Science.gov

Sample records for atom wire formation

  1. Hydrogen in Mono-Atomic Gold Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Robert N.; Sherbakov, Andrew G.; Landman, Uzi; Hakkinen, Hannu

    2004-03-01

    Results of ab-initio scalar relativistic density functional calculations of the interaction between a mono-atomic gold wire (suspended between two gold tips) and a hydrogen molecule, at various stages of wire stretching, are presented. The hydrogen molecule does not bind to the wire until the wire is sufficiently stretched, i.e. starting to break, at which time the molecule inserts itself into the wire restoring a fraction of the conductance quantum g. With subsequent compression of the wire the axis of the molecule gradually tips away from the wire axis until it becomes "quasi-dissociated" with the H-H axis perpendicular to the wire. At this point the conductance almost vanishes, while for the bare wire the conductance at this tip-to-tip separation is close to 1g. These results, and the frequency of various vibrational modes of the hydrogen molecule, are compared with recent experimental and theoretical work involving platinum wires.

  2. Wire Composition: Its Effect on Metal Disintegration and Particle Formation in Twin-Wire Arc-Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.

    2013-03-01

    The wire tips in twin-wire arc-spraying (TWAS) are heated in three different zones. A high-speed camera was used to observe the melting behavior, metal breakup, and particle formation under different operating conditions. In zone (I), the wire tips are melted (liquidus metal) and directly atomized in the form of smaller droplets. Their size is a function of the specific properties of the molten metal and the exerting aerodynamic forces. Zone (II) is directly beneath zone (I) and the origin of the extruded metal sheets at the wire tips. The extruded metal sheets in the case of cored wires are shorter than those observed while using solid wires. In this study, the effects of adjustable parameters and powder filling on melting behavior, particle formation, and process instability were revealed, and a comparison between solid and cored wires was made. The findings can improve the accuracy of the TWAS process modeling.

  3. A motif for infinite metal atom wires.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xi; Warren, Steven A; Pan, Yung-Tin; Tsao, Kai-Chieh; Gray, Danielle L; Bertke, Jeffery; Yang, Hong

    2014-12-15

    A new motif for infinite metal atom wires with tunable compositions and properties is developed based on the connection between metal paddlewheel and square planar complex moieties. Two infinite Pd chain compounds, [Pd4(CO)4(OAc)4Pd(acac)2] 1 and [Pd4(CO)4(TFA)4Pd(acac)2] 2, and an infinite Pd-Pt heterometallic chain compound, [Pd4(CO)4(OAc)4Pt(acac)2] 3, are identified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In these new structures, the paddlewheel moiety is a Pd four-membered ring coordinated by bridging carboxylic ligands and μ2 carbonyl ligands. The planar moiety is either Pd(acac)2 or Pt(acac)2 (acac = acetylacetonate). These moieties are connected by metallophilic interactions. The results showed that these one-dimensional metal wire compounds have photoluminescent properties that are tunable by changing ligands and metal ions. 3 can also serve as a single source precursor for making Pd4Pt bimetallic nanostructures with precise control of metal composition. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Inelastic fingerprints of hydrogen contamination in atomic gold wire systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Paulsson, Magnus; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-03-01

    We present series of first-principles calculations for both pure and hydrogen contaminated gold wire systems in order to investigate how such impurities can be detected. We show how a single H atom or a single H2 molecule in an atomic gold wire will affect forces and Au-Au atom distances under elongation. We further determine the corresponding evolution of the low-bias conductance as well as the inelastic contributions from vibrations. Our results indicate that the conductance of gold wires is only slightly reduced from the conductance quantum G0 = 2e2/h by the presence of a single hydrogen impurity, hence making it difficult to use the conductance itself to distinguish between various configurations. On the other hand, our calculations of the inelastic signals predict significant differences between pure and hydrogen contaminated wires, and, importantly, between atomic and molecular forms of the impurity. A detailed characterization of gold wires with a hydrogen impurity should therefore be possible from the strain dependence of the inelastic signals in the conductance.

  5. Nonconservative dynamics in long atomic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Brian; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Dundas, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    The effect of nonconservative current-induced forces on the ions in a defect-free metallic nanowire is investigated using both steady-state calculations and dynamical simulations. Nonconservative forces were found to have a major influence on the ion dynamics in these systems, but their role in increasing the kinetic energy of the ions decreases with increasing system length. The results illustrate the importance of nonconservative effects in short nanowires and the scaling of these effects with system size. The dependence on bias and ion mass can be understood with the help of a simple pen and paper model. This material highlights the benefit of simple preliminary steady-state calculations in anticipating aspects of brute-force dynamical simulations, and provides rule of thumb criteria for the design of stable quantum wires.

  6. Shot noise in parallel atomic wires from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerqvist, Johan; Chen, Yu-Chang; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2003-03-01

    We report first-principles calculations of shot noise in two parallel carbon atomic wires as a function of the wires separation and length. The calculations have been performed with a novel field-theoretic approach to calculate shot noise [1] in terms of the single-particle wavefunctions obtained with density-functional theory.[2] We find that current fluctuations are a non-linear function of the distance between the wires and can be suppressed at wires separations small compared to the independent-wire distance. We discuss these results in terms of the coherence effects between the wires and the interference effects at the contacts. Work supported in part by NSF, Carilion Biomedical Institute and ACS-Petroleum Research Fund. [1] Y.-C. Chen and M. Di Ventra, submitted. [2] N.D. Lang, Phys. Rev. B 52, 5335 (1995); M. Di Ventra and N.D. Lang, Phys. Rev. B 65, 045402 (2002); Z. Yang, A. Tackett and M. Di Ventra, Phys. Rev. B 66, 041405 (2002).

  7. Reaction and Protection of Electrical Wire Insulators in Atomic-oxygen Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Cantrell, Gidget

    1994-01-01

    Atomic-oxygen erosion on spacecraft in low Earth orbit is an issue which is becoming increasingly important because of the growing number of spacecraft that will fly in the orbits which have high concentrations of atomic oxygen. In this investigation, the atomic-oxygen durability of three types of electrical wire insulation (carbon-based, fluoropolymer, and polysiloxane elastomer) were evaluated. These insulation materials were exposed to thermal-energy atomic oxygen, which was obtained by RF excitation of air at a pressure of 11-20 Pa. The effects of atomic-oxygen exposure on insulation materials indicate that all carbon-based materials erode at about the same rate as polyamide Kapton and, therefore, are not atomic-oxygen durable. However, the durability of fluoropolymers needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis because the erosion rates of fluoropolymers vary widely. For example, experimental data suggest the formation of atomic fluorine during atomic-oxygen amorphous-fluorocarbon reactions. Dimethyl polysiloxanes (silicone) do not lose mass during atomic-oxygen exposure, but develop silica surfaces which are under tension and frequently crack as a result of loss of methyl groups. However, if the silicone sample surfaces were properly pretreated to provide a certain roughness, atomic oxygen exposure resulted in a sturdy, non-cracked atomic-oxygen durable SiO2 layer. Since the surface does not crack during such silicone-atomic oxygen reaction, the crack-induced contamination by silicone can be reduced or completely stopped. Therefore, with proper pretreatment, silicone can be either a wire insulation material or a coating on wire insulation materials to provide atomic-oxygen durability.

  8. Majorana edge States in atomic wires coupled by pair hopping.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Christina V; Dalmonte, Marcello; Baranov, Mikhail A; Läuchli, Andreas M; Zoller, P

    2013-10-25

    We present evidence for Majorana edge states in a number conserving theory describing a system of spinless fermions on two wires that are coupled by pair hopping. Our analysis is based on a combination of a qualitative low energy approach and numerical techniques using the density matrix renormalization group. In addition, we discuss an experimental realization of pair-hopping interactions in cold atom gases confined in optical lattices.

  9. Atom chips in the real world: the effects of wire corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, T.; Estève, J.; Figl, C.; Trebbia, J.-B.; Aussibal, C.; Nguyen, H.; Mailly, D.; Bouchoule, I.; Westbrook, C. I.; Aspect, A.

    2005-02-01

    We present a detailed model describing the effects of wire corrugation on the trapping potential experienced by a cloud of atoms above a current carrying micro wire. We calculate the distortion of the current distribution due to corrugation and then derive the corresponding roughness in the magnetic field above the wire. Scaling laws are derived for the roughness as a function of height above a ribbon shaped wire. We also present experimental data on micro wire traps using cold atoms which complement some previously published measurements [CITE] and which demonstrate that wire corrugation can satisfactorily explain our observations of atom cloud fragmentation above electroplated gold wires. Finally, we present measurements of the corrugation of new wires fabricated by electron beam lithography and evaporation of gold. These wires appear to be substantially smoother than electroplated wires.

  10. Platinum atomic wire encapsulated in gold nanotubes: A first principle study

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, Sandeep, E-mail: snigam@barc.gov.in; Majumder, Chiranjib; Sahoo, Suman K.

    2014-04-24

    The nanotubes of gold incorporated with platinum atomic wire have been investigated by means of firstprinciples density functional theory with plane wave pseudopotential approximation. The structure with zig-zag chain of Pt atoms in side gold is found to be 0.73 eV lower in energy in comparison to straight chain of platinum atoms. The Fermi level of the composite tube was consisting of d-orbitals of Pt atoms. Further interaction of oxygen with these tubes reveals that while tube with zig-zag Pt prefers dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecule, the gold tube with linear Pt wire favors molecular adsorption.

  11. Correlating electronic transport to atomic structures in self-assembled quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Zhang, Yanning; Ouyang, Wenjie; Weitering, Hanno H; Shih, Chih-Kang; Baddorf, Arthur P; Wu, Ruqian; Li, An-Ping

    2012-02-08

    Quantum wires, as a smallest electronic conductor, are expected to be a fundamental component in all quantum architectures. The electronic conductance in quantum wires, however, is often dictated by structural instabilities and electron localization at the atomic scale. Here we report on the evolutions of electronic transport as a function of temperature and interwire coupling as the quantum wires of GdSi(2) are self-assembled on Si(100) wire-by-wire. The correlation between structure, electronic properties, and electronic transport are examined by combining nanotransport measurements, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. A metal-insulator transition is revealed in isolated nanowires, while a robust metallic state is obtained in wire bundles at low temperature. The atomic defects lead to electron localizations in isolated nanowire, and interwire coupling stabilizes the structure and promotes the metallic states in wire bundles. This illustrates how the conductance nature of a one-dimensional system can be dramatically modified by the environmental change on the atomic scale. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  12. Crystal-Phase Quantum Wires: One-Dimensional Heterostructures with Atomically Flat Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Corfdir, Pierre; Li, Hong; Marquardt, Oliver; Gao, Guanhui; Molas, Maciej R; Zettler, Johannes K; van Treeck, David; Flissikowski, Timur; Potemski, Marek; Draxl, Claudia; Trampert, Achim; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Grahn, Holger T; Brandt, Oliver

    2018-01-10

    In semiconductor quantum-wire heterostructures, interface roughness leads to exciton localization and to a radiative decay rate much smaller than that expected for structures with flat interfaces. Here, we uncover the electronic and optical properties of the one-dimensional extended defects that form at the intersection between stacking faults and inversion domain boundaries in GaN nanowires. We show that they act as crystal-phase quantum wires, a novel one-dimensional quantum system with atomically flat interfaces. These quantum wires efficiently capture excitons whose radiative decay gives rise to an optical doublet at 3.36 eV at 4.2 K. The binding energy of excitons confined in crystal-phase quantum wires is measured to be more than twice larger than that of the bulk. As a result of their unprecedented interface quality, these crystal-phase quantum wires constitute a model system for the study of one-dimensional excitons.

  13. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    DOE PAGES

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2016-10-12

    For nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms are surrounded by low-density fast expanding plasma corona. Here, a novel integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. This data was previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. Furthermore, an extremely high melting temperature and significant pre-melt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal.

  14. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    For nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms are surrounded by low-density fast expanding plasma corona. Here, a novel integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. This data was previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. Furthermore, an extremely high melting temperature and significant pre-melt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal.

  15. A model of optical trapping cold atoms using a metallic nano wire with surface plasmon effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Phuong Lan, Nguyen; Thi Nga, Do; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we construct a new model of optical trapping cold atoms with a metallic nano wire by using surface plasmon effect generated by strong field of laser beams. Using the skin effect, we send a strong oscillated electromagnetic filed through the surface of a metallic nano wire. The local field generated by evanescent effect creates an effective attractive potential near the surface of metallic nano wires. The consideration of some possible boundary and frequency conditions might lead to non-trivial bound state solution for a cold atom. We discus also the case of the laser reflection optical trap with shell-core design, and compare our model with another recent schemes of cold atom optical traps using optical fibers and carbon nanotubes.

  16. Controlled electron doping into metallic atomic wires: Si(111)4×1-In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Harumo; Hwang, C. C.; Yeom, Han Woong

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate the controllable electron doping into metallic atomic wires, indium wires self-assembled on the Si(111) surface, which feature one-dimensional (1D) band structure and temperature-driven metal-insulator transition. The electron filling of 1D metallic bands is systematically increased by alkali-metal adsorption, which, in turn, tunes the macroscopic property, that is, suppresses the metal-insulator transition. On the other hand, the dopant atoms induce a local lattice distortion without a band-gap opening, leading to a microscopic phase separation on the surface. The distinct bifunctional, electronic and structural, roles of dopants in different length scales are thus disclosed.

  17. Modeling inelastic phonon scattering in atomic- and molecular-wire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2005-11-01

    Computationally inexpensive approximations describing electron-phonon scattering in molecular-scale conductors are derived from the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The accuracy is demonstrated with a first-principles calculation on an atomic gold wire. Quantitative agreement between the full nonequilibrium Green’s function calculation and the newly derived expressions is obtained while simplifying the computational burden by several orders of magnitude. In addition, analytical models provide intuitive understanding of the conductance including nonequilibrium heating and provide a convenient way of parameterizing the physics. This is exemplified by fitting the expressions to the experimentally observed conductances through both an atomic gold wire and a hydrogen molecule.

  18. Molecule-assisted ferromagnetic atomic chain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manohar; Sethu, Kiran Kumar Vidya; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M.

    2015-06-01

    One dimensional systems strongly enhance the quantum character of electron transport. Such systems can be realized in 5 d transition metals Au, Pt, and Ir, in the form of suspended monatomic chains between bulk leads. Atomic chains between ferromagnetic leads would open up many perspectives in the context of spin-dependent transport and spintronics, but the evidence suggests that for pure metals only the mentioned three 5 d metals are susceptible to chain formation. It has been argued that the stability of atomic chains made up from ferromagnetic metals is compromised by the same exchange interaction that produces the local moments. Here we demonstrate that magnetic atomic chains can be induced to form in break junctions under the influence of light molecules. Explicitly, we find deuterium assisted chain formation in the 3 d ferromagnetic transition metals Fe and Ni. Chain lengths up to eight atoms are formed upon stretching the ferromagnetic atomic contact in deuterium atmosphere at cryogenic temperatures. From differential conductance spectra vibronic states of D2 can be identified, confirming the presence of deuterium in the atomic chains. Shot noise spectroscopy indicates the presence of weakly spin polarized transmission channels.

  19. First-principles Theory of Inelastic Transport and Local Heating in Atomic Gold Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Paulsson, Magnus; Brandbyge, Mads; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2007-04-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the inelastic transport properties in atomic gold wires. Our method is based on a combination of density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions. The vibrational spectra for extensive series of wire geometries have been calculated using SIESTA, and the corresponding effects in the conductance are analyzed. In particular, we focus on the heating of the active vibrational modes. By a detailed comparison with experiments we are able to estimate an order of magnitude for the external damping of the active vibrations.

  20. Measuring the dynamic polarizability of tungsten atom via electrical wire explosion in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huantong; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2018-02-01

    Electrical explosion of wire provides a practical approach to the experimental measurement of dynamic polarizability of metal atoms with high melting and boiling temperatures. With the help of insulation coating, a section of tungsten wire was transformed to the plasma state while the near electrode region was partially vaporized, which enabled us to locate the "neutral-region" (consisting of gaseous atoms) in the Mach-Zehnder interferogram. In this paper, the polarizability of the tungsten atom at 532 nm was reconstructed based on a technique previously used for the same purpose, and the basic preconditions of the measurement were verified in detail, including the existence of the neutral region, conservation of linear density of tungsten during wire expansion, and neglect of the vaporized insulation coating. The typical imaging time varied from 80 ns to as late as 200 ns and the reconstructed polarizability of the tungsten atom was 16 ± 1 Å3, which showed good statistical consistency and was also in good agreement with the previous results.

  1. Formation of nanometer-size wires using infiltration into latent nuclear tracks

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanometer-size wires having a cross-sectional dimension of less than 8 nm with controllable lengths and diameters are produced by infiltrating latent nuclear or ion tracks formed in trackable materials with atomic species. The trackable materials and atomic species are essentially insoluble in each other, thus the wires are formed by thermally driven, self-assembly of the atomic species during annealing, or re-crystallization, of the damage in the latent tracks. Unlike conventional ion track lithography, the inventive method does not require etching of the latent tracks.

  2. Surface Treatment of Plastic Substrates using Atomic Hydrogen Generated on Heated Tungsten Wire at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heya, Akira; Matsuo, Naoto

    2007-06-01

    The surface properties of a plastic substrate were changed by a novel surface treatment called atomic hydrogen annealing (AHA). In this method, a plastic substrate was exposed to atomic hydrogen generated by cracking hydrogen molecules on heated tungsten wire. For the substrate, surface roughness was increased and halogen elements (F and Cl) were selectively etched by AHA. AHA was useful for pretreatment before film deposition on a plastic substrate because the changes in surface state relate to adhesion improvement. It is concluded that this method is a promising technique for preparing high-performance plastic substrates at low temperatures.

  3. Formation of hollow atoms above a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, Jean Pierre; Phaneuf, Ronald; Terracol, Stephane; Xie, Zuqi

    2012-06-01

    Slow highly stripped ions approaching or penetrating surfaces are known to capture electrons into outer shells of the ions, leaving the innermost shells empty, and forming hollow atoms. Electron capture occurs above and below the surfaces. The existence of hollow atoms below surfaces e.g. Ar atoms whose K and L shells are empty, with all electrons lying in the M and N shells, was demonstrated in 1990 [1]. At nm above surfaces, the excited ions may not have enough time to decay before hitting the surfaces, and the formation of hollow atoms above surfaces has even been questioned [2]. To observe it, one must increase the time above the surface by decelerating the ions. We have for the first time decelerated O^7+ ions to energies as low as 1 eV/q, below the minimum energy gained by the ions due to the acceleration by their image charge. As expected, no ion backscattering (trampoline effect) above dielectric (Ge) was observed and at the lowest ion kinetic energies, most of the observed x-rays were found to be emitted by the ions after surface contact. [4pt] [1] J. P. Briand et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 65(1990)159.[0pt] [2] J.P. Briand, AIP Conference Proceedings 215 (1990) 513.

  4. Atomization and merging of two Al and W wires driven by a 1 kA, 10 ns current pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Lu, Yihan; Lebedev, S. V.; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2016-11-01

    Possibility of preconditioning of wires in wire array Z-pinch loads by an auxiliary low-level current pulse was investigated in experiments with two aluminum or two polyimide-coated tungsten wires. It was found that the application of a 1 kA, 10 ns current pulse could convert all the length of the Al wires (1 cm long, 15 μm diameter) and ˜70% of length of the W wires (1 cm long, 15 μm diameter, 2 μm polyimide coating) into a gaseous state via ohmic heating. The expansion and merging of the wires, positioned at separations of 1-3 mm, were investigated with two-wavelength (532 nm and 1064 nm) laser interferometry. The gasified wire expanded freely in a vacuum and its density distribution at different times could be well described using an analytic model for the expansion of the gas into vacuum. Under an energy deposition around its atomization enthalpy of the wire material, the aluminum vapor column had an expansion velocity of 5-7 km/s, larger than the value of ˜4 km/s from tungsten wires. The dynamic atomic polarizabilities of tungsten for 532 nm and 1064 nm were also estimated.

  5. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation

    DOE PAGES

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Lock, Nina; Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; ...

    2014-04-14

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structuremore » is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries.« less

  6. Evaluation of surface roughness of orthodontic wires by means of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Antò, Vincenzo; Rongo, Roberto; Ametrano, Gianluca; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Manzo, Paolo; Martina, Roberto; Paduano, Sergio; Valletta, Rosa

    2012-09-01

    To compare the surface roughness of different orthodontic archwires. Four nickel-titanium wires (Sentalloy(®), Sentalloy(®) High Aesthetic, Titanium Memory ThermaTi Lite(®), and Titanium Memory Esthetic(®)), three β-titanium wires (TMA(®), Colored TMA(®), and Beta Titanium(®)), and one stainless-steel wire (Stainless Steel(®)) were considered for this study. Three samples for each wire were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three-dimensional images were processed using Gwiddion software, and the roughness average (Ra), the root mean square (Rms), and the maximum height (Mh) values of the scanned surface profile were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's post hoc test (P < .05). The Ra, Rms, and Mh values were expressed as the mean ± standard deviation. Among as-received archwires, the Stainless Steel (Ra  =  36.6 ± 5.8; Rms  =  48 ± 7.7; Mh  =  328.1 ± 64) archwire was less rough than the others (ANOVA, P < .05). The Sentalloy High Aesthetic was the roughest (Ra  =  133.5 ± 10.8; Rms  =  165.8 ± 9.8; Mh  =  949.6 ± 192.1) of the archwires. The surface quality of the wires investigated differed significantly. Ion implantation effectively reduced the roughness of TMA. Moreover, Teflon(®)-coated Titanium Memory Esthetic was less rough than was ion-implanted Sentalloy High Aesthetic.

  7. DNA G-Wire Formation Using an Artificial Peptide is Controlled by Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kenji; Okada, Arisa; Sakashita, Shungo; Shimooka, Masayuki; Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Nakano, Shu-Ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Mashima, Tsukasa; Katahira, Masato; Hamada, Yoshio

    2017-11-16

    The development of a switching system for guanine nanowire (G-wire) formation by external signals is important for nanobiotechnological applications. Here, we demonstrate a DNA nanostructural switch (G-wire <--> particles) using a designed peptide and a protease. The peptide consists of a PNA sequence for inducing DNA to form DNA-PNA hybrid G-quadruplex structures, and a protease substrate sequence acting as a switching module that is dependent on the activity of a particular protease. Micro-scale analyses via TEM and AFM showed that G-rich DNA alone forms G-wires in the presence of Ca 2+ , and that the peptide disrupted this formation, resulting in the formation of particles. The addition of the protease and digestion of the peptide regenerated the G-wires. Macro-scale analyses by DLS, zeta potential, CD, and gel filtration were in agreement with the microscopic observations. These results imply that the secondary structure change (DNA G-quadruplex <--> DNA/PNA hybrid structure) induces a change in the well-formed nanostructure (G-wire <--> particles). Our findings demonstrate a control system for forming DNA G-wire structures dependent on protease activity using designed peptides. Such systems hold promise for regulating the formation of nanowire for various applications, including electronic circuits for use in nanobiotechnologies.

  8. Production and reactions of silicon atoms in hot wire deposition of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2003-10-01

    Decomposing silane and hydrogen molecules on a hot tungsten filament is an alternative method of depositing hydrogenated microcrystal and amorphous Si for thin-film semmiconductor devices. This "hot-wire" method can have significant advantages, such as high film deposition rates. The deposition chemistry involves Si and H atoms released from the filament, followed by their reactions with the vapor and surfaces. To establish these deposition pathways, we measure radicals at the substrate with a home built, threshold ionization mass spectrometer. The design and operation of this mass spectrometer for radical detection, and the behavior of Si atom production and reactions, will be presented. This work is supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401

  9. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Alberto; Tommasini, Matteo; Russo, Valeria; Li Bassi, Andrea; Lucotti, Andrea; Cataldo, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs) can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes), resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes), expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms) and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure). Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length). Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds. PMID:25821689

  10. Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at the carbon atom wire modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kuan-Hong; Liu, Jia-Mei; Wei, Ri-Bing; Chen, Shao-Peng

    2006-09-01

    Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at an electrode modified by carbon atom wires (CAWs), a new material, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry combined with UV-vis spectrometry, and forced convection method. As to the electrochemical response of redox of adrenaline/adrenalinequinone couple in 0.50 M H 2SO 4, at a nitric acid treated CAW modified electrode, the anodic and cathodic peak potentials Epa and Epc shifted by 87 mV negatively and 139 mV in the positive direction, respectively, and standard heterogeneous rate constant k0 increased by 16 times compared to the corresponding bare electrode, indicating the extraordinary activity of CAWs in electrocatalysis for the process.

  11. Mechanism of formation and spatial distribution of lead atoms in quartz tube atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Baxter, D. C.; Ohlsson, K. E. A.; Frech, W.

    1997-05-01

    The cross-sectional and longitudinal spatial distributions of lead atoms in a quartz tube (QT) atomizers coupled to a gas chromatograph have been investigated. A uniform analyte atom distribution over the cross-section was found in a QT having an inner diameter (i.d.) of 7 mm, whereas a 10 mm i.d. QT showed an inhomogeneous distribution. These results accentuate the importance of using QTs with i.d.s below 10 mm to fulfil the prerequirement of the Beer—Lambert law to avoid bent calibration curves. The influence of the make up gas on the formation of lead atoms from alkyllead compounds has been studied, and carbon monoxide was found equally efficient in promoting free atom formation as hydrogen. This suggests that hydrogen radicals are not essential for mediating the atomization of alkyllead in QT atomizers at ˜ 1200 K. Furthermore, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations describing the investigated system were performed supporting the experimental results. Based on the presented data, a mechanism for free lead atom formation in continuously heated QT atomizers is proposed; thermal atomization occurs under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in a reducing gas. The longitudinal atom distribution has been further investigated applying other make up gases, N 2 and He. These results show the effect of the influx of atmospheric oxygen on the free lead atom formation. Calculations of the partial pressure of oxygen in the atomizer gas phase assuming thermodynamic equilibrium have been undertaken using a convective-diffusional model.

  12. Soybean extracts facilitate bacterial agglutination and prevent biofilm formation on orthodontic wire.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heon-Jin; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han; Hong, Su-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Soybean is an essential food ingredient that contains a class of organic compounds known as isoflavones. It is also well known that several plant agglutinins interfere with bacterial adherence to smooth surfaces. However, little is known about the effects of soybean extracts or genistein (a purified isoflavone from soybean) on bacterial biofilm formation. We evaluated the effects of soybean (Glycine max) extracts, including fermented soybean and genistein, on streptococcal agglutination and attachment onto stainless steel orthodontic wire. After cultivating streptococci in biofilm medium containing soybean extracts and orthodontic wire, the viable bacteria attached to the wire were counted. Phase-contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were conducted to evaluate bacterial agglutination and attachment. Our study showed that soybean extracts induce agglutination between streptococci, which results in bacterial precipitation. Conversely, viable bacterial counting and SEM image analysis of Streptococcus mutans attached to the orthodontic wire show that bacterial attachment decreases significantly when soybean extracts were added. However, there was no significant change in pre-attached S. mutans biofilm in response to soybean. A possible explanation for these results is that increased agglutination of planktonic streptococci by soybean extracts results in inhibition of bacterial attachment onto the orthodontic wire.

  13. Anisotropic Formation of Quantum Turbulence Generated by a Vibrating Wire in Superfluid {}4{He}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, H.; Ogawa, K.; Chiba, Y.; Obara, K.; Ishikawa, O.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the formation of quantum turbulence in superfluid {}4{He}, we have studied the emission of vortex rings with a ring size of larger than 38 μm in diameter from turbulence generated by a vibrating wire. The emission rate of vortex rings from a turbulent region remains low until the beginning of high-rate emissions, suggesting that some of the vortex lines produced by the wire combine to form a vortex tangle, until an equilibrium is established between the rate of vortex line combination with the tangle and dissociation. The formation times of equilibrium turbulence are proportional to ɛ ^{-1.2} and ɛ ^{-0.6} in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the vibrating direction of the generator, respectively, indicating the anisotropic formation of turbulence. Here, ɛ is the generation power of the turbulence. This power dependence may be associated with the characteristics of quantum turbulence with a constant energy flux.

  14. Competing charge density wave and antiferromagnetism of metallic atom wires in GaN(10 1 ¯ ) and ZnO(10 1 ¯ )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yoon-Gu; Kim, Sun-Woo; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2017-12-01

    Low-dimensional electron systems often show a delicate interplay between electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, giving rise to interesting quantum phases such as the charge density wave (CDW) and magnetism. Using the density-functional theory (DFT) calculations with the semilocal and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals as well as the exact-exchange plus correlation in the random-phase approximation (EX + cRPA), we systematically investigate the ground state of the metallic atom wires containing dangling-bond (DB) electrons, fabricated by partially hydrogenating the GaN(10 1 ¯0 ) and ZnO(10 1 ¯0 ) surfaces. We find that the CDW or antiferromagnetic (AFM) order has an electronic energy gain due to a band-gap opening, thereby being more stabilized compared to the metallic state. Our semilocal DFT calculation predicts that both DB wires in GaN(10 1 ¯0 ) and ZnO(10 1 ¯0 ) have the same CDW ground state, whereas the hybrid DFT and EX + cRPA calculations predict the AFM ground state for the former DB wire and the CDW ground state for the latter one. It is revealed that more localized Ga DB electrons in GaN(10 1 ¯0 ) prefer the AFM order, while less localized Zn DB electrons in ZnO(10 1 ¯0 ) the CDW formation. Our findings demonstrate that the drastically different ground states are competing in the DB wires created on the two representative compound semiconductor surfaces.

  15. Biofilm formation on stainless steel and gold wires for bonded retainers in vitro and in vivo and their susceptibility to oral antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Marije A; Pelser, Floris D H; van der Mei, Henny C; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2013-05-01

    Bonded retainers are used in orthodontics to maintain treatment result. Retention wires are prone to biofilm formation and cause gingival recession, bleeding on probing and increased pocket depths near bonded retainers. In this study, we compare in vitro and in vivo biofilm formation on different wires used for bonded retainers and the susceptibility of in vitro biofilms to oral antimicrobials. Orthodontic wires were exposed to saliva, and in vitro biofilm formation was evaluated using plate counting and live/dead staining, together with effects of exposure to toothpaste slurry alone or followed by antimicrobial mouthrinse application. Wires were also placed intra-orally for 72 h in human volunteers and undisturbed biofilm formation was compared by plate counting and live/dead staining, as well as by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for compositional differences in biofilms. Single-strand wires attracted only slightly less biofilm in vitro than multi-strand wires. Biofilms on stainless steel single-strand wires however, were much more susceptible to antimicrobials from toothpaste slurries and mouthrinses than on single-strand gold wires and biofilms on multi-strand wires. Also, in vivo significantly less biofilm was found on single-strand than on multi-strand wires. Microbial composition of biofilms was more dependent on the volunteer involved than on wire type. Biofilms on single-strand stainless steel wires attract less biofilm in vitro and are more susceptible to antimicrobials than on multi-strand wires. Also in vivo, single-strand wires attract less biofilm than multi-strand ones. Use of single-strand wires is preferred over multi-strand wires, not because they attract less biofilm, but because biofilms on single-strand wires are not protected against antimicrobials as in crevices and niches as on multi-strand wires.

  16. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, A.; Stancari, M.; Steffens, E.

    2009-08-01

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC) [2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  17. Self-Assembly of Parallel Atomic Wires and Periodic Clusters of Silicon on a Vicinal Si(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Takeharu; Yoshida, Shunji; Itoh, Kohei M.

    2005-09-02

    Silicon self-assembly at step edges in the initial stage of homoepitaxial growth on a vicinal Si(111) surface is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. The resulting atomic structures change dramatically from a parallel array of 0.7 nm wide wires to one-dimensionally aligned periodic clusters of diameter {approx}2 nm and periodicity 2.7 nm in the very narrow range of growth temperatures between 400 and 300 deg. C. These nanostructures are expected to play important roles in future developments of silicon quantum computers. Mechanisms leading to such distinct structures are discussed.

  18. Mid-Atomic-Number Cylindrical Wire Array Precursor Plasma Studies on Zebra

    DOE PAGES

    Stafford, A; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; ...

    2014-12-30

    The precursor plasmas from low wire number cylindrical wire arrays (CWAs) were previously shown to radiate at temperatures >300 eV for Ni-60 (94% Cu and 6% Ni) wires in experiments on the 1-MA Zebra generator. Continued research into precursor plasmas has studied additional midatomic-number materials including Cu and Alumel (95% Ni, 2% Al, 2% Mn, and 1% Si) to determine if the >300 eV temperatures are common for midatomic-number materials. Additionally, current scaling effects were observed by performing CWA precursor experiments at an increased current of 1.5 MA using a load current multiplier. Our results show an increase in amore » linear radiation yield of ~50% (16 versus 10 kJ/cm) for the experiments at increased current. However, plasma conditions inferred through the modeling of X-ray time-gated spectra are very similar for the precursor plasma in both current conditions.« less

  19. Length-dependent structural stability of linear monatomic Cu wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Kumar, Krishan; Singh, Baljinder; Moudgil, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    We present first-principle calculations based on density functional theory for the finite-length monatomic Cu atom linear wires. The structure and its stability with increasing wire length in terms of number of atoms (N) is determined. Interestingly, the bond length is found to exhibit an oscillatory structure (the so-called magic length phenomenon), with a qualitative change in oscillatory behavior as one moves from even N wire to odd N wire. The even N wires follow simple even-odd oscillations whereas odd N wires show a phase change at the half length of the wires. The stability of the wire structure, determined in terms of the wire formation energy, also contains even-odd oscillation as a function of wire length. However, the oscillations in formation energy reverse its phase after the wire length is increased beyond N=12. Our findings are seen to be qualitatively consistent with recent simulations for a similar class finite-length metal atom wires.

  20. Production of B atoms and BH radicals from B2H6/He/H2 mixtures activated on heated W wires.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Hironobu; Kanemitsu, Taijiro; Tanaka, Akihito

    2014-07-17

    B atoms and BH radicals could be identified by laser-induced fluorescence when B2H6/He/H2 mixtures were activated on heated tungsten wires. The densities of these radical species increased not only with the wire temperature but also with the partial pressure of H2. The densities in the presence of 0.026 Pa of B2H6 and 2.6 Pa of H2 were on the order of 10(11) cm(-3) both for B and BH when the wire temperature was 2000 K. Densities in the absence of a H2 flow were much smaller, suggesting that the direct production of these species on wire surfaces is minor. B and BH must be produced in the H atom shifting reactions, BH(x) + H → BH(x-1) + H2 (x = 1-3), in the gas phase, while H atoms are produced from H2 on wire surfaces. The B atom density increased monotonously with the H atom density, while the BH density showed saturation. These tendencies could be reproduced by simple modeling based on ab initio potential energy calculations and the transition-state theoretical calculations of the rate constants. The absolute densities could also be reproduced within a factor of 2.5.

  1. Memory formation orchestrates the wiring of adult-born hippocampal neurons into brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Petsophonsakul, Petnoi; Richetin, Kevin; Andraini, Trinovita; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2017-08-01

    During memory formation, structural rearrangements of dendritic spines provide a mean to durably modulate synaptic connectivity within neuronal networks. New neurons generated throughout the adult life in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus contribute to learning and memory. As these neurons become incorporated into the network, they generate huge numbers of new connections that modify hippocampal circuitry and functioning. However, it is yet unclear as to how the dynamic process of memory formation influences their synaptic integration into neuronal circuits. New memories are established according to a multistep process during which new information is first acquired and then consolidated to form a stable memory trace. Upon recall, memory is transiently destabilized and vulnerable to modification. Using contextual fear conditioning, we found that learning was associated with an acceleration of dendritic spines formation of adult-born neurons, and that spine connectivity becomes strengthened after memory consolidation. Moreover, we observed that afferent connectivity onto adult-born neurons is enhanced after memory retrieval, while extinction training induces a change of spine shapes. Together, these findings reveal that the neuronal activity supporting memory processes strongly influences the structural dendritic integration of adult-born neurons into pre-existing neuronal circuits. Such change of afferent connectivity is likely to impact the overall wiring of hippocampal network, and consequently, to regulate hippocampal function.

  2. Sheet, ligament and droplet formation in swirling primary atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Changxiao; Luo, Kun; Chai, Min; Fan, Jianren

    2018-04-01

    We report direct numerical simulations of swirling liquid atomization to understand the physical mechanism underlying the sheet breakup of a non-turbulent liquid swirling jet which lacks in-depth investigation. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method coupled with adapted mesh refinement (AMR) technique in GERRIS code is employed in the present simulation. The mechanisms of sheet, ligament and droplet formation are investigated. It is observed that the olive-shape sheet structure is similar to the experimental result qualitatively. The numerical results show that surface tension, pressure difference and swirling effect contribute to the contraction and extension of liquid sheet. The ligament formation is partially at the sheet rim or attributed to the extension of liquid hole. Especially, the movement of hairpin vortex exerts by an anti-radial direction force to the sheet surface and leads to the sheet thinness. In addition, droplet formation is attributed to breakup of ligament and central sheet.

  3. Autoionization following nanoplasma formation in atomic and molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Bernd; Lahl, Jan; Oelze, Tim; Krikunova, Maria; Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Rouzée, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    Nanoplasmas resulting from the ionization of nano-scale particles by intense laser pulses are typically described by quasiclassical models, where electron emission is understood to take place via thermal processes. Recently, we discovered that, following the interaction of intense near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses with molecular oxygen clusters, electron emission from nanoplasmas can also occur from atomic bound states via autoionization [Schütte et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 123002 (2015)]. Here we extend these studies and demonstrate that the formation and decay of doubly-excited atoms and ions is a very common phenomenon in nanoplasmas. We report on the observation of autoionization involving spin-orbit excited states in molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide clusters as well as in atomic krypton and xenon clusters ionized by intense NIR pulses, for which we find clear bound-state signatures in the electron kinetic energy spectra. By applying terahertz (THz) streaking, we show that the observed autoionization processes take place on a picosecond to nanosecond timescale after the interaction of the NIR laser pulse with the clusters. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  4. Modeling DNA bubble formation at the atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Beleva, V; Rasmussen, K. O.; Garcia, A. E.

    We describe the fluctuations of double stranded DNA molecules using a minimalist Go model over a wide range of temperatures. Minimalist models allow us to describe, at the atomic level, the opening and formation of bubbles in DNA double helices. This model includes all the geometrical constraints in helix melting imposed by the 3D structure of the molecule. The DNA forms melted bubbles within double helices. These bubbles form and break as a function of time. The equilibrium average number of broken base pairs shows a sharp change as a function of T. We observe a temperature profile of sequencemore » dependent bubble formation similar to those measured by Zeng et al. Long nuclei acid molecules melt partially through the formations of bubbles. It is known that CG rich sequences melt at higher temperatures than AT rich sequences. The melting temperature, however, is not solely determined by the CG content, but by the sequence through base stacking and solvent interactions. Recently, models that incorporate the sequence and nonlinear dynamics of DNA double strands have shown that DNA exhibits a very rich dynamics. Recent extensions of the Bishop-Peyrard model show that fluctuations in the DNA structure lead to opening in localized regions, and that these regions in the DNA are associated with transcription initiation sites. 1D and 2D models of DNA may contain enough information about stacking and base pairing interactions, but lack the coupling between twisting, bending and base pair opening imposed by the double helical structure of DNA that all atom models easily describe. However, the complexity of the energy function used in all atom simulations (including solvent, ions, etc) does not allow for the description of DNA folding/unfolding events that occur in the microsecond time scale.« less

  5. Current shunting and formation of stationary shock waves during electric explosions of metal wires in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanenkov, G. V.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Barishpol'tsev, D. V.

    2010-01-15

    Results of experiments on the generation of shock waves during electric explosions of fine copper and tungsten wires in air are analyzed. The generation mechanism of stationary shock wave by a plasma piston formed during the shunting breakdown of the electrode gap in the course of a wire explosion is investigated. The role of structural elements of such discharges, such as the core, corona, and wire environment, is analyzed.

  6. Fabrication of Microstripline Wiring for Large Format Transition Edge Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.; Adams, J. M.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S.; Brekosky, R. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Erwin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a process to integrate microstripline wiring with transition edge sensors (TES). The process includes additional layers for metal-etch stop and dielectric adhesion to enable recovery of parameters achieved in non-microstrip pixel designs. We report on device parameters in close-packed TES arrays achieved with the microstrip process including R(sub n), G, and T(sub c) uniformity. Further, we investigate limits of this method of producing high-density, microstrip wiring including critical current to determine the ultimate scalability of TES arrays with two layers of wiring.

  7. Three-dimensional cut wire pair behavior and controllable bianisotropic response in vertically oriented meta-atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce; Adomanis, Bryan M.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    2017-01-08

    This paper investigates three-dimensional cut wire pair (CWP) behavior in vertically oriented meta-atoms. We first analyze CWP metamaterial inclusions using full-wave electromagnetic simulations. The scattering behavior of the vertical CWP differs substantially from that of the planar version of the same structure. In particular, we show that the vertical CWP supports a magnetic resonance that is solely excited by the incident magnetic field. This is in stark contrast to the bianisotropic resonant excitation of in-plane CWPs. We further show that this CWP behavior can occur in other vertical metamaterial resonators, such as back-to-back linear dipoles and back-to-back split ring resonatorsmore » (SRRs), due to the strong coupling between the closely spaced metallic elements in the back-to-back configuration. In the case of SRRs, the vertical CWP mode (unexplored in previous literature) can be excited with a magnetic field that is parallel to both SRR loops, and exists in addition to the familiar fundamental resonances of the individual SRRs. In order to fully describe the scattering behavior from such dense arrays of three-dimensional structures, coupling effects between the close-packed inclusions must be included. Here, the new flexibility afforded by using vertical resonators allows us to controllably create purely electric inclusions, purely magnetic inclusions, as well as bianisotropic inclusions, and vastly increases the degrees of freedom for the design of metafilms.« less

  8. Optical Pattern Formation in Cold Atoms: Explaining the Red-Blue Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Gauthier, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The study of pattern formation in atomic systems has provided new insight into fundamental many-body physics and low-light-level nonlinear optics. Pattern formation in cold atoms in particular is of great interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because atoms undergo self-organization at ultralow input powers. We recently reported the first observation of pattern formation in cold atoms but found that our results were not accurately described by any existing theoretical model of pattern formation. Previous models describing pattern formation in cold atoms predict that pattern formation should occur using both red and blue-detuned pump beams, favoring a lower threshold for blue detunings. This disagrees with our recent work, in which we only observed pattern formation with red-detuned pump beams. Previous models also assume a two-level atom, which cannot account for the cooling processes that arise when beams counterpropagate through a cold atomic vapor. We describe a new model for pattern formation that accounts for Sisyphus cooling in multi-level atoms, which gives rise to a new nonlinearity via spatial organization of the atoms. This spatial organization causes a sharp red-blue detuning asymmetry, which agrees well with our experimental observations. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  9. Effect of Punica granatum L. Flower Water Extract on Five Common Oral Bacteria and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Orthodontic Wire

    PubMed Central

    VAHID DASTJERDI, Elahe; ABDOLAZIMI, Zahra; GHAZANFARIAN, Marzieh; AMDJADI, Parisa; KAMALINEJAD, Mohammad; MAHBOUBI, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of herbal extracts and essences as natural antibacterial compounds has become increasingly popular for the control of oral infectious diseases. Therefore, finding natural antimicrobial products with the lowest side effects seems necessary. The present study sought to assess the effect of Punica granatum L. water extract on five oral bacteria and bacterial biofilm formation on orthodontic wire. Methods: Antibacterial property of P. granatum L. water extract was primarily evaluated in brain heart infusion agar medium using well-plate method. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined by macro-dilution method. The inhibitory effect on orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation was evaluated using viable cell count in biofilm medium. At the final phase, samples were fixed and analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results: The growth inhibition zone diameter was proportional to the extract concentration. The water extract demonstrated the maximum antibacterial effect on Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556 with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 6.25 mg/ml and maximum bactericidal effect on S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 and S. sobrinus ATCC 27607 with minimum bactericidal concentration of 25 mg/ml. The water extract decreased bacterial biofilm formation by S. sanguinis, S. sobrinus, S. salivarius, S. mutans ATCC 35608 and E. faecalis CIP 55142 by 93.7–100%, 40.6–99.9%, 85.2–86.5%, 66.4–84.4% and 35.5–56.3% respectively. Conclusion: Punica granatum L. water extract had significant antibacterial properties against 5 oral bacteria and prevented orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation. However, further investigations are required to generalize these results to the clinical setting. PMID:26171362

  10. Improvements in the Formation of Boron-Doped Diamond Coatings on Platinum Wires Using the Novel Nucleation Process (NNP)

    PubMed Central

    Fhaner, Mathew; Zhao, Hong; Bian, Xiaochun; Galligan, James J.; Swain, Greg M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to increase the initial nucleation density for the growth of boron-doped diamond on platinum wires, we employed the novel nucleation process (NNP) originally developed by Rotter et al. and discussed by others [1–3]. This pretreatment method involves (i) the initial formation of a thin carbon layer over the substrate followed by (ii) ultrasonic seeding of this “soft” carbon layer with nanoscale particles of diamond. This two-step pretreatment is followed by the deposition of boron-doped diamond by microwave plasma-assisted CVD. Both the diamond seed particles and sites on the carbon layer itself function as the initial nucleation zones for diamond growth from an H2-rich source gas mixture. We report herein on the characterization of the pre-growth carbon layer formed on Pt as well as boron-doped films grown for 2, 4 and 6 h post NNP pretreatment. Results from scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical studies are reported. The NNP method increases the initial nucleation density on Pt and leads to the formation of a continuous diamond film in a shorter deposition time than is typical for wires pretreated by conventional ultrasonic seeding. The results indicate that the pregrowth layer itself consists of nanoscopic domains of diamond and functions well to enhance the initial nucleation of diamond without any diamond powder seeding. PMID:21617759

  11. Formation of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x /Ag multifilamentary metallic precursor powder-in-tube wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Koch, Carl C.; Schwartz, Justin

    2016-12-01

    Previously, a metallic precursor (MP) approach to synthesizing Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x (Bi2212), with a homogeneous mixture of Bi, Sr, Ca, Cu and Ag was produced by mechanical alloying. Here, Bi2212/Ag round multifilamentary wire is manufactured using a metallic precursor powder-in-tube (MPIT) process. The MP powders were packed into a pure Ag tube in an Ar atmosphere and then sealed. After deformation, multifilamentary round wires and rolled tapes were heat treated in flowing oxygen through three stages: oxidation, conversion and partial-melt processing (PMP). Processing-microstructure-property relationships on 20-50 mm long multifilamentary round wires and rolled tapes were studied extensively. It is shown that conventional wire deformation processes, optimized for oxide-powder-in-tube wires, are not effective for deforming MPIT wires, and that as with prior studies of MPIT Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O y conductors, hot extrusion is required for obtaining a multifilamentary structure with fine filaments. As a result, the Bi2212 MPIT wires reported here have low engineering critical current density. Nonetheless, by focusing on sections of wires that remain intact after deformation, it is also shown that the first heat treatment stage, the oxidation stage, plays a crucial role in chemical homogeneity, phase transformation, and microstructural evolution and three reaction pathways for MP oxidation are presented. Furthermore, it is found the Bi2212 grain alignment within an MPIT filament is significantly different from that found in OPIT filaments after PMP, indicating the formation of highly dense filaments containing Bi2212 fine grains and Ag particles before PMP aids the formation of large, c-axis textured Bi2212 filaments during PMP. These results show that, with improved wire deformation, high critical current density may be obtained via a MPIT process.

  12. Measurements of stretch lengths of gold mono-atomic wires covered with 1,6-hexanedithiol in 0.1 M NaClO4 with an electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Akiba, Uichi; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2008-09-01

    Stretch lengths of pure gold mono-atomic wires have been studied recently with an electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Here, we will report a study of stretch lengths of gold mono-atomic wires with and without 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) using the STM break-junction method. First, the stretch length was measured as a function of electrode potentials of a bare Au(111) substrate and a gold STM tip in a 0.1 M NaClO4 aqueous solution. Second, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was fabricated on an Au(111) substrate by dipping the substrate into a 1 mM HDT ethanol solution. At last, we measured the stretch length of gold mono-atomic wires on a substrate covered with the SAM in place of the bare Au(111) substrate. We compared the electrode potential dependence of the stretch lengths of gold mono-atomic wires covered with and without HDT. We will discuss the effect of the electrode potential on the stretch lengths by taking account of electrocapillarity of gold mono-atomic wires.

  13. Formation and structural phase transition in Co atomic chains on a Cu(775) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Syromyatnikov, A. G.; Kabanov, N. S.; Saletsky, A. M.

    The formation of Co atomic chains on a Cu(775) surface is investigated by the kinetic Monte Carlo method. It is found that the length of Co atomic chains formed as a result of self-organization during epitaxial growth is a random quantity and its mean value depends on the parameters of the experiment. The existence of two structural phases in atomic chains is detected using the density functional theory. In the first phase, the separations between an atom and its two nearest neighbors in a chain are 0.230 and 0.280 nm. In the second phase, an atomic chain has identical atomicmore » spacings of 0.255 nm. It is shown that the temperature of the structural phase transition depends on the length of the atomic chain.« less

  14. Defect-free atomic array formation using the Hungarian matching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2017-05-01

    Deterministic loading of single atoms onto arbitrary two-dimensional lattice points has recently been demonstrated, where by dynamically controlling the optical-dipole potential, atoms from a probabilistically loaded lattice were relocated to target lattice points to form a zero-entropy atomic lattice. In this atom rearrangement, how to pair atoms with the target sites is a combinatorial optimization problem: brute-force methods search all possible combinations so the process is slow, while heuristic methods are time efficient but optimal solutions are not guaranteed. Here, we use the Hungarian matching algorithm as a fast and rigorous alternative to this problem of defect-free atomic lattice formation. Our approach utilizes an optimization cost function that restricts collision-free guiding paths so that atom loss due to collision is minimized during rearrangement. Experiments were performed with cold rubidium atoms that were trapped and guided with holographically controlled optical-dipole traps. The result of atom relocation from a partially filled 7 ×7 lattice to a 3 ×3 target lattice strongly agrees with the theoretical analysis: using the Hungarian algorithm minimizes the collisional and trespassing paths and results in improved performance, with over 50% higher success probability than the heuristic shortest-move method.

  15. Novel Growth Technologies for In Situ Formation of Semiconductor Quantum Wire Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    as the alternative source for phosphine for the first time. We have developed the Stranski-Krastanow (SK) growth mode for the in-situ formation of InP...tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as the alternative source 3 for phosphine for the first time. At growth temperatures of 600oC specular surface morphology and mobilities...semi-insulating hnP buffer layer using ferrocene as the Fe-dopant. For the n-channel in our JFET structure disilane is used to obtain carrier

  16. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mengdi, E-mail: M.Yang@utwente.nl; Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecularmore » or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.« less

  17. The Formation of Formaldehyde on Interstellar Carbonaceous Grain Analogs by O/H Atom Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas; Jonusas, Mindaugas; Krim, Lahouari

    2017-09-01

    An understanding of possible scenarios for the formation of astrophysically relevant molecules, particularly complex organic molecules, will bring us one step closer to the understanding of our astrochemical heritage. In this context, formaldehyde is an important molecule as a precursor of methanol, which in turn is a starting point for the formation of more complex organic species. In the present experiments, for the first time, following the synthesis of CO, formaldehyde has been produced on the surface of interstellar grain analogs, hydrogenated fullerene-like carbon grains, by O and H atom bombardment. The formation of H2CO is an indication for a possible methanol formation route in such systems.

  18. Kinetic analysis of MgB2 layer formation in advanced internal magnesium infiltration (AIMI) processed MgB2 wires

    PubMed Central

    Li, G. Z.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Significantly enhanced critical current density (Jc) for MgB2 superconducting wires can be obtained following the advanced internal Mg infiltration (AIMI) route. But unless suitable precautions are taken, the AIMI-processed MgB2 wires will exhibit incomplete MgB2 layer formation, i.e. reduced superconductor core size and hence suppressed current-carrying capability. Microstructural characterization of AIMI MgB2 wires before and after the heat treatment reveals that the reaction mechanism changes from a “Mg infiltration-reaction” at the beginning of the heat treatment to a “Mg diffusion-reaction” once a dense MgB2 layer is formed. A drastic drop in the Mg transport rate from infiltration to diffusion causes the termination of the MgB2 core growth. To quantify this process, a two-stage kinetic model is built to describe the MgB2 layer formation and growth. The derived kinetic model and the associated experimental observations indicate that fully reacted AIMI-processed MgB2 wires can be achieved following the optimization of B particle size, B powder packing density, MgB2 reaction activation energy and its response to the additions of dopants. PMID:26973431

  19. Study on Formation Mechanism of CaO-SiO2-Based Inclusions in Saw Wire Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun-Peng; Jiang, Min; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Hao-Qian; Cao, Zhan-Min

    2017-12-01

    Attempts were made to elucidate the formation mechanism of CaO-SiO2-based inclusions in saw wires by both laboratory experiments and industrial trials. The key point was to make clear the origin of CaO in such oxide inclusions. Probable origins of [Ca] in steel were first discussed, which can be taken into steel from the steel-slag reaction or ferrous alloy. As a result, slag-steel chemical reaction equilibrium was carefully evaluated at 1873 K (1600 °C) to classify the changes of dissolved aluminum ([Al]), total magnesium (Mg), and total calcium (Ca) in steel and the caused composition variations of inclusions. With the rise of slag basicity from 0.5 to 1.8, [Al] was remarkably increased from 0.00045 to 0.00139 mass pct, whereas Mg varied in the range of 0.00038 to 0.00048 mass pct. By contrast, Ca was constantly kept below 0.00003 mass pct. Accordingly, Al2O3 and MgO in inclusions witnessed obvious rises from 5 to 23 mass pct and from 2 to 8 mass pct, respectively. By contrast, inclusions were free of CaO when slag basicity was below 1.5. With slag basicity further increased to 1.8, CaO witnessed a negligible rise to only 1.0 mass pct on average. This phenomenon agreed well with thermodynamic calculations, which revealed that chemical reaction between steel and CaO in slag (for example, between [Si] and CaO) was weak to hardly supplying sufficient [Ca] to steel to increase CaO in inclusions. Ca contained in ferrous alloys as contaminations was not the cause of CaO-SiO2-based inclusions, either. The industrial trial results indicated that CaO-SiO2-based inclusions have been readily produced in short time just after BOF tapping. Also, a percentage of them changed slightly with the proceeding of refining. Based on the good agreement of laboratory, industrial, and thermodynamics calculations results, it can be reasonably concluded that CaO-SiO2-based inclusions in saw wire were exogenous particles from entrapped/emulsified top slag, but not products of slag

  20. Local Control of Lung Derived Tumors by Diffusing Alpha-Emitting Atoms Released From Intratumoral Wires Loaded With Radium-224

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Tomer; Schmidt, Michael; Bittan, Hadas

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DART) is a new form of brachytherapy enabling the treatment of solid tumors with alpha radiation. The present study examines the antitumoral effects resulting from the release of alpha emitting radioisotopes into solid lung carcinoma (LL2, A427, and NCI-H520). Methods and Materials: An in vitro setup tested the dose-dependent killing of tumor cells exposed to alpha particles. In in vivo studies, radioactive wires (0.3 mm diameter, 5 mm long) with {sup 224}Ra activities in the range of 21-38 kBq were inserted into LL/2 tumors in C57BL/6 mice and into human-derived A427 or NCI-H520 tumors inmore » athymic mice. The efficacy of the short-lived daughters of {sup 224}Ra to produce tumor growth retardation and prolong life was assessed, and the spread of radioisotopes inside tumors was measured using autoradiography. Results: The insertion of a single DART wire into the center of 6- to 7-mm tumors had a pronounced retardation effect on tumor growth, leading to a significant inhibition of 49% (LL2) and 93% (A427) in tumor development and prolongations of 48% (LL2) in life expectancy. In the human model, more than 80% of the treated tumors disappeared or shrunk. Autoradiographic analysis of the treated sectioned tissue revealed the intratumoral distribution of the radioisotopes, and histological analysis showed corresponding areas of necrosis. In vitro experiments demonstrated a dose-dependent killing of tumors cells exposed to alpha particles. Conclusions: Short-lived diffusing alpha-emitters produced tumor growth retardation and increased survival in mice bearing lung tumor implants. These results justify further investigations with improved dose distributions.« less

  1. Optical Pattern Formation in Spatially Bunched Atoms: A Self-Consistent Model and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear optics and optomechanical physics communities use different theoretical models to describe how optical fields interact with a sample of atoms. There does not yet exist a model that is valid for finite atomic temperatures but that also produces the zero temperature results that are generally assumed in optomechanical systems. We present a self-consistent model that is valid for all atomic temperatures and accounts for the back-action of the atoms on the optical fields. Our model provides new insights into the competing effects of the bunching-induced nonlinearity and the saturable nonlinearity. We show that it is crucial to keep the fifth and seventh-order nonlinearities that arise when there exists atomic bunching, even at very low optical field intensities. We go on to apply this model to the results of our experimental system where we observe spontaneous, multimode, transverse optical pattern formation at ultra-low light levels. We show that our model accurately predicts our experimentally observed threshold for optical pattern formation, which is the lowest threshold ever reported for pattern formation. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  2. Basic Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This module is the first in a series of three wiring publications; it serves as the foundation for students enrolled in a wiring program. It is a prerequisite to either "Residential Wiring" or "Commercial and Industrial Wiring." The module contains 16 instructional units that cover the following topics: occupational…

  3. Theoretical survey on positronium formation and ionisation in positron atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Madhumita; Ghosh, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The recent theoretical studies are surveyed and reported on the formation of exotic atoms in positron-hydrogen, positron-helium and positron-lithium scattering specially at intermediate energy region. The ionizations of these targets by positron impact was also considered. Theoretical predictions for both the processes are compared with existing measured values.

  4. Dynamics of Hollow Atom Formation in Intense X-Ray Pulses Probed by Partial Covariance Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, L. J.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Siano, M.; Eland, J. H. D.; Linusson, P.; v. d. Meulen, P.; Salén, P.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Foucar, L.; Ullrich, J.; Motomura, K.; Mondal, S.; Ueda, K.; Osipov, T.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B. F.; Berrah, N.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Schorb, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Cryan, J. P.; Coffee, R. N.; Takahashi, O.; Wada, S.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Feifel, R.

    2013-08-01

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called “partial covariance mapping” to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  5. Electron transport in stretched monoatomic gold wires.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, A; Skorodumova, N V; Simak, S I; Wendin, G; Johansson, B; Ahuja, R

    2006-12-08

    The conductance of monoatomic gold wires containing 3-7 gold atoms has been obtained from ab initio calculations. The transmission is found to vary significantly depending on the wire stretching and the number of incorporated atoms. Such oscillations are determined by the electronic structure of the one-dimensional (1D) part of the wire between the contacts. Our results indicate that the conductivity of 1D wires can be suppressed without breaking the contact.

  6. Kinetics of oxygen atom formation during the oxidation of methane behind shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the formation of oxygen atoms during the oxidation of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures behind incident shock waves was carried out over the temperature range 1790-2584 K at reaction pressures between 1.2 and 1.7 atm. Oxygen atom levels were determined indirectly by measurement of emission from reaction of O with CO. On the basis of these data and ignition-delay data reported in the literature, a kinetic scheme for methane oxidation was assembled. The proposed kinetic mechanism, in general, predicts higher peak oxygen atom levels than the current oxidation mechanisms proposed by Bowman and Seery and by Skinner and his co-workers.

  7. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  8. Pattern Formations for Optical Switching Using Cold Atoms as a Nonlinear Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Greenberg, Joel; Gauthier, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    The study of spatio-temporal pattern formation in nonlinear optical systems has both led to an increased understanding of nonlinear dynamics as well as given rise to sensitive new methods for all-optical switching. Whereas the majority of past experiments utilized warm atomic vapors as nonlinear media, we report the first observation of an optical instability leading to pattern formation in a cloud of cold Rubidium atoms. When we shine a pair of counterpropagating pump laser beams along the pencil-shaped cloud's long axis, new beams of light are generated along cones centered on the trap. This generated light produces petal-like patterns in the plane orthogonal to the pump beams that can be used for optical switching. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-0855399 and the DARPA Slow Light Program.

  9. Measurements of Polyatomic Molecule Formation on an Icy Grain Analog Using Fast Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Madsunkov, S.; Shortt, B. J.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide has been produced from the impact of a monoenergetic O(P-3) beam upon a surface cooled to 4.8 K and covered with a CO ice. Using temperature-programmed desorption and mass spectrometer detection, we have detected increasing amounts of CO2 formation with O(P-3) energies of 2, 5, 10, and 14 eV. This is the first measurement of polyatomic molecule formation on a surface with superthermal atoms. The goal of this work is to detect other polyatomic species, such as CH3OH, which can be formed under conditions that simulate the grain temperature, surface coverage, and superthermal atoms present in shock-heated circumstellar and interstellar regions.

  10. Motion of W and He atoms during formation of W fuzz

    DOE PAGES

    Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; ...

    2018-04-11

    Measurements are conducted to identify the motion of tungsten and helium atoms during the formation of tungsten fuzz. In a first series of experiments the mobility of helium within the growing fuzz was measured by adding 3He to the different stages of plasma exposure under conditions that promoted tungsten fuzz growth. Ion beam analysis was used to quantify the amount of 3He remaining in the samples following the plasma exposure. The results indicate that the retention of helium in bubbles within tungsten is a dynamic process with direct implantation rather than diffusion into the bubbles, best describing the motion ofmore » the helium atoms. In the second experiment, an isotopically enriched layer of tungsten (~92.99% 182W) is deposited on the surface of a bulk tungsten sample with the natural abundance of the isotopes. This sample is then exposed to helium plasma at the conditions necessary to support the formation of tungsten 'fuzz'. Depth profiles of the concentration of each of the tungsten isotopes are obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) before and after the plasma exposure. The depth profiles clearly show mixing of tungsten atoms from the bulk sample toward the surface of the fuzz. Lastly, this supports a physical picture of the dynamic behavior of helium bubbles which, also, causes an enhanced mixing of tungsten atoms.« less

  11. Atomic Step Formation on Sapphire Surface in Ultra-precision Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongrong; Guo, Dan; Xie, Guoxin; Pan, Guoshun

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces with controlled atomic step structures as substrates are highly relevant to desirable performances of materials grown on them, such as light emitting diode (LED) epitaxial layers, nanotubes and nanoribbons. However, very limited attention has been paid to the step formation in manufacturing process. In the present work, investigations have been conducted into this step formation mechanism on the sapphire c (0001) surface by using both experiments and simulations. The step evolutions at different stages in the polishing process were investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The simulation of idealized steps was constructed theoretically on the basis of experimental results. It was found that (1) the subtle atomic structures (e.g., steps with different sawteeth, as well as steps with straight and zigzag edges), (2) the periodicity and (3) the degree of order of the steps were all dependent on surface composition and miscut direction (step edge direction). A comparison between experimental results and idealized step models of different surface compositions has been made. It has been found that the structure on the polished surface was in accordance with some surface compositions (the model of single-atom steps: Al steps or O steps). PMID:27444267

  12. Motion of W and He atoms during formation of W fuzz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Zach, M.

    2018-06-01

    Measurements are conducted to identify the motion of tungsten and helium atoms during the formation of tungsten fuzz. In a first series of experiments the mobility of helium within the growing fuzz was measured by adding 3He to the different stages of plasma exposure under conditions that promoted tungsten fuzz growth. Ion beam analysis was used to quantify the amount of 3He remaining in the samples following the plasma exposure. The results indicate that the retention of helium in bubbles within tungsten is a dynamic process with direct implantation rather than diffusion into the bubbles, best describing the motion of the helium atoms. In the second experiment, an isotopically enriched layer of tungsten (~92.99% 182W) is deposited on the surface of a bulk tungsten sample with the natural abundance of the isotopes. This sample is then exposed to helium plasma at the conditions necessary to support the formation of tungsten ‘fuzz’. Depth profiles of the concentration of each of the tungsten isotopes are obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) before and after the plasma exposure. The depth profiles clearly show mixing of tungsten atoms from the bulk sample toward the surface of the fuzz. This supports a physical picture of the dynamic behavior of helium bubbles which, also, causes an enhanced mixing of tungsten atoms.

  13. Atomic Step Formation on Sapphire Surface in Ultra-precision Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongrong; Guo, Dan; Xie, Guoxin; Pan, Guoshun

    2016-07-01

    Surfaces with controlled atomic step structures as substrates are highly relevant to desirable performances of materials grown on them, such as light emitting diode (LED) epitaxial layers, nanotubes and nanoribbons. However, very limited attention has been paid to the step formation in manufacturing process. In the present work, investigations have been conducted into this step formation mechanism on the sapphire c (0001) surface by using both experiments and simulations. The step evolutions at different stages in the polishing process were investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The simulation of idealized steps was constructed theoretically on the basis of experimental results. It was found that (1) the subtle atomic structures (e.g., steps with different sawteeth, as well as steps with straight and zigzag edges), (2) the periodicity and (3) the degree of order of the steps were all dependent on surface composition and miscut direction (step edge direction). A comparison between experimental results and idealized step models of different surface compositions has been made. It has been found that the structure on the polished surface was in accordance with some surface compositions (the model of single-atom steps: Al steps or O steps).

  14. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation Energy and Imaging Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents particle formation energy balances and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium during the Phase II testing in 2001. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. The particle formation efficiency is also estimated. Particle sizes from the Phase I testing in 1999 and the Phase II testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles and it allows designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  15. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation, Imaging, Observations, and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    This report presents particle formation observations and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Hydrogen was frozen into particles in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. These newly analyzed data are from the test series held on February 28, 2001. Particle sizes from previous testing in 1999 and the testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed: microparticles and delayed particle formation. These experiment image analyses are some of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and they allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  16. The Formation of Formaldehyde on Interstellar Carbonaceous Grain Analogs by O/H Atom Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, Alexey; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas

    An understanding of possible scenarios for the formation of astrophysically relevant molecules, particularly complex organic molecules, will bring us one step closer to the understanding of our astrochemical heritage. In this context, formaldehyde is an important molecule as a precursor of methanol, which in turn is a starting point for the formation of more complex organic species. In the present experiments, for the first time, following the synthesis of CO, formaldehyde has been produced on the surface of interstellar grain analogs, hydrogenated fullerene-like carbon grains, by O and H atom bombardment. The formation of H{sub 2}CO is an indication formore » a possible methanol formation route in such systems.« less

  17. Wire stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economu, M. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An insulation stripper is described which is especially useful for shielded wire, the stripper including a first pair of jaws with blades extending substantially perpendicular to the axis of the wire, and a second pair of jaws with blades extending substantially parallel to the axis of the wire. The first pair of jaws is pressed against the wire so the blades cut into the insulation, and the device is turned to form circumferential cuts in the insulation. Then the second pair of jaws is pressed against the wire so the blades cut into the insulation, and the wire is moved through the device to form longitudinal cuts that permit easy removal of the insulation. Each of the blades is located within the concave face of a V-block, to center the blades on the wire and to limit the depth of blade penetration.

  18. In-situ studies of Fe2B phase formation in MgB2 wires and tapes by means of high-energy x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivel, J. C.; Andersen, N. H.; Pinholt, R.; Ková, P.; Husek, I.; Hässler, W.; Herrmann, M.; Perner, O.; Rodig, C.; Homeyer, J.

    2006-06-01

    The phase transformations occurring in the ceramic core of Fe-sheathed MgB2 wires and tapes prepared by in-situ reaction of Mg and B precursor powders, have been studied by means of high-energy x-ray diffraction. In particular, the time evolution of the Fe2B phase, forming at the interface between the sheath and the ceramic, was studied at different sintering temperatures. The reactivity of the sheath towards Fe2B formation is strongly dependent on powder pre-treatment. In wires produced with commercial Mg and B powders without additional mechanical activation, the Fe2B phase starts forming around 650°C. In contrast, in tapes produced from a mixture of Mg and B powders subjected to high-energy ball milling, the interfacial Fe2B layer forms readily at 600°C. The increase of Fe2B volume fraction is linear to first approximation, showing that the interfacial layer does not act as a diffusion barrier against further reaction between the sheath and the ceramic core. If the ceramic core is converted to MgB2 at a temperature, which is low enough to avoid Fe2B formation, the interface is stable during further annealing at temperatures up to 700°C at least. However, too high annealing temperatures (T > 800°C), would result in formation of Fe2B, probably following the partial decomposition of MgB2.

  19. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Spray formation of biodiesel-water in air-assisted atomizer using Schlieren photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirnordin, S. H.; Khalid, A.; Sapit, A.; Salleh, H.; Razali, A.; Fawzi, M.

    2016-11-01

    Biodiesels are attractive renewable energy sources, particularly for industrial boiler and burner operators. However, biodiesels produce higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions compared with diesel. Although water-emulsified fuels can lower NOx emissions by reducing flame temperature, its influence on atomization needs to be investigated further. This study investigates the effects of water on spray formation in air-assisted atomizers. The Schlieren method was used to capture the spray images in terms of tip penetration, spray angle, and spray area. The experiment used palm oil biodiesel at different blending ratios (B5, B10, and B15) and water contents (0vol%-15vol%). Results show that water content in the fuel increases the spray penetration and area but reduces the spray angle because of the changes in fuel properties. Therefore, biodiesel-water application is applicable to burner systems.

  1. Control of the electrical resistivity of Ni-Cr wires using low pressure chemical vapor deposition of tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Bak, Jeong Geun; Lee, Kangtaek; Kim, Chang-Koo

    2018-01-01

    Control of the electrical resistivity of Ni-Cr wires is demonstrated using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tin on the surface of the wire, after which the effects of the deposition temperature on the structural, morphological, and compositional characteristics of the tin-deposited Ni-Cr wires are investigated. As the deposition temperature is increased, the resistivity of the Ni-Cr wires increases in the temperature range 300-400 °C; then remains nearly constant as the temperature increased to 700 °C. The increase in the resistivity of the Ni-Cr wires is attributed to formation of Ni3Sn2 particulates on the surface of the wire. Compositional analysis shows that the pattern of change in the tin content with the deposition temperature is similar to that of resistivity with temperature, implying that the atomic content of tin on Ni-Cr directly affects the electrical resistivity.

  2. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO 2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO 2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interfacemore » with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.« less

  3. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  4. Surface effects on the mechanical elongation of AuCu nanowires: De-alloying and the formation of mixed suspended atomic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, M. J.; Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia-LNNANO, 13083-970 Campinas-SP; Autreto, P. A. S.

    2015-03-07

    We report here an atomistic study of the mechanical deformation of Au{sub x}Cu{sub (1−x)} atomic-size wires (nanowires (NWs)) by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to obtain deeper insights on the dynamical properties of stretched NWs. The mechanical properties are significantly dependent on the chemical composition that evolves in time at the junction; some structures exhibit a remarkable de-alloying behavior. Also, our results represent the first experimental realization of mixed linear atomic chains (LACs) among transition and noble metals; in particular, surface energies induce chemical gradients on NW surfacesmore » that can be exploited to control the relative LAC compositions (different number of gold and copper atoms). The implications of these results for nanocatalysis and spin transport of one-atom-thick metal wires are addressed.« less

  5. Mg line formation in late-type stellar atmospheres. I. The model atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Y.; Barklem, P. S.; Lind, K.; Belyaev, A. K.; Spielfiedel, A.; Guitou, M.; Feautrier, N.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Magnesium is an element of significant astrophysical importance, often traced in late-type stars using lines of neutral magnesium, which is expected to be subject to departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The importance of Mg , together with the unique range of spectral features in late-type stars probing different parts of the atom, as well as its relative simplicity from an atomic physics point of view, makes it a prime target and test bed for detailed ab initio non-LTE modelling in stellar atmospheres. Previous non-LTE modelling of spectral line formation has, however, been subject to uncertainties due to lack of accurate data for inelastic collisions with electrons and hydrogen atoms. Aims: In this paper we build and test a Mg model atom for spectral line formation in late-type stars with new or recent inelastic collision data and no associated free parameters. We aim to reduce these uncertainties and thereby improve the accuracy of Mg non-LTE modelling in late-type stars. Methods: For the low-lying states of Mg i, electron collision data were calculated using the R-matrix method. Hydrogen collision data, including charge transfer processes, were taken from recent calculations by some of us. Calculations for collisional broadening by neutral hydrogen were also performed where data were missing. These calculations, together with data from the literature, were used to build a model atom. This model was then employed in the context of standard non-LTE modelling in 1D (including average 3D) model atmospheres in a small set of stellar atmosphere models. First, the modelling was tested by comparisons with observed spectra of benchmark stars with well-known parameters. Second, the spectral line behaviour and uncertainties were explored by extensive experiments in which sets of collisional data were changed or removed. Results: The modelled spectra agree well with observed spectra from benchmark stars, showing much better agreement with line

  6. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; ...

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  7. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim, E-mail: mkouza@chem.uw.edu.pl; Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleusmore » size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template

  8. Formation mechanism of atomic cluster structures in Al-Mg alloy during rapid solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng-xiang; Liu, Rang-su; Hou, Zhao-yang; Liu, Hai-Rong; Tian, Ze-an; Zhou, Li-li

    2009-02-01

    The rapid solidification processes of Al 50Mg 50 liquid alloy consisting of 50,000 atoms have been simulated by using molecular dynamics method based on the effective pair potential derived from the pseudopotential theory. The formation mechanisms of atomic clusters during the rapid solidification processes have been investigated adopting a new cluster description method—cluster-type index method (CTIM). The simulated partial structure factors are in good agreement with the experimental results. And Al-Mg amorphous structure characterized with Al-centered icosahedral topological short-range order (SRO) is found to form during the rapid solidification processes. The icosahedral cluster plays a key role in the microstructure transition. Besides, it is also found that the size distribution of various clusters in the system presents a magic number sequence of 13, 19, 23, 25, 29, 31, 33, 37, …. The magic clusters are more stable and mainly correspond to the incompact arrangements of linked icosahedra in the form of rings, chains or dendrites. And each magic number point stands correspondingly for one certain combining form of icosahedra. This magic number sequence is different from that generated in the solidification structure of liquid Al and those obtained by methods of gaseous deposition and ionic spray, etc.

  9. Wire Wise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanquist, Barry

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how today's technology is encouraging schools to invest in furnishings that are adaptable to computer use and telecommunications access. Explores issues concerning modularity, wiring management, ergonomics, durability, price, and aesthetics. (GR)

  10. The formation of excited atoms during charge exchange between hydrogen ions and alkali atoms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieman, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    The charge exchange cross sections for protons and various alkali atoms are calculated using the classical approximation of Gryzinski. It is assumed that the hydrogen atoms resulting from charge exchange exist in all possible excited states. Charge transfer collisions between protons and potassium as well as protons and sodium atoms are studied. The energy range investigated is between 4 and 30 keV. The theoretical calculations of the capture cross section and the cross section for the creation of metastable 2S hydrogen are compared to experimental values. Good quantitative agreement is found for the capture cross section but only qualitative agreement for the metastable cross section. Analysis of the Lyman alpha window in molecular oxygen suggests that measured values of the metastable cross section may be in error. Thick alkali target data are also presented. This allows the determination of the total electron loss cross section. Finally, some work was done with H2(+).

  11. Effect of different filler wires on weld formation for fiber laser welding 6A02 Aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Chen, L.; Lu, W.; He, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    6A02 aluminum alloy was welded by fibre laser welding with two different filler wires (ER4043 and ER5356). The weld apperance, microstructure and mechanical properties were analysed. The results show the welding course with ER4043 is more stable than that with ER5356, and the welding spatters of the former are smaller than that of the latter. The microsturtrue of the weld zone, including columnar-grains near the fusion zone and mixed microstructures (columnar grains and equiaxed grains) in the weld center zone, is finer with ER5356 than that with ER4043. So the average microhardness value of the former is higher than the latter. A great number of low melting point eutectic phases disperse in grains boundary. Due to the eutectic phases distributing more in two zones (overheat zone near the fusion zone and the weld center zone) than other zones, the welded joints have these two low hardness and weak strength zones. The ultimate strength and the elongations after fracture of the welded joints with ER4043 are lower than that with ER5356 slihgtly. However, the former are improved obviously and higher than the latter after heat treatment. The tensile properties of all joints can reach to the base material level. And the tensile fractures always occur near the fusion zone.

  12. A MOLECULAR STAR FORMATION LAW IN THE ATOMIC-GAS-DOMINATED REGIME IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Dumas, Gaelle

    2011-08-15

    We use the IRAM HERACLES survey to study CO emission from 33 nearby spiral galaxies down to very low intensities. Using 21 cm line atomic hydrogen (H I) data, mostly from THINGS, we predict the local mean CO velocity based on the mean H I velocity. By re-normalizing the CO velocity axis so that zero corresponds to the local mean H I velocity we are able to stack spectra coherently over large regions. This enables us to measure CO intensities with high significance as low as I{sub CO} {approx} 0.3 K km s{sup -1} ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}1 M{sub sun} pc{supmore » -2}), an improvement of about one order of magnitude over previous studies. We detect CO out to galactocentric radii r{sub gal} {approx} r{sub 25} and find the CO radial profile to follow a remarkably uniform exponential decline with a scale length of {approx}0.2 r{sub 25}. Here we focus on stacking as a function of radius, comparing our sensitive CO profiles to matched profiles of H I, H{alpha}, far-UV (FUV), and Infrared (IR) emission at 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m. We observe a tight, roughly linear relationship between CO and IR intensity that does not show any notable break between regions that are dominated by molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}>{Sigma}{sub H{sub i}}) and those dominated by atomic gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}<{Sigma}{sub H{sub i}}). We use combinations of FUV+24 {mu}m and H{alpha}+24 {mu}m to estimate the recent star formation rate (SFR) surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}, and find approximately linear relations between {Sigma}{sub SFR} and {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}. We interpret this as evidence of stars forming in molecular gas with little dependence on the local total gas surface density. While galaxies display small internal variations in the SFR-to-H{sub 2} ratio, we do observe systematic galaxy-to-galaxy variations. These galaxy-to-galaxy variations dominate the scatter in relationships between CO and SFR tracers measured at large scales. The variations have the sense that less

  13. Thermal equilibrium concentration of intrinsic point defects in heavily doped silicon crystals - Theoretical study of formation energy and formation entropy in area of influence of dopant atoms-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamaoka, S.; Sueoka, K.; Vanhellemont, J.

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that p-type, neutral and n-type dopants affect the intrinsic point defect (vacancy V and self-interstitial I) behavior in single crystal Si. By the interaction with V and/or I, (1) growing Si crystals become more V- or I-rich, (2) oxygen precipitation is enhanced or retarded, and (3) dopant diffusion is enhanced or retarded, depending on the type and concentration of dopant atoms. Since these interactions affect a wide range of Si properties ranging from as-grown crystal quality to LSI performance, numerical simulations are used to predict and to control the behavior of both dopant atoms and intrinsic point defects. In most cases, the thermal equilibrium concentrations of dopant-point defect pairs are evaluated using the mass action law by taking only the binding energy of closest pair to each other into account. The impacts of dopant atoms on the formation of V and I more distant than 1st neighbor and on the change of formation entropy are usually neglected. In this study, we have evaluated the thermal equilibrium concentrations of intrinsic point defects in heavily doped Si crystals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to obtain the formation energy (Ef) of the uncharged V and I at all sites in a 64-atom supercell around a substitutional p-type (B, Ga, In, and Tl), neutral (C, Ge, and Sn) and n-type (P, As, and Sb) dopant atom. The formation (vibration) entropies (Sf) of free I, V and I, V at 1st neighboring site from B, C, Sn, P and As atoms were also calculated with the linear response method. The dependences of the thermal equilibrium concentrations of trapped and total intrinsic point defects (sum of free I or V and I or V trapped with dopant atoms) on the concentrations of B, C, Sn, P and As in Si were obtained. Furthermore, the present evaluations well explain the experimental results of the so-called ;Voronkov criterion; in B and C doped Si, and also the observed dopant dependent void sizes in P and As doped Si

  14. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of −3.0 ± 0.4 nN and −330 ± 43 aJ (10−18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions. PMID:26585552

  15. No Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLoughry, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California at Santa Cruz has completed a successful test of a wireless computer network that would enable students and professors to get on line from anywhere on campus. The network, linked by radio waves, could save millions of dollars in campus wiring costs and would better meet student and faculty information needs. (MSE)

  16. Thermodynamic properties of arsenic compounds and the heat of formation of the As atom from high level electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Feller, David; Vasiliu, Monica; Grant, Daniel J; Dixon, David A

    2011-12-29

    Structures, vibrational frequencies, atomization energies at 0 K, and heats of formation at 0 and 298 K are predicted for the compounds As(2), AsH, AsH(2), AsH(3), AsF, AsF(2), and AsF(3) from frozen core coupled cluster theory calculations performed with large correlation consistent basis sets, up through augmented sextuple zeta quality. The coupled cluster calculations involved up through quadruple excitations. For As(2) and the hydrides, it was also possible to examine the impact of full configuration interaction on some of the properties. In addition, adjustments were incorporated to account for extrapolation to the frozen core complete basis set limit, core/valence correlation, scalar relativistic effects, the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction, and atomic spin orbit corrections. Based on our best theoretical D(0)(As(2)) and the experimental heat of formation of As(2), we propose a revised 0 K arsenic atomic heat of formation of 68.86 ± 0.8 kcal/mol. While generally good agreement was found between theory and experiment, the heat of formation of AsF(3) was an exception. Our best estimate is more than 7 kcal/mol more negative than the single available experimental value, which argues for a re-examination of that measurement. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Formation of Triplet Positron-helium Bound State by Stripping of Positronium Atoms in Collision with Ground State Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of triplet positron-helium bound state by stripping of positronium atoms in collision with ground state helium JOSEPH DI RlENZI, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, RICHARD J. DRACHMAN, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center - The system consisting of a positron and a helium atom in the triplet state e(+)He(S-3)(sup e) was conjectured long ago to be stable [1]. Its stability has recently been established rigorously [2], and the values of the energies of dissociation into the ground states of Ps and He(+) have also been reported [3] and [4]. We have evaluated the cross-section for this system formed by radiative attachment of a positron in triplet He state and found it to be small [5]. The mechanism of production suggested here should result in a larger cross-section (of atomic size) which we are determining using the Born approximation with simplified initial and final wave functions.

  18. Exploring star formation in high-z galaxies using atomic and molecular emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullberg, Bitten

    2016-03-01

    The conditions under which stars are formed and the reasons for triggering and quenching of starburst events in high-z galaxies, are still not well understood. Studying the interstellar medium (ISM) and the morphology of high-z galaxies are therefore key points in order to understand galaxy evolution. The cosmic star formation rate density peaks between 1formation triggering and quenching mechanisms. Phenomena such as major mergers and galactic nuclear activity are believed to be mechanisms dominating the star formation activity at this period of time. It is therefore necessary to study galaxy populations which show signs of major merger events and active galactic nuclei (AGN). This thesis presents three studies of the ISM in high-z galaxies and their morphologies by: Exploring the physical conditions of the ISM in a sample of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) using the relative observed line strength of ionised carbon ([CII]) and carbon monoxide (CO). We find that the line ratios can best be described by a medium of [CII] and CO emitting gas with a higher [CII] than CO excitation temperature, high CO optical depth tau(CO)>>1, and low to moderate [CII] optical depth tau(CII)<1. Combining millimetre/sub-millimetre and optical data cubes for the high-z radio galaxy (HzRG) MRC0943-242, has revealed a much more complicated morphology than seen in the individual data sets. The millimetre/sub-millimetre observations data have allowed us to spatially separate of the AGN and starburst dominated components, which ~65 kpc apart. The optical data reveal structures of emitting and absorbing gas at multiple wavelengths. A deep high resolution millimetre/sub-millimetre study of the HzRG MRC1138-262, shows emission from water (H2O) and an unusually large amount of neutral atomic carbon ([CI]) relative to highly excited CO compared to lensed DSFGs. The

  19. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Eldon D.; Hooper, Frederick M.; Reichenbach, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

  20. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

    1992-08-11

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

  1. Room temperature deintercalation of alkali metal atoms from epitaxial graphene by formation of charge-transfer complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.-C.; Ahn, S. J.; Kim, H. W.

    2016-08-22

    Atom (or molecule) intercalations and deintercalations have been used to control the electronic properties of graphene. In general, finite energies above room temperature (RT) thermal energy are required for the intercalations and deintercalations. Here, we demonstrate that alkali metal atoms can be deintercalated from epitaxial graphene on a SiC substrate at RT, resulting in the reduction in density of states at the Fermi level. The change in density of states at the Fermi level at RT can be applied to a highly sensitive graphene sensor operating at RT. Na atoms, which were intercalated at a temperature of 80 °C, were deintercalatedmore » at a high temperature above 1000 °C when only a thermal treatment was used. In contrast to the thermal treatment, the intercalated Na atoms were deintercalated at RT when tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) molecules were adsorbed on the surface. The RT deintercalation occurred via the formation of charge-transfer complexes between Na atoms and F4-TCNQ molecules.« less

  2. Room temperature deintercalation of alkali metal atoms from epitaxial graphene by formation of charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, H.-C.; Ahn, S. J.; Kim, H. W.; Moon, Y.; Rai, K. B.; Woo, S. H.; Ahn, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    Atom (or molecule) intercalations and deintercalations have been used to control the electronic properties of graphene. In general, finite energies above room temperature (RT) thermal energy are required for the intercalations and deintercalations. Here, we demonstrate that alkali metal atoms can be deintercalated from epitaxial graphene on a SiC substrate at RT, resulting in the reduction in density of states at the Fermi level. The change in density of states at the Fermi level at RT can be applied to a highly sensitive graphene sensor operating at RT. Na atoms, which were intercalated at a temperature of 80 °C, were deintercalated at a high temperature above 1000 °C when only a thermal treatment was used. In contrast to the thermal treatment, the intercalated Na atoms were deintercalated at RT when tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) molecules were adsorbed on the surface. The RT deintercalation occurred via the formation of charge-transfer complexes between Na atoms and F4-TCNQ molecules.

  3. Inorganic and Organometallic Molecular Wires for Single-Molecule Devices.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuya; Kiguchi, Manabu; Akita, Munetaka

    2017-04-06

    Recent developments of single-molecule conductance measurements allow us to understand fundamental conducting properties of molecular wires. While a wide variety of organic molecular wires have been studied so far, inorganic and organometallic molecular wires have received much less attention. However, molecular wires with transition-metal atoms show interesting features and functions distinct from those of organic wires. These properties originate mainly from metal-ligand dπ-pπ interactions and metal-metal d-d interactions. Thanks to the rich combination of metal atoms and supporting ligands, frontier orbital energies of the molecular wires can be finely tuned to lead to highly conducting molecular wires. Moreover, the unique electronic structures of metal complexes are susceptible to subtle environmental changes, leading to potential functional molecular devices. This article reviews recent advances in the single-molecule conductance study of inorganic and organometallic molecular wires. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. NASA wiring for space applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program and its relationship to NASA's space technology enterprise is given in viewgraph format. The mission of the space technology enterprise is to pioneer, with industry, the development and use of space technology to secure national economic competitiveness, promote industrial growth, and to support space missions. The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program is to improve the safety, performance, and reliability of wiring systems for space applications and to develop improved wiring technologies for NASA flight programs and commercial applications. Wiring system failures in space and commercial applications have shown the need for arc track resistant wiring constructions. A matrix of tests performed versus wiring constructions is presented. Preliminary data indicate the performance of the Tensolite and Filotex hybrid constructions are the best of the various candidates.

  5. Formation of bimetallic clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets analysed by atomic resolution electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haberfehlner, Georg; Thaler, Philipp; Knez, Daniel; Volk, Alexander; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Structure, shape and composition are the basic parameters responsible for properties of nanoscale materials, distinguishing them from their bulk counterparts. To reveal these in three dimensions at the nanoscale, electron tomography is a powerful tool. Advancing electron tomography to atomic resolution in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope remains challenging and has been demonstrated only a few times using strong constraints or extensive filtering. Here we demonstrate atomic resolution electron tomography on silver/gold core/shell nanoclusters grown in superfluid helium nanodroplets. We reveal morphology and composition of a cluster identifying gold- and silver-rich regions in three dimensions and we estimate atomic positions without using any prior information and with minimal filtering. The ability to get full three-dimensional information down to the atomic scale allows understanding the growth and deposition process of the nanoclusters and demonstrates an approach that may be generally applicable to all types of nanoscale materials. PMID:26508471

  6. Routes to formation of highly excited neutral atoms in the break-up of strongly driven hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanouilidou, Agapi

    2012-06-01

    We present a theoretical quasiclassical treatment of the formation, during Coulomb explosion, of highly excited neutral H atoms for strongly-driven hydrogen molecule. This process, where after the laser field is turned off, one electron escapes to the continuum while the other occupies a Rydberg state, was recently reported in an experimental study in Phys. Rev. Lett 102, 113002 (2009). We find that two-electron effects are important in order to correctly account for all pathways leading to highly excited neutral hydrogen formation [1]. We identify two pathways where the electron that escapes to the continuum does so either very quickly or after remaining bound for a few periods of the laser field. These two pathways of highly excited neutral H formation have distinct traces in the probability distribution of the escaping electron momentum components. [4pt] [1] A. Emmanouilidou, C. Lazarou, A. Staudte and U. Eichmann, Phys. Rev. A (Rapid) 85 011402 (2012).

  7. Sensory and short-term memory formations observed in a Ag2S gap-type atomic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Nayak, Alpana; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Gimzewski, James K.; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-11-01

    Memorization caused by the change in conductance in a Ag2S gap-type atomic switch was investigated as a function of the amplitude and width of input voltage pulses (Vin). The conductance changed little for the first few Vin, but the information of the input was stored as a redistribution of Ag-ions in the Ag2S, indicating the formation of sensory memory. After a certain number of Vin, the conductance increased abruptly followed by a gradual decrease, indicating the formation of short-term memory (STM). We found that the probability of STM formation depends strongly on the amplitude and width of Vin, which resembles the learning behavior of the human brain.

  8. Formation of atomically smooth epitaxial metal films on a chemically reactive interface: Mg on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özer, Mustafa M.; Weitering, Hanno H.

    2013-07-01

    Deposition of Mg on Si(111)7 × 7 produces an epitaxial magnesium silicide layer. Under identical annealing conditions, the thickness of this Mg2Si(111) layer increases with deposition amount, reaching a maximum of 4 monolayer (ML) and decreasing to ˜3 ML at higher Mg coverage. Excess Mg coalesces into atomically flat, crystalline Mg(0001) films. This surprising growth mode can be attributed to the accidental commensurability of the Mg(0001), Si(111), and Mg2Si(111) interlayer spacing and the concurrent minimization of in-plane Si mass transfer and domain-wall energies. The commensurability of the interlayer spacing defines a highly unique solid-phase epitaxial growth process capable of producing trilayer structures with atomically abrupt interfaces and atomically smooth surface morphologies.

  9. Dynamics of the formation and loss of boron atoms in a H2/B2H6 microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duluard, C. Y.; Aubert, X.; Sadeghi, N.; Gicquel, A.

    2016-09-01

    For further improvements in doped-diamond deposition technology, an understanding of the complex chemistry in H2/CH4/B2H6 plasmas is of general importance. In this context, a H2/B2H6 plasma ignited by microwave power in a near resonant cavity at high pressure (100-200 mbar) is studied to measure the B-atom density in the ground state. The discharge is ignited in the gas mixture (0-135 ppm B2H6 in H2) by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator, leading to the formation of a hemispheric plasma core, surrounded by a faint discharge halo filling the remaining reactor volume. Measurements with both laser induced fluorescence and resonant absoption with a boron hollow cathode lamp indicate that the B-atom density is higher in the halo than in the plasma core. When the absorption line-of-sight is positioned in the halo, the absorption is so strong that the upper detection limit is reached. To understand the mechanisms of creation and loss of boron atoms, time-resolved absorption measurements have been carried out in a pulsed plasma regime (10 Hz, duty cycle 50%). The study focuses on the influence of the total pressure, the partial pressure of B2H6, as well as the source power, on the growth and decay rates of boron atoms when the plasma is turned off.

  10. Noncontextual Wirings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Barbara; Cabello, Adán; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Aolita, Leandro

    2018-03-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory necessary for certain models of quantum computation and communication. Serious steps have therefore been taken towards a formal framework for contextuality as an operational resource. However, the main ingredient of a resource theory—a concrete, explicit form of free operations of contextuality—was still missing. Here we provide such a component by introducing noncontextual wirings: a class of contextuality-free operations with a clear operational interpretation and a friendly parametrization. We characterize them completely for general black-box measurement devices with arbitrarily many inputs and outputs. As applications, we show that the relative entropy of contextuality is a contextuality monotone and that maximally contextual boxes that serve as contextuality bits exist for a broad class of scenarios. Our results complete a unified resource-theoretic framework for contextuality and Bell nonlocality.

  11. Noncontextual Wirings.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Barbara; Cabello, Adán; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Aolita, Leandro

    2018-03-30

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory necessary for certain models of quantum computation and communication. Serious steps have therefore been taken towards a formal framework for contextuality as an operational resource. However, the main ingredient of a resource theory-a concrete, explicit form of free operations of contextuality-was still missing. Here we provide such a component by introducing noncontextual wirings: a class of contextuality-free operations with a clear operational interpretation and a friendly parametrization. We characterize them completely for general black-box measurement devices with arbitrarily many inputs and outputs. As applications, we show that the relative entropy of contextuality is a contextuality monotone and that maximally contextual boxes that serve as contextuality bits exist for a broad class of scenarios. Our results complete a unified resource-theoretic framework for contextuality and Bell nonlocality.

  12. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  13. Growth of germanium on Au(111): formation of germanene or intermixing of Au and Ge atoms?

    PubMed

    Cantero, Esteban D; Solis, Lara M; Tong, Yongfeng; Fuhr, Javier D; Martiarena, María Luz; Grizzi, Oscar; Sánchez, Esteban A

    2017-07-19

    We studied the growth of Ge layers on Au(111) under ultra-high vacuum conditions from the submonolayer regime up to a few layers with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Direct Recoiling Spectroscopy (DRS) and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). Most STM images for the thicker layers are consistent with a commensurate 5 × 8 arrangement. The high surface sensitivity of TOF-DRS allows us to confirm the coexistence of Au and Ge atoms in the top layer for all stages of growth. An estimation of the Au to Ge ratio at the surface of the thick layer gives about 1 Au atom per 2 Ge ones. When the growth is carried out at sample temperatures higher than about 420 K, a fraction of the deposited Ge atoms migrate into the bulk of Au. This incorporation of Ge into the bulk reduces the growth rate of the Ge films, making it more difficult to obtain films thicker than a few layers. After sputtering the Ge/Au surface, the segregation of bulk Ge atoms to the surface occurs for temperatures ≥600 K. The surface obtained after segregation of Ge reaches a stable condition (saturation) with an n × n symmetry with n on the order of 14.

  14. Direct Imaging of Lipid-Ion Network Formation under Physiological Conditions by Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Higgins, Michael J.; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2007-03-01

    Various metal cations in physiological solutions interact with lipid headgroups in biological membranes, having an impact on their structure and stability, yet little is known about the molecular-scale dynamics of the lipid-ion interactions. Here we directly investigate the extensive lipid-ion interaction networks and their transient formation between headgroups in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer under physiological conditions. The spatial distribution of ion occupancy is imaged in real space by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution.

  15. The formation of molecules in interstellar clouds from singly and multiply ionized atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The suggestion is considered that multiply ionized atoms produced by K- and L-shell X-ray ionization and cosmic-ray ionization can undergo ion-molecule reactions and also initiate molecule production. The role of X-rays in molecule production in general is discussed, and the contribution to molecule production of the C(+) radiative association with hydrogen is examined. Such gas-phase reactions of singly and multiply ionized atoms are used to calculate molecular abundances of carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-bearing species. The column densities of the molecules are evaluated on the basis of a modified version of previously developed isobaric cloud models. It is found that reactions of multiply ionized carbon with H2 can contribute a significant fraction of the observed CH in diffuse interstellar clouds in the presence of diffuse X-ray structures or discrete X-ray sources and that substantial amounts of CH(+) can be produced under certain conditions.

  16. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis by gold supported on reducible oxides has been extensively studied, yet issues such as the nature of the catalytic site and the role of the reducible support remain fiercely debated topics. Here we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of an unprecedented dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism for the oxidation of carbon monoxide by ceria-supported gold clusters. The reported dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism results from the ability of the gold cation to strongly couple with the redox properties of the ceria in a synergistic manner, thereby lowering the energy of redox reactions. The gold cation can break away from the gold nanoparticle to catalyse carbon monoxide oxidation, adjacent to the metal/oxide interface and subsequently reintegrate back into the nanoparticle after the reaction is completed. Our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in catalysis. PMID:25735407

  17. Effect of solute atom concentration on vacancy cluster formation in neutron-irradiated Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koichi; Itoh, Daiki; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Xu, Qiu; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Toyama, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The dependence of microstructural evolution on solute atom concentration in Ni alloys was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. The positron annihilation lifetimes in pure Ni, Ni-0.05 at.%Si, Ni-0.05 at.%Sn, Ni-Cu, and Ni-Ge alloys were about 400 ps even at a low irradiation dose of 3 × 10 -4 dpa, indicating the presence of microvoids in these alloys. The size of vacancy clusters in Ni-Si and Ni-Sn alloys decreased with an increase in the solute atom concentration at irradiation doses less than 0.1 dpa; vacancy clusters started to grow at an irradiation dose of about 0.1 dpa. In Ni-2 at.%Si, irradiation-induced segregation was detected by positron annihilation coincidence Doppler broadening measurements. This segregation suppressed one-dimensional (1-D) motion of the interstitial clusters and promoted mutual annihilation of point defects. The frequency and mean free path of the 1-D motion depended on the solute atom concentration and the amount of segregation.

  18. Carbon Displacement-Induced Single Carbon Atomic Chain Formation and its Effects on Sliding of SiC Fibers in SiC/graphene/SiC Composite

    DOE PAGES

    Wallace, Joseph B.; Chen, Di; Shao, Lin

    2015-11-03

    Understanding radiation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC composites is important to their application in advanced reactor designs. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we found that due to strong interface bonding between the graphene layers and SiC, the sliding friction of SiC fibers is largely determined by the frictional behavior between graphene layers. Upon sliding, carbon displacements between graphene layers can act as seed atoms to induce the formation of single carbon atomic chains (SCACs) by pulling carbon atoms from the neighboring graphene planes. The formation, growth, and breaking of SCACs determine the frictional response to irradiation.

  19. Windows: Life after Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Although wired glass is extremely common in school buildings, the International Building Code adopted new standards that eliminate the use of traditional wired glass in K-12 schools, daycare centers, and athletic facilities. Wired glass breaks easily, and the wires can cause significant injuries by forming dangerous snags when the glass breaks.…

  20. In vitro corrosion characteristics of commercially available orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Yasuyuki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Iijima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroki; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2004-06-01

    The corrosion characteristics of orthodontic alloy wires were investigated both in as-received and grinded conditions in 0.9% NaCl solution by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The amount of each metal ion released from most alloys was larger for the grinded wires than for the as-received wires (p<0.01). The fact that the beta-Ti alloy wire (Ti-Mo-Zr) does not contain allergenic metals such as Ni, Co, and Cr, and the finding that resistance to both general and localized corrosion is the highest among the six wires investigated suggest that this wire is the most biocompatible orthodontic wire. Since a small amount of Ni, Cr or Co ions were released from Ni-Ti, Co-Cr and stainless steel wires, special attention should be paid during their clinical use for patients with allergic tendencies.

  1. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se; Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H.

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitivemore » technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.« less

  2. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. In this paper, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with themore » IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe 2O 3)-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Finally, tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.« less

  3. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan; ...

    2017-06-20

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. In this paper, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with themore » IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe 2O 3)-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Finally, tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.« less

  4. ATom observations of new particle formation in the tropical upper troposphere. The role of convection and nucleation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupc, A.; Williamson, C.; Hodshire, A. L.; Pierce, J. R.; Ray, E. A.; Froyd, K. D.; Richardson, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Dollner, M.; Erdesz, F.; Bui, T. V.; Diskin, G. S.; Brock, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Measurements of size distributions during the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) reveal high number concentrations (>>1000 cm-3) of nucleation mode particles at high altitudes in the tropics and subtropics under low condensation sink conditions and are associated with upwelling in convective clouds. The broad spatial extent of these newly formed particles shows that the upper free troposphere (FT) of the tropics and subtropics is a globally significant source. In this study, we investigate the link between convection and new particle formation (NPF) by exploring the processes that govern NPF and growth in the tropical and subtropical FT of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. We use measurements of the size distributions made with a suite of fast-response instruments on board of a NASA DC-8 aircraft during ATom mission. ATom maps the remote atmosphere over the Pacific and Atlantic basins ( 80 °N and 65 °S) in continuous ascents and descents (0.2 and 13 km), providing the latitudinal and vertical information on the greenhouse gases, reactive and tracer species and aerosol properties and their seasonal variability. We couple measurements of size distributions between 0.003 and 4.8 µm and potential aerosol precursor vapors measured on ATom (August 2016 and February 2017) with calculated air mass back trajectories and the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) box model. The back trajectories identify air masses potentially influenced by recent convection. We then use TOMAS to model particle nucleation, condensation and coagulation along that trajectory to investigate the link between convection and NPF. Through TOMAS, we explore the influence of different nucleation mechanisms (such as binary, ternary or the one with organics) and gas-phase aerosol precursors (such as sulfur dioxide) on observed particle size distributions. We discuss similarities and differences in NPF over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and their relationship to convection, examine particle

  5. Atomic-scale study of stacking faults in Zr hydrides and implications on hydride formation.

    PubMed

    Besson, Remy; Thuinet, L; Louchez, Marc-Antoine

    2018-06-25

    We performed atomic-scale ab initio calculations to investigate the stacking fault (SF) properties of the metastable zeta-Zr2H zirconium hydride. The effect of H near the SF was found to entail the existence of negative SF energies, showing that the zeta compound is probably unstable with respect to shearing in the basal plane. The effect of temperature on SFs was investigated by means of free energy calculations in the quasiharmonic approximation. This evidenced unexpectedly large temperature effects, confirming the main conclusions drawn at 0 K, in particular the zeta mechanical instability. The complex behaviour of H atoms during the shear process suggested zeta-hcp --> Zr2H[111]-fcc as a plausible shear path leading to an fcc compound with same composition as zeta. Finally, as shown by an analysis based on microelasticity, this Zr2H[111]-fcc intermediate compound may be relevant for better interpreting the currently intricate issue of hydride habit planes in zirconium. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of biofilm formation among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from clinical specimens, an Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM) study.

    PubMed

    Bazari, Pelin Aslani Menareh; Honarmand Jahromy, Sahar; Zare Karizi, Shohreh

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial infections. Biofilm formation is an important factor for bacterial pathogenesis. Its mechanisms are complex and include of many genes depends on expression of icaADBC operon involved in the synthesis of a polysaccharide intercellular adhesion. The aim of study was to investigate biofilm forming ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Also Atomic Force microscope (AFM) was used to visualize biofilm formation. 140 Isolates were collected from clinical specimens of patients in Milad Hospital, Tehran and diagnosed by biochemical tests. The ability of strains to produce slime was evaluated by CRA method. For diagnosing of bacterial EPS, Indian ink staining were used and finally biofilm surface of 3 isolates observed by AFM. The prevalence of icaA and icaD genes was determined by PCR. By CRA method 15% of samples considered as positive slime producers, 44.28% as intermediate and 40.71% indicative as negative slime producers. 118 staphylococcus aureus strains showed a distinct halo transparent zone but 22 strains showed no halo zone. AFM analysis of Slime positive isolates showed a distinct and complete biofilm formation. In slime negative strain, there was not observed biofilm. The prevalence of icaA, icaD genes was 44.2% and 10% of the isolates had both genes simultaneously. There is a relationship between exopolysaccharide layer and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The presence of icaAD genes among isolates is not associated with in vitro formation of biofilm. AFM is a useful tool for observation of bacterial biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Femtosecond laser patterning, synthesis, defect formation, and structural modification of atomic layered materials

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Eunpa; Hwang, David J.

    2016-12-06

    This article summarizes recent research on laser-based processing of twodimensional (2D) atomic layered materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Ultrafast lasers offer unique processing routes that take advantage of distinct interaction mechanisms with 2D materials to enable extremely localized energy deposition. Experiments have shown that ablative direct patterning of graphene by ultrafast lasers can achieve resolutions of tens of nanometers, as well as single-step pattern transfer. Ultrafast lasers also induce non-thermal excitation mechanisms that are useful for the thinning of TMDCs to tune the 2D material bandgap. Laser-assisted site-specific doping was recently demonstrated where ultrafast laser radiation undermore » ambient air environment could be used for the direct writing of high-quality graphene patterns on insulating substrates. This article concludes with an outlook towards developing further advanced laser processing with scalability, in situ monitoring strategies and potential applications.« less

  8. Formation and disruption of current paths of anodic porous alumina films by conducting atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyoshi, K.; Nigo, S.; Inoue, J.; Sakai, O.; Kitazawa, H.; Kido, G.

    2010-11-01

    Anodic porous alumina (APA) films have a honeycomb cell structure of pores and a voltage-induced bi-stable switching effect. We have applied conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a method to form and to disrupt current paths in the APA films. A bi-polar switching operation was confirmed. We have firstly observed terminals of current paths as spots or areas typically on the center of the triangle formed by three pores. In addition, though a part of the current path showed repetitive switching, most of them were not observed again at the same position after one cycle of switching operations in the present experiments. This suggests that a part of alumina structure and/or composition along the current paths is modified during the switching operations.

  9. Pump-probe study of the formation of rubidium molecules by ultrafast photoassociation of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, David J.; England, Duncan G.; Martay, Hugo E. L.; Friedman, Melissa E.; Petrovic, Jovana; Dimova, Emiliya; Chatel, Béatrice; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2009-09-01

    An experimental pump-probe study of the photoassociative creation of translationally ultracold rubidium molecules is presented together with numerical simulations of the process. The formation of loosely bound excited-state dimers is observed as a first step toward a fully coherent pump-dump approach to the stabilization of Rb2 into its lowest ground vibrational states. The population that contributes to the pump-probe process is characterized and found to be distinct from a background population of preassociated molecules.

  10. Role of Acoustoelectric Interaction in the Formation of Nanoscale Periodic Structures of Adsorbed Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Peleshchak, R. M., E-mail: peleshchak@rambler.ru; Lazurchak, I. I.; Kuzyk, O. V.

    The role of acoustoelectric effects in the formation of nanoscale structures of adatoms, resulting from the self-consistent interaction of adatoms with a surface acoustic wave and the electronic subsystem, is studied for the case of charged and uncharged adatoms. It is shown that an increase in the doping level of a semiconductor with donor impurities at a fixed average adatom concentration results in an increase in the critical temperature below which self-organization processes occur.

  11. Using Nested Contractions and a Hierarchical Tensor Format To Compute Vibrational Spectra of Molecules with Seven Atoms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Phillip S; Carrington, Tucker

    2015-12-31

    We propose a method for solving the vibrational Schrödinger equation with which one can compute hundreds of energy levels of seven-atom molecules using at most a few gigabytes of memory. It uses nested contractions in conjunction with the reduced-rank block power method (RRBPM) described in J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 140, 174111. Successive basis contractions are organized into a tree, the nodes of which are associated with eigenfunctions of reduced-dimension Hamiltonians. The RRBPM is used recursively to compute eigenfunctions of nodes in bases of products of reduced-dimension eigenfunctions of nodes with fewer coordinates. The corresponding vectors are tensors in what is called CP-format. The final wave functions are therefore represented in a hierarchical CP-format. Computational efficiency and accuracy are significantly improved by representing the Hamiltonian in the same hierarchical format as the wave function. We demonstrate that with this hierarchical RRBPM it is possible to compute energy levels of a 64-D coupled-oscillator model Hamiltonian and also of acetonitrile (CH3CN) and ethylene oxide (C2H4O), for which we use quartic potentials. The most accurate acetonitrile calculation uses 139 MB of memory and takes 3.2 h on a single processor. The most accurate ethylene oxide calculation uses 6.1 GB of memory and takes 14 d on 63 processors. The hierarchical RRBPM shatters the memory barrier that impedes the calculation of vibrational spectra.

  12. Formation of Triboelectric Series via Atomic-Level Surface Functionalization for Triboelectric Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Ho; Bae, Young Eun; Moon, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jungkil; Choi, Suk-Ho; Kim, Yongho; Yoon, Hyo Jae; Lee, Min Hyung; Nah, Junghyo

    2017-06-27

    Triboelectric charging involves frictional contact of two different materials, and their contact electrification usually relies on polarity difference in the triboelectric series. This limits the choices of materials for triboelectric contact pairs, hindering research and development of energy harvest devices utilizing triboelectric effect. A progressive approach to resolve this issue involves modification of chemical structures of materials for effectively engineering their triboelectric properties. Here, we describe a facile method to change triboelectric property of a polymeric surface via atomic-level chemical functionalizations using a series of halogens and amines, which allows a wide spectrum of triboelectric series over single material. Using this method, tunable triboelectric output power density is demonstrated in triboelectric generators. Furthermore, molecular-scale calculation using density functional theory unveils that electrons transferred through electrification are occupying the PET group rather than the surface functional group. The work introduced here would open the ability to tune triboelectric property of materials by chemical modification of surface and facilitate the development of energy harvesting devices and sensors exploiting triboelectric effect.

  13. Wire Test Grip Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Wire-testing issues, such as the gripping strains imposed on the wire, play a critical role in obtaining clean data. In a standard test frame fitted with flat wedge grips, the gripping action alone creates stresses on the wire specimen that cause the wire to fail at the grip location. A new test frame, which is outfitted with a vacuum chamber, negated the use of any conventional commercially available wire test fixtures, as only 7 in. (17.8 cm) existed between the grip faces. An innovative grip fixture was designed to test thin gauge wire for a variety of applications in an existing Instron test frame outfitted with a vacuum chamber.

  14. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-09-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H f L of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity ( ϕ L) and bonding electron density ( n b L ). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n b L , together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H f L for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  15. Atomic insights into nanoparticle formation of hydroxyfluorinated anatase featuring titanium vacancies

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; ...

    2016-06-28

    Anatase TiO 2 with exposed highly reactive (001) surface is commonly prepared using solution-based synthesis in the presence of a fluorinating agent acting as a structure directing agent. Here, the solvothermal reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide in the presence of aqueous HF has resulted in the stabilization of an oxyhydroxyfluorinated anatase phase featuring cationic vacancies. In the present work, we have studied its formation mechanism, revealing a solid-state transformation of a highly defective anatase phase having a hydroxyfluoride composition that subsequently evolves through an oxolation reaction into an oxyhydroxyfluoride phase. Importantly, this work confirms that titanium alkoxide precursors can react withmore » HF via a fluorolysis process yielding fluorinated molecular precursors, which further condense to produce new composition and structural features deviating from a well ordered anatase network.« less

  16. Atomic structure of water/Au, Ag, Cu and Pt atomic junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-08

    Much progress has been made in understanding the transport properties of atomic-scale conductors. We prepared atomic-scale metal contacts of Cu, Ag, Au and Pt using a mechanically controllable break junction method at 10 K in a cryogenic vacuum. Water molecules were exposed to the metal atomic contacts and the effect of molecular adsorption was investigated by electronic conductance measurements. Statistical analysis of the electronic conductance showed that the water molecule(s) interacted with the surface of the inert Au contact and the reactive Cu ant Pt contacts, where molecular adsorption decreased the electronic conductance. A clear conductance signature of water adsorption was not apparent at the Ag contact. Detailed analysis of the conductance behaviour during a contact-stretching process indicated that metal atomic wires were formed for the Au and Pt contacts. The formation of an Au atomic wire consisting of low coordination number atoms leads to increased reactivity of the inert Au surface towards the adsorption of water.

  17. Investigation of Kp- and Kd-atom formation and their collisional processes with hydrogen and deuterium targets by the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Raeisi, G. M.; Department of Physics, Shahrekord University, Shahrekord 115; Kalantari, S. Z.

    The classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method has been used to study the capture of negative kaons by hydrogen and deuterium atoms; subsequently, the elastic scattering, Stark mixing, and Coulomb deexcitation cross sections of Kp and Kd atoms have been determined. The results for kaonic atom formation confirm the initial conditions that have been parametrically applied by most atomic cascade models. Our results show that Coulomb deexcitation in Kp and Kd atoms with {Delta}n>1 is important in addition to n=1. We have shown that the contribution of molecular structure effects to the cross sections of the collisional processes is larger than themore » isotopic effects of the targets. We have also compared our results with the semiclassical approaches.« less

  18. The role of phase separation for self-organized surface pattern formation by ion beam erosion and metal atom co-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäss, H.; Zhang, K.; Pape, A.; Bobes, O.; Brötzmann, M.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the ripple pattern formation on Si surfaces at room temperature during normal incidence ion beam erosion under simultaneous deposition of different metallic co-deposited surfactant atoms. The co-deposition of small amounts of metallic atoms, in particular Fe and Mo, is known to have a tremendous impact on the evolution of nanoscale surface patterns on Si. In previous work on ion erosion of Si during co-deposition of Fe atoms, we proposed that chemical interactions between Fe and Si atoms of the steady-state mixed Fe x Si surface layer formed during ion beam erosion is a dominant driving force for self-organized pattern formation. In particular, we provided experimental evidence for the formation of amorphous iron disilicide. To confirm and generalize such chemical effects on the pattern formation, in particular the tendency for phase separation, we have now irradiated Si surfaces with normal incidence 5 keV Xe ions under simultaneous gracing incidence co-deposition of Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, W, Pt, and Au surfactant atoms. The selected metals in the two groups (Fe, Ni, Cu) and (W, Pt, Au) are very similar regarding their collision cascade behavior, but strongly differ regarding their tendency to silicide formation. We find pronounced ripple pattern formation only for those co deposited metals (Fe, Mo, Ni, W, and Pt), which are prone to the formation of mono and disilicides. In contrast, for Cu and Au co-deposition the surface remains very flat, even after irradiation at high ion fluence. Because of the very different behavior of Cu compared to Fe, Ni and Au compared to W, Pt, phase separation toward amorphous metal silicide phases is seen as the relevant process for the pattern formation on Si in the case of Fe, Mo, Ni, W, and Pt co-deposition.

  19. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1999-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 degree C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire (2) bundle of 15 or more wires (3) 70 C environment (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  20. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire; (2) bundle of 15 or more wires; (3) 70 C environment: and (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  1. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: 3.7 amps per wire, bundle of 15 or more wires, 70 C environment, and vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  2. Wire harness twisting aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, E. J.; Commadore, C. C.; Ingles, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Long wire bundles twist into uniform spiral harnesses with help of simple apparatus. Wires pass through spacers and through hand-held tool with hole for each wire. Ends are attached to low speed bench motor. As motor turns, operator moves hand tool away forming smooth twists in wires between motor and tool. Technique produces harnesses that generate less radio-frequency interference than do irregularly twisted cables.

  3. Visualization of the evolution of charged droplet formation and jet transition in electrostatic atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Yuanping, E-mail: huoyuanping@gmail.com; Wang, Junfeng, E-mail: wangjunfeng@ujs.edu.cn; Zuo, Ziwen

    2015-11-15

    A detailed experimental study on the evolution of charged droplet formation and jet transition from a capillary is reported. By means of high-speed microscopy, special attention has been paid to the dynamics of the liquid thread and satellite droplets in the dripping mode, and a method for calculating the surface charge on the satellite droplet is proposed. Jet transition behavior based on the electric Bond number has been visualized, droplet sizes and velocities are measured to obtain the ejection characteristic of the spray plume, and the charge and hydrodynamic relaxation are linked to give explanations for ejection dynamics with differentmore » properties. The results show that the relative length is very sensitive to the hydrodynamic relaxation time. The magnitude of the electric field strength dominates the behavior of coalescence and noncoalescence, with the charge relationship between the satellite droplet and the main droplet being clear for every noncoalescence movement. Ejection mode transitions mainly depend on the magnitude of the electric Bond number, and the meniscus dynamics is determined by the ratio of the charge relaxation time to the hydrodynamic relaxation time.« less

  4. Imaging initial formation processes of nanobubbles at the graphite-water interface through high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hsien-Shun; Yang, Chih-Wen; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Hwu, En-Te; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2018-03-01

    The initial formation process of nanobubbles at solid-water interfaces remains unclear because of the limitations of current imaging techniques. To directly observe the formation process, an astigmatic high-speed atomic force microscope (AFM) was modified to enable imaging in the liquid environment. By using a customized cantilever holder, the resonance of small cantilevers was effectively enhanced in water. The proposed high-speed imaging technique yielded highly dynamic quasi-two-dimensional (2D) gas structures (thickness: 20-30 nm) initially at the graphite-water interface. The 2D structures were laterally mobile mainly within certain areas, but occasionally a gas structure might extensively migrate and settle in a new area. The 2D structures were often confined by substrate step edges in one lateral dimension. Eventually, all quasi-2D gas structures were transformed into cap-shaped nanobubbles of higher heights and reduced lateral dimensions. These nanobubbles were immobile and remained stable under continuous AFM imaging. This study demonstrated that nanobubbles could be stably imaged at a scan rate of 100 lines per second (640 μm/s).

  5. Spectroscopy of Pionic Atoms in 122Sn (d, 3He) Reaction and Angular Dependence of the Formation Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, T.; Itahashi, K.; Berg, G. P. A.; Fujioka, H.; Fukuda, N.; Fukunishi, N.; Geissel, H.; Hayano, R. S.; Hirenzaki, S.; Ichikawa, K.; Ikeno, N.; Inabe, N.; Itoh, S.; Iwasaki, M.; Kameda, D.; Kawase, S.; Kubo, T.; Kusaka, K.; Matsubara, H.; Michimasa, S.; Miki, K.; Mishima, G.; Miya, H.; Nagahiro, H.; Nakamura, M.; Noji, S.; Okochi, K.; Ota, S.; Sakamoto, N.; Suzuki, K.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Todoroki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Uesaka, T.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Weick, H.; Yamakami, H.; Yoshida, K.; piAF Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    We observed the atomic 1 s and 2 p states of π- bound to 121Sn nuclei as distinct peak structures in the missing mass spectra of the 122Sn(d ,3He) nuclear reaction. A very intense deuteron beam and a spectrometer with a large angular acceptance let us achieve a potential of discovery, which includes the capability of determining the angle-dependent cross sections with high statistics. The 2 p state in a Sn nucleus was observed for the first time. The binding energies and widths of the pionic states are determined and found to be consistent with previous experimental results of other Sn isotopes. The spectrum is measured at finite reaction angles for the first time. The formation cross sections at the reaction angles between 0° and 2° are determined. The observed reaction-angle dependence of each state is reproduced by theoretical calculations. However, the quantitative comparison with our high-precision data reveals a significant discrepancy between the measured and calculated formation cross sections of the pionic 1 s state.

  6. Solar Power Wires Based on Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michael R.; Eckert, Robert D.; Forberich, Karen; Dennler, Gilles; Brabec, Christoph J.; Gaudiana, Russell A.

    2009-04-01

    Organic photovoltaics in a flexible wire format has potential advantages that are described in this paper. A wire format requires long-distance transport of current that can be achieved only with conventional metals, thus eliminating the use of transparent oxide semiconductors. A phase-separated, photovoltaic layer, comprising a conducting polymer and a fullerene derivative, is coated onto a thin metal wire. A second wire, coated with a silver film, serving as the counter electrode, is wrapped around the first wire. Both wires are encased in a transparent polymer cladding. Incident light is focused by the cladding onto to the photovoltaic layer even when it is completely shadowed by the counter electrode. Efficiency values of the wires range from 2.79% to 3.27%.

  7. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S., E-mail: vlebedev@sci.lebedev.ru

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n andmore » for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.« less

  8. Kirschner wire bending.

    PubMed

    Firoozabadi, Reza; Kramer, Patricia A; Benirschke, Stephen K

    2013-11-01

    Although Kirschner wires are useful implants in many situations, migration of the wire and irritation of the surrounding soft tissues are common complications. Seven steps are described herein, which result in a Kirschner wire that is bent 180° angle, providing a smooth anchor into bone. Use of this technique produces implants that provide stable fixation with few soft tissue complications.

  9. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  10. Central Doping of a Foreign Atom into the Silver Cluster for Catalytic Conversion of CO2 toward C-C Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Chai, Xiaoqi; Cai, Xiao; Chen, Mingyang; Jin, Rongchao; Ding, Weiping; Zhu, Yan

    2018-06-19

    Clusters with an exact number of atoms are of particular research interest in catalysis. Their catalytic behaviors can be potentially altered with the addition or removal of a single atom. Herein we explore the effects of the single-foreign-atom (Au, Pd and Pt) doping into the core of an Ag cluster with 25-atoms on the catalytic properties, where the foreign atom is protected by 24 Ag atoms (i.e., Au@Ag24, Pd@Ag24, and Pt@Ag24). The central doping of a single atom into the Ag25 cluster is found to have a substantial influence on the catalytic performance in the carboxylation reaction of CO2 with terminal alkyne through C-C bond formation to produce propiolic acid. Our studies reveal that the catalytic properties of the cluster catalysts can be dramatically changed with the subtle alteration by a single atom away from the active sites. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program were to investigate the effects of atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and AO with UV synergistic effects on wire insulation materials. The AO exposure was on the order of 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm and the vacuum UV radiation was on the order of 10,000 ESH. The results of these tests are presented in this document

  12. Influence of average ion energy and atomic oxygen flux per Si atom on the formation of silicon oxide permeation barrier coatings on PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitschker, F.; Wißing, J.; Hoppe, Ch; de los Arcos, T.; Grundmeier, G.; Awakowicz, P.

    2018-04-01

    The respective effect of average incorporated ion energy and impinging atomic oxygen flux on the deposition of silicon oxide (SiO x ) barrier coatings for polymers is studied in a microwave driven low pressure discharge with additional variable RF bias. Under consideration of plasma parameters, bias voltage, film density, chemical composition and particle fluxes, both are determined relative to the effective flux of Si atoms contributing to film growth. Subsequently, a correlation with barrier performance and chemical structure is achieved by measuring the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) and by performing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is observed that an increase in incorporated energy to 160 eV per deposited Si atom result in an enhanced cross-linking of the SiO x network and, therefore, an improved barrier performance by almost two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, independently increasing the number of oxygen atoms to 10 500 per deposited Si atom also lead to a comparable barrier improvement by an enhanced cross-linking.

  13. Spectroscopy of a plasma formed in the vicinity of implosion of the shock wave generated by underwater electrical explosion of spherical wire array

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, O.; Efimov, S.; Gurovich, V. Tz.

    The results of visible spectroscopy of the plasma formed inside a copper capillary placed at the equatorial plane of an underwater electrically exploded spherical wire array (30 mm in diameter; 40 wires, each of 100 μm in diameter) are reported. In the experiments, a pulsed power generator with current amplitude of ∼300 kA and rise time of ∼1.1 μs was used to produce wire array explosion accompanied by the formation of a converging strong shock wave. The data obtained support the assumption of uniformity of the shock wave along the main path of its convergence. The spectroscopic measurements show that this rather simple methodmore » of formation of a converging strong shock wave can be used successfully for studying the shock wave's interaction with matter and the evaporation processes of atoms from a target.« less

  14. H-atom addition and abstraction reactions in mixed CO, H2CO and CH3OH ices - an extended view on complex organic molecule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-01-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been observed not only in the hot cores surrounding low- and high-mass protostars, but also in cold dark clouds. Therefore, it is interesting to understand how such species can be formed without the presence of embedded energy sources. We present new laboratory experiments on the low-temperature solid state formation of three complex molecules - methyl formate (HC(O)OCH3), glycolaldehyde (HC(O)CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (H2C(OH)CH2OH) - through recombination of free radicals formed via H-atom addition and abstraction reactions at different stages in the CO→H2CO→CH3OH hydrogenation network at 15 K. The experiments extend previous CO hydrogenation studies and aim at resembling the physical-chemical conditions typical of the CO freeze-out stage in dark molecular clouds, when H2CO and CH3OH form by recombination of accreting CO molecules and H-atoms on ice grains. We confirm that H2CO, once formed through CO hydrogenation, not only yields CH3OH through ongoing H-atom addition reactions, but is also subject to H-atom-induced abstraction reactions, yielding CO again. In a similar way, H2CO is also formed in abstraction reactions involving CH3OH. The dominant methanol H-atom abstraction product is expected to be CH2OH, while H-atom additions to H2CO should at least partially proceed through CH3O intermediate radicals. The occurrence of H-atom abstraction reactions in ice mantles leads to more reactive intermediates (HCO, CH3O and CH2OH) than previously thought, when assuming sequential H-atom addition reactions only. This enhances the probability to form COMs through radical-radical recombination without the need of UV photolysis or cosmic rays as external triggers.

  15. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Douberly, Gary E.; Miller, Roger E.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic “3+1” clusters, which are ~5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenchingmore » the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.« less

  16. HIGH STAR FORMATION RATES IN TURBULENT ATOMIC-DOMINATED GAS IN THE INTERACTING GALAXIES IC 2163 AND NGC 2207

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Kaufman, Michele; Bournaud, Frédéric

    CO observations of the interacting galaxies IC 2163 and NGC 2207 are combined with HI, H α , and 24 μ m observations to study the star formation rate (SFR) surface density as a function of the gas surface density. More than half of the high-SFR regions are HI dominated. When compared to other galaxies, these HI-dominated regions have excess SFRs relative to their molecular gas surface densities but normal SFRs relative to their total gas surface densities. The HI-dominated regions are mostly located in the outer part of NGC 2207 where the HI velocity dispersion is high, 40–50 kmmore » s{sup −1}. We suggest that the star-forming clouds in these regions have envelopes at lower densities than normal, making them predominantly atomic, and cores at higher densities than normal because of the high turbulent Mach numbers. This is consistent with theoretical predictions of a flattening in the density probability distribution function for compressive, high Mach number turbulence.« less

  17. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare...

  19. Thin wire pointing method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, G.; Mattauch, R. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for forming sharp tips on thin wires, in particular phosphor bronze wires of diameters such as one-thousandth inch used to contact micron size Schottky barrier diodes, which enables close control of tip shape and which avoids the use of highly toxic solutions. The method includes dipping an end of a phosphor bronze wire into a dilute solution of sulfamic acid and applying a current through the wire to electrochemically etch it. The humidity in the room is controlled to a level of less than 50%, and the voltage applied between the wire and another electrode in the solutions is a half wave rectified voltage. The current through the wire is monitored, and the process is stopped when the current falls to a predetermined low level.

  20. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  1. Wire-inhomogeneity detector

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, G.H.; Smits, R.G.; Eberhard, P.H.

    1982-08-31

    A device for uncovering imperfections in electrical conducting wire, particularly superconducting wire, by detecting variations in eddy currents. Eddy currents effect the magnetic field in a gap of an inductor, contained in a modified commercial ferrite core, through which the wire being tested is passed. A small increase or decrease in the amount of conductive material, such as copper, in a fixed cross section of wire will unbalance a bridge used to measure the impedance of the inductor, tripping a detector and sounding an alarm.

  2. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface is disclosed. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest. 4 figs.

  3. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    PubMed

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media.

  4. Self-assembly of tin wires via phase transformation of heteroepitaxial germanium-tin on germanium substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Lingzi; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org

    This work demonstrates and describes for the first time an unusual strain-relaxation mechanism by the formation and self-assembly of well-ordered tin wires during the thermal annealing of epitaxial Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}-on-Ge(001) substrate. Fully strained germanium-tin alloys (Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}) were epitaxially grown on Ge(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The morphological and compositional evolution of Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} during thermal annealing is studied by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy. Under certain annealing conditions, the Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} layer decomposes into two stable phases, and well-defined Sn wires that are preferentially oriented along two orthogonal 〈100〉 azimuths aremore » formed. The formation of the Sn wires is related to the annealing temperature and the Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} thickness, and can be explained by the nucleation of a grain with Sn islands on the outer front, followed by grain boundary migration. The Sn wire formation process is found to be thermally activated, and an activation enthalpy (E{sub c}) of 0.41 eV is extracted. This thermally activated phase transformation, i.e., 2D epitaxial layer to 3D wires, occurs via a mechanism akin to “cellular precipitation.” This synthesis route of Sn wires opens new possibilities for creation of nanoscale patterns at high-throughput without the need for lithography.« less

  5. Investigation about the Chrome Steel Wire Arc Spray Process and the Resulting Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilden, J.; Bergmann, J. P.; Jahn, S.; Knapp, S.; van Rodijnen, F.; Fischer, G.

    2007-12-01

    Nowadays, wire-arc spraying of chromium steel has gained an important market share for corrosion and wear protection applications. However, detailed studies are the basis for further process optimization. In order to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the effects of the spray parameters DoE-based experiments had been carried out with high-speed camera shoots. In this article, the effects of spray current, voltage, and atomizing gas pressure on the particle jet properties, mean particle velocity and mean particle temperature and plume width on X46Cr13 wire are presented using an online process monitoring device. Moreover, the properties of the coatings concerning the morphology, composition and phase formation were subject of the investigations using SEM, EDX, and XRD-analysis. These deep investigations allow a defined verification of the influence of process parameters on spray plume and coating properties and are the basis for further process optimization.

  6. The formation of diethyl ether via the reaction of iodoethane with atomic oxygen on the Ag(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. Scott; Barteau, Mark A.; Vohs, John M.

    1999-01-01

    The reactions of iodoethane (ICH 2CH 3) on clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces were investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Iodoethane adsorbs dissociatively at 150 K to produce surface ethyl groups on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces. The ethyl species couple to form butane on both surfaces, with the desorption peak maximum located between 218 and 238 K, depending on the ethyl coverage. In addition to butane, a number of oxidation products including diethyl ether, ethanol, acetaldehyde, surface acetate, ethylene, carbon dioxide and water were formed on the oxygen-dosed Ag(110) surface. Diethyl ether was the major oxygenate produced at all ethyl:oxygen ratios, and the peak temperature for ether evolution varied from 220 to 266 K depending on the relative coverages of these reactants. The total combustion products, CO 2 and H 2O, were primarily formed at low ethyl coverages in the presence of excess oxygen. The formation of ethylene near 240 K probably involves an oxygen-assisted dehydrogenation pathway since ethylene is not formed from ethyl groups on the clean surface. Acetaldehyde and ethanol evolve coincidentally with a peak centered at 270-280 K, and are attributed to the reactions of surface ethoxide species. The surface acetate which decomposes near 620 K is formed from subsequent reactions of acetaldehyde with oxygen atoms. The addition of ethyl to oxygen to form surface ethoxides was verified by HREELS results. The yields of all products exhibited a strong dependence on the relative coverages of ethyl and oxygen.

  7. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  8. High-resolution AFM structure of DNA G-wires in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bose, Krishnashish; Lech, Christopher J; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2018-05-17

    We investigate the self-assembly of short pieces of the Tetrahymena telomeric DNA sequence d[G 4 T 2 G 4 ] in physiologically relevant aqueous solution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Wire-like structures (G-wires) of 3.0 nm height with well-defined surface periodic features were observed. Analysis of high-resolution AFM images allowed their classification based on the periodicity of these features. A major species is identified with periodic features of 4.3 nm displaying left-handed ridges or zigzag features on the molecular surface. A minor species shows primarily left-handed periodic features of 2.2 nm. In addition to 4.3 and 2.2 nm ridges, background features with periodicity of 0.9 nm are also observed. Using molecular modeling and simulation, we identify a molecular structure that can explain both the periodicity and handedness of the major G-wire species. Our results demonstrate the potential structural diversity of G-wire formation and provide valuable insight into the structure of higher-order intermolecular G-quadruplexes. Our results also demonstrate how AFM can be combined with simulation to gain insight into biomolecular structure.

  9. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  10. Formation of the low-resistivity compound Cu{sub 3}Ge by low-temperature treatment in an atomic hydrogen flux

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, E. V., E-mail: erofeev@micran.ru; Kazimirov, A. I.; Fedin, I. V.

    The systematic features of the formation of the low-resistivity compound Cu{sub 3}Ge by low-temperature treatment of a Cu/Ge two-layer system in an atomic hydrogen flux are studied. The Cu/Ge two-layer system is deposited onto an i-GaAs substrate. Treatment of the Cu/Ge/i-GaAs system, in which the layer thicknesses are, correspondingly, 122 and 78 nm, in atomic hydrogen with a flux density of 10{sup 15} at cm{sup 2} s{sup –1} for 2.5–10 min at room temperature induces the interdiffusion of Cu and Ge, with the formation of a polycrystalline film containing the stoichiometric Cu{sub 3}Ge phase. The film consists of vertically orientedmore » grains 100–150 nm in size and exhibits a minimum resistivity of 4.5 µΩ cm. Variations in the time of treatment of the Cu/Ge/i-GaAs samples in atomic hydrogen affect the Cu and Ge depth distribution, the phase composition of the films, and their resistivity. Experimental observation of the synthesis of the Cu{sub 3}Ge compound at room temperature suggests that treatment in atomic hydrogen has a stimulating effect on both the diffusion of Cu and Ge and the chemical reaction of Cu{sub 3}Ge-compound formation. These processes can be activated by the energy released upon the recombination of hydrogen atoms adsorbed at the surface of the Cu/Ge/i-GaAs sample.« less

  11. International space station wire program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd

    1995-01-01

    Hardware provider wire systems and current wire insulation issues for the International Space Station (ISS) program are discussed in this viewgraph presentation. Wire insulation issues include silicone wire contamination, Tefzel cold temperature flexibility, and Russian polyimide wire insulation. ISS is a complex program with hardware developed and managed by many countries and hundreds of contractors. Most of the obvious wire insulation issues are known by contractors and have been precluded by proper selection.

  12. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  13. Body of Knowledge (BOK) for Copper Wire Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutkowski, E.; Sampson, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper wire bonds have replaced gold wire bonds in the majority of commercial semiconductor devices for the latest technology nodes. Although economics has been the driving mechanism to lower semiconductor packaging costs for a savings of about 20% by replacing gold wire bonds with copper, copper also has materials property advantages over gold. When compared to gold, copper has approximately: 25% lower electrical resistivity, 30% higher thermal conductivity, 75% higher tensile strength and 45% higher modulus of elasticity. Copper wire bonds on aluminum bond pads are also more mechanically robust over time and elevated temperature due to the slower intermetallic formation rate - approximately 1/100th that of the gold to aluminum intermetallic formation rate. However, there are significant tradeoffs with copper wire bonding - copper has twice the hardness of gold which results in a narrower bonding manufacturing process window and requires that the semiconductor companies design more mechanically rigid bonding pads to prevent cratering to both the bond pad and underlying chip structure. Furthermore, copper is significantly more prone to corrosion issues. The semiconductor packaging industry has responded to this corrosion concern by creating a palladium coated copper bonding wire, which is more corrosion resistant than pure copper bonding wire. Also, the selection of the device molding compound is critical because use of environmentally friendly green compounds can result in internal CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) mismatches with the copper wire bonds that can eventually lead to device failures during thermal cycling. Despite the difficult problems associated with the changeover to copper bonding wire, there are billions of copper wire bonded devices delivered annually to customers. It is noteworthy that Texas Instruments announced in October of 2014 that they are shipping microcircuits containing copper wire bonds for safety critical automotive applications

  14. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce3+ upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce(3+), while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  15. Effect of gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms on chemical bonding: A proposed mechanism for the formation of crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    Using first principle calculations, we study the atomic arrangement and bonding mechanism in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). It is found that the stability of GST depends on the gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms. The configurations with different concentration of Ge/Sb in layers have been analyzed by the partial density of state, electron localization function and Bader charge distribution. The s and p-states of Ge atom alter with different stacking configurations but there is no change in Sb and Te atom states. Our findings show that the bonding between Ge-Te is not only responsible for the stability of GST alloy but can also predict which composition can show generic features of phase change material. As the number of Ge atoms near to vacancy layer decreases, Ge donates more charge. A growth model has been proposed for the formation of crystalline phase which justifies the structure models proposed in the literature.

  16. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-Dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Ooutskirts of Star-Forming Galaxies From z approx. 1 to z approx. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR)efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in damped Ly(alpha) systems (DLAs) at z approx. 3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS)relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z approx. 1, z approx. 2, and z approx. 3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of H I gas at z > 1 is approx. 1%-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift. Our analysis instead suggests that the reduced SFR efficiency is driven by the low molecular content of this atomic-dominated phase, with metallicity playing a secondary effect in regulating the conversion between atomic and molecular gas. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between the observed SFR efficiency and that observed in local atomic-dominated gas, such as in the outskirts of local spiral galaxies and local dwarf galaxies.

  17. Next Generation Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Petro; Jolley, Scott; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Vinje, Rubiela; Williams, Martha; Clayton, LaNetra; Roberson, Luke; Smith, Trent; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    Wiring is a major operational component on aerospace hardware that accounts for substantial weight and volumetric space. Over time wire insulation can age and fail, often leading to catastrophic events such as system failure or fire. The next generation of wiring must be reliable and sustainable over long periods of time. These features will be achieved by the development of a wire insulation capable of autonomous self-healing that mitigates failure before it reaches a catastrophic level. In order to develop a self-healing insulation material, three steps must occur. First, methods of bonding similar materials must be developed that are capable of being initiated autonomously. This process will lead to the development of a manual repair system for polyimide wire insulation. Second, ways to initiate these bonding methods that lead to materials that are similar to the primary insulation must be developed. Finally, steps one and two must be integrated to produce a material that has no residues from the process that degrades the insulating properties of the final repaired insulation. The self-healing technology, teamed with the ability to identify and locate damage, will greatly improve reliability and safety of electrical wiring of critical systems. This paper will address these topics, discuss the results of preliminary testing, and remaining development issues related to self-healing wire insulation.

  18. Radiation from mixed multi-planar wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.

    2014-03-15

    The study of radiation from different wire materials in wire array Z-pinch plasma is a very challenging topic because it is almost impossible to separate different plasmas at the stagnation. A new approach is suggested based on planar wire array (PWA) loads to assess this problem. Multi-planar wire arrays are implemented that consist of few planes, each with the same number of wires and masses but from different wire materials, arranged in parallel rows. In particular, the experimental results obtained with triple PWAs (TPWAs) on the UNR Zebra generator are analyzed with Wire Ablation Dynamics Model, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium kineticmore » model, and 2D radiation magneto-hydrodynamic to illustrate this new approach. In TPWAs, two wire planes were from mid-atomic-number wire material and another plane was from alloyed Al, placed either in the middle or at the edge of the TPWA. Spatial and temporal properties of K-shell Al and L-shell Cu radiations were analyzed and compared from these two configurations of TPWAs. Advantages of the new approach are demonstrated and future work is discussed.« less

  19. Lingual straight wire method.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kyoto; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Lombardo, L U C A; Takemoto, Y U I

    2009-12-01

    The mushroom arch-wire is mainly used in lingual orthodontic treatment but the complicated wire bending it requires affects both the treatment results and the time spent at the chair. The author proposes a new lingual straight wire method (LSW) in order to facilitate arch coordination and simplify the mechanics. The attention paid to the set-up model and bracket positioning and bonding plus the use of the new LSW method will also improve patient comfort. Copyright 2009 Collège Européen d'Orthodontie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards plant wires.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    In experimental laboratory studies we evaluate a possibility of making electrical wires from living plants. In scoping experiments we use lettuce seedlings as a prototype model of a plant wire. We approximate an electrical potential transfer function by applying direct current voltage to the lettuce seedlings and recording output voltage. We analyse oscillation frequencies of the output potential and assess noise immunity of the plant wires. Our findings will be used in future designs of self-growing wetware circuits and devices, and integration of plant-based electronic components into future and emergent bio-hybrid systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of vapor emissions at wire explosion thresholda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belony, Paul A.; Kim, Yong W.

    2010-10-01

    X-pinch plasmas have been actively studied in the recent years. Numerical simulation of the ramp-up of metallic vapor emissions from wire specimens shows that under impulsive Ohmic heating the wire core invariably reaches a supercritical state before explosion. The heating rate depends sensitively on the local wire resistance, leading to highly variable vapor emission flux along the wire. To examine the vapor emission process, we have visualized nickel wire explosions by means of shock formation in air. In a single explosion as captured by shadowgraphy, there usually appear several shocks with spherical or cylindrical wave front originating from different parts of the wire. Growth of various shock fronts in time is well characterized by a power-law scaling in one form or another. Continuum emission spectra are obtained and calibrated to measure temperature near the explosion threshold. Shock front structures and vapor plume temperature are examined.

  2. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor); Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  3. Orbiter Kapton wire operational requirements and experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The agenda of this presentation includes the Orbiter wire selection requirements, the Orbiter wire usage, fabrication and test requirements, typical wiring installations, Kapton wire experience, NASA Kapton wire testing, summary, and backup data.

  4. Spectral correlations in Anderson insulating wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, M.; Micklitz, T.

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spectral level-level correlation function of Anderson insulating wires for all three Wigner-Dyson classes. A measurement of its Fourier transform, the spectral form factor, is within reach of state-of-the-art cold atom quantum quench experiments, and we find good agreement with recent numerical simulations of the latter. Our derivation builds on a representation of the level-level correlation function in terms of a local generating function which may prove useful in other contexts.

  5. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  6. Wire-guided sphincterotomy.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S; Uzer, M F; Lehman, G A

    1994-12-01

    Guidewire-assisted techniques have acquired an important role in endoscopic interventions in the pancreaticobiliary tree. The wire-guided sphincterotome allows the endoscopist to maintain direct access to the biliary tree before or after the sphincterotomy. It has the additional advantages of allowing for more expeditious placement of accessories and being useful in combined percutaneous-endoscopic procedures. There are two basic designs of wire-guided sphincterotomes. The single-channel model has a single lumen for both the cutting wire and guidewire and requires guidewire removal before the application of power. The double-channel model has two separate lumens for the guidewire and stainless steel cutting wire. In vitro data suggest that significant capacitive coupling currents (or short circuits) may occur on the standard Teflon-coated guidewire when used with a double lumen sphincterotome, resulting in electrosurgical burns. Thus, the manufacturers of the double-lumen models recommend removing the Teflon-coated wire before performing sphincterotomy. Although limited data in humans have been published, it appears that wire-guided sphincterotomy and standard sphincterotomy have similar complication rates. More safety information in humans is awaited.

  7. Cavitation during wire brushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen

    2016-11-01

    In our daily life, brush is often used to scrub the surface of objects, for example, teeth, pots, shoes, pool, etc. And cleaning rust and stripping paint are accomplished using wire brush. Wire brushes also can be used to clean the teeth for large animals, such as horses, crocodiles. By observing brushing process in water, we capture the cavitation phenomenon on the track of moving brush wire. It shows that the cavitation also can affect the surface. In order to take clear and entire pictures of cavity, a simplified model of one stainless steel wire brushing a boss is adopted in our experiment. A transparent organic tank filled with deionized water is used as a view box. And a high speed video camera is used to record the sequences. In experiment, ambient pressure is atmospheric pressure and deionized water temperature is kept at home temperature. An obvious beautiful flabellate cavity zone appears behind the moving steel wire. The fluctuation of pressure near cavity is recorded by a hydrophone. More movies and pictures are used to show the behaviors of cavitation bubble following a restoring wire. Beautiful tracking cavitation bubble cluster is captured and recorded to show.

  8. Superconducting wire manufactured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuexian; Sun, Yue; Xu, Shiming; Peng, Ying

    1985-10-01

    The MF Nb/Cu Extrusion Tube Method was used to manufacture 3 kg of stable practical MF Nb2Sn composite superconducting wire containing pure Cu(RRR approx. 200)/Ta. The draw state composite wire diameter was 0.56 mm, it contained 11,448 x 2.6 micron Nb core, and the twist distance was 1.5 cm. The composite wire cross-section was pure Cu/Ta/11,448 Nb core/Cu/ 91Sn-Cu; containing 22.8 v. % pure Cu, 13.3 v. % Ta; within the Ta layer to prevent Sn diffusion. The wire was sheathed in nonalkaline glass fiber as an insulating layer. A section of wire weighing 160 g was cut off and coiled it into a small solenoid. After reaction diffusion processing at 675 C/30 and curing by vacuum dipping in paraffin, it was measured in a Nb-Ti backfield of 7.2 T intensity, a current of 129 A was passed through the Nb3Sn solenoid and produced a strength of 2.5 T, the overall magnetic field intensity of the composite magnet reached 9.7 T. At this time, the wire full current density J sub c.w. = 5.2 x 10 to the 4th power A/sq cm; the effective current density J sub c (Nb + Sn - Cu) = 8.2 x 10 to the 4th power A/sq cm.

  9. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  10. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003...

  12. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade.

    PubMed

    Kolmogorov, A; Atoian, G; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Ritter, J; Stupishin, N; Zelenski, A

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H(-) ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  13. Heat treatment effect on the mechanical properties of industrial drawn copper wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beribeche, Abdellatif; Boumerzoug, Zakaria; Ji, Vincent

    2013-12-01

    In this present investigation, the mechanical properties of industrial drawn copper wires have been studied by tensile tests. The effect of prior heat treatments at 500°C on the drawn wires behavior was the main goal of this investigation. We have found that the mechanical behavior of drawn wires depends strongly on those treatments. SEM observations of the wire cross section after tensile tests have shown that the mechanism of rupture was mainly controlled by the void formation.

  14. Metallurgical investigation of wire breakage of tyre bead grade.

    PubMed

    Palit, Piyas; Das, Souvik; Mathur, Jitendra

    2015-10-01

    Tyre bead grade wire is used for tyre making application. The wire is used as reinforcement inside the polymer of tyre. The wire is available in different size/section such as 1.6-0.80 mm thin Cu coated wire. During tyre making operation at tyre manufacturer company, wire failed frequently. In this present study, different broken/defective wire samples were collected from wire mill for detailed investigation of the defect. The natures of the defects were localized and similar in nature. The fracture surface was of finger nail type. Crow feet like defects including button like surface abnormalities were also observed on the broken wire samples. The defect was studied at different directions under microscope. Different advanced metallographic techniques have been used for detail investigation. The analysis revealed that, white layer of surface martensite was formed and it caused the final breakage of wire. In this present study we have also discussed about the possible reason for the formation of such kind of surface martensite (hard-phase).

  15. Low-temperature surface formation of NH3 and HNCO: hydrogenation of nitrogen atoms in CO-rich interstellar ice analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Zhao, D.; Lamberts, T.; Linnartz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state astrochemical reaction pathways have the potential to link the formation of small nitrogen-bearing species, like NH3 and HNCO, and prebiotic molecules, specifically amino acids. To date, the chemical origin of such small nitrogen-containing species is still not well understood, despite the fact that ammonia is an abundant constituent of interstellar ices towards young stellar objects and quiescent molecular clouds. This is mainly because of the lack of dedicated laboratory studies. The aim of this work is to experimentally investigate the formation routes of NH3 and HNCO through non-energetic surface reactions in interstellar ice analogues under fully controlled laboratory conditions and at astrochemically relevant temperatures. This study focuses on the formation of NH3 and HNCO in CO-rich (non-polar) interstellar ices that simulate the CO freeze-out stage in dark interstellar cloud regions, well before thermal and energetic processing start to become relevant. We demonstrate and discuss the surface formation of solid HNCO through the interaction of CO molecules with NH radicals - one of the intermediates in the formation of solid NH3 upon sequential hydrogenation of N atoms. The importance of HNCO for astrobiology is discussed.

  16. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  17. 2. TYPICAL OVERHEAD WIRE CONSTRUCTION CURVE GUY WIRE ARRANGEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. TYPICAL OVERHEAD WIRE CONSTRUCTION - CURVE GUY WIRE ARRANGEMENT (ABANDONED WEST LEG OF WYE AT SIXTH AVENUE AND PINE STREET) - Yakima Valley Transportation Company Interurban Railroad, Trackage, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  18. Very strong Rydberg atom scattering in K(12p)-CH3NO2 collisions: Role of transient ion pair formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M.; Buathong, S.; Dunning, F. B.

    2017-05-01

    Collisions between K(12p) Rydberg atoms and CH3NO2 target molecules are studied. Whereas CH3NO2 can form long-lived valence-bound CH3NO2-ions, the data provide no evidence for production of long-lived K+⋯ CH3NO2 - ion pair states. Rather, the data show that collisions result in unusually strong Rydberg atom scattering. This behavior is attributed to ion-ion scattering resulting from formation of transient ion pair states through transitions between the covalent K(12p) + CH3NO2 and ionic K+ + (dipole bound) CH3NO2-terms in the quasimolecule formed during collisions. The ion-pair states are destroyed through rapid dissociation of the CH3NO2 - ions induced by the field of the K+ core ion, the detached electron remaining bound to the K+ ion in a Rydberg state. Analysis of the experimental data shows that ion pair lifetimes ≳10 ps are sufficient to account for the present observations. The present results are consistent with recent theoretical predictions that Rydberg collisions with CH3NO2 will result in strong collisional quenching. The work highlights a new mechanism for Rydberg atom scattering that could be important for collisions with other polar targets. For purposes of comparison, results obtained following K(12p)-SF6 collisions are also included.

  19. Parametric Study of Amorphous High-Entropy Alloys formation from two New Perspectives: Atomic Radius Modification and Crystalline Structure of Alloying Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Guo, S.; Wang, J. M.; Yan, Y. H.; Chen, S. S.; Lu, D. P.; Liu, K. M.; Zou, J. Z.; Zeng, X. R.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical and topological parameters have been widely used for predicting the phase selection in high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Nevertheless, previous studies could be faulted due to the small number of available data points, the negligence of kinetic effects, and the insensitivity to small compositional changes. Here in this work, 92 TiZrHfM, TiZrHfMM, TiZrHfMMM (M = Fe, Cr, V, Nb, Al, Ag, Cu, Ni) HEAs were prepared by melt spinning, to build a reliable and sufficiently large material database to inspect the robustness of previously established parameters. Modification of atomic radii by considering the change of local electronic environment in alloys, was critically found out to be superior in distinguishing the formation of amorphous and crystalline alloys, when compared to using atomic radii of pure elements in topological parameters. Moreover, crystal structures of alloying element were found to play an important role in the amorphous phase formation, which was then attributed to how alloying hexagonal-close-packed elements and face-centered-cubic or body-centered-cubic elements can affect the mixing enthalpy. Findings from this work not only provide parametric studies for HEAs with new and important perspectives, but also reveal possibly a hidden connection among some important concepts in various fields.

  20. Ripple formation on atomically flat cleaved Si surface with roughness of 0.038 nm rms by low-energy Ar{sup 1+} ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pahlovy, Shahjada A.; Mahmud, S. F.; Yanagimoto, K.

    The authors have conducted research regarding ripple formation on an atomically flat cleaved Si surface by low-energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. The cleaved atomically flat and smooth plane of a Si wafer was obtained by cutting vertically against the orientation of a Si (100) wafer. Next, the cleaved surface was sputtered by a 1 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at ion-incidence angles of 0 deg., 60 deg., 70 deg., and 80 deg. The results confirm the successful ripple formation at ion-incidence angles of 60 deg. - 80 deg. and that the wavelength of the ripples increases with the increase ofmore » the ion-incidence angle, as well as the inverse of ion doses. The direction of the ripple also changes from perpendicular to parallel to the projection of the ion-beam direction along the surface with the increasing ion-incidence angle. The authors have also observed the dose effects on surface roughness of cleaved Si surface at the ion-incidence angle of 60 deg., where the surface roughness increases with the increased ion dose. Finally, to understand the roughening mechanism, the authors studied the scaling behavior, measured the roughness exponent {alpha}, and compared the evolution of scaling regimes with Cuerno's one-dimensional simulation results.« less

  1. One hundred angstrom niobium wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, H. E.; Rose, R. M.; Wulff, J.

    1968-01-01

    Composite of fine niobium wires in copper is used to study the size and proximity effects of a superconductor in a normal matrix. The niobium rod was drawn to a 100 angstrom diameter wire on a copper tubing.

  2. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  3. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  4. Wired vs. Wireless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Randall

    2000-01-01

    Presents a debate on which technology will be in tomorrow's classrooms and the pros and cons of wiring classrooms and using a wireless network. Concluding comments address the likelihood, and desirability, of placing computers throughout the entire educational process and what types of computers and capabilities are needed. (GR)

  5. A World without Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    The wireless bandwagon is rolling across Mississippi, picking up a fresh load of converts and turning calamity into opportunity. Traditional wired school networks, many of which unraveled during Hurricane Katrina, are giving way to advanced wireless mesh networks that frequently include voice-over-IP (VoIP) capabilities. Vendor funding is helping…

  6. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  7. Reliable Wiring Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    New harness for electrical wiring includes plugs that do not loosen from vibration. Ground braids prevented from detaching from connectors and constrained so braids do not open into swollen "birdcage" sections. Spring of stainless steel encircles ground braid. Self-locking connector contains ratchet not only preventing connector from opening, but tightens when vibrated.

  8. Hopkins installs wire harnesses

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-24

    ISS038-E-008291 (24 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, installs wire harnesses in the International Space Station?s Harmony node to support the installation of Ethernet video cables for the station?s local area network. These new cables will provide Ethernet connectivity to the visiting vehicles that dock to Harmony?s Earth-facing port.

  9. Residential Wiring. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist teachers conducting a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in the residential wiring trade. Included in the guide are six instructional units and the following sections of information for teachers: guidelines in using the unit components; academic and workplace skills classifications and…

  10. One-wire thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Staimach, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Nickel alloy/constantan device accurately measures surface temperature at precise locations. Device is moderate in cost and simplifies fabrication of highly-instrumented seamless-surface heat-transfer models. Device also applies to metal surfaces if constantan wire has insulative coat.

  11. Easily-wired toggle switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. T.; Stringer, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Crimp-type connectors reduce assembly and disassembly time. With design, no switch preparation is necessary and socket contracts are crimped to wires inserted in module attached to back of toggle switch engaging pins inside module to make electrical connections. Wires are easily removed with standard detachment tool. Design can accommodate wires of any gage and as many terminals can be placed on switch as wire gage and switch dimensions will allow.

  12. Wire EDM for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellars, G. R.; Harris, F. E.; Lowell, C. E.; Pollman, W. M.; Rys, V. J.; Wills, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce fabrication time and costs, Wire Electrical Discharge Machine (Wire EDM) method was investigated as tool for fabricating matched blade roots and disk slots. Eight high-strength nickel-base superalloys were used. Computer-controlled Wire EDM technique provided high quality surfaces with excellent dimensional tolerances. Wire EDM method offers potential for substantial reductions in fabrication costs for "hard to machine" alloys and electrically conductive materials in specific high-precision applications.

  13. Computer simulation of metal wire explosion under high rate heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolnikov, K. P.; Kryzhevich, D. S.; Korchuganov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Synchronous electric explosion of metal wires and synthesis of bicomponent nanoparticles were investigated on the base of molecular dynamics method. Copper and nickel nanosized crystallites of cylindrical shape were chosen as conductors for explosion. The embedded atom approximation was used for calculation of the interatomic interactions. The agglomeration process after explosion metal wires was the main mechanism for particle synthesis. The distribution of chemical elements was non-uniform over the cross section of the bicomponent particles. The copper concentration in the surface region was higher than in the bulk of the synthesized particle. By varying the loading parameters (heating temperature, the distance between the wires) one can control the size and internal structure of the synthesized bicomponent nanoparticles. The obtained results showed that the method of molecular dynamics can be effectively used to determine the optimal technological mode of nanoparticle synthesis on the base of electric explosion of metal wires.

  14. Atomic force microscopic study of step bunching and macrostep formation during the growth of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwal, K.; Torrent-Burgues, J.; Sanz, F.; Gorostiza, P.

    1997-02-01

    The experimental results of the formation of step bunches and macrosteps on the {100} face of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate crystals grown from aqueous solutions at different supersaturations studied by using atomic force microscopy are described and discussed. It was observed that (1) the step height does not remain constant with increasing time but fluctuates within a particular range of heights, which depends on the region of step bunches, (2) the maximum height and the slope of bunched steps increases with growth time as well as supersaturation used for growth, and that (3) the slope of steps of relatively small heights is usually low with a value of about 8° and does not depend on the region of formation of step bunches, but the slope of steps of large heights is up to 21°. Analysis of the experimental results showed that (1) at a particular value of supersaturation the ratio of the average step height to the average step spacing is a constant, suggesting that growth of the {100} face of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate crystals occurs by direct integration of growth entities to growth steps, and that (2) the formation of step bunches and macrosteps follows the dynamic theory of faceting, advanced by Vlachos et al.

  15. Assembly of streptolysin O pores assessed by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy provides evidence for the formation of anchored but incomplete oligomers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Michael E; Paintavigna, Stefania; Tabor, Rico F; Martin, Lisandra L; Bird, Phillip I

    2015-01-01

    Streptolysin O (SLO) is a bacterial pore forming protein that is part of the cholesterol dependent cytolysin (CDC) family. We have used quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to examine SLO membrane binding and pore formation. In this system, SLO binds tightly to cholesterol-containing membranes, and assembles into partial and complete pores confirmed by atomic force microscopy. SLO binds to the lipid bilayer at a single rate consistent with the Langmuir isotherm model of adsorption. Changes in dissipation illustrate that SLO alters the viscoelastic properties of the bilayer during pore formation, but there is no loss of material from the bilayer as reported for small membrane-penetrating peptides. SLO mutants were used to further dissect the assembly and insertion processes by QCM-D. This shows the signature of SLO in QCM-D changes when pore formation is inhibited, and that bound and inserted SLO forms can be distinguished. Furthermore a pre-pore locked SLO mutant binds reversibly to lipid, suggesting that the partially complete wtSLO forms observed by AFM are anchored to the membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetics of solvent supported tubule formation of Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) wax on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) investigated by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Kerstin; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Wandelt, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The time dependence of the formation of lotus wax tubules after recrystallization from various chloroform-based solutions on an HOPG surface at room temperature was studied by atomic force microscopy (magnetic AC mode) taking series of consecutive images of the formation process. The growth of the tubules oriented in an upright fashion follows a sequential rodlet→ring→tubule behavior. The influence of a number of factors, e.g., different wax concentration in chloroform, the additional presence of water, or salts [(NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3] or a mixture of salt/water in the solution on the growth rate and orientation of the tubules is also investigated. Different wax concentrations were found to have no effect on the growth rate or the orientation of tubules in none of the solutions. The presence of water, however, considerably increased the growth rate of tubule formation, while the presence of salt was again found to have no effect on growth rate or orientation of tubules. PMID:29515959

  17. Implosion dynamics and radiative properties of W planar wire arrays influenced by Al wires on University of Michigan's LTD generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Shrestha, I. K.; Butcher, C. J.; Stafford, A.; Campbell, P. C.; Miller, S.; Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Jordan, N. M.; McBride, R. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2017-10-01

    The results of new experiments with W Double Planar Wire Arrays (DPWA) at the University of Michigan's Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) generator are presented that are of particular importance for future work with wire arrays on 40-60 MA LTDs at SNL. A diagnostic set similar to the previous campaigns comprised filtered x-ray diodes, a Faraday cup, x-ray spectrometers and pinhole cameras, but had an ultra-fast 12-frame self-emission imaging system. Implosion and radiative characteristics of two DPWAs of the same mass (60 μg/cm) and geometry (two planes with 8 wires each at the distance of 6 mm and an inter-wire gap of 0.7 mm) with one plane of W wires and another either of W wires (1) or of Al wires (2) were compared in detail. The substantial differences between two cases are observed: 1) precursor formation and intense hard x-ray characteristic emission of W (``cold'' L lines) caused by electron beams; 2) no precursor, standing shocks at the W plane side that lasted up to a hundred of ns, fast ablation and implosion of Al wires, and suppression of hard x-ray ``cold'' L lines of W. In addition, the evolution of self-emission in a broad period of time up to 400 ns is analyzed for the first time. Research supported by NNSA under DOE Grant DE-NA0003047.

  18. Impact tensile testing of wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The test consists of fixing one end of a wire specimen and allowing a threaded falling weight to strike the other. Assuming the dynamic stress in the wire to be a function only of its strain, energy considerations show for negligible wire inertia effects that the governing dynamic stress-strain law can be determined directly from impact energy vs. wire elongation data. Theoretical calculations are presented which show negligible wire inertia effects for ratios of wire mass to striking mass of the order of .01 or less. The test method is applied to soft copper wires and the dynamic stress-strain curve so determined is found to be about 30 percent higher than the corresponding static curve.

  19. A novel pre-surgical maxillary orthodontic device using β-titanium wire for wide unilateral cleft lip and palate patients: preliminary study of its efficacy and impact for the maxillary formation.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Maki; Oyama, Tomoki; Kiya, Koichiro; Sone, Yumiko; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Ko

    2014-02-01

    For patients with a wide, complete, unilateral cleft lip and palate, pre-surgical maxillary orthodontic treatments have been used to reduce the alveolar gap before cheiloplasty. However, most of these treatments are complicated and laborious for patients and for medical professionals. Thus, we developed an original pre-surgical orthodontic device made with two separate acrylic resin plates connected with a spring-shaped β-titanium wire (β-TW). When the device was applied on the palate, each segment of the maxilla was automatically aligned for our target formation with the elastic force of β-titanium alloy. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the new device and the size of the maxilla in comparison with the conventional Hotz procedures. A total of 47 patients with a wide unilateral cleft lip and palate were retrospectively evaluated; 33 patients were treated with our new device (β-TW plate group) and 14 were treated with a Hotz plate (HP group). We evaluated the alveolar gap reduction and the size of the maxilla between the two groups, obtaining intraoral maxillary impressions at birth, at 3 months and 1 year. The width of the alveolar gap in the β-TW plate group was significantly reduced compared with that in the HP group 1 month after the treatment (p < 0.001). The alveolar gap reduction continued until the age of 1 year (p = 0.02). By contrast, no significant difference in the maxillary size was observed between the two groups at any examination period. Our treatment protocol using the β-TW plate was not only easy and simple to apply but it was also cost-effective, with highly predictable outcomes. Moreover, it provided the ideal alveolar cleft reduction without detrimental collapse of the alveolar segments. Therefore, we consider our β-TW plate device to be useful for application in pre-surgical orthodontic treatments. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  1. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using ammonium reineckate ion-pair complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Gamal H.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2004-03-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric, conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of norfloxacin (NRF), ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and enrofloxacin (ENF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone in the range 5.0-65, 4.0-48, 5.0-56 and 6.0-72 μg ml -1 of NRF, CPF, OFL and ENF, respectively. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. The results obtained showed good recoveries of 99.15±1.15, 99.30±1.40, 99.60±1.50, and 99.00±1.25% with relative standard deviations of 0.81, 1.06, 0.97, and 0.69% for NRF, CPF, OFL, and ENF, respectively. Applications of the proposed methods to representative pharmaceutical formulations are successfully presented.

  2. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  3. Wire insulation defect detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Wiring defects are located by detecting a reflected signal that is developed when an arc occurs through the defect to a nearby ground. The time between the generation of the signal and the return of the reflected signal provides an indication of the distance of the arc (and therefore the defect) from the signal source. To ensure arcing, a signal is repeated at gradually increasing voltages while the wire being tested and a nearby ground are immersed in a conductive medium. In order to ensure that the arcing occurs at an identifiable time, the signal whose reflection is to be detected is always made to reach the highest potential yet seen by the system.

  4. Wiring for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, J. L., Jr.; Dickman, J. E.; Bercaw, R. W.; Myers, I. T.; Hammoud, A. N.; Stavnes, M.; Evans, J.

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize the current state of knowledge of arc propagation in aerospace power wiring and efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) towards the understanding of the arc tracking phenomena in space environments. Recommendations will be made for additional testing. A database of the performance of commonly used insulating materials will be developed to support the design of advanced high power missions, such as Space Station Freedom and Lunar/Mars Exploration.

  5. Wiring for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. L., Jr.; Dickman, J. E.; Bercaw, R. W.; Myers, I. T.; Hammoud, A. N.; Stavnes, M.; Evans, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize the current state of knowledge of arc propagation in aerospace power wiring and efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) towards the understanding of the arc tracking phenomena in space environments. Recommendations will be made for additional testing. A database of the performance of commonly used insulating materials will be developed to support the design of advanced high power missions, such as Space Station Freedom and Lunar/Mars Exploration.

  6. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  7. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  8. Relationship between population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state and oligomer formation times of peptides: Insights from all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hoang Bao; Kouza, Maksim; Zung, Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2010-04-01

    Despite much progress in understanding the aggregation process of biomolecules, the factors that govern its rates have not been fully understood. This problem is of particular importance since many conformational diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, and type-II diabetes are associated with the protein oligomerization. Having performed all-atom simulations with explicit water and various force fields for two short peptides KFFE and NNQQ, we show that their oligomer formation times are strongly correlated with the population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state. The larger the population the faster the aggregation process. Our result not only suggests that this quantity plays a key role in the self-assembly of polypeptide chains but also opens a new way to understand the fibrillogenesis of biomolecules at the monomeric level. The nature of oligomer ordering of NNQQ is studied in detail.

  9. Reaction of Methyl Fluoroformyl Peroxycarbonate (FC(O)OOC(O)OCH3) with Cl Atoms: Formation of Hydro-ChloroFluoro-Peroxides.

    PubMed

    Berasategui, Matias; Argüello, Gustavo A; Burgos Paci, Maxi A

    2017-10-12

    The products following Cl atom initiated reactions of FC(O)OOC(O)OCH 3 in 50-760 Torr of N 2 at 296 K were investigated using FTIR. Reaction of Cl atoms with methyl fluoroformyl peroxycarbonate proceeds mainly via attack at the methyl group, forming FC(O)OOC(O)OCH 2 • radicals. Further reaction of this kind of radical with Cl 2 forms three new compounds: FC(O)OOC(O)OCH 2 Cl, FC(O)OOC(O)OCHCl 2 , and FC(O)OOC(O)OCCl 3 , whose existence was characterized experimentally by FTIR spectroscopy assisted by ab initio calculations at the B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level. Relative rate techniques were used to measure k (Cl+FC(O)OOC(O)OCH3) = (4.0 ± 0.4) × 10 -14 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and k (Cl+FC(O)OOC(O)OCH2Cl) = (3.2 ± 0.3) × 10 -14 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . When the reaction is run in the presence of oxygen, the paths giving chlorinated peroxide formation are suppressed, and oxidation to (mainly) CO 2 and HCl takes place through highly oxidized intermediates with lifetimes long enough to be detected by FTIR spectroscopy.

  10. Formation routes and structural details of the CaF1 layer on Si(111) from high-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahe, Philipp; Smith, Emily F.; Wollschläger, Joachim; Moriarty, Philip J.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the CaF1/Si (111 ) interface using a combination of high-resolution scanning tunneling and noncontact atomic force microscopy operated at cryogenic temperature as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Submonolayer CaF1 films grown at substrate temperatures between 550 and 600 ∘C on Si (111 ) surfaces reveal the existence of two island types that are distinguished by their edge topology, nucleation position, measured height, and inner defect structure. Our data suggest a growth model where the two island types are the result of two reaction pathways during CaF1 interface formation. A key difference between these two pathways is identified to arise from the excess species during the growth process, which can be either fluorine or silicon. Structural details as a result of this difference are identified by means of high-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy and add insights into the growth mode of this heteroepitaxial insulator-on-semiconductor system.

  11. Material and biofilm load of K wires in toe surgery: titanium versus stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Martin; Graf, Susanne; Gersbach, Silke; Hintermann, Beat; Ilchmann, Thomas; Knupp, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Recurrence rates for toe deformity correction are high and primarily are attributable to scar contractures. These contractures may result from subclinical infection. We hypothesized that (1) recurrence of toe deformities and residual pain are related to low-grade infections from biofilm formation on percutaneous K wires, (2) biofilm formation is lower on titanium (Ti) K wires compared with stainless steel (SS) K wires, and (3) clinical outcome is superior with the use of Ti K wires compared with SS K wires. In this prospective nonrandomized, comparative study, we investigated 135 lesser toe deformities (61 patients; 49 women; mean ± SD age, 60 ± 15 years) temporarily fixed with K wires between August 2010 and March 2011 (81 SS, 54 Ti). K wires were removed after 6 weeks. The presence of biofilm-related infections was analyzed by sonication. High bacterial loads (> 500 colony-forming units [CFU]/mL) were detected on all six toes requiring revision before 6 months. Increased bacterial load was associated with pain and swelling but not recurrence of the deformity. More SS K wires had greater than 100 CFU/mL bacteria than Ti K wires. For K wires with a bacterial count greater than 100 CFU/mL, toes with Ti K wires had a lower recurrence rate, less pain, and less swelling than toes with SS K wires. Ti K wires showed superior clinical outcomes to SS K wires. This appears to be attributable to reduced infection rates. Although additional study is needed, we currently recommend the use of Ti K wires for the transfixation of toe deformities. Level II, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  12. Topography and transport properties of oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecular wires studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Geetha R.; Fan, Wendy; Koehne, Jessica; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Conjugated phenylene(ethynylene) molecular wires are of interest as potential candidates for molecular electronic devices. Scanning tunneling microscopic study of the topography and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of self-assembled monolayers of two types of molecular wires are presented here. The study shows that the topography and I-Vs, for small scan voltages, of the two wires are quite similar and that the electronic and structural changes introduced by the substitution of an electronegative N atom in the central phenyl ring of these wires does not significantly alter the self-assembly or the transport properties.

  13. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOEpatents

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  14. Manually Operated Welding Wire Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A manual welding wire feeder apparatus comprising a bendable elongate metal frame with a feed roller mounted at the center thereof for rotation about an axis transverse to the longitudinal axis of the frame. The frame ends are turned up as tabs and each provided with openings in alignment with each other and the mid-width center of the roller surface. The tab openings are sized to accommodate welding wire and each extends to a side edge of the tab, both opening on the same side of the frame, whereby welding wire can be side-loaded onto the frame. On the side of the frame, opposite the roller a lock ring handle is attached tangentially and is rotatable about the attachment point and an axis perpendicular to the frame. The device is grasped in the hand normally used to hold the wire. A finger is placed through the loop ring and the frame positioned across the palm and lower fingers. The thumb is positioned atop the wire so it can be moved from the back of the frame across the roller, and towards the front. In doing so, the wire is advanced at a steady rate in axial alignment with the tab openings and roller. To accommodate different wire diameters the frame is bendable about its center in the plane of the frame axis and wire so as to keep the wire in sufficient tension against the roller and to keep the wire fixed when the frame is tilted and thumb pressure released.

  15. Comparative range of orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Ingram, S B; Gipe, D P; Smith, R J

    1986-10-01

    ADA specification No. 32 for determining the range (elastic limit) of orthodontic wires uses the bending of a wire section treated as a cantilever beam. An alternative method for defining the range of orthodontic wires proposed by Waters (1981) is to wrap wire sections around mandrels of varying diameters and measure the deformation imparted after unwrapping. Four brass mandrels with a total of 46 test diameters ranging from 3.5 to 60.0 mm were used in this study. Wire sections 9 cm in length were rolled on the mandrel with a hand lathe. The mandrel cross section required to produce a predetermined amount of deformation (2 mm arc height for a 5 cm chord) was defined as the yield diameter for that particular wire. No individual wire was tested twice so as to avoid introduction of strain history. Test samples of 488 different orthodontic wires supplied by nine commercial distributors were evaluated (a total of 4,747 samples). Stainless steel wires of identical dimensions had a large variation in range, depending on the state of strain hardening and heat treatment. For example, 0.020 inch round wire had yield diameters ranging from 22.8 mm for Australian special plus orange (TP Laboratories) to 42.9 mm for Nubryte gold (G.A.C. International). Chromium cobalt wires had less range than stainless steel before heat treatment, but increased greatly in range after heat treatment. Nitinol (Unitek) had the greatest range of all wires tested (yield diameter of 8.7 mm for 0.016 inch Nitinol). Multistranded stainless steel wires had yield diameters between 9.0 and 14.0 mm.

  16. Interfacial Microstructure and Its Influence on Resistivity of Thin Layers Copper Cladding Steel Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongjuan; Ding, Zhimin; Zhao, Ruirong

    2018-04-01

    The interfacial microstructure and resistivity of cold-drawn and annealed thin layers copper cladding steel (CCS) wires have been systematically investigated by the methods of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and resistivity testing. The results showed that the Cu and Fe atoms near interface diffused into each other matrixes. The Fe atoms diffused into Cu matrixes and formed a solid solution. The mechanism of solid solution is of substitution type. When the quantity of Fe atoms exceeds the maximum solubility, the supersaturated solid solution would form Fe clusters and decompose into base Cu and α-Fe precipitated phases under certain conditions. A few of α-Fe precipitates was observed in the copper near Cu/Fe interfaces of cold-drawn CCS wires, with 1-5 nm in size. A number of α-Fe precipitates of 1-20 nm in size can be detected in copper near Cu/Fe interfaces of CCS wires annealed at 850°C. When annealing temperature was less than 750°C, the resistivity of CCS wires annealed was lower than that of cold-drawn CCS wires. However, when annealing temperature was above 750°C, the resistivity of CCS wires was greater than that of cold-drawn CCS wires and increased with rising the annealing temperature. The relationship between nanoscale α-Fe precipitation and resistivity of CCS wires has been well discussed.

  17. Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Renjie; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Mook, William M.; ...

    2017-03-23

    In the alloyed and compound contacts between metal and semiconductor transistor channels we see that they enable self-aligned gate processes which play a significant role in transistor scaling. At nanoscale dimensions and for nanowire channels, prior experiments focused on reactions along the channel length, but the early stage of reaction in their cross sections remains unknown. We report on the dynamics of the solid-state reaction between metal (Ni) and semiconductor (In 0.53Ga 0.47As), along the cross-section of nanowires that are 15 nm in width. Unlike planar structures where crystalline nickelide readily forms at conventional, low alloying temperatures, nanowires exhibit amore » solid-state amorphization step that can undergo a crystal regrowth step at elevated temperatures. Here, we capture the layer-by-layer reaction mechanism and growth rate anisotropy using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our kinetic model depicts this new, in-plane contact formation which could pave the way for engineered nanoscale transistors.« less

  18. Metering Wheel-Wire Track Wire Boom Deployment Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granoff, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA MMS Spin Plane Double Probe (SDP) Deployer utilizes a helical path, rotating Metering Wheel and a spring loaded Wire "Holding" Track to pay out a "fixed end" 57 meter x 1.5 mm diameter Wire Boom stored between concentric storage cylinders. Unlike rotating spool type storage devices, the storage cylinders remain stationary, and the boom wire is uncoiled along the length of the cylinder via the rotation of the Metering Wheel. This uncoiling action avoids the need for slip-ring contacts since the ends of the wire can remain stationary. Conventional fixed electrical connectors (Micro-D type) are used to terminate to operational electronics.

  19. Delamination of Pearlitic Steel Wires: The Defining Role of Prior-Drawing Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgaprasad, A.; Giri, S.; Lenka, S.; Sarkar, Sudip Kumar; Biswas, Aniruddha; Kundu, S.; Mishra, S.; Chandra, S.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, I.

    2018-06-01

    This article reports the occasional (< 10 pct of the actual production) delamination of pearlitic wires subjected to a drawing strain of 2.5. The original wire rods which exhibited post-drawing delamination had noticeably lower axial alignment of the pearlite: 22 ± 5 pct vs 34 ± 4 pct in the nondelaminated wires. Although all wires had similar through-thickness texture and stress gradients, delaminated wires had stronger gradients in composition and higher hardness across the ferrite-cementite interface. Carbide dissolution and formation of supersaturated ferrite were clearly correlated with delamination, which could be effectively mitigated by controlled laboratory annealing at 673 K. Direct observations on samples subjected to simple shear revealed significant differences in shear localizations. These were controlled by pearlite morphology and interlamellar spacing. Prior-drawing microstructure of coarse misaligned pearlite thus emerged as a critical factor in the wire drawing-induced delamination of the pearlitic wires.

  20. Evaluation of Pd-Cr Wires for Strain Gage Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Greer, L. C., III; Oberle, L. G.

    1995-01-01

    A newly developed alloy, palladium-13 weight percent chromium (Pd13Cr), was identified by United Technologies Research Center under a NASA contract to be the best material for high temperature strain gage applications. An electrical resistance strain gage that can provide accurate static strain measurement to a temperature higher than that of a commercially available gage is urgently needed in aerospace and aeronautics research. A strain gage made of a 25.4 micron (1 mil) diameter Pd13Cr wire has been recently demonstrated to be usable for static strain measurements to 800 C. This compares to the 400 C temperature limit of the commercially available strain gages. The performance of the Pd-Cr gage, however, strongly depends on the quality of the Pd13Cr wire. Four batches of Pd-Cr wires purchased from three different manufacturers were therefore evaluated to determine the best source of the wire for strain gage applications. The three suppliers were Precious Metal Institute in China, Sigmund Cohn Co., and G & S Titanium, Inc. in the United States. Two batches of wires obtained from Previous Metal Institute in 1987 and 1992, respectively are referred to herein as China87 and China92 wires. The mechanical, chemical and electrical properties of these wires, both as-received and after high temperature exposures at 800 C for 50 hours were analyzed. The elastic modulus and the failure strength of the wires were evaluated using a tensile test machine equipped with a laser speckle strain measurement system. The chemical and microstructural properties of the wires were inspected using a plasma atomic emission spectrometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS). The electrical stability and repeatability of the wires were determined by measuring the electrical resistance of the wires during three thermal cycles to 1000 C and a ten-hour soak at 1000 C. As a result of this study, the wire which has the highest

  1. Relationship between spontaneous γH2AX foci formation and progenitor functions in circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells among atomic-bomb survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Weng, Nan-ping; Young, Lauren F.; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated DNA damage in hematopoietic stem cells is a primary mechanism of aging-associated dysfunction in human hematopoiesis. About 70 years ago, atomic-bomb (A-bomb) radiation induced DNA damage and functional decreases in the hematopoietic system of A-bomb survivors in a radiation dose-dependent manner. The peripheral blood cell populations then recovered to a normal range, but accompanying cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells still remain that bear molecular changes possibly caused by past radiation exposure and aging. In the present study, we evaluated radiation-related changes in the frequency of phosphorylated (Ser-139) H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation in circulating CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34 + Lin−) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) among 226Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. An association between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation in HSPCs and the radiation dose was observed, but the γH2AX foci frequency was not significantly elevated by past radiation. We found a negative correlation between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation and the length of granulocyte telomeres. A negative interaction effect between the radiation dose and the frequency of γH2AX foci was suggested in a proportion of a subset of HSPCs as assessed by the cobblestone area-forming cell assay (CAFC), indicating that the self-renewability of HSPCs may decrease in survivors who were exposed to a higher radiation dose and who had more DNA damage in their HSPCs. Thus, although many years after radiation exposure and with advancing age, the effect of DNA damage on the self-renewability of HSPCs may be modified by A-bomb radiation exposure. PMID:27169377

  2. Investigation of the dipole formation and growth behavior at In2O3|TiO2 heterojunctions using photoemission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Michael; Halpegamage, Sandamali; Batzill, Matthias; Schlaf, Rudy

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses the investigation of the dipole formation at In2O3|TiO2 heterojunctions depending on preparation conditions, i.e., cleaning methods. In2O3 films were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto solvent and in situ cleaned anatase and rutile film substrates. The interface dipole strength and film thickness were evaluated by photoemission spectroscopy. Our results indicate the formation of a large intrinsic and film thickness dependent interface dipole that reaches its maximum strength at monolayer thick ALD films. In addition, it was observed that UV photoelectron spectroscopy measurements introduced UV induced surface hydroxylation, which resulted in dipole potentials of -0.70 eV and -0.50 eV on solvent cleaned anatase and rutile, respectively. The overlayers also introduced small amounts of band bending (˜0.10 eV) at the interfaces. Taking these effects into account, the total dipole strength at monolayer thick In2O3 films was determined to be -0.96 eV for solvent cleaned anatase and rutile and -0.81 eV for in situ cleaned rutile. The deposition of single ALD cycles on differently cleaned rutile substrates resulted in similar work function values, suggesting little influence of the sample preparation method prior to ALD deposition on the dipole formation. This was assigned to the fact that ALD oxides benefit from ambient water related contamination by integrating the molecules into the growing ALD layer. Highest initial growth was observed on solvent cleaned rutile, followed by in-situ cleaned rutile and solvent cleaned anatase. The In2O3 growth converged at 0.3 Å/c past the nucleation regime.

  3. Relationship between spontaneous γH2AX foci formation and progenitor functions in circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells among atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Weng, Nan-Ping; Young, Lauren F; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-05-01

    Accumulated DNA damage in hematopoietic stem cells is a primary mechanism of aging-associated dysfunction in human hematopoiesis. About 70 years ago, atomic-bomb (A-bomb) radiation induced DNA damage and functional decreases in the hematopoietic system of A-bomb survivors in a radiation dose-dependent manner. The peripheral blood cell populations then recovered to a normal range, but accompanying cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells still remain that bear molecular changes possibly caused by past radiation exposure and aging. In the present study, we evaluated radiation-related changes in the frequency of phosphorylated (Ser-139) H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation in circulating CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34+Lin-) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) among 226Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. An association between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation in HSPCs and the radiation dose was observed, but the γH2AX foci frequency was not significantly elevated by past radiation. We found a negative correlation between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation and the length of granulocyte telomeres. A negative interaction effect between the radiation dose and the frequency of γH2AX foci was suggested in a proportion of a subset of HSPCs as assessed by the cobblestone area-forming cell assay (CAFC), indicating that the self-renewability of HSPCs may decrease in survivors who were exposed to a higher radiation dose and who had more DNA damage in their HSPCs. Thus, although many years after radiation exposure and with advancing age, the effect of DNA damage on the self-renewability of HSPCs may be modified by A-bomb radiation exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Twin-Axial Wire Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    12 and 14 can be of differing gauges and can be either stranded or solid. In a prototype, both conductors were made from #22 solid copper wire ...08-2015 Publication Twin-Axial Wire Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L, Bldg 102T...Approved for Public Release Distribution is unlimited Attorney Docket No. 300030 1 of 10 TWIN-AXIAL WIRE ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST

  5. Measuring Inhomogeneities In Thermocouple Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; West, James W.; Crum, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Spools rotated to pull thermocouple wires through liquid nitrogen, while output voltage of thermocouple recorded on strip chart. Wires exposed to severe temperature gradients, amounting to overall change of 200 degrees C, where they enter and leave liquid nitrogen. If wires homogeneous, net output voltage zero. If inhomogeneity passes through liquid-nitrogen/air interface, resulting deviation of output voltage from zero seen immediately on strip chart. If inhomogeneity greater than allowable, reels stopped temporarily so inhomogeneity tagged before wound onto takeup reel.

  6. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  7. Reliability Criteria for Thick Bonding Wire.

    PubMed

    Dagdelen, Turker; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2018-04-17

    Bonding wire is one of the main interconnection techniques. Thick bonding wire is widely used in power modules and other high power applications. This study examined the case for extending the use of traditional thin wire reliability criteria, namely wire flexure and aspect ratio, to thick wires. Eleven aluminum (Al) and aluminum coated copper (CucorAl) wire samples with diameter 300 μm were tested experimentally. The wire response was measured using a novel non-contact method. High fidelity FEM models of the wire were developed and validated. We found that wire flexure is not correlated to its stress state or fatigue life. On the other hand, aspect ratio is a consistent criterion of thick wire fatigue life. Increasing the wire aspect ratio lowers its critical stress and increases its fatigue life. Moreover, we found that CucorAl wire has superior performance and longer fatigue life than Al wire.

  8. Reliability Criteria for Thick Bonding Wire

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    Bonding wire is one of the main interconnection techniques. Thick bonding wire is widely used in power modules and other high power applications. This study examined the case for extending the use of traditional thin wire reliability criteria, namely wire flexure and aspect ratio, to thick wires. Eleven aluminum (Al) and aluminum coated copper (CucorAl) wire samples with diameter 300 μm were tested experimentally. The wire response was measured using a novel non-contact method. High fidelity FEM models of the wire were developed and validated. We found that wire flexure is not correlated to its stress state or fatigue life. On the other hand, aspect ratio is a consistent criterion of thick wire fatigue life. Increasing the wire aspect ratio lowers its critical stress and increases its fatigue life. Moreover, we found that CucorAl wire has superior performance and longer fatigue life than Al wire. PMID:29673194

  9. -X Mixing in T- and V-Shaped Quantum Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Carlo, A.; Pescetelli, S.; Kavokin, A.; Vladimirova, M.; Lugli, P.

    1997-11-01

    We have applied both tight-binding (TB) and multivalley envelope function (MEF) techniques to calculate the electronic states in T- and V-shaped realistic quantum wires taking into account -X mixing in the conduction band. Strong reduction of the electron quantization energy due to the off-resonant -X mixing has been found in all types of quantum wires. This effect appears to be tied to the localization of the electron wave function and to its overlap with atomic layers next to interfaces.

  10. 49 CFR 234.231 - Fouling wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fouling wires. 234.231 Section 234.231..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.231 Fouling wires. Each set of fouling wires in a highway... single duplex wire with single plug acting as fouling wires is prohibited. Existing installations having...

  11. 49 CFR 234.231 - Fouling wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fouling wires. 234.231 Section 234.231..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.231 Fouling wires. Each set of fouling wires in a highway... single duplex wire with single plug acting as fouling wires is prohibited. Existing installations having...

  12. Two-Wire to Four-Wire Audio Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, G. L., Jr; Seale, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    Simple circuit provides interface between normally incompatible voicecommunication lines. Circuit maintains 40 dB of isolation between input and output halves of four-wire line permitting two-wire line to be connected. Balancing potentiometer, Rg, adjusts gain of IC2 to null feed through from input to output. Adjustment is done on workbench just after assembly.

  13. Corrosion of Wires on Wooden Wire-Bound Packaging Crates

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Stan Lebow

    2015-01-01

    Wire-bound packaging crates are used by the US Army to transport materials. Because these crates may be exposed to harsh environments, they are dip-treated with a wood preservative (biocide treatment). For many years, zinc-naphthenate was the most commonly used preservative for these packaging crates and few corrosion problems with the wires were observed. Recently,...

  14. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  15. Unidirectional photonic wire laser

    SciTech Connect

    Khalatpour, Ali; Reno, John L.; Kherani, Nazir P.

    Photonic wire lasers are a new genre of lasers that have a transverse dimension much smaller than the wavelength. Unidirectional emission is highly desirable as most of the laser power will be in the desired direction. Owing to their small lateral dimension relative to the wavelength, however, the mode mostly propagates outside the solid core. Consequently, conventional approaches to attach a highly reflective element to the rear facet, whether a thin film or a distributed Bragg reflector, are not applicable. In this paper, we propose a simple and effective technique to achieve unidirectionality. Terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with distributed feedback (DFB)more » were chosen as the platform of the photonic wire lasers. Unidirectionality is achieved with a power ratio of the forward/backward of about eight, and the power of the forward-emitting laser is increased by a factor of 1.8 compared with a reference bidirectional DFB laser. Finally and furthermore, we achieved a wall plug power efficiency of ~1%.« less

  16. Unidirectional photonic wire laser

    DOE PAGES

    Khalatpour, Ali; Reno, John L.; Kherani, Nazir P.; ...

    2017-08-07

    Photonic wire lasers are a new genre of lasers that have a transverse dimension much smaller than the wavelength. Unidirectional emission is highly desirable as most of the laser power will be in the desired direction. Owing to their small lateral dimension relative to the wavelength, however, the mode mostly propagates outside the solid core. Consequently, conventional approaches to attach a highly reflective element to the rear facet, whether a thin film or a distributed Bragg reflector, are not applicable. In this paper, we propose a simple and effective technique to achieve unidirectionality. Terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with distributed feedback (DFB)more » were chosen as the platform of the photonic wire lasers. Unidirectionality is achieved with a power ratio of the forward/backward of about eight, and the power of the forward-emitting laser is increased by a factor of 1.8 compared with a reference bidirectional DFB laser. Finally and furthermore, we achieved a wall plug power efficiency of ~1%.« less

  17. In situ formation and characterisation of singly ionised atomic europium in rare gas matrices—Luminescence spectroscopy and MP2 calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Owen; Davis, Barry; McCaffrey, John G., E-mail: john.mccaffrey@nuim.ie

    2015-02-07

    Irradiation of atomic europium isolated in the solid rare gases, with low intensity laser excitation of the y{sup 8}P←a{sup 8}S resonance transition at ca. 465 nm, is found to produce singly charged europium cations (Eu{sup +}) in large amounts in xenon and in smaller amounts in argon. Confirmation of the formation of matrix-isolated Eu{sup +} is obtained from characteristic absorption bands in the UV and in the visible spectral regions. The luminescence produced with excitation of the cation bands is presented in greatest detail for Eu/Xe and assigned. Excitation of the 4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2})6p{sub 3/2} absorption bands of Eu{supmore » +} between 390 and 410 nm produces emission which is quite distinct from that resulting from excitation of the 4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2})6p{sub 1/2} absorption (430 to 450 nm) features. The latter consists of narrow, resolved emission bands with Stokes shifts ten times smaller than the former. The observed spectral differences are discussed in relation to the different spatial symmetries of the p{sub 3/2} and p{sub 1/2} orbitals in these j-j coupled (7/2, 3/2){sub J} and the (7/2, 1/2){sub J} levels. Møller-Plesset calculations are conducted to obtain the molecular parameters of the neutral Eu-RG and cationic Eu{sup +}-RG diatomics (RG = Ar, Kr, Xe). From the short bond lengths and the strong binding energies obtained for the Eu{sup +}-RG species, these values suggest the isolation of the ion in small, possibly interstitial sites especially in xenon. In contrast, but consistent with previous work [O. Byrne and J. G. McCaffrey, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 124501 (2011)], the interaction potentials calculated herein for the Eu-RG diatomics suggest that the neutral Eu atom occupies tetra-vacancy (tv) and hexa-vacancy (hv) sites in the solid rare gas hosts. Possible reasons for the facile production of Eu{sup +} in the solid rare gases are discussed. The mechanism proposed is that atomic europium is also acting as an electron

  18. Non-LTE line formation for N: Abundances and stellar parameters. Model atom and first results on BA-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, N.; Butler, K.

    2001-12-01

    A comprehensive model atom for non-LTE line formation calculations for neutral and singly-ionized nitrogen is presented. Highly accurate radiative and collisional atomic data are incorporated, recently determined for astrophysical and fusion research using the R-matrix method in the close-coupling approximation. As a test and first application of the model, nitrogen abundances are determined on the basis of line-blanketed LTE model atmospheres for five stars, the main sequence object Vega (A0 V) and the supergiants eta Leo (A0 Ib), HD 111613 (A2 Iabe), HD 92207 (A0 Iae) and beta Ori (B8 Iae), using high S/N and high-resolution spectra at visual and near-IR wavelengths. The computed non-LTE line profiles fit the observations excellently for a given nitrogen abundance in each object. Moreover, the ionization equilibrium of \\ion{N}{i/ii} proves to be a sensitive temperature indicator for late B-type and early A-type supergiants - even at low metallicities - due to the apparent nitrogen overabundance in these objects. All supergiants within our sample show an enrichment of nitrogen on the order of ~ 0.3-0.6 dex, indicating the mixing of CN-cycled material into atmospheric layers, with the sum of the CNO abundances staying close to solar. This finding is in accordance with recent stellar evolution models accounting for mass-loss and rotation. For Vega, an underabundance of nitrogen by 0.25 dex is found, in good agreement with the similar underabundance of other light elements. The dependence of the non-LTE effects on the atmospheric parameters is discussed with special emphasis on the supergiants where a strong radiation field at low particle densities favours deviations from LTE. Non-LTE effects systematically strengthen the \\ion{N}{i/ii} lines. For some N I lines in supergiants non-LTE abundance corrections in excess of 1 dex are found and they react sensitively to modifications of the collisional excitation data. The influence of microturbulence on the statistical

  19. Effect of heparin and heparan sulphate on open promoter complex formation for a simple tandem gene model using ex situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chammas, Oliver; Bonass, William A; Thomson, Neil H

    2017-05-01

    The influence of heparin and heparan sulphate (HepS) on the appearance and analysis of open promoter complex (RP o ) formation by E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme (σ 70 RNAP) on linear DNA using ex situ imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been investigated. Introducing heparin or HepS into the reaction mix significantly reduces non-specific interactions of the σ 70 RNAP and RNAP after RP o formation allowing for better interpretation of complexes shown within AFM images, particularly on DNA templates containing more than one promoter. Previous expectation was that negatively charged polysaccharides, often used as competitive inhibitors of σRNAP binding and RP o formation, would also inhibit binding of the DNA template to the mica support surface and thereby lower the imaging yield of active RNAP-DNA complexes. We found that the reverse of this was true, and that the yield of RP o formation detected by AFM, for a simple tandem gene model containing two λ PR promoters, increased. Moreover and unexpectedly, HepS was more efficient than heparin, with both of them having a dispersive effect on the sample, minimising unwanted RNAP-RNAP interactions as well as non-specific interactions between the RNAP and DNA template. The success of this method relied on the observation that E. coli RNAP has the highest affinity for the mica surface of all the molecular components. For our system, the affinity of the three constituent biopolymers to muscovite mica was RNAP>Heparin or HepS>DNA. While we observed that heparin and HepS can inhibit DNA binding to the mica, the presence of E. coli RNAP overcomes this effect allowing a greater yield of RP o s for AFM analysis. This method can be extended to other DNA binding proteins and enzymes, which have an affinity to mica higher than DNA, to improve sample preparation for AFM studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Most Wired 2006: measuring value.

    PubMed

    Solovy, Alden

    2006-07-01

    As the Most Wired hospitals incorporate information technology into their strategic plans, they combine a"balanced scorecard"approach with classic business analytics to measure how well IT delivers on their goals. To find out which organizations made this year's 100 Most Wired list, as well as those named in other survey categories, go to the foldout section.

  1. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  2. The Current in a Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Keith

    2009-01-01

    This little problem arose because I was frustrated with the standard electromagnetism texts, which show the magnetic field due to a current-bearing wire outside the wire [proportional to] 1/r and inside [proportional to] r. However, they never point out that the moving electrons must be influenced by the magnetic field created by the other moving…

  3. Wire Stripper Holds Insulation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Allen D.; Morris, Henry S.; Bauer, Laverne

    1994-01-01

    Attachment to standard wire-stripping tool catches bits of insulation as they are removed from electrical wire and retains them for proper disposal. Prevents insulation particles from falling at random, contaminating electronic equipment and soiling workspace. Commercial tool modified by attaching small collection box to one of the jaws.

  4. Electron Diffraction Evidence for the Ordering of Excess Nickel Atoms by Relation to Stoichiometry in Nickel-Rich Beta'-Nial Formation of a Nickel-Aluminum (Ni2al) Superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynaud, F.

    1988-01-01

    In electron diffraction patterns of nickel-rich beta-NiAl alloys, many anomalies are observed. One of these is the appearance of diffuse intensity maxima between the reflexions of the B2 structure. This is explained by the short-range ordering of the excess nickel atoms on the simple cubic sublattice occupied only by aluminum atoms in the stoichiometric, perfectly ordered NiAl alloy. After annealing Ni 37.5 atomic percent Al and Ni 37.75 atomic percent Al for 1 week at 300 and 400 C, the diffuse intensity maxima transformed into sharp superstructure reflexions. These reflexions are explained by the formation of the four possible variants of an ordered hexagonal superstructure corresponding to the Ni2Al composition. This structure is closely related to the Ni2Al3 structure (same space group) formed by the ordering of vacancies on the nickel sublattice in aluminum-rich beta-NiAl alloys.

  5. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  6. Wire metamaterials: physics and applications.

    PubMed

    Simovski, Constantin R; Belov, Pavel A; Atrashchenko, Alexander V; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-08-16

    The physics and applications of a broad class of artificial electromagnetic materials composed of lattices of aligned metal rods embedded in a dielectric matrix are reviewed. Such structures are here termed wire metamaterials. They appear in various settings and can operate from microwaves to THz and optical frequencies. An important group of these metamaterials is a wire medium possessing extreme optical anisotropy. The study of wire metamaterials has a long history, however, most of their important and useful properties have been revealed and understood only recently, especially in the THz and optical frequency ranges where the wire media correspond to the lattices of microwires and nanowires, respectively. Another group of wire metamaterials are arrays and lattices of nanorods of noble metals whose unusual properties are driven by plasmonic resonances. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Apollo experience report: Electrical wiring subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The general requirements of the electrical wiring subsystems and the problem areas and solutions that occurred during the major part of the Apollo Program are detailed in this report. The concepts and definitions of specific requirements for electrical wiring; wire-connecting devices; and wire-harness fabrication, checkout, and installation techniques are discussed. The design and development of electrical wiring and wire-connecting devices are described. Mission performance is discussed, and conclusions and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  8. Forming Refractory Insulation On Copper Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlock, J.; Roberts, G.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative insulating process forms flexible coat of uncured refractory insulating material on copper wire. Coated wire formed into coil or other complex shape. Wire-coating apparatus forms "green" coat on copper wire. After wire coiled, heating converts "green" coat to refractory electrical insulator. When cured to final brittle form, insulating material withstands temperatures above melting temperature of wire. Process used to make coils for motors, solenoids, and other electrical devices to be operated at high temperatures.

  9. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD... Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be component insulated. (c) Wire, other than in switchboards, must meet the requirements in sections 24.6.7 and...

  10. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD... Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be component insulated. (c) Wire, other than in switchboards, must meet the requirements in sections 24.6.7 and...

  11. Electrode carrying wire for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a hollow tungsten electrode including a ceramic liner and forms the filler metal wire guide. The wire is fed through the tungsten electrode thereby reducing the size of the torch to eliminate clearance problems which exist with external wire guides. Since the wire is preheated from the tungsten more wire may be fed into the weld puddle, and the wire will not oxidize because it is always within the shielding gas.

  12. Internal wire guide for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a filler metal wire guide positioned within the torch, and within the shielding gas nozzle. The wire guide is adjacent to the tungsten electrode and has a ceramic liner through which the wire is fed. This reduces the size of the torch and eliminates the outside clearance problems that exit with external wire guides. Additionally, since the wire is always within the shielding gas, oxidizing of the wire is eliminated.

  13. Accelerating NLTE radiative transfer by means of the Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration: A two-level atom line formation in 2D Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milić, Ivan; Atanacković, Olga

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art methods in multidimensional NLTE radiative transfer are based on the use of local approximate lambda operator within either Jacobi or Gauss-Seidel iterative schemes. Here we propose another approach to the solution of 2D NLTE RT problems, Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration (FBILI), developed earlier for 1D geometry. In order to present the method and examine its convergence properties we use the well-known instance of the two-level atom line formation with complete frequency redistribution. In the formal solution of the RT equation we employ short characteristics with two-point algorithm. Using an implicit representation of the source function in the computation of the specific intensities, we compute and store the coefficients of the linear relations J=a+bS between the mean intensity J and the corresponding source function S. The use of iteration factors in the ‘local’ coefficients of these implicit relations in two ‘inward’ sweeps of 2D grid, along with the update of the source function in other two ‘outward’ sweeps leads to four times faster solution than the Jacobi’s one. Moreover, the update made in all four consecutive sweeps of the grid leads to an acceleration by a factor of 6-7 compared to the Jacobi iterative scheme.

  14. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R [San Jose, CA; Ives, R Lawrence [Saratoga, CA

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  15. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  16. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  17. The Atomic Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummo, Evelyn; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to provide students with opportunities to practice drawing atomic models and discover the logical pairings of whole families on the periodic table. Follows the format of a television game show. (DDR)

  18. Dynamics of conical wire array Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, D. J.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.

    2007-10-15

    A modification of the wire array Z pinch, the conical wire array, has applications to the understanding of wire array implosions and potentially to pulse shaping relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Results are presented from imploding conical wire array experiments performed on university scale 1 MA generators--the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College London [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci Instrum. 67, 1533 (1996)] and the Nevada Terawatt Facility's Zebra generator (1 MA, 100 ns) at the University of Nevada, Reno [B. Bauer et al., in Dense Z-Pinches, edited by N. Pereira, J. Davis, and P.more » Pulsifer (AIP, New York, 1997), Vol. 409, p. 153]. This paper will discuss the implosion dynamics of conical wire arrays. Data indicate that mass ablation from the wires in this complex system can be reproduced with a rocket model with fixed ablation velocity. Modulations in the ablated plasma are present, the wavelength of which is invariant to a threefold variation in magnetic field strength. The axial variation in the array leads to a zippered precursor column formation. An initial implosion of a magnetic bubble near the cathode is followed by the implosion zippering upwards. Spectroscopic data demonstrating a variation of plasma parameters (e.g., electron temperature) along the Z-pinch axis is discussed, and experimental data are compared to magnetohydrodynamic simulations.« less

  19. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent.

  20. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent. PMID:28895900

  1. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.; Karska, A.; Messias, H.; van der Werf, P.; Hunt, L. K.; Baes, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rizzo, J. R.; Rossi, A.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Schady, P.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims: Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas in the closest galaxy hosting a GRB (980425). Methods: We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [C II] 158 μm and [O I] 63 μm spectroscopy, and an APEX/SHeFI CO(2-1) line detection and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. Results: The GRB 980425 host has elevated [C II]/FIR and [O I]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rates (SFR) derived from line ([C II], [O I], Hα) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [C II] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy centre, whereas [O I] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [O I] flux indicates that there is high radiation field and high gas density at these positions, as derived from modelling of photo-dissociation regions. The [C II]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Indeed, its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [C II]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. Conclusions: The [O I] and H I concentrations and the high radiation field and density close to the GRB position are consistent with the hypothesis of a very recent (at most a few tens of Myr ago) inflow of atomic gas triggering star formation. In this scenario dust has not had time to build up (explaining high line-to-continuum ratios). Such a recent enhancement of star formation activity would indeed manifest itself in high SFRline/SFRcontinuum ratios because the line indicators are sensitive only to recent (≲10 Myr) activity, whereas the continuum indicators measure

  2. Requirements for Printed Wiring Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In order to maintain the high standards of the NASA printed wiring programs, this publication: prescribes NASA's requirements for assuring reliable rigid printed wiring boards; describes and incorporates basic considerations necessary to assure reliable rigid printed wiring boards; establishes the supplier's responsibility to train and certify personnel; provides for supplier documentation of the fabrication and inspection procedures to be used for NASA work, including supplier innovations and changes in technology; and provides visual workmanship standards to aid those responsible for determining quality conformance to the established requirements.

  3. Electrolytic Migration of Ag-Pd Alloy Wires with Various Pd Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hao; He, Yu-Zhen; Chen, Sheng-Chi; Chuang, Tung-Han

    2018-03-01

    During Ag ion migration in an aqueous water drop covering a pair of parallel Ag-Pd wires under current stressing, hydrogen bubbles form first from the cathode, followed by the appearance of pure Ag dendrites on the cathodic wire. In this study, Ag dendrites with a diameter of 0.2-0.4 μm grew toward the anodic wire. The growth rate (v) of these dendrites decreased with the Pd content (c) with a linear relationship of: v = 10.02 - 0.43 c . Accompanying the growth of pure Ag dendrites was the formation of a continuous layer of crystallographic Ag2O particles on the surface of the anodic wire. The deposition of such insulating Ag2O products did not prevent the contact of Ag dendrites with the anodic Ag-Pd wire or the short circuit of the wire couple.

  4. Electrolytic Migration of Ag-Pd Alloy Wires with Various Pd Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hao; He, Yu-Zhen; Chen, Sheng-Chi; Chuang, Tung-Han

    2018-07-01

    During Ag ion migration in an aqueous water drop covering a pair of parallel Ag-Pd wires under current stressing, hydrogen bubbles form first from the cathode, followed by the appearance of pure Ag dendrites on the cathodic wire. In this study, Ag dendrites with a diameter of 0.2-0.4 μm grew toward the anodic wire. The growth rate ( v) of these dendrites decreased with the Pd content ( c) with a linear relationship of: v = 10.02 - 0.43 c . Accompanying the growth of pure Ag dendrites was the formation of a continuous layer of crystallographic Ag2O particles on the surface of the anodic wire. The deposition of such insulating Ag2O products did not prevent the contact of Ag dendrites with the anodic Ag-Pd wire or the short circuit of the wire couple.

  5. Formation of {Co(dppe)}2{μ2-η(2):η(2)-η(2):η(2)-[(C60)2]} Dimers Bonded by Single C-C Bonds and Bridging η(2)-Coordinated Cobalt Atoms.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Troyanov, Sergey I; Ustimenko, Kseniya A; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Shestakov, Alexander F; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2015-05-18

    Coordination of two bridging cobalt atoms to fullerenes by the η(2) type in {Co(dppe)}2{μ2-η(2):η(2)-η(2):η(2)-[(C60)2]}·3C6H4Cl2 [1; dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane] triggers fullerene dimerization with the formation of two intercage C-C bonds of 1.571(4) Å length. Coordination-induced fullerene dimerization opens a path to the design of fullerene structures bonded by both covalent C-C bonds and η(2)-coordination-bridged metal atoms.

  6. Potential energy surfaces for atomic oxygen reactions: Formation of singlet and triplet biradicals as primary reaction products with unsaturated organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental study of the interaction of atomic oxygen with organic polymer films under LEO conditions has been hampered by the inability to conduct detailed experiments in situ. As a result, studies of the mechanism of oxygen atom reactions have relied on laboratory O-atom sources that do not fully reproduce the orbital environment. For example, it is well established that only ground electronic state O atoms are present at LEO, yet most ground-based sources are known to produce singlet O atoms and molecules and ions in addition to O(3P). Engineers should not rely on such facilities unless it can be demonstrated either that these different O species are inert or that they react in the same fashion as ground state atoms. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been aimed at elucidating the biradical intermediates formed during the electrophilic addition of ground and excited-state O atoms to carbon-carbon double bonds in small olefins and aromatic molecules. These biradicals are critical intermediates in any possible insertion, addition and elimination reaction mechanisms. Through these calculations, we will be able to comment on the relative importance of these pathways for O(3P) and O(1D) reactions. The reactions of O atoms with ethylene and benzene are used to illustrate the important features of the mechanisms of atomic oxygen reaction with unsaturated organic compounds and polymeric materials.

  7. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  8. Iron species determination by task-specific ionic liquid-based in situ solvent formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Susan; Ashoori, Vahid

    2017-10-01

    The task-specific ionic liquid (TSIL) of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide functionalized with 8-hydroxyquinoline was used as a chelating agent and extracting solvent for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and subsequent determination of Fe(III) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The in situ solvent formation of TSIL using KPF 6 provided the desired water-immiscible ionic liquid. The total Fe concentration could be determined after pre-oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Various factors affecting the proposed extraction procedure were optimized. The proposed analytical conditions were: sample pH 5, TSIL amount 0.3% (w/v), KPF 6 amount 0.15% (w/v), anti-sticking 0.1% (w/v) and salt concentration 5% (w/v). Under optimal conditions, the linear dynamic ranges for Fe(III) and total Fe were 20-80 and 20-110 ng mL -1 , respectively, with a detection limit of 6.9 ng mL -1 for Fe(III) and relative standard deviation of 2.2%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace Fe(III) in water (underground, tap, refined water and artificial sea water) and beverage (apple, tomato, and tea) samples. The developed method offers advantages such as simplicity, ease of operation, and extraction of Fe(III) from aqueous solutions without the use of organic solvent. It was successfully applied for iron speciation in different real samples. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Coupled cluster investigation on the thermochemistry of dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide and their dissociation products: the problem of the enthalpy of formation of atomic sulphur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Pablo A.

    2014-04-01

    By means of coupled cluster theory and correlation consistent basis sets we investigated the thermochemistry of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), dimethyl disulphide (DMDS) and four closely related sulphur-containing molecules: CH3SS, CH3S, CH3SH and CH3CH2SH. For the four closed-shell molecules studied, their enthalpies of formation (EOFs) were derived using bomb calorimetry. We found that the deviation of the EOF with respect to experiment was 0.96, 0.65, 1.24 and 1.29 kcal/mol, for CH3SH, CH3CH2SH, DMS and DMDS, respectively, when ΔHf,0 = 65.6 kcal/mol was utilised (JANAF value). However, if the recently proposed ΔHf,0 = 66.2 kcal/mol was used to estimate EOF, the errors dropped to 0.36, 0.05, 0.64 and 0.09 kcal/mol, respectively. In contrast, for the CH3SS radical, a better agreement with experiment was obtained if the 65.6 kcal/mol value was used. To compare with experiment avoiding the problem of the ΔHf,0 (S), we determined the CH3-S and CH3-SS bond dissociation energies (BDEs) in CH3S and CH3SS. At the coupled cluster with singles doubles and perturbative triples correction level of theory, these values are 48.0 and 71.4 kcal/mol, respectively. The latter BDEs are 1.5 and 1.2 kcal/mol larger than the experimental values. The agreement can be considered to be acceptable if we take into consideration that these two radicals present important challenges when determining their EOFs. It is our hope that this work stimulates new studies which help elucidate the problem of the EOF of atomic sulphur.

  10. An evaluation of two types of nickel-titanium wires in terms of micromorphology and nickel ions' release following oral environment exposure.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Abdul Razzak A; Hajeer, Mohammad Y; Al-Sabbagh, Rabab; Alghoraibi, Ibrahim; Aldiry, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare superelastic and heat-activated nickel-titanium orthodontic wires' surface morphology and potential release of nickel ions following exposure to oral environment conditions. Twenty-four 20-mm-length distal cuts of superelastic (NiTi Force I®) and 24 20-mm-length distal cuts of heat-activated (Therma-Ti Lite®) nickel-titanium wires (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA) were divided into two equal groups: 12 wire segments left unused and 12 segments passively exposed to oral environment for 1 month. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze surface morphology of the wires which were then immersed in artificial saliva for 1 month to determine potential nickel ions' release by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heat-activated nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires were rougher than superelastic wires, and both types of wires released almost the same amount of Ni ions. After clinical exposure, more surface roughness was recorded for superelastic NiTi wires and heat-activated NiTi wires. However, retrieved superelastic NiTi wires released less Ni ions in artificial saliva after clinical exposure, and the same result was recorded regarding heat-activated wires. Both types of NiTi wires were obviously affected by oral environment conditions; their surface roughness significantly increased while the amount of the released Ni ions significantly declined.

  11. Modeling birds on wires.

    PubMed

    Aydoğdu, A; Frasca, P; D'Apice, C; Manzo, R; Thornton, J M; Gachomo, B; Wilson, T; Cheung, B; Tariq, U; Saidel, W; Piccoli, B

    2017-02-21

    In this paper we introduce a mathematical model to study the group dynamics of birds resting on wires. The model is agent-based and postulates attraction-repulsion forces between the interacting birds: the interactions are "topological", in the sense that they involve a given number of neighbors irrespective of their distance. The model is first mathematically analyzed and then simulated to study its main properties: we observe that the model predicts birds to be more widely spaced near the borders of each group. We compare the results from the model with experimental data, derived from the analysis of pictures of pigeons and starlings taken in New Jersey: two different image elaboration protocols allow us to establish a good agreement with the model and to quantify its main parameters. We also discuss the potential handedness of the birds, by analyzing the group organization features and the group dynamics at the arrival of new birds. Finally, we propose a more refined mathematical model that describes landing and departing birds by suitable stochastic processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Demonstrating Forces between Parallel Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Blane

    2000-01-01

    Describes a physics demonstration that dramatically illustrates the mutual repulsion (attraction) between parallel conductors using insulated copper wire, wooden dowels, a high direct current power supply, electrical tape, and an overhead projector. (WRM)

  13. 29 CFR 1919.79 - Wire rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wire rope. 1919.79 Section 1919.79 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.79 Wire rope. (a) Wire rope and replacement wire rope shall be of the same size, same or better grade, and same construction...

  14. 29 CFR 1919.79 - Wire rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wire rope. 1919.79 Section 1919.79 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.79 Wire rope. (a) Wire rope and replacement wire rope shall be of the same size, same or better grade, and same construction...

  15. Spring control of wire harness loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curcio, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Negator spring control guides wire harness between movable and fixed structure. It prevents electrical wire harness loop from jamming or being severed as wire moves in response to changes in position of aircraft rudder. Spring-loaded coiled cable controls wire loop regardless of rudder movement.

  16. High strength, wire-reinforced electroformed structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, J. M.; Duscha, R. A.; Mccandless, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Using half-round reinforcing wires, electrodeposited matrix metal readily fills spaces between wires in intimate contact with wires and without voids. Procedure combines advantages of electroforming with high-strength of commonly available wire to produce non-welded shell structures for high pressure uses.

  17. Method of manufacturing superconductor wire

    DOEpatents

    Motowidlo, Leszek

    2014-09-16

    A method for forming Nb.sub.3Sn superconducting wire is provided. The method employs a powder-in-tube process using a high-tin intermetallic compound, such as MnSn.sub.2, for producing the Nb.sub.3Sn. The use of a high-tin intermetallic compound enables the process to perform hot extrusion without melting the high-tin intermetallic compound. Alternatively, the method may entail drawing the wire without hot extrusion.

  18. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2018-05-30

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  19. 30 CFR 75.701-4 - Grounding wires; capacity of wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding wires; capacity of wires. 75.701-4... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.701-4 Grounding wires; capacity of wires. Where grounding wires are used to ground metallic sheaths, armors, conduits, frames...

  20. 30 CFR 75.701-4 - Grounding wires; capacity of wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grounding wires; capacity of wires. 75.701-4... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.701-4 Grounding wires; capacity of wires. Where grounding wires are used to ground metallic sheaths, armors, conduits, frames...

  1. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical...

  2. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical...

  3. A 3D-analysis of cluster formation and dynamics of the X(-)-benzene (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ionic dimer solvated by Ar atoms.

    PubMed

    Albertí, Margarita; Huarte-Larrañaga, Fermín; Aguilar, Antonio; Lucas, José M; Pirani, Fernando

    2011-05-14

    The specific influence of X(-) ions (X = F,Cl, Br, I) in the solvation process of halide-benzene (X(-)-Bz) ionic heterodimers by Ar atoms is investigated by means of molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The gradual evolution from cluster rearrangement to solvation dynamics is discussed by considering ensembles of n (n = 1-15 and n = 30) Ar atoms around the X(-)-Bz stable ionic dimers. The potential energy surfaces employed are based on an atom/ion-atom and atom/ion-bond decomposition, which has been developed previously by some of the authors. The outcome of the dynamics is analyzed by employing radial distribution functions (RDF) and tridimensional (3D) probability densities.

  4. Beyond Molecular Codes: Simple Rules to Wire Complex Brains

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Bassem A.; Hiesinger, P. Robin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Molecular codes, like postal zip codes, are generally considered a robust way to ensure the specificity of neuronal target selection. However, a code capable of unambiguously generating complex neural circuits is difficult to conceive. Here, we re-examine the notion of molecular codes in the light of developmental algorithms. We explore how molecules and mechanisms that have been considered part of a code may alternatively implement simple pattern formation rules sufficient to ensure wiring specificity in neural circuits. This analysis delineates a pattern-based framework for circuit construction that may contribute to our understanding of brain wiring. PMID:26451480

  5. Connecting to Thermocouples with Fewer Lead Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    A simple technique has been devised to reduce the number of lead wires needed to connect an array of thermocouples to the instruments (e.g., voltmeters) used to read their output voltages. Because thermocouple wires are usually made of expensive metal alloys, reducing the number of lead wires can effect a considerable reduction in the cost of such an array. Reducing the number of wires also reduces the number of terminals and the amount of space needed to accommodate the wires.

  6. Fabrication of Pd-Cr wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, Sidney; Leach, Dennen M.

    1989-01-01

    Fabrication of Pd-13 percent Cr alloy wires is described. Melting, casting, swaging and annealing processes are discussed. Drawing to reach two diameters (0.003 inch and 0.00176 inch) of wire is described. Representative micrographs of the Pd-Cr alloy at selected stages during wire fabrication are included. The resistance of the wire was somewhat lower, by about 15 to 20 percent, than comparable wire of other alloys used for strain gages.

  7. Development and Properties of Advanced Internal Magnesium Infiltration (AIMI) Processed MgB2 Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Collings, Prof Edward William; Sumption, Prof Michael D; Li, Guangze

    The development, processing, properties, and formation mechanisms of Advanced Internal Magnesium Infiltration (AIMI) MgB2 wires are discussed against a background of the related and original processes, Internal-Magnesium-Diffusion (IMD) and Magnesium-Reactive-Liquid-Infiltration (Mg-RLI). First reviewed are the formation, properties and applications of Mg-RLI bulks as basis for discussions of Mg-RLI-processed and IMD-processed wires. The transition from Mg-RLI- and IMD- to AIMI wires is explained, and the relative performances of powder-in-tube (PIT), IMD and AIMI wires are summarized in the form of an iso-Je diagram of Jc,nb versus Anb/ATOT in which ATOT, Anb, Jc,nb, and Je are, respectively, the wire s cross-sectional area,more » the area inside the chemical barrier, the critical current (Ic) normalized to Anb, and Ic normalized to ATOT. After the details of AIMI wire fabrication selection of starting powders, dopants, and reaction heat treatments are introduced the report goes on to describe in detail the development of high performance AIMI wires: layer Jcs, fill factors, Jes, and the effects of wire size, multifilamentarization, doping with C, and co-doping with C and Dy2O3. The two-stage mechanism of layer formation in AIMI wires is discussed: first the reactive infiltration of liquid Mg into a porous B pack, a process that terminates with the formation of a dense MgB2 layer; second the slow diffusion of Mg into any remaining B through that MgB2 layer. The report concludes with a brief general discussion of anisotropy, current percolation, and the Jc field dependence of MgB2 wires.« less

  8. Galvanic corrosion between orthodontic wires and brackets in fluoride mouthwashes.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Nicolas; Boinet, Mickaël; Morgon, Laurent; Lissac, Michèle; Dalard, Francis; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of fluoride in certain mouthwashes on the risk of corrosion through galvanic coupling of orthodontic wires and brackets. Two titanium alloy wires, nickel-titanium (NiTi) and copper-nickel-titanium (CuNiTi), and the three most commonly used brackets, titanium (Ti), iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr), were tested in a reference solution of Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva and in two commercially available fluoride (250 ppm) mouthwashes, Elmex and Meridol. Corrosion resistance was assessed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-MS), analysis of released metal ions, and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) study of the metal surfaces after immersion of different wire-bracket pairs in the test solutions. The study was completed by an electrochemical analysis. Meridol mouthwash, which contains stannous fluoride, was the solution in which the NiTi wires coupled with the different brackets showed the highest corrosion risk, while in Elmex mouthwash, which contains sodium fluoride, the CuNiTi wires presented the highest corrosion risk. Such corrosion has two consequences: deterioration in mechanical performance of the wire-bracket system, which would negatively affect the final aesthetic result, and the risk of local allergic reactions caused by released Ni ions. The results suggest that mouthwashes should be prescribed according to the orthodontic materials used. A new type of mouthwash for use during orthodontic therapy could be an interesting development in this field.

  9. Electron transport in molecular wires with transition metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Hugh

    A molecular wire is an organic molecule that forms a conducting bridge between electronic contacts. Single molecules are likely to be the smallest entities to conduct electricity and thus molecular wires present many interesting challenges to fundamental science as well as enormous potential for nanoelectronic technological applications. A particular challenge stems from the realization that the properties of molecular wires are strongly influenced by the combined characteristics of the molecule and the metal contacts. While gold has been the most studied contact material to date, interest in molecular wires with transition metal contacts that are electronically more complex than gold is growing. This thesis presents a theoretical investigation of electron transport and associated phenomena in molecular wires with transition metal contacts. An appropriate methodology is developed on the basis of Landauer theory and ab initio and semi-empirical considerations and new, physically important systems are identified. Spin-dependent transport mechanisms and device characteristics are explored for molecular wires with ferromagnetic iron contacts, systems that have not been considered previously, either theoretically or experimentally. Electron transport between iron point contacts bridged by iron atoms is also investigated. Spin-dependent transport is also studied for molecules bridging nickel contacts and a possible explanation of some experimentally observed phenomena is proposed. A novel physical phenomenon termed strong spin current rectification and a new controllable negative differential resistance mechanism with potential applications for molecular electronic technology are introduced. The phenomena predicted in this thesis should be accessible to present day experimental techniques and this work is intended to stimulate experiments directed at observing them. Keywords. molecular electronics; spintronics; electron transport; interface states.

  10. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  11. Californium Recovery from Palladium Wire

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jon D.

    2014-08-01

    The recovery of 252Cf from palladium- 252Cf cermet wires was investigated to determine the feasibility of implementing it into the cermet wire production operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center. The dissolution of Pd wire in 8 M HNO 3 and trace amounts of HCl was studied at both ambient and elevated temperatures. These studies showed that it took days to dissolve the wire at ambient temperature and only 2 hours at 60°C. Adjusting the ratio of the volume of solvent to the mass of the wire segment showed little change in the kinetics of dissolution, whichmore » ranged from 0.176 mL/mg down to 0.019 mL/mg. A successful chromatographic separation of 153Gd, a surrogate for 252Cf, from Pd was demonstrated using AG 50x8 cation exchange resin with a bed volume of 0.5 mL and an internal diameter of 0.8 cm.« less

  12. Stiffness and frictional resistance of a superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wire with low-stress hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Yu M; Lai, Yu-Lin; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2007-05-01

    Stress-induced martensite formation with stress hysteresis that changes the elasticity and stiffness of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) wire influences the sliding mechanics of archwire-guided tooth movement. This in-vitro study investigated the frictional behavior of an improved superelastic Ni-Ti wire with low-stress hysteresis. Improved superelastic Ni-Ti alloy wires (L & H Titan, Tomy International, Tokyo, Japan) with low-stress hysteresis were examined by using 3-point bending and frictional resistance tests with a universal test machine at a constant temperature of 35 degrees C, and compared with the former conventional austenitic-active superelastic Ni-Ti wires (Sentalloy, Tomy International). Wire stiffness levels were derived from differentiation of the polynomial regression of the unloading curves, and values for kinetic friction were measured at constant bending deflection distances of 0, 2, 3, and 4 mm, respectively. Compared with conventional Sentalloy wires, the L & H Titan wire had a narrower stress hysteresis including a lower loading plateau and a higher unloading plateau. In addition, L & H Titan wires were less stiff than the Sentalloy wires during most unloading stages. Values of friction measured at deflections of 0, 2, and 3 mm were significantly (P <.05) increased in both types of wire. However, they showed a significant decrease in friction from 3 to 4 mm of deflection. L & H Titan wires had less friction than Sentalloy wires at all bending deflections (P <.05). Stress-induced martensite formation significantly reduced the stiffness and thus could be beneficial to decrease the binding friction of superelastic Ni-Ti wires during sliding with large bending deflections. Austenitic-active alloy wires with low-stress hysteresis and lower stiffness and friction offer significant potential for further investigation.

  13. Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Shi, Yuanjie

    Experimental investigations on the electrical explosion of aluminum wire using negative polarity current in vacuum are presented. Current pulses with rise rates of 40 A/ns, 80 A/ns, and 120 A/ns are generated for investigating the influence of current rise rate on energy deposition. Experimental results show a significant increase of energy deposition into the wire before the voltage breakdown with the increase of current rise rate. The influence of wire dimension on energy deposition is investigated as well. Decreasing the wire length allows more energy to be deposited into the wire. The energy deposition of a 0.5 cm-long wire explosion ismore » ∼2.5 times higher than the energy deposition of a 2 cm-long wire explosion. The dependence of the energy deposition on wire diameter demonstrates a maximum energy deposition of 2.7 eV/atom with a diameter of ∼18 μm. Substantial increase in energy deposition is observed in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire with polyimide coating. A laser probe is applied to construct the shadowgraphy, schlieren, and interferometry diagnostics. The morphology and expansion trajectory of exploding products are analyzed based on the shadowgram. The interference phase shift is reconstructed from the interferogram. Parallel dual wires are exploded to estimate the expansion velocity of the plasma shell.« less

  14. Antenna coupled photonic wire lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Kao, Tsung-Kao; Cai, Xiaowei; Lee, Alan W. M.; ...

    2015-06-22

    Slope efficiency (SE) is an important performance metric for lasers. In conventional semiconductor lasers, SE can be optimized by careful designs of the facet (or the modulation for DFB lasers) dimension and surface. However, photonic wire lasers intrinsically suffer low SE due to their deep sub-wavelength emitting facets. Inspired by microwave engineering techniques, we show a novel method to extract power from wire lasers using monolithically integrated antennas. These integrated antennas significantly increase the effective radiation area, and consequently enhance the power extraction efficiency. When applied to wire lasers at THz frequency, we achieved the highest single-side slope efficiency (~450more » mW/A) in pulsed mode for DFB lasers at 4 THz and a ~4x increase in output power at 3 THz compared with a similar structure without antennas. This work demonstrates the versatility of incorporating microwave engineering techniques into laser designs, enabling significant performance enhancements.« less

  15. Atom-by-atom assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-05-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed.

  16. Wire Detection Algorithms for Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar; Camps, Octavia I.

    2002-01-01

    In this research we addressed the problem of obstacle detection for low altitude rotorcraft flight. In particular, the problem of detecting thin wires in the presence of image clutter and noise was studied. Wires present a serious hazard to rotorcrafts. Since they are very thin, their detection early enough so that the pilot has enough time to take evasive action is difficult, as their images can be less than one or two pixels wide. Two approaches were explored for this purpose. The first approach involved a technique for sub-pixel edge detection and subsequent post processing, in order to reduce the false alarms. After reviewing the line detection literature, an algorithm for sub-pixel edge detection proposed by Steger was identified as having good potential to solve the considered task. The algorithm was tested using a set of images synthetically generated by combining real outdoor images with computer generated wire images. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated both, at the pixel and the wire levels. It was observed that the algorithm performs well, provided that the wires are not too thin (or distant) and that some post processing is performed to remove false alarms due to clutter. The second approach involved the use of an example-based learning scheme namely, Support Vector Machines. The purpose of this approach was to explore the feasibility of an example-based learning based approach for the task of detecting wires from their images. Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have emerged as a promising pattern classification tool and have been used in various applications. It was found that this approach is not suitable for very thin wires and of course, not suitable at all for sub-pixel thick wires. High dimensionality of the data as such does not present a major problem for SVMs. However it is desirable to have a large number of training examples especially for high dimensional data. The main difficulty in using SVMs (or any other example-based learning

  17. Preconditioned wire array Z-pinches driven by a double pulse current generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Lu, Yihan; Sun, Fengju; Li, Xingwen; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Daoyuan; Qiu, Aici; Lebedev, Sergey

    2018-07-01

    Suppression of the core-corona structure and wire ablation in wire array Z-pinches is investigated using a novel double pulse current generator ‘Qin-1’ facility. The ‘Qin-1’ facility allows coupling a ∼10 kA 20 ns prepulse generator with a ∼0.8 MA 160 ns main current generator. The tailored prepulse current preheats wires to a gaseous state and the time interval between the prepulse and the main current pulse allows formation of a more uniform mass distribution for the implosion. The implosion of a gasified two aluminum-wire array showed no ablation phase and allowed all array mass to participate in the implosion. The initial perturbations formed from the inhomogeneous ablation were suppressed, however, the magneto Rayleigh–Taylor (MRT) instability during the implosion was still significant and further researches on the generation and development of the MRT instabilities of this gasified wire array are needed.

  18. Wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Kulkarni, Sneha A.; Li, Zhen; Xu, Wenjing; Batabyal, Sudip K.; Zhang, Sam; Cao, Anyuan; Wong, Lydia Helena

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays is demonstrated for the first time by integrating a perovskite absorber on TNT-coated Ti wire. Anodization was adopted for the conformal growth of TNTs on Ti wire, together with the simultaneous formation of a compact TiO2 layer. A sequential step dipping process is employed to produce a uniform and compact perovskite layer on top of TNTs with conformal coverage as the efficient light absorber. Transparent carbon nanotube film is wrapped around Ti wire as the hole collector and counter electrode. The integrated perovskite solar cell wire by facile fabrication approaches shows a promising future in portable and wearable textile electronics.

  19. New insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenski, George

    1994-01-01

    Outlined in this presentation is the background to insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications, the Air Force wiring policy, the purpose and contract requirements of new insulation constructions, the test plan, and the test results.

  20. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  1. RCS of resonant scatterers with attached wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trueman, C. W.; Mishra, S. R.; Kubina, S. J.; Larose, C. L.

    1993-03-01

    Some aircraft carry wire antennas for HF communication. This paper investigates the effect of such wires on the radar cross section (RCS) at HF frequencies by comparing the RCS of a strip, a cylinder, and a rod with and without an attached wire. The RCS is found for broadside incidence and for end-on incidence of the plane wave for scatterer lengths from 0.4 to 3.8 wavelengths, typical of aircraft size at HF frequencies. It is shown that the RCS of such fuselage-like targets with a wire 'antenna' is quite different from that of the targets without the wire. For broadside incidence, the wire contributes a sharp peak-and-trough to the RCS at the wire's fundamental resonant frequency. For end-on incidence the wire considerably enhances the RCS at frequencies making its length odd multiples of the quarter-wave.

  2. Energy Deposition and Condition of the Metal Core in Exploding Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.; McDaniel, D. H.; Waisman, E. M.; Sasorov, P. V.

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of the Joule energy deposition into exploding wire and its relation with condition of the expanding wire core are presented. Wires of nine different metals with diameters of 10-30 microns, have been exploded by fast 150A/ns and slow 20A/ns pulses, in vacuum and in air. It has been shown by interferometry and light emission that expanding wire core has different conditions. The substances with small atomization enthalpy (Ag, Al, Cu, Au) demonstrate full vaporization of the wire core. The refractory metals (Ti, Pt, Mo, W) demonstrates that core consists from vapor and small and hot microparticles. In this case we observe "firework effect" when large radiation from the wire exceed the energy deposition time in a three order of magnitude. For non-refractory metals radiation dropping fast in 100 ns time scale due to effective adiabatic cooling. It is possible if main part of the metal core was vaporized. The interferometrical investigation of the refraction coefficient of expanding metal core is proof this conclusion. It has been shown that energy deposition before surface breakdown dependent strongly from current rate, surface coatings, environment, wire diameter and radial electric field. The regime of wire explosion in vacuum without shunting plasma shell has been realized for fast exploding mode. In this case we observe anomaly high energy deposition in to the wire core exceeding regular value in almost 20 times. The experimental results for Al wire have been compared with ALEGRA 2D MHD simulations. *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  3. Explosion symmetry improvement of polyimide-coated tungsten wire in vacuum on negative discharge facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo; Wu, Jian; Lu, Yihan; Li, Xingwen; Li, Yang; Qiu, Mengtong

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten wire explosion is very asymmetric when fast current rate and insulated coatings are both applied on negative discharge facility using a 24-mm-diameter cathode geometry, which is commonly used on mega-ampere facilities. It is inferred, based on an analytical treatment of the guiding center drift and COMSOL simulations, that the large negative radial electric field causes early voltage breakdown and terminates energy deposition into the wire core on the anode side of the wire. After the anode side is short circuited, the radial electric field along the wire surface on the cathode side will change its polarity and thus leading to additional energy deposition into the wire core. This change causes ˜10 times larger energy deposition and ˜14 times faster explosion velocity in the cathode side than the anode side. In order to reduce this asymmetry, a hollow cylindrical cathode geometry was used to reverse the polarity of radial electric field and was optimized to use on multi-MA facilities. In this case, fully vaporized polyimide-coated tungsten wire with great symmetry improvement was achieved with energy deposition of ˜8.8 eV/atom. The atomic and electronic density distributions for the two different load geometries were obtained by the double-wavelength measurement.

  4. Plated wire random access memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouldin, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to construct 4096-work by 18-bit random access, NDRO-plated wire memory units. The memory units were subjected to comprehensive functional and environmental tests at the end-item level to verify comformance with the specified requirements. A technical description of the unit is given, along with acceptance test data sheets.

  5. Space Wire Upper Layer Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakow, Glenn; Schnurr, Richard; Gilley, Daniel; Parkes, Steve

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses efforts to provide a streamlined approach for developing SpaceWire Upper layer protocols which allows industry to drive standardized communication solutions for real projects. The presentation proposes a simple packet header that will allow flexibility in implementing a diverse range of protocols.

  6. REACH. Residential Electrical Wiring Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansley, Jimmy; Ennis, Mike

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of residential electrical wiring. The instructional units focus on grounded outlets, service entrance, and blueprint reading. Each unit follows a typical format…

  7. Health care's 100 most wired.

    PubMed

    Solovy, A; Serb, C

    1999-02-01

    They're wired all right, and America's 100 most techno-savvy hospitals and health systems share one more thing: a commitment to using technology to link with employees, patients, suppliers, and insurers. "We want to be a health care travel agency for our community," says one chief information officer. "And we see Internet technology as a key."

  8. Wire-Wrap Chatter Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisch, G. Z.; Borden, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Monitoring circuit responds to changes in resistance as little as 0.1 ohm. Has been used to detect defective wire-wrap connections during thermal and vibration tests. Defect is indicated to operator by light-emitting diode and by increase in count on a two-digit display.

  9. Flexible substrate for printed wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakura, M.; Yabe, K.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, A.

    1982-01-01

    A very flexible substrate for printed wiring is disclosed which is composed of a blend of phenoxy resin-polyisocyanate-brominated epoxy resin in which the equivalent ration of the functional groups is hydroxyl grouped: isocyanate group: epoxy group = 1:0.2 to 2:0.5 to 3. The product has outstanding solder resistance and is applied to metal without using adhesives.

  10. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Electrical Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    This document is a curriculum guide for instructors teaching vocational preparation for electrical wiring to special needs students. The purpose of the curriculum guide is to provide minimum skills for disadvantaged and handicapped students entering the mainstream; to supplement vocational skills of those students already in a regular training…

  11. Novel Wiring Technologies for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    Because wire failure in aerospace vehicles could be catastrophic, smart wiring capabilities have been critical for NASA. Through the years, researchers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have developed technologies, expertise, and research facilities to meet this need. In addition to aerospace applications, NASA has applied its knowledge of smart wiring, including self-healing materials, to serve the aviation industry. This webinar will discuss the development efforts of several wiring technologies at KSC and provide insight into both current and future research objectives.

  12. [Mechanics analysis of fracture of orthodontic wires].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeping; Sun, Xiaoye; Zhang, Longqi

    2003-03-01

    Fracture problem of orthodontic wires was discussed in this paper. The calculation formulae of bending stress and tensile stress were obtained. All main factors that affect bending stress and tensile stress of orthodontic wires were analyzed and discussed. It was concluded that the main causes of fracture of orthodontic wires were fatigue and static disruption. Some improving proposals for preventing fracture of orthodontic wires were put forward.

  13. Moving Large Wiring-Harness Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Samuel D.; Gurman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    Carrier for wiring-harness fabrication boards enables lone operator to move board easily and safely. Holds harness while operator fabricating, while being stored, and being transported to equipment frame for mounting. When positioned for assembly of wiring harness, board and carrier give operator easy and convenient access to wires and cables, when positioned for transfer of wiring harness to or from storage area, carrier holds board securely while moved by one person.

  14. NEMA wire and cable standards development programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) is the nation's largest trade association for manufacturers of electrical equipment. Its member companies produce components, end-use equipment and systems for the generation, transmission, distribution, control and use of electricity. The wire and cable division is presented in 6 sections: building wire and cable, fabricated conductors, flexible cords, high performance wire and cable, magnet wire, and power and control cable. Participating companies are listed.

  15. Shape-Memory Wires Switch Rotary Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron J.

    1992-01-01

    Thermomechanical rotary actuator based on shape-memory property of alloy composed of equal parts of titanium and nickel. If alloy stretched while below transition temperature, it reverts to original length when heated above transition temperature. Two capstans on same shaft wrapped with shape-memory wires. As one wire heated, it contracts and stretches opposite wire. Wires heated in alternation so they switch shaft between two extreme angular positions; "on" and "off" positions of rotary valve.

  16. Band structure dynamics in indium wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Krause, R.; Aeschlimann, S.; Gierz, I.

    2018-05-01

    One-dimensional indium wires grown on Si(111) substrates, which are metallic at high temperatures, become insulating below ˜100 K due to the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). The physics of this transition is not conventional and involves a multiband Peierls instability with strong interband coupling. This CDW ground state is readily destroyed with femtosecond laser pulses resulting in a light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition. The current understanding of this transition remains incomplete, requiring measurements of the transient electronic structure to complement previous investigations of the lattice dynamics. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with extreme ultraviolet radiation is applied to this end. We find that the transition from the insulating to the metallic band structure occurs within ˜660 fs, which is a fraction of the amplitude mode period. The long lifetime of the transient state (>100 ps) is attributed to trapping in a metastable state in accordance with previous work.

  17. Magnet-wire wrapping tool for integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    Wire-dispensing tool which resembles mechanical pencil is used to wrap magnet wire around integrated circuit terminals uniformly and securely without damaging insulative coating on wire. Tool is hand-held and easily manipulated to execute wire wrapping movements.

  18. 30 CFR 75.906 - Trailing cables for mobile equipment, ground wires, and ground check wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cables for mobile equipment, ground wires, and ground check wires. 75.906 Section 75.906 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH..., ground wires, and ground check wires. [Statutory Provisions] Trailing cables for mobile equipment shall...

  19. 30 CFR 75.906 - Trailing cables for mobile equipment, ground wires, and ground check wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cables for mobile equipment, ground wires, and ground check wires. 75.906 Section 75.906 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH..., ground wires, and ground check wires. [Statutory Provisions] Trailing cables for mobile equipment shall...

  20. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wiring systems. 393.28 Section 393.28 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.28 Wiring systems...

  1. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wiring systems. 393.28 Section 393.28 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.28 Wiring systems...

  2. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wiring systems. 393.28 Section 393.28 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.28 Wiring systems...

  3. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wiring systems. 393.28 Section 393.28 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.28 Wiring systems...

  4. Pre-wired systems prove their worth.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    The 'new generation' of modular wiring systems from Apex Wiring Solutions have been specified for two of the world's foremost teaching hospitals - the Royal London and St Bartholomew's Hospital, as part of a pounds sterling 1 billion redevelopment project, to cut electrical installation times, reduce on-site waste, and provide a pre-wired, factory-tested, power and lighting system. HEJ reports.

  5. Getting "Wired" for McLuhan's Cyberculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurdo, George

    1995-01-01

    Examines the introduction of the computing magazine, "Wired", into the United Kingdom's (UK) market. Presents conversations with the founder and editorial staff of the UK edition, and discusses the accessibility of "Wired" via the World Wide Web. Describes 10 articles from United States "Wired" back-issues and…

  6. 49 CFR 236.838 - Wire, shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire, shunt. 236.838 Section 236.838 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Wire, shunt. A wire forming part of a shunt circuit. ...

  7. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire. (a) This account shall include the original cost of bare line wire and other material used in the...

  8. 49 CFR 236.838 - Wire, shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wire, shunt. 236.838 Section 236.838 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Wire, shunt. A wire forming part of a shunt circuit. ...

  9. 75 FR 4584 - Wire Decking From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-466 and 731-TA-1162 (Final)] Wire... subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of wire decking, provided for in subheadings 9403.90... subject merchandise as ``welded-wire rack decking, which is also known as, among other things, ``pallet...

  10. 30 CFR 57.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guy wires. 57.12047 Section 57.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.12047 Guy wires. Guy wires of poles supporting high-voltage transmission lines shall meet the...

  11. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire. (a) This account shall include the original cost of bare line wire and other material used in the...

  12. Home and School Technology: Wired versus Wireless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of informal research on smart homes and appliances, structured home wiring, whole-house audio/video distribution, hybrid cable, and wireless networks. Computer network wiring is tricky to install unless all-in-one jacketed cable is used. Wireless phones help installers avoid pre-wiring problems in homes and schools. (MLH)

  13. Wire-bonder-assisted integration of non-bondable SMA wires into MEMS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A. C.; Gradin, H.; Schröder, S.; Braun, S.; Stemme, G.; van der Wijngaart, W.; Niklaus, F.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on a novel technique for the integration of NiTi shape memory alloy wires and other non-bondable wire materials into silicon-based microelectromechanical system structures using a standard wire-bonding tool. The efficient placement and alignment functions of the wire-bonding tool are used to mechanically attach the wire to deep-etched silicon anchoring and clamping structures. This approach enables a reliable and accurate integration of wire materials that cannot be wire bonded by traditional means.

  14. Tungsten devices in analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiandeng; Jones, Bradley T.

    2002-04-01

    Tungsten devices have been employed in analytical atomic spectrometry for approximately 30 years. Most of these atomizers can be electrically heated up to 3000 °C at very high heating rates, with a simple power supply. Usually, a tungsten device is employed in one of two modes: as an electrothermal atomizer with which the sample vapor is probed directly, or as an electrothermal vaporizer, which produces a sample aerosol that is then carried to a separate atomizer for analysis. Tungsten devices may take various physical shapes: tubes, cups, boats, ribbons, wires, filaments, coils and loops. Most of these orientations have been applied to many analytical techniques, such as atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, atomic fluorescence spectrometry, laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry, metastable transfer emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and microwave plasma atomic spectrometry. The analytical figures of merit and the practical applications reported for these techniques are reviewed. Atomization mechanisms reported for tungsten atomizers are also briefly summarized. In addition, less common applications of tungsten devices are discussed, including analyte preconcentration by adsorption or electrodeposition and electrothermal separation of analytes prior to analysis. Tungsten atomization devices continue to provide simple, versatile alternatives for analytical atomic spectrometry.

  15. A Full-Visible-Spectrum Invisibility Cloak for Mesoscopic Metal Wires.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; An, Byeong Wan; Cho, Eunjin; Hyun, Byung Gwan; Moon, Yoon-Jong; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Park, Jang-Ung

    2018-06-13

    Structured metals can sustain a very large scattering cross-section that is induced by localized surface plasmons, which often has an adverse effect on their use as transparent electrodes in displays, touch screens, and smart windows due to an issue of low clarity. Here, we report a broadband optical cloaking strategy for the network of mesoscopic metal wires with submicrometer to micrometer diameters, which is exploited for manufacturing and application of high-clarity metal-wires-based transparent electrodes. We prepare electrospun Ag wires with 300-1800 nm in diameter and perform a facile surface oxidation process to form Ag/Ag 2 O core/shell heterogeneous structures. The absorptive Ag 2 O shell, together with the coating of a dielectric cover, leads to the cancellation of electric multipole moments in Ag wires, thereby drastically suppressing plasmon-mediated scattering over the full visible spectrum and rendering Ag wires to be invisible. Simultaneously with the effect of invisibility, the transmittance of Ag/Ag 2 O wires is significantly improved compared to bare Ag wires, despite the formation of an absorptive Ag 2 O shell. As an application example, we demonstrate that these invisible Ag wires serve as a high-clarity, high-transmittance, and high-speed defroster for automotive windshields.

  16. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yuhu; Calzolaio, Ciro; Senatore, Carmine

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanicalmore » loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.« less

  17. Activation of C-O and C-C bonds and formation of novel HAlOH-ether complexes: an EPR study of the reaction of ground-state Al atoms with methylethyl ether and diethyl ether.

    PubMed

    Brunet, François D; Feola, Julie C; Joly, Helen A

    2012-03-15

    Reaction mixtures, containing Al atoms and methylethyl ether (MEE) or diethyl ether (DEE) in an adamantane matrix, were prepared with the aid of a metal-atom reactor known as a rotating cryostat. The EPR spectra of the resulting products were recorded from 77-260 K, at 10 K intervals. Al atoms were found to insert into methyl-O, ethyl-O, and C-C bonds to form CH(3)AlOCH(2)CH(3), CH(3)OAlCH(2)CH(3), and CH(3)OCH(2)AlCH(3), respectively, in the case of MEE while DEE produced CH(3)CH(2)AlOCH(2)CH(3) and CH(3)AlCH(2)OCH(2)CH(3), respectively. From the intensity of the transition lines attributed to the Al atom C-O insertion products of MEE, insertion into the methyl-O bond is preferred. The Al hyperfine interaction (hfi) extracted from the EPR spectra of the C-O insertion products was greater than that of the C-C insertion products, that is, 5.4% greater for the DEE system and 7% greater for the MEE system. The increase in Al hfi is thought to arise from the increased electron-withdrawing ability of the substituents bonded to Al. Besides HAlOH, resulting from the reaction of Al atoms with adventitious water, novel mixed HAlOH:MEE and HAlOH:DEE complexes were identified with the aid of isotopic studies involving H(2)(17)O and D(2)O. The Al and H hfi of HAlOH were found to decrease upon complex formation. These findings are consistent with the nuclear hfi calculated using a density functional theory (DFT) method with close agreement between theory and experiment occurring at the B3LYP level using a 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set.

  18. Frequency response in short thermocouple wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Meeks, E. L.; Ma, J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. The amplitude ratio at low frequency omega approaches 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) for a steady state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a nonuniform wire in the limit of infinite length l approaches infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties. Theoretical expressions are also derived for the steady state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire and a two material wire with unequal material properties across the junction. For the case of a one material supported wire, an exact solution is derived which compares favorably with an approximate expression that only matches temperatures at the support junction. Moreover, for the case of a two material supported wire, an analytical expression is derived that closely correlates numerical results. Experimental measurements are made for the steady state frequency response of a supported thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a supported one material wire (type K) and a two material wire (type T) with unequal material properties across the junction. The data for the amplitude ratio and phase angle are correlated to within 10 pct. with the theoretical predictions of Forney and Fralick (1991). This is accomplished by choosing a natural frequency omega sub n for the wire data to correlate the first order response at large gas temperature frequencies. It is found that a large bead size, however, will increase the amplitude ratio at

  19. Electron Beam-Induced Writing of Nanoscale Iron Wires on a Functional Metal Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam-induced surface activation (EBISA) has been used to grow wires of iron on rutile TiO2(110)-(1 × 1) in ultrahigh vacuum. The wires have a width down to ∼20 nm and hence have potential utility as interconnects on this dielectric substrate. Wire formation was achieved using an electron beam from a scanning electron microscope to activate the surface, which was subsequently exposed to Fe(CO)5. On the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy measurements, the activation mechanism involves electron beam-induced surface reduction and restructuring. PMID:24159366

  20. Application Of Numerical Modelling To Ribbed Wire Rod Dimensions Precision Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szota, Piotr; Mróz, Sebastian; Stefanik, Andrzej

    2007-05-01

    The paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the process of rolling square ribbed wire rod designed for concrete reinforcement. Numerical modelling of the process of rolling in the finishing and pre-finishing grooves was carried out using the Forge2005® software. In the investigation, particular consideration was given to the analysis of the effect of pre-finished band shape on the formation of ribs on the finished wire rod in the finishing groove. The results of theoretical studies were verified in experimental tests, which were carried out in a wire rolling mill.

  1. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD)

    PubMed Central

    Nazarov, Denis V.; Zemtsova, Elena G.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Smirnov, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD), chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD). For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions) and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO2 films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material. PMID:28793716

  2. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Esboui, Mounir, E-mail: mounir.esboui@fst.rnu.tn; Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Hail College of Technology, P.O. Box 1960, Hail 81441

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocationmore » analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.« less

  3. Electromagnetic scattering by a straight thin wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamansky, Harry T.; Dominek, Allen K.; Peters, Leon, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The traveling-wave energy, which multiply diffracts on a straight thin wire, is represented as a sum of terms, each with a distinct physical meaning, that can be individually examined in the time domain. Expressions for each scattering mechanism on a straight thin wire are cast in the form of four basic electromagnetic wave concepts: diffraction, attachment, launch, and reflection. Using the basic mechanisms from P. Ya. Ufimtsev (1962), each of the scattering mechanisms is included into the total scattered field for the straight thin wire. Scattering as a function of angle and frequency is then compared to the moment-method solution. These analytic expressions are then extended to a lossy wire with a simple approximate modification using the propagation velocity on the wire as derived from the Sommerfeld wave on a straight lossy wire. Both the perfectly conducting and lossy wire solutions are compared to moment-method results, and excellent agreement is found. As is common with asymptotic solutions, when the electrical length of wire is smaller than 0.2 lambda the results lose accuracy. The expressions modified to approximate the scattering for the lossy thin wire yield excellent agreement even for lossy wires where the wire radius is on the order of skin depth.

  4. SpaceWire Data Handling Demonstration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S.; Parkes, S. M.; O'Gribin, N.

    2007-08-01

    The SpaceWire standard was published in 2003 with the aim of providing a standard for onboard communications, defining the physical and data link layers of an interconnection, in order to improve reusability, reliability and to reduce the cost of mission development. The many benefits which it provides mean that it has already been used in a number of missions, both in Europe and throughout the world. Recent work by the SpaceWire community has included the development of higher level protocols for SpaceWire, such as the Remote Memory Access Protocol (RMAP) which can be used for many purposes, including the configuration of SpaceWire devices. Although SpaceWire has become very popular, the various ways in which it can be used are still being discovered, as are the most efficient ways to use it. At the same time, some in the space industry are not even aware of SpaceWire's existence. This paper describes the SpaceWire Data Handling Demonstration System that has been developed by the University of Dundee. This system simulates an onboard data handling network based on SpaceWire. It uses RMAP for all communication, and so demonstrates how SpaceWire and standardised higher level protocols can be used onboard a spacecraft. The system is not only a good advert for those who are unfamiliar with the benefits of SpaceWire, it is also a useful tool for those using SpaceWire to test ideas.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1003-1 - Other requirements for guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003-1 Section 75.1003-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003-1 Other requirements for guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. Adequate precaution shall be taken to insure that equipment being moved along...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1003-1 - Other requirements for guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003-1 Section 75.1003-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003-1 Other requirements for guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. Adequate precaution shall be taken to insure that equipment being moved along...

  7. Anisotropic Thermal Response of Packed Copper Wire

    DOE PAGES

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Emily Cousineau, J.; Bennion, Kevin; ...

    2017-04-19

    The apparent thermal conductivity of packed copper wire test specimens was measured parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the wire using laser flash, transient plane source, and transmittance test methods. Approximately 50% wire packing efficiency was produced in the specimens using either 670- or 925-μm-diameter copper wires that both had an insulation coating thickness of 37 μm. The interstices were filled with a conventional varnish material and also contained some remnant porosity. The apparent thermal conductivity perpendicular to the wire axis was about 0.5–1 W/mK, whereas it was over 200 W/mK in the parallel direction. The Kanzaki model andmore » an finite element analysis (FEA) model were found to reasonably predict the apparent thermal conductivity perpendicular to the wires but thermal conductivity percolation from nonideal wire-packing may result in their underestimation of it.« less

  8. Wire Crimp Connectors Verification using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Perey, Daniel F.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp connections is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp connector and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which previously has been used to assess crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies (missing wire strands, incorrect wire gauge, incomplete wire insertion in connector) are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with pull-testing data) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying the technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented.

  9. Low temperature formation of higher-k cubic phase HfO{sub 2} by atomic layer deposition on GeO{sub x}/Ge structures fabricated by in-situ thermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R., E-mail: zhang@mosfet.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027; Huang, P.-C.

    2016-02-01

    We have demonstrated a low temperature formation (300 °C) of higher-k HfO{sub 2} using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on an in-situ thermal oxidation GeO{sub x} interfacial layer. It is found that the cubic phase is dominant in the HfO{sub 2} film with an epitaxial-like growth behavior. The maximum permittivity of 42 is obtained for an ALD HfO{sub 2} film on a 1-nm-thick GeO{sub x} form by the in-situ thermal oxidation. It is suggested from physical analyses that the crystallization of cubic phase HfO{sub 2} can be induced by the formation of six-fold crystalline GeO{sub x} structures in the underlying GeO{sub x}more » interfacial layer.« less

  10. Sintered wire cesium dispenser photocathode

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Eric J; Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Louis R

    2014-03-04

    A photoelectric cathode has a work function lowering material such as cesium placed into an enclosure which couples a thermal energy from a heater to the work function lowering material. The enclosure directs the work function lowering material in vapor form through a low diffusion layer, through a free space layer, and through a uniform porosity layer, one side of which also forms a photoelectric cathode surface. The low diffusion layer may be formed from sintered powdered metal, such as tungsten, and the uniform porosity layer may be formed from wires which are sintered together to form pores between the wires which are continuous from the a back surface to a front surface which is also the photoelectric surface.

  11. Mobile atom traps using magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, D. A.; Schrefl, T.; Hrkac, G.; Hughes, I. G.; Adams, C. S.

    2006-07-01

    By solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation using a finite element method we show that an atom trap can be produced above a ferromagnetic nanowire domain wall. Atoms experience trap frequencies of up to a few megahertz, and can be transported by applying a weak magnetic field along the wire. Lithographically defined nanowire patterns could allow quantum information processing by bringing domain walls in close proximity at certain places to allow trapped atom interactions and far apart at others to allow individual addressing.

  12. Energetics and electronic properties of Pt wires of different topologies on monolayer MoSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Jamdagni, Pooja, E-mail: j.poojaa1228@gmail.com; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-05-23

    The energetics and electronic properties of different topology of Pt wires including linear, zigzag and ladder structures on MoSe{sub 2} monolayer have been investigated in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The predicted order of stability of Pt wire on MoSe{sub 2} monolayer is found to be: linear > ladder > zigzag. Pt wires induce states near the Fermi level of MoSe{sub 2} that results into metallic characteristics of Pt-wire/MoSe{sub 2} assembled system. Valence band charge density signifies most of the contribution from Pt atoms near the Fermi energy of assembled wire/MoSe{sub 2} system. These findings are expected tomore » be important for the fabrication of devices based on MoSe{sub 2} layers for flexible nanoelectronics.« less

  13. Thermoelectric performance of various benzo-difuran wires

    SciTech Connect

    Péterfalvi, Csaba G.; Grace, Iain; Manrique, Dávid Zs.

    2014-05-07

    Using a first principles approach to electron transport, we calculate the electrical and thermoelectrical transport properties of a series of molecular wires containing benzo-difuran subunits. We demonstrate that the side groups introduce Fano resonances, the energy of which is changing with the electronegativity of selected atoms in it. We also study the relative effect of single, double, or triple bonds along the molecular backbone and find that single bonds yield the highest thermopower, approximately 22 μV/K at room temperature, which is comparable with the highest measured values for single-molecule thermopower reported to date.

  14. Shock-tube measurements of carbon to oxygen atom ratios for incipient soot formation with C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6 fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radcliffe, S. W.; Appleton, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The critical atomic carbon to oxygen ratios, Phi sub C, for incipient soot formation in shock heated acetylene, ethylene, ethane/oxygen/ argon mixtures was measured over the temperature range 2000 K to 2500 K for reactant partial pressures between 0.1 and 0.4 atoms. Absorption of light from a He-Ne laser at 6328A was was used to detect soot. It was observed that the values of Phi sub C for all three fuels increased uniformly with temperature such that at the highest temperatures Phi sub C was considerably greater than unity, i.e. greater than the value of about unity at which solid carbon should have been precipitated on a thermochemical equilibrium basis. Observations were made over periods extending up to about one millisecond, which was well in excess of the time required for the major heat release of the combustion reactions. The relevance of these experimental findings to the problem of soot formation in gas turbine combustion chambers is discussed.

  15. 1 mil gold bond wire study.

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Johnathon; McLean, Michael B.; Jenkins, Mark W.

    2013-05-01

    In microcircuit fabrication, the diameter and length of a bond wire have been shown to both affect the current versus fusing time ratio of a bond wire as well as the gap length of the fused wire. This study investigated the impact of current level on the time-to-open and gap length of 1 mil by 60 mil gold bond wires. During the experiments, constant current was provided for a control set of bond wires for 250ms, 410ms and until the wire fused; non-destructively pull-tested wires for 250ms; and notched wires. The key findings were that as the current increases, themore » gap length increases and 73% of the bond wires will fuse at 1.8A, and 100% of the wires fuse at 1.9A within 60ms. Due to the limited scope of experiments and limited data analyzed, further investigation is encouraged to confirm these observations.« less

  16. Method and apparatus for laying wire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Horowitz, Seymour M.; Nesbitt, Dale D.

    1986-01-01

    Wire arrays (11) having a continuous wire (12) which is formed into a predetermined pattern and adhered to a backing material or substrate (13) are fabricated by applying adhesive material (16a, 16b) along opposite edge portions (17, 18) of the substrate, positioning a row of winding spools (21) along each of the edge portions and repeatedly extending the wire between and around successive spools at the opposite edge portions. The wound wire is then traveled along each spool toward the substrate and into contact with the adhesive. The spools are then removed and a coating of hardenable material (54) is applied to secure the wound wire to the substrate. Tension in the wire is relieved prior to contact of the wire with the adhesive and a small amount of slack is introduced into the wire before the final coating step. Mechanism (32) is provided for lifting the spools away from the substrate without disturbing the wound wire. The method and apparatus enable manufacture of precisely configured wire arrays without complex or costly equipment and do not require structural alterations in the substrate for the purpose of accommodating to fabrication equipment.

  17. Atomic layer deposition and post-growth thermal annealing of ultrathin MoO3 layers on silicon substrates: Formation of surface nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongfei; Yang, Ren Bin; Yang, Weifeng; Jin, Yunjiang; Lee, Coryl J. J.

    2018-05-01

    Ultrathin MoO3 layers have been grown on Si substrates at 120 °C by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using molybdenum hexacarbonyl [Mo(CO)6] and ozone (O3) as the Mo- and O-source precursors, respectively. The ultrathin films were further annealed in air at Tann = 550-750 °C for 15 min. Scanning-electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been employed to evaluate the morphological and elemental properties as well as their evolutions upon annealing of the thin films. They revealed an interfacial SiOx layer in between the MoO3 layer and the Si substrate; this SiOx layer converted into SiO2 during the annealing; and the equivalent thickness of the MoO3 (SiO2) layer decreased (increased) with the increase in Tann. Particles with diameters smaller than 50 nm emerged at Tann = 550 °C and their sizes (density) were reduced (increased) by increasing Tann to 650 °C. A further increase of Tann to 750 °C resulted in telephone-cord-like MoO3 structures, initiated from isolated particles on the surface. These observations have been discussed and interpreted based on temperature-dependent atomic interdiffusions, surface evaporations, and/or melting of MoO3, which shed new light on ALD MoO3 towards its electronic applications.

  18. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    PubMed

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  19. Rodent Zic Genes in Neural Network Wiring.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Eloísa

    2018-01-01

    The formation of the nervous system is a multistep process that yields a mature brain. Failure in any of the steps of this process may cause brain malfunction. In the early stages of embryonic development, neural progenitors quickly proliferate and then, at a specific moment, differentiate into neurons or glia. Once they become postmitotic neurons, they migrate to their final destinations and begin to extend their axons to connect with other neurons, sometimes located in quite distant regions, to establish different neural circuits. During the last decade, it has become evident that Zic genes, in addition to playing important roles in early development (e.g., gastrulation and neural tube closure), are involved in different processes of late brain development, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and refinement of axon terminals. ZIC proteins are therefore essential for the proper wiring and connectivity of the brain. In this chapter, we review our current knowledge of the role of Zic genes in the late stages of neural circuit formation.

  20. Surface characterization of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Manu; Seema, Saraswathy; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sharma, Himanshu S.; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires poses several clinical challenges. Surface modification with aesthetic/metallic/non metallic materials is therefore a recent innovation, with clinical efficacy yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Methods One conventional and five types of surface modified nickel titanium arch wires were surface characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy and 3D profilometry. Root mean square roughness values were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and post hoc Duncan's multiple range tests. Results Study groups demonstrated considerable reduction in roughness values from conventional in a material specific pattern: Group I; conventional (578.56 nm) > Group V; Teflon (365.33 nm) > Group III; nitride (301.51 nm) > Group VI (i); rhodium (290.64 nm) > Group VI (ii); silver (252.22 nm) > Group IV; titanium (229.51 nm) > Group II; resin (158.60 nm). It also showed the defects with aesthetic (resin/Teflon) and nitride surfaces and smooth topography achieved with metals; titanium/silver/rhodium. Conclusions Resin, Teflon, titanium, silver, rhodium and nitrides were effective in decreasing surface roughness of nickel titanium arch wires albeit; certain flaws. Findings have clinical implications, considering their potential in lessening biofilm adhesion, reducing friction, improving corrosion resistance and preventing nickel leach and allergic reactions. PMID:26843749

  1. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of NiTi dental wires: a comparison of laboratory experiments and clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Toker, S M; Canadinc, D

    2014-07-01

    Effects of intraoral environment on the surface degradation of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy orthodontic wires was simulated through ex situ static immersion experiments in artificial saliva. The tested wires were compared to companion wires retrieved from patients in terms of chemical changes and formation of new structures on the surface. Results of the ex situ experiments revealed that the acidic erosion effective at the earlier stages of immersion led to the formation of new structures as the immersion period approached 30 days. Moreover, comparison of these results with the analysis of wires utilized in clinical treatment evidenced that ex situ experiments are reliable in terms predicting C-rich structure formation on the wire surfaces. However, the formation of C pileups at the contact sites of arch wires and brackets could not be simulated with the aid of static immersion experiments, warranting the simulation of the intraoral environment in terms of both chemical and physical conditions, including mechanical loading, when evaluating the biocompatibility of NiTi orthodontic arch wires. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Brian; Naides, Matthew; Turner, Richard; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin

    2010-03-01

    Atom chip technology---substrates supporting micron-sized current-carrying wires that create magnetic microtraps near surfaces for thermal or degenerate gases of neutral atoms---will enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux below the 10-7 flux quantum level. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, cryogenic atom chips could provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses all other techniques by a factor of 10^2--10^3. We describe the merits of atom chip microscopy, our Rb BEC and atom chip apparatus, and prospects for imaging strongly correlated condensed matter materials.

  3. A Vibrating Wire System For Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    A vibrating wire system is being developed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note provides a detailed analysis of the system. The LCLS will have quadrupoles between the undulator segments to keep the electron beam focused. If the quadrupoles are not centered on the beam axis, the beam will receive transverse kicks, causing it to deviate from the undulator axis. Beam based alignment will be used to move the quadrupoles onto a straight line, but an initial, conventional alignment must place the quadrupole centers on a straight line to 100 {micro}m. In the fiducialization stepmore » of the initial alignment, the position of the center of the quadrupole is measured relative to tooling balls on the outside of the quadrupole. The alignment crews then use the tooling balls to place the magnet in the tunnel. The required error on the location of the quadrupole center relative to the tooling balls must be less than 25 {micro}m. In this note, we analyze a system under construction for the quadrupole fiducialization. The system uses the vibrating wire technique to position a wire onto the quadrupole magnetic axis. The wire position is then related to tooling balls using wire position detectors. The tooling balls on the wire position detectors are finally related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to perform the fiducialization. The total 25 {micro}m fiducialization error must be divided between these three steps. The wire must be positioned onto the quadrupole magnetic axis to within 10 {micro}m, the wire position must be measured relative to tooling balls on the wire position detectors to within 15 {micro}m, and tooling balls on the wire position detectors must be related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to within 10 {micro}m. The techniques used in these three steps will be discussed. The note begins by discussing various quadrupole fiducialization techniques used in the past and discusses why the vibrating wire technique is our

  4. Wire ablation dynamics model and its application to imploding wire arrays of different geometries.

    PubMed

    Esaulov, A A; Kantsyrev, V L; Safronova, A S; Velikovich, A L; Shrestha, I K; Williamson, K M; Osborne, G C

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents an extended description of the amplified wire ablation dynamics model (WADM), which accounts in a single simulation for the processes of wire ablation and implosion of a wire array load of arbitrary geometry and wire material composition. To investigate the role of wire ablation effects, the implosions of cylindrical and planar wire array loads at the university based generators Cobra (Cornell University) and Zebra (University of Nevada, Reno) have been analyzed. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the wire mass ablation rate can be described as a function of the current through the wire and some coefficient defined by the wire material properties. The aluminum wires were found to ablate with the highest rate, while the copper ablation is the slowest one. The lower wire ablation rate results in a higher inward velocity of the ablated plasma, a higher rate of the energy coupling with the ablated plasma, and a more significant delay of implosion for a heavy load due to the ablation effects, which manifest the most in a cylindrical array configuration and almost vanish in a single-planar array configuration. The WADM is an efficient tool suited for wire array load design and optimization in wide parameter ranges, including the loads with specific properties needed for the inertial confinement fusion research and laboratory astrophysics experiments. The data output from the WADM simulation can be used to simplify the radiation magnetohydrodynamics modeling of the wire array plasma.

  5. In-situ observation of the growth of individual silicon wires in the zinc reduction reaction of SiCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasawa, Susumu

    2015-02-01

    We conducted in-situ monitoring of the formation of silicon wires in the zinc reduction reaction of SiCl4 at 950 °C. Tip growth with a constant growth rate was observed. Some wires showed a sudden change in the growth direction during their growth. We also observed both the lateral faces and cross sections of formed wires using a scanning electron microscope. Although wires with smooth lateral faces had a smooth hexagonal cross section, those with rough lateral faces had a polygonal cross section with a radial pattern. The transition of lateral faces from smooth to rough was found even in a single wire. Because the diameter of the rough part became larger than that of the smooth part, we consider that the wire diameter is a key factor for the lateral faces. Our study revealed that both dynamic and static observations are still necessary to further understand the VLS growth of wires and nanowires.

  6. Waveguide bends from nanometric silica wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Limin; Lou, Jingyi; Mazur, Eric

    2005-02-01

    We propose to use bent silica wires with nanometric diameters to guide light as optical waveguide bend. We bend silica wires with scanning tunneling microscope probes under an optical microscope, and wire bends with bending radius smaller than 5 μm are obtained. Light from a He-Ne laser is launched into and guided through the wire bends, measured bending loss of a single bend is on the order of 1 dB. Brief introductions to the optical wave guiding and elastic bending properties of silica wires are also provided. Comparing with waveguide bends based on photonic bandgap structures, the waveguide bends from silica nanometric wires show advantages of simple structure, small overall size, easy fabrication and wide useful spectral range, which make them potentially useful in the miniaturization of photonic devices.

  7. Self-Catalyzed CdTe Wires.

    PubMed

    Baines, Tom; Papageorgiou, Giorgos; Hutter, Oliver S; Bowen, Leon; Durose, Ken; Major, Jonathan D

    2018-04-25

    CdTe wires have been fabricated via a catalyst free method using the industrially scalable physical vapor deposition technique close space sublimation. Wire growth was shown to be highly dependent on surface roughness and deposition pressure, with only low roughness surfaces being capable of producing wires. Growth of wires is highly (111) oriented and is inferred to occur via a vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism, wherein a CdTe seed particle acts to template the growth. Such seed particles are visible as wire caps and have been characterized via energy dispersive X-ray analysis to establish they are single phase CdTe, hence validating the self-catalysation route. Cathodoluminescence analysis demonstrates that CdTe wires exhibited a much lower level of recombination when compared to a planar CdTe film, which is highly beneficial for semiconductor applications.

  8. Direct simulation of heat transfer in a turbulent swept flow over a wire in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Reetesh; Pantano, Carlos; Fischer, Paul; Siegel, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of heat transfer (considered as a passive scalar) in a turbulent swept flow across a thin, cylindrical wire in a channel. This model mimics the flow through the wire-wrapped fuel pins typical of fast neutron reactor designs. Mean flow develops both along the wire and across the wire, leading to the formation of a turbulent cross-flow regime in the channel. This leads to improvement in heat transfer properties of the channel surface due to enhancement in mixing. The friction Reynolds number in the axial direction is approximately 305. Cross-flow friction Reynolds numbers ranging from 0 to 115 are examined. Two passive scalars at Prandtl number of 1.0 and 0.01 respectively, are simulated in this study. Constant flux boundary conditions are used along the walls of the channel and adiabatic conditions are used along the surface of the wire. The numerical method uses spectral elements in the plane perpendicular to the wire axis and Fourier decomposition in the direction of the axis of the wire. The simulations use up to 107 million collocation points and were performed at the Argonne Leadership BG/P supercomputer. The passive scalar field statistics are investigated, including mean scalar field, turbulence statistics and instantaneous surface scalar distribution.

  9. Release of nickel and chromium ions from orthodontic wires following the use of teeth whitening mouthwashes.

    PubMed

    Mirhashemi, AmirHossein; Jahangiri, Sahar; Kharrazifard, MohammadJavad

    2018-02-05

    Corrosion resistance is an important requirement for orthodontic appliances. Nickel and chromium may be released from orthodontic wires and can cause allergic reactions and cytotoxicity when patients use various mouthwashes to whiten their teeth. Our study aimed to assess the release of nickel and chromium ions from nickel titanium (NiTi) and stainless steel (SS) orthodontic wires following the use of four common mouthwashes available on the market. This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 120 orthodontic appliances for one maxillary quadrant including five brackets, one band and half of the required length of SS, and NiTi wires. The samples were immersed in Oral B, Oral B 3D White Luxe, Listerine, and Listerine Advance White for 1, 6, 24, and 168 h. The samples immersed in distilled water served as the control group. Atomic absorption spectroscopy served to quantify the amount of released ions. Nickel ions were released from both wires at all time-points; the highest amount was in Listerine and the lowest in Oral B mouthwashes. The remaining two solutions were in-between this range. The process of release of chromium from the SS wire was the same as that of nickel. However, the release trend in NiTi wires was not uniform. Listerine caused the highest release of ions. Listerine Advance White, Oral B 3D White Luxe, and distilled water were the same in terms of ion release. Oral B showed the lowest amount of ion release.

  10. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  11. Radiofrequency Wire Recanalization of Chronically Thrombosed TIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Majdalany, Bill S., E-mail: bmajdala@med.umich.edu; Elliott, Eric D., E-mail: eric.elliott@osumc.edu; Michaels, Anthony J., E-mail: Anthony.michaels@osumc.edu

    Radiofrequency (RF) guide wires have been applied to cardiac interventions, recanalization of central venous thromboses, and to cross biliary occlusions. Herein, the use of a RF wire technique to revise chronically occluded transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is described. In both cases, conventional TIPS revision techniques failed to revise the chronically thrombosed TIPS. RF wire recanalization was successfully performed through each of the chronically thrombosed TIPS, demonstrating initial safety and feasibility in this application.

  12. Space Shuttle Columbia Aging Wiring Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniels, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Columbia main engine controller 14 AWG wire short circuited during the launch of STS-93. Post-flight examination divulged that the wire had electrically arced against the head of a nearby bolt. More extensive inspection revealed additional damage to the subject wire, and to other wires as well from the mid-body of Columbia. The shorted wire was to have been constructed from nickel-plated copper conductors surrounded by the polyimide insulation Kapton, top-coated with an aromatic polyimide resin. The wires were analyzed via scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX), and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA); differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the polyimide. Exemplar testing under laboratory conditions was performed to replicate the mechanical damage characteristics evident on the failed wires. The exemplar testing included a step test, where, as the name implies, a person stepped on a simulated wire bundle that rested upon a bolt head. Likewise, a shear test that forced a bolt head and a torque tip against a wire was performed to attempt to damage the insulation and conductor. Additionally, a vibration test was performed to determine if a wire bundle would abrade when vibrated against the head of a bolt. Also, an abrasion test was undertaken to determine if the polyimide of the wire could be damaged by rubbing against convolex helical tubing. Finally, an impact test was performed to ascertain if the use of the tubing would protect the wire from the strike of a foreign object.

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation of Aircraft and Spacecraft Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E.; Tucholski, Edward J.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft, and especially aircraft, often fry well past their original design lives and, therefore, the need to develop nondestructive evaluation procedures for inspection of vital structures in these craft is extremely important. One of the more recent problems is the degradation of wiring and wiring insulation. The present paper describes several nondestructive characterization methods which afford the possibility to detect wiring and insulation degradation in-situ prior to major problems with the safety of aircraft and spacecraft.

  14. Wired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Aaron R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses technology's impact on scoreboard design: the development of the light-emitting diode (LED) display. How the LED system works is explained, as are the advantages and disadvantages of LED compared with incandescent lamp boards. Final comments address deciding on materials for scoreboard casings. (GR)

  15. Magnetic Calorimeter Arrays with High Sensor Inductance and Dense Wiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Devasia, A. M.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.; Yoon, W.

    2018-05-01

    We describe prototype arrays of magnetically coupled microcalorimeters fabricated with an approach scalable to very large format arrays. The superconducting interconnections and sensor coils have sufficiently low inductance in the wiring and sufficiently high inductance in the coils in each pixel, to enable arrays containing greater than 4000 sensors and 100,000 X-ray absorbers to be used in future astrophysics missions such as Lynx. We have used projection lithography to create submicron patterns (e.g., 400 nm lines and spaces) in our niobium sensor coils and wiring, integrated with gold-erbium sensor films and gold X-ray absorbers. Our prototype devices will explore the device physics of metallic magnetic calorimeters as feature sizes are reduced to nanoscale.

  16. Comparative Reliability Studies and Analysis of Au, Pd-Coated Cu and Pd-Doped Cu Wire in Microelectronics Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Chong Leong, Gan; Uda, Hashim

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares and discusses the wearout reliability and analysis of Gold (Au), Palladium (Pd) coated Cu and Pd-doped Cu wires used in fineline Ball Grid Array (BGA) package. Intermetallic compound (IMC) thickness measurement has been carried out to estimate the coefficient of diffusion (Do) under various aging conditions of different bonding wires. Wire pull and ball bond shear strengths have been analyzed and we found smaller variation in Pd-doped Cu wire compared to Au and Pd-doped Cu wire. Au bonds were identified to have faster IMC formation, compared to slower IMC growth of Cu. The obtained weibull slope, β of three bonding wires are greater than 1.0 and belong to wearout reliability data point. Pd-doped Cu wire exhibits larger time-to-failure and cycles-to-failure in both wearout reliability tests in Highly Accelerated Temperature and Humidity (HAST) and Temperature Cycling (TC) tests. This proves Pd-doped Cu wire has a greater potential and higher reliability margin compared to Au and Pd-coated Cu wires. PMID:24244344

  17. Adjustable Bracket For Entry Of Welding Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.

    1993-01-01

    Wire-entry bracket on welding torch in robotic welding system provides for adjustment of angle of entry of welding wire over range of plus or minus 30 degrees from nominal entry angle. Wire positioned so it does not hide weld joint in view of through-the-torch computer-vision system part of robot-controlling and -monitoring system. Swiveling bracket also used on nonvision torch on which wire-feed-through tube interferes with workpiece. Angle simply changed to one giving sufficient clearance.

  18. Measuring the elastic properties of fine wire.

    PubMed

    Fallen, C T; Costello, J; Crawford, G; Schmidt, J A

    2001-01-01

    The elastic moduli of fine wires made from MP35N and 304SS used in implantable biomedical devices are assumed to be the same as those published in the literature. However, the cold working required to manufacture the wire significantly alters the elastic moduli of the material. We describe three experiments performed on fine wire made from MP35N and 304SS. The experimentally determined Young's and shear modulus of both wire types were significantly less than the moduli reported in the literature. Young's modulus differed by as much as 26%, and the shear modulus differed by as much as 14% from reported values.

  19. A deployable .015 inch diameter wire antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibiasi, L.

    1979-01-01

    This mechanism was developed to dispense a small diameter wire which serves as a receiving antenna for electric field measurements on an Earth orbiting satellite. The antenna is deployed radially from a spinning satellite. A brushless dc motor drives a storage spool to dispense the wire at a controlled rate. Centrifugal force, acting on a mass attached to the end of the wire, keeps the wire in the radial position. The mechanism design, testing, and performance characteristics are discussed. Finally, operational data of the mechanism while in orbit are presented.

  20. Larger sized wire arrays on 1.5 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, A. S., E-mail: alla@unr.edu; Kantsyrev, V. L., E-mail: alla@unr.edu; Weller, M. E., E-mail: alla@unr.edu

    Experiments on the UNR Zebra generator with Load Current Multiplier (LCM) allow for implosions of larger sized wire array loads than at standard current of 1 MA. Advantages of larger sized planar wire array implosions include enhanced energy coupling to plasmas, better diagnostic access to observable plasma regions, and more complex geometries of the wire loads. The experiments with larger sized wire arrays were performed on 1.5 MA Zebra with LCM (the anode-cathode gap was 1 cm, which is half the gap used in the standard mode). In particular, larger sized multi-planar wire arrays had two outer wire planes frommore » mid-atomic-number wires to create a global magnetic field (gmf) and plasma flow between them. A modified central plane with a few Al wires at the edges was put in the middle between outer planes to influence gmf and to create Al plasma flow in the perpendicular direction (to the outer arrays plasma flow). Such modified plane has different number of empty slots: it was increased from 6 up to 10, hence increasing the gap inside the middle plane from 4.9 to 7.7 mm, respectively. Such load configuration allows for more independent study of the flows of L-shell mid-atomic-number plasma (between the outer planes) and K-shell Al plasma (which first fills the gap between the edge wires along the middle plane) and their radiation in space and time. We demonstrate that such configuration produces higher linear radiation yield and electron temperatures as well as advantages of better diagnostics access to observable plasma regions and how the load geometry (size of the gap in the middle plane) influences K-shell Al radiation. In particular, K-shell Al radiation was delayed compared to L-shell mid-atomic-number radiation when the gap in the middle plane was large enough (when the number of empty slots was increased up to ten)« less

  1. Superradiators created atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  2. Atomic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Colm T.

    2018-04-01

    A knowledge of atomic theory should be an essential part of every physicist's and chemist's toolkit. This book provides an introduction to the basic ideas that govern our understanding of microscopic matter, and the essential features of atomic structure and spectra are presented in a direct and easily accessible manner. Semi-classical ideas are reviewed and an introduction to the quantum mechanics of one and two electron systems and their interaction with external electromagnetic fields is featured. Multielectron atoms are also introduced, and the key methods for calculating their properties reviewed.

  3. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an MDU...

  4. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an MDU...

  5. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an MDU...

  6. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an MDU...

  7. 30 CFR 77.1430 - Wire ropes; scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wire ropes; scope. 77.1430 Section 77.1430... Hoisting Wire Ropes § 77.1430 Wire ropes; scope. (a) Sections 77.1431 through 77.1438 apply to wire ropes.... (b) These standards do not apply to wire ropes used for elevators. ...

  8. 30 CFR 77.1430 - Wire ropes; scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wire ropes; scope. 77.1430 Section 77.1430... Hoisting Wire Ropes § 77.1430 Wire ropes; scope. (a) Sections 77.1431 through 77.1438 apply to wire ropes.... (b) These standards do not apply to wire ropes used for elevators. ...

  9. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.802 Disposition of cable home wiring... alternative video programming service provider connects its wiring to the home wiring before the incumbent... alternative video programming service provider shall be responsible for ensuring that the incumbent's wiring...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1413 - Wire rope-inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Apparent deficiencies in this category are: (A) Visible broken wires, as follows: (1) In running wire ropes: Six randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or three broken wires in one strand in one rope... around the rope. (2) In rotation resistant ropes: Two randomly distributed broken wires in six rope...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1413 - Wire rope-inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Apparent deficiencies in this category are: (A) Visible broken wires, as follows: (1) In running wire ropes: Six randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or three broken wires in one strand in one rope... around the rope. (2) In rotation resistant ropes: Two randomly distributed broken wires in six rope...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1413 - Wire rope-inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Apparent deficiencies in this category are: (A) Visible broken wires, as follows: (1) In running wire ropes: Six randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or three broken wires in one strand in one rope... around the rope. (2) In rotation resistant ropes: Two randomly distributed broken wires in six rope...

  13. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems Wires and Cables § 236.74 Protection of insulated...

  14. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems Wires and Cables § 236.74 Protection of insulated...

  15. Spin correlations in quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chen; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2015-04-01

    We consider theoretically spin correlations in a one-dimensional quantum wire with Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction (RDI). The correlations of noninteracting electrons display electron spin resonance at a frequency proportional to the RDI coupling. Interacting electrons, upon varying the direction of the external magnetic field, transit from the state of Luttinger liquid (LL) to the spin-density wave (SDW) state. We show that the two-time total-spin correlations of these states are significantly different. In the LL, the projection of total spin to the direction of the RDI-induced field is conserved and the corresponding correlator is equal to zero. The correlators of two components perpendicular to the RDI field display a sharp electron-spin resonance driven by the RDI-induced intrinsic field. In contrast, in the SDW state, the longitudinal projection of spin dominates, whereas the transverse components are suppressed. This prediction indicates a simple way for an experimental diagnostic of the SDW in a quantum wire. We point out that the Luttinger model does not respect the spin conservation since it assumes the infinite Fermi sea. We propose a proper cutoff to correct this failure.

  16. Tuning a Tetrahertz Wire Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Qi; Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Tunable terahertz lasers are desirable in applications in sensing and spectroscopy because many biochemical species have strong spectral fingerprints at terahertz frequencies. Conventionally, the frequency of a laser is tuned in a similar manner to a stringed musical instrument, in which pitch is varied by changing the length of the string (the longitudinal component of the wave vector) and/ or its tension (the refractive index). However, such methods are difficult to implement in terahertz semiconductor lasers because of their poor outcoupling efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a novel tuning mechanism based on a unique 'wire laser' device for which the transverse dimension w is much much less than lambda. Placing a movable object close to the wire laser manipulates a large fraction of the waveguided mode propagating outside the cavity, thereby tuning its resonant frequency. Continuous single-mode redshift and blueshift tuning is demonstrated for the same device by using either a dielectric or metallic movable object. In combination, this enables a frequency tuning of approximately equal to 137 GHz (3.6%) from a single laser device at approximately equal to 3.8 THz.

  17. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  18. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  19. Abstract Sculptures: Wire and Plaster Cloth Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Presents a three-dimensional art project for middle-school students in which they create sculptures of plaster cloth and wire. The introduction explains that they learn about Alexander Calder, a master of using wire in art. Discusses how to make the sculptures. (CMK)

  20. Wire-Guide Manipulator For Automated Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Tim; White, Kevin; Gordon, Steve; Emerich, Dave; Richardson, Dave; Faulkner, Mike; Stafford, Dave; Mccutcheon, Kim; Neal, Ken; Milly, Pete

    1994-01-01

    Compact motor drive positions guide for welding filler wire. Drive part of automated wire feeder in partly or fully automated welding system. Drive unit contains three parallel subunits. Rotations of lead screws in three subunits coordinated to obtain desired motions in three degrees of freedom. Suitable for both variable-polarity plasma arc welding and gas/tungsten arc welding.

  1. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  2. Flywheel system using wire-wound rotor

    DOEpatents

    Chiao, Edward Young; Bender, Donald Arthur; Means, Andrew E.; Snyder, Philip K.

    2016-06-07

    A flywheel is described having a rotor constructed of wire wound onto a central form. The wire is prestressed, thus mitigating stresses that occur during operation. In another aspect, the flywheel incorporates a low-loss motor using electrically non-conducting permanent magnets.

  3. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires. Guy...

  4. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires. Guy...

  5. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires. Guy...

  6. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires. Guy...

  7. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  8. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the strain characteristics of the wire.

  9. Pretinning Nickel-Plated Wire Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igawa, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-plated copper shielding for wires pretinned for subsequent soldering with help of activated rosin flux. Shield cut at point 0.25 to 0.375 in. (6 to 10 mm) from cut end of outer jacket. Loosened end of shield straightened and pulled toward cut end. Insulation of inner wires kept intact during pretinning.

  10. Ultra-flexible biomedical electrodes and wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rositano, S. A.

    1970-01-01

    Soft, flexible electrode conforms to body contour during body motion. It is fabricated from an elastomer impregnated with a conductive powder which can be configured into any required shape, including a wire shape to connect the electrode directly to an electrical instrument or to a conventional metallic wire.

  11. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.J.; Suenaga, M.; Welch, D.

    1979-12-19

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  12. Add-On Shielding for Unshielded Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. C.; Billitti, J. W.; Tallon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Fabrication sequence used to produce compact shields slipped into place from free ends of wires already soldered into connectors at other ends. Single shields are formed into harnesses by connecting grounding jumpers. Technique is especially useful for small diameter wire attached to microminiature connectors.

  13. MSFC inspections of installed polyimide wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landers, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    An alert was issued because of the arc-tracking possibilities of installed polyimide wire harnesses. MSFC undertook a program to try to enhance the safety and reliability of these harnesses. Photographs are presented showing the need for inspections of installed wiring harnesses.

  14. Atomic-scale models of early-stage alkali depletion and SiO2-rich gel formation in bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of Na(+)/H(+)-exchanged 45S5 Bioglass® models reveal that a large fraction of the hydroxyl groups introduced into the proton-exchanged, hydrated glass structure do not initially form covalent bonds with Si and P network formers but remain free and stabilised by the modifier metal cations, whereas substantial Si-OH and P-OH bonding is observed only at higher Na(+)/H(+) exchange levels. The strong affinity between free OH groups and modifier cations in the highly fragmented 45S5 glass structure appears to represent the main driving force for this effect. This suggests an alternative direct route for the formation of a repolymerised silica-rich gel in the early stages of the bioactive mechanism, not considered before, which does not require sequential repeated breakings of Si-O-Si bonds and silanol condensations.

  15. FIBER AND INTEGRATED OPTICS. OPTOELECTRONICS: Some characteristics of formation of volume dynamic holograms by concurrent waves propagating in resonant atomic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilenko, A. K.

    1989-07-01

    An investigation was made of the transient process of formation of volume dynamic holograms by light within the spectral limits of the D2 resonant absorption line of sodium. The observed asymmetry of the spectral distribution of the gain of the signal waves in the case of a concurrent interaction between four beams was attributed to different mechanisms of the interaction, the main of which were a four-wave interaction in the long-wavelength wing and transient two-beam energy transfer in the short-wavelength wing. The results obtained were used to recommend an experimental method for the determination of the relative contributions of these processes to the amplification of signal waves.

  16. Time-Resolved In Situ Liquid-Phase Atomic Force Microscopy and Infrared Nanospectroscopy during the Formation of Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Mandemaker, Laurens D B; Filez, Matthias; Delen, Guusje; Tan, Huanshu; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-04-19

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films show unmatched promise as smart membranes and photocatalytic coatings. However, their nucleation and growth resulting from intricate molecular assembly processes are not well understood yet are crucial to control the thin film properties. Here, we directly observe the nucleation and growth behavior of HKUST-1 thin films by real-time in situ AFM at different temperatures in a Cu-BTC solution. In combination with ex situ infrared (nano)spectroscopy, synthesis at 25 °C reveals initial nucleation of rapidly growing HKUST-1 islands surrounded by a continuously nucleating but slowly growing HKUST-1 carpet. Monitoring at 13 and 50 °C shows the strong impact of temperature on thin film formation, resulting in (partial) nucleation and growth inhibition. The nucleation and growth mechanisms as well as their kinetics provide insights to aid in future rational design of MOF thin films.

  17. Time-Resolved In Situ Liquid-Phase Atomic Force Microscopy and Infrared Nanospectroscopy during the Formation of Metal–Organic Framework Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Metal–organic framework (MOF) thin films show unmatched promise as smart membranes and photocatalytic coatings. However, their nucleation and growth resulting from intricate molecular assembly processes are not well understood yet are crucial to control the thin film properties. Here, we directly observe the nucleation and growth behavior of HKUST-1 thin films by real-time in situ AFM at different temperatures in a Cu-BTC solution. In combination with ex situ infrared (nano)spectroscopy, synthesis at 25 °C reveals initial nucleation of rapidly growing HKUST-1 islands surrounded by a continuously nucleating but slowly growing HKUST-1 carpet. Monitoring at 13 and 50 °C shows the strong impact of temperature on thin film formation, resulting in (partial) nucleation and growth inhibition. The nucleation and growth mechanisms as well as their kinetics provide insights to aid in future rational design of MOF thin films. PMID:29595980

  18. 30 CFR 57.14160 - Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground. 57... wire hazards underground. Mantrips shall be covered if there is danger of persons contacting the trolley wire. ...

  19. 30 CFR 57.14160 - Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground. 57... wire hazards underground. Mantrips shall be covered if there is danger of persons contacting the trolley wire. ...

  20. Stiffness Corrections for the Vibration Frequency of a Stretched Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, H. G.; Durie, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the need of introducing corrections due to wire stiffness arising from end constraints and wire axis distribution curvature in the measurement of ac electrical frequency by exciting transverse standing waves in a stretched steel wire. (SL)

  1. Wiring harnesses documented by punched-card technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, W. W.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Cards representing a connector are punched, sorted, and then used to printout wiring documentation for that connector. When wiring changes are made, new cards are punched and the wiring documentation is reprinted to reflect the latest configuration.

  2. Method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Owen, Charles V.

    1985-08-06

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb.sub.3 Sn in a copper matrix which eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb.sub.3 Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting.

  3. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  4. Wiring Damage Analyses for STS OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Walter, III

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the Shuttle Program s belief that Space Transportation System (STS) wiring damage occurrences are random, that is, a constant occurrence rate. Using Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA)-derived data for STS Space Shuttle OV-103, wiring damage was observed to increase over the vehicle s life. Causal factors could include wiring physical deterioration, maintenance and inspection induced damage, and inspection process changes resulting in more damage events being reported. Induced damage effects cannot be resolved with existent data. Growth analysis (using Crow-AMSAA, or CA) resolved maintenance/inspection effects (e.g., heightened awareness) on all wire damages and indicated an overall increase since Challenger Return-to-Flight (RTF). An increasing failure or occurrence rate per flight cycle was seen for each wire damage mode; these (individual) rates were not affected by inspection process effects, within statistical error.

  5. Improved method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schmidt, F.A.; Owen, C.V.

    1979-10-17

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb/sub 3/Sn in a copper matrix eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb/sub 3/Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting.

  6. Fossilized bioelectric wire - the trace fossil Trichichnus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kędzierski, M.; Uchman, A.; Sawlowicz, Z.; Briguglio, A.

    2014-12-01

    The trace fossil Trichichnus is proposed as an indicator of fossil bioelectric bacterial activity at the interface oxic - anoxic zone of marine sediments. This fulfils the idea that such processes, commonly found in the modern realm, should be also present in the geological past. Trichichnus is an exceptional trace fossil due to its very thin diameter (mostly less than 1 mm) and common pyritic filling. It is ubiquitous in some fine-grained sediments, where it has been interpreted as a burrow formed deeper than any other trace fossils, below the redox boundary. Trichichnus formerly referred to as deeply burrowed invertebrates, has been found as remnant of a fossilized intrasediment bacterial mat that is pyritized. As visualized in 3-D by means of X-ray computed microtomography scanner, Trichichnus forms dense filamentous fabric, which reflects that produced by modern large, mat-forming, sulphide-oxidizing bacteria, belonging mostly to Trichichnus-related taxa, which are able to house a complex bacterial consortium. Several stages of Trichichnus formation, including filamentous, bacterial mat and its pyritization, are proposed to explain an electron exchange between oxic and suboxic/anoxic layers in the sediment. Therefore, Trichichnus can be considered a fossilized "electric wire".

  7. Fossilized bioelectric wire - the trace fossil Trichichnus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kędzierski, M.; Uchman, A.; Sawlowicz, Z.; Briguglio, A.

    2015-04-01

    The trace fossil Trichichnus is proposed as an indicator of fossil bioelectric bacterial activity at the oxic-anoxic interface zone of marine sediments. This fulfils the idea that such processes, commonly found in the modern realm, should be also present in the geological past. Trichichnus is an exceptional trace fossil due to its very thin diameter (mostly less than 1 mm) and common pyritic filling. It is ubiquitous in some fine-grained sediments, where it has been interpreted as a burrow formed deeper than any other trace fossils, below the redox boundary. Trichichnus, formerly referred to as deeply burrowed invertebrates, has been found as remnant of a fossilized intrasediment bacterial mat that is pyritized. As visualized in 3-D by means of X-ray computed microtomography scanner, Trichichnus forms dense filamentous fabric, which reflects that it is produced by modern large, mat-forming, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, belonging mostly to Thioploca-related taxa, which are able to house a complex bacterial consortium. Several stages of Trichichnus formation, including filamentous, bacterial mat and its pyritization, are proposed to explain an electron exchange between oxic and suboxic/anoxic layers in the sediment. Therefore, Trichichnus can be considered a fossilized "electric wire".

  8. Recent advances in theoretical and numerical studies of wire array Z-pinch in the IAPCM

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ning, E-mail: ding-ning@iapcm.ac.cn; Zhang, Yang, E-mail: ding-ning@iapcm.ac.cn; Xiao, Delong, E-mail: ding-ning@iapcm.ac.cn

    2014-12-15

    Fast Z-pinch has produced the most powerful X-ray radiation source in laboratory and also shows the possibility to drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Recent advances in wire-array Z-pinch researches at the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics are presented in this paper. A typical wire array Z-pinch process has three phases: wire plasma formation and ablation, implosion and the MRT instability development, stagnation and radiation. A mass injection model with azimuthal modulation coefficient is used to describe the wire initiation, and the dynamics of ablated plasmas of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, θ) geometry is numerically studied. In the implosionmore » phase, a two-dimensional(r, z) three temperature radiation MHD code MARED has been developed to investigate the development of the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor(MRT) instability. We also analyze the implosion modes of nested wire-array and find that the inner wire-array is hardly affected before the impaction of the outer wire-array. While the plasma accelerated to high speed in the implosion stage stagnates on the axis, abundant x-ray radiation is produced. The energy spectrum of the radiation and the production mechanism are investigated. The computational x-ray pulse shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental result. We also suggest that using alloyed wire-arrays can increase multi-keV K-shell yield by decreasing the opacity of K-shell lines. In addition, we use a detailed circuit model to study the energy coupling between the generator and the Z-pinch implosion. Recently, we are concentrating on the problems of Z-pinch driven ICF, such as dynamic hohlraum and capsule implosions. Our numerical investigations on the interaction of wire-array Z-pinches on foam convertors show qualitative agreements with experimental results on the “Qiangguang I” facility. An integrated two-dimensional simulation of dynamic hohlraum driven capsule implosion provides us the physical insights of

  9. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux models for fundamental vibrational intensity changes on H-bond formation of water and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Arnaldo F.; Richter, Wagner E.; Bruns, Roy E., E-mail: bruns@iqm.unicamp.br

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules/Charge-Charge Flux-Dipole Flux (QTAIM/CCFDF) model has been used to investigate the electronic structure variations associated with intensity changes on dimerization for the vibrations of the water and hydrogen fluoride dimers as well as in the water-hydrogen fluoride complex. QCISD/cc-pVTZ wave functions applied in the QTAIM/CCFDF model accurately provide the fundamental band intensities of water and its dimer predicting symmetric and antisymmetric stretching intensity increases for the donor unit of 159 and 47 km mol{sup −1} on H-bond formation compared with the experimental values of 141 and 53 km mol{sup −1}. The symmetric stretching ofmore » the proton donor water in the dimer has intensity contributions parallel and perpendicular to its C{sub 2v} axis. The largest calculated increase of 107 km mol{sup −1} is perpendicular to this axis and owes to equilibrium atomic charge displacements on vibration. Charge flux decreases occurring parallel and perpendicular to this axis result in 42 and 40 km mol{sup −1} total intensity increases for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches, respectively. These decreases in charge flux result in intensity enhancements because of the interaction contributions to the intensities between charge flux and the other quantities. Even though dipole flux contributions are much smaller than the charge and charge flux ones in both monomer and dimer water they are important for calculating the total intensity values for their stretching vibrations since the charge-charge flux interaction term cancels the charge and charge flux contributions. The QTAIM/CCFDF hydrogen-bonded stretching intensity strengthening of 321 km mol{sup −1} on HF dimerization and 592 km mol{sup −1} on HF:H{sub 2}O complexation can essentially be explained by charge, charge flux and their interaction cross term. Atomic contributions to the intensities are also calculated. The bridge hydrogen atomic contributions

  10. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  11. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, D.K.; Miller, T.A.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schwartzkopf, L.A.; Sanders, S.C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  12. Quasiclassical theory of disordered multi-channel Majorana quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neven, Patrick; Bagrets, Dmitry; Altland, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Multi-channel spin-orbit quantum wires, when subjected to a magnetic field and proximity coupled to an s-wave superconductor, may support Majorana states. We study what happens to these systems in the presence of disorder. Inspired by the widely established theoretical methods of mesoscopic superconductivity, we develop á la Eilenberger a quasiclassical approach to topological nanowires valid in the limit of strong spin-orbit coupling. We find that the ‘Majorana number’ {\\cal M} , distinguishing between the state with Majorana fermions (symmetry class B) and no Majorana fermions (class D), is given by the product of two Pfaffians of gapped quasiclassical Green's functions fixed by the right and left terminals connected to the wire. A numerical solution of the Eilenberger equations reveals that the class D disordered quantum wires are prone to the formation of the zero-energy anomaly (class D impurity spectral peak) in the local density of states that shares the key features of the Majorana peak. In this way, we confirm the robustness of our previous conclusions (Bagrets and Altland 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 227005) on a more restrictive system setup. Generally speaking, we find that the quasiclassical approach provides a highly efficient means to address disordered class D superconductors both in the presence and in the absence of topological structures.

  13. 47 CFR 32.2321 - Customer premises wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2321... 232, Station Connections, inside wiring subclass. (b) Embedded Customer Premises Wiring is that...

  14. 47 CFR 32.2321 - Customer premises wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2321... 232, Station Connections, inside wiring subclass. (b) Embedded Customer Premises Wiring is that...

  15. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Kasevich, Mark

    2017-12-22

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  16. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Canmore » atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?« less

  17. In Situ Electrochemical Deposition of Microscopic Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee; Myung, Nosang; Vasquez, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A method of fabrication of wires having micron and submicron dimensions is built around electrochemical deposition of the wires in their final positions between electrodes in integrated circuits or other devices in which the wires are to be used. Heretofore, nanowires have been fabricated by a variety of techniques characterized by low degrees of controllability and low throughput rates, and it has been necessary to align and electrically connect the wires in their final positions by use of sophisticated equipment in expensive and tedious post-growth assembly processes. The present method is more economical, offers higher yields, enables control of wire widths, and eliminates the need for post-growth assembly. The wires fabricated by this method could be used as simple electrical conductors or as transducers in sensors. Depending upon electrodeposition conditions and the compositions of the electroplating solutions in specific applications, the wires could be made of metals, alloys, metal oxides, semiconductors, or electrically conductive polymers. In this method, one uses fabrication processes that are standard in the semiconductor industry. These include cleaning, dry etching, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, lithography, dielectric deposition, electron-beam lithography, and metallization processes as well as the electrochemical deposition process used to form the wires. In a typical case of fabrication of a circuit that includes electrodes between which microscopic wires are to be formed on a silicon substrate, the fabrication processes follow a standard sequence until just before the fabrication of the microscopic wires. Then, by use of a thermal SiO-deposition technique, the electrodes and the substrate surface areas in the gaps between them are covered with SiO. Next, the SiO is electron-beam patterned, then reactive-ion etched to form channels having specified widths (typically about 1 m or less) that define the widths of the wires to be formed. Drops

  18. Charge Transport in 4 nm Molecular Wires with Interrupted Conjugation: Combined Experimental and Computational Evidence for Thermally Assisted Polaron Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Taherinia, Davood; Smith, Christopher E; Ghosh, Soumen; Odoh, Samuel O; Balhorn, Luke; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-04-26

    We report the synthesis, transport measurements, and electronic structure of conjugation-broken oligophenyleneimine (CB-OPI 6) molecular wires with lengths of ∼4 nm. The wires were grown from Au surfaces using stepwise aryl imine condensation reactions between 1,4-diaminobenzene and terephthalaldehyde (1,4-benzenedicarbaldehyde). Saturated spacers (conjugation breakers) were introduced into the molecular backbone by replacing the aromatic diamine with trans-1,4-diaminocyclohexane at specific steps during the growth processes. FT-IR and ellipsometry were used to follow the imination reactions on Au surfaces. Surface coverages (∼4 molecules/nm(2)) and electronic structures of the wires were determined by cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the wires were acquired using conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) in which an Au-coated AFM probe was brought into contact with the wires to form metal-molecule-metal junctions with contact areas of ∼50 nm(2). The low bias resistance increased with the number of saturated spacers, but was not sensitive to the position of the spacer within the wire. Temperature dependent measurements of resistance were consistent with a localized charge (polaron) hopping mechanism in all of the wires. Activation energies were in the range of 0.18-0.26 eV (4.2-6.0 kcal/mol) with the highest belonging to the fully conjugated OPI 6 wire and the lowest to the CB3,5-OPI 6 wire (the wire with two saturated spacers). For the two other wires with a single conjugation breaker, CB3-OPI 6 and CB5-OPI 6, activation energies of 0.20 eV (4.6 kcal/mol) and 0.21 eV (4.8 kcal/mol) were found, respectively. Computational studies using density functional theory confirmed the polaronic nature of charge carriers but predicted that the semiclassical activation energy of hopping should be higher for CB-OPI molecular wires than for the OPI 6 wire. To reconcile the experimental and

  19. Surface Modification of Plastic Substrates Using Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heya, Akira; Matsuo, Naoto

    The surface properties of a plastic substrate were changed by a novel surface treatment called atomic hydrogen annealing (AHA). In this method, a plastic substrate was exposed to atomic hydrogen generated by cracking of hydrogen molecules on heated tungsten wire. Surface roughness was increased and halogen elements (F and Cl) were selectively etched by AHA. In addition, plastic surface was reduced by AHA. The surface can be modified by the recombination reaction of atomic hydrogen, the reduction reaction and selective etching of halogen atom. It is concluded that this method is a promising technique for improvement of adhesion between inorganic films and plastic substrates at low temperatures.

  20. Dual-Wavelength Interferometry and Light Emission Study for Experimental Support of Dual-Wire Ablation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Andrew; Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Sarkisov, Gennady; Leland, John

    2017-10-01

    In the Plasma Physics and Sensors Laboratory, located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, we utilize a pulsed power source to create plasma through a wire ablation process of metallic wires. With a parallel arrangement of wires the azimuthal magnetic fields generated around each wire, along with the Ohmic current dissipation and heating occurring upon wire evaporation, launch strong radial outflows of magnetized plasmas towards the centralized stagnation region. It is in this region that we investigate two phases of the wire ablation process. Observations in the first phase are collsionless and mostly comprised of light ions ejected from the initial corona. The second phase is observed when the wire core is ablated and heavy ions dominate collisions in the stagnation region. In this presentation we will show how dual-wavelength interferometric techniques can provide information about electron and atomic densities from experiments. Additionally, we expect white-light emission to provide a qualitative confirmation of the instabilities observed from our experiments. The material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number 16RYCOR289.

  1. Coronal plasma development in wire-array z-pinches made of twisted-pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, C. L.; Greenly, J. B.; Gourdain, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated coronal and core plasma development in wire array z-pinches in which single fine wires are replaced by twisted-pairs (``cable'') on the 1 MA, 100 ns rise time COBRA pulsed power generator. X-ray radiography, employed to investigate dense wire core expansion, showed periodic axial nonuniformity and evidence for shock waves developing where the individual wire plasmas collide. Laser shadowgraphy images indicated that the axial instability properties of the coronal plasma are substantially modified from ordinary wire arrays. Cable mass per unit length, material and the twist wavelength were varied in order to study their effects upon the instability wavelength. Implosion uniformity and bright-spot formation, as well as magnetic topology evolution, have also been investigated using self-emission imaging, x-ray diagnostics and small B-dot probes, respectively. Results from the cable-array z-pinches will be compared with results from ordinary wire-array z-pinches. This research was supported by the SSAA program of the National Nuclear Security Administration under DOE Cooperative agreement DE-FC03-02NA00057.

  2. Flow Control via a Single Spanwise Wire on the Surface of a Stationary Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmekci, Alis; Rockwell, Donald

    2007-11-01

    The flow structure arising from a single spanwise wire attached along the surface of a circular stationary cylinder is investigated experimentally via a cinema technique of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). Consideration is given to wires that have smaller and larger scales than the thickness of the unperturbed boundary layer that develops around the cylinder prior to flow separation. The wires have diameters that are 1% and 3% of the cylinder diameter. Over a certain range of angular positions with respect to the approach flow, both small- and large-scale wires show important global effects on the entire near-wake. Two critical angles are identified on the basis of the near-wake structure. These critical angles are associated with extension and contraction of the near-wake, relative to the wake in absence of the effect of a surface disturbance. The critical angle of the wire that yields near-wake extension is associated with bistable oscillations of the separating shear layer, at irregular time intervals, much longer that the time scale associated with classical Karman vortex shedding. Moreover, for the large scale wire, in specific cases, either attenuation or enhancement of the Karman mode of vortex formation is observed.

  3. Molten thermoplastic dripping behavior induced by flame spread over wire insulation under overload currents.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Zhang, Qixing; Tu, Ran; Zhao, Luyao; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yongming

    2016-12-15

    The dripping behavior of the molten thermoplastic insulation of copper wire, induced by flame spread under overload currents, was investigated for a better understanding of energized electrical wire fires. Three types of sample wire, with the same polyethylene insulation thickness and different core diameters, were used in this study. First, overload current effects on the transient one-dimensional wire temperature profile were predicted using simplified theoretical analysis; the heating process and equilibrium temperature were obtained. Second, experiments on the melting characteristics were conducted in a laboratory environment, including drop formation and frequency, falling speed, and combustion on the steel base. Third, a relationship between molten mass loss and volume variation was proposed to evaluate the dripping time and frequency. A strong current was a prerequisite for the wire dripping behavior and the averaged dripping frequency was found to be proportional to the square of the current based on the theoretical and experimental results. Finally, the influence of dripping behavior on the flame propagation along the energized electrical wire was discussed. The flame width, bright flame height and flame spreading velocity presented different behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Wire Crimp Termination Verification Using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp terminations is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp termination and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which is a standard for assessing crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies such as undercrimping, missing wire strands, incomplete wire insertion, partial insulation removal, and incorrect wire gauge are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the nondestructive ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with destructive testing) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying this technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented. The instrument is based on a two-jaw type crimp tool suitable for butt-splice type connections. Finally, an approach for application to multipin indenter type crimps will be discussed.

  5. Failure analysis of explanted sternal wires.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ming; Su, Yea-Yang; Lin, Shing-Jong; Shih, Chun-Che

    2005-05-01

    To classify and understand the mechanisms of surface damages and fracture mechanisms of sternal wires, explanted stainless steel sternal wires were collected from patients with sternal dehiscence following open-heart surgery. Surface alterations and fractured ends of sternal wires were examined and analyzed. Eighty fractured wires extracted from 25 patients from January 1999 to December 2003, with mean implantation interval of 55+/-149 days (range 5-729 days) after cardiac surgery, were studied by various techniques. The extracted wires were cleaned and the fibrotic tissues were removed. Irregularities and fractured ends were assayed by a scanning electron microscopy. After stereomicroscopy and documentation, the explants were cleaned with 1% sodium hypochlorite to remove the blood and tissues and was followed by cleaned with deionized water and alcohol. The explants were examined by stereomicroscopy, and irregularities on surface and fracture surfaces of sternal wires were assayed by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and X-ray mapping. The explants with surrounding fibrotic tissue were stained and examined with stereomicroscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Corrosion pits were found on the surface of explanted sternal wires. EDAX and X-ray mapping examinations revealed diminution of nickel concentration in the severely corroded pits on sternal wires. A feature of transgranular cracking was observed for stress corrosion cracking and striation character for typical corrosion fatigue was also identified. TEM examination of tissue showed the metallic particles in phagolysosomes of macrophages inside the surrounding sternal tissue. The synergic effect of hostile environment and the stress could be the precursors of failures for sternal wires.

  6. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Tate, Lanetra; Smith, Trent; Gibson, Tracy; Medelius, Pedro; Jolley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    An In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System (ISWDDS) has been developed that is capable of detecting damage to a wire insulation, or a wire conductor, or to both. The system will allow for realtime, continuous monitoring of wiring health/integrity and reduce the number of false negatives and false positives while being smaller, lighter in weight, and more robust than current systems. The technology allows for improved safety and significant reduction in maintenance hours for aircraft, space vehicles, satellites, and other critical high-performance wiring systems for industries such as energy production and mining. The integrated ISWDDS is comprised of two main components: (1) a wire with an innermost core conductor, an inner insulation film, a conductive layer or inherently conductive polymer (ICP) covering the inner insulation film, an outermost insulation jacket; and (2) smart connectors and electronics capable of producing and detecting electronic signals, and a central processing unit (CPU) for data collection and analysis. The wire is constructed by applying the inner insulation films to the conductor, followed by the outer insulation jacket. The conductive layer or ICP is on the outer surface of the inner insulation film. One or more wires are connected to the CPU using the smart connectors, and up to 64 wires can be monitored in real-time. The ISWDDS uses time domain reflectometry for damage detection. A fast-risetime pulse is injected into either the core conductor or conductive layer and referenced against the other conductor, producing transmission line behavior. If either conductor is damaged, then the signal is reflected. By knowing the speed of propagation of the pulse, and the time it takes to reflect, one can calculate the distance to and location of the damage.

  7. Ion Release and Galvanic Corrosion of Different Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in Artificial Saliva.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, Soodeh; Sheikh, Tahereh; Hemmati, Yasamin B

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the galvanic corrosion of brackets manufactured by four different companies coupled with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires in an artificial saliva solution. A total of 24 mandibular central incisor Roth brackets of four different manufacturers (American Orthodontics, Dentaurum, Shinye, ORJ) were used in this experimental study. These brackets were immersed in artificial saliva along with SS or NiTi orthodontic wires (0.016'', round) for 28 days. The electric potential difference of each bracket/ wire coupled with a saturated calomel reference electrode was measured via a voltmeter and recorded constantly. Corrosion rate (CR) was calculated, and release of ions was measured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. Stereomicroscope was used to evaluate all samples. Then, samples with corrosion were further assessed by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze data. Among ions evaluated, release of nickel ions from Shinye brackets was significantly higher than that of other brackets. The mean potential difference was significantly lower in specimens containing a couple of Shinye brackets and SS wire compared with other specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mean CR of various groups (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation showed corrosion in two samples only: Shinye bracket coupled with SS wire and American Orthodontics bracket coupled with NiTi wire. Shinye brackets coupled with SS wire showed more susceptibility to galvanic corrosion. There were no significant differences among specimens in terms of the CR or released ions except the release of Ni ions, which was higher in Shinye brackets.

  8. Preferential sites for InAsP/InP quantum wire nucleation using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez-Moraleda, Bernardo; Pizarro, Joaquin; Guerrero, Elisa; Guerrero-Lebrero, Maria P.; Yáñez, Andres; Molina, Sergio Ignacio; Galindo, Pedro Luis

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, stress fields at the surface of the capping layer of self-assembled InAsP quantum wires grown on an InP (001) substrate have been determined from atomistic models using molecular dynamics and Stillinger-Weber potentials. To carry out these calculations, the quantum wire compositional distribution was extracted from previous works, where the As and P distributions were determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-resolution aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging. Preferential sites for the nucleation of wires on the surface of the capping layer were studied and compared with (i) previous simulations using finite element analysis to solve anisotropic elastic theory equations and (ii) experimentally measured locations of stacked wires. Preferential nucleation sites of stacked wires were determined by the maximum stress location at the MD model surface in good agreement with experimental results and those derived from finite element analysis. This indicates that MD simulations based on empirical potentials provide a suitable and flexible tool to study strain dependent atom processes.

  9. Enhanced zero-bias Majorana peak in the differential tunneling conductance of disordered multisubband quantum-wire/superconductor junctions.

    PubMed

    Pientka, Falko; Kells, Graham; Romito, Alessandro; Brouwer, Piet W; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-11-30

    A recent experiment Mourik et al. [Science 336, 1003 (2012)] on InSb quantum wires provides possible evidence for the realization of a topological superconducting phase and the formation of Majorana bound states. Motivated by this experiment, we consider the signature of Majorana bound states in the differential tunneling conductance of multisubband wires. We show that the weight of the Majorana-induced zero-bias peak is strongly enhanced by mixing of subbands, when disorder is added to the end of the quantum wire. We also consider how the topological phase transition is reflected in the gap structure of the current-voltage characteristic.

  10. Space Station Freedom secondary power wiring requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Secondary power is produced by DDCU's (direct current to direct current converter units) and routed to and through secondary power distribution assemblies (SPDA's) to loads or tertiary distribution assemblies. This presentation outlines requirements of Space Station Freedom (SSF) EEE (electrical, electronic, and electromechanical) parts wire and the approved electrical wire and cable. The SSF PDRD (Program Definition and Requirements Document) language problems and resolution are reviewed. The cable routing to and from the SPDA's is presented as diagrams and the wire recommendations and characteristics are given.

  11. Detectors Ensure Function, Safety of Aircraft Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Pedro Medelius waited patiently in his lab at Kennedy Space Center. He had just received word that a colleague was bringing over a cable from a Space Shuttle solid rocket booster to test Medelius new invention. Medelius was calm until his colleague arrived, with about 30 other people. "Talk about testing under pressure," says Medelius. "There were people there from the Navy, the Air Force, and the Federal Aviation Administration." After the group s arrival, Medelius took a deep breath and connected his Standing Wave Reflectometer (SWR) to the cable. He wiggled the cable around, and the display showed a fault (a short or open circuit in wire) about an inch and a half inside the connector on the cable. His colleague questioned the results, because he had already checked that area on the cable. Medelius used the SWR to check again but got the same result. "That is when we took the cable apart and looked inside," Medelius says. "Lo and behold, that was exactly where the fault was." The impetus for Medelius new wire inspection technology came about in 1999 when one of the space shuttles lost power due to a fault somewhere in its more than 200 miles of electrical wiring. "The backup circuit was activated and prevented a major dysfunction, but nevertheless, there was a problem with the wiring," Medelius describes. Even though technicians used a device called a multimeter to measure the electrical current to find which wire had a fault, it could not pinpoint exactly where on the wire the fault was located. For that, technicians had to visually inspect the wire. "Sometimes they would have to remove the whole wire assembly and visually inspect every single wire. It was a very tedious operation because the wires are behind cabinets. They go all over the place in the shuttle," says Medelius. "NASA needed an instrument capable of telling them exactly where the faults were occurring." To meet NASA s needs for a highly precise device to inspect electrical power bundles, wires

  12. Pulse speed on a plucked wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odekirk, Tristan; Slaton, William V.

    2012-04-01

    This paper serves to update an elegant experiment published in The Physics Teacher to measure the speed of a pulse on a taut metal wire. Unfortunately, commercially available units2 that serve the same purpose are priced outside the range of most high school or college physics teaching laboratories. Wakeland et al. show how an affordable adaptation of the traditional standing wave apparatus using taut metal wire and horseshoe magnets can be used to measure the speed of a pulse by using an oscilloscope to measure an induced voltage in the wire as the pulse transverses the middle of the magnets, which are a known distance apart.

  13. Filter line wiring designs in aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Richard M.

    1990-10-01

    The paper presents a harness design using a filter-line wire technology and appropriate termination methods to help meet high-energy radiated electromagnetic field (HERF) requirements for protection against the adverse effects of EMI on electrical and avionic systems. Filter-line interconnect harnessing systems discussed consist of high-performance wires and cables; when properly wired they suppress conducted and radiated EMI above 100 MHz. Filter-line termination devices include backshell adapters, braid splicers, and shield terminators providing 360-degree low-impedance terminations and enhancing maintainability of the system.

  14. The Influence of Pd-Doped Au Wire Bonding on HAZ Microstructure and Looping Profile in Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Roslina; Omar, Ghazali; Jalar, Azman; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-07-01

    Wire bonding processes has been widely adopted in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) packaging especially in biomedical devices for the integration of components. In the first process sequence in wire bonding, the zone along the wire near the melted tips is called the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The HAZ plays an important factor that influenced the looping profiles of wire bonding process. This paper investigates the effect of dopants on microstructures in the HAZ. One precent palladium (Pd) was added to the as-drawn 4N gold wire and annealed at 600°C. The addition of Pd was able to moderate the grain growth in the HAZ by retarding the heat propagation to the wire. In the formation of the looping profile, the first bending point of the looping is highly associated with the length of the HAZ. The alloyed gold wire (2N gold) has a sharp angle at a distance of about 30 m from the neck of the wire with a measured bending radius of about 40 mm and bending angle of about 40° clockwise from vertical axis, while the 4N gold wire bends at a longer distance. It also shows that the HAZ for 4N gold is longer than 2N gold wire.

  15. Products from the Oxidation of n-Butane from 298 to 735 K Using Either Cl Atom or Thermal Initiation: Formation of Acetone and Acetic Acid-Possible Roaming Reactions?

    PubMed

    Kaiser, E W; Wallington, T J

    2017-11-16

    The oxidation of 2-butyl radicals (and to a lesser extent 1-butyl radicals) has been studied over the temperature range of 298-735 K. The reaction of Cl atoms (formed by 360 nm irradiation of Cl 2 ) with n-butane generated the 2-butyl radicals in mixtures of n-C 4 H 10 , O 2 , and Cl 2 at temperatures below 600 K. Above 600 K, 2-butyl radicals were produced by thermal combustion reactions in the absence of chlorine. The yields of the products were measured by gas chromatography using a flame ionization detector. Major products quantified include acetone, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, butanone, 2-butanol, butanal, 1- and 2- chlorobutane, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and cis-2-butene. At 298 K, the major oxygenated products are those expected from bimolecular reactions of 2-butylperoxy radicals (butanone, 2-butanol, and acetaldehyde). As the temperature rises to 390 K, the butanone decreases while acetaldehyde increases because of the increased rate of 2-butoxy radical decomposition. Acetone and acetic acid first appear in significant yield near 400 K, and these species rise slowly at first and then sharply, peaking near 525 K at yields of ∼25 and ∼20 mol %, respectively. In the same temperature range (400-525 K), butanone, acetaldehyde, and 2-butanol decrease rapidly. This suggests that acetone and acetic acid may be formed by previously unknown reaction channels of the 2-butylperoxy radical, which are in competition with those that lead to butanone, acetaldehyde, and 2-butanol. Above 570 K, the yields of acetone and acetic acid fall rapidly as the yields of the butenes rise. Experiments varying the Cl atom density, which in turn controls the entire radical pool density, were performed in the temperature range of 410-440 K. Decreasing the Cl atom density increased the yields of acetone and acetic acid while the yields of butanone, acetaldehyde, and 2-butanol decreased. This is consistent with the formation of acetone and acetic acid by unimolecular decomposition

  16. The Design, Fabrication and Characterization of a Transparent Atom Chip

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Huang, Chia-Shiuan; Chen, Hung-Pin; Huang, Chi-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the design and fabrication of transparent atom chips for atomic physics experiments. A fabrication process was developed to define the wire patterns on a transparent glass substrate to create the desired magnetic field for atom trapping experiments. An area on the chip was reserved for the optical access, so that the laser light can penetrate directly through the glass substrate for the laser cooling process. Furthermore, since the thermal conductivity of the glass substrate is poorer than other common materials for atom chip substrate, for example silicon, silicon carbide, aluminum nitride. Thus, heat dissipation copper blocks are designed on the front and back of the glass substrate to improve the electrical current conduction. The testing results showed that a maximum burnout current of 2 A was measured from the wire pattern (with a width of 100 μm and a height of 20 μm) without any heat dissipation design and it can increase to 2.5 A with a heat dissipation design on the front side of the atom chips. Therefore, heat dissipation copper blocks were designed and fabricated on the back of the glass substrate just under the wire patterns which increases the maximum burnout current to 4.5 A. Moreover, a maximum burnout current of 6 A was achieved when the entire backside glass substrate was recessed and a thicker copper block was electroplated, which meets most requirements of atomic physics experiments. PMID:24922456

  17. Tried and True: The Romance of the Atoms--Animated Atomic Attractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbitt, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Since the formation of atomic bonds is active, the authors sought a way of learning through drama or kinetic activity. To achieve this goal, they developed an activity called Romance of the Atoms. The activity requires students to use computer-animation technology to develop short cartoons that explain atomic classification and bonds. This…

  18. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  19. Power and energy of exploding wires

    DOE PAGES

    Valancius, Cole J.; Garasi, Christopher J.; O?Malley, Patrick D.

    2017-01-01

    Exploding wires are used in many high-energy applications, such as initiating explosives. Previous work analyzing gold wire burst in detonator applications has shown burst current and action metrics to be inconsistent with burst phenomenon across multiple firing-sets. Energy density better captures the correlation between different wire geometries, different electrical inputs, and explosive initiation. This idea has been expanded upon, to analyze the burst properties in power-energy space. Further inconsistencies in the understanding of wire burst and its relation to peak voltage have been found. An argument will be made for redefining the definition of burst. The result is a moremore » broad understanding of rapid metal phase transition and the initiation of explosives in EBW applications.« less

  20. Autonomous Command Operation of the WIRE Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prior, Mike; Walyus, Keith; Saylor, Rick

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the end-to-end design architecture for an autonomous commanding capability to be used on the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) mission for the uplink of command loads during unattended station contacts. The WIRE mission is the fifth and final mission of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Small Explorer (SMEX) series to be launched in March of 1999. Its primary mission is the targeting of deep space fields using an ultra-cooled infrared telescope. Due to its mission design WIRE command loads are large (approximately 40 Kbytes per 24 hours) and must be performed daily. To reduce the cost of mission operations support that would be required in order to uplink command loads, the WIRE Flight Operations Team has implemented an autonomous command loading capability. This capability allows completely unattended operations over a typical two-day weekend period.

  1. Wiring test program insulation material related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reher, Heinz-Josef

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of activities at DASA-RI concerning the testing of wires for manned spacecraft, including test facilities, arc-tracking tests, flammability tests, microgravity tests, and standardization, and outlines future activities.

  2. Evaluation of Wiring Constructions for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Stavnes, Mark W.; Dickman, John E.; Burkhardt, Linda A.; Woodford, Lynn M.; Ide, James R.; Muegge, ED

    1994-01-01

    A NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OS&MA) program to develop lightweight, reliable, and safe wiring insulations for aerospace applications is being performed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). As part of this effort, a new wiring construction utilizing high strength PTFE (poly tetrafluoroethylene) as the insulation has been tested and compared with the existing military standard polyimide-based MIL-W-81381 wire construction. Electrical properties which were investigated included ac corona inception and extinction voltages (sea level and 60,000 feet), time/current to smoke, and wire fusing time. The two constructions were also characterized in terms of their mechanical properties of flexural strength, abrasion resistance (23 C and 150 C), and dynamic cut-through (23 C and 200 C). The results obtained in this testing effort are presented and discussed in this paper.

  3. Side wire feed for welding apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Coaxial electrode arrangement has solid central electrode, insulated outer electrode, and transverse channel for feeding wire through tip of electrode assembly. Polymeric insulation is thrust aside by pressure, which is provided by separately operated mechanism acting through central electrode.

  4. Printed wiring board system programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkerhoff, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The printed wiring board system provides automated techniques for the design of printed circuit boards and hybrid circuit boards. The system consists of four programs: (1) the preprocessor program combines user supplied data and pre-defined library data to produce the detailed circuit description data; (2) the placement program assigns circuit components to specific areas of the board in a manner that optimizes the total interconnection length of the circuit; (3) the organizer program assigns pin interconnections to specific board levels and determines the optimal order in which the router program should attempt to layout the paths connecting the pins; and (4) the router program determines the wire paths which are to be used to connect each input pin pair on the circuit board. This document is intended to serve as a programmer's reference manual for the printed wiring board system. A detailed description of the internal logic and flow of the printed wiring board programs is included.

  5. Power and energy of exploding wires

    SciTech Connect

    Valancius, Cole J.; Garasi, Christopher J.; O?Malley, Patrick D.

    Exploding wires are used in many high-energy applications, such as initiating explosives. Previous work analyzing gold wire burst in detonator applications has shown burst current and action metrics to be inconsistent with burst phenomenon across multiple firing-sets. Energy density better captures the correlation between different wire geometries, different electrical inputs, and explosive initiation. This idea has been expanded upon, to analyze the burst properties in power-energy space. Further inconsistencies in the understanding of wire burst and its relation to peak voltage have been found. An argument will be made for redefining the definition of burst. The result is a moremore » broad understanding of rapid metal phase transition and the initiation of explosives in EBW applications.« less

  6. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  7. 46 CFR 129.340 - Cable and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... buildup of condensation. (b) Each cable and wire must— (1) Have stranded copper conductors with sufficient... Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.340 Cable and wiring. (a) If individual wires, rather than cables, are used in systems operating at a potential of greater than 50 volts, the wire and associated...

  8. 46 CFR 129.340 - Cable and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... buildup of condensation. (b) Each cable and wire must— (1) Have stranded copper conductors with sufficient... Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.340 Cable and wiring. (a) If individual wires, rather than cables, are used in systems operating at a potential of greater than 50 volts, the wire and associated...

  9. 46 CFR 129.340 - Cable and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... buildup of condensation. (b) Each cable and wire must— (1) Have stranded copper conductors with sufficient... Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.340 Cable and wiring. (a) If individual wires, rather than cables, are used in systems operating at a potential of greater than 50 volts, the wire and associated...

  10. 46 CFR 129.340 - Cable and wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... buildup of condensation. (b) Each cable and wire must— (1) Have stranded copper conductors with sufficient... Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.340 Cable and wiring. (a) If individual wires, rather than cables, are used in systems operating at a potential of greater than 50 volts, the wire and associated...

  11. 47 CFR 32.2321 - Customer premises wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer premises wiring. 32.2321 Section 32... Customer premises wiring. (a) This account shall include all amounts transferred from the former Account 232, Station Connections, inside wiring subclass. (b) Embedded Customer Premises Wiring is that...

  12. What's in the Walls: Copper, Fiber, or Coaxial Wiring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Presents planning guidelines for wiring specifications for K-12 schools by reviewing advantages and disadvantages of using copper, fiber-optic, and coaxial wire. Addresses the future of network wiring and educational technology, and makes recommendations. A sidebar describes the physical appearance of different types of wire and a table compares…

  13. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring. 76.802... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.802 Disposition of cable home wiring... cable operator shall not remove the cable home wiring unless it gives the subscriber the opportunity to...

  14. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring. 76.802... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.802 Disposition of cable home wiring... cable operator shall not remove the cable home wiring unless it gives the subscriber the opportunity to...

  15. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring. 76.802... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.802 Disposition of cable home wiring... cable operator shall not remove the cable home wiring unless it gives the subscriber the opportunity to...

  16. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring. 76.802... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.802 Disposition of cable home wiring... cable operator shall not remove the cable home wiring unless it gives the subscriber the opportunity to...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12053 - Circuits powered from trolley wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Circuits powered from trolley wires. 57.12053... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12053 Circuits powered from trolley wires. Ground wires for lighting circuits powered from trolley wires shall be connected securely to the ground return circuit. Surface Only ...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12086 - Location of trolley wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Location of trolley wire. 57.12086 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12086 Location of trolley wire. Trolley and trolley feeder wire shall be installed... limitations would prevent the safe installation or use of such trolley and trolley feeder wire. ...

  19. 49 CFR 236.723 - Circuit, double wire; line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit, double wire; line. 236.723 Section 236... § 236.723 Circuit, double wire; line. An electric circuit not employing a common return wire; a circuit formed by individual wires throughout. ...

  20. 30 CFR 77.701-3 - Grounding wires; capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding wires; capacity. 77.701-3 Section 77... MINES Grounding § 77.701-3 Grounding wires; capacity. Where grounding wires are used to ground metallic sheaths, armors, conduits, frames, casings, and other metallic enclosures, such grounding wires will be...