valérie; Feller, Urs; Lasseur, Christophe

    Higher plants play an important role in closed ecological life support systems as oxygen pro-ducers, carbon dioxide and water recyclers, and as a food source. For an integration of higher plant chambers into the MELiSSA (Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative) loop, a detailed characterization and optimization of the full food production and preparation chain is needed. This implies the prediction and control of the nutritional quality of the final products consumed by the crew, the prediction of the wastes quality and quantity produced along the chain for further waste treatment (MELiSSA waste treatment) and the optimization of overall efficiencies. To reach this goal several issues have to be studied in an integrated manner: the physiological responses of crops to a range of environmental parameters, crop yield efficiencies and respective ratio and composition of edible and inedible biomass, the processability and storability of the produced food and last but not least composition of wastes in view of further degradation (fiber content). Within the Food Characterization (FC) project several compar-ative plant growth bench tests were carried out to obtain preliminary data regarding these aspects. Four pre-selected cultivars of each of the four energy-rich crops with worldwide usage -wheat, durum wheat, potato and soybean -were grown under well-characterized environmental conditions. The different cultivars of each species are screened for their performance in view of a closed loop application by parameter ranking. This comprises the characterization of edi-ble/inedible biomass ratio, nutritional quality, processability and overall performance under the specific conditions of hydroponic cultivation and artificial illumination. A second closely linked goal of the FC project is to develop a mechanistic physiological plant model, which will ease the integration of higher plants compartments in the MELiSSA concept by virtue of its predictive abilities

  1. 77 FR 74913 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (Social Security Administration (SSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2012-0055] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (Social Security Administration (SSA)/Office of Personnel Management (OPM))--Match Number 1307 AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing...

  2. 20 CFR 411.330 - How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? 411.330 Section 411.330 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.330 How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? (a) We will...

  3. 20 CFR 411.330 - How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? 411.330 Section 411.330 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.330 How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? (a) We will...

  4. 20 CFR 411.330 - How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? 411.330 Section 411.330 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.330 How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? (a) We will...

  5. 20 CFR 411.330 - How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? 411.330 Section 411.330 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.330 How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? (a) We will...

  6. 20 CFR 411.330 - How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? 411.330 Section 411.330 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.330 How will SSA evaluate an EN's performance? (a) We will...

  7. Preliminary study of the space adaptation of the MELiSSA life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Albaigès, Joan L.; Duatis, Jordi; Podhajsky, Sandra; Guirado, Víctor; Poughon, Laurent

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is an European Space Agency (ESA) project focused on the development of a closed regenerative life support system to aid the development of technologies for future life support systems for long term manned planetary missions, e.g. a lunar base or missions to Mars. In order to understand the potential evolution of the MELiSSA concept towards its future use in the referred manned planetary mission context the MELiSSA Space Adaptation (MSA) activity has been undertaken. MSA's main objective is to model the different MELiSSA compartments using EcosimPro R , a specialized simulation tool for life support applications, in order to define a preliminary MELiSSA implementation for service in a man-tended lunar base scenario, with a four-member crew rotating in six-month increments, and performing the basic LSS functions of air revitalization, food production, and waste and water recycling. The MELiSSA EcosimPro R Model features a dedicated library for the different MELiSSA elements (bioreactors, greenhouse, crew, interconnecting elements, etc.). It is used to dimension the MELiSSA system in terms of major parameters like mass, volume and energy needs, evaluate the accuracy of the results and define the strategy for a progressive loop closure from the initial required performance (approx.100 The MELiSSA configuration(s) obtained through the EcosimPro R simulation are further analysed using the Advanced Life Support System Evaluation (ALISSE) metric, relying on mass, energy, efficiency, human risk, system reliability and crew time, for trade-off and optimization of results. The outcome of the MSA activity is, thus, a potential Life Support System architecture description, based on combined MELiSSA and other physico-chemical technologies, defining its expected performance, associated operational conditions and logistic needs.

  8. Results and Analysis of the ESA SSA Radar Tracking Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontdecaba Baig, Jordi; Martinerie, Francis; Sutter, Moise; Martinot, Vincent; Ameline, Patrick; Blazejczak, Eric; Fletcher, Emmet

    2013-08-01

    Following the decision at the Ministerial Council 2008 to initiate a Preparatory Programme on Space Situational Awareness (SSA), the European Space Agency started a series of activities together with industry, implementing both classical design approaches: bottom-up and top-down. For the Space Surveillance and Tracking segment of the programme, the bottom-up approach was initially addressed through various activities to evaluate the potential performance of contemporary European resources. One element of this investigation was the assessment of the existing European assets that can be used to generate tracking data on Earth orbiting objects at all altitudes between LEO and the GEO graveyard orbits. The study addressed both the technical performances of the assets and the identification of the operational constraints characteristic for each sensor. In this context, a paper was presented at the 2011 European Space Surveillance Conference in Madrid, Spain that discussed the results obtained using two existing European radars: EISCAT and Chilbolton. The emphasis of this new paper is to analyse the results obtained from a third asset: the BEM Monge, a measurement and test vessel of the French Navy operated for the French Direction Générale de l'Armement (DGA). The Monge's three primary radars were designed with the specific mission to detect and characterise the trajectory of missiles as part of France's national missile defence programme, however the radar on-board the Monge are also able to detect and track Earth-orbiting objects. Even though this role is not the primary one for the system, the achieved accuracy of the orbital tracks and resulting orbit determination is several orders of magnitude better than radars that have been developed for other uses. The evaluation carried out in the frame of the SSA programme helped demonstrate that the systems provided by the Monge are able to perform orbital tracking within the performance requirements of a federated SSA

  9. 20 CFR 422.705 - When SSA employees may listen-in to or record telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When SSA employees may listen-in to or record telephone conversations. 422.705 Section 422.705 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES Use of SSA Telephone Lines § 422.705 When SSA employees may listen-in to or record...

  10. 20 CFR 422.705 - When SSA employees may listen-in to or record telephone conversations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When SSA employees may listen-in to or record telephone conversations. 422.705 Section 422.705 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES Use of SSA Telephone Lines § 422.705 When SSA employees may listen-in to or record...

  11. 77 FR 33547 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Centers for Medicare and Medicaid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2012-0015] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS))--Match Number 1094 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a new computer matching program that will expire...

  12. 77 FR 32709 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of Homeland Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2011-0089] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Department of Homeland Security (DHS))--Match Number 1010 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching program that...

  13. 78 FR 69926 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2013-0059] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS))--Match Number 1076 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching...

  14. 76 FR 21091 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2011-0022] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS))--Match Number 1076 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching...

  15. BOREAS TE-12 Leaf Optical Data for SSA Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Mesarch, Mark A.; Chen, L.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-12 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the reflectance, transmittance, and gas exchange of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of hemispherical spectral reflectance and transmittance factors of individual leaves, needles (ages: current and past 2 years' growth, i.e., for 1993, the growing seasons of 1993, 1992, and 1991 were measured; in 1994, the growing seasons of 1994, 1993, and 1992 were measured), twigs (reflectance only), and substrate at near-normal incidence measured using a LI-COR LI-1800-12 integrating sphere attached to a Spectron Engineering SE590 spectroradiometer. Procedures of Daughtry et a]. (1989) were followed. These procedures permitted measurement of samples that: (1) filled the entire integrating sphere sample port; and (2) were narrow with a length greater than the sample port diameter. Optical properties were measured in 1993 and 1994 at the SSA Fen, YJP, YA, and OBS sites. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. BOREAS TGB-10 Oxidant Concentration Data over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Westberg, Hal; Hall, Brad; Jackson, Andrea V.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-10 team collected several trace gas data sets in its efforts to determine the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions with respect to boreal forest carbon cycles. This data set contains measured peroxide (H2O2 and total organic peroxides (ROOH)) and ozone concentrations as well as H2O2 and ROOH deposition velocities. These data were obtained at the SSA-OJP site from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. Some important results were: (1) Ozone concentrations were consistently low, 20-30 ppb, during the summer of 1994. (2) Peroxide concentrations showed a seasonal variation with highest concentrations occurring in July (IFC-2). (3) Midday H2O2 levels averaged around 1.4 ppb during IFC-2 and 0.4 - 0.5 ppb during IFC's 1 and 3. (4) Midday organic peroxide concentrations were lower, averaging 0.8 ppb during IFC-2, and 0.4 - 0.5 ppb during IFC's 1 and 3. (5) The rough pine forest canopy serves as a significant sink for H2O2. (6) Midday H2O2 deposition velocities averaged 4 - 7 cm/s. (7) Organic peroxide deposition velocities (measured as total ROOH) were approximately 40% as large as those of H2O2.

  17. BOREAS TGB-10 Oxidant Flux Data over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Westberg, Hal; Hall, Brad; Jackson, Andrea V.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-10 team collected several trace gas data sets in its efforts to determine the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions with respect to boreal forest carbon cycles. This oxidant data set contains measured peroxide (H2O2 and total organic peroxides (ROOH)) and ozone concentrations as well as H2O2 and ROOH deposition velocities. These data were obtained at the SSA-OJP site during the summer of 1994. Measurements were made from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. Some important results were: (1) Ozone concentrations were consistently low, 20-30 ppb, during the summer of 1994. (2) Peroxide concentrations showed a seasonal variation with highest concentrations occurring in July (IFC-2). (3) Midday H2O2 levels averaged around 1.4 ppb during IFC-2 and 0.4 - 0.5 ppb during IFC's 1 and 3. (4) Midday organic peroxide concentrations were lower, averaging 0.8 ppb during IFC-2, and 0.4 - 0.5 ppb during IFC's 1 and 3. (5) The rough pine forest canopy serves as a significant sink for H2O2. (6) Midday H2O2 deposition velocities averaged 4 - 7 cm/s. (7) Organic peroxide deposition velocities (measured as total ROOH) were approximately 40% as large as those of H2O2.

  18. Lyman continuum leaking AGN in the SSA22 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheva, Genoveva; Iwata, Ikuru; Inoue, Akio K.

    2017-02-01

    Subaru/SuprimeCam narrow-band photometry of the SSA22 field reveals the presence of four Lyman continuum (LyC) candidates among a sample of 14 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two show offsets and likely have stellar LyCin nature or are foreground contaminants. The remaining two LyC candidates are type I AGN. We argue that the average LyC escape fraction of high-redshift, low-luminosity AGN is not likely to be unity, as often assumed in the literature. From direct measurement we obtain the average LyC-to-UV flux density ratio and ionizing emissivity for a number of AGN classes and find it at least a factor of 2 lower than values obtained assuming fesc = 1. Comparing to recent Ly α forest measurements, AGNs at redshift z ˜ 3 make up at most ˜12 per cent and as little as ˜5 per cent of the total ionizing budget. Our results suggest that AGNs are unlikely to dominate the ionization budget of the Universe at high redshifts.

  19. A New Hybrid-Multiscale SSA Prediction of Non-Stationary Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Mitra; Aminghafari, Mina

    2016-02-01

    Singular spectral analysis (SSA) is a non-parametric method used in the prediction of non-stationary time series. It has two parameters, which are difficult to determine and very sensitive to their values. Since, SSA is a deterministic-based method, it does not give good results when the time series is contaminated with a high noise level and correlated noise. Therefore, we introduce a novel method to handle these problems. It is based on the prediction of non-decimated wavelet (NDW) signals by SSA and then, prediction of residuals by wavelet regression. The advantages of our method are the automatic determination of parameters and taking account of the stochastic structure of time series. As shown through the simulated and real data, we obtain better results than SSA, a non-parametric wavelet regression method and Holt-Winters method.

  20. Resonance assignments for the substrate binding domain of Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wanhui; Wu, Huiwen; Zhang, Hong; Gong, Weibin; Perrett, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Hsp70 chaperone proteins play crucial roles in the cell. Extensive structural and functional studies have been performed for bacterial and mammalian Hsp70s. Ssa1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of the Hsp70 family. In vivo and biochemical studies on Ssa1 have revealed that it regulates prion propagation and the cell cycle. However, no structural data has been obtained for Ssa1 up to now. Here we report the almost complete (96 %) (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side chain NMR assignment of the 18.8 kDa Ssa1 substrate binding domain. The construct includes residues 382-554, which corresponds to the entire substrate binding domain and two following α-helices in homologous structures. The secondary structure predicted from the assigned chemical shifts is consistent with that of homologous Hsp70 substrate binding domains.

  1. A New Trend-Following Indicator: Using SSA to Design Trading Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leles, Michel Carlo Rodrigues; Mozelli, Leonardo Amaral; Guimarães, Homero Nogueira

    Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is a non-parametric approach that can be used to decompose a time-series as trends, oscillations and noise. Trend-following strategies rely on the principle that financial markets move in trends for an extended period of time. Moving Averages (MAs) are the standard indicator to design such strategies. In this study, SSA is used as an alternative method to enhance trend resolution in comparison with the traditional MA. New trading rules using SSA as indicator are proposed. This paper shows that for the Down Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) and Shangai Securities Composite Index (SSCI) time-series the SSA trading rules provided, in general, better results in comparison to MA trading rules.

  2. Newborn infant with maternal anti-SSA antibody-induced complete heart block accompanying cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Iida, Midori; Inamura, Noboru; Takeuchi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Newborn case of maternal anti-SSA antibody-induced congenital complete heart block (CCHB) accompanying cardiomyopathy is presented. Unexpectedly, she died of ventricular tachycardia, not bradycardia, 6 days after birth. Autopsy revealed left ventricular cardiomyopathy with endocardial fibroelastosis. Thus, when evaluating fetal cardiac performance in cases of maternal anti-SSA antibody-induced CCHB, it is necessary to pay attention to myocardial attributes such as endocardial hyperplasia.

  3. Hydraulic and mechanical behavior of landfill clay liner containing SSA in contact with leachate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Lu, Haijun; Liu, Junzhu; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiong

    2018-05-01

    Sewage sludge ash (SSA) produced by municipal sludge can be used as a modified additive for clay liner, and improves the working performance of landfill clay liner in contact with leachate. Under the action of landfill leachate, the permeability, shear strength, phase composition, and pore structure of the modified clay are investigated through the flexible wall permeability test, triaxial shear test, thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, and low-temperature nitrogen adsorption test, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of the modified clay containing 0-5% SSA is in the range of 3.94 × 10 -8 -1.16 × 10 -7  cm/s, and the pollutant concentration of the sample without SSA was higher than others. The shear strength of the modified clay is more than that of the traditional clay liner, the cohesion rate of modified clay increases from 32.5 to 199.91 kPa, and the internal friction angle decreases from 32.5° to 15.6°. Furthermore, the weight loss rates of the samples are 15.69%, 17.92%, 18.06%, and 20.68%, respectively, when the SSA content increases from 0% to 5%. The total pore volume and average pore diameter of the modified clay decrease with the increase in the SSA content, respectively. However, the specific area of the modified clay increases with the increase in the SSA content.

  4. The location of a disease-associated polymorphism and genomic structure of the human 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus (SSA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsugu, H.; Horowitz, R.; Gibson, N.

    1994-12-01

    Sera from approximately 30% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contain high titers of autoantibodies that bind to the 52-kDa Ro/SSA protein. We previously detected polymorphisms in the 52-kDa Ro/SSA gene (SSA1) with restriction enzymes, one of which is strongly associated with the presence of SLE (P < 0.0005) in African Americans. A higher disease frequency and more severe forms of the disease are commonly noted among these female patients. To determine the location and nature of this polymorphism, we obtained two clones that span 8.5 kb of the 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus including its upstream regulatory region. Six exonsmore » were identified, and their nucleotide sequences plus adjacent noncoding regions were determined. No differences were found between these exons and the coding region of one of the reported cDNAs. The disease-associated polymorphic site suggested by a restriction enzyme map and confirmed by DNA amplification and nucleotide sequencing was present upstream of exon 1. This polymorphism may be a genetic marker for a disease-related variation in the coding region for the protein or in the upstream regulatory region of this gene. Although this RFLP is present in Japanese, it is not associated with lupus in this race. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  5. Automatic Satellite Telemetry Analysis for SSA using Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottler, R.; Mao, J.

    In April 2016, General Hyten, commander of Air Force Space Command, announced the Space Enterprise Vision (SEV) (http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/719941/hyten-announces-space-enterprise-vision/). The SEV addresses increasing threats to space-related systems. The vision includes an integrated approach across all mission areas (communications, positioning, navigation and timing, missile warning, and weather data) and emphasizes improved access to data across the entire enterprise and the ability to protect space-related assets and capabilities. "The future space enterprise will maintain our nation's ability to deliver critical space effects throughout all phases of conflict," Hyten said. Satellite telemetry is going to become available to a new audience. While that telemetry information should be valuable for achieving Space Situational Awareness (SSA), these new satellite telemetry data consumers will not know how to utilize it. We were tasked with applying AI techniques to build an infrastructure to process satellite telemetry into higher abstraction level symbolic space situational awareness and to initially populate that infrastructure with useful data analysis methods. We are working with two organizations, Montana State University (MSU) and the Air Force Academy, both of whom control satellites and therefore currently analyze satellite telemetry to assess the health and circumstances of their satellites. The design which has resulted from our knowledge elicitation and cognitive task analysis is a hybrid approach which combines symbolic processing techniques of Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) and Behavior Transition Networks (BTNs) with current Machine Learning approaches. BTNs are used to represent the process and associated formulas to check telemetry values against anticipated problems and issues. CBR is used to represent and retrieve BTNs that represent an investigative process that should be applied to the telemetry in certain circumstances

  6. DAN DORNEY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-16

    CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE LAUNCH VEHICLE FOR NASA'S COMMERCIAL CREW PROGRAM, DAN DORNEY GUIDES THE TEAM EVALUATING THE VEHICLES CREATED BY INDUSTRY PARTNERS AND ENSURES THE ROCKETS MEET THE REQUIREMENTS TO SAFELY CARRY ASTRONAUTS TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION.

  7. Model-Atmosphere Spectra of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae - Access via the Virtual Observatory Service TheoSSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Reindl, N.

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of the Virtual Observatory (VO), the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory GAVO project provides easy access to theoretical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) within the registered GAVO service TheoSSA (http://dc.g-vo.org/theossa). TheoSSA is based on the well established Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP) for hot, compact stars. This includes central stars of planetary nebulae. We show examples of TheoSSA in operation.

  8. BOREAS TE-1 Soils Data Over The SSA Tower Sites in Raster Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Anderson, Darwin; Knapp, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. This data set was gridded from vector layers of soil maps that were received from Dr. Darwin Anderson (TE-1), who did the original soil mapping in the field during 1994. The vector layers were gridded into raster files that cover approximately 1 square kilometer over each of the tower sites in the SSA. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. Spectral Analysis within the Virtual Observatory: The GAVO Service TheoSSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringat, E.

    2012-03-01

    In the last decade, numerous Virtual Observatory organizations were established. One of these is the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) that e.g. provides access to spectral energy distributions via the service TheoSSA. In a pilot phase, these are based on the Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP) and suitable for hot, compact stars. We demonstrate the power of TheoSSA in an application to the sdOB primary of AA Doradus by comparison with a “classical” spectral analysis.

  10. The requirements of yeast Hsp70 of SSA family for the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of short-lived and abnormal proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hee; Sherman, Michael Y; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2016-06-17

    Cytoplasmic Hsp70s of SSA family, especially Ssa1p, are involved in the degradation of a variety of misfolded proteins in yeast. However the importance of other Ssa proteins in this process is unclear. To clarify the role(s) of individual Ssa proteins in proteolysis, we measured the breakdown of various cell proteins in mutants lacking different Ssa proteins. In mutants lacking Ssa1p and Ssa2p, the proteasomal degradation of short-lived proteins was reduced, which was not restored fully by the over-expression of Ssa1p. By contrast, the degradation of stable cellular proteins did not require Ssa proteins. The degradation of the cytosolic model substrates (Ub-P-β-gal and R-β-gal) and their ubiquitylation were inhibited by the inactivation of Ssa proteins. In addition, Ssa1p and the co-chaperone Ydj1p are indispensable for the intracellular degradation of a mutant secretory protein, Siiyama variant of human antitrypsin. Our findings indicate that both Ssa1p and Ssa2p are essential for the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of short-lived proteins and the requirements of Ssa proteins and the co-chaperones widely vary depending on the conformations and folding status of the substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 20 CFR 408.1235 - How does the State transfer funds to SSA to administer its recognition payment program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Federal Administration of State Recognition... end of each calendar month, SSA will provide the State with a statement showing, cumulatively, the... charged by SSA to administer such recognition payments; the State's total liability; and the end-of-month...

  12. 20 CFR 408.1235 - How does the State transfer funds to SSA to administer its recognition payment program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Federal Administration of State Recognition... end of each calendar month, SSA will provide the State with a statement showing, cumulatively, the... charged by SSA to administer such recognition payments; the State's total liability; and the end-of-month...

  13. 20 CFR 408.1235 - How does the State transfer funds to SSA to administer its recognition payment program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Federal Administration of State Recognition... end of each calendar month, SSA will provide the State with a statement showing, cumulatively, the... charged by SSA to administer such recognition payments; the State's total liability; and the end-of-month...

  14. 77 FR 49849 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Office of Child Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ...: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer-matching... INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (Public Law (Pub. L.) 100-503... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2012-0021] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended...

  15. 75 FR 32833 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Office of Personnel Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA-2009-0077] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Office of Personnel Management (OPM))--Match 1307 AGENCY: Social Security... INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (Public Law (Pub. L.) 100-503...

  16. 77 FR 27108 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Office of Child Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching... protections for such persons. The Privacy Act, as amended, regulates the use of computer matching by Federal... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2012-0010] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended...

  17. 75 FR 68396 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of Labor (DOL))-Match...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2010-0052] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Department of Labor (DOL))--Match Number 1003 AGENCY: Social Security... as shown above. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection...

  18. 78 FR 37647 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Railroad Retirement Board (RRB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2013-0010] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Railroad Retirement Board (RRB))--Match Number 1006 AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching program that will expire on...

  19. 78 FR 16564 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Office of Personnel Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... 1021 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of existing computer... above. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2012-0073] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended...

  20. 78 FR 12127 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of the Treasury...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... 1310 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer..., as shown above. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA 2013-0007] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended...

  1. 78 FR 51264 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of the Treasury...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

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  12. The relationship of the lipoprotein SsaB, manganese and superoxide dismutase in Streptococcus sanguinis virulence for endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Crump, Katie E; Bainbridge, Brian; Brusko, Sarah; Turner, Lauren S; Ge, Xiuchun; Stone, Victoria; Xu, Ping; Kitten, Todd

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis colonizes teeth and is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Our prior work showed that the lipoprotein SsaB is critical for S. sanguinis virulence for endocarditis and belongs to the LraI family of conserved metal transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that an ssaB mutant accumulates less manganese and iron than its parent. A mutant lacking the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, SodA, was significantly less virulent than wild-type in a rabbit model of endocarditis, but significantly more virulent than the ssaB mutant. Neither the ssaB nor the sodA mutation affected sensitivity to phagocytic killing or efficiency of heart valve colonization. Animal virulence results for all strains could be reproduced by growing bacteria in serum under physiological levels of O(2). SodA activity was reduced, but not eliminated in the ssaB mutant in serum and in rabbits. Growth of the ssaB mutant in serum was restored upon addition of Mn(2+) or removal of O(2). Antioxidant supplementation experiments suggested that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals were together responsible for the ssaB mutant's growth defect. We conclude that manganese accumulation mediated by the SsaB transport system imparts virulence by enabling cell growth in oxygen through SodA-dependent and independent mechanisms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Relationship of the Lipoprotein SsaB, Manganese, and Superoxide Dismutase in Streptococcus sanguinis Virulence for Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Katie E.; Bainbridge, Brian; Brusko, Sarah; Turner, Lauren S.; Ge, Xiuchun; Stone, Victoria; Xu, Ping; Kitten, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Streptococcus sanguinis colonizes teeth and is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Our prior work showed that the lipoprotein SsaB is critical for S. sanguinis virulence for endocarditis and belongs to the LraI family of conserved metal transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that an ssaB mutant accumulates less manganese and iron than its parent. A mutant lacking the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, SodA, was significantly less virulent than wild-type in a rabbit model of endocarditis, but significantly more virulent than the ssaB mutant. Neither the ssaB nor the sodA mutation affected sensitivity to phagocytic killing or efficiency of heart valve colonization. Animal virulence results for all strains could be reproduced by growing bacteria in serum under physiological levels of O2. SodA activity was reduced, but not eliminated in the ssaB mutant in serum and in rabbits. Growth of the ssaB mutant in serum was restored upon addition of Mn2+ or removal of O2. Antioxidant supplementation experiments suggested that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals were together responsible for the ssaB mutant’s growth defect. We conclude that manganese accumulation mediated by the SsaB transport system imparts virulence by enabling cell growth in oxygen through SodA-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:24750294

  14. ESA SSA Space Radiation Expert Service Centre: the Importance of Community Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Norma; Dierckxsens, Mark; Kruglanski, Michel; De Donder, Erwin; Calders, Stijn; Messios, Neophytos; Glover, Alexi

    2017-04-01

    End-users in a wide range of sectors both in space and on the ground are affected by space weather. In the frame of its Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme (http://swe.ssa.esa.int/) the European Space Agency (ESA) is establishing a Space Weather (SWE) Service Network to support end-users in three ways: mitigate the effects of space weather on their systems, reduce costs, and improve reliability. Almost 40 expert groups from institutes and organisations across Europe contribute to this Network organised in five Expert Service Centres (ESCs) - Solar Weather, Heliospheric Weather, Space Radiation, Ionospheric Weather, Geomagnetic Conditions. To understand the end-user needs, the ESCs are supported by the SSCC (SSA Space Weather Coordination Centre) that offers first line support to the end-users. Here we present the mission of the Space Radiation ESC (R-ESC) (http://swe.ssa.esa.int/space-radiation) and the space domain services it supports. Furthermore, we describe how the R-ESC project complements past and ongoing projects both on national level as well as international (e.g. EU projects), emphasizing the importance of inter-disciplinary communication between different communities ranging from scientists, engineers to end-users. Such collaboration is needed if basic science is to be used most efficiently for the development of products and tools that provide end-users with what they actually need. Additionally, feedback from the various communities (projects) is also essential when defining future projects.

  15. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z.; Nesic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and momentum flux data above the canopy along with meteorological and soils data at the BOREAS SSA-OA site from mid-April to the end of the year for 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  16. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Understory Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z.; Nesic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and momentum flux data under the canopy along with meteorological and soils data at the BOREAS SSA-OA site from mid-October to mid-November of 1993 and throughout all of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  17. BOREAS TF-9 SSA-OBS Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Massheder, Jonathan M.; Moncrieff, John B.; Rayment, Mark B.; Jarvis, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-9 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and water vapor flux data at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site during the growing season of 1994 and most of the year for 1996. From the winter of 1995 to 1996, soil temperature data were also collected and provided. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  18. 78 FR 69936 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8955-SSA

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  20. 20 CFR 439.400 - What are my responsibilities as an SSA awarding official?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  1. An application of the Krylov-FSP-SSA method to parameter fitting with maximum likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Khanh N.; Sidje, Roger B.

    2017-12-01

    Monte Carlo methods such as the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) have traditionally been employed in gene regulation problems. However, there has been increasing interest to directly obtain the probability distribution of the molecules involved by solving the chemical master equation (CME). This requires addressing the curse of dimensionality that is inherent in most gene regulation problems. The finite state projection (FSP) seeks to address the challenge and there have been variants that further reduce the size of the projection or that accelerate the resulting matrix exponential. The Krylov-FSP-SSA variant has proved numerically efficient by combining, on one hand, the SSA to adaptively drive the FSP, and on the other hand, adaptive Krylov techniques to evaluate the matrix exponential. Here we apply this Krylov-FSP-SSA to a mutual inhibitory gene network synthetically engineered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which bimodality arises. We show numerically that the approach can efficiently approximate the transient probability distribution, and this has important implications for parameter fitting, where the CME has to be solved for many different parameter sets. The fitting scheme amounts to an optimization problem of finding the parameter set so that the transient probability distributions fit the observations with maximum likelihood. We compare five optimization schemes for this difficult problem, thereby providing further insights into this approach of parameter estimation that is often applied to models in systems biology where there is a need to calibrate free parameters. Work supported by NSF grant DMS-1320849.

  2. BOREAS TF-5 SSA-OJP Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Vogel, Christoph; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux (BOREAS TF-5) team collected tower flux data at the BOREAS Southern Study Area Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) site through the growing season of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  3. BOREAS TF-7 SSA-OBS Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Pattey, Elizabeth; Desjardins, Raymond L.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-7 team collected meteorological data as well as energy, carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, and nitrous oxide flux data at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site. The data were collected from 24-May to 19-Sep-1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  4. SERM Forest Cover Data Layers of the SSA in Vector Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickeson, Jaime; Gruszka, Fern; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set was prepared by the SERM-FBIU. The data include information on forest parameters and cover the area in and near the BOREAS SSA, excluding the PANP. The data were produced from aerial photography taken as recently as 1988.

  5. BOREAS TF-4 SSA-YJP Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Canopy Condition Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striegl, Robert; Wickland, Kimberly; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux (BOREAS TF-4) team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and water vapor flux data at the BOREAS Southern Study Area-Young Jack Pine (SSA-YJP) site during the growing season of 1994. In addition, meteorological data were collected both above and within the canopy. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  6. Understanding Supermassive Black Hole Growth Mechanisms in the SSA22 Protocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonine, Brett; Lehmer, Bret

    2018-01-01

    The SSA22 protocluster is a collection of galaxies at redshift z = 3.09, corresponding to a look back time of 11.6 billion years. Observations of the protocluster allow for the investigation of galaxy properties of such protocluster environments in the early universe, potentially giving insight into the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters visible in the local universe (e.g., the Coma Cluster). Compared to other field galaxies at a similar redshift, a larger fraction of galaxies in SSA22 have been found to possess active galactic nuclei (AGN). This enhanced AGN activity suggests a relationship between the environment within the cluster and the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). I will clarify the role that the protocluster environment at z = 3.09 plays in enhancing the growth of SMBHs in the cluster. To accomplish this, we are analyzing recently obtained WFC3 F160W data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in SSA22, and equivalent archival CANDELS data in the Hubble Deep Field-North, to compare the merger rates and stellar mass distributions of galaxies in the SSA22 protocluster and in the field. Our goal is to assess the relative role that mergers play in enhancing the SMBH growth observed in over-dense regions in the z = 3 Universe.

  7. Understanding Large-scale Structure in the SSA22 Protocluster Region Using Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, Michael W.; Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Naoz, Smadar; Primack, Joel R.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the nature and evolution of large-scale structure within the SSA22 protocluster region at z = 3.09 using cosmological simulations. A redshift histogram constructed from current spectroscopic observations of the SSA22 protocluster reveals two separate peaks at z = 3.065 (blue) and z = 3.095 (red). Based on these data, we report updated overdensity and mass calculations for the SSA22 protocluster. We find {δ }b,{gal}=4.8+/- 1.8 and {δ }r,{gal}=9.5+/- 2.0 for the blue and red peaks, respectively, and {δ }t,{gal}=7.6+/- 1.4 for the entire region. These overdensities correspond to masses of {M}b=(0.76+/- 0.17)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ , {M}r=(2.15+/- 0.32)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ , and {M}t=(3.19+/- 0.40)× {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ for the red, blue, and total peaks, respectively. We use the Small MultiDark Planck (SMDPL) simulation to identify comparably massive z∼ 3 protoclusters, and uncover the underlying structure and ultimate fate of the SSA22 protocluster. For this analysis, we construct mock redshift histograms for each simulated z∼ 3 protocluster, quantitatively comparing them with the observed SSA22 data. We find that the observed double-peaked structure in the SSA22 redshift histogram corresponds not to a single coalescing cluster, but rather the proximity of a ∼ {10}15{h}-1 {M}ȯ protocluster and at least one > {10}14{h}-1 {M}ȯ cluster progenitor. Such associations in the SMDPL simulation are easily understood within the framework of hierarchical clustering of dark matter halos. We finally find that the opportunity to observe such a phenomenon is incredibly rare, with an occurrence rate of 7.4{h}3 {{{Gpc}}}-3. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  8. MELiSSA Pilot Plant: A facility for ground demonstration of a closed life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godia, Francesc; Fossen, Arnaud; Peiro, Enrique; Gerbi, Olivier; Dussap, Gilles; Leys, Natalie; Arnau, Carolina; Milian, Ernest

    MELiSSA (Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is an international collaborative effort focused on the development of a Life Support System for long-term Space missions. The goals of the MELiSSA loop are the recovery of food, water and oxygen from wastes, i.e. CO2 and organic wastes, using light as a source of energy. It is conceived as a series of compartments, each one performing a specific function within this cycle, inspired in the terrestrial ecological systems. Each one of the compartments is colonized with specific bacteria or higher plants depending on its dedicated function. Therefore, its design and operational conditions should guarantee that only a given specific biological activity takes place in each compartment. Moreover, this has to be done in a controlled manner, both at the subsystems level (i.e., compartments) and at the overall system level (i.e., complete loop). In order to achieve the complete operation of such a Closed Ecological System, in a first step each compartment has to be developed at individual level, and its operation demonstrated under its associated control law. In a second step, the complete loop needs to be integrated by the connection of the different compartments in the gas, loop and solid phases. An extensive demonstration of MELiSSA loop under terrestrial conditions is a mandatory step in the process of its adaptation to space. This is the main goal of the MPP. The demonstration scenario for the MPP is the respiration equivalent of a human being, and production of 20 percent of the diet of one person. To serve this goal, the different compartments of the MELiSSA loop have been designed and sized at the pilot scale level, and further characterized. Nowadays, the focus of the MELiSSA Pilot Plant is on the integration of its compartments. To this end, the integration challenge is concentrated in three compartments devoted to the following functions: nitrification (Compartment 3, an axenic co-culture of Nitrosomonas

  9. BOREAS RSS-17 Xylem Flux Density Measurements at the SSA-OBS Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea; McDonald, Kyle; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As part of its efforts to determine environmental and phenological states from radar imagery, the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-17 team collected in situ tree xylem flow measurements for one growing season on five Picea mariana (black spruce) trees. The data were collected to obtain information on the temporal and spatial variability in water uptake by trees in the Southern Study Area-Old Black Spruce (SSA-OBS) stand in the BOREAS SSA. Temporally, the data were collected in 30-minute intervals for 120 days from 31 May 1994 until 27 September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The xylem flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. The Process of Parallelizing the Conjunction Prediction Algorithm of ESA's SSA Conjunction Prediction Service Using GPGPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, M.; Navarro, V.; Martin, L.; Fletcher, E.

    2013-08-01

    Space Situational Awareness[8] (SSA) is defined as the comprehensive knowledge, understanding and maintained awareness of the population of space objects, the space environment and existing threats and risks. As ESA's SSA Conjunction Prediction Service (CPS) requires the repetitive application of a processing algorithm against a data set of man-made space objects, it is crucial to exploit the highly parallelizable nature of this problem. Currently the CPS system makes use of OpenMP[7] for parallelization purposes using CPU threads, but only a GPU with its hundreds of cores can fully benefit from such high levels of parallelism. This paper presents the adaptation of several core algorithms[5] of the CPS for general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) using NVIDIAs Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA).

  11. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen 1996 Water Surface Film Capping Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billesbach, David P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. The data described in this document were made by the TF-11 team at the SSA-Fen site to quantify the effect that the films observed to form on open water surfaces had on the transfer of carbon dioxide and methane from the water to the air. Measurements of fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane were made in 1994 and in 1996 using the chamber flux method. A gas chromatograph and a LI-COR LI-6200 were used to measure concentrations and to calculate the fluxes. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  12. BOREAS TF-11 CO2 and CH4 Flux Data from the SSA-Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, David W.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team collected several data sets in its efforts to fully describe the flux and site characteristics at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide at the SSA-Fen site measured using static chambers. The measurements were conducted as part of a 2 x 2 factorial experiment in which we added carbon (300 g/sq m as wheat straw) and nitrogen (6 g/sq m as urea) to four replicate locations in the vicinity of the TF-11 tower. In addition to siting and treatment variables, it reports air temperature and water table height relative to the average peat surface during each measurement. The data set covers the period from the first week of June 1994 through the second week of September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  13. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen 1995 Leaf Area Index Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. These data are LAI measurements made by the TF-11 team throughout the 1995 growing season. The data include the LAI of plants that fall into six categories: total, Carex spp., Betula pumila, Menyanthes trifoliata, Salix spp., and other vascular plants. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  14. Vector Topographic Map Data over the BOREAS NSA and SSA in SIF Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, David; Nickeson, Jaime; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains vector contours and other features of individual topographic map sheets from the National Topographic Series (NTS). The map sheet files were received in Standard Interchange Format (SIF) and cover the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Northern Study Area (NSA) and Southern Study Area (SSA) at scales of 1:50,000 and 1:250,000. The individual files are stored in compressed Unix tar archives.

  15. Higher Plants in Space for MELiSSA -Literature Review and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabrodina, Marina; Kittang, Ann-Iren; Coelho, Liz Helena; Karoliussen, Irene; Aase Wolff, Silje; Iversen, Tor-Henning

    The human exploration of space requires the development of closed life support systems to regenerate oxygen, purify water, and produce food. MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a model system for advanced life support based on different microbial species and higher plants. The main objective of the LiRHiPliSMe (Literature Review of Higher Plants in Space for MELiSSA) project was to elaborate the preliminary roadmap for higher plant research activities for the MELiSSA project Phase 2 (Preliminary Space Experiments). The first task was to establish an understanding of the current knowledge concerning how higher plant will adapt to Moon/Mars physical factors different from Earth with focus on reduced gravity, space radiation, variations in magnetic field and combined effects of these factors. The literature related to how Moon/Mars physical factors can affect genetic processes, growth regulators, development, morphology, water and nutrients transport, gas exchange and metabolism of higher plants during one life cycle were collected. The possible effects of the space environment on the plant role as a food and on the mass balance in a Life Support System that includes a Higher Plant Compartment are reviewed. Based on this literature review there was made an assessment of where new or extended scientific knowledge about space factors effects on higher plant growth and development is needed. The requirements for research activities on higher plants in enclosed life support systems were identified. The required higher plant research activities for MELiSSA phase 2 both on ground and in space were placed in a timescale from the present until higher plants can be grown in closed life support systems on Moon and Mars.

  16. Next generation of space based sensor for application in the SSA space weather domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Frank; Kudela, Karel; Behrens, Joerg

    Next generation of space based sensor for application in the SSA space weather domain. F. Jansen1, K. Kudela2, J. Behrens1 and NESTEC consortium3 1DLR, Bremen, Germany 2IEP SAS Kosice, Slovakia 3NESTEC consortium members (DLR Bremen, DESY Hamburg, MPS Katlenburg-Lindau, CTU Prague, University of Twente, IEP-SAS Kosice, UCL/MSSL, University of Manchester, University of Surrey, Hermanus Magnetic Observatory, North-West University Potchefsroom, University of Montreal) High energy solar and galactic cosmic rays have twofold importance for the SSA space weather domain. Cosmic rays have dangerous effects for space, air and ground based assets, but on the other side cosmic rays are direct measure tools for real time space weather warning. A review of space weather related SSA results from operating global cosmic ray networks (especially those by neutron monitors and by muon directional telescopes), its limitations and main questions to be solved, is presented. Especially those recent results, received in real time and with high temporal resolution, are reviewed and discussed. In addition the relevance of these monitors and telescopes in forecasting geomagnetic disturbances are checked. Based on this study result, a next generation of highly miniaturized hybrid silicon pixel device (Medipix sensor) will be described for the following, beyond state-of-the-art application: a SSA satellite for high energy solar and galactic cosmic ray spectrum measurement, with a space plasma environment data package and CME real time imaging by means of cosmic rays. All data management and processing will be carried out on the satellite in real time. Insofar a high reduction of data and transmission to ground station of finalized space weather relevant data and images are foreseen.

  17. BOREAS TF-4 CO2 and CH4 Chamber Flux Data from the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Dean; Striegl, Robert; Wickland, Kimberly; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-4 team measured fluxes of CO2 and CH4 across the soil-air interface in four ages of jack pine forest at the BOREAS SSA during August 1993 to March 1995. Gross and net flux of CO2 and flux of CH4 between soil and air are presented for 24 chamber sites in mature jack pine forest, 20-year-old, 4-year-old, and clear cut areas. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  18. SUBSTRUCTURE WITHIN THE SSA22 PROTOCLUSTER AT z ≈ 3.09

    SciTech Connect

    Topping, Michael W.; Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C., E-mail: mtopping@astro.ucla.edu

    We present the results of a densely sampled spectroscopic survey of the SSA22 protocluster at z ≈ 3.09. Our sample with Keck/LRIS spectroscopy includes 106 Ly α emitters (LAEs) and 40 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 3.05–3.12. These galaxies are contained within the 9′ × 9′ region in which the protocluster was discovered, which also hosts the maximum galaxy overdensity in the SSA22 region. The redshift histogram of our spectroscopic sample reveals two distinct peaks, at z = 3.069 (blue; 43 galaxies) and z = 3.095 (red; 103 galaxies). Furthermore, objects in the blue and red peaks aremore » segregated on the sky, with galaxies in the blue peak concentrating toward the western half of the field. These results suggest that the blue and red redshift peaks represent two distinct structures in physical space. Although the double-peaked redshift histogram is traced in the same manner by LBGs and LAEs, and brighter and fainter galaxies, we find that 9 out of 10 X-ray AGNs in SSA22, and all 7 spectroscopically confirmed giant Ly α “blobs,” reside in the red peak. We combine our data set with sparsely sampled spectroscopy from the literature over a significantly wider area, finding preliminary evidence that the double-peaked structure in redshift space extends beyond the region of our dense spectroscopic sampling. In order to fully characterize the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and evolution of large-scale structure in the SSA22 overdensity, we require the measurement of large samples of LAE and LBG redshifts over a significantly wider area, as well as detailed comparisons with cosmological simulations of massive cluster formation.« less

  19. BOREAS TF-2 SSA-OA Tethersonde Meteorological and Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, A. James; Mickle, Robert E.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux-2 (BOREAS TF-2) team collected meteorological and ozone measurements from instruments mounted below a tethered balloon. These data were collected at the Southern Study Area Old Aspen (SSA-OA) site to extend meteorological and ozone measurements made from the flux tower to heights of 300 m. The tethersonde operated during the fall of 1993 and the spring, summer, and fall of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  20. Prediction of NOx emissions from a simplified biodiesel surrogate by applying stochastic simulation algorithms (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvarborna, Hamid; Kumar, Ashok; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2017-03-01

    A stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) approach is implemented with the components of a simplified biodiesel surrogate to predict NOx (NO and NO2) emission concentrations from the combustion of biodiesel. The main reaction pathways were obtained by simplifying the previously derived skeletal mechanisms, including saturated methyl decenoate (MD), unsaturated methyl 5-decanoate (MD5D), and n-decane (ND). ND was added to match the energy content and the C/H/O ratio of actual biodiesel fuel. The MD/MD5D/ND surrogate model was also equipped with H2/CO/C1 formation mechanisms and a simplified NOx formation mechanism. The predicted model results are in good agreement with a limited number of experimental data at low-temperature combustion (LTC) conditions for three different biodiesel fuels consisting of various ratios of unsaturated and saturated methyl esters. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) of predicted values are 0.0020, 0.0018, and 0.0025 for soybean methyl ester (SME), waste cooking oil (WCO), and tallow oil (TO), respectively. The SSA model showed the potential to predict NOx emission concentrations, when the peak combustion temperature increased through the addition of ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD) to biodiesel. The SSA method used in this study demonstrates the possibility of reducing the computational complexity in biodiesel emissions modelling.

  1. Surviving space flight: case study on MELiSSA's CIII nitrifying compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgrande, Chiara; Lasseur, Christophe; Mastroleo, Felice; Paille, Christel; Leys, Natalie; Morozova, Julia; Ilyin, Vyacheslav; Clauwaert, Peter; Christiaens, Marlies E. R.; Lindeboom, Ralph E. F.; Vlaeminck, Siegfried; Prat, Delphine; Arroyo, Jose M. C.; Conincx, Ilse; Van Hoey, Olivier; Roume, Hugo; Udert, Kai; Sas, Benedikt

    2016-07-01

    Space synthetic biology offers key opportunities for long-term space missions. Planets mining, terraformation, space medicine and Life Support technologies would all benefit from an integrative biological approach. However, space is a harsh environment for life: microgravity, temperature, UV and cosmic radiation can affect the health and functionality of microorganisms and plants, possibly preventing the optimal performance of the systems. The European Space Agency's Life Support System (MELiSSA) has been developed as a model for future long term Space missions and Space habitation. MELiSSA is a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem with microorganisms and higher, that aims at completely recycling gas, liquid and solid waste. In this study, the survival and functional activity after Lower Earth Orbit conditions of microbial nitrogen conversions, relevant for MELiSSA's CIII compartment, was tested. Synthetic communities containing Nitrosomonas europeae, Nitrosomonas ureae, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Nitrospira moscoviensis and Cupriavidus pinatubonensis were exposed to the Lower Earth Orbit conditions of the International Space Station (ISS) for 7 days. Nitrosomonas europeae, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Cupriavidus pinatubonensis, and three mixed communities (a urine nitrification sludge, a sludge containing aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria (OLAND), and an aquaculture sludge containing ammonia oxidizing archaea) were exposed to Lower Earth Orbit conditions for 44 days. Survival after both space flights was demonstrated because nitritation, nitratation, denitrification and anammox activity could be restored at a rate comparable to ground storage conditions. Our results validate the potential survival feasibility and suggest future space applications for N-related microorganisms.

  2. Pregnancy Outcomes in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases and Anti-Ro/SSA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cimaz, Rolando; Caporali, Roberto; Ramoni, Véronique; Buyon, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are associated with neonatal lupus (congenital heart block (CHB), neonatal transient skin rash, hematological and hepatic abnormalities), but do not negatively affects other gestational outcomes, and the general outcome of these pregnancies is now good, when followed by experienced multidisciplinary teams. The prevalence of CHB, defined as an atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the neonatal period (0–27 days after birth), in the offspring of an anti-Ro/SSA-positive women is 1–2%, of neonatal lupus rash around 10–20%, while laboratory abnormalities in asymptomatic babies can be detected in up to 27% of cases. The risk of recurrence of CHB is ten times higher. Most of the mothers are asymptomatic at delivery and are identified only by the birth of an affected child. Half of these asymptomatic women develop symptoms of a rheumatic disease, most commonly arthralgias and xerophtalmia, but few develop lupus nephritis. A standard therapy for CHB is still matter of investigation, although fluorinated corticosteroids have been reported to be effective for associated cardiomyopathy. Serial echocardiograms and obstetric sonograms, performed at least every 1–2 weeks starting from the 16th week of gestational age, are recommended in anti-Ro/SSA-positive pregnant women to detect early fetal abnormalities that might be a target of preventive therapy. PMID:20012231

  3. 20 CFR 411.597 - Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the outcome-milestone payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....597 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.597 Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the...

  4. 20 CFR 411.597 - Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the outcome-milestone payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....597 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.597 Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the...

  5. 20 CFR 411.597 - Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the outcome-milestone payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....597 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.597 Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the...

  6. 20 CFR 411.597 - Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the outcome-milestone payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....597 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.597 Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the...

  7. 20 CFR 411.597 - Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the outcome-milestone payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....597 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.597 Will SSA periodically review the outcome payment system and the...

  8. Swarm Utilisation Analysis: LEO satellite observations for the ESA's SSA Space Weather network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervalishvili, Guram; Stolle, Claudia; Rauberg, Jan; Olsen, Nils; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Gullikstad Johnsen, Magnar; Hall, Chris

    2017-04-01

    ESA's (European Space Agency) constellation mission Swarm was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The three satellites achieved their final constellation on 17 April 2014 and since then Swarm-A and Swarm-C orbiting the Earth at about 470 km (flying side-by-side) and Swarm-B at about 520 km altitude. Each of Swarm satellite carries instruments with high precision to measure magnetic and electric fields, neutral and plasma densities, and TEC (Total Electron Content) for which a dual frequency GPS receiver is used. SUA (Swarm Utilisation Analysis) is a project of the ESA's SSA (Space Situational Awareness) SWE (Space Weather) program. Within this framework GFZ (German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam, Germany) and DTU (National Space Institute, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark) have developed two new Swarm products ROT (Rate Of change of TEC) and PEJ (Location and intensity level of Polar Electrojets), respectively. ROT is derived as the first time derivative from the Swarm measurements of TEC at 1 Hz sampling. ROT is highly relevant for users in navigation and communications: strong plasma gradients cause GPS signal degradation or even loss of GPS signal. Also, ROT is a relevant space weather asset irrespective of geomagnetic activity, e.g., high amplitude values of ROT occur during all geomagnetic conditions. PEJ is derived from the Swarm measurements of the magnetic field strength at 1 Hz sampling. PEJ has a high-level importance for power grid companies since the polar electrojet is a major cause for ground-induced currents. ROT and PEJ together with five existing Swarm products TEC, electron density, IBI (Ionospheric Bubble Index), FAC (Field-Aligned Current), and vector magnetic field build the SUA service prototype. This prototype will be integrated into ESA's SSA Space Weather network as a federated service and will be available soon from ESA's SSA SWE Ionospheric Weather and Geomagnetic Conditions Expert Service Centres (ESCs).

  9. Space Environment Forecasting with Neutron Monitors: Establishing a novel service for the ESA SSA Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Souvatzoglou, George; Paschalis, Pavlos; Sarlanis, Christos; Dimitroulakos, John; Gerontidou, Maria

    2013-04-01

    High-energy particles released at the Sun during a solar flare or a very energetic coronal mass ejection, result to a significant intensity increase at neutron monitor measurements known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Due to their space weather impact (i.e. risks and failures at communication and navigation systems, spacecraft electronics and operations, space power systems, manned space missions, and commercial aircraft operations) it is crucial to establish a real-time operational system that would be in place to issue reliable and timely GLE Alerts. Currently, the Cosmic Ray group of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens is working towards the establishment of a Neutron Monitor Service that will be made available via the Space Weather Portal operated by the European Space Agency (ESA), under the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Program. To this end, a web interface providing data from multiple Neutron Monitor stations as well as an upgraded GLE Alert will be provided. Both services are now under testing and validation and they will probably enter to an operational phase next year. The core of this Neutron Monitor Service is the GLE Alert software, and therefore, the main goal of this research effort is to upgrade the existing GLE Alert software, to minimize the probability of a false alarm and to enhance the usability of the corresponding results. The ESA Neutron Monitor Service is building upon the infrastructure made available with the implementation of the High-Resolution Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB). In this work the structure of the Neutron Monitor Service for ESA SSA Program and the impact of the novel GLE Alert Service that will be made available to future users via ESA SSA web portal will be presented and further discussed.

  10. Overview of Human-Centric Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Science and Technology (S&T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianni, J.; Aleva, D.; Ellis, S.

    2012-09-01

    A number of organizations, within the government, industry, and academia, are researching ways to help humans understand and react to events in space. The problem is both helped and complicated by the fact that there are numerous data sources that need to be planned (i.e., tasked), collected, processed, analyzed, and disseminated. A large part of the research is in support of the Joint Space Operational Center (JSpOC), National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC), and similar organizations. Much recent research has been specifically targeting the JSpOC Mission System (JMS) which has provided a unifying software architecture. This paper will first outline areas of science and technology (S&T) related to human-centric space situational awareness (SSA) and space command and control (C2) including: 1. Object visualization - especially data fused from disparate sources. Also satellite catalog visualizations that convey the physical relationships between space objects. 2. Data visualization - improve data trend analysis as in visual analytics and interactive visualization; e.g., satellite anomaly trends over time, space weather visualization, dynamic visualizations 3. Workflow support - human-computer interfaces that encapsulate multiple computer services (i.e., algorithms, programs, applications) into a 4. Command and control - e.g., tools that support course of action (COA) development and selection, tasking for satellites and sensors, etc. 5. Collaboration - improve individuals or teams ability to work with others; e.g., video teleconferencing, shared virtual spaces, file sharing, virtual white-boards, chat, and knowledge search. 6. Hardware/facilities - e.g., optimal layouts for operations centers, ergonomic workstations, immersive displays, interaction technologies, and mobile computing. Secondly we will provide a survey of organizations working these areas and suggest where more attention may be needed. Although no detailed master plan exists for human

  11. Findings from the UK and Canadian Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Experimentation during the Relocation of SKYNET 5A Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, A.; Scott, L.; Feline, W.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the planning, execution, analysis and lessons identified from a collaborative Space Situational Awareness (SSA) experiment to observe the SKYNET 5A satellite during a series of orbital maneuvers that occurred in the summer of 2015. In March 2015 Airbus Defence and Space (Airbus DS) announced its intention to relocate the SKYNET 5A satellite from the Atlantic to the Asia Pacific region to increase its global coverage; this provided an opportunity to observe this high value asset to explore the challenges and technical solutions related to deep space SSA. Within the UK the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl, part of the UK Ministry of Defence) were established as the lead agency to plan the observation campaign utilising operational and emerging experimental SSA capabilities. The campaign was then expanded to involve Canada, the United States and Australia under the auspices of the Combined Space Operations (CSpO) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to further explore the coordination of observations between operational systems and potential fusion of data collected using experimental SSA assets. The focus for this paper is the collaborative work between Dstl and Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) that featured a period of experimentation to explore methods that enable cross cueing between ground-based and space-based SSA sensors, namely the UK Starbrook facility (located on the island of Cyprus), and NEOSSat/ Sapphire space surveillance satellites located in low-Earth orbit. A number of conclusions and lessons are identified in this paper that seek to inform the wider SSA community on the challenges, potential solutions and benefits of operating a distributed SSA architecture such as the one utilized during this experiment.

  12. BOREAS Forest Cover Data Layers over the SSA-MSA in Raster Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickeson, Jaime; Gruszka, F; Hall, F.

    2000-01-01

    This data set, originally provided as vector polygons with attributes, has been processed by BORIS staff to provide raster files that can be used for modeling or for comparison purposes. The original data were received as ARC/INFO coverages or as export files from SERM. The data include information on forest parameters for the BOREAS SSA-MSA. Most of the data used for this product were acquired by BORIS in 1993; the maps were produced from aerial photography taken as recently as 1988. The data are stored in binary, image format files.

  13. BOREAS Elevation Contours over the NSA and SSA in ARC/INFO Generate Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, David; Nickeson, Jaime; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set was prepared by BORIS Staff by reformatting the original data into the ARC/INFO Generate format. The original data were received in SIF at a scale of 1:50,000. BORIS staff could not find a format document or commercial software for reading SIF; the BOREAS HYD-08 team pro-vided some C source code that could read some of the SIF files. The data cover the BOREAS NSA and SSA. The original data were compiled from information available in the 1970s and 1980s. The data are available in ARC/INFO Generate format files.

  14. BOREAS RSS-7 Landsat TM LAI IMages of the SSA and NSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Chen, Jing; Cihlar, Josef

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Remote Sensing Science (BOREAS RSS-7) team used Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images processed at CCRS to produce images of Leaf Area Index (LAI) for the BOREAS study areas. Two images acquired on 06-Jun and 09-Aug-1991 were used for the SSA, and one image acquired on 09-Jun-1994 was used for the NSA. The LAI images are based on ground measurements and Landsat TM Reduced Simple Ratio (RSR) images. The data are stored in binary image-format files.

  15. BOREAS TF-8 NSA-OJP and SSA-OBS Ceilometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kathleen E.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Fitzjarrald, David R.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-8 team used ceilometers to collect data on the fraction of the sky covered with clouds and the cloud height. Included with these data is the surface-based lifting condensation level, derived from temperature and humidity values acquired at the flux tower at the NSA-OJP site. Ceilo-meter data were collected at the NSA-OJP site in 1994 and at the NSA-OJP and SSA-OBS sites in 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  16. BOREAS Soils Data over the SSA in Raster Format and AEAC Projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, David; Rostad, Harold; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set consists of GIS layers that describe the soils of the BOREAS SSA. The original data were submitted as vector layers that were gridded by BOREAS staff to a 30-meter pixel size in the AEAC projection. These data layers include the soil code (which relates to the soil name), modifier (which also relates to the soil name), and extent (indicating the extent that this soil exists within the polygon). There are three sets of these layers representing the primary, secondary, and tertiary soil characteristics. Thus, there is a total of nine layers in this data set along with supporting files. The data are stored in binary, image format files.

  17. BOREAS TF-2 SSA-OA Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Precipitation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Harold; Mickle, Robert; Staebler, Ralf; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux-2 (BOREAS TF-2) team collected energy, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and momentum flux data above the canopy and in profiles through the canopy, along with meteorological data at the BOREAS Southern Study Area-Old Aspen (SSA-OA) site. Above-canopy measurements began in early February and ran through mid-September of 1994. Measurements were collected over a longer period of 1994 than most BOREAS flux sites. Daily precipitation data from several gauges were also collected. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  18. MELiSSA third compartment: Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi axenic cultures in bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruvellier, Nelly; Lasseur, Christophe; Poughon, Laurent; Creuly, Catherine; Dussap, Gilles

    Nitrogen is a key element for the life and its balance on Earth is regulated by the nitrogen cycle. This loop includes several steps among which nitrification that permits the transformation of the ammonium into nitrate. The MELiSSA loop is an artificial ecosystem designed for life support systems (LSS). It is based on the carbon and nitrogen cycles and the recycling of the non-edible part of the higher plants and the waste produced by the crew. In this order, all the wastes are collected in the first compartment to degrade them into organic acids and CO2. These compounds are joining the second compartment which is a photoheterotrophic compartment where at the outlet an organic-free medium containing ammonium is produced. This solution will be the substrate of the third compartment where nitrification is done. This compartment has to oxidize the ammonium into nitrate, and this biological reaction needs two steps. In the MELiSSA loop, the nitrification is carried out by two bacteria: Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC® 19718™ which is oxidizing ammonia into nitrite and Nitrobacter winogradskyi ATCC® 25391™ which is producing nitrate from nitrite in the third compartment. These two bacteria are growing in axenic conditions on a fixed bed bioreactor filled with Biostyr® beads. The nitrogen compounds are controlled by Ionic Chromatography and colorimetric titration for each sample. The work presented here deals with the culture of both bacteria in pure cultures and mixed cultures in stirred and aerated bioreactors of different volumes. The first aim of our work is the characterization of the bacteria growth in bioreactors and in the nitrifying fixed-bed column. The experimental results confirm that the growth is slow; the maximal growth rate in suspended cultures is 0.054h-1 for Nitrosomonas europaea and 0.022h-1 for Nitrobacter winogradskyi. Mixed cultures are difficult to control and operate but one could be done for more than 500 hours. The characterization of the

  19. Effect of lime addition during sewage sludge treatment on characteristics of resulting SSA when it is used in cementitious materials.

    PubMed

    Vouk, D; Nakic, D; Štirmer, N; Baricevic, A

    2017-02-01

    Final disposal of sewage sludge is important not only in terms of satisfying the regulations, but the aspect of choosing the optimal wastewater treatment technology, including the sludge treatment. In most EU countries, significant amounts of stabilized and dewatered sludge are incinerated, and sewage sludge ash (SSA) is generated as a by product. At the same time, lime is one of the commonly used additives in the sewage sludge treatment primarily to stabilize the sludge. In doing so, the question arose how desirable is such addition of lime if the sludge is subsequently incinerated, and the generated ash is further used in the production of cementitious materials. A series of mortars were prepared where 10-20% of the cement fraction was replaced by SSA. Since all three types of analyzed SSA (without lime, with lime added during sludge stabilization and with extra lime added during sludge incineration) yielded nearly same results, it can be concluded that if sludge incineration is accepted solution, lime addition during sludge treatment is unnecessary even from the standpoint of preserving the pozzolanic properties of the resulting SSA. Results of the research carried out on cement mortars point to the great possibilities of using SSA in concrete industry.

  20. Characterizing the Space Debris Environment with a Variety of SSA Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Eugene G.

    2010-01-01

    Damaging space debris spans a wide range of sizes and altitudes. Therefore no single method or sensor can fully characterize the space debris environment. Space debris researchers use a variety of radars and optical telescopes to characterize the space debris environment in terms of number, altitude, and inclination distributions. Some sensors, such as phased array radars, are designed to search a large volume of the sky and can be instrumental in detecting new breakups and cataloging and precise tracking of relatively large debris. For smaller debris sizes more sensitivity is needed which can be provided, in part, by large antenna gains. Larger antenna gains, however, produce smaller fields of view. Statistical measurements of the debris environment with less precise orbital parameters result. At higher altitudes, optical telescopes become the more sensitive instrument and present their own measurement difficulties. Space Situational Awareness, or SSA, is concerned with more than the number and orbits of satellites. SSA also seeks to understand such parameters as the function, shape, and composition of operational satellites. Similarly, debris researchers are seeking to characterize similar parameters for space debris to improve our knowledge of the risks debris poses to operational satellites as well as determine sources of debris for future mitigation. This paper will discuss different sensor and sensor types and the role that each plays in fully characterizing the space debris environment.

  1. SSA Building Blocks - Transforming Your Data and Applications into Operational Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, D.; Hawthorne, Shayn, L.; Higgins, J.

    The Electronic System Center's 850 Electronic Systems Group (ELSG) is currently using a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) to rapidly create net-centric experimental prototypes. This SOA has been utilized effectively across diverse mission areas, such as global air operations and rapid sensor tasking for improved space event management. The 850 ELSG has deployed a working, accredited, SOA on the SIPRNET and provided real-time space information to five separate distributed operations centers. The 850 ELSG has learned first-hand the power of SOAs for integrating DoD and non-DoD SSA data in a rapid and agile manner, allowing capabilities to be fielded and sensors to be integrated in weeks instead of months. This opens a world of opportunity to integrate University data and experimental or proof-of-concept data with sensitive sensors and sources to support developing an array of SSA products for approved users in and outside of the space community. This paper will identify how new capabilities can be proactively developed to rapidly answer critical needs when SOA methodologies are employed and identifies the operational utility and the far-reaching benefits realized by implementing a service-oriented architecture. We offer a new paradigm for how data and application producer's contributions are presented for the rest of the community to leverage.

  2. BOREAS TE-1 CH4 Flux Data Over The SSA-OA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Darwin; Papagno, Andrea; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. Particular emphasis was placed on nutrient biochemistry, the stores and transfers of organic carbon, and how the characteristics were related to measured methane fluxes. The overall transect in the Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) included the major plant communities and related soils that occurred in that section of the boreal forest. Soil physical, chemical, and biological measurements along the transect were used to characterize the static environment, which allowed them to be related to methane fluxes. Chamber techniques were used to provide a measure of methane production/uptake. Chamber measurements coupled with flask sampling were used to determine the seasonality of methane fluxes. This particular data set contains methane flux and soil profile methane concentration values from the SSA-OA site. The data were collected from 29-May to 17-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. BOREAS TE-1 CO2 and CH4 Flux Data Over the SSA-OBS Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Darwin; Papagno, Andrea; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. Particular emphasis was placed on nutrient biochemistry, the stores and transfers of organic carbon, and how the characteristics were related to measured methane fluxes. The overall transect in the Prince Albert National Park (Saskatchewan, Canada) included the major plant communities and related soils that occurred in that section of the boreal forest. Soil physical, chemical, and biological measurements along the transect were used to characterize the static environment, which allowed them to be related to methane fluxes. Chamber techniques were used to provide a measure of methane production/uptake. Chamber measurements coupled with flask sampling were used to determine the seasonality of methane fluxes. This particular data set contains carbon dioxide and methane flux values from the SSA-OBS site. The data were collected from 09-Jun to 04-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  4. Analysis of three-dimensionally proliferated sensor architectures for flexible SSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunio, Phillip M.; Flewelling, Brien

    2018-05-01

    The evolution of space into a congested, contested, and competitive regime drives a commensurate need for awareness of events there. As the number of systems on orbit grows, so will the need for sensing and tracking these systems. One avenue for advanced sensing capability is a widespread network of small but capable Space Situational Awareness (SSA) sensors, proliferated widely in the three-dimensional volume extending from the Earth's surface to the Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) belt, incorporating multiple different varieties and types of sensors. Due to the freedom of movement afforded by solid surfaces and atmosphere, some of these sensors may have substantial mobility. Accordingly, designing a network for maximum SSA coverage at reasonable cost may entail heterogeneous architectures with common logistics (including modular sensor packages or mobility platforms, which may be flexibly re-assigned). Smaller mobile sensors leveraging Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components and software are appealing for their ability to simplify logistics versus large, monolithic, uniquely-exquisite sensor systems. This paper examines concepts for such sensor systems, and analyzes the costs associated with their use, while assessing the benefits (including reduced gap time, weather resilience, and multiple-sensor coverage) that such an architecture enables. Recommendations for preferred modes and mixes of fielding sensors in a heterogeneous architecture are made, and directions for future related research are suggested.

  5. Solar Flare Prediction Science-to-Operations: the ESA/SSA SWE A-EFFort Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Themelis, Konstantinos; Magiati, Margarita; Angelopoulou, Georgia

    2016-07-01

    We attempt a synoptical overview of the scientific origins of the Athens Effective Solar Flare Forecasting (A-EFFort) utility and the actions taken toward transitioning it into a pre-operational service of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Programme. The preferred method for solar flare prediction, as well as key efforts to make it function in a fully automated environment by coupling calculations with near-realtime data-downloading protocols (from the Solar Dynamics Observatory [SDO] mission), pattern recognition (solar active-region identification) and optimization (magnetic connectivity by simulated annealing) will be highlighted. In addition, the entire validation process of the service will be described, with its results presented. We will conclude by stressing the need for across-the-board efforts and synergistic work in order to bring science of potentially limited/restricted interest into realizing a much broader impact and serving the best public interests. The above presentation was partially supported by the ESA/SSA SWE A-EFFort project, ESA Contract No. 4000111994/14/D/MRP. Special thanks go to the ESA Project Officers R. Keil, A. Glover, and J.-P. Luntama (ESOC), M. Bobra and C. Balmer of the SDO/HMI team at Stanford University, and M. Zoulias at the RCAAM of the Academy of Athens for valuable technical help.

  6. Meet EPA's Dan Nelson

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s Dan Nelson is the Director of the Human Research Protocol Office at the National Health and Environmental Effect Research Laboratory, Dan works to protect the rights and welfare of EPA’s research participants.

  7. A Cloud-based, Open-Source, Command-and-Control Software Paradigm for Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, R.; Thomas, J.

    With the rapid growth in the number of space actors, there has been a marked increase in the complexity and diversity of software systems utilized to support SSA target tracking, indication, warning, and collision avoidance. Historically, most SSA software has been constructed with "closed" proprietary code, which limits interoperability, inhibits the code transparency that some SSA customers need to develop domain expertise, and prevents the rapid injection of innovative concepts into these systems. Open-source aerospace software, a rapidly emerging, alternative trend in code development, is based on open collaboration, which has the potential to bring greater transparency, interoperability, flexibility, and reduced development costs. Open-source software is easily adaptable, geared to rapidly changing mission needs, and can generally be delivered at lower costs to meet mission requirements. This paper outlines Ball's COSMOS C2 system, a fully open-source, web-enabled, command-and-control software architecture which provides several unique capabilities to move the current legacy SSA software paradigm to an open source model that effectively enables pre- and post-launch asset command and control. Among the unique characteristics of COSMOS is the ease with which it can integrate with diverse hardware. This characteristic enables COSMOS to serve as the command-and-control platform for the full life-cycle development of SSA assets, from board test, to box test, to system integration and test, to on-orbit operations. The use of a modern scripting language, Ruby, also permits automated procedures to provide highly complex decision making for the tasking of SSA assets based on both telemetry data and data received from outside sources. Detailed logging enables quick anomaly detection and resolution. Integrated real-time and offline data graphing renders the visualization of the both ground and on-orbit assets simple and straightforward.

  8. BOREAS TE-18 Landsat TM Maximum Likelihood Classification Image of the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team focused its efforts on using remotely sensed data to characterize the successional and disturbance dynamics of the boreal forest for use in carbon modeling. The objective of this classification is to provide the BOREAS investigators with a data product that characterizes the land cover of the SSA. A Landsat-5 TM image from 02-Sep- 1994 was used to derive the classification. A technique was implemented that uses reflectances of various land cover types along with a geometric optical canopy model to produce spectral trajectories. These trajectories are used as training data to classify the image into the different land cover classes. These data are provided in a binary image file format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Center (DAAC).

  9. BOREAS TE-18 Landsat TM Physical Classification Image of the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team focused its efforts on using remotely sensed data to characterize the successional and disturbance dynamics of the boreal forest for use in carbon modeling. The objective of this classification is to provide the BOREAS investigators with a data product that characterizes the land cover of the SSA. A Landsat-5 TM image from 02-Sep-1994 was used to derive the classification. A technique was implemented that uses reflectances of various land cover types along with a geometric optical canopy model to produce spectral trajectories. These trajectories are used as training data to classify the image into the different land cover classes. These data are provided in a binary image file format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. BOREAS RSS-4 1994 Jack Pine Leaf Biochemistry and Modeled Spectra in the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Plummer, Stephen; Lucas, Neil; Dawson, Terry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-4 team focused its efforts on deriving estimates of LAI and leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen concentrations from remotely sensed data for input into the Forest BGC model. This data set contains measurements of jack pine (Pinus banksiana) needle biochemistry from the BOREAS SSA in July and August 1994. The data contain measurements of current and year-1 needle chlorophyll, nitrogen, lignin, cellulose, and water content for the OJP flux tower and nearby auxiliary sites. The data have been used to test a needle reflectance and transmittance model, LIBERTY (Dawson et al., in press). The source code for the model and modeled needle spectra for each of the sampled tower and auxiliary sites are provided as part of this data set. The LIBERTY model was developed and the predicted spectral data generated to parameterize a canopy reflectance model (North, 1996) for comparison with AVIRIS, POLDER, and PARABOLA data. The data and model source code are stored in ASCII files.

  11. BOREAS TF-11 CO2 and CH4 Concentration Data from the SSA-Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor); Valentine, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team collected several data sets in its efforts to fully describe the flux and site characteristics at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains temperature, pH, and concentration profiles of methane and carbon dioxide within the surface 50 cm of peat. The measurements were conducted as part of a 2 x 2 factorial experiment in which we added carbon (300 g/sq m as wheat straw) and nitro-gen (6 g/sq m as urea) to four replicate locations in the vicinity of the TF-11 tower. The data set covers the period from the first week of June 1994 through the second week of September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  12. BOREAS TF-4 CO2 and CH4 Soil Profile Data from the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striegl, Robert; Wickland, Kimberly; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux (BOREAS TF-4) team measured distributions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations for the upper 5 m of soil and unsaturated zone at the mature stand, upper 6 m at the 20-year-old stand, and the upper 1 m at the 8-year-old stand and clear cut area at the BOREAS Southern Study Area (SSA) during August 1993 to March 1995. Particle size and carbon content of the unsaturated deposits, precipitation, soil temperature and moisture, carbon and oxygen isotopes of soil CO2, and soil water chemistry are also presented. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  13. BOREAS RSS-8 BIOME-BGC SSA Simulation of Annual Water and Carbon Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Kimball, John

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-8 team performed research to evaluate the effect of seasonal weather and landcover heterogeneity on boreal forest regional water and carbon fluxes using a process-level ecosystem model, BIOME-BGC, coupled with remote sensing-derived parameter maps of key state variables. This data set contains derived maps of landcover type and crown and stem biomass as model inputs to determine annual evapotranspiration, gross primary production, autotrophic respiration, and net primary productivity within the BOREAS SSA-MSA, at a 30-m spatial resolution. Model runs were conducted over a 3-year period from 1994-1996; images are provided for each of those years. The data are stored in binary image format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. Batch Model for Batched Timestamps Data Analysis with Application to the SSA Disability Program

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Qingqi; Yuan, Ao; Che, Xuan; Huynh, Minh; Zhou, Chunxiao

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Disability Adjudication and Review (ODAR) is responsible for holding hearings, issuing decisions, and reviewing appeals as part of the Social Security Administration’s disability determining process. In order to control and process cases, the ODAR has established a Case Processing and Management System (CPMS) to record management information since December 2003. The CPMS provides a detailed case status history for each case. Due to the large number of appeal requests and limited resources, the number of pending claims at ODAR was over one million cases by March 31, 2015. Our National Institutes of Health (NIH) team collaborated with SSA and developed a Case Status Change Model (CSCM) project to meet the ODAR’s urgent need of reducing backlogs and improve hearings and appeals process. One of the key issues in our CSCM project is to estimate the expected service time and its variation for each case status code. The challenge is that the systems recorded job departure times may not be the true job finished times. As the CPMS timestamps data of case status codes showed apparent batch patterns, we proposed a batch model and applied the constrained least squares method to estimate the mean service times and the variances. We also proposed a batch search algorithm to determine the optimal batch partition, as no batch partition was given in the real data. Simulation studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed methods. Finally, we applied the method to analyze a real CPMS data from ODAR/SSA. PMID:27747132

  15. The ESA SSA NEO Coordination Centre contribution to NEO hazard monitoring and observational campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, Marco; Borgia, Barbara; Drolshagen, Gerhard; Koschny, Detlef; Perozzi, Ettore

    2015-08-01

    The NEO Coordination Centre (NEOCC) has recently been established in Frascati, near Rome, within the framework of the ESA Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Programme. Among its tasks is the coordination of observational activities related to the NEO hazard, and the distribution of relevant and up-to-date information on NEOs to both the scientific community and general users through its web portal (http://neo.ssa.esa.int).On the observational side, the NEOCC is linked to an increasingly large worldwide network of collaborating observatories, ranging from amateurs observers to large professional telescopes. The Centre organizes observation campaigns, alerting the network to suggest urgent or high-priority observations, and providing them with observational support.The NEOCC is also directly obtaining astrometric observations of high-priority targets, especially Virtual Impactors (VIs), on challenging objects as faint as magnitude 26.5, thanks to successful collaborations with ESO VLT in Chile and the INAF-sponsored LBT in Arizona. In addition, the Centre carries out regular monthly runs dedicated to NEO follow-up, recovery and survey activities with the 1-meter ESA OGS telescope in Tenerife.From a service perspective, the NEO System hosted at the NEOCC collects data and information on NEOs produced by various European services (e.g. NEODyS, EARN) and makes them available to a variety of users, with a particular focus on objects with possible collision solutions with the Earth. Among the tools provided through the web portal are the Risk List (a table of all known NEOs with impact solutions), a table of recent and upcoming close approaches, a database of physical properties of NEOs and the so-called Priority List, which allows observers to identify NEOs in most urgent need of observations, and prioritise their observational activities accordingly.The results of our recent observation campaigns and some major recent improvements to the NEO System will presented and

  16. The formation of the massive galaxies in the SSA22 z = 3.1 protocluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yamada, T.

    We study the properties of K-band-selected galaxies (K {sub AB} < 24) in the z = 3.09 SSA22 protocluster field. 430 galaxies at 2.6 < z {sub phot} < 3.6 are selected as potential protocluster members in a 112 arcmin{sup 2} area based on their photometric redshifts. We find that ≈20% of the massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} at z {sub phot} ∼ 3.1 have colors consistent with those of quiescent galaxies with ages >0.5 Gyr. This fraction increases to ≈50% after correcting for unrelated foreground/background objects. We also find that 30% of the massivemore » galaxies are heavily reddened, dusty, star-forming galaxies. Few such quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts are seen in typical survey fields. An excess surface density of 24 μm sources at z {sub phot} ∼ 3.1 is also observed, implying the presence of dusty star-formation activity in the protocluster. Cross-correlation with the X-ray data indicates that the fraction of K-band-selected protocluster galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is also high compared with the field. The sky distribution of the quiescent galaxies, the 24 μm sources, and the X-ray AGNs show clustering around a density peak of z = 3.1 Lyα emitters. A significant fraction of the massive galaxies have already become quiescent, while dusty star-formation is still active in the SSA22 protocluster. These findings indicate that we are witnessing the formation epoch of massive early-type galaxies in the centers of the predecessors to present-day rich galaxy clusters.« less

  17. Validation study - on-road evaluation of the Cooperative Intersection Collision Avoidance System - Stop Sign Assist sign : (CICAS-SSA Report #5).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-01

    The CICAS-SSA sign is a roadside driver support system that is intended to improve gap rejection at rural stop-controlled intersections. The CICAS-SSA system tracks vehicle locations on a major roadway and then displays a message to a driver on the m...

  18. 20 CFR 416.582 - Review within SSA that an overpayment is past due and legally enforceable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review within SSA that an overpayment is past due and legally enforceable. 416.582 Section 416.582 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Payment of Benefits, Overpayments...

  19. 42 CFR 401.132 - Materials in field offices of the Office of Hearings and Appeals, SSA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials in field offices of the Office of Hearings and Appeals, SSA. 401.132 Section 401.132 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.132 Materials in...

  20. 76 FR 5235 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA Internal Match)-Match Number 1014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ...; Computer Matching Program (SSA Internal Match)--Match Number 1014 AGENCY: Social Security Administration... regarding protections for such persons. The Privacy Act, as amended, regulates the use of computer matching....C. 552a, as amended, and the provisions of the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988...

  1. 76 FR 12397 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Bureau of the Public Debt (BPD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ...; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Bureau of the Public Debt (BPD))--Match Number 1038 AGENCY: Social Security... as shown above. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection... containing SSNs extracted from the Supplemental Security Record database. Exchanges for this computer...

  2. 78 FR 37875 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Bureau of the Fiscal Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ...: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching... above. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988... computer matching involving the Federal government could be performed and adding certain protections for...

  3. 76 FR 71417 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Law Enforcement Agencies (LEA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ...; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Law Enforcement Agencies (LEA)) Match Number 5001 AGENCY: Social Security... protections for such persons. The Privacy Act, as amended, regulates the use of computer matching by Federal... accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended by the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of...

  4. 75 FR 54213 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Office of Personnel Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... 1021 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (Public Law (Pub... computer matching involving the Federal government could be performed and adding certain protections for...

  5. 20 CFR 408.1205 - How can a State have SSA administer its State recognition payment program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recognition payment program? 408.1205 Section 408.1205 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Federal Administration of State Recognition Payments § 408.1205 How can a State have SSA administer its State recognition payment program? A State (or...

  6. 20 CFR 403.130 - What factors may the Commissioner consider in determining whether SSA will grant your application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What factors may the Commissioner consider in determining whether SSA will grant your application for testimony? 403.130 Section 403.130 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES AND THE PRODUCTION OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION IN...

  7. 20 CFR 403.100 - When can an SSA employee testify or produce information or records in legal proceedings?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When can an SSA employee testify or produce information or records in legal proceedings? 403.100 Section 403.100 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES AND THE PRODUCTION OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 403...

  8. 20 CFR 411.321 - Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance? 411.321 Section 411.321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.321 Under...

  9. 20 CFR 411.321 - Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance? 411.321 Section 411.321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.321 Under...

  10. 20 CFR 411.321 - Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance? 411.321 Section 411.321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.321 Under...

  11. 20 CFR 411.321 - Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance? 411.321 Section 411.321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.321 Under...

  12. 20 CFR 411.321 - Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Under what conditions will SSA terminate an agreement with an EN due to inadequate performance? 411.321 Section 411.321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.321 Under...

  13. 20 CFR 408.1235 - How does the State transfer funds to SSA to administer its recognition payment program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... administer its recognition payment program? 408.1235 Section 408.1235 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... United States Department of the Treasury. (c) State audit. Any State entering into an agreement with SSA which provides for Federal administration of the State's recognition payments has the right to an audit...

  14. 20 CFR 408.1235 - How does the State transfer funds to SSA to administer its recognition payment program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... administer its recognition payment program? 408.1235 Section 408.1235 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... United States Department of the Treasury. (c) State audit. Any State entering into an agreement with SSA which provides for Federal administration of the State's recognition payments has the right to an audit...

  15. Atom-by-atom assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-05-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed.

  16. Sewage sludge ash (SSA) from large and small incineration plants as a potential source of phosphorus - Polish case study.

    PubMed

    Smol, Marzena; Kulczycka, Joanna; Kowalski, Zygmunt

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this research is to present the possibility of using the sewage sludge ash (SSA) generated in incineration plants as a secondary source of phosphorus (P). The importance of issues related to P recovery from waste materials results from European Union (UE) legislation, which indicated phosphorus as a critical raw material (CRM). Due to the risks of a shortage of supply and its impact on the economy, which is greater than other raw materials, the proper management of phosphorus resources is required in order to achieve global P security. Based on available databases and literature, an analysis of the potential use of SSA for P-recovery in Poland was conducted. Currently, approx. 43,000 Mg/year of SSA is produced in large and small incineration plants and according to in the Polish National Waste Management Plan 2014 (NWMP) further steady growth is predicted. This indicates a great potential to recycle phosphorus from SSA and to reintroduce it again into the value chain as a component of fertilisers which can be applied directly on fields. The amount of SSA generated in installations, both large and small, varies and this contributes to the fact that new and different P recovery technology solutions must be developed and put into use in the years to come (e.g. mobile/stationary P recovery installations). The creation of a database focused on the collection and sharing of data about the amount of P recovered in EU and Polish installations is identified as a helpful tool in the development of an efficient P management model for Poland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of quorum sensing in compartment II of the MELiSSA loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condori, Sandra; Mastroleo, Felice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) has been conceived as a 5 compartments microorganisms and higher plants recycling system for long haul space flights. Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H colonizes compartment II. Previous work reported that continuous culture of the bacterium in a photobioreactor could lead to thick biofilm formation, leading to bioreactor arrest. Our aim is to investigate the unknown quorum sensing (QS) system of R. rubrum S1H, specifically under MELiSSA relevant culture conditions meaning light anaerobic (LAN) and using acetate as carbon source. In that purpose an autoinducer synthase gene (Rru_A3396) knockout mutant was constructed by allelic exchange generating strain M68. In addition phenotypic comparison between wild type (WT) and M68 was performed. Results of thin layer chromatography assay where Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 have been used as reporter strain showed that WT produces acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) from C4 to C12 acyl carbon chain length; however, in M68 no AHLs were detected confirming that gene Rru_A3396 (named rruI) encodes an autoinducer synthase. Interestingly under a low shear or static environment M68 showed cell aggregation similar as reported in a closely related bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (cerI mutant). In contrast to WT, M68 did not form biofilm and exhibited a decreased motility and pigment content. M68 vs wild type transcriptomics results showed that 326 genes were statistically significant differentially expressed. Downregulation of genes related to photosynthesis e.g., reaction center subunits, light harvesting complex and photosynthetic assembly proteins was observed. Similar results were obtained for preliminary proteomic analysis. Results obtained showed that in R. rubrum S1H the AHL-based QS system regulates almost 8% of the genome which is linked to biofilm formation among other biological processes described above. Since strain M68 could not be used in compartment II due to its less

  18. Observer Interface Analysis for Standardization to a Cloud Based Real-Time Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilers, J.

    2013-09-01

    The interface analysis from an observer of space objects makes a standard necessary. This standardized dataset serves as input for a cloud based service, which aimed for a near real-time Space Situational Awareness (SSA) system. The system contains all advantages of a cloud based solution, like redundancy, scalability and an easy way to distribute information. For the standard based on the interface analysis of the observer, the information can be separated in three parts. One part is the information about the observer e.g. a ground station. The next part is the information about the sensors that are used by the observer. And the last part is the data from the detected object. Backbone of the SSA System is the cloud based service which includes the consistency check for the observed objects, a database for the objects, the algorithms and analysis as well as the visualization of the results. This paper also provides an approximation of the needed computational power, data storage and a financial approach to deliver this service to a broad community. In this context cloud means, neither the user nor the observer has to think about the infrastructure of the calculation environment. The decision if the IT-infrastructure will be built by a conglomerate of different nations or rented on the marked should be based on an efficiency analysis. Also combinations are possible like starting on a rented cloud and then go to a private cloud owned by the government. One of the advantages of a cloud solution is the scalability. There are about 3000 satellites in space, 900 of them are active, and in total there are about ~17.000 detected space objects orbiting earth. But for the computation it is not a N(active) to N problem it is more N(active) to N(apo peri) quantity of N(all). Instead of 15.3 million possible collisions to calculate a computation of only approx. 2.3 million possible collisions must be done. In general, this Space Situational Awareness System can be used as a

  19. BOREAS AFM-1 NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ Aircraft Flux data Over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Timothy L.; Baldocchi, Dennis; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Gunter, Laureen; Dumas, Ed; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains measurements from the Airborne Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-1 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (NOAA/ATDD) Long-EZ Aircraft collected during the 1994 Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) at the southern study area (SSA). These measurements were made from various instruments mounted on the aircraft. The data that were collected include aircraft altitude, wind direction, wind speed, air temperature, potential temperature, water mixing ratio, U and V components of wind velocity, static pressure, surface radiative temperature, downwelling and upwelling total radiation, downwelling and upwelling longwave radiation, net radiation, downwelling and upwelling photosynthectically active radiation (PAR), greenness index, CO2 concentration, O3 concentration, and CH4 concentration. There are also various columns that indicate the standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and trend of some of these data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ aircraft flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  20. BOREAS AFM-08 ECMWF Hourly Surface and Upper Air Data for the SSA and NSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterbo, Pedro; Betts, Alan; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-8 team focused on modeling efforts to improve the understanding of the diurnal evolution of the convective boundary layer over the boreal forest. This data set contains hourly data from the European Center for for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational model from below the surface to the top of the atmosphere, including the model fluxes at the surface. Spatially, the data cover a pair of the points that enclose the rawinsonde sites at Candle Lake, Saskatchewan, in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Thompson, Manitoba, in the Northern Study Area (NSA). Temporally, the data include the two time periods of 13 May 1994 to 30 Sept 1994 and 01 Mar 1996 to 31 Mar 1997. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The number of records in the upper air data files may exceed 20,000, causing a problem for some software packages. The ECMWF hourly surface and upper air data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  1. Benefits of Applying Predictive Intelligence to the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B.; Mann, B.; Millard, C.

    Recent events have heightened the interest in providing improved Space Situational Awareness (SSA) to the warfighter using novel techniques that are affordable and effective. The current Space Surveillance Network (SSN) detects, tracks, catalogs and identifies artificial objects orbiting earth and provides information on Resident Space Objects (RSO) as well as new foreign launch (NFL) satellites. The reactive nature of the SSN provides little to no warning on changes to the expected states of these RSOs or NFLs. This paper will detail the use of the historical data collected on RSOs to characterize what their steady state is, proactively help identify when changes or anomalies have occurred using a pattern-of-like activity based intelligence approach, and apply dynamic, adaptive mission planning to the observables that lead up to a NFL. Multiple hypotheses will be carried along with the intent or the changes to the steady state to assist the SSN in tasking the various sensors in the network to collect the relevant data needed to help prune the number of hypotheses by assigning likelihood to each of those activities. Depending on the hypothesis and thresholds set, these likelihoods will then be used in turn to alert the SSN operator with changes to the steady state, prioritize additional data collections, and provide a watch list of likely next activities.

  2. Implementing the European Neutron Monitor Service for the ESA SSA Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromichalaki, H.; Papaioannou, A.; Souvatzoglou, G.; Dimitroulakos, J.; Paschalis, P.; Gerontidou, M.; Sarlanis, Ch.

    2013-09-01

    Ground level enhancements (GLEs) are observed as significant intensity increases at neutron monitor measurements, followed by an intense solar flare and/or a very energetic coronal mass ejection. Due to their space weather impact it is crucial to establish a real-time operational system that would be in place to issue reliable and timely GLE Alerts. Such a Neutron Monitor Service that will be made available via the Space Weather Portal operated by the European Space Agency (ESA), under the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Program, is currently under development. The ESA Neutron Monitor Service will provide two products: a web interface providing data from multiple Neutron Monitor stations as well as an upgraded GLE Alert. Both services are now under testing and validation and will probably enter to an operational phase next year. The core of this Neutron Monitor Service is the GLE Alert software, and therefore, the main goal of this research effort is to upgrade the existing GLE Alert software and to minimize the probability of false alarms. The ESA Neutron Monitor Service is building upon the infrastructure made available with the implementation of the High-Resolution Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB). In this work the structure of the ESA Neutron Monitor Service, the core of the novel GLE Alert Service and its validation results will be presented and further discussed.

  3. Hazard Analysis for the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Used in One-g Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kate; Ross, Amy; Blanco, Raul; Wood, Art

    2012-01-01

    This Hazard Analysis document encompasses the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) and associated ancillary equipment. It has been prepared using JSC17773, "Preparing Hazard Analyses for JSC Ground Operation", as a guide. The purpose of this document is to present the potential hazards involved in ground (23 % maximum O2, One-g) operations of the Mark III and associated ancillary support equipment system. The hazards listed in this document are specific to suit operations only; each supporting facility (Bldg. 9, etc.) is responsible for test specific Hazard Analyses. A "hazard" is defined as any condition that has the potential for harming personnel or equipment. This analysis was performed to document the safety aspects associated with manned use of the Mark III for pressurized and unpressurized ambient, ground-based, One-g human testing. The hazards identified herein represent generic hazards inherent to all standard JSC test venues for nominal ground test configurations. Non-standard test venues or test specific configurations may warrant consideration of additional hazards analysis prior to test. The cognizant suit engineer is responsible for the safety of the astronaut/test subject, space suit, and suit support personnel. The test requester, for the test supported by the suit test engineer and suited subject, is responsible for overall safety and any necessary Test Readiness Reviews (TRR).

  4. Are crude oil markets multifractal? Evidence from MF-DFA and MF-SSA perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ling-Yun; Chen, Shu-Peng

    2010-08-01

    In this article, we investigated the multifractality and its underlying formation mechanisms in international crude oil markets, namely, Brent and WTI, which are the most important oil pricing benchmarks globally. We attempt to find the answers to the following questions: (1) Are those different markets multifractal? (2) What are the dynamical causes for multifractality in those markets (if any)? To answer these questions, we applied both multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and multifractal singular spectrum analysis (MF-SSA) based on the partition function, two widely used multifractality detecting methods. We found that both markets exhibit multifractal properties by means of these methods. Furthermore, in order to identify the underlying formation mechanisms of multifractal features, we destroyed the underlying nonlinear temporal correlation by shuffling the original time series; thus, we identified that the causes of the multifractality are influenced mainly by a nonlinear temporal correlation mechanism instead of a non-Gaussian distribution. At last, by tracking the evolution of left- and right-half multifractal spectra, we found that the dynamics of the large price fluctuations is significantly different from that of the small ones. Our main contribution is that we not only provided empirical evidence of the existence of multifractality in the markets, but also the sources of multifractality and plausible explanations to current literature; furthermore, we investigated the different dynamical price behaviors influenced by large and small price fluctuations.

  5. BOREAS TGB-8 Monoterpene Concentration Data over the SSA-OBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Lerdau, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-8 team collected data to investigate the controls over NMHC fluxes from boreal forest tree species. This data set contains measurements of monoterpene concentrations in collected foliar gas emissions and foliar samples. The data were collected at the OJP and OBS tower flux sites in the SSA and were the locus for the monoterpene emission measurements. These areas contained mature stands of jack pine and black spruce and were the focal sites in the BOREAS program for studies of biosphere/atmosphere exchange from these two habitat types. The OBS site is situated in a black spruce/sphagnum bog with the largest trees 155 years old and 10-15 m tall. The OJP site is in a jack pine forest, 80 to 120 years old, which lies on a sandy bench of glacial outwash with the largest tree standing 15 m tall. Temporally, the data cover the period of 24-May-1994 to 19-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  6. Dan Macumber | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Dan Macumber Photo of Daniel Macumber Dan Macumber Engineering Daniel.Macumber@nrel.gov | 303-384 -6172 Orcid ID http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6909-4725 Daniel joined NREL in 2008 and works in the and interoperability. Prior to joining NREL, Daniel worked as a software developer working on

  7. SSA AND VA DISABILITY PROGRAMS: Re-Examination of Disability Criteria Needed to Help Ensure Program Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    Insurance DOT Dictionary of Occupational Titles O*NET Occupational Information Network SGA substantial gainful activity SSA Social Security Administration...Examining Disability Criteria broader social changes that focus on building and supporting the work capacities of people with disabilities. To this...available at no charge on the GAO Web site at http://www.gao.gov. If you have any Page 35 GAO-02-597 Re-Examining Disability Criteria questions about

  8. Imaging of diffuse H I absorption structure in the SSA22 protocluster region at z = 3.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawatari, Ken; Inoue, Akio K.; Yamada, Toru; Hayashino, Tomoki; Otsuka, Takuya; Matsuda, Yuichi; Umehata, Hideki; Ouchi, Masami; Mukae, Shiro

    2017-06-01

    Using galaxies as background light sources to map intervening Ly α absorption is a novel approach to study the interplay among galaxies, the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and the intergalactic medium. Introducing a new measure of z = 3.1 H I Ly α absorption relative to the cosmic mean, ΔNB497, estimated from photometric data of star-forming galaxies at 3.3 ≲ z ≲ 3.5, we have made two-dimensional ΔNB497 maps in the z = 3.1 SSA22 protocluster region and two control fields (Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey; Great Observatory Optical Deep Survey North) with a spatial resolution of ˜5 comoving Mpc. The ΔNB497 measurements in the SSA22 field are systematically larger than those in the control fields, and this H I absorption enhancement extends more than 50 comoving Mpc. The field-averaged (I.e. ˜50 comoving Mpc scale) ΔNB497 and the overdensity of Ly α emitters (LAEs) seem to be correlated, while there is no clear dependency of the ΔNB497 on the local LAE overdensity in a few comoving Mpc scale. These results suggest that diffuse H I gas spreads out in/around the SSA22 protocluster. We have also found an enhancement of ΔNB497 at a projected distance <100 physical kpc from the nearest z = 3.1 galaxies at least in the SSA22 field, which is probably due to H I gas associated with the CGM of individual galaxies. The H I absorption enhancement in the CGM-scale tends to be weaker around galaxies with stronger Ly α emission, which suggests that the Ly α escape fraction from galaxies depends on hydrogen neutrality in the CGM.

  9. Simulation of the MELiSSA closed loop system as a tool to define its integration strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poughon, Laurent; Farges, Berangere; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Godia, Francesc; Lasseur, Christophe

    Inspired from a terrestrial ecosystem, MELiSSA (Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a project of closed life support system future long-term manned missions (Moon and Mars bases). Started on ESA in 1989, this 5 compartments concept has evolved following a mechanistic engineering approach for acquiring both theoretical and technical knowledge. In its current state of development the project can now start to demonstrate the MELiSSA loop concept at a pilot scale. Thus an integration strategy for a MELiSSA Pilot Plant (MPP) was defined, describing the different phases for tests and connections between compartments. The integration steps should be started in 2008 and be completed with a complete operational loop in 2015, which final objective is to achieve a closed liquid and gas loop with 100 Although the integration logic could start with the most advanced processes in terms of knowledge and hardware development, this logic needs to be completed by high politic of simulation. Thanks to this simulation exercise, the effective demonstrations of each independent process and its progressive coupling with others will be performed in operational conditions as close as possible to the final configuration. The theoretical approach described in this paper is based on mass balance models of each of the MELiSSA biological compartments which are used to simulate each integration step and the complete MPP loop itself. These simulations will help to identify criticalities of each integration steps and to check the consistencies between objectives, flows, recycling efficiencies and sizing of the pilot reactors. A MPP scenario compatible with the current knowledge of the operation of the pilot reactors was investigated and the theoretical performances of the system compared to the objectives of the MPP. From this scenario the most important milestone steps in the integration are highlighted and their behaviour can be simulated.

  10. Management of hypertension at the community level in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA): towards a rational use of available resources.

    PubMed

    Twagirumukiza, M; Van Bortel, L M

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is emerging in many developing nations as a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, morbidity and disability in adults. In sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries it has specificities such as occurring in young and active adults, resulting in severe complications dominated by heart failure and taking place in limited-resource settings in which an individual's access to treatment (affordability) is very limited. Within this context of restrained economic conditions, the greatest gains for SSA in controlling the hypertension epidemic lie in its prevention. Attempts should be made to detect hypertensive patients early before irreversible organ damage becomes apparent, and to provide them with the best possible and affordable non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment. Therefore, efforts should be made for detection and early management at the community level. In this context, a standardized algorithm of management can help in the rational use of available resources. Although many international and regional guidelines have been published, they cannot apply to SSA settings because the economy of the countries and affordability of the patients do not allow access to advocated treatment. In addition, none of them suggest a clear algorithm of management for limited-resource settings at the community level. In line with available data and analysing existing guidelines, a practical algorithm for management of hypertension at the community level, including treatment affordability, has been suggested in the present work.

  11. Ground Optical Signal Processing Architecture for Contributing SSA Space Based Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblick, D.; Klug, M.; Goldsmith, A.; Flewelling, B.; Jah, M.; Shanks, J.; Piña, R.

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of the DARPA program Orbit Outlook (O^2) is to improve the metric tracking and detection performance of the Space Situational Network (SSN) by adding a diverse low-cost network of contributing sensors to the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) mission. In order to accomplish this objective, not only must a sensor be in constant communication with a planning and scheduling system to process tasking requests, there must be an underlying framework to provide useful data products, such as angles only measurements. Existing optical signal processing implementations such as the Optical Processing Architecture at Lincoln (OPAL) are capable of converting mission data collections to angles only observations, but may be difficult for many users to obtain, support, and customize for low-cost missions and demonstration programs. The Ground Optical Signal Processing Architecture (GOSPA) will ingest raw imagery and telemetry data from a space based electro optical sensor and perform a background removal process to remove anomalous pixels, interpolate over bad pixels, and dominant temporal noise. After background removal, the streak end points and target centroids are located using a corner detection algorithm developed by Air Force Research Laboratory. These identified streak locations are then fused with the corresponding spacecraft telemetry data to determine the Right Ascension and Declination measurements with respect to time. To demonstrate the performance of GOSPA, non-rate tracking collections against a satellite in Geosynchronous Orbit are simulated from a visible optical imaging sensor in a polar Low Earth Orbit. Stars, noise and bad pixels are added to the simulated images based on look angles and sensor parameters. These collections are run through the GOSPA framework to provide angles- only measurements to the Air Force Research Laboratory Constrained Admissible Region Multiple Hypothesis Filter (CAR-MHF) in which an Initial Orbit Determination is

  12. Human Ro60 (SSA2) genomic organization and sequence alterations, examined in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Ashton, G H S; Kondeatis, E; Vaughan, R W; Hughes, G R V; Khamashta, M A; Hawk, J L M; McGregor, J M; McGrath, J A

    2002-02-01

    The Ro 60 kDa protein (Ro60 or SSA2) is the major component of the Ro ribonucleoprotein (Ro RNP) complex, to which an immune response is a specific feature of several autoimmune diseases. The genomic organization and any sequence variation within the DNA encoding Ro60 are unknown. To characterize the Ro60 gene structure and to assess whether any sequence alterations might be associated with serum anti-Ro antibody in subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE), thus potentially providing new insight into disease pathogenesis. The cDNA sequence for Ro60 was obtained from the NCBI database and used for a BLAST search for a clone containing the entire genomic sequence. The intron-exon borders were confirmed by designing intronic primer pairs to flank each exon, which were then used to amplify genomic DNA for automated sequencing from 36 caucasian patients with SCLE (anti-Ro positive) and 49 with discoid LE (DLE, anti-Ro negative), in addition to 36 healthy caucasian controls. Heteroduplex analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from patients and controls spanning all Ro60 exons (1-8) revealed a common bandshift in the PCR products spanning exon 7. Sequencing of the corresponding PCR products demonstrated an A > G substitution at nucleotide position 1318-7, within the consensus acceptor splice site of exon 7 (GenBank XM001901). The allele frequencies were major allele A (0.71) and minor allele G (0.29) in 72 control chromosomes, with no significant differences found between SCLE patients, DLE patients and controls. The genomic organization of the DNA encoding the Ro60 protein is described, including a common polymorphism within the consensus acceptor splice site of exon 7. Our delineation of a strategy for the genomic amplification of Ro60 forms a basis for further examination of the pathological functions of the Ro RNP in autoimmune disease.

  13. Automatic, Rapid Replanning of Satellite Operations for Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottler, D.; Mahan, K.

    An important component of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is knowledge of the status and tasking of blue forces (e.g. satellites and ground stations) and the rapid determination of the impacts of real or hypothetical changes and the ability to quickly replan based on those changes. For example, if an antenna goes down (either for benign reasons or from purposeful interference) determining which missions will be impacted is important. It is not simply the set of missions that were scheduled to utilize that antenna, because highly expert human schedulers will respond to the outage by intelligently replanning the real-time schedule. We have developed an automatic scheduling and deconfliction engine, called MIDAS (for Managed Intelligent Deconfliction And Scheduling) that interfaces to the current legacy system (ESD 2.7) which can perform this replanning function automatically. In addition to determining the impact of failed resources, MIDAS can also replan in response to a satellite under attack. In this situation, additional supports must be quickly scheduled and executed (while minimizing impacts to other missions). Because MIDAS is a fully automatic system, replacing a current human labor-intensive process, and provides very rapid turnaround (seconds) it can also be used by commanders to consider what-if questions and focus limited protection resources on the most critical resources. For example, the commander can determine the impact of a successful attack on one of two ground stations and place heavier emphasis on protecting the station whose loss would create the most severe impacts. The system is currently transitioning to operational use. The MIDAS system and its interface to the legacy ESD 2.7 system will be described along with the ConOps for different types of detailed operational scenarios.

  14. Relation of Sensory Peripheral Neuropathy in Sjögren Syndrome to anti-Ro/SSA

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Amanda K.; Radfar, Lida; Ice, John; Vista, Evan; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Houston, Glen; Lewis, David; Stone, Donald U.; Chodosh, James; Hefner, Kimberly; Lessard, Christopher J.; Moser, Kathy L.; Scofield, R. Hal

    2013-01-01

    Background Sjögren syndrome is a common, chronic autoimmune disease that typically produces inflammation and poor function of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Other organs can be affected, including the nervous system. Sensory peripheral neuropathy is a common manifestation of the disease. Methods Eight-eight patients attending a dry eyes-dry mouth clinic were classified as primary Sjögren syndrome and underwent a neurological examination. Anti-Ro (or SSA) and anti-La (or SSB) were determined using immunodiffusion as well as Inno-Lia and BioPlex ANA screen. Serum vitamin B12 levels were determined using an enzyme-linked microtiter plate assay. Results Twenty-seven (31%) of the 88 patients had peripheral neuropathy as defined by loss of light touch, proprioception or vibratory sensation. Anti-Ro and anti-La were found by immunodiffusion in 12 patients, and 8 of these 12 had neuropathy (χ2=8.46, p=0.0036, odds ratio = 6.0 compared to those without precipitating anti-Ro and anti-La). Of the 27 patients with only anti-Ro by immunodiffusion, 13 (48.1%) of these had neuropathy (χ2 =5.587, p=0.018 compared to those without anti-Ro). There was no relationship of the other, more sensitive measures of anti-Ro and anti-La to neuropathy. In addition, we found no association of serum vitamin B12 levels to neuropathy among these patients with Sjögren syndrome. Conclusion Sensory peripheral neuropathy is common among patients with Sjögren syndrome, and is associated with the presence of anti-Ro and anti-La when determined by immunodiffusion. PMID:22955477

  15. Relation of sensory peripheral neuropathy in Sjögren syndrome to anti-Ro/SSA.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Amanda Kyle; Radfar, Lida; Ice, John A; Vista, Evan; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Houston, Glen; Lewis, David; Stone, Donald U; Chodosh, James; Hefner, Kimberly; Lessard, Christopher J; Moser, Kathy L; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2012-09-01

    Sjögren syndrome is a common, chronic autoimmune disease that typically produces inflammation and poor function of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Other organs can be affected, including the nervous system. Sensory peripheral neuropathy is a common manifestation of the disease. Eight-eight patients attending a dry eyes-dry mouth clinic were diagnosed to have primary Sjögren syndrome and underwent a neurological examination. Anti-Ro (or SSA) and anti-La (or SSB) were determined using immunodiffusion as well as Inno-Lia and BioPlex ANA screen. Serum vitamin B(12) levels were determined using an enzyme-linked microtiter plate assay. Twenty-seven (31%) of the 88 patients had peripheral neuropathy as defined by loss of light touch, proprioception, or vibratory sensation. Anti-Ro and anti-La were found by immunodiffusion in 12 patients, and 8 of these 12 had neuropathy (χ(2) = 8.46, P = 0.0036, odds ratio = 6.0 compared to those without precipitating anti-Ro and anti-La). Of the 27 patients with only anti-Ro by immunodiffusion, 13 (48.1%) had neuropathy (χ(2) = 5.587, P = 0.018, compared to those without anti-Ro). There was no relationship of the other, more sensitive measures of anti-Ro and anti-La to neuropathy. In addition, we found no association of serum vitamin B(12) levels to neuropathy among these patients with Sjögren syndrome. Sensory peripheral neuropathy is common among patients with Sjögren syndrome and is associated with the presence of anti-Ro and anti-La when determined by immunodiffusion.

  16. SsaA, a Member of a Novel Class of Transcriptional Regulators, Controls Sansanmycin Production in Streptomyces sp. Strain SS through a Feedback Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinglian; Wang, Lifei; Xie, Yunying; Wang, Songmei; Chen, Ruxian

    2013-01-01

    Sansanmycins, produced by Streptomyces sp. strain SS, are uridyl peptide antibiotics with activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this work, the biosynthetic gene cluster of sansanmycins, comprised of 25 open reading frames (ORFs) showing considerable amino acid sequence identity to those of the pacidamycin and napsamycin gene cluster, was identified. SsaA, the archetype of a novel class of transcriptional regulators, was characterized in the sansanmycin gene cluster, with an N-terminal fork head-associated (FHA) domain and a C-terminal LuxR-type helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif. The disruption of ssaA abolished sansanmycin production, as well as the expression of the structural genes for sansanmycin biosynthesis, indicating that SsaA is a pivotal activator for sansanmycin biosynthesis. SsaA was proved to directly bind several putative promoter regions of biosynthetic genes, and comparison of sequences of the binding sites allowed the identification of a consensus SsaA binding sequence, GTMCTGACAN2TGTCAGKAC. The DNA binding activity of SsaA was inhibited by sansanmycins A and H in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, sansanmycins A and H were found to directly interact with SsaA. These results indicated that SsaA strictly controls the production of sansanmycins at the transcriptional level in a feedback regulatory mechanism by sensing the accumulation of the end products. As the first characterized regulator of uridyl peptide antibiotic biosynthesis, the understanding of this autoregulatory process involved in sansanmycin biosynthesis will likely provide an effective strategy for rational improvements in the yields of these uridyl peptide antibiotics. PMID:23475969

  17. Superradiators created atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  18. Atomic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Colm T.

    2018-04-01

    A knowledge of atomic theory should be an essential part of every physicist's and chemist's toolkit. This book provides an introduction to the basic ideas that govern our understanding of microscopic matter, and the essential features of atomic structure and spectra are presented in a direct and easily accessible manner. Semi-classical ideas are reviewed and an introduction to the quantum mechanics of one and two electron systems and their interaction with external electromagnetic fields is featured. Multielectron atoms are also introduced, and the key methods for calculating their properties reviewed.

  19. ALMA deep field in SSA22: Blindly detected CO emitters and [C II] emitter candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayatsu, Natsuki H.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Umehata, Hideki; Yoshida, Naoki; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. Mark; Ivison, Rob; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Kubo, Mariko; Iono, Daisuke; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei; Nagao, Tohru; Inoue, Akio K.; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Lee, Minju; Ao, Yiping; Fujimoto, Seiji; Izumi, Takuma; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Ikarashi, Soh; Yamada, Toru

    2017-06-01

    We report the identification of four millimeter line-emitting galaxies with the Atacama Large Milli/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in SSA22 Field (ADF22). We analyze the ALMA 1.1-mm survey data, with an effective survey area of 5 arcmin2, frequency ranges of 253.1-256.8 and 269.1-272.8 GHz, angular resolution of 0{^''.}7 and rms noise of 0.8 mJy beam-1 at 36 km s-1 velocity resolution. We detect four line-emitter candidates with significance levels above 6σ. We identify one of the four sources as a CO(9-8) emitter at z = 3.1 in a member of the proto-cluster known in this field. Another line emitter with an optical counterpart is likely a CO(4-3) emitter at z = 0.7. The other two sources without any millimeter continuum or optical/near-infrared counterpart are likely to be [C II] emitter candidates at z = 6.0 and 6.5. The equivalent widths of the [C II] candidates are consistent with those of confirmed high-redshift [C II] emitters and candidates, and are a factor of 10 times larger than that of the CO(9-8) emitter detected in this search. The [C II] luminosity of the candidates are 4-7 × 108 L⊙. The star formation rates (SFRs) of these sources are estimated to be 10-20 M⊙ yr-1 if we adopt an empirical [C II] luminosity-SFR relation. One of them has a relatively low S/N ratio, but shows features characteristic of emission lines. Assuming that at least one of the two candidates is a [C II] emitter, we derive a lower limit of [C II]-based star formation rate density (SFRD) at z ˜ 6. The resulting value of >10-2 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 is consistent with the dust-uncorrected UV-based SFRD. Future millimeter/submillimeter surveys can be used to detect a number of high-redshift line emitters, with which to study the star formation history in the early universe.

  20. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  1. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  2. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  3. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Kasevich, Mark

    2017-12-22

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  4. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Canmore » atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?« less

  5. Production characteristics of lettuce Lactuca sativa L. in the frame of the first crop tests in the Higher Plant Chamber integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lawson, Jamie; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Paille, Christel; Peiro, Enrique; Fossen, Arnaud; Godia, Francesc

    Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an artificial closed ecosystem that is considered a tool for the development of a bioregenerative life support system for manned space missions. One of the five compartments of MELiSSA loop -Higher Plant Chamber was recently integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility at Universitat Aut`noma deo Barcelona. The main contributions expected by integration of this photosynthetic compartment are oxygen, water, vegetable food production and CO2 consumption. Production characteristics of Lactuca sativa L., as a MELiSSA candidate crop, were investigated in this work in the first crop experiments in the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility. The plants were grown in batch culture and totaled 100 plants with a growing area 5 m long and 1 m wide in a sealed controlled environment. Several replicates of the experiments were carried out with varying duration. It was shown that after 46 days of lettuce cultivation dry edible biomass averaged 27, 2 g per plant. However accumulation of oxygen in the chamber, which required purging of the chamber, and decrease in the food value of the plants was observed. Reducing the duration of the tests allowed uninterrupted test without opening the system and also allowed estimation of the crop's carbon balance. Results of productivity, tissue composition, nutrient uptake and canopy photosynthesis of lettuce regardless of test duration are discussed in the paper.

  6. BOREAS HYP-8 DEM Data Over The NSA-MSA and SSA-MSA in The AEAC Projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, David E.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Wang, Xue-Wen; Band, L. E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    These data were derived from the original Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) produced by the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-8 team. The original DEMs were in the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, while this product is projected in the Albers Equal-Area Conic (AEAC) projection. The pixel size of the data is 100 meters, which is appropriate for the 1:50,000-scale contours from which the DEMs were made. The original data were compiled from information available in the 1970s and 1980s. This data set covers the two Modeling Sub-Areas (MSAs) that are contained within the Southern Study Area (SSA) and the Northern Study Area (NSA). The data are stored in binary, image format files. The DEM data over the NSA-MSA and SSA-MSA in the AEAC projection are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. Induction of Osmoadaptive Mechanisms and Modulation of Cellular Physiology Help Bacillus licheniformis Strain SSA 61 Adapt to Salt Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Sangeeta; Aggarwal, Chetana; Thakur, Jyoti Kumar

    Bacillus licheniformis strain SSA 61, originally isolated from Sambhar salt lake, was observed to grow even in the presence of 25 % salt stress. Osmoadaptive mechanisms of this halotolerant B. licheniformis strain SSA 61, for long-term survival and growth under salt stress, were determined. Proline was the preferentially accumulated compatible osmolyte. There was also increased accumulation of antioxidants ascorbic acid and glutathione. Among the different antioxidative enzymes assayed, superoxide dismutase played the most crucial role in defense against salt-induced stress in the organism. Adaptation to stress by the organism involved modulation of cellular physiology at various levels. There was enhancedmore » expression of known proteins playing essential roles in stress adaptation, such as chaperones DnaK and GroEL, and general stress protein YfkM and polynucleotide phosphorylase/polyadenylase. Proteins involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathway, ribosome structure, and peptide elongation were also overexpressed. Salt stress-induced modulation of expression of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism was observed. There was up-regulation of a number of enzymes involved in generation of NADH and NADPH, indicating increased cellular demand for both energy and reducing power.« less

  8. Neurodevelopment in children with and without congenital heart block born to anti-Ro/SSA-positive mothers.

    PubMed

    Skog, Amanda; Tingström, Joanna; Salomonsson, Stina; Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2013-01-01

    To define factors influencing neurodevelopment in children with and without complete congenital heart block (CHB) born to mothers with Ro/SSA autoantibodies. Medical records of a population-based cohort of siblings with (n = 60) and without (n = 54) CHB born 1974-2009 to anti-Ro/SSA-positive mothers were retrieved from children primary healthcare centres and school health services and used to extract data on neurodevelopment. Impaired neurodevelopment was reported in 16% of the children (18/114) during the follow-up time of 13.0 (8.2-17.5) years, median (quartiles). Reported problems included speech (9%), motor (8%) and learning (8%) impairment, attention deficit (5%) and behavioural impairment (4%). Impairment in motor skill development was more common in boys (p < 0.001) if the child was born preterm (p < 0.001). Learning impairment was significantly influenced by maternal SLE (p < 0.005), while attention deficits was influenced by both maternal SLE (p < 0.05) and CHB in the child (p < 0.05). Our data indicate that in addition to well-established factors such as male sex and being born preterm, both maternal SLE and CHB may influence neurodevelopment. Follow-up of neurodevelopment should therefore be considered for children with CHB, especially if the mother is diagnosed with SLE. ©2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica ©2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  9. Characterization of Brca2-Deficient Plants Excludes the Role of NHEJ and SSA in the Meiotic Chromosomal Defect Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Marilyn; Massot, Sophie; Doutriaux, Marie-Pascale; Gratias, Ariane

    2011-01-01

    In somatic cells, three major pathways are involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DBS): Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ), Single-Strand Annealing (SSA) and Homologous Recombination (HR). In somatic and meiotic HR, DNA DSB are 5′ to 3′ resected, producing long 3′ single-stranded DNA extensions. Brca2 is essential to load the Rad51 recombinase onto these 3′ overhangs. The resulting nucleofilament can thus invade a homologous DNA sequence to copy and restore the original genetic information. In Arabidopsis, the inactivation of Brca2 specifically during meiosis by an RNAi approach results in aberrant chromosome aggregates, chromosomal fragmentation and missegregation leading to a sterility phenotype. We had previously suggested that such chromosomal behaviour could be due to NHEJ. In this study, we show that knock-out plants affected in both BRCA2 genes show the same meiotic phenotype as the RNAi-inactivated plants. Moreover, it is demonstrated that during meiosis, neither NHEJ nor SSA compensate for HR deficiency in BRCA2-inactivated plants. The role of the plant-specific DNA Ligase6 is also excluded. The possible mechanism(s) involved in the formation of these aberrant chromosomal bridges in the absence of HR during meiosis are discussed. PMID:22039535

  10. Environment-Level Strategies to Support Independent Control of Finances: A Response to the SSA Review of Financial Capability Determination Review.

    PubMed

    Harper, Annie; Rowe, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Social Security Administration (SSA) recently completed an evaluation of the process by which representative payees are assigned. The SSA report is welcome, particularly for its focus on developing more accurate, real-world assessments of a person's financial capability and its recognition of the need for more flexible options for people with disabilities. Crucially, the report discusses the impact of the broader environment-specifically, conditions related to living in poverty. However, it provides no guidance about environmental interventions that could enable more beneficiaries to manage their funds without a payee. Innovative financial products could be offered to beneficiaries, and the retail industry could develop processes to support responsible financial management by people with mental illness. Changes to SSA benefits systems, including raising benefits levels and asset limits, could enable more beneficiaries to manage their funds independently.

  11. An analysis of the potential for achieving the fourth millennium development goal in SSA with domestic resources.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Bernadette; Makuta, Innocent

    2015-02-25

    The importance of good health is reflected in the fact that more than half of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are aimed at improving health status. Goal 4 (MDG4) aims to reduce child mortality. The progress indicator for goal 4 is the under-five mortality rate (U5M), with a targeted reduction of two thirds by 2015 from 1990 levels. This paper seeks to compare the time (in years) Sub Saharan African (SSA) countries will take to reach their MDG4 target at the current rate of decline, and the time it could have taken to reach their target if domestic resources had not been lost through illicit financial flows, corruption and servicing of debt since 2000. We estimate the amount by which the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita would increase (in percentage terms) if losses of resource through illicit financial flows, corruption and debt servicing, were reduced. Using the income elasticity of U5M, a metric which reports the percentage change in U5M for a one percent change in GDP per capita, we estimate the potential gains in the annual reduction of the under-five mortality if these resource losses were reduced. At the current rate of reduction in U5M, nine countries out of this sample of 36 SSA countries (25%) will achieve their MDG4 target by 2015. In the absence of the leakages (IFF, corruption and debt service) 30 out of 36 (83%) would reach their MDG4 target by 2015 and all except one country, Zimbabwe would have achieved their MDG4 by 2017 (97%). In view of the uncertainty of the legitimacy of African debts we have also provided results where we excluded debt repayment from our analysis. Most countries would have met MDG4 target by curtailing these outflows. In order to release latent resources in SSA for development, action will be needed both by African countries and internationally. We consider that stemming these outflows, and thereby reducing the need for aid, can be achieved with a more transparent global financial system.

  12. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  13. Dan Olis | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    | 303-384-7398 Dan Olis is a mechanical engineer with experience in mechanical and systems design, plant for the U.S. Department of Defense, Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and the

  14. New collinear twist-3 analysis of transverse SSA: Toward a resolution for the sign-mismatch problem

    DOE PAGES

    Kanazawa, Koichi; Pitonyak, Daniel; Koike, Yuji; ...

    2014-10-19

    We present a new collinear twist-3 analysis of the transverse SSA A N at RHIC. We use the TMD Sivers/Collins function to fix some of the relevant collinear twist-3 functions and perform a fit of the RHIC data with other parameterized twist-3 functions. This allows us to keep the consistency among descriptions in pp collision, SIDIS, and e +e – annihilation and thus could provide a unified description of the spin asymmetries in the low- and high-P T processes. In conclusion, by taking into account the twist-3 fragmentation contribution, we show for the first time this contribution could be themore » main source of A N in pp ↑ → hX and its inclusion could provide a solution for the sign-mismatch problem.« less

  15. BOREAS HYD-8 DEM Data Over the NSA-MSA and SSA-MSA in the UTM Projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xue-Wen; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Band, L. E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS HYD-8 team focused on describing the scaling behavior of water and carbon flux processes at local and regional scales. These DEMs were produced from digitized contours at a cell resolution of 100 meters. Vector contours of the area were used as input to a software package that interpolates between contours to create a DEM representing the terrain surface. The vector contours had a contour interval of 25 feet. The data cover the BOREAS MSAs of the SSA and NSA and are given in a UTM map projection. Most of the elevation data from which the DEM was produced were collected in the 1970s or 1980s. The data are stored in binary, image format files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. Preliminary Modelling of Mass Flux at the Surface of Plant Leaves within the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Madeleine; Paille, Christel; Lasseur, Christophe

    The ESA project Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an ecosystem of micro-organisms and higher plants, constructed with the objective of being operated as a tool to understand artificial ecosystems to be used for a long-term or permanent manned planetary base (e.g. Moon or Mars). The purpose of such a system is to provide for generation of food, water recycling, atmospheric regeneration and waste management within defined standards of quality and reliability. As MELiSSA consists of individual compartments which are connected to each other, the robustness of the system is fully dependent on the control of each compartment, as well as the flow management between them. Quality of consumables and reliability of the ecosystem rely on the knowledge, understanding and control of each of the components. This includes the full understanding of all processes related to the higher plants. To progress in that direction, this paper focuses on the mechanical processes driving the gas and liquid exchanges between the plant leaf and its environment. The process responsible for the mass transfer on the surface of plant leaves is diffusion. The diffusion flux is dependent on the behaviour of the stoma of the leaf and also on the leaf boundary layer (BL). In this paper, the physiology of the leaf is briefly examined in order to relate parameters such as light quality, light quantity, CO2 concentration, temperature, leaf water potential, humidity, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) gradients and pollutants to the opening or closing of stomata. The diffusion process is described theoretically and the description is compared to empirical approaches. The variables of the BL are examined and the effect airflow in the compartment has on the BL is investigated. Also presented is the impact changes in different environmental parameters may have on the fluid exchanges. Finally, some tests, to evaluate the accuracy of the concluded model, are suggested.

  17. The design of a minimal sensor configuration for a Cooperative Intersection Collision Avoidance System - Stop Sign Assist : (CICAS-SSA report #2).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-08-01

    The deployment of a Cooperative Intersection Collision Avoidance System Stop Sign Assist (CICAS-SSA) can save lives by addressing the causal factor of crashes at rural thru-Stop intersection: drivers who stop on the minor leg of the intersection,...

  18. The mapping of the human 52-kD Ro/SSA autoantigen gene to human chromosome II, and its polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.B.; Itoh, Kazuko; Fujisaku, Atsushi

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the ribonucleoprotein Ro/SSA occur in nearly half of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and are associated with lymphopenia, photosensitive dermatitis, and pulmonary and renal disease, which suggests that they have an immunopathologic role. The majority of Ro/SSA precipitin-positive patients produce serum antibodies that bind to the 60-kD and 52-kD Ro/SSA proteins. The authors previously isolated and determined the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone that encodes the 52-kD form of the human Ro/SSA protein. In the present study, they have determined the chromosomal location of the gene by in situ hybridization to the end of the shortmore » arm of chromosome 11. Hybridization of portions of the cDNA probe to restriction enzyme-digested DNA indicated the gene is composed of at least three exons. The exon encoding the putative zinc fingers of this protein was found to be distinct from that which encodes the leucine zipper. An RFLP of this gene was identified and is associated with the presence of lupus, primarily in black Americans. 60 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  19. 75 FR 30839 - Privacy Act of 1974; CMS Computer Match No. 2010-03, HHS Computer Match No. 1003, SSA Computer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... of the Matching Program A. General The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (Pub. L.... 100-503, the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act (CMPPA) of 1988), the Office of Management... 1974; CMS Computer Match No. 2010-03, HHS Computer Match No. 1003, SSA Computer Match No. 1048, IRS...

  20. Supplemental Security Income: SSA Needs a Uniform Standard for Assessing Childhood Disability. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Human Resources, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    This report presents the Government Accounting Office's recommendations regarding standards for determining eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) based on a childhood disability. The report is based on the Social Security Administration's (SSA) monitoring of 288,000 children whose eligibility was subject to review and of 370,000 new…

  1. 20 CFR 403.145 - What will SSA do if you have not satisfied the conditions in this part or in 20 CFR part 401 or 402?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What will SSA do if you have not satisfied the conditions in this part or in 20 CFR part 401 or 402? 403.145 Section 403.145 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES AND THE PRODUCTION OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION IN...

  2. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  3. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  4. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Silje A.; Coelho, Liz H.; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-01-01

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space. PMID:25370192

  5. Characteristics of interstitial lung disease in SS-A positive/Jo-1 positive inflammatory myopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Váncsa, Andrea; Csípo, I; Németh, J; Dévényi, K; Gergely, L; Dankó, K

    2009-07-01

    The strongest predictive factor for the development of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in myositis (IIM) patients is the presence of different antisynthetase antibodies. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics, radiological findings and therapeutic response between the anti-SS-A positive and negative antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) patients. A prospective study of 315 IIM patients was conducted including 27 anti-Jo-1 positive ASS patients. Mean disease duration was 46.6 (range 4-198) months. All patients fulfilled the classification criteria for IIM. All patients underwent chest radiography, pulmonary function tests and HRCT at he time of diagnosis and 6 months after the immunosuppressive therapy. Routine laboratory tests, RF, ANA, anti-ENA, anti-SS-A, anti-histidyl-transfer RNA antibody (Jo-1) measurements were performed in all patients. ILD was found to be present in 70.4% of ASS patients. The anti-SS-A negative ASS group had a more frequent association with alveolitis and responded well to immunosuppressive therapy (p < 0.05). HRCT scan showed more fibrosis in the SS-A positive group. 15.8% of patients died due to pulmonary or cardiac complications. In conclusion, coexistence of anti-SS-A and anti-Jo-1 antibody may be a good predictor for a more coarse and severe ILD in IIM patients who require a more aggressive approach in therapy.

  6. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Silje A; Coelho, Liz H; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-05-05

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space.

  7. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  8. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  9. The yeast Hsp70 Ssa1 is a sensor for activation of the heat shock response by thiol-reactive compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyu; Gibney, Patrick A.; West, James D.; Morano, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The heat shock transcription factor HSF1 governs the response to heat shock, oxidative stresses, and xenobiotics through unknown mechanisms. We demonstrate that diverse thiol-reactive molecules potently activate budding yeast Hsf1. Hsf1 activation by thiol-reactive compounds is not consistent with the stresses of misfolding of cytoplasmic proteins or cytotoxicity. Instead, we demonstrate that the Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1, which represses Hsf1 in the absence of stress, is hypersensitive to modification by a thiol-reactive probe. Strikingly, mutation of two conserved cysteine residues to serine in Ssa1 rendered cells insensitive to Hsf1 activation and subsequently induced thermotolerance by thiol-reactive compounds, but not by heat shock. Conversely, substitution with the sulfinic acid mimic aspartic acid resulted in constitutive Hsf1 activation. Cysteine 303, located within the nucleotide-binding domain, was found to be modified in vivo by a model organic electrophile, demonstrating that Ssa1 is a direct target for thiol-reactive molecules through adduct formation. These findings demonstrate that Hsp70 is a proximal sensor for Hsf1-mediated cytoprotection and can discriminate between two distinct environmental stressors. PMID:22809627

  10. The MELiSSA GreenMOSS Study: Preliminary Design Considerations for a Greenhouse Module on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobascio, Cesare; Paille, Christel; Lamantea, Matteo Maria; Boscheri, Giorgio; Rossetti, Vittorio

    Extended human presence on an extraterrestrial planetary surface will be made possible by the development of life support systems affordable in the long term. The key elements to support the goal will be the maximization of closure of air and water cycles, as well as the development of cost-effective and reliable hardware, including a careful strategic effort toward reduction of spare parts and consumables. Regenerative life support systems likely represent the final step toward long term sustainability of a space crew, allowing in situ food production and regeneration of organic waste. Referring to the MELiSSA loop, a key element for food production is the Higher Plant Compartment. The paper focuses on the preliminary design of a Greenhouse at the lunar South Pole, as performed within the “Greenhouse Module for Space System” (GreenMOSS) study, under a contract from the European Space Agency. The greenhouse is in support to a relatively small crew for provision of an energetic food complement. Resources necessary for the greenhouse such as water, carbon dioxide and nitrogen are assumed available, as required. The relevant mass and energy balances for incoming resources should be part of future studies, and should help integrate this element with the interfacing MELISSA compartments. Net oxygen production and harvested crop biomass from the greenhouse system will be quantified. This work presents the results of the two major trade-offs performed as part of this study: artificial vs natural illumination and monocrop vs multicrop solutions. Comparisons among possible design solutions were driven by the ALiSSE metric as far as practicable within this preliminary stage, considering mass and power parameters. Finally, the paper presents the mission duration threshold for determining the convenience of the designed solution with respect to other resources provision strategies

  11. Dan Says - Continuum Magazine | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    provide incisive insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting compelling and a useful look into NREL's ongoing contributions to our collective energy future. Dr. Dan E

  12. Intelligent Sensors for Atomization Processing of Molten Metals and Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    20ff. 12. Hirleman, Dan E. Particle Sizing by Optical , Nonimaging Techniques. Liquid Particle Size Measurement Techniques, ASTM, 1984, pp. 35ff. 13...sensors are based on electric, electromagnetic or optical principles, the latter being most developed in fields obviously related to atomization. Optical ...beams to observe various interference, diffraction, and heterodyning effects, and to observe, with high signal-to-noise ratio, even weak optical

  13. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading coldmore » atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.« less

  14. The Virtual Observatory Service TheoSSA: Establishing a Database of Synthetic Stellar Flux Standards II. NLTE Spectral Analysis of the OB-Type Subdwarf Feige 110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Rudkowski, A.; Kampka, D.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J. W.; Moehler, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. In the framework of the Virtual Observatory (VO), the German Astrophysical VO (GAVO) developed the registered service TheoSSA (Theoretical Stellar Spectra Access). It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code, generally for all effective temperatures, surface gravities, and elemental compositions. We will establish a database of SEDs of flux standards that are easily accessible via TheoSSA's web interface. Aims. The OB-type subdwarf Feige 110 is a standard star for flux calibration. State-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium stellar-atmosphere models that consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements will be used to provide a reliable synthetic spectrum to compare with observations. Methods. In case of Feige 110, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape from the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to the optical wavelength range but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its FUV spectrum. Results. We present a state-of-the-art spectral analysis of Feige 110. We determined Teff =47 250 +/- 2000 K, log g=6.00 +/- 0.20, and the abundances of He, N, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, and Ge. Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and Ge were identified for the first time in this star. Upper abundance limits were derived for C, O, Si, Ca, and Sc. Conclusions. The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on models and SEDs calculated with state-of-the-art model atmosphere codes.

  15. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    forces on the order of (hbar)(k) (Omega), where Omega is the laser Rabi frequency. We have observed behavior compatible with bichromatic slowing and... Rabi frequency. We have observed behavior compatible with bichromatic slowing and cooling of some atoms in atomic beam. Results were presented at the

  16. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  17. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor…

  18. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  19. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  20. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  1. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  2. Three cases of pigmented cosmetic dermatitis-like eruptions associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome or anti-SSA antibody.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Naoko; Sakai, Takashi; Saito-Shono, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Kazushi; Hatano, Yutaka; Katagiri, Kazumoto; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Kenji; Kimoto, Kenichi; Kubota, Toshiaki; Eshima, Nobuoki; Kojima, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2016-08-01

    Pigmented cosmetic dermatitis-like (Riehl's melanosis-like) pigmentation was reported in three of 27 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. But case reports of such eruptions are rare. We describe three cases of such eruptions associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome or anti-SSA antibody and possible associations with specific types of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and infiltrating lymphocytes. These middle-aged Japanese women had reticular facial pigmentation and histopathological examination revealed interface dermatitis, melanophages, and dense lymphocytic infiltration around hair follicles and sweat ducts. HLA typing revealed common antigenic equivalents or genetic typing of HLA-A2, DR52, DPA1(02:02) and DPB1(05:01). Immunohistochemical staining revealed major subsets of T cells to be CD8 and CD45RO. Some Foxp3- and few IL17-positive cells were found in strong contrast to the major CD4 subset of infiltrated T cells in annular erythema associated with Sjögren's syndrome. Apparently, our patients' pigmentation represented a specific etiology associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome or anti-SSA antibody. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Derivatives Harboring Defined aroC and Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 Type III Secretion System (ssaV) Mutations by Immunization of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Zoë; Chatfield, Steven N.; Phillimore, Jo; Bentley, Matthew; Johnson, Julie; Cosgrove, Catherine A.; Ghaem-Maghami, Marjan; Sexton, Amy; Khan, Mohammad; Brennan, Frank R.; Everest, Paul; Wu, Tao; Pickard, Derek; Holden, David W.; Dougan, Gordon; Griffin, George E.; House, Deborah; Santangelo, Joseph D.; Khan, Shahid A.; Shea, Jaqueline E.; Feldman, Robert G.; Lewis, David J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The attenuation and immunogenicity of two novel Salmonella vaccine strains, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Ty2 ΔaroC ΔssaV, designated ZH9) and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (TML ΔaroC ΔssaV, designated WT05), were evaluated after their oral administration to volunteers as single escalating doses of 107, 108, or 109 CFU. ZH9 was well tolerated, not detected in blood, nor persistently excreted in stool. Six of nine volunteers elicited anti-serovar Typhi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses, with three of three vaccinees receiving 108 and two of three receiving 109 CFU which elicited high-titer LPS-specific serum IgG. WT05 was also well tolerated with no diarrhea, although the administration of 108 and 109 CFU resulted in shedding in stools for up to 23 days. Only volunteers immunized with 109 CFU of WT05 mounted detectable serovar Typhimurium LPS-specific ASC responses and serum antibody responses were variable. These data indicate that mutations in type III secretion systems may provide a route to the development of live vaccines in humans and highlight significant differences in the potential use of serovars Typhimurium and Typhi. PMID:12065485

  4. Dan Says - Continuum Magazine | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Dan Says Leading Energy Systems Integration A headshot of a man in a suit, smiling. Photo by Dennis U.S. dedicated to solving the complex problems associated with energy systems integration (ESI) on a national scale. Our 185,000-square-foot Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is designed to provide a

  5. Corner Office: Google's Dan Clancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Andrew Richard; Oder, Norman

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dan Clancy, engineering director for Google Book Search. In this interview, Clancy talks about the pending Google Book Search settlement, involving millions of volumes digitized from libraries, which drew a lawsuit from the Association of American Publishers and the Authors Guild. He also discusses pricing,…

  6. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-09-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  7. ssaD1, a suppressor of secA51(Ts) that renders growth of Escherichia coli cold sensitive, is an early amber mutation in the transcription factor gene nusB.

    PubMed Central

    Rajapandi, T.; Oliver, D.

    1994-01-01

    Complementation analysis of the ssaD1 mutation, isolated as a suppressor of the secA51(Ts) mutation that renders growth of Escherichia coli cold sensitive, was used to show that ssaD corresponds to nusB, a gene known to be important in transcription antitermination. DNA sequence analysis of the ssaD1 allele showed that it creates an amber mutation in the 15th codon of nusB. Analysis of the effect of different levels of NusB protein on secA transcription and translation suggested that NusB plays little or no role in the control of secA expression. Accordingly, mechanisms by which nusB inactivation can lead to suppression of secA51(Ts) and secY24(Ts) mutations without affecting secA expression need to be considered. PMID:8021230

  8. Single-cell antibody nanowells: a novel technology in detecting anti-SSA/Ro60- and anti-SSB/La autoantibody-producing cells in peripheral blood of rheumatic disease patients.

    PubMed

    Esfandiary, Lida; Gupta, Nirupama; Voigt, Alexandria; Wanchoo, Arun; Chan, Edward K L; Sukumaran, Sukesh; Nguyen, Cuong Q

    2016-05-17

    Anti-SSA/Ro60 and anti-SSB/La are essential serological biomarkers for rheumatic diseases, specifically Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Currently, laboratory detection technology and platforms are designed with an emphasis on high-throughput methodology; therefore, the relationship of sensitivity with specificity remains a significant area for improvement. In this study, we used single-cell antibody nanowells (SCAN) technology to directly profile individual B cells producing antibodies against specific autoantigens such as SSA/Ro60 and SSB/La. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated using Ficoll gradient. Fluorescently labeled cells were added to fabricated nanowells and imaged using a high-speed epifluorescence microscope. The microengraving process was conducted using printed slides coated with immunoglobulins. Printed slides were hybridized with fluorescence-conjugated immunoglobulin G (IgG), SSA/Ro60, and SSB/La antigens. Microarray spots were analyzed for nanowells with single live B cells that produced antigen-specific autoantibodies. Our results indicate that SCAN can simultaneously detect high frequencies of anti-SSA/Ro60 and anti-SSB/La with a specific IgG isotype in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients, as well as measure their individual secretion levels. The data showed that patients with SS and SLE exhibited higher frequency and greater concentration of anti-SSA/Ro60- and anti-SSB/La-producing B cells in the IgG isotype. Furthermore, individual B cells of patients produced higher levels of IgG-specific anti-SSA/Ro60 autoantibody, but not IgG-specific anti-SSB/La autoantibody, compared with healthy control subjects. These results support the application of SCAN as a robust multiparametric analytical bioassay that can directly measure secretion of autoantibody and accurately report antigen-specific, autoantibody-producing cells.

  9. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  10. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  11. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  12. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  13. Atom Interferometer Modeling Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    present, LiveAtom supports the alkali metals from Lithium to Cesium. LiveAtom will also show where atoms in the equilibrium state will sit if a trap is...Address: 7105 La Vista Pl . Niwot, CO 80503 Phone Number: 303-652-0725 The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors...0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing

  14. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  15. TheoSSA - Model WD Spectra on Demand: The Impact of Ne, Na, Mg, and Iron-group Elements on the Balmer Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, N.; Rauch, T.

    2015-06-01

    The registered German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) service TheoSSA provides easy access to synthetic stellar spectra. This GAVO database contains already ten thousands of these, which were calculated with different chemical compositions of the elements H to Ni. In addition to the database, it is possible to calculate individual spectra for hot, compact stars based on the Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP) via the TMAW service. The TMAW models were, in the pilot phase, restricted to the elements H, He, C, N, and O. Now, TMAW is extended to additionally consider opacities from Ne, Na, and Mg. Soon, TMAW will also be able to include the opacities from the so-called iron-group elements (Ca - Ni). We describe the improvements and show the impact of Ne, Na, Mg, and iron-group elements on the Balmer lines.

  16. Analysis and correction for measurement error of edge sensors caused by deformation of guide flexure applied in the Thirty Meter Telescope SSA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haifeng; Zhang, Jingxu; Yang, Fei; An, Qichang; Zhao, Hongchao; Guo, Peng

    2018-05-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project will design and build a 30-m-diameter telescope for research in astronomy in visible and infrared wavelengths. The primary mirror of TMT is made up of 492 hexagonal mirror segments under active control. The highly segmented primary mirror will utilize edge sensors to align and stabilize the relative piston, tip, and tilt degrees of segments. The support system assembly (SSA) of the segmented mirror utilizes a guide flexure to decouple the axial support and lateral support, while its deformation will cause measurement error of the edge sensor. We have analyzed the theoretical relationship between the segment movement and the measurement value of the edge sensor. Further, we have proposed an error correction method with a matrix. The correction process and the simulation results of the edge sensor will be described in this paper.

  17. Highlights from 4STAR Sky-Scanning Retrievals of Aerosol Intensive Optical Properties from Multiple Field Campaigns with Detailed Comparisons of SSA Reported During SEAC4RS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument combines airborne sun tracking capabilities of the Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-14) with AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network)-like sky-scanning capability and adds state-of-the-art fiber-coupled grating spectrometry to yield hyperspectral measurements of direct solar irradiance and angularly resolved sky radiance. The combination of sun-tracking and sky-scanning capability enables retrievals of wavelength-dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD), mode-resolved aerosol size distribution (SD), asphericity, and complex refractive index, and thus also the scattering phase function, asymmetry parameter, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and absorption aerosol optical thickness (AAOT). From 2012 to 2014 4STAR participated in four major field campaigns: the U.S. Dept. of Energy's TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) I & II campaigns, and NASA's SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea & Ice Experiment) campaigns. Establishing a strong performance record, 4STAR operated successfully on all flights conducted during each of these campaigns. Sky radiance spectra from scans in either constant azimuth (principal plane) or constant zenith angle (almucantar) were interspersed with direct beam measurements during level legs. During SEAC4RS and ARISE, 4STAR airborne measurements were augmented with flight-level albedo from the collocated Shortwave Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) providing improved specification of below-aircraft radiative conditions for the retrieval. Calibrated radiances and retrieved products will be presented with particular emphasis on detailed comparisons of ambient SSA retrievals and measurements during SEAC4RS from 4STAR, AERONET, HSRL2 (High Spectral Resolution Lidar), and from in situ measurements.

  18. 4STAR Sky-Scanning Retrievals of Aerosol Intensive Optical Properties from Multiple Field Campaigns with Detailed Comparisons of SSA Reported During SEAC4RS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Connor; Dahlgren, R. P.; Dunagan, S.; Johnson, R.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Livingston, J.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Segal Rozenhaimer, M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument combines airborne sun tracking capabilities of the Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-14) with AERONET-like sky-scanning capability and adds state-of-the-art fiber-coupled grating spectrometry to yield hyper spectral measurements of direct solar irradiance and angularly resolved sky radiance. The combination of sun-tracking and sky-scanning capability enables retrievals of wavelength-dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD), mode-resolved aerosol size distribution (SD), asphericity, and complex refractive index, and thus also the scattering phase function, asymmetry parameter, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and absorption aerosol optical thickness (AAOT).From 2012 to 2014 4STAR participated in four major field campaigns: the U.S. Dept. of Energy TCAP I II campaigns, and NASAs SEAC4RS and ARISE campaigns. Establishing a strong performance record, 4STAR operated successfully on all flights conducted during each of these campaigns. Sky radiance spectra from scans in either constant azimuth (principal plane) or constant zenith angle (almucantar) were interspersed with direct beam measurements during level legs. During SEAC4RS and ARISE, 4STAR airborne measurements were augmented with flight-level albedo from the collocated Shortwave Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) providing improved specification of below-aircraft radiative conditions for the retrieval. Calibrated radiances and retrieved products will be presented with particular emphasis on detailed comparisons of ambient SSA retrievals and measurements during SEAC4RS from 4STAR, AERONET, HSRL2, and from in situ measurements.

  19. Stellar parameters for the central star of the planetary nebula PRTM 1 using the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory service TheoSSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Demleitner, M.; Hoyer, D.; Werner, K.

    2018-04-01

    The German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) developed the registered service TheoSSA (theoretical stellar spectra access) and the supporting registered VO tool TMAW (Tübingen Model-Atmosphere WWW interface). These allow individual spectral analyses of hot, compact stars with state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) stellar-atmosphere models that presently consider opacities of the elements H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, and Mg, without requiring detailed knowledge about the involved background codes and procedures. Presently, TheoSSA provides easy access to about 150 000 pre-calculated stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In the case of the exciting star of PN PRTM 1, we demonstrate the easy way to calculate individual NLTE stellar model-atmospheres to reproduce an observed optical spectrum. We measured T_eff = 98 000± 5 000 K, log (g / cm/s^2) = 5.0^{+0.3}_{-0.2}, and photospheric mass fractions of H =7.5 × 10-1 (1.02 times solar), He =2.4 × 10-1 (0.96), C =2.0 × 10-3 (0.84), N =3.2 × 10-4 (0.46), and O =8.5 × 10-3 (1.48) with uncertainties of ±0.2 dex. We determined the stellar mass and luminosity of 0.73^{+0.16}_{-0.15} M_{⊙} and log (L/L⊙) = 4.2 ± 0.4, respectively.

  20. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  1. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  2. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  3. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  4. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  5. Atomic Power Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…

  6. Beyond the Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John

    2011-08-01

    1. Introduction - the atom in the seventies; 2. The vacuum tube; 3. The new rays; 4. The new substances; 5. Disintegration; 6. A family tree; 7. Verifications and results; 8. The objective reality of molecules; 9. The new atom; Bibliography; Index.

  7. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  8. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  9. L'astronomie dans le monde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfroid, J.

    2017-05-01

    matière sombre – Abell 2744 vu par ALMA – Bousculade dans Orion – Rotation stellaire – Tsunamis martiens – Planète X ou 9 – Formation d’étoiles dans les jets de trous noirs – Éjection d’un trou noir

  10. Epitaxy: Programmable Atom Equivalents Versus Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Gabrys, Paul A.

    The programmability of DNA makes it an attractive structure-directing ligand for the assembly of nanoparticle superlattices in a manner that mimics many aspects of atomic crystallization. However, the synthesis of multilayer single crystals of defined size remains a challenge. Though previous studies considered lattice mismatch as the major limiting factor for multilayer assembly, thin film growth depends on many interlinked variables. Here, a more comprehensive approach is taken to study fundamental elements, such as the growth temperature and the thermodynamics of interfacial energetics, to achieve epitaxial growth of nanoparticle thin films. Under optimized equilibrium conditions, single crystal, multilayer thin filmsmore » can be synthesized over 500 × 500 μm2 areas on lithographically patterned templates. Importantly, these superlattices follow the same patterns of crystal growth demonstrated in thin film atomic deposition, allowing for these processes to be understood in the context of well-studied atomic epitaxy, and potentially enabling a nanoscale model to study fundamental crystallization processes.« less

  11. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  12. Single-Atom Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Shi, Qiurong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-11-06

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the production of sustainable and renewable energy. However, the electrochemical performances of the various systems are limited, and there is an intensive search for highly efficient electrocatalysts by more rational control over the size, shape, composition, and structure. Of particular interest are the studies on single-atom catalysts (SACs), which have sparked new interests in electrocatalysis because of their high catalytic activity, stability, selectivity, and 100 % atom utilization. In this Review, we introduce innovative syntheses and characterization techniques for SACs, with a focus on their electrochemical applications in the oxygen reduction/evolution reaction, hydrogen evolution reaction, and hydrocarbon conversion reactions for fuel cells (electrooxidation of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid). The electrocatalytic performance is further considered at an atomic level and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. The ultimate goal is the tailoring of single atoms for electrochemical applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Atomic bomb health benefits.

    PubMed

    Luckey, T D

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment.

  14. The Atomic Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummo, Evelyn; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to provide students with opportunities to practice drawing atomic models and discover the logical pairings of whole families on the periodic table. Follows the format of a television game show. (DDR)

  15. Atomic Bomb Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Luckey, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment. PMID:19088902

  16. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  17. Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adatom chains, precise structures artificially created on an atomically regulated surface, are the smallest possible candidates for future nanoelectronics. Since all the devices are created by combining adatom chains precisely prepared with atomic precision, device characteristics are predictable, and free from deviations due to accidental structural defects. In this atomic dimension, however, an analogy to the current semiconductor devices may not work. For example, Si structures are not always semiconducting. Adatom states do not always localize at the substrate surface when adatoms form chemical bonds to the substrate atoms. Transport properties are often determined for the entire system of the chain and electrodes, and not for chains only. These fundamental issues are discussed, which will be useful for future device considerations.

  18. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P.

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  19. Atomizing nozzle and method

    DOEpatents

    Ting, Jason; Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2000-03-16

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  20. Navigation with Atom Interferometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-20

    cos(1[ 2 1)( ttP g g e    (1) where  2  is the zero detuning Rabi frequency,  is the atomic dipole moment, 22  g is the...generalized Rabi frequency and oL   is the detuning of the laser from the atomic transition. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution

  1. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  2. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  3. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  4. On the bosonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate ground state properties of atoms, in which substitute fermions - electrons by bosons, namely π --mesons. We perform some calculations in the frame of modified Hartree-Fock (HF) equation. The modification takes into account symmetry, instead of anti-symmetry of the pair identical bosons wave function. The modified HF approach thus enhances (doubles) the effect of self-action for the boson case. Therefore, we accordingly modify the HF equations by eliminating the self-action terms "by hand". The contribution of meson-meson and meson-nucleon non-Coulomb interaction is inessential at least for atoms with low and intermediate nuclear charge, which is our main subject. We found that the binding energy of pion negative ions A π - , pion atoms A π , and the number of extra bound pions ΔN π increases with the growth of nuclear charge Z. For e.g. Xe ΔN π = 4. As an example of a simple process with a pion atom, we consider photoionization that differs essentially from that for electron atoms. Namely, it is not monotonic decreasing from the threshold but has instead a prominent maximum above threshold. We study also elastic scattering of pions by pion atoms.

  5. Atomic clocks for geodesy.

    PubMed

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10 -17 , opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein's general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today's best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10 -18 , comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  6. Atomic clocks for geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E.; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O.; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10‑17, opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein’s general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today’s best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10‑18, comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  7. Molecules Without Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Anthony; Collins, Laura; Gomes, Kenjiro; Janko, Boldizsar

    We present a real-space representation of molecules which results in the normal bonding rules and electronic structure of chemistry without atom-centered coulomb potentials. Using a simple mapping, we can generate atomless molecules from the structure of real molecules. Additionally, molecules without atoms show similar covalent bonding energies and transfer of charge in ionic bonds as real molecules. The atomless molecules contain only the valence and conduction electronic structure of the real molecule. Using the framework of the Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory of Bader, we prove that the topological features of the valence charge distribution of molecules without atoms are identical to that of real molecules. In particular, the charge basins of atomless molecules show identical location and quantities of representative charge. We compare the accuracy, computational cost, and intuition gained from electronic structure calculations of molecules without atoms with the use of pseudopotentials to represent atomic cores in density functional theory. A. R. acknowledges support from a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  8. Cardiac fibroblast transcriptome analyses support a role for interferogenic, profibrotic, and inflammatory genes in anti-SSA/Ro-associated congenital heart block.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Jackson, Tanisha; Rasmussen, Sara E; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Buyon, Jill P

    2017-09-01

    The signature lesion of SSA/Ro autoantibody-associated congenital heart block (CHB) is fibrosis and a macrophage infiltrate, supporting an experimental focus on cues influencing the fibroblast component. The transcriptomes of human fetal cardiac fibroblasts were analyzed using two complementary approaches. Cardiac injury conditions were simulated in vitro by incubating human fetal cardiac fibroblasts with supernatants from macrophages transfected with the SSA/Ro-associated noncoding Y ssRNA. The top 10 upregulated transcripts in the stimulated fibroblasts reflected a type I interferon (IFN) response [e.g., IFN-induced protein 44-like (IFI44L), of MX dynamin-like GTPase (MX)1, MX2, and radical S -adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (Rsad2)]. Within the fibrotic pathway, transcript levels of endothelin-1 (EDN1), phosphodiesterase (PDE)4D, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)2, and CXCL3 were upregulated, while others, including adenomedullin, RAP guanine nucleotide exchange factor 3 (RAPGEF3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1, TIMP3, and dual specificity phosphatase 1, were downregulated. Agnostic Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery analysis revealed a significant increase in inflammatory genes, including complement C3A receptor 1 (C3AR1), F2R-like thrombin/trypsin receptor 3, and neutrophil cytosolic factor 2. In addition, stimulated fibroblasts expressed high levels of phospho-MADS box transcription enhancer factor 2 [a substrate of MAPK5 (ERK5)], which was inhibited by BIX-02189, a specific inhibitor of ERK5. Translation to human disease leveraged an unprecedented opportunity to interrogate the transcriptome of fibroblasts freshly isolated and cell sorted without stimulation from a fetal heart with CHB and a matched healthy heart. Consistent with the in vitro data, five IFN response genes were among the top 10 most highly expressed transcripts in CHB fibroblasts. In addition, the expression of matrix-related genes

  9. Atom-atom inelastic collisions and three-body atomic recombination in weakly ionized argon plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, C. G.; Kunc, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A stationary collisional-radiative model including both inelastic electron-atom and atom-atom collisions is used to examine nonequilibrium weakly ionized argon plasmas with atomic densities 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 20th/cu cm, temperatures below 6000 K, and with different degrees of radiation trapping. It is shown that three-body atomic recombination becomes important at high particle densities. Comparison is made between the present approach and Thomson's theory for atomic recombination.

  10. Coherent single-atom superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junki; Yang, Daeho; Oh, Seung-hoon; An, Kyungwon

    2018-02-01

    Superradiance is a quantum phenomenon emerging in macroscopic systems whereby correlated single atoms cooperatively emit photons. Demonstration of controlled collective atom-field interactions has resulted from the ability to directly imprint correlations with an atomic ensemble. Here we report cavity-mediated coherent single-atom superradiance: Single atoms with predefined correlation traverse a high–quality factor cavity one by one, emitting photons cooperatively with the N atoms that have already gone through the cavity (N represents the number of atoms). Enhanced collective photoemission of N-squared dependence was observed even when the intracavity atom number was less than unity. The correlation among single atoms was achieved by nanometer-precision position control and phase-aligned state manipulation of atoms by using a nanohole-array aperture. Our results demonstrate a platform for phase-controlled atom-field interactions.

  11. Atomic spectrometry update - atomic mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, J.; Crain, J. S.; McMahon, A. W.

    The MS and XRF updates have been published together since their introduction in 1988. In the last few years, however, the two sections have been prepared independently of each other and it therefore seemed appropriate to publish the two sections separately. With effect from this issue, the MS Update will appear in the October issue of JAAS and the XRF Update in the November issue. The format used for the MS section is broadly similar to that used last year, with some additional sub-headings. This Update is intended to cover all atomic and stable isotopic MS techniques, but not thosemore » used in studies of fundamental nuclear physics and exotic nuclei far from stability. Also excluded are those reports in which MS is used as a tool in the study of molecular processes and of gaseous components. the review is based on critical selection of developments in instrumentation and methodology, notable for their innovation, originality or achievement of significant advances, and is not intended to be comprehensive in its coverage. Conference papers are only included if they contain enough information to show they meet these criteria, and our policy in general remains one of waiting for a development to appear in a full paper before inclusion in the review. a similar policy applies to foreign language papers unlikely to reach a wide audience. Routine applications of atomic MS are not included in this Update and the reader is referred to the Updates on Industrial Analysis: Metals, Chemicals and Advanced Materials (96/416), Environmental Analysis (96/1444) and Clinical and Biological Materials, Food and Beverages (96/2479). Also excluded are those applications, even if not routine, which use atomic spectroscopy as a tool for the study of a non-atomic property, for example, the use of stable isotope labeling of carbon or nitrogen in biomolecules in metabolic studies. There have been few general reviews on atomic MS of note in the period covered by this update. That of

  12. Atomic resolution holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    Atomic resolution holography, such as X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH)[1] and photoelectron holography (PH), has the attention of researcher as an informative local structure analysis, because it provides three dimensional atomic images around specific elements within a range of a few nanometers. It can determine atomic arrangements around a specific element without any prior knowledge of structures. It is considered that the atomic resolution holographic is a third method of structural analysis at the atomic level after X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As known by many researchers, XRD and XAFS are established methods that are widespread use in various fields. XRD and XAFS provide information on long-range translational periodicities and very local environments, respectively, whereas the atomic resolution holography gives 3D information on the local order and can visualize surrounding atoms with a large range of coordination shells. We call this feature "3D medium-range local structure observation".In addition to this feature, the atomic resolution holography is very sensitive to the displacement of atoms from their ideal positions, and one can obtain quantitative information about local lattice distortions by analyzing reconstructed atomic images[2] When dopants with different atomic radii from the matrix elements are present, the lattices around the dopants are distorted. However, using the conventional methods of structural analysis, one cannot determine the extent to which the local lattice distortions are preserved from the dopants. XFH is a good tool for solving this problem.Figure 1 shows a recent achievement on a relaxor ferroelectric of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) using XFH. The structural studies of relaxor ferroelectrics have been carried out by X-ray or neutron diffractions, which suggested rhombohedral distortions of their lattices. However, their true pictures have not been obtained, yet. The Nb Kα holograms showed

  13. Effect of the Prevalence of HIV/AIDS and the Life Expectancy Rate on Economic Growth in SSA Countries: Difference GMM Approach.

    PubMed

    Waziri, Salisu Ibrahim; Mohamed Nor, Norashidah; Raja Abdullah, Nik Mustapha; Adamu, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The productivity of countries around the globe is adversely affected by the health-related problems of their labour force. This study examined the effect of the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and life expectancy on the economic growth of 33 Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries over a period of 11 years (2002-2012). The study employed a dynamic panel approach as opposed to the static traditional approach utilised in the literature. The dynamic approach became eminent because of the fact that HIV/AIDS is a dynamic variable as its prevalence today depends on the previous years. The result revealed that HIV/AIDS is negatively correlated with economic growth in the region, with a coefficient of 0.014, and significant at the 1% level. That is, a 10% increase in HIV/AIDS prevalence leads to a 0.14% decrease in the GDP of the region. Tackling HIV/AIDS is therefore imperative to the developing Sub-Saharan African region and all hands must be on deck to end the menace globally.

  14. Deep Submillimeter and Radio Observations in the SSA22 Field. I. Powering Sources and the Lyα Escape Fraction of Lyα Blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Henkel, C.; Iono, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Geach, J.; Hatsukade, B.; Hayes, M.; Hine, N. K.; Kato, Y.; Kawabe, R.; Kohno, K.; Kubo, M.; Lehnert, M.; Malkan, M.; Menten, K. M.; Nagao, T.; Norris, R. P.; Ouchi, M.; Saito, T.; Tamura, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Umehata, H.; Weiss, A.

    2017-12-01

    We study the heating mechanisms and Lyα escape fractions of 35 Lyα blobs (LABs) at z ≈ 3.1 in the SSA22 field. Dust continuum sources have been identified in 11 of the 35 LABs, all with star formation rates (SFRs) above 100 M ⊙ yr-1. Likely radio counterparts are detected in 9 out of 29 investigated LABs. The detection of submillimeter dust emission is more linked to the physical size of the Lyα emission than to the Lyα luminosities of the LABs. A radio excess in the submillimeter/radio-detected LABs is common, hinting at the presence of active galactic nuclei. Most radio sources without X-ray counterparts are located at the centers of the LABs. However, all X-ray counterparts avoid the central regions. This may be explained by absorption due to exceptionally large column densities along the line-of-sight or by LAB morphologies, which are highly orientation dependent. The median Lyα escape fraction is about 3% among the submillimeter-detected LABs, which is lower than a lower limit of 11% for the submillimeter-undetected LABs. We suspect that the large difference is due to the high dust attenuation supported by the large SFRs, the dense large-scale environment as well as large uncertainties in the extinction corrections required to apply when interpreting optical data.

  15. Discovery of a Damped Lyα Absorber at z = 3.3 along a Galaxy Sight-line in the SSA22 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawatari, K.; Inoue, A. K.; Kousai, K.; Hayashino, T.; Cooke, R.; Prochaska, J. X.; Yamada, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Using galaxies as background light sources to map the Lyα absorption lines is a novel approach to study Damped Lyα Absorbers (DLAs). We report the discovery of an intervening z = 3.335 ± 0.007 DLA along a galaxy sight-line identified among 80 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) spectra obtained with our Very Large Telescope/Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph survey in the SSA22 field. The measured DLA neutral hydrogen (H I) column density is log(NH I/cm-2) = 21.68 ± 0.17. The DLA covering fraction over the extended background LBG is >70% (2σ), yielding a conservative constraint on the DLA area of ≳1 kpc2. Our search for a counterpart galaxy hosting this DLA concludes that there is no counterpart galaxy with star formation rate larger than a few M⊙ yr-1, ruling out an unobscured violent star formation in the DLA gas cloud. We also rule out the possibility that the host galaxy of the DLA is a passive galaxy with M* ≳ 5 × 1010M⊙ or a heavily dust-obscured galaxy with E(B - V) ≳ 2. The DLA may coincide with a large-scale overdensity of the spectroscopic LBGs. The occurrence rate of the DLA is compatible with that of DLAs found in QSO sight-lines.

  16. Quantitative proteomics and network analysis of SSA1 and SSB1 deletion mutants reveals robustness of chaperone HSP70 network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F.; Eyers, Claire E.; Schwartz, Jean‐Marc; Grant, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones play an important role in protein homeostasis and the cellular response to stress. In particular, the HSP70 chaperones in yeast mediate a large volume of protein folding through transient associations with their substrates. This chaperone interaction network can be disturbed by various perturbations, such as environmental stress or a gene deletion. Here, we consider deletions of two major chaperone proteins, SSA1 and SSB1, from the chaperone network in Sacchromyces cerevisiae. We employ a SILAC‐based approach to examine changes in global and local protein abundance and rationalise our results via network analysis and graph theoretical approaches. Although the deletions result in an overall increase in intracellular protein content, correlated with an increase in cell size, this is not matched by substantial changes in individual protein concentrations. Despite the phenotypic robustness to deletion of these major hub proteins, it cannot be simply explained by the presence of paralogues. Instead, network analysis and a theoretical consideration of folding workload suggest that the robustness to perturbation is a product of the overall network structure. This highlights how quantitative proteomics and systems modelling can be used to rationalise emergent network properties, and how the HSP70 system can accommodate the loss of major hubs. PMID:25689132

  17. Effect of the Prevalence of HIV/AIDS and the Life Expectancy Rate on Economic Growth in SSA Countries: Difference GMM Approach

    PubMed Central

    Waziri, Salisu Ibrahim; Nor, Norashidah Mohamed; Abdullah, Nik Mustapha Raja; Adamu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of countries around the globe is adversely affected by the health-related problems of their labour force. This study examined the effect of the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and life expectancy on the economic growth of 33 Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries over a period of 11 years (2002–2012). The study employed a dynamic panel approach as opposed to the static traditional approach utilised in the literature. The dynamic approach became eminent because of the fact that HIV/AIDS is a dynamic variable as its prevalence today depends on the previous years. The result revealed that HIV/AIDS is negatively correlated with economic growth in the region, with a coefficient of 0.014, and significant at the 1% level. That is, a 10% increase in HIV/AIDS prevalence leads to a 0.14% decrease in the GDP of the region. Tackling HIV/AIDS is therefore imperative to the developing Sub-Saharan African region and all hands must be on deck to end the menace globally. PMID:26573032

  18. Scarlet fever is caused by a limited number of Streptococcus pyogenes lineages and is associated with the exotoxin genes ssa, speA and speC.

    PubMed

    Silva-Costa, Catarina; Carriço, Joao A; Ramirez, Mario; Melo-Cristino, Jose

    2014-03-01

    Several outbreaks of scarlet fever caused by Streptococcus pyogenes were recently reported. Scarlet fever is historically considered a toxin-mediated disease, dependent on the production of the exotoxins SpeA and SpeC, but a strict association between scarlet fever and these exotoxins is not always detected. The aims of this study were to characterize the scarlet fever bacterial isolates recovered from patients in a Lisbon hospital and to identify any distinctive characteristics of such isolates. We characterized a collection of 303 pharyngeal S. pyogenes collected between 2002 and 2008. One-hundred and one were isolated from scarlet fever patients and 202 were associated to a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis. Isolates were characterized by T and emm typing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiling and superantigen gene profiling. The diversity of the scarlet fever isolates was lower than that of the pharyngitis isolates. Specific lineages of emm87, emm4 and emm3 were overrepresented in scarlet fever isolates but only 1 pulsed field gel electrophoresis major lineage was significantly associated with scarlet fever. Multivariate analysis indicated associations of ssa, speA and speC with scarlet fever. In nonoutbreak conditions, scarlet fever is caused by a number of distinct genetic lineages. The lower diversity of these isolates and the association with specific exotoxin genes indicates that some lineages are more prone to cause this presentation than others even in nonoutbreak conditions.

  19. T Cell Epitope Mimicry between Sjögren’s Syndrome Antigen A (SSA)/Ro60 and Oral, Gut, Skin and Vaginal Bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Szymula, Agnieszka; Rosenthal, Jacob; Szczerba, Barbara M; Bagavant, Harini; Fu, Shu Man; Deshmukh, Umesh S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that Sjogren’s syndrome Antigen A (SSA)/Ro60-reactive T cells are activated by peptides originating from oral and gut bacteria. T cell hybridomas generated from HLA-DR3 transgenic mice recognized 3 regions on Ro60, with core epitopes mapped to amino acids 228-238, 246-256 and 371-381. BLAST analysis identified several mimicry peptides, originating from human oral, intestinal, skin and vaginal bacteria, as well as environmental bacteria. Amongst these, a peptide from the von Willebrand factor type A domain protein (vWFA) from the oral microbe Capnocytphaga ochracea was the most potent activator. Further, Ro60-reactive T cells were activated by recombinant vWFA protein and whole E. coli expressing this protein. These results demonstrate that peptides derived from normal human microbiota can activate Ro60-reactive T cells. Thus, immune responses to commensal microbiota and opportunistic pathogens should be explored as potential triggers for initiating autoimmunity in SLE and Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:24576620

  20. Quantitative proteomics and network analysis of SSA1 and SSB1 deletion mutants reveals robustness of chaperone HSP70 network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Eyers, Claire E; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Grant, Christopher M; Hubbard, Simon J

    2015-09-01

    Molecular chaperones play an important role in protein homeostasis and the cellular response to stress. In particular, the HSP70 chaperones in yeast mediate a large volume of protein folding through transient associations with their substrates. This chaperone interaction network can be disturbed by various perturbations, such as environmental stress or a gene deletion. Here, we consider deletions of two major chaperone proteins, SSA1 and SSB1, from the chaperone network in Sacchromyces cerevisiae. We employ a SILAC-based approach to examine changes in global and local protein abundance and rationalise our results via network analysis and graph theoretical approaches. Although the deletions result in an overall increase in intracellular protein content, correlated with an increase in cell size, this is not matched by substantial changes in individual protein concentrations. Despite the phenotypic robustness to deletion of these major hub proteins, it cannot be simply explained by the presence of paralogues. Instead, network analysis and a theoretical consideration of folding workload suggest that the robustness to perturbation is a product of the overall network structure. This highlights how quantitative proteomics and systems modelling can be used to rationalise emergent network properties, and how the HSP70 system can accommodate the loss of major hubs. © 2015 The Authors. PROTEOMICS published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Single atoms in a MOT

    SciTech Connect

    Meschede, Dieter; Ueberholz, Bernd; Gomer, Victor

    1999-06-11

    We are experimenting with individual neutral cesium atoms stored in a magneto-optical trap. The atoms are detected by their resonance fluorescence, and fluorescence fluctuations contain signatures of the atomic internal and external degrees of freedom. This noninvasive probe provides a rich source of information about atomic dynamics at all relevant time scales.

  2. Privacy Act of 1974; matching program--HCFA. Notice of a matching program--the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Social Security Administration (SSA), and HCFA--disclosure of IRS taxpayer identity and filing status information to be matched with SSA earned income information for Medicare beneficiaries and their spouses.

    PubMed

    1990-09-21

    As required by Section 6202 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (OBRA 1989), Public Law 101-239, the Department of Health and Human Services is providing public notice that the IRS and the SSA will disclose certain information regarding the taxpayer identification and filing status and the earned income of Medicare beneficiaries and their spouses for HCFA's use in identifying Medicare secondary payer (MSP) situations. This will enable HCFA to seek recovery of identified mistaken payments that were the liability of another primary insurer or other type of payer. The matching report set forth below is in compliance with the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (Pub. L. No. 100-503).

  3. Double photoionization of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoeft, Marco

    2003-10-01

    Double photoionization studies of atoms and molecules are new state-of-the-art studies providing a deeper knowledge of multi-electron excitations. This type of work advances the understanding of many-body problems. Double photoionization of atoms is of great interest to learn about electron-electron correlation and relaxation effects in atoms and molecules. In order to study double photoionization processes, a new electron-electron coincidence apparatus was built to carry out the measurements. I will present the apparatus I built as well as the results of the measurement of the triply-differential-cross-section (TDCS) for the predicted interference and Post-Collision-Interaction (PCI) effects in the Xenon N5O2,3 O2,3 Auger decay after 4d5/2 photoionization. Furthermore I present measurements for direct double photoionization of Helium at various photon energies.

  4. Handling of Atomic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Deetjen, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art NLTE model atmosphere codes have arrived at a high level of ``numerical'' sophistication and are an adequate tool to analyze the available high-quality spectra from the infrared to the X-ray wavelength range. The computational capacities allow the calculation which include all elements from hydrogen up to the iron group and the lack of reliable atomic data has become a crucial problem for further progress. We summarize briefly the available sources of atomic data and how these are implemented in the Tübingen Model Atmosphere Package (TMAP).

  5. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  6. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  7. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  8. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  9. Atomic cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  10. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    Ricken, Joel and Heidloff, Andrew

    2018-05-07

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  11. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  12. Energy from the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  13. Atomically resolved tissue integration.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Johan; Sundell, Gustav; Thuvander, Mattias; Andersson, Martin

    2014-08-13

    In the field of biomedical technology, a critical aspect is the ability to control and understand the integration of an implantable device in living tissue. Despite the technical advances in the development of biomaterials, the elaborate interplay encompassing materials science and biology on the atomic level is not very well understood. Within implantology, anchoring a biomaterial device into bone tissue is termed osseointegration. In the most accepted theory, osseointegration is defined as an interfacial bonding between implant and bone; however, there is lack of experimental evidence to confirm this. Here we show that atom probe tomography can be used to study the implant-tissue interaction, allowing for three-dimensional atomic mapping of the interface region. Interestingly, our analyses demonstrated that direct contact between Ca atoms and the implanted titanium oxide surface is formed without the presence of a protein interlayer, which means that a pure inorganic interface is created, hence giving experimental support to the current theory of osseointegration. We foresee that this result will be of importance in the development of future biomaterials as well as in the design of in vitro evaluation techniques.

  14. Bonds Between Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  15. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  16. Atoms in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Paul A.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. A Basic Topics section discusses atomic structure, emphasizing states of matter at high temperature and spectroscopic analysis of light from the stars. A section…

  17. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Josh B.; Dick, Don D.; McDonnell, Stephen J.; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H. G.; Owen, William R.; Alexander, Justin D.; Jaeger, David L.; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J.; Wallace, Robert M.; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M.; Randall, John N.; Von Ehr, James

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure. PMID:26274555

  18. FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ming Feng

    2018-02-01

    FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

  19. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  20. Rutherford-Bohr atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, J. L.

    1981-03-01

    Bohr used to introduce his attempts to explain clearly the principles of the quantum theory of the atom with an historical sketch, beginning invariably with the nuclear model proposed by Rutherford. That was sound pedagogy but bad history. The Rutherford-Bohr atom stands in the middle of a line of work initiated by J.J. Thomson and concluded by the invention of quantum mechanics. Thompson's program derived its inspiration from the peculiar emphasis on models characteristic of British physics of the 19th century. Rutherford's atom was a late product of the goals and conceptions of Victorian science. Bohr's modifications, although ultimately fatal to Thomson's program, initially gave further impetus to it. In the early 1920s the most promising approach to an adequate theory of the atom appeared to be the literal and detailed elaboration of the classical mechanics of multiply periodic orbits. The approach succeeded, demonstrating in an unexpected way the force of an argument often advanced by Thomson: because a mechanical model is richer in implications than the considerations for which it was advanced, it can suggest new directions of research that may lead to important discoveries.

  1. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  2. Precisely detecting atomic position of atomic intensity images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a quantitative method to detect atomic position in atomic intensity images from experiments such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and simulation such as phase field crystal modeling. The evaluation of detection accuracy proves the excellent performance of the method. This method provides a chance to precisely determine atomic interactions based on the detected atomic positions from the atomic intensity image, and hence to investigate the related physical, chemical and electrical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  4. Trapped atoms along nanophotonic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Brian; Kim, May; Chang, Tzu-Han; Hung, Chen-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Many-body systems subject to long-range interactions have remained a very challenging topic experimentally. Ultracold atoms trapped in extreme proximity to the surface of nanophotonic structures provides a dynamic system combining the strong atom-atom interactions mediated by guided mode photons with the exquisite control implemented with trapped atom systems. The hybrid system promises pair-wise tunability of long-range interactions between atomic pseudo spins, allowing studies of quantum magnetism extending far beyond nearest neighbor interactions. In this talk, we will discuss our current status developing high quality nanophotonic ring resonators, engineered on CMOS compatible optical chips with integrated nanostructures that, in combination with a side illuminating beam, can realize stable atom traps approximately 100nm above the surface. We will report on our progress towards loading arrays of cold atoms near the surface of these structures and studying atom-atom interaction mediated by photons with high cooperativity.

  5. HPAM: Hirshfeld Partitioned Atomic Multipoles

    PubMed Central

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2011-01-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank lmax on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from lmax = 0 (atomic charges) to lmax = 4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank lmax are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L ≤ lmax. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only (lmax = 0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. PMID:22140274

  6. ALMA deep field in SSA22: Survey design and source catalog of a 20 arcmin2 survey at 1.1 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehata, Hideki; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Smail, Ian; Alexander, David M.; Ivison, Rob J.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Kato, Yuta; Hayatsu, Natsuki H.; Kubo, Mariko; Ikarashi, Soh

    2018-06-01

    To search for dust-obscured star-formation activity in the early Universe, it is essential to obtain a deep and wide submillimeter/millimeter map. The advent of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has enabled us to obtain such maps with sufficiently high spatial resolution to be free from source confusion. We present a new 1.1 mm-wave map obtained by ALMA in the SSA22 field. The field contains a remarkable proto-cluster at z = 3.09; therefore, it is an ideal region to investigate the role of a large-scale cosmic web on dust-obscured star formation. The typical 1σ depth of our map is 73 μJy beam-1 with a {0^{^''.}5} resolution. Combining the present survey with earlier, archived observations, we map an area of 20 arcmin2 (71 comoving Mpc2 at z = 3.09). Within the combined survey area we have detected 35 sources at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >5, with flux densities of S1.1mm = 0.43-5.6 mJy, equivalent to star-formation rates of ≳100-1000 M⊙ yr-1 at z = 3.09, for a Chabrier initial mass function: 17 sources out of 35 are new detections. The cumulative number counts show an excess by a factor of three to five compared to blank fields. The excess suggests enhanced, dust-enshrouded star-formation activity in the proto-cluster on a 10 comoving Mpc scale, indicating accelerated galaxy evolution in this overdense region.

  7. DISCOVERY OF A DAMPED Lyα ABSORBER AT z = 3.3 ALONG A GALAXY SIGHT-LINE IN THE SSA22 FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Mawatari, K.; Inoue, A. K.; Kousai, K.

    2016-02-01

    Using galaxies as background light sources to map the Lyα absorption lines is a novel approach to study Damped Lyα Absorbers (DLAs). We report the discovery of an intervening z = 3.335 ± 0.007 DLA along a galaxy sight-line identified among 80 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) spectra obtained with our Very Large Telescope/Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph survey in the SSA22 field. The measured DLA neutral hydrogen (H i) column density is log(N{sub H} {sub i}/cm{sup −2}) = 21.68 ± 0.17. The DLA covering fraction over the extended background LBG is >70% (2σ), yielding a conservative constraint on the DLA area of ≳1 kpc{sup 2}. Our search for a counterpartmore » galaxy hosting this DLA concludes that there is no counterpart galaxy with star formation rate larger than a few M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, ruling out an unobscured violent star formation in the DLA gas cloud. We also rule out the possibility that the host galaxy of the DLA is a passive galaxy with M{sub *} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 10}M{sub ⊙} or a heavily dust-obscured galaxy with E(B − V) ≳ 2. The DLA may coincide with a large-scale overdensity of the spectroscopic LBGs. The occurrence rate of the DLA is compatible with that of DLAs found in QSO sight-lines.« less

  8. The interaction between anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB autoantibodies and anti-infectious antibodies in a wide spectrum of auto-immune diseases: another angle of the autoimmune mosaic.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Dagan, Amir; Peri, Yogev; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Selmi, Carlo; Tincani, Angela; Bizzaro, Nicola; Stojanovich, Ljudmila; Damoiseaux, Jan; Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem; Mosca, Marta; Cervera, Ricard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The presence of anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies has been linked with autoimmunity in general and with several autoimmune diseases (AID) in particular. In the current study we evaluated these antibodies in a wide spectrum of AID as well as the links between them and anti-infectious antibodies. We examined 2082 sera from patients with 16 different AID compared to 524 sera from geographically-matched healthy controls, for the presence and titres of anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB. All samples were also tested for a variety of anti-infectious agents' antibodies using the BioPlex 2200-immunoassay (Bio-Rad, USA). Anti-Ro/SSA was more prevalent, with significantly higher titre in 5 autoimmune diseases namely Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) both primary and APS linked to SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Anti-La/SSB was more prevalent with higher titers in SS, SLE, APS linked to SLE and PBC. Prevalence, but not titers, of both antibodies were higher also in polymyositis (PM). Additionally, we found a correlation between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and antibodies of the IgM and IgG subtypes directed at cytomegalovirus as well as IgG-antibodies directed at Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and toxoplasma (p<0.001). Anti-La/SSB antibodies correlated with the presence of IgG antibodies against EBV early antigen (p<0.001). In a large cohort of patients with autoimmune diseases we found an association between anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies and 6 autoimmune diseases, amongst which primary APS and PM. Additionally, we observed linkages between these autoantibodies and anti-infectious antibodies directed at Epstein-Barr virus, toxoplasma and cytomegalovirus. Our findings support the concept of interplay between infectious agents and autoimmunity, such as the plausibility of an infectious agent that trigger the immune system to produce specific antibodies which will later result in a unique

  9. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  10. Lasers, Cold Atoms and Atomic Clocks: Realizing the Second Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonico, Davide

    2013-09-01

    The time is the physical quantity that mankind could measure with the best accuracy, thanks to the properties of the atomic physics, as the present definition of time is based on atomic energy transitions. This short review gives some basic information on the heart of the measurement of time in the contemporary world, i.e. the atomic clocks, and some trends related.

  11. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  12. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  13. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  14. Atoms, Stars, and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1991-09-01

    1. Introducing stars and nebulae; 2. Stellar rainbows; 3. Atoms and molecules; 4. The climate in a stellar atmosphere; 5. Analysing the stars; 6. Dwarfs, giants, and supergiants; 7. What makes a star shine?; 8. The youth and middle age of a common star; 9. Wind, dust and pulsations; 10. A star's last hurray?; 11. The interstellar medium and gaseous nebulae; 12. Uncommon stars and their sometimes violent behaviour; 13. High energy astronomy.

  15. Atomic Josephson Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaurov, Vitaliy; Kuklov, Anatoly

    2006-03-01

    We show that atomic Josephson vortices [1] in a quasi-1D atomic junction can be controllably manipulated by imposing a tunneling bias current created by a difference of chemical potentials on the atomic BEC waveguides forming the junction. This effect, which has its origin in the Berry phase structure of a vortex, turns out to be very robust in the whole range of the parameters where such vortices can exist [2]. Acceleration of the vortex up to a certain threshold speed, determined by the strength of the Josephson coupling, results in the phase slip causing switching of the vorticity. This effect is directly related to the interconversion [1], when slow variation of the coupling can cause transformation of the vortex into the dark soliton and vice verse. We also propose that a Josephson vortex can be created by the phase imprinting technique and can be identified by a specific tangential feature in the interference picture produced by expanding clouds released from the waveguides [2]. [1] V. M. Kaurov , A. B. Kuklov, Phys. Rev. A 71, 11601(R) (2005). [2] V. M. Kaurov , A. B. Kuklov cond-mat/0508342

  16. Ghost imaging with atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  17. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  18. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  19. Building to be Named for Former Rep. Dan Schaefer

    Science.gov Websites

    Building to be Named for Former Rep. Dan Schaefer For more information contact: e:mail: Public Renewable Energy Laboratory will be renamed to honor retired U.S. Rep. Dan Schaefer on Monday, Jan. 11. In ceremonies beginning at 11 a.m., the center formally will become the Dan Schaefer Federal Building. Congress

  20. Rapid prototyping of versatile atom chips for atom interferometry applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Brian; Squires, Matthew; Olson, Spencer; Kroese, Bethany; Imhof, Eric; Kohn, Rudolph; Stuhl, Benjamin; Schramm, Stacy; Stickney, James

    2016-05-01

    We present recent advances in the manipulation of ultracold atoms with ex-vacuo atom chips (i.e. atom chips that are not inside to the UHV chamber). Details will be presented of an experimental system that allows direct bonded copper (DBC) atom chips to be removed and replaced in minutes, requiring minimal re-optimization of parameters. This system has been used to create Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as magnetic waveguides with precisely tunable axial parameters, allowing double wells, pure harmonic confinement, and modified harmonic traps. We investigate the effects of higher order magnetic field contributions to the waveguide, and the implications for confined atom interferometry.

  1. Dan Johnson's impact on hearing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotland, Lawrence I.

    2003-04-01

    Daniel L. Johnson is well known for his many technical contributions to noise research. Throughout a long and distinguished career at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dan published the results of several significant experiments, including his landmark experiments on asymptotic threshold shift and exposure to impulse noise. His work in the area of noise exposure laid much of the groundwork for a greater understanding of the physiologic response to hazardous noise, much of which has since been incorporated in national and international standards. Dan is highly regarded for his tireless work on technical and advisory committees in noise, and most recently, ototoxicity. Throughout his career, Dan has adhered to a self-imposed standard of intellectual honesty and discovery. Dan's most recent endeavor, the development of a personal noise dosimeter designed for self-monitoring by the employee, is characteristic of his creativity and energy. Perhaps less well known are his contributions over the years to the success of his younger colleagues. He has accomplished this in an unselfish and egalitarian manner, oftentimes challenging and even contradicting his own research. The focus of this talk will elaborate on these facets of Dan's professional contributions.

  2. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  3. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Osborne, Matthew G.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled.

  4. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Osborne, M.G.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled. 6 figs.

  5. The International Atomic Energy Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II inaugurated a new era in world history, the atomic age. After the war, the Soviet Union, eager to develop the same military capabilities as those demonstrated by the United States, soon rivaled the U.S. as an atomic and nuclear superpower. Faced by the possibility of…

  6. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  7. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Lyα BLOB 2

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Martin, D.; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Lyαmore » blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Lyα emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Lyα emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding

  8. Doping of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid progress in atom manipulation technology, atomic chain electronics would not be a dream, where foreign atoms are placed on a substrate to form a chain, and its electronic properties are designed by controlling the lattice constant d. It has been shown theoretically that a Si atomic chain is metallic regardless of d and that a Mg atomic chain is semiconducting or insulating with a band gap modified with d. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along the chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome this dilemma, we may place a dopant atom beside the chain at every N lattice periods (N > 1). Because of the periodic arrangement of dopant atoms, we can avoid the unwanted Anderson localization. Moreover, since the dopant atoms do not constitute the chain, the overlap interaction between them is minimized, and the band structure modification can be made smallest. Some tight-binding results will be discussed to demonstrate the present idea.

  9. Chameleon induced atomic afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare

    2010-11-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  10. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  11. Generalizing Atoms in Constraint Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, C. David, Jr.; Frisch, Alan M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the generalization of atomic formulas, or atoms, that are augmented with constraints on or among their terms. The atoms may also be viewed as definite clauses whose antecedents express the constraints. Atoms are generalized relative to a body of background information about the constraints. This paper first examines generalization of atoms with only monadic constraints. The paper develops an algorithm for the generalization task and discusses algorithm complexity. It then extends the algorithm to apply to atoms with constraints of arbitrary arity. The paper also presents semantic properties of the generalizations computed by the algorithms, making the algorithms applicable to such problems as abduction, induction, and knowledge base verification. The paper emphasizes the application to induction and presents a pac-learning result for constrained atoms.

  12. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    PubMed

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  13. Directed Atom-by-Atom Assembly of Dopants in Silicon.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Bethany M; Song, Jiaming; Sims, Hunter; Troparevsky, M Claudia; Humble, Travis S; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Snijders, Paul C; Lupini, Andrew R

    2018-05-17

    The ability to controllably position single atoms inside materials is key for the ultimate fabrication of devices with functionalities governed by atomic-scale properties. Single bismuth dopant atoms in silicon provide an ideal case study in view of proposals for single-dopant quantum bits. However, bismuth is the least soluble pnictogen in silicon, meaning that the dopant atoms tend to migrate out of position during sample growth. Here, we demonstrate epitaxial growth of thin silicon films doped with bismuth. We use atomic-resolution aberration-corrected imaging to view the as-grown dopant distribution and then to controllably position single dopants inside the film. Atomic-scale quantum-mechanical calculations corroborate the experimental findings. These results indicate that the scanning transmission electron microscope is of particular interest for assembling functional materials atom-by-atom because it offers both real-time monitoring and atom manipulation. We envision electron-beam manipulation of atoms inside materials as an achievable route to controllable assembly of structures of individual dopants.

  14. [Brief investigation on the issue of Zhen Dan(Cinnabar, HgS) irrelevant to Qian Dan (Minium, Pb(3)O(4))].

    PubMed

    Shen, S N

    2017-07-28

    Zhen Dan, the abbreviated form of Zhen Dan Sha, or called Zhu Sha (Cinnabar, HgS). It can be ruled out that Zhen Dan is the nickname of Qian Dan (Minium, Pb(3)O(4)) through the homologous formulas contrast. The prescriptions containing Zhen Dan in the Zheng lei ben cao ( Classified Materia Medica ) was put under the "attached prescriptions" of Qian Dan, while Zhong yao da ci dian ( Great Dictionary of Chinese Materia Medica )and Zhong hua ben cao ( Chinese Herbology )all definitelyconfirmed that Zhen Dan is the other name of Qian Dan, which are wrong and should be corrected.

  15. Evaluation of the risk of anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibody-associated cardiac manifestations of neonatal lupus in fetuses of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus exposed to hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Izmirly, Peter M; Kim, Mimi Y; Llanos, Carolina; Le, Phuong U; Guerra, Marta M; Askanase, Anca D; Salmon, Jane E; Buyon, Jill P

    2010-10-01

    Based on the potential involvement of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling in the pathogenesis of neonatal lupus (NL), it was hypothesised that fetal exposure to hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a TLR inhibitor, might reduce the risk of anti-SSA/Ro/SSB/La antibody-associated cardiac manifestations of NL (cardiac-NL). Cardiac-NL children (N=50) and controls (N=151) were drawn from the following overlapping pregnancy studies: Research Registry for NL; PR Interval and Dexamethasone Evaluation in Cardiac-NL; and Predictors of Pregnancy Outcomes: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Pregnancies met the following inclusion criteria: documentation of maternal anti-SSA/Ro/SSB/La antibodies at pregnancy, confirmation of medication use and child's outcome, a diagnosis of SLE before pregnancy and birth by 31 December 2007. Seven (14%) of the cardiac-NL children were exposed to HCQ compared with 56 (37%) of the controls (p=0.002; OR 0.28; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.63). Cases and controls were similar with respect to demographic and antibody status. Multivariable analysis adjusting for birth year, maternal race/ethnicity, antibody status, non-fluorinated steroid use and prior cardiac-NL risk yielded an OR associated with HCQ use of 0.46 (95% CI 0.18 to 1.18; p=0.10). This case-control study suggests that, in mothers with SLE with anti-SSA/Ro/SSB/La antibodies, exposure to HCQ during pregnancy may decrease the risk of fetal development of cardiac-NL. Prospective studies are needed for confirmation.

  16. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-26

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale.

  17. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale. PMID:28443645

  18. Atom-by-atom assembly of defect-free one-dimensional cold atom arrays.

    PubMed

    Endres, Manuel; Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-11-25

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a platform for the deterministic preparation of regular one-dimensional arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of more than 50 atoms in less than 400 milliseconds. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach may enable controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes autophagy and apoptosis leading to cellular redistribution of the autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/SSB in salivary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Katsiougiannis, S; Tenta, R; Skopouli, F N

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in minor salivary glands, to investigate the interplay between ER stress-induced autophagy and apoptosis in human salivary gland (HSG) cells and to test the effect of ER stress-induced apoptosis on the cellular redistribution of the two major Sjögren's syndrome (SS) autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SSB). Minor salivary gland biopsies from SS patients and sicca controls were examined by immunohistochemistry for the expression of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BiP) as an indicator of unfolded protein response (UPR). HSG cells were treated with thapsigargin (TG) and cell viability, autophagy and apoptosis were assessed. Immunoblot was applied to detect the conversion of LC3I to LC3II and the protein levels of GRP78/BiP and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). Apoptosis was evaluated by a single-stranded DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ro/SSA and La/SSB localization was visualized using immunofluorescence. GRP78/BiP was expressed by acinar and ductal epithelial cells in salivary glands of patients and sicca controls. TG treatment induced autophagy, as indicated by enhanced protein expression of LC3II. The protein levels of UPR marker XBP-1 were increased after TG treatment, while GRP78/BiP levels were decreased. TG treatment resulted in induction of HSG apoptosis. Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens were localized predominantly to the cytoplasm in resting cells, while they were redistributed to cell membrane and blebs in the apoptotic cells. In conclusion, ER stress is activated in minor salivary gland epithelial cells from SS patients and controls. ER stress-induced apoptosis in HSG cells leads to cell surface and apoptotic blebs relocalization of Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  20. [Atomic absorption fingerprint and identification studies of Da Huo Luo pill. I. Exploration of inorganic elements fingerprint for establishment of industrial standard].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Feng; Zhu, Long-Yin; Ding, Shu-Liang; Wang, Chen; Tu, Long-Fei

    2008-03-01

    The fingerprints for most of Chinese medicines based on their organic compositions have been well established. Nevertheless, there are very few known fingerprints which are based on inorganic elements. In order to identify the Da Huo Luo Dan and its efficiency from other Chinese medicines, the authors attempted to set up a fingerprint which could be determined by the measurement of inorganic elements in Da Huo Luo Dan and other Chinese medicines. In the present study, the authors first employed 28 batches of Da Huo Luo Dan produced by Zhang-Shu Pharmatheutical Company in Jiang Xi Province to screen 12 kinds of inorganic elements measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer and established the atomic absorption fingerprints. Secondly, the authors tried to identify Da Huo Luo Dan and other Chinese medicines by using the similarly analysis of vectors and the statistical analysis of compositional data. The result showed that the methods the authors used here were predictable to tell the efficiency of Da Huo Luo Dan from others. The authors' study also proves that establishment of standard for quality control by analysis of inorganic elements in Chinese medicines is feasible. The present study provides a new idea and a new technique that serve for the establishment of industrial standards for analysis of inorganic elements fingerprint to explore the effects of Chinese medicines.

  1. A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalff, F. E.; Rebergen, M. P.; Fahrenfort, E.; Girovsky, J.; Toskovic, R.; Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Otte, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of devices based on single dopants, such as the single-atom transistor, the single-spin magnetometer and the single-atom memory, has motivated the quest for strategies that permit the control of matter with atomic precision. Manipulation of individual atoms by low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy provides ways to store data in atoms, encoded either into their charge state, magnetization state or lattice position. A clear challenge now is the controlled integration of these individual functional atoms into extended, scalable atomic circuits. Here, we present a robust digital atomic-scale memory of up to 1 kilobyte (8,000 bits) using an array of individual surface vacancies in a chlorine-terminated Cu(100) surface. The memory can be read and rewritten automatically by means of atomic-scale markers and offers an areal density of 502 terabits per square inch, outperforming state-of-the-art hard disk drives by three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the chlorine vacancies are found to be stable at temperatures up to 77 K, offering the potential for expanding large-scale atomic assembly towards ambient conditions.

  2. Enhancing light-atom interactions via atomic bunching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-07-01

    There is a broad interest in enhancing the strength of light-atom interactions to the point where injecting a single photon induces a nonlinear material response. Here we show theoretically that sub-Doppler-cooled two-level atoms that are spatially organized by weak optical fields give rise to a nonlinear material response that is greatly enhanced beyond that attainable in a homogeneous gas. Specifically, in the regime where the intensity of the applied optical fields is much less than the off-resonance saturation intensity, we show that the third-order nonlinear susceptibility scales inversely with atomic temperature and, due to this scaling, can be two orders of magnitude larger than that of a homogeneous gas for typical experimental parameters. As a result, we predict that spatially bunched two-level atoms can exhibit single-photon nonlinearities. Our model is valid for all regimes of atomic bunching and simultaneously accounts for the backaction of the atoms on the optical fields. Our results agree with previous theoretical and experimental results for light-atom interactions that have considered only limited regimes of atomic bunching. For lattice beams tuned to the low-frequency side of the atomic transition, we find that the nonlinearity transitions from a self-focusing type to a self-defocusing type at a critical intensity. We also show that higher than third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities are significant in the regime where the dipole potential energy is on the order of the atomic thermal energy. We therefore find that it is crucial to retain high-order nonlinearities to accurately predict interactions of laser fields with spatially organized ultracold atoms. The model presented here is a foundation for modeling low-light-level nonlinear optical processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  3. Registration of 'Dan' winter hulless barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dan’ (Reg. No. CV- , PI 659066) six-rowed winter hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was developed and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in March 2009. Dan was derived from the cross VA96-41-17 / SC872143. It was released for production in the eastern United States, as a poten...

  4. Homogeneous Atomic Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth B.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the creation of homogeneous Fermi gases of ultracold atoms in a uniform potential. In the momentum distribution of a spin-polarized gas, we observe the emergence of the Fermi surface and the saturated occupation of one particle per momentum state: the striking consequence of Pauli blocking in momentum space for a degenerate gas. Cooling a spin-balanced Fermi gas at unitarity, we create homogeneous superfluids and observe spatially uniform pair condensates. For thermodynamic measurements, we introduce a hybrid potential that is harmonic in one dimension and uniform in the other two. The spatially resolved compressibility reveals the superfluid transition in a spin-balanced Fermi gas, saturation in a fully polarized Fermi gas, and strong attraction in the polaronic regime of a partially polarized Fermi gas.

  5. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  6. Atoms in astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of electromagnetic radiation and atomic physics needed for an understanding of astronomical applications are explored. Although intended primarily for teachers, this brochure is written so that it can be distributed to students if desired. The first section, Basic Topics, is suitable for a ninth-grade general science class; the style is simple and repetitive, and no mathematics or physics background is required. The second section, Intermediate and Advanced Topics, requires a knowledge of the material in the first section and assumes a generally higher level of achievement and motivation on the part of the student. These latter topics might fit well into junior-level physics, chemistry, or earth-science courses. Also included are a glossary, a list of references and teaching aids, class exercises, and a question and answer section.

  7. Atomic masses 1993. The 1993 atomic mass evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audi, G.; Wapstra, A. H.

    1993-11-01

    The 1993 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment of systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge.

  8. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  9. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  10. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  11. Thin film atomic hydrogen detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Thin film and bead thermistor atomic surface recombination hydrogen detectors were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Devices were constructed on a thin Mylar film substrate. Using suitable Wheatstone bridge techniques sensitivities of 80 microvolts/2x10 to the 13th power atoms/sec are attainable with response time constants on the order of 5 seconds.

  12. The Stair-Step Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a model of a generic atom that is used to represent the movement of electrons from lower to higher levels and vice-versa due to excitation and de-excitation of the atom. As the process of de-excitation takes place, photons represented by colored ping-pong balls are emitted, indicating the emission of light. (MDH)

  13. Fuel Injector With Shear Atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, George W.; Mills, Virgil L.; Smith, Durward B., II; Beacom, William F.

    1995-01-01

    Atomizer for injecting liquid fuel into combustion chamber uses impact and swirl to break incoming stream of fuel into small, more combustible droplets. Slanted holes direct flow of liquid fuel to stepped cylindrical wall. Impact on wall atomizes liquid. Air flowing past vanes entrains droplets of liquid in swirling flow. Fuel injected at pressure lower than customarily needed.

  14. Atomic Spectroscopic Databases at NIST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, J.; Kramida, A. E.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2006-01-01

    We describe recent work at NIST to develop and maintain databases for spectra, transition probabilities, and energy levels of atoms that are astrophysically important. Our programs to critically compile these data as well as to develop a new database to compare plasma calculations for atoms that are not in local thermodynamic equilibrium are also summarized.

  15. Hyperthermal atomic oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Wu, Dongchuan

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the transport properties of oxygen through silver was continued. Specifically, experiments measuring the transport through Ag(111), Ag(110), Ag(100) single crystals and through Ag0.05 Zr alloy were completed. In addition, experiments using glow discharge excitation of oxygen to assist in the transport were completed. It was found that the permeability through the different orientations of single crystal Ag was the same, but significant differences existed in the diffusivity. The experimental ratio of diffusivities, however, was in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates. Since the solubilities of orientations must be the same, this suggests some problems with the assumption K = DS. The glow discharge experiments show that there is a substantial increase in transport (factor of six) when the upstream pressure is dissociated to some fraction of atoms (which have a much higher sticking coefficient). These results indicate that there is a significant surface limitation because of dissociative adsorption of the molecules. Experiments with the Ag0.05 Zr alloy and its high-grain boundary and defect density show a permeability of greater than a factor of two over ordinary polycrystalline Ag, but it is unclear as to whether this is because of enhanced transport through these defects or whether the Zr and defects on the surface increased the sticking coefficient and therefore the transport.

  16. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom’s angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light’s OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light–matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069766

  17. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  18. Selenium speciation using capillary electrophoresis coupled with modified electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after selective extraction with 5-sulfosalicylic acid functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lizhen; Deng, Biyang; Shen, Caiying; Long, Chanjuan; Deng, Qiufen; Tao, Chunyao

    2015-05-22

    A new method for selenium speciation in fermented bean curd wastewater and juice was described. This method involved sample extraction with 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA)-functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SMNPs), capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation, and online detection with a modified electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) system. The modified interface for ETAAS allowed for the introduction of CE effluent directly through the end of the graphite tube. Elimination of the upper injection hole of the graphite tube reduced the loss of the anlayte and enhanced the detection sensitivity. The SSA-SMNPs were synthesized and used to extract trace amounts of selenite [Se(IV)], selenite [Se(VI)], selenomethionine (SeMet), and selenocystine (SeCys2) from dilute samples. The concentration enrichment factors for Se(VI), Se(IV), SeMet, and SeCys2 were 21, 29, 18, and 12, respectively, using the SSA-SMNPs extraction. The limits of detection for Se(VI), Se(IV), SeMet, and SeCys2 were 0.18, 0.17, 0.54, 0.49ngmL(-1), respectively. The RSD values (n=6) of method for intraday were observed between 0.7% and 2.9%. The RSD values of method for interday were less than 3.5%. The linear range of Se(VI) and Se(IV) were in the range of 0.5-200ngmL(-1), and the linear ranges of SeMet and SeCys2 were 2-500 and 2-1000ngmL(-1), respectively. The detection limits of this method were improved by 10 times due to the enrichment by the SSA-SMNP extraction. The contents of Se(VI) and Se(IV) in fermented bean curd wastewater were measured as 3.83 and 2.62ngmL(-1), respectively. The contents of Se(VI), Se(IV), SeMet, and SeCys2 in fermented bean curd juice were determined as 6.39, 4.08, 2.77, and 4.00ngmL(-1), respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 99.14-104.5% and the RSDs (n=6) of recoveries between 0.82% and 3.5%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. NDI and DAN DNA: nucleic acid-directed assembly of NDI and DAN.

    PubMed

    Ikkanda, Brian A; Samuel, Stevan A; Iverson, Brent L

    2014-03-07

    Two novel DNA base surrogate phosphoramidites 1 and 2, based upon relatively electron-rich 1,5-dialkoxynaphthalene (DAN) and relatively electron-deficient 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide (NDI), respectively, were designed, synthesized, and incorporated into DNA oligonucleotide strands. The DAN and NDI artificial DNA bases were inserted within a three-base-pair region within the interior of a 12-mer oligonucleotide duplex in various sequential arrangements and investigated with CD spectroscopy and UV melting curve analysis. The CD spectra of the modified duplexes indicated B-form DNA topology. Melting curve analyses revealed trends in DNA duplex stability that correlate with the known association of DAN and NDI moieties in aqueous solution as well as the known favorable interactions between NDI and natural DNA base pairs. This demonstrates that DNA duplex stability and specificity can be driven by the electrostatic complementarity between DAN and NDI. In the most favorable case, an NDI-DAN-NDI arrangement in the middle of the DNA duplex was found to be approximately as stabilizing as three A-T base pairs.

  20. Atom-atom entanglement by single-photon detection.

    PubMed

    Slodička, L; Hétet, G; Röck, N; Schindler, P; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R

    2013-02-22

    A scheme for entangling distant atoms is realized, as proposed in the seminal paper by [C. Cabrillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 59, 1025 (1999)]. The protocol is based on quantum interference and detection of a single photon scattered from two effectively one meter distant laser cooled and trapped atomic ions. The detection of a single photon heralds entanglement of two internal states of the trapped ions with high rate and with a fidelity limited mostly by atomic motion. Control of the entangled state phase is demonstrated by changing the path length of the single-photon interferometer.

  1. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1995-06-13

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

  2. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1995-06-13

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray.

  3. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Balsavich, John

    1991-01-01

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  5. PubChem atom environments.

    PubMed

    Hähnke, Volker D; Bolton, Evan E; Bryant, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Atom environments and fragments find wide-spread use in chemical information and cheminformatics. They are the basis of prediction models, an integral part in similarity searching, and employed in structure search techniques. Most of these methods were developed and evaluated on the relatively small sets of chemical structures available at the time. An analysis of fragment distributions representative of most known chemical structures was published in the 1970s using the Chemical Abstracts Service data system. More recently, advances in automated synthesis of chemicals allow millions of chemicals to be synthesized by a single organization. In addition, open chemical databases are readily available containing tens of millions of chemical structures from a multitude of data sources, including chemical vendors, patents, and the scientific literature, making it possible for scientists to readily access most known chemical structures. With this availability of information, one can now address interesting questions, such as: what chemical fragments are known today? How do these fragments compare to earlier studies? How unique are chemical fragments found in chemical structures? For our analysis, after hydrogen suppression, atoms were characterized by atomic number, formal charge, implicit hydrogen count, explicit degree (number of neighbors), valence (bond order sum), and aromaticity. Bonds were differentiated as single, double, triple or aromatic bonds. Atom environments were created in a circular manner focused on a central atom with radii from 0 (atom types) up to 3 (representative of ECFP_6 fragments). In total, combining atom types and atom environments that include up to three spheres of nearest neighbors, our investigation identified 28,462,319 unique fragments in the 46 million structures found in the PubChem Compound database as of January 2013. We could identify several factors inflating the number of environments involving transition metals, with many

  6. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  7. Dynamics of atom-atom correlations in the Fermi problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, Massimo; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Plastina, Francesco; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2012-10-01

    We present a detailed perturbative study of the dynamics of several types of atom-atom correlations in the famous Fermi problem. This is an archetypal model to study micro-causality in the quantum domain, where two atoms, one initially excited and the other prepared in its ground state, interact with the vacuum electromagnetic field. The excitation can be transferred to the second atom via a flying photon, and various kinds of quantum correlations between the two are generated during this process. Among these, prominent examples are given by entanglement, quantum discord and non-local correlations. The aim of this paper is to analyze the role of the light cone in the emergence of such correlations.

  8. Microcavities coupled to multilevel atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Sandra Isabelle; Evers, Jörg

    2011-11-01

    A three-level atom in the Λ configuration coupled to a microcavity is studied. The two transitions of the atom are assumed to couple to different counterpropagating mode pairs in the cavity. We analyze the dynamics both in the strong-coupling and the bad-cavity limits. We find that, compared to a two-level setup, the third atomic state and the additional control field modes crucially modify the system dynamics and enable more advanced control schemes. All results are explained using appropriate dressed-state and eigenmode representations. As potential applications, we discuss optical switching and turnstile operations and detection of particles close to the resonator surface.

  9. Studies of Highly Excited Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-02

    R 2 o i86 Chemical Physics Laboratory " i 0. R . Abrahamson i Vice President Physical Fciences Division ri" - c. -:OP...34 - men I IN RO U TI, .. . . . . . . . . . - .... .... o .. . . . o ......... - TI R SOPA T C LLIS OWZ.... ... . 6 ... ... oo ... .... ... .... . - A...by WA =W + 1ns- 0 (3a) and R = 1’np + ’(n-l)p (3b) .* 7_7. ’ P. z Atom 2 ’b y tom1 SA-846 1-30A FIGURE 2 GEOMETRY OF THE COLLISION OF TWO ATOMS Atom I

  10. NIST Databases on Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, J.; Wiese, W. L.; Martin, W. C.; Musgrove, A.; Fuhr, J. R.

    2002-11-01

    The NIST atomic and molecular spectroscopic databases now available on the World Wide Web through the NIST Physics Laboratory homepage include Atomic Spectra Database, Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms, Spectrum of Platinum Lamp for Ultraviolet Spectrograph Calibration, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Transition Probabilities, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Spectral Line Broadening, and Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database. The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) [1] offers evaluated data on energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities for atoms and atomic ions. Data are given for some 950 spectra and 70,000 energy levels. About 91,000 spectral lines are included, with transition probabilities for about half of these. Additional data resulting from our ongoing critical compilations will be included in successive new versions of ASD. We plan to include, for example, our recently published data for some 16,000 transitions covering most ions of the iron-group elements, as well as Cu, Kr, and Mo [2]. Our compilations benefit greatly from experimental and theoretical atomic-data research being carried out in the NIST Atomic Physics Division. A new compilation covering spectra of the rare gases in all stages of ionization, for example, revealed a need for improved data in the infrared. We have thus measured these needed data with our high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer [3]. An upcoming new database will give wavelengths and intensities for the stronger lines of all neutral and singly-ionized atoms, along with energy levels and transition probabilities for the persistent lines [4]. A critical compilation of the transition probabilities of Ba I and Ba II [5] has been completed and several other compilations of atomic transition probabilities are nearing completion. These include data for all spectra of Na, Mg, Al, and Si [6]. Newly compiled data for selected ions of Ne, Mg, Si and S, will form the basis for a new

  11. The Virtual Observatory Service TheoSSA: Establishing a Database of Synthetic Stellar Flux Standards I. NLTE Spectral Analysis of the DA-Type White Dwarf G191-B2B *,**,***,****

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims. We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods. In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results. TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at Teff =60 000 +/- 2000K and log g=7.60 +/- 0.05.We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions. The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare.

  12. AtomPy: an open atomic-data curation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Manuel; Mendoza, Claudio; Boswell, Josiah S; Ajoku, Chukwuemeka

    2014-06-01

    We present a cloud-computing environment for atomic data curation, networking among atomic data providers and users, teaching-and-learning, and interfacing with spectral modeling software. The system is based on Google-Drive Sheets, Pandas (Python Data Analysis Library) DataFrames, and IPython Notebooks for open community-driven curation of atomic data for scientific and technological applications. The atomic model for each ionic species is contained in a multi-sheet Google-Drive workbook, where the atomic parameters from all known public sources are progressively stored. Metadata (provenance, community discussion, etc.) accompanying every entry in the database are stored through Notebooks. Education tools on the physics of atomic processes as well as their relevance to plasma and spectral modeling are based on IPython Notebooks that integrate written material, images, videos, and active computer-tool workflows. Data processing workflows and collaborative software developments are encouraged and managed through the GitHub social network. Relevant issues this platform intends to address are: (i) data quality by allowing open access to both data producers and users in order to attain completeness, accuracy, consistency, provenance and currentness; (ii) comparisons of different datasets to facilitate accuracy assessment; (iii) downloading to local data structures (i.e. Pandas DataFrames) for further manipulation and analysis by prospective users; and (iv) data preservation by avoiding the discard of outdated sets.

  13. Learning atoms for materials discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Tang, Peizhe; Liu, Shenxiu; Pan, Jinbo; Yan, Qimin; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2018-06-26

    Exciting advances have been made in artificial intelligence (AI) during recent decades. Among them, applications of machine learning (ML) and deep learning techniques brought human-competitive performances in various tasks of fields, including image recognition, speech recognition, and natural language understanding. Even in Go, the ancient game of profound complexity, the AI player has already beat human world champions convincingly with and without learning from the human. In this work, we show that our unsupervised machines (Atom2Vec) can learn the basic properties of atoms by themselves from the extensive database of known compounds and materials. These learned properties are represented in terms of high-dimensional vectors, and clustering of atoms in vector space classifies them into meaningful groups consistent with human knowledge. We use the atom vectors as basic input units for neural networks and other ML models designed and trained to predict materials properties, which demonstrate significant accuracy. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  14. Contemporary Aspects of Atomic Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, R. G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The approach generally used in writing undergraduate textbooks on Atomic and Nuclear Physics presents this branch as historical in nature. Describes the concepts of astrophysics, plasma physics and spectroscopy as contemporary and intriguing for modern scientists. (PS)

  15. Coherent Radiation in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Robert Tyler

    Over the last century, quantum mechanics has dramatically altered our understanding of light and matter. Impressively, exploring the relationship between the two continues to provide important insights into the physics of many-body systems. In this thesis, we add to this still growing field of study. Specifically, we discuss superradiant line-broadening and cooperative dipole-dipole interactions for cold atom clouds in the linear-optics regime. We then discuss how coherent radiation changes both the photon scattering properties and the excitation distribution of atomic arrays. After that, we explore the nature of superradiance in initially inverted clouds of multi-level atoms. Finally, we explore the physics of clouds with degenerate Zeeman ground states, and show that this creates quantum effects that fundamentally change the photon scattering of atomic ensembles.

  16. Atom beams split by gentle persuasion

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1994-02-25

    Two different research teams have taken a big step toward atom interferometry. They have succeeded in splitting atomic beams by using atoms in spin states that neither absorb nor reemit laser light. By proper adjustment of experimental conditions, atoms are changed from one spin state to another, without passing through the intermediary excited state. The atoms in essence absorb momentum from the laser photons, without absorption or emission of photons. The change in momentum deflects atoms in the proper spin state.

  17. Laser Cooling of Neutral Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Assumptions and Scope ........oo......469....... II. Theory of the Resonance Radiation Force ........... 7 .’ Introduction o ..... - ... o7 General Explanation...areas. First, the initial velocity distribution for the atoms are needed. This information is developed in Ramsey’s book (Ref 12). Second, a general ...theory of the interaction of light with an atom is required. A general theory of resonance radiation pressure of light is developed from quantum

  18. Copper atomic-scale transistors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fangqing; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Röger, Moritz; Albrecht, Daniel; Hölscher, Hendrik; Leuthold, Jürgen; Schimmel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO 4 + H 2 SO 4 ) in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate). The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and -170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes ( U bias ) influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1 G 0 ( G 0 = 2e 2 /h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck's constant) or 2 G 0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  19. Copper atomic-scale transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kavalenka, Maryna N; Röger, Moritz; Albrecht, Daniel; Hölscher, Hendrik; Leuthold, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO4 + H2SO4) in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate). The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and −170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes (U bias) influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1G 0 (G 0 = 2e2/h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck’s constant) or 2G 0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors. PMID:28382242

  20. Microbial ecology of the closed artificial ecosystem MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative): reinventing and compartmentalizing the Earth's food and oxygen regeneration system for long-haul space exploration missions.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Larissa; De Wever, Heleen; Hermans, Veronik; Mastroleo, Felice; Morin, Nicolas; Wilmotte, Annick; Janssen, Paul; Mergeay, Max

    2006-01-01

    MELiSSA is a bioregenerative life support system designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the complete recycling of gas, liquid and solid wastes during long distance space exploration. The system uses the combined activity of different living organisms: microbial cultures in bioreactors, a plant compartment and a human crew. In this minireview, the development of a short-cut ecological system for the biotransformation of organic waste is discussed from a microorganism's perspective. The artificial ecological model--still in full development--that is inspired by Earth's own geomicrobiological ecosystem serves as an ideal study object on microbial ecology and will become an indispensable travel companion in manned space exploration.

  1. A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalff, Floris; Rebergen, Marnix; Fahrenfort, Nora; Girovsky, Jan; Toskovic, Ranko; Lado, Jose; FernáNdez-Rossier, JoaquíN.; Otte, Sander

    The ability to manipulate individual atoms by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) opens op opportunities for storage of digital data on the atomic scale. Recent achievements in this direction include data storage based on bits encoded in the charge state, the magnetic state, or the local presence of single atoms or atomic assemblies. However, a key challenge at this stage is the extension of such technologies into large-scale rewritable bit arrays. We demonstrate a digital atomic-scale memory of up to 1 kilobyte (8000 bits) using an array of individual surface vacancies in a chlorine terminated Cu(100) surface. The chlorine vacancies are found to be stable at temperatures up to 77 K. The memory, crafted using scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperature, can be read and re-written automatically by means of atomic-scale markers, and offers an areal density of 502 Terabits per square inch, outperforming state-of-the-art hard disk drives by three orders of magnitude.

  2. Differents aspects du fer dans l'organisme

    PubMed Central

    Bessis, Marcel; Breton-Gorius, Janine

    1959-01-01

    On voit des molécules de ferritine apparaitre dans le cytoplasme des cellules réticulaires au cours de la digestion des érythrocytes, autour des stromas phagocytés. Cette ferritine s'accumule en amas dans lesquels entrent d'autres substances, en particulier des lipides, provenant aussi des stromas globulaires et qui apparaissent sous forme myélinique. Souvent la ferritine se dispose d'une manière cristalline. Parfois la ferritine et l'apoferritine alternent dans ces cristaux. Parfois l'hémosidérine contient des cristaux qui semblent bien être de l'apoferritine pure. L'injection de sels de fer donne lieu à l'apparition de ferritine dans les cellules réticulaires. Dans les conditions de nos expériences, la plus grande partie du fer injecté était sous forme de ferritine dans un délai de 3 jours. Un aspect intermédiaire entre celui du fer injecté et celui de la ferritine a été trouvé. Dans le cas des injections de saccharate de fer ce sont de fines aiguilles; dans le cas des injections de lactate de fer, il s'agit de masses fibreuses. PMID:13800106

  3. Chip-Scale Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, Svenja

    2010-03-01

    Atomic magnetometers have reached sensitivities rivaling those of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in some frequency ranges [1]. A major advancement in atomic magnetometry was made possible by implementing interrogation schemes that suppress spin-exchange collisions between the alkali atoms [2]. Good signal-to-noise can be achieved by operation at very high alkali densities. At the same time, it introduces the challenge to create uniform spin-polarization and monitor the atomic precession about the magnetic field in atomic vapors with large optical densities. Off-resonant detection of the polarization rotation rather than the absorption is essential to operate in this regime. By use of microfabrication methods, we are miniaturizing such atomic magnetometers. They consist of miniature vapor cells with volumes of a few cubic millimeters integrated with micro-optical components. We present the advancement in sensitivities of such devices over nearly four orders of magnitude [3]. This allows for small low-power room-temperature devices with sensitivities that get close to those of SQUIDs in the frequency range around 100 Hz. We outline the current performance of chip-scale atomic magnetometers and the major challenges. Apart from efficient pumping and probing at high optical densities, these include magnetic noise caused by several sensor components and environmental factors, noise on the light fields, as well as magnetic fields from current-carrying parts, such as heaters, lasers, and photodetectors.[4pt] [1] Allred et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 130801 (2002) [0pt] [2] Happer and Tam, Phys. Rev. A 16, 1877 (1977) [0pt] [3] Griffith et al., Appl. Phys. Lett 94, 023502 (2009)

  4. Neutral atom imaging at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, A.; Orsini, S.; Milillo, A.; Di Lellis, A. M.; De Angelis, E.

    2006-02-01

    The feasibility of neutral atom detection and imaging in the Hermean environment is discussed in this study. In particular, we consider those energetic neutral atoms (ENA) whose emission is directly related to solar wind entrance into Mercury's magnetosphere. In fact, this environment is characterised by a weak magnetic field; thus, cusp regions are extremely large if compared to the Earth's ones, and intense proton fluxes are expected there. Our study includes a model of H + distribution in space, energy and pitch angle, simulated by means of a single-particle, Monte-Carlo simulation. Among processes that could generate neutral atom emission, we focus our attention on charge-exchange and ion sputtering, which, in principle, are able to produce directional ENA fluxes. Simulated neutral atom images are investigated in the frame of the neutral particle analyser-ion spectrometer (NPA-IS) SERENA experiment, proposed to fly on board the ESA mission BepiColombo/MPO. The ELENA (emitted low-energy neutral atoms) unit, which is part of this experiment, will be able to detect such fluxes; instrumental details and predicted count rates are given.

  5. Biological atomism and cell theory.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Daniel J

    2010-09-01

    Biological atomism postulates that all life is composed of elementary and indivisible vital units. The activity of a living organism is thus conceived as the result of the activities and interactions of its elementary constituents, each of which individually already exhibits all the attributes proper to life. This paper surveys some of the key episodes in the history of biological atomism, and situates cell theory within this tradition. The atomistic foundations of cell theory are subsequently dissected and discussed, together with the theory's conceptual development and eventual consolidation. This paper then examines the major criticisms that have been waged against cell theory, and argues that these too can be interpreted through the prism of biological atomism as attempts to relocate the true biological atom away from the cell to a level of organization above or below it. Overall, biological atomism provides a useful perspective through which to examine the history and philosophy of cell theory, and it also opens up a new way of thinking about the epistemic decomposition of living organisms that significantly departs from the physicochemical reductionism of mechanistic biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    DOEpatents

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  7. Expedition 4 Crew Interviews: Dan Bursch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 Flight Engineer Dan Bursch is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 4 crew in place of the Expedition 3 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and what the S0 truss will mean to ISS. Bursch ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  8. STS-105 Crew Interview: Dan Barry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Mission Specialist Dan Barry is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Barry discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  9. Parametric Cooling of Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Bharath, H. M.; Barrios, Maryrose; Chapman, Michael

    2017-04-01

    An oscillator is characterized by a restoring force which determines the natural frequency at which oscillations occur. The amplitude and phase-noise of these oscillations can be amplified or squeezed by modulating the magnitude of this force (e.g. the stiffness of the spring) at twice the natural frequency. This is parametric excitation; a long-studied phenomena in both the classical and quantum regimes. Parametric cooling, or the parametric squeezing of thermo-mechanical noise in oscillators has been studied in micro-mechanical oscillators and trapped ions. We study parametric cooling in ultracold atoms. This method shows a modest reduction of the variance of atomic momenta, and can be easily employed with pre-existing controls in many experiments. Parametric cooling is comparable to delta-kicked cooling, sharing similar limitations. We expect this cooling to find utility in microgravity experiments where the experiment duration is limited by atomic free expansion.

  10. Atomic scale study of nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldum, A.; Ciraci, S.; Batra, Inder P.; Fong, C. Y.

    1998-03-01

    Nanocontact and subsequent pulling off a sharp Ni(111) tip on a Cu(110) surface are investigated by using molecular dynamics method with embedded atom model. As the contact is formed, the sharp tip experiences multiple jump to contact in the attractive force range. The contact interface develops discontinuously mainly due to disorder-order transformations which lead to disappearance of a layer and hence abrupt changes in the normal force variation. Atom exchange occurs in the repulsive range. The connective neck is reduced also discontinuously by pulling off the tip. The novel atomic structure of the neck under the tensile force is analyzed. We also presented a comperative study for the contact by a Si(111) tip on Si(111)-(2x1) surface.

  11. Correlations between interacting Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Braun, Christoph; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a short introduction to Rydberg physics and quantum nonlinear optics using Rydberg atoms. It has been prepared as a compliment to a series of lectures delivered during the Latin American School of Physics "Marcos Moshinsky" 2017. We provide a short introduction to the properties of individual Rydberg atoms and discuss in detail how the interaction potential between Rydberg atom pairs is calculated. We then discuss how this interaction gives rise to the Rydberg blockade mechanism. With the aid of hallmark experiments in the field applications of the blockade for creating correlated quantum systems are discussed. Our aim is to give an overview of this exciting and rapidly evolving field. The interested reader is referred to original work and more comprehensive reviews and tutorials for further details on these subjects.

  12. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder

    DOE PAGES

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; ...

    2015-12-10

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. Here in this paper, we propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approachmore » the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust.« less

  13. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  14. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  15. Hot atoms in cosmic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossler, K; Jung, H J; Nebeling, B

    1984-01-01

    High energy chemical reactions and atom molecule interactions might be important for cosmic chemistry with respect to the accelerated species in solar wind, cosmic rays, colliding gas and dust clouds and secondary knock-on particles in solids. "Hot" atoms with energies ranging from a few eV to some MeV can be generated via nuclear reactions and consequent recoil processes. The chemical fate of the radioactive atoms can be followed by radiochemical methods (radio GC or HPLC). Hot atom chemistry may serve for laboratory simulation of the reactions of energetic species with gaseous or solid interstellar matter. Due to the effective measurement of 10(8)-10(10) atoms only it covers a low to medium dose regime and may add to the studies of ion implantation which due to the optical methods applied are necessarily in the high dose regime. Experimental results are given for the systems: C/H2O (gas), C/H2O (solid, 77 K), N/CH4 (solid, 77K) and C/NH3 (solid, 77 K). Nuclear reactions used for the generation of 2 to 3 MeV atoms are: N(p,alpha) 11C, 16O(p,alpha pn) 11C and 12C(d,n) 13N with 8 to 45 MeV protons or deuterons from a cyclotron. Typical reactions products are: CO, CO2, CH4, CH2O, CH3OH, HCOOH, NH3, CH3NH2, cyanamide, formamidine, guanidine etc. Products of hot reactions in solids are more complex than in corresponding gaseous systems, which underlines the importance of solid state reactions for the build-up of precursors for biomolecules in space. As one of the major mechanisms for product formation, the simultaneous or fast consecutive reactions of a hot carbon with two target molecules (reaction complex) is discussed.

  16. The RPA Atomization Energy Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P; Csonka, Gábor I

    2010-01-12

    There is current interest in the random phase approximation (RPA), a "fifth-rung" density functional for the exchange-correlation energy. RPA has full exact exchange and constructs the correlation with the help of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham orbitals. In many cases (uniform electron gas, jellium surface, and free atom), the correction to RPA is a short-ranged effect that is captured by a local spin density approximation (LSDA) or a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Nonempirical density functionals for the correction to RPA were constructed earlier at the LSDA and GGA levels (RPA+), but they are constructed here at the fully nonlocal level (RPA++), using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) of Langreth, Lundqvist, and collaborators. While they make important and helpful corrections to RPA total and ionization energies of free atoms, they correct the RPA atomization energies of molecules by only about 1 kcal/mol. Thus, it is puzzling that RPA atomization energies are, on average, about 10 kcal/mol lower than those of accurate values from experiment. We find here that a hybrid of 50% Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA with 50% RPA+ yields atomization energies much more accurate than either one does alone. This suggests a solution to the puzzle: While the proper correction to RPA is short-ranged in some systems, its contribution to the correlation hole can spread out in a molecule with multiple atomic centers, canceling part of the spread of the exact exchange hole (more so than in RPA or RPA+), making the true exchange-correlation hole more localized than in RPA or RPA+. This effect is not captured even by the vdW-DF nonlocality, but it requires the different kind of full nonlocality present in a hybrid functional.

  17. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  18. [Recent Development of Atomic Spectrometry in China].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuan-fang; Wang, Xiao-hua; Hang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    As an important part of modern analytical techniques, atomic spectrometry occupies a decisive status in the whole analytical field. The development of atomic spectrometry also reflects the continuous reform and innovation of analytical techniques. In the past fifteen years, atomic spectrometry has experienced rapid development and been applied widely in many fields in China. This review has witnessed its development and remarkable achievements. It contains several directions of atomic spectrometry, including atomic emission spectrometry (AES), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), and atomic mass spectrometry (AMS). Emphasis is put on the innovation of the detection methods and their applications in related fields, including environmental samples, biological samples, food and beverage, and geological materials, etc. There is also a brief introduction to the hyphenated techniques utilized in atomic spectrometry. Finally, the prospects of atomic spectrometry in China have been forecasted.

  19. The Atom and the Ocean, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, E. W. Seabrook

    Included is a brief description of the characteristics of the ocean, its role as a resource for food and minerals, its composition and its interactions with land and air. The role of atomic physics in oceanographic exploration is illustrated by the use of nuclear reactors to power surface and submarine research vessels and the design and use of…

  20. Atomic clusters and atomic surfaces in icosahedral quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Portier, Richard; Gratias, Denis

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the basic tools commonly used to describe the atomic structures of quasicrystals with a specific focus on the icosahedral phases. After a brief recall of the main properties of quasiperiodic objects, two simple physical rules are discussed that lead one to eventually obtain a surprisingly small number of atomic structures as ideal quasiperiodic models for real quasicrystals. This is due to the fact that the atomic surfaces (ASs) used to describe all known icosahedral phases are located on high-symmetry special points in six-dimensional space. The first rule is maximizing the density using simple polyhedral ASs that leads to two possible sets of ASs according to the value of the six-dimensional lattice parameter A between 0.63 and 0.79 nm. The second rule is maximizing the number of complete orbits of high symmetry to construct as large as possible atomic clusters similar to those observed in complex intermetallic structures and approximant phases. The practical use of these two rules together is demonstrated on two typical examples of icosahedral phases, i-AlMnSi and i-CdRE (RE = Gd, Ho, Tm).

  1. Phase modulation atomic force microscope with true atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kilpatrick, Jason I.; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a dynamic force microscope (DFM) working in a novel operation mode which is referred to as phase modulation atomic force microscopy (PM-AFM). PM-AFM utilizes a fixed-frequency excitation signal to drive a cantilever, which ensures stable imaging even with occasional tip crash and adhesion to the surface. The tip-sample interaction force is detected as a change of the phase difference between the cantilever deflection and excitation signals and hence the time response is not influenced by the Q factor of the cantilever. These features make PM-AFM more suitable for high-speed imaging than existing DFM techniques such as amplitude modulation and frequency modulation atomic force microscopies. Here we present the basic principle of PM-AFM and the theoretical limit of its performance. The design of the developed PM-AFM is described and its theoretically limited noise performance is demonstrated. Finally, we demonstrate the true atomic resolution imaging capability of the developed PM-AFM by imaging atomic-scale features of mica in water.

  2. Atomic Manipulation on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternes, Markus; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    Half a century ago, Nobel Laureate Richard Feynman asked in a now-famous lecture what would happen if we could precisely position individual atoms at will [R.P. Feynman, Eng. Sci. 23, 22 (1960)]. This dream became a reality some 30 years later when Eigler and Schweizer were the first to position individual Xe atoms at will with the probe tip of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) on a Ni surface [D.M. Eigler, E.K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990)].

  3. Entanglement evaluation with atomic Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obada, A.-S. F.; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, the concept of atomic Fisher information (AFI) is introduced. The marginal distributions of the AFI are defined. This quantity is used as a parameter of entanglement and compared with linear and atomic Wehrl entropies of the two-level atom. The evolution of the atomic Fisher information and atomic Wehrl entropy for only the pure state (or dissipation-free) of the Jaynes-Cummings model is analyzed. We demonstrate the connections between these measures.

  4. Analyse de plomb dans les peintures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broll, N.; Frezouls, J.-M.

    2002-07-01

    The analysis of lead in paints was previously used for the characterisation of pigments. In this way, the analysis is able to specify the century of the painting of a work of art. Recently this technique was also used to determine the toxicity of lead paints in building. This paper compared the result of several X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, either wave length/energy dispersion laboratory apparatus or X-ray microtube/radioactive source portable equipment's. L'analyse du plomb dans les peintures a jusqu'à présent été appliquée essentiellement pour caractériser les pigments lors de leur fabrication et pour identifier des rouvres d'art. Récemment cette technique est également utilisée pour déterminer la toxicité des peintures au plomb dans les bâtiments. Nous avons comparé les performances de plusieurs spectromètres de fluorescence X, soit de laboratoire à dispersion en longueur d'onde ou à dispersion en énergie (avec tube à rayonsX), soit portable avec source radioactive ou tube à rayons X.

  5. Relativistic calculations of atomic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Sahoo, B. K.; Arora, Bindiya

    2017-04-01

    Singly charged ions are engaging candidates in many areas of Physics. They are especially important in astrophysics for evaluating the radiative properties of stellar objects, in optical frequency standards and for fundamental physics studies such as searches for permanent electric dipole moments and atomic parity violation. Interpretation of these experiments often requires a knowledge of their transition wavelengths and electric dipole amplitudes. In this work, we discuss the calculation of various properties of alkaline earth ions. The relativistic all-order SD method in which all single and double excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave function are included, is used to calculate these atomic properties. We use this method for evaluation of electric dipole matrix elements of alkaline earth ions. Combination of these matrix elements with experimental energies allow to obtain the polarizabilities of ground and excited states of ions. We discuss the applications of estimated polarizabiities as a function of imaginary frequencies in the calculations of long-range atom-ion interactions. We have also located the magic wavelengths for nS1 / 2 - nD3 / 2 , 5 / 2 transitions of alkaline earth ions. These calculated properties will be highly valuable to atomic and astrophysics community. UGC-BSR Grant No. F.7-273/2009/BSR.

  6. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  7. LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle are presented. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water and hydroc...

  8. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  9. Atomism from Newton to Dalton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    Indicates that although Newton's achievements were rooted in an atomistic theory of matter resembling aspects of modern nuclear physics, Dalton developed his chemical atomism on the basis of the character of the gross behavior of substances rather than their particulate nature. (Author/SK)

  10. Strategic Applications of Ultracold Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-20

    behavior is strongly constrained by the Pauli Exclusion Principle. This limits the variety of possible nonlinear atom optics effects, but also offers the...sensors”, Wolfgang Ketterle, Steven Chu, Eric Cornell and Carl Wieman (2002). 19 Participating Scientific Personnel Steven Chu Wolfgang

  11. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  12. Experiments With Trapped Neutral Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-05

    number of condensate atoms in the trap [11]. (a) i solitons (b) £ 10 \\QT>J — \\^y Darks -WW . ’ VrV Ground state A(|>=0 <* -^ Mr...interacting condensates leading to soliton formation for a relative phase of Pi. (b) The relative phase of two split condensates was monitored for various

  13. Modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bindiya

    This dissertation reports the modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum information. This work is motivated by the prospects of optical frequency standards with trapped ions and the quantum computation proposals with neutral atoms in optical lattices. Extensive calculations of the electric-dipole matrix elements in monovalent atoms are conducted using the relativistic all-order method. This approach is a linearized version of the coupled-cluster method, which sums infinite sets of many-body perturbation theory terms. All allowed transitions between the lowest ns, np1/2, np 3/2 states and a large number of excited states of alkali-metal atoms are evaluated using the all-order method. For Ca+ ion, additional allowed transitions between nd5/2, np 3/2, nf5/2, nf 7/2 states and a large number of excited states are evaluated. We combine D1 lines measurements by Miller et al. [18] with our all-order calculations to determine the values of the electric-dipole matrix elements for the 4pj - 3d j' transitions in K and for the 5pj - 4dj' transitions in Rb to high precision. The resulting electric-dipole matrix elements are used for the high-precision calculation of frequency-dependent polarizabilities of ground state of alkali atoms. Our values of static polarizabilities are found to be in excellent agreement with available experiments. Calculations were done for the wavelength in the range 300--1600 nm, with particular attention to wavelengths of common infrared lasers. We parameterize our results so that they can be extended accurately to arbitrary wavelengths above 800 nm. Our data can be used to predict the oscillation frequencies of optically-trapped atoms, and particularly the ratios of frequencies of different species held in the same trap. We identify wavelengths at which two different alkali atoms have the same oscillation frequency. We present results of all-order calculations of static and frequency-dependent polarizabilities of excited np1/2 and np3

  14. The virtual observatory service TheoSSA: Establishing a database of synthetic stellar flux standards. I. NLTE spectral analysis of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims: We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods: In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results: TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at and log g = 7.60 ± 0.05. We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions: The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope

  15. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Ty2 aroC-ssaV-) M01ZH09, with a defined mutation in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2, as a live, oral typhoid vaccine in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, B D; McKenzie, Robin; O'Neill, J Patrick; Larsson, Catherine J; Bourgeois, A Louis; Shimko, Janet; Bentley, Matthew; Makin, Jill; Chatfield, Steve; Hindle, Zoë; Fidler, Christine; Robinson, Brad E; Ventrone, Cassandra H; Bansal, Nivedita; Carpenter, Colleen M; Kutzko, Deborah; Hamlet, Sandra; LaPointe, Casey; Taylor, David N

    2006-01-12

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains with mutations in the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2) may represent an effective strategy for human vaccine development, and a vectoring system for heterologous antigens. S. Typhi (Ty2 aroC-ssaV-) M01ZH09 is an attenuated, live, oral typhoid vaccine harboring defined deletion mutations in ssaV, which encodes an integral component in the SPI-2 type III secretion system (TTSS), as well as a mutation in an aromatic biosynthetic pathway needed for bacterial growth in vivo (aroC). SPI-2 mutant vaccines have yet to be evaluated in a large, randomized human trial. A simplified or single-oral dose oral typhoid vaccine using the SPI-2 strategy would offer significant advantages over the currently licensed typhoid vaccines. We performed a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating clinical trial in 60 healthy adult volunteers to determine the tolerability and immunogenicity of a single dose of M01ZH09. Three groups of 20 healthy adult volunteers were enrolled; 16 in each group received a single oral dose of the freeze-dried vaccine at 5 x 10(7), 5 x 10(8) or 5 x 10(9)CFU in a bicarbonate buffer. Four volunteers in each cohort received placebo in the same buffer. Adverse events were infrequent and not statistically different between vaccine and placebo recipients, although two subjects in the mid-range dose and three subjects in the highest dose had temperature measurements >37.5 degrees C. No blood or urine cultures were positive for M01ZH09, and fecal shedding was brief. The immune response was dose-related; the highest vaccine dose (5 x 10(9)CFU) was the most immunogenic. All tested subjects receiving the highest dose had a significant ASC response (mean 118 spots/10(6) cells). A >or=4-fold increase in antibody titer for S. Typhi LPS or flagellin was detected in 75% of volunteers in the highest-dose cohort by day 28. The SPI-2 mutant vaccine, M01ZH09, is a promising typhoid vaccine candidate and deserves further

  16. Electrostatic atomization: Effect of electrode materials on electrostatic atomizer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Abhilash; Staszel, Christopher; Kashir, Babak; Perri, Anthony; Mashayek, Farzad; Yarin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Electrostatic atomization was studied experimentally with a pointed electrode in a converging nozzle. Experiments were carried out on poorly conductive canola oil where it was observed that electrode material may affect charge transfer. This points at the possible faradaic reactions that can occur at the surfaces of the electrodes. The supply voltage is applied to the sharp electrode and the grounded nozzle body constitutes the counter-electrode. The charge transfer is controlled by the electrochemical reactions on both the electrodes. The electrical performance study of the atomizer issuing a charged oil jet was conducted using three different nozzle body materials - brass, copper and stainless steel. Also, two sharp electrode materials - brass and stainless steel - were tested. The experimental results revealed that both the nozzle body material, as well as the sharp electrode material affected the spray and leak currents. Moreover, the effect of the sharp electrode material is quite significant. This research is supported by NSF Grant 1505276.

  17. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  18. Quantum memory with optically trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Chuu, Chih-Sung; Strassel, Thorsten; Zhao, Bo; Koch, Markus; Chen, Yu-Ao; Chen, Shuai; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2008-09-19

    We report the experimental demonstration of quantum memory for collective atomic states in a far-detuned optical dipole trap. Generation of the collective atomic state is heralded by the detection of a Raman scattered photon and accompanied by storage in the ensemble of atoms. The optical dipole trap provides confinement for the atoms during the quantum storage while retaining the atomic coherence. We probe the quantum storage by cross correlation of the photon pair arising from the Raman scattering and the retrieval of the atomic state stored in the memory. Nonclassical correlations are observed for storage times up to 60 mus.

  19. Magneto-optical cooling of atoms.

    PubMed

    Raizen, Mark G; Budker, Dmitry; Rochester, Simon M; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2014-08-01

    We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces, can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultracold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power.

  20. Super-Coulombic atom-atom interactions in hyperbolic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Cristian L.; Jacob, Zubin

    2017-01-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, which govern phenomena such as cooperative Lamb shifts, superradiant decay rates, Van der Waals forces and resonance energy transfer rates, are conventionally limited to the Coulombic near-field. Here we reveal a class of real-photon and virtual-photon long-range quantum electrodynamic interactions that have a singularity in media with hyperbolic dispersion. The singularity in the dipole-dipole coupling, referred to as a super-Coulombic interaction, is a result of an effective interaction distance that goes to zero in the ideal limit irrespective of the physical distance. We investigate the entire landscape of atom-atom interactions in hyperbolic media confirming the giant long-range enhancement. We also propose multiple experimental platforms to verify our predicted effect with phonon-polaritonic hexagonal boron nitride, plasmonic super-lattices and hyperbolic meta-surfaces as well. Our work paves the way for the control of cold atoms above hyperbolic meta-surfaces and the study of many-body physics with hyperbolic media.

  1. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  2. STS-108 Crew Interviews: Dan Tani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Mission Specialist Dan Tani is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about the mission's goals and significance, explaining the meaning of 'utilization flight 1' (UF-1) as opposed to an 'assembly flight'. He gives details on the payload (Starshine Satellite, Avian Development Facility, and Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM)), his role in the rendezvous, docking, and undocking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), how he will participate in the unloading and reloading of the MPLM, and the way in which the old and new resident crews of ISS will exchanged. Tani ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  3. Tungsten devices in analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiandeng; Jones, Bradley T.

    2002-04-01

    Tungsten devices have been employed in analytical atomic spectrometry for approximately 30 years. Most of these atomizers can be electrically heated up to 3000 °C at very high heating rates, with a simple power supply. Usually, a tungsten device is employed in one of two modes: as an electrothermal atomizer with which the sample vapor is probed directly, or as an electrothermal vaporizer, which produces a sample aerosol that is then carried to a separate atomizer for analysis. Tungsten devices may take various physical shapes: tubes, cups, boats, ribbons, wires, filaments, coils and loops. Most of these orientations have been applied to many analytical techniques, such as atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, atomic fluorescence spectrometry, laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry, metastable transfer emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and microwave plasma atomic spectrometry. The analytical figures of merit and the practical applications reported for these techniques are reviewed. Atomization mechanisms reported for tungsten atomizers are also briefly summarized. In addition, less common applications of tungsten devices are discussed, including analyte preconcentration by adsorption or electrodeposition and electrothermal separation of analytes prior to analysis. Tungsten atomization devices continue to provide simple, versatile alternatives for analytical atomic spectrometry.

  4. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  5. Catalysis on Single Supported Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The highly successful application of supported metals as heterogeneous catalysts in automotive catalysts, fuel cells, and other multitudes of industrial processes have led to extensive efforts to understand catalyst behavior at the nano-scale. Recent discovery of simple wet methods to prepare single supported atoms, the smallest nano-catalyst, has allowed for experimental validation of catalytic activity of a variety of catalysts and potential for large scale production for such catalysts for industrial processes. In this chapter, we summarize the synthetic and structural aspects of single supported atoms. We also present proposed mechanisms for the activity of single supported catalysts where conventionalmore » mechanisms cannot operate due to lack of M-M bonds in the catalysts.« less

  6. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.

    1994-08-01

    The simple hydrogen atom permits unique confrontations between spectroscopic experiment and fundamental theory. The experimental resolution and measurement accuracy continue to improve exponentially. Recent advances include a new measurement of the Lamb shift of the 1S ground state which provides now the most stringent test of QED for an atom and reveals unexpectedly large two-loop binding corrections. The H-D isotope shift of the extremely narrow 1S-2S two-photon resonance is yielding a new value for the structure radius of the deuteron, in agreement with nuclear theory. The Rydberg constant as determined within 3 parts in 1011 by two independent groups has become the most accurately known of any fundamental constant. Advances in the art of absolute optical frequency measurements will permit still more precise experiments in the near future.

  7. Stochastic models for atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. A.; Jones, R. H.; Tryon, P. V.; Allan, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    For the atomic clocks used in the National Bureau of Standards Time Scales, an adequate model is the superposition of white FM, random walk FM, and linear frequency drift for times longer than about one minute. The model was tested on several clocks using maximum likelihood techniques for parameter estimation and the residuals were acceptably random. Conventional diagnostics indicate that additional model elements contribute no significant improvement to the model even at the expense of the added model complexity.

  8. Atomic Energy Levels in Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-02-24

    testing, evaluation, calibration services, and various consultation and information servics. Research projecta are also performed for other government...agencies when the woric relates to and aupplementi the basic program of the Bureau or when the Bureau’s unique competence is requed aThe scope of...Johns Hopkins University, with the support of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, initiated a program of experimental studies of the sharp line

  9. Monolayer atomic crystal molecular superlattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; He, Qiyuan; Halim, Udayabagya; Liu, Yuanyue; Zhu, Enbo; Lin, Zhaoyang; Xiao, Hai; Duan, Xidong; Feng, Ziying; Cheng, Rui; Weiss, Nathan O; Ye, Guojun; Huang, Yun-Chiao; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Imran; Liao, Lei; Chen, Xianhui; Goddard, William A; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2018-03-07

    Artificial superlattices, based on van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene or molybdenum disulfide, offer technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. Typical strategies for creating such artificial superlattices rely on arduous layer-by-layer exfoliation and restacking, with limited yield and reproducibility. The bottom-up approach of using chemical-vapour deposition produces high-quality heterostructures but becomes increasingly difficult for high-order superlattices. The intercalation of selected two-dimensional atomic crystals with alkali metal ions offers an alternative way to superlattice structures, but these usually have poor stability and seriously altered electronic properties. Here we report an electrochemical molecular intercalation approach to a new class of stable superlattices in which monolayer atomic crystals alternate with molecular layers. Using black phosphorus as a model system, we show that intercalation with cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide produces monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattices in which the interlayer distance is more than double that in black phosphorus, effectively isolating the phosphorene monolayers. Electrical transport studies of transistors fabricated from the monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattice show an on/off current ratio exceeding 10 7 , along with excellent mobility and superior stability. We further show that several different two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide, can be intercalated with quaternary ammonium molecules of varying sizes and symmetries to produce a broad class of superlattices with tailored molecular structures, interlayer distances, phase compositions, electronic and optical properties. These studies define a versatile material platform for fundamental studies and potential technological applications.

  10. Monolayer atomic crystal molecular superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; He, Qiyuan; Halim, Udayabagya; Liu, Yuanyue; Zhu, Enbo; Lin, Zhaoyang; Xiao, Hai; Duan, Xidong; Feng, Ziying; Cheng, Rui; Weiss, Nathan O.; Ye, Guojun; Huang, Yun-Chiao; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Imran; Liao, Lei; Chen, Xianhui; Goddard, William A., III; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2018-03-01

    Artificial superlattices, based on van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene or molybdenum disulfide, offer technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. Typical strategies for creating such artificial superlattices rely on arduous layer-by-layer exfoliation and restacking, with limited yield and reproducibility. The bottom-up approach of using chemical-vapour deposition produces high-quality heterostructures but becomes increasingly difficult for high-order superlattices. The intercalation of selected two-dimensional atomic crystals with alkali metal ions offers an alternative way to superlattice structures, but these usually have poor stability and seriously altered electronic properties. Here we report an electrochemical molecular intercalation approach to a new class of stable superlattices in which monolayer atomic crystals alternate with molecular layers. Using black phosphorus as a model system, we show that intercalation with cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide produces monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattices in which the interlayer distance is more than double that in black phosphorus, effectively isolating the phosphorene monolayers. Electrical transport studies of transistors fabricated from the monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattice show an on/off current ratio exceeding 107, along with excellent mobility and superior stability. We further show that several different two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide, can be intercalated with quaternary ammonium molecules of varying sizes and symmetries to produce a broad class of superlattices with tailored molecular structures, interlayer distances, phase compositions, electronic and optical properties. These studies define a versatile material platform for fundamental studies and potential technological applications.

  11. Prospects for atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.

    1984-01-01

    The potentialities of different atomic frequency standards which are not yet into field operation, for most of them, but for which preliminary data, obtained in laboratory experiments, give confidence that they may improve greatly the present state of the art are described. The review will mainly cover the following devices: (1) cesium beam frequency standards with optical pumping and detection; (2) optically pumped rubidium cells; (3) magnesium beam; (4) cold hydrogen masers; and (5) traps with stored and cooled ions.

  12. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  13. The Future of Atomic Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  14. Dynamics in atomic signaling games.

    PubMed

    Fox, Michael J; Touri, Behrouz; Shamma, Jeff S

    2015-07-07

    We study an atomic signaling game under stochastic evolutionary dynamics. There are a finite number of players who repeatedly update from a finite number of available languages/signaling strategies. Players imitate the most fit agents with high probability or mutate with low probability. We analyze the long-run distribution of states and show that, for sufficiently small mutation probability, its support is limited to efficient communication systems. We find that this behavior is insensitive to the particular choice of evolutionary dynamic, a property that is due to the game having a potential structure with a potential function corresponding to average fitness. Consequently, the model supports conclusions similar to those found in the literature on language competition. That is, we show that efficient languages eventually predominate the society while reproducing the empirical phenomenon of linguistic drift. The emergence of efficiency in the atomic case can be contrasted with results for non-atomic signaling games that establish the non-negligible possibility of convergence, under replicator dynamics, to states of unbounded efficiency loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  16. Atomically Thin Femtojoule Memristive Device

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Huan; Dong, Zhipeng; Tian, He; ...

    2017-10-25

    The morphology and dimension of the conductive filament formed in a memristive device are strongly influenced by the thickness of its switching medium layer. Aggressive scaling of this active layer thickness is critical toward reducing the operating current, voltage, and energy consumption in filamentary-type memristors. Previously, the thickness of this filament layer has been limited to above a few nanometers due to processing constraints, making it challenging to further suppress the on-state current and the switching voltage. In this paper, the formation of conductive filaments in a material medium with sub-nanometer thickness formed through the oxidation of atomically thin two-dimensionalmore » boron nitride is studied. The resulting memristive device exhibits sub-nanometer filamentary switching with sub-pA operation current and femtojoule per bit energy consumption. Furthermore, by confining the filament to the atomic scale, current switching characteristics are observed that are distinct from that in thicker medium due to the profoundly different atomic kinetics. The filament morphology in such an aggressively scaled memristive device is also theoretically explored. Finally, these ultralow energy devices are promising for realizing femtojoule and sub-femtojoule electronic computation, which can be attractive for applications in a wide range of electronics systems that desire ultralow power operation.« less

  17. "Electronium": A Quantum Atomic Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an alternative atomic model to the probability model, the descriptive quantum atomic model Electronium. Discusses the way in which it is intended to support students in learning quantum-mechanical concepts. (Author/MM)

  18. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  19. Atomic oxygen damage characterization by photothermal scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A. W.; Wood, N. J.; Zakaria, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we use a photothermal imaging technique to characterize the damage caused to an imperfectly coated gold-coated Kapton sample exposed to successively increased fluences of atomic oxygen in a laboratory atomic source.

  20. The Kinetics of Nitrogen Atom Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Ronald; Winkler, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a study of the kinetics of the recombination of nitrogen atoms in which concentration-time relations are determined directly by utilizing visual observations of emissions to make gas phase titrations of N atoms with NO. (MLH)

  1. The Rubidium Atomic Clock and Basic Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-10

    from orbiting GPS (global positioning system) satellites. Thankfully, you make it home without an exciting but har- rowing story to tell family...the vapor-cell atomic clock, -i\\till is elec- tronically tied to an atomic resonance, thereby transferring the stability of atomic structure to the...are applied to the resonance cell, there is a net transfer of atoms from F = 1 back into F = 2 and a decrease in transmitted light intensity. The

  2. Adiabatic Quantum Computing with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Aaron; Biedermann, Grant; Burns, George; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Johnson, Cort; Kemme, Shanalyn; Landahl, Andrew; Mangan, Michael; Parazzoli, L. Paul; Schwindt, Peter; Armstrong, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    We are developing, both theoretically and experimentally, a neutral atom qubit approach to adiabatic quantum computation. Using our microfabricated diffractive optical elements, we plan to implement an array of optical traps for cesium atoms and use Rydberg-dressed ground states to provide a controlled atom-atom interaction. We will develop this experimental capability to generate a two-qubit adiabatic evolution aimed specifically toward demonstrating the two-qubit quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) routine.

  3. How Good Are the Standard Atomic Weights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peiser, H. Steffen

    1985-01-01

    This review of standard atomic weights is written chiefly for chemical analysts who may place too much confidence in the accuracy of these values. Topics considered include Frank Clarke's atomic weights, effects of radioactivity and other anomalies in isotopic abundance, atomic weight limitations from experimental uncertainties, and others. (JN)

  4. Clarifying Atomic Weights: A 2016 Four-Figure Table of Standard and Conventional Atomic Weights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Meyers, Fabienne; Holden, Norman E.

    2017-01-01

    To indicate that atomic weights of many elements are not constants of nature, in 2009 and 2011 the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) replaced single-value standard atomic weight values with atomic weight intervals for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron,…

  5. Pursuit of the Kramers-Henneberger atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Wang, Pingxiao; Kais, Sabre; Herschbach, Dudley

    2017-09-01

    Superstrong femtosecond pulsed lasers can profoundly alter electronic structure of atoms and molecules. The oscillating laser field drives one or more electrons almost free. When averaged over, the rapid oscillations combine with the static Coulomb potential to create an effective binding potential. The consequent array of bound states comprises the ;Kramers-Henneberger Atom;. Theorists have brought forth many properties of KH atoms, yet convincing experimental evidence is meager. We examine a remarkable experiment accelerating atoms (Eichmann et al., 2009). It offers tantalizing evidence for the KH atom, with prospects for firm confirmation by adjustment of laser parameters.

  6. Atom Interferometry in a Warm Vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Biedermann, G. W.; McGuinness, H. J.; Rakholia, A. V.; ...

    2017-04-17

    Here, we demonstrate matter-wave interference in a warm vapor of rubidium atoms. Established approaches to light-pulse atom interferometry rely on laser cooling to concentrate a large ensemble of atoms into a velocity class resonant with the atom optical light pulse. In our experiment, we show that clear interference signals may be obtained without laser cooling. This effect relies on the Doppler selectivity of the atom interferometer resonance. Lastly, this interferometer may be configured to measure accelerations, and we demonstrate that multiple interferometers may be operated simultaneously by addressing multiple velocity classes.

  7. Atom optics in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, M.; Szriftgiser, P.; Dalibard, J.; Steane, A. M.

    1996-05-01

    Atom-optics experiments are presented using a time-modulated evanescent light wave as an atomic mirror in the trampoline configuration, i.e., perpendicular to the direction of the atomic free fall. This modulated mirror is used to accelerate cesium atoms, to focus their trajectories, and to apply a ``multiple lens'' to separately focus different velocity classes of atoms originating from a point source. We form images of a simple two-slit object to show the resolution of the device. The experiments are modelled by a general treatment analogous to classical ray optics.

  8. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  9. Progress towards a cesium atomic fountain clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, William M.; Raithel, Georg A.; Rolston, Steven L.; Phillips, William D.; Ekstrom, Christopher R.

    1997-04-01

    We have been developing a fountain of laser--cooled cesium atoms for use as an atomic clock. Our design largely follows that of the fountain built at LPTF in Paris. In our fountain, chirp--slowed atoms are first collected in a Magneto--Optic Trap (MOT) and then cooled to a few μK in optical molasses. The cooled atoms are then launched vertically into a "moving molasses" by shifting the frequencies of the vertical cooling beams. The atoms then travel through a microwave cavity tuned to the 9.2 GHz cesium hyperfine frequency for a first Ramsey pulse. After roughly 0.5 seconds of free flight under the influence of gravity, the atoms fall back through the microwave cavity and into an optical state--detection region which detects the number of atoms making the F=3 arrow F=4 transition. The increased Ramsey interaction time improves the short--time precision as compared to traditional atomic beam experiments, while many systematic shifts which limit the accuracy of an atomic beam clock are reduced by the low atomic velocity and the retrace of the atomic trajectory through the microwave cavity. We will discuss the progress towards a working fountain being assembled in our laboratory.

  10. Laser-Free Cold-Atom Gymnastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, Benedict; Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have performed beam transport simulations on ultra cold (2 μK) and cold (130 μK) neutral Cs atoms in the F = M = + 4 (magnetic weak-field seeking) ground state. We use inhomogeneous magnetic fields to focus and accelerate the atoms. Acceleration of neutral atoms by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was demonstrated by Stern and Gerlach in 1922. In the simulations, a two mm diameter cloud of atoms is released to fall under gravity. A magnetic coil focuses the falling atoms. After falling 41 cm, the atoms are reflected in the magnetic fringe field of a solenoid. They return to their starting height, about 0.7 s later, having passed a second time through the focusing coil. The simulations show that > 98 % of ultra cold Cs atoms and > 70 % of cold Cs atoms will survive at least 15 round trips (assuming perfect vacuum). More than 100 simulations were run to optimize coil currents and focusing coil diameter and height. Simulations also show that atoms can be launched into a fountain. An experimental apparatus to test the simulations, is being constructed. This technique may find application in atomic fountain clocks, interferometers, and gravitometers, and may be adaptable for use in microgravity. It may also work with Bose-Einstein condensates of paramagnetic atoms.

  11. Quantum state atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    New classical modalities of atomic force microscopy continue to emerge to achieve higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution for nanometrology of materials. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum mechanical modality that capitalizes on squeezed states of probe displacement. We show that such squeezing is enabled nanomechanically when the probe enters the van der Waals regime of interaction with a sample. The effect is studied in the non-contact mode, where we consider the parameter domains characterizing the attractive regime of the probe-sample interaction force.

  12. Atomic oxygen effects on materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Brady, Joyce A.; Merrow, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Understanding of the basic processes of atomic oxygen interaction is currently at a very elementary level. However, measurement of erosion yields, surface morphology, and optical properties for low fluences have brought about much progress in the past decade. Understanding the mechanisms and those factors that are important for proper simulation of low Earth orbit is at a much lower level of understanding. The ability to use laboratory simulations with confidence to quantifiably address the functional performance and durability of materials in low Earth orbit will be necessary to assure long-term survivability to the natural space environment.

  13. Optical binding with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Bachelard, R.; Kaiser, R.

    2018-04-01

    Optical binding is a form of light-mediated forces between elements of matter which emerge in response to the collective scattering of light. Such a phenomenon has been studied mainly in the context of the equilibrium stability of dielectric sphere arrays which move amid dissipative media. In this article, we demonstrate that optically bounded states of a pair of cold atoms can exist, in the absence of nonradiative damping. We study the scaling laws for the unstable-stable phase transition at negative detuning and the unstable-metastable one for positive detuning. In addition, we show that angular momentum can lead to dynamical stabilization with infinite-range scaling.

  14. Chaos in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuiqing; Raman, Arvind

    2006-01-01

    Chaotic oscillations of microcantilever tips in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are reported and characterized. Systematic experiments performed using a variety of microcantilevers under a wide range of operating conditions indicate that softer AFM microcantilevers bifurcate from periodic to chaotic oscillations near the transition from the noncontact to the tapping regimes. Careful Lyapunov exponent and noise titration calculations of the tip oscillation data confirm their chaotic nature. AFM images taken by scanning the chaotically oscillating tips over the sample show small, but significant metrology errors at the nanoscale due to this “deterministic” uncertainty.

  15. Quantum state atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    2017-04-10

    New classical modalities of atomic force microscopy continue to emerge to achieve higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution for nanometrology of materials. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum mechanical modality that capitalizes on squeezed states of probe displacement. We show that such squeezing is enabled nanomechanically when the probe enters the van der Waals regime of interaction with a sample. The effect is studied in the non-contact mode, where we consider the parameter domains characterizing the attractive regime of the probe-sample interaction force.

  16. Atomic oxygen effects on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, Albert T.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of specimen geometry on the attack of metals by atomic oxygen is addressed. This is done by extending the coupled-currents approach in metal oxidation to spherical and cylindrical geometries. Kinetic laws are derived for the rates of oxidation of samples having these geometries. It is found that the burn-up time for spherical particles of a given diameter can be as much as a factor of 3 shorter than the time required to completely oxidize a planar sample of the same thickness.

  17. Metal powder production by gas atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, E. Y.; Grant, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The confined liquid, gas-atomization process was investigated. Results from a two-dimensional water model showed the importance of atomization pressure, as well as delivery tube and atomizer design. The atomization process at the tip of the delivery tube was photographed. Results from the atomization of a modified 7075 aluminum alloy yielded up to 60 wt pct. powders that were finer than 45 microns in diameter. Two different atomizer designs were evaluated. The amount of fine powders produced was correlated to a calculated gas-power term. An optimal gas-power value existed for maximized fine powder production. Atomization at gas-power greater than or less than this optimal value produced coarser powders.

  18. Knowledge Extraction from Atomically Resolved Images.

    PubMed

    Vlcek, Lukas; Maksov, Artem; Pan, Minghu; Vasudevan, Rama K; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2017-10-24

    Tremendous strides in experimental capabilities of scanning transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) over the past 30 years made atomically resolved imaging routine. However, consistent integration and use of atomically resolved data with generative models is unavailable, so information on local thermodynamics and other microscopic driving forces encoded in the observed atomic configurations remains hidden. Here, we present a framework based on statistical distance minimization to consistently utilize the information available from atomic configurations obtained from an atomically resolved image and extract meaningful physical interaction parameters. We illustrate the applicability of the framework on an STM image of a FeSe x Te 1-x superconductor, with the segregation of the chalcogen atoms investigated using a nonideal interacting solid solution model. This universal method makes full use of the microscopic degrees of freedom sampled in an atomically resolved image and can be extended via Bayesian inference toward unbiased model selection with uncertainty quantification.

  19. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; del Corro, Pablo G; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A; Lally, Richard W; Bishop, David J

    2015-06-28

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ∼1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.

  20. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.