Science.gov

Sample records for atom wire formation

  1. Formation of indium arsenide atomic wires on the In/Si(111)-4 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.

    2017-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been applied to describe the formation of InAs atomic-size wires on the In/Si(111)-4 × 1 surface. Two different coverages, ¼ ML and ½ ML, were considered. We have taken in to consideration different high symmetry sites for As adsorption. At ¼ ML coverage, in the energetically stable configuration, As and In atoms form atomic wires. Upon increasing the coverage up to ½ ML of As, a pair of InAs atomic wires are formed. Surface formation energy calculations help to clarify the stability ranges of these structures: for arsenic poor conditions the stable configuration corresponds to the In/Si(111)-4 × 1 surface (with no As atoms). Increasing the arsenic content, for intermediate to rich As conditions, results in the formation of an InAs wire. At the arsenic rich limit, the formation of two InAs wires is favorable. The InAs wires are highly symmetric, and charge density distributions and projected density of states show the covalent character of the Insbnd As bonds of the wire. These results demonstrate that the In/Si(111)-4 × 1 surface may be used as a substrate to growth quasi-unidimensional InAs wires.

  2. Formation and manipulation of a metallic wire of single gold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, A. I.; Bollinger, G. Rubio; van den Brom, H. E.; Agraït, N.; van Ruitenbeek, J. M.

    1998-10-01

    The continuing miniaturization of microelectronics raises the prospect of nanometre-scale devices with mechanical and electrical properties that are qualitatively different from those at larger dimensions. The investigation of these properties, and particularly the increasing influence of quantum effects on electron transport, has therefore attracted much interest. Quantum properties of the conductance can be observed when `breaking' a metallic contact: as two metal electrodes in contact with each other are slowly retracted, the contact area undergoes structural rearrangements until it consists in its final stages of only a few bridging atoms. Just before the abrupt transition to tunnelling occurs, the electrical conductance through a monovalent metal contact is always close to a value of 2e2/h (~12.9Ω-1), where e is the charge on an electron and h is Planck's constant. This value corresponds to one quantum unit of conductance, thus indicating that the `neck' of the contact consists of a single atom. In contrast to previous observations of only single-atom necks, here we describe the breaking of atomic-scale gold contacts, which leads to the formation of gold chains one atom thick and at least four atoms long. Once we start to pull out a chain, the conductance never exceeds 2e2/h, confirming that it acts as a one-dimensional quantized nanowire. Given their high stability and the ability to support ballistic electron transport, these structures seem well suited for the investigation of atomic-scale electronics.

  3. Quantum stability and magic lengths of metal atom wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lan, Haiping; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Niu, Qian; Yang, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-06-01

    Metal atom wires represent an important class of nanomaterials in the development of future electronic devices and other functional applications. Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we carry out a systematic study of the quantum stability of freestanding atom wires consisting of prototypical metal elements with s -, s p -, and s d -valence electrons. We explore how the quantum mechanically confined motion and local bonding of the valence electrons in these different wire systems can dictate their overall structural stability and find that the formation energy of essentially all the wires oscillates with respect to their length measured by the number n of atoms contained in the wires, establishing the existence of highly preferred (or magic) lengths. Furthermore, different wire classes exhibit distinctively different oscillatory characteristics and quantum stabilities. Alkali metal wires possessing an unpaired s valence electron per atom exhibit simple damped even-odd oscillations. In contrast, Al and Ga wires containing three s2p1 valence electrons per atom generally display much larger and undamped even-odd energy oscillations due to stronger local bonding of the p orbitals. Among the noble metals, the s -dominant Ag wires behave similarly to the linear alkali metal wires, while Au and Pt wires distinctly prefer to be structurally zigzagged due to strong relativistic effects. These findings are discussed in connection with existing experiments and should also be instrumental in future experimental realization of different metal atom wires in freestanding or supported environments with desirable functionalities.

  4. Realization of a Strained Atomic Wire Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Song, Inkyung; Goh, Jung Suk; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Sung Won; Shin, Jin Sung; Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yeom, Han Woong

    2015-11-24

    A superlattice of strained Au-Si atomic wires is successfully fabricated on a Si surface. Au atoms are known to incorporate into the stepped Si(111) surface to form a Au-Si atomic wire array with both one-dimensional (1D) metallic and antiferromagnetic atomic chains. At a reduced density of Au, we find a regular array of Au-Si wires in alternation with pristine Si nanoterraces. Pristine Si nanoterraces impose a strain on the neighboring Au-Si wires, which modifies both the band structure of metallic chains and the magnetic property of spin chains. This is an ultimate 1D version of a strained-layer superlattice of semiconductors, defining a direction toward the fine engineering of self-assembled atomic-scale wires.

  5. Plasma Formation Around Single Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duselis, Peter U.; Kusse, Bruce R.

    2002-12-01

    At Cornell's Laboratory of Plasma Studies, single wires of various metals were exploded using a ˜250 ns pulser with a rise time of ˜20 A/ns. It was found that the wires first experience a resistive heating phase that lasts 50-80 ns before a rapid collapse of voltage. From that point on, the voltage across the wire was negligible while the current through the wire continued to increase. We attribute this voltage collapse to the formation of plasma about the wire. Further confirmation of this explanation will be presented along with new experimental data describing preliminary spectroscopy results, the expansion rate of the plasma, and current flow along the wire as a function of radius. The resistance of the wire-electrode connection will be shown to significantly affect the energy deposition. Various diagnostics were used to obtain these experiments. Ultraviolet sensitive vacuum photodiodes and a framing camera with an 8 ns shutter were used to detect and measure the width of the visible light emitted by the plasma. A special wire holder was constructed that allowed the transfer of current from the wire to the surrounding plasma to be observed.

  6. Correlated atomic wires on substrates. II. Application to Hubbard wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahab, Anas; Jeckelmann, Eric; Hohenadler, Martin

    2017-07-01

    In the first part of our theoretical study of correlated atomic wires on substrates, we introduced lattice models for a one-dimensional quantum wire on a three-dimensional substrate and their approximation by quasi-one-dimensional effective ladder models [Abdelwahab et al., preceding paper, Phys. Rev. B 96, 035445 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevB.96.035445]. In this second part, we apply this approach to the case of a correlated wire with a Hubbard-type electron-electron repulsion deposited on an insulating substrate. The ground-state and spectral properties are investigated numerically using the density-matrix renormalization group method and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. As a function of the model parameters, we observe various phases with quasi-one-dimensional low-energy excitations localized in the wire, namely, paramagnetic Mott insulators, Luttinger liquids, and spin-1 /2 Heisenberg chains. The validity of the effective ladder models is assessed for selected parameters by studying the dependence of results on the number of legs and comparing to the full three-dimensional model. We find that narrow ladder models accurately reproduce the quasi-one-dimensional excitations of the full three-dimensional model but predict only qualitatively whether excitations are localized around the wire or delocalized in the three-dimensional substrate.

  7. Atomic Configuration and Conductance of Tantalum Single-Atom Contacts and Single-Atom Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizuka, Tokushi; Murata, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    The tensile deformation and successive fracture process of tantalum (Ta) nanocontacts (NCs) while applying various bias voltages was observed in situ by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy using a picometer-precision dual-goniometer nanotip manipulation technique. Simultaneously, the variation in the conductance of the contacts was measured. The NCs were thinned atom by atom during mechanical elongation, resulting in the formation of two types of single-atom cross-sectional contacts: single-atom contacts (SACs) and single-atom wires (SAWs), in which two electrodes, typically nanotips, are connected by a single shared atom or a one-line array of single atoms, respectively. When the bias voltage was 11 mV, Ta SACs were formed during tensile deformation; however, elongation of the single-atom cross-sectional part did not occur. In contrast, when the bias voltage was increased to 200 mV, Ta SACs were first formed during the tensile deformation, followed by elongation of the single-atom cross section up to a length of three atoms, i.e., the formation of SAWs. Thus, the present observation shows that Ta SAWs are stable even at such a high bias voltage. The conductance of the SACs was approximately 0.10G0 (G0 = 2e2/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck’s constant), whereas the conductance of the three-atom-long SAWs ranged from 0.01G0 to 0.22G0. Lower conductances were observed for linear SAWs, whereas higher conductances resulted from kinked SAWs.

  8. Onset of energy dissipation in ballistic atomic wires.

    PubMed

    Agraït, Nicolás; Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Vieira, Sebastián

    2002-05-27

    Electronic transport at finite voltages in free-standing gold atomic chains of up to seven atoms in length is studied at low temperatures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The conductance vs voltage curves show that transport in these single-mode ballistic atomic wires is nondissipative up to a finite voltage threshold of the order of several mV. The onset of dissipation and resistance within the wire corresponds to the excitation of the atomic vibrations by the electrons traversing the wire and is very sensitive to strain.

  9. Selective silver atom interaction at β-SiC(100) surfaces: From anisotropic diffusion to metal atomic wires and stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, M.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.

    2007-07-01

    Silver (Ag) atom interaction on β-SiC(100) surface reconstructions is investigated by atom-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy. On the 3×2 (Si-rich) reconstruction, the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction is dominant with no surface wetting, leading to Ag cluster formation. In contrast, on the c(4×2) Si-terminated reconstruction, almost equivalent Ag-Ag and Ag-surface interactions allow selective one dimensional nano-object formation including Ag atomic wires and stripes following the substrate registry. Their orientation is mediated by anisotropic Ag atom diffusion occurring along Si-dimer rows at 25°C and perpendicularly to them at elevated temperatures, suggesting dimer flipping as diffusion barrier. These metal nanowires potentially open up cross-wiring capability in massively parallel Si atomic lines network.

  10. Novel solar cells in a wire format.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Qiu, Longbin; Yang, Zhibin; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-06-21

    Photovoltaic devices in a wire format have recently attracted increasing attention as, compared with the conventional planar structure, they show unique and promising advantages. For instance, they are light-weight and can be easily woven into clothes or integrated into other structures, which enable applications in electronic textiles and various complex devices. In this tutorial review, the recent advancement in photovoltaic wires including both dye-sensitized and polymer solar cells are described. Two main architectures based on a single core-sheath fiber and twisted fibers are carefully illustrated with an emphasis on the comparison of various substrates which have been focused in past development. The current challenge including low energy conversion efficiency and low stability and future direction of the wire-shaped cell have been finally summarized.

  11. Carbon atomic wires: charge transfer induced electron conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larade, Brian; Taylor, Jeremy; Mehrez, Hatem; Guo, Hong

    2001-03-01

    We report a first principles theoretical analysis of quantum transport properties of carbon atomic wires. Our theory is based on density functional theory within the LDA approximation, with standard norm conserving pseudopotentials defining the atomic core, and a localized orbital basis set to model the valence states. The charge density for the open atomic wire system is calculated using the non-equilibrium Green's functions. This theory is implemented in our molecular electronics modeling package McDCAL. For carbon atomic chains with different lengths in contact with metallic electrodes, we calculated linear DC conductance as a function of the chain-electrode distance and the current-voltage characteristics. Our results show that charge transfer from the electrodes to the atomic wire plays a most important role in aligning the Fermi level of the electrodes to the LUMO state of the atomic wire, inducing a substantial conductance variation due to this effect. Our results also show that the eigenstates of the carbon chain and band structure of the electrodes are of particular importance to the transport properties. We will compare our results to those obtained previously.

  12. Self-organization of atom wires on vicinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snijders, Paul

    2008-03-01

    Self-organization is possibly the best way to produce nanostructures in large quantities. This also holds for the ultimate 1D system, atom wires; they can be self-assembled in large arrays on vicinal Si surfaces. Such atom wire systems often show intriguing electronic properties such as competing charge density waves and spin-orbit split one-dimensional bands. However, because of their low dimensionality, these wires also frequently show profound thermodynamic fluctuations that limit their structural uniformity and have a large influence on their electronic properties. Therefore, in this talk I will focus on structural fluctuations in Ga atom wires self-organized on the Si(112) surface. In these atom wires, strain-relieving adatom vacancies self-organize into meandering vacancy lines (VLs) similar to the well-known nx2 superstructures for Ge on Si(100). The average spacing between these line defects can be experimentally controlled continuously by adjusting the chemical potential μ of the Ga adatoms. Significant VL correlations are discovered in STM experiments that cannot be captured within a mean field analysis. These structural flucuations are well described by a new lattice model that combines Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations for perfectly ordered structures with the fluctuating disorder seen in experiment, and the experimental control parameter μ. This hybrid approach of lattice modeling and DFT can be applied to other examples of line defects in hetero-epitaxy, especially in cases where correlation effects are significant and a mean field approach is not valid.

  13. Coupled atomic wires in a synthetic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, J. C.; Elben, A.; ŁÄ cki, M.; Sterdyniak, A.; Baranov, M. A.; Zoller, P.

    2017-04-01

    We propose and study systems of coupled atomic wires in a perpendicular synthetic magnetic field as a platform to realize exotic phases of quantum matter. This includes (fractional) quantum Hall states in arrays of many wires inspired by the pioneering work [C. L. Kane et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 036401 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.036401], as well as Meissner phases and vortex phases in double wires. With one continuous and one discrete spatial dimension, the proposed setup naturally complements recently realized discrete counterparts, i.e., the Harper-Hofstadter model and the two-leg flux ladder, respectively. We present both an in-depth theoretical study and a detailed experimental proposal to make the unique properties of the semicontinuous Harper-Hofstadter model accessible with cold-atom experiments. For the minimal setup of a double wire, we explore how a subwavelength spacing of the wires can be implemented. This construction increases the relevant energy scales by at least an order of magnitude compared to ordinary optical lattices, thus rendering subtle many-body phenomena such as Lifshitz transitions in Fermi gases observable in an experimentally realistic parameter regime. For arrays of many wires, we discuss the emergence of Chern bands with readily tunable flatness of the dispersion and show how fractional quantum Hall states can be stabilized in such systems. Using for the creation of optical potentials Laguerre-Gauss beams that carry orbital angular momentum, we detail how the coupled atomic wire setups can be realized in nonplanar geometries such as cylinders, disks, and tori.

  14. Reaction and protection of electrical wire insulators in atomic-oxygen environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Cantrell, Gidget

    1994-11-01

    Atomic-oxygen erosion on spacecraft in low Earth orbit is an issue which is becoming increasingly important because of the growing number of spacecraft that will fly in the orbits which have high concentrations of atomic oxygen. In this investigation, the atomic-oxygen durability of three types of electrical wire insulation (carbon-based, fluoropolymer, and polysiloxane elastomer) were evaluated. These insulation materials were exposed to thermal-energy atomic oxygen, which was obtained by RF excitation of air at a pressure of 11-20 Pa. The effects of atomic-oxygen exposure on insulation materials indicate that all carbon-based materials erode at about the same rate as polyamide Kapton and, therefore, are not atomic-oxygen durable. However, the durability of fluoropolymers needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis because the erosion rates of fluoropolymers vary widely. For example, experimental data suggest the formation of atomic fluorine during atomic-oxygen amorphous-fluorocarbon reactions. Dimethyl polysiloxanes (silicone) do not lose mass during atomic-oxygen exposure, but develop silica surfaces which are under tension and frequently crack as a result of loss of methyl groups. However, if the silicone sample surfaces were properly pretreated to provide a certain roughness, atomic oxygen exposure resulted in a sturdy, non-cracked atomic-oxygen durable SiO2 layer. Since the surface does not crack during such silicone-atomic oxygen reaction, the crack-induced contamination by silicone can be reduced or completely stopped. Therefore, with proper pretreatment, silicone can be either a wire insulation material or a coating on wire insulation materials to provide atomic-oxygen durability.

  15. Reaction and Protection of Electrical Wire Insulators in Atomic-oxygen Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Cantrell, Gidget

    1994-01-01

    Atomic-oxygen erosion on spacecraft in low Earth orbit is an issue which is becoming increasingly important because of the growing number of spacecraft that will fly in the orbits which have high concentrations of atomic oxygen. In this investigation, the atomic-oxygen durability of three types of electrical wire insulation (carbon-based, fluoropolymer, and polysiloxane elastomer) were evaluated. These insulation materials were exposed to thermal-energy atomic oxygen, which was obtained by RF excitation of air at a pressure of 11-20 Pa. The effects of atomic-oxygen exposure on insulation materials indicate that all carbon-based materials erode at about the same rate as polyamide Kapton and, therefore, are not atomic-oxygen durable. However, the durability of fluoropolymers needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis because the erosion rates of fluoropolymers vary widely. For example, experimental data suggest the formation of atomic fluorine during atomic-oxygen amorphous-fluorocarbon reactions. Dimethyl polysiloxanes (silicone) do not lose mass during atomic-oxygen exposure, but develop silica surfaces which are under tension and frequently crack as a result of loss of methyl groups. However, if the silicone sample surfaces were properly pretreated to provide a certain roughness, atomic oxygen exposure resulted in a sturdy, non-cracked atomic-oxygen durable SiO2 layer. Since the surface does not crack during such silicone-atomic oxygen reaction, the crack-induced contamination by silicone can be reduced or completely stopped. Therefore, with proper pretreatment, silicone can be either a wire insulation material or a coating on wire insulation materials to provide atomic-oxygen durability.

  16. Atomic force microscopy observation of insulated molecular wire formed by conducting polymer and molecular nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeshi; Akai, Tomonori; Abe, Takumi; Ito, Kohzo

    2002-02-01

    Inclusion complex formation between a conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI) with emeraldine base, and a molecular nanotube synthesized from α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) has been studied by atomic force microscopy. We observed a rodlike inclusion complex of PANI and the molecular nanotube on mica substrate at room temperature. The height of this structure is nearly equal to the outside diameter of α-CD and almost uniform along the whole length of the structure, which indicates that a conducting wire of PANI is fully covered by molecular nanotubes as insulator. Accordingly, this inclusion complex can be regarded as insulated molecular wire.

  17. Rectification in substituted atomic wires: a theoretical insight.

    PubMed

    Asai, Yoshihiro

    2012-04-25

    Recently, there have been discussions that the giant diode property found experimentally in diblock molecular junctions could be enhanced by the many-body electron correlation effect beyond the mean field theory. In addition, the effect of electron-phonon scattering on an electric current through the diode molecule, measured by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy (IETS), was found to be symmetric with respect to the voltage sign change even though the current is asymmetric. The reason for this behavior is a matter of speculation. In order to clarify whether or not this feature is limited to organic molecules in the off-resonant tunneling region, we discuss the current asymmetry effect on IETS in the resonant region. We introduced heterogeneous atoms into an atomic wire and found that IETS becomes asymmetric in this substituted atomic wire case. Our conclusion gives the other example of intrinsic differences between organic molecules and metallic wires. While the contribution of electron-phonon scattering to IETS is not affected by the current asymmetry in the former case, it is affected in the latter case. The importance of the contribution of the electron-hole excitation to phonon damping in bringing about the current asymmetry effect in IETS in the latter case is discussed.

  18. Iridium wire grid polarizer fabricated using atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Käsebier, Thomas; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-10-25

    In this work, an effective multistep process toward fabrication of an iridium wire grid polarizer for UV applications involving a frequency doubling process based on ultrafast electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition is presented. The choice of iridium as grating material is based on its good optical properties and a superior oxidation resistance. Furthermore, atomic layer deposition of iridium allows a precise adjustment of the structural parameters of the grating much better than other deposition techniques like sputtering for example. At the target wavelength of 250 nm, a transmission of about 45% and an extinction ratio of 87 are achieved.

  19. Origin of metallicity in atomic Ag wires on Si(557)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, U.; Lichtenstein, T.; Brand, C.; Tegenkamp, C.; Pfnür, H.

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the metallicity of Ag-\\sqrt{3} ordered atomic wires close to one monolayer (ML) coverage, which are formed on Si(557) via self assembly. For this purpose we combined high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with tunneling microscopy. By extending the excess Ag coverage up to 0.6 ML on samples annealed at high temperatures where partial desorption occurs, we demonstrate that one-dimensional metallicity in the Ag-\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} R30° ordered atomic wires on the (111) mini-terraces originates only from Ag atoms in excess of (local) monolayer coverage, which are adsorbed and localized at the highly stepped parts of the Si(557) surface. Thus these Ag atoms act as extrinsic dopants on the atomic scale, causing coverage dependent subband filling and increasing localization as a function of doping concentration. The second layer lattice gas as well as Ag islands on the (111) terraces turn out not to be relevant as dopants. We simulated the peculiar saturation behavior within a modified lattice gas model and give evidence that the preparation dependent saturation of doping is due to changes of average terrace size and step morphology induced by high temperature treatment.

  20. Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires

    SciTech Connect

    Snijders, Paul C; Weitering, Harm H

    2010-01-01

    Low dimensional systems have fascinated physicists for a long time due to their unusual properties such as charge fractionalization, semionic statistics, and Luttinger liquid behavior among others. In nature, however, low dimensional systems often suffer from thermal fluctuations that can make these systems structurally unstable. Human beings, however, can trick nature by producing artificial structures which are not naturally produced. This Colloquium reviews the problem of self-assembled atomic wires on solid surfaces from an experimental and theoretical point of view. These materials represent a class of one-dimensional systems with very unusual properties that can open doors to the study of exotic physics that cannot be studied otherwise.

  1. Numerical simulation of charged wire interferometer for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-Feng; Tan, Yong-Gang; Hu, Yao-Hua

    2016-10-01

    In recent paper, Nowak et al. report a charged wire interferometer for atoms, and employ analytical method to explain the interference patterns [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 (1998) 5792]. In this paper, a numerical calculation with semi-classical method is carried out and the experimental patterns are rebuilt very well. The interference patterns are interpreted by path integral. We also calculate the fringe period for different voltages and the agreement with experiment is more rigorous than the analytical expression. Besides, the fringe visibility of the interference patterns at different applied voltages and degrees is also discussed.

  2. Electronic structure and charge transport properties of atomic carbon wires.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, K; Simserides, C

    2017-10-11

    Atomic carbon wires represent the ultimate one-atom-thick one-dimensional structure. We use a Tight-binding (TB) approach to determine the electronic structure of polyynic and cumulenic carbynes, in terms of their dispersion relations (for cyclic boundaries), eigenspectra (for fixed boundaries) and density of states (DOS). We further derive the transmission coefficient at zero-bias by attaching the carbynes to semi-infinite metallic leads, and demonstrate the effect of the coupling strength and asymmetry to the transparency of the system to incident carriers. Finally, we determine the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of carbynes and study the effect of factors such as the weakening of the coupling of the system to one of the leads, the relative position of the Fermi levels of the carbyne and the leads, the leads' bandwidth and, finally, the difference in the energy structure between the leads. Our results confirm and reproduce some of the most recent experimental findings.

  3. Quantum Transport in Gated Dangling-Bond Atomic Wires.

    PubMed

    Bohloul, S; Shi, Q; Wolkow, Robert A; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-11

    A single line of dangling bonds (DBs) on Si(100)-2 × 1:H surface forms a perfect metallic atomic-wire. In this work, we investigate quantum transport properties of such dangling bond wires (DBWs) by a state-of-the-art first-principles technique. It is found that the conductance of the DBW can be gated by electrostatic potential and orbital overlap due to only a single DB center (DBC) within a distance of ∼16 Å from the DBW. The gating effect is more pronounced for two DBCs and especially, when these two DB "gates" are within ∼3.9 Å from each other. These effective length scales are in excellent agreement with those measured in scanning tunnelling microscope experiments. By analyzing transmission spectrum and density of states of DBC-DBW systems, with or without subsurface doping, for different length of the DBW, distance between DBCs and the DBW, and distance between DB gates, we conclude that charge transport in a DBW can be regulated to have both an on-state and an off-state using only one or two DBs.

  4. Atom probe study on microstructure change in severely deformed pearlitic steels: application to rail surfaces and drawn wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Pearlitic steel is used as the material for high tensile steel wires, rails and wheels due to its high work hardening and wear resistance. These properties arise from a layered structure comprising deformable lamellar ferrite and hard lamellar cementite. This paper reviews the microstructural change in heavily drawn pearlitic steels wires and worn surfaces of pearlitic rails using atom probe tomography analysis. The cementite decomposition mechanism was elucidated for heavily drawn pearlitic steel wires. For pearlitic rail steels, atomic scale characterization of worn surfaces and of the white etching layer (WEL) were performed, and a mechanism for the formation of the WEL was proposed. The differences and similarities in microstructure and in the state of the cementite in these severely deformed pearlitic steels are discussed.

  5. Modeling a ``Snap-shot'' of Cold Rydberg Atoms in the Field of a Charged Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Anne; Nawarat, Poomirat; Harper, Colleen

    2014-05-01

    We propose to cool a cloud of Rb atoms and to launch the cloud at 12 m/s toward a charge suspended wire with a cylindrically-symmetric electric field. The cloud expands slightly as it moves upward and will be illuminated by excitation light to promote these atoms into the desired Rydberg state (30S) in mid-flight. This requires de-tuning the excitation laser from the zero-field n = 30 transition to excite atoms in a region where the field causes a significant shift of the Rydberg energy levels (if the wire is charged to +10 V, the field is less than 1 / 3n5 a.u., without mixing Stark-shifted states yet). Immediately after excitation, the Rydberg atoms are located in a ring around the wire. Later studies will probe the dynamics of this ring of excited slow-moving atoms. As a method of detection, we model the effect of pulsing the wire potential to ionize the atoms. A ramp time of roughly 0.2 μs for increasing the wire potential will ``freeze'' the motion of the slow atoms; for example, a speed of 12 m/s corresponds to a distance of 2.4 μm traveled during this ramp time. This ``snap-shot'' technique may be used later to study the dynamics of Rydberg atoms around a charged wire, like previous experiments with ground-state atoms.

  6. The effect of semi-infinite crystalline electrodes on transmission of gold atomic wires using DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattar, Abdul; Amjad, Raja Junaid; Yasmeen, Sumaira; Javed, Hafsa; Latif, Hamid; Mahmood, Hasan; Iqbal, Azmat; Usman, Arslan; Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Khan, Salman Naeem; Dousti, M. R.

    2016-05-01

    First principle calculations of the conductance of gold atomic wires containing chain of 3-8 atoms each with 2.39 Å bond lengths are presented using density functional theory. Three different configurations of wire/electrodes were used. For zigzag wire with semi-infinite crystalline electrodes, even-odd oscillation is observed which is consistent with the previously reported results. A lower conductance is observed for the chain in semi-infinite crystalline electrodes compared to the chains suspended in wire-like electrode. The calculated transmission spectrum for the straight and zig-zag wires suspended between semi-infinite crystalline electrodes showed suppression of transmission channels due to electron scattering occurring at the electrode-wire interface.

  7. Platinum atomic wire encapsulated in gold nanotubes: A first principle study

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, Sandeep Majumder, Chiranjib; Sahoo, Suman K.; Sarkar, Pranab

    2014-04-24

    The nanotubes of gold incorporated with platinum atomic wire have been investigated by means of firstprinciples density functional theory with plane wave pseudopotential approximation. The structure with zig-zag chain of Pt atoms in side gold is found to be 0.73 eV lower in energy in comparison to straight chain of platinum atoms. The Fermi level of the composite tube was consisting of d-orbitals of Pt atoms. Further interaction of oxygen with these tubes reveals that while tube with zig-zag Pt prefers dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecule, the gold tube with linear Pt wire favors molecular adsorption.

  8. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2016-10-01

    Nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms surrounded by a low-density fast expanding plasma corona. An integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. These data were previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. An extremely high melting temperature and significant premelt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal. Most attempts to vaporize tungsten wire by electrical current pulse result in the disintegration of the sample into macro- and microfragments. However, application of a very fast-rising current, ˜1 kA /ns , can vaporize a thin 10-15 μm-diameter tungsten wire and generate a calibrated gas-plasma cylinder. Adding a dielectric coating to the wire leads to increased energy deposition to the wire core and a reduction of the surrounding plasma corona. Employing the integrated-phase technique on a fast-exploding coated tungsten wire, we find that the dynamic dipole polarizability of tungsten atoms at a wavelength of 532 nm equals 15 ±1.3 Å3 .

  9. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    DOE PAGES

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2016-10-12

    For nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms are surrounded by low-density fast expanding plasma corona. Here, a novel integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. This data was previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. Furthermore, an extremely high melting temperature and significant pre-melt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal.

  10. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2016-10-12

    For nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms are surrounded by low-density fast expanding plasma corona. Here, a novel integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. This data was previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. Furthermore, an extremely high melting temperature and significant pre-melt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal.

  11. Wave mechanics of a two-wire atomic beam splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolotti, Daniele C.E.; Bohn, John L.

    2004-03-01

    We consider the problem of an atomic beam propagating quantum mechanically through an atom beam splitter. Casting the problem in an adiabatic representation (in the spirit of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in molecular physics) sheds light on explicit effects due to nonadiabatic passage of the atoms through the splitter region. We are thus able to probe the fully three-dimensional structure of the beam splitter, gathering quantitative information about mode mixing, splitting ratios, and reflection and transmission probabilities.

  12. Wire melting and droplet atomization in a high velocity oxy-fuel jet

    SciTech Connect

    Neiser, R.A.; Brockmann, J.E.; O`Hern, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    Coatings produced by feeding a steel wire into a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) torch are being intensively studied by the automotive industry as a cost-effective alternative to the more expensive cast iron sleeves currently used in aluminum engine blocks. The microstructure and properties of the sprayed coatings and the overall economics of the process depend critically on the melting and atomization occurring at the wire tip. This paper presents results characterizing several aspects of wire melting and droplet breakup in an HVOF device. Fluctuations in the incandescent emission of the plume one centimeter downstream from the wire tip were recorded using a fast photodiode. A Fourier transform of the light traces provided a measure of the stripping rate of molten material from the wire tip. Simultaneous in-flight measurement of atomized particle size and velocity distributions were made using a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA). The recorded size distributions approximate a log-normal distribution. Small particles traveled faster than large particles, but the difference was considerably smaller than simple aerodynamic drag arguments would suggest. A set of experiments was carried out to determine the effect that variations in torch gas flow rates have on wire melt rate, average particle size, and average particle velocity. The observed variation of particle size with spray condition is qualitatively consistent with a Weber breakup of the droplets coming off the wire. The measurements also showed that it was possible to significantly alter atomized particle size and velocity without appreciably changing the wire melt rate.

  13. Braiding of Atomic Majorana Fermions in Wire Networks and Implementation of the Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Christina V.; Zoller, P.; Baranov, Mikhail A.

    2013-11-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for braiding Majorana fermions realized as edge states in atomic wire networks, and demonstrate its robustness against experimentally relevant errors. The braiding of two Majorana fermions located on one side of two adjacent wires requires only a few local operations on this side which can be implemented using local site addressing available in current experiments with cold atoms and molecules. Based on this protocol we provide an experimentally feasible implementation of the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm for two qubits in a topologically protected way.

  14. Intermetallic compound formation at Cu-Al wire bond interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, In-Tae; Young Jung, Dae; Chen, William T.; Du, Yong

    2012-12-01

    Intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and evolution at Cu-Al wire bond interface were studied using focused ion beam /scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED) and structure factor (SF) calculation. It was found that discrete IMC patches were formed at the Cu/Al interface in as-packaged state and they grew toward Al pad after high temperature storage (HTS) environment at 150 °C. TEM/EDS and NBED results combined with SF calculation revealed the evidence of metastable θ'-CuAl2 IMC phase (tetragonal, space group: I4¯m2, a = 0.404 nm, c = 0.580 nm) formed at Cu/Al interfaces in both of the as-packaged and the post-HTS samples. Two feasible mechanisms for the formation of the metastable θ'-CuAl2 phase are discussed based on (1) non-equilibrium cooling of wire bond that is attributed to highly short bonding process time and (2) the epitaxial relationships between Cu and θ'-CuAl2, which can minimize lattice mismatch for θ'-CuAl2 to grow on Cu.

  15. The Intermetallic Compound Formation for the Wire Bond Between an Al Pad and Ag-xPd Alloy Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Lin, Yu-Wei; Cheng, Yun-Kai

    2016-12-01

    Silver-palladium alloy wire has been shown as an economical and reliable substitute for gold wire in various applications in the electronic packaging industry. The success of wire bonding relies on the formation of an interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC). This study is aimed to investigate the formation behavior of IMCs between an Al pad and Ag-Pd alloy wire with various Pd concentrations of 1.0-6.0% for the as-bonded commercial Ag/Al joint. The interfacial IMCs were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The IMCs formed are separate (Ag, Pd)2Al and (Ag, Pd)3Al2 for a Ag6Pd wire bond, while (Ag, Pd)2Al and (Ag, Pd)3Al2 are mixed for the other Ag(1-4.5)Pd alloy wire bonds. The thickness of the total IMC layer varies from 0.65 μm for Ag1Pd to 0.91 μm for Ag6Pd, yet a minimum of 0.44 μm exists for Ag3.5Pd. The compound formation behavior was found to correspond with the Ag-Al phase diagram. After pressure cooker tests, a less stable IMC (Ag, Pd)3Al formed at the AgxPd/Al interface.

  16. Fabrication of atomic wires on H-terminated Si (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Tomihiro

    2000-03-01

    Atomic-scale one-dimensional structures on a hydrogen-terminated Si(100)-2x1-H surface are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and the first-principles calculations. The Jahn-Teller distortion resulting from the pairing of the second-layer Si atoms of the dangling-bond (DB) linear-chain structures is observed. In a short even-numbered DB structures, an unpaired second-layer Si atom exists and behaves as a soliton accompanied by the flip-flop motion of the structure. A Ga atom on the Si(100)-2x1-H surface migrates in a linear potential well confined by adjacent dimer rows and local dihydride defects, and is observed as a continuous linear protrusion ( a Ga-bar structure) at a narrow range of temperatures near 100 K. The height of the Ga-bar structure maps out the local variation in potential energy at individual adsorption sites. [1] T. Hitosugi, S. Heike, T. Onogi, T. Hashizume, S. Watanabe, Z. -Q. Li, K. Ohno, Y. Kawazoe, T. Hasegawa, and K. Kitazawa, PRL 82, 4034 (1999). [2] T. Hitosugi, Y. Suwa, S. Matsuura, S. Heike, T. Onogi, S. Watanabe, T. Hasegawa, K. Kitazawa, and T. Hashizume, PRL 83, 4116 (1999).

  17. Correlated atomic wires on substrates. I. Mapping to quasi-one-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahab, Anas; Jeckelmann, Eric; Hohenadler, Martin

    2017-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of correlated atomic wires deposited on substrates in two parts. In this first part, we propose lattice models for a one-dimensional quantum wire on a three-dimensional substrate and map them onto effective two-dimensional lattices using the Lanczos algorithm. We then discuss the approximation of these two-dimensional lattices by narrow ladder models that can be investigated with well-established methods for one-dimensional correlated quantum systems, such as the density-matrix renormalization group or bosonization. The validity of this approach is studied first for noninteracting electrons and then for a correlated wire with a Hubbard electron-electron repulsion using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. While narrow ladders cannot be used to represent wires on metallic substrates, they capture the physics of wires on insulating substrates if at least three legs are used. In the second part [Abdelwahab et al., following paper, Phys. Rev. B 96, 035446 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevB.96.035446], we use this approach for a detailed numerical investigation of a wire with a Hubbard interaction on an insulating substrate.

  18. One-dimensional Si-in-Si(001) template for single-atom wire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, J. H. G.; Bianco, F.; Köster, S. A.; Mazur, D.; Bowler, D. R.; Renner, Ch.

    2010-08-01

    Single atom metallic wires of arbitrary length are of immense technological and scientific interest. We present atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscope data of a silicon-only template, which modeling predicts to enable the self-organized growth of isolated micrometer long surface and subsurface single-atom chains. It consists of a one-dimensional, defect-free Si reconstruction four dimers wide—the Haiku core—formed by hydrogenation of self-assembled Bi-nanolines on Si(001) terraces, independent of any step edges. We discuss the potential of this Si-in-Si template as an appealing alternative to vicinal surfaces for nanoscale patterning.

  19. Conductance decay of a surface hydrogen tunneling junction fabricated along a Si(001)- (2×1) -H atomic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hiroyo; Yeo, Yong Kiat; Saeys, Mark; Joachim, Christian

    2010-05-01

    On a Si(001)- (2×1) -H substrate, electrons tunneling through hydrogen atomic junctions fabricated between two surface dangling-bond (DB) wires are theoretically investigated using the elastic-scattering quantum-chemistry method. The surface states introduced in the Si band gap by removing H atoms from a Si(001)- (2×1) -H surface were calculated and also analyzed using a simple tight-binding model. The two-channel surface conductance of a DB wire results from a combination of through-space and through-lattice electronic couplings between DB states. The conductance of the DB wire-H-junction-DB wire structure decreases exponentially with the length of H junction with an inverse decay rate ranging from 0.20 to 0.23Å-1 , depending on the energy. When the DB wire-H-junction-DB wire structure is contacted by Au nanoelectrodes, the transmission resonances corresponding to the DB wire states split, demonstrating a coupling of the DB wires through short surface hydrogen atomic junctions. This splitting decreases with the length of H junction between the DB wires with an inverse decay length ranging from 0.22 to 0.44Å-1 , indicating that such an atomic scale surface tunneling junction is not a very good insulator.

  20. Electronic conductance via atomic wires: a phase field matching theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczęśniak, D.; Khater, A.

    2012-06-01

    A model is presented for the quantum transport of electrons, across finite atomic wire nanojunctions between electric leads, at zero bias limit. In order to derive the appropriate transmission and reflection spectra, familiar in the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, we develop the algebraic phase field matching theory (PFMT). In particular, we apply our model calculations to determine the electronic conductance for freely suspended monatomic linear sodium wires (MLNaW) between leads of the same element, and for the diatomic copper-cobalt wires (DLCuCoW) between copper leads on a Cu(111) substrate. Calculations for the MLNaW system confirm the correctness and functionality of our PFMT approach. We present novel transmission spectra for this system, and show that its transport properties exhibit the conductance oscillations for the odd- and even-number wires in agreement with previously reported first-principle results. The numerical calculations for the DLCuCoW wire nanojunctions are motivated by the stability of these systems at low temperatures. Our results for the transmission spectra yield for this system, at its Fermi energy, a monotonic exponential decay of the conductance with increasing wire length of the Cu-Co pairs. This is a cumulative effect which is discussed in detail in the present work, and may prove useful for applications in nanocircuits. Furthermore, our PFMT formalism can be considered as a compact and efficient tool for the study of the electronic quantum transport for a wide range of nanomaterial wire systems. It provides a trade-off in computational efficiency and predictive capability as compared to slower first-principle based methods, and has the potential to treat the conductance properties of more complex molecular nanojunctions.

  1. Formation of nanometer-size wires using infiltration into latent nuclear tracks

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanometer-size wires having a cross-sectional dimension of less than 8 nm with controllable lengths and diameters are produced by infiltrating latent nuclear or ion tracks formed in trackable materials with atomic species. The trackable materials and atomic species are essentially insoluble in each other, thus the wires are formed by thermally driven, self-assembly of the atomic species during annealing, or re-crystallization, of the damage in the latent tracks. Unlike conventional ion track lithography, the inventive method does not require etching of the latent tracks.

  2. Atomization and merging of two Al and W wires driven by a 1 kA, 10 ns current pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Lu, Yihan; Lebedev, S. V.; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2016-11-01

    Possibility of preconditioning of wires in wire array Z-pinch loads by an auxiliary low-level current pulse was investigated in experiments with two aluminum or two polyimide-coated tungsten wires. It was found that the application of a 1 kA, 10 ns current pulse could convert all the length of the Al wires (1 cm long, 15 μm diameter) and ˜70% of length of the W wires (1 cm long, 15 μm diameter, 2 μm polyimide coating) into a gaseous state via ohmic heating. The expansion and merging of the wires, positioned at separations of 1-3 mm, were investigated with two-wavelength (532 nm and 1064 nm) laser interferometry. The gasified wire expanded freely in a vacuum and its density distribution at different times could be well described using an analytic model for the expansion of the gas into vacuum. Under an energy deposition around its atomization enthalpy of the wire material, the aluminum vapor column had an expansion velocity of 5-7 km/s, larger than the value of ˜4 km/s from tungsten wires. The dynamic atomic polarizabilities of tungsten for 532 nm and 1064 nm were also estimated.

  3. Study of Jet Formation in Wire X-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, F.N.; Ross, I.; Zhu, Y.; Dangor, A.E.; Krushelnick, K.

    2006-01-05

    Observations of x-pinch discharges driven by the 160 kA, 80 ns IMP generator are reported. X-pinches consisting of two wires of aluminum and molybdenum were used. X-pinches were mounted at two angles (120 deg. and 83 deg. ). The coronal plasma from the wires was observed to be streaming towards the mid plane of an x-pinch, forming jets on either side of the cross-point. Streaming of the coronal plasma was significant for a narrow angle and jets were observed to be m=1 unstable indicating a transfer of current.

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of Oriented Carbon Atom Wires Assembled on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,K.H.; Wu,L.; Chen, S.-P.; Wanga, L.X.; Wei, R.-B.; Xu, S.-M.; Cui, L.; Mao, B.-W.; Tian, Z.-Q.; Zen, C.-H.; Sun, S.-G.; Zhu, Y.-M.

    2009-02-17

    Carbon atom wires (CAWs) are of the sp-hybridized allotrope of carbon. To augment the extraordinary features based on sp-hybridization, we developed an approach to make CAWs be self-assembled and orderly organized on Au substrate. The self-assembling process was investigated in situ by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The properties of the assembled film were characterized by voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the contact angle measurements. Experimental results indicated that the assembled CAW film was of the good structural integrity and well organized, with the sp-hybridized features enhanced.

  5. Measurement of Dynamic Atomic Dipole Polarizability for Tungsten and Molybdenum using Integrated Phase Technique and Electrical Exploding Wires in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Cowan, T. E.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2006-10-01

    The Integrated Phase Technique [1] was applied to measure dynamic atomic dipole polarizability for two refractory metals. A fast-rising current pulse ˜1000A/ns vaporized 16μm diameter wires of either W or Mo in vacuum. To avoid the generation of dense plasma we used wire coated with polyimide. Under these conditions the deposited energy totally converts the wire to metallic vapor. In this case the radial integration of the interference phase shift allows the reconstruction of atomic polarizability for the probing wavelength [1]. Partial vaporization of the metal or its ionization gives a lower value of the reconstructed atomic polarizability. In this case the correct atomic polarizability can be reconstructed as the maximum value vs. deposited energy. [1]. G.S. Sarkisov, et al., Phys. Rev. A, 73, 042501 (2006).

  6. The formation of bronchocutaneous fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Patris, Vasileios; Argiriou, Michalis; Salem, Agni-Leila; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Charitos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Temporary epicardial pacing wires during open-heart surgery are routinely used both for diagnostic and treatment purposes. In complicated cases where patients are unstable or the wires are difficult to remove, the pacing wires are cut at the skin level and allowed to retract by themselves. This procedure rarely causes complications. However, there have been cases reporting that retained pacing wires are linked to the formation of sterno-bronchial fistulae, which may present a while after the date of operation and are usually infected. This review aims to study the cases presenting sterno-bronchial fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires and to highlight the important factors associated with these. It is important to note these complications, as fistulae may cause a variety of problems to the patient if undiagnosed and left untreated. With the aid of scans such as fistulography, fistulae can be identified and treated and will improve the patients’ health dramatically. PMID:27716700

  7. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation

    DOE PAGES

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Lock, Nina; Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; ...

    2014-04-14

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structuremore » is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries.« less

  8. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Lock, Nina; Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; Christensen, Mogens; Bøjesen, Espen D.; Emerich, Hermann; Vaughan, Gavin; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Iversen, Bo B.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structure is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries. PMID:25075335

  9. Limits to metallic conduction in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional silicon wires.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bent; Ryu, Hoon; Tan, Y-H Matthias; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2014-12-12

    The recent observation of ultralow resistivity in highly doped, atomic-scale silicon wires has sparked interest in what limits conduction in these quasi-1D systems. Here we present electron transport measurements of gated Si:P wires of widths 4.6 and 1.5 nm. At 4.6 nm we find an electron mobility, μ(el)≃60  cm²/V s, in excellent agreement with that of macroscopic Hall bars. Metallic conduction persists to millikelvin temperatures where we observe Gaussian conductance fluctuations of order δG∼e²/h. In thinner wires (1.5 nm), metallic conduction breaks down at G≲e²/h, where localization of carriers leads to Coulomb blockade. Metallic behavior is explained by the large carrier densities in Si:P δ-doped systems, allowing the occupation of all six valleys of the silicon conduction band, enhancing the number of 1D channels and hence the localization length.

  10. Non-equilibrium 8π Josephson effect in atomic Kitaev wires

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, C.; Budich, J. C.; Zoller, P.; Dalmonte, M.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of fractionalized excitations, such as Majorana quasi-particles, would be a striking signal of the realization of exotic quantum states of matter. While the paramount demonstration of such excitations would be a probe of their non-Abelian statistics via controlled braiding operations, alternative proposals exist that may be easier to access experimentally. Here we identify a signature of Majorana quasi-particles, qualitatively different from the behaviour of a conventional superconductor, which can be detected in cold atom systems using alkaline-earth-like atoms. The system studied is a Kitaev wire interrupted by an extra site, which gives rise to super-exchange coupling between two Majorana-bound states. We show that this system hosts a tunable, non-equilibrium Josephson effect with a characteristic 8π periodicity of the Josephson current. The visibility of the 8π periodicity of the Josephson current is then studied including the effects of dephasing and particle losses. PMID:27481540

  11. Formation quality optimization of laser hot wire cladding for repairing martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Peng; Feng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Shiqing

    2015-01-01

    Laser cladding is an advantaged repairing technology due to its low heat input and high flexibility. With preheating wire by resistance heat, laser hot wire cladding shows better process stability and higher deposition efficiency compared to laser cold wire/powder cladding. Multi-pass layer were cladded on the surface of martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel FV520B by fiber laser with ER410NiMo wire. Wire feed rate and preheat current were optimized to obtain stable wire transfer, which guaranteed good formation quality of single pass cladding. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize processing parameters and predict formation quality of multi-pass cladding. Laser power P, scanning speed Vs, wire feed rate Vf and overlap ratio η were selected as the input variables, while flatness ratio, dilution and incomplete fusion value as the responses. Optimal clad layer with flat surface, low dilution and no incomplete fusion was obtained by appropriately reducing Vf, and increasing P, Vs and η. No defect like pore or crack was found. The tensile strength and impact toughness of the clad layer is respectively 96% and 86% of those of the substrate. The clad layer showed nonuniform microstructure and was divided into quenched areas with coarse lath martensite and tempered areas with tempered martensite due to different thermal cycles in adjacent areas. The tempered areas showed similar hardness to the substrate.

  12. Kinetic study on hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition of nickel thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Guangjie Shimizu, Hideharu; Momose, Takeshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    2014-01-15

    High-purity Ni films were deposited using hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition (HW-ALD) at deposition temperatures of 175, 250, and 350 °C. Negligible amount of nitrogen or carbon contamination was detected, even though the authors used NH{sub 2} radical as the reducing agent and nickelocene as the precursor. NH{sub 2} radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 3} with the assist of HW and used to reduce the adsorbed metal growth precursors. To understand and improve the deposition process, the kinetics of HW-ALD were analyzed using a Langmuir-type model. Unlike remote-plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, HW-ALD does not lead to plasma-induced damage. This is a significant advantage, because the authors can supply sufficient NH{sub 2} radicals to deposit high-purity metallic films by adjusting the distance between the hot wire and the substrate. NH{sub 2} radicals have a short lifetime, and it was important to use a short distance between the radical generation site and substrate. Furthermore, the impurity content of the nickel films was independent of the deposition temperature, which is evidence of the temperature-independent nature of the NH{sub 2} radical flux and the reactivity of the NH{sub 2} radicals.

  13. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Alberto; Tommasini, Matteo; Russo, Valeria; Li Bassi, Andrea; Lucotti, Andrea; Cataldo, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs) can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes), resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes), expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms) and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure). Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length). Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds. PMID:25821689

  14. Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at the carbon atom wire modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kuan-Hong; Liu, Jia-Mei; Wei, Ri-Bing; Chen, Shao-Peng

    2006-09-01

    Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at an electrode modified by carbon atom wires (CAWs), a new material, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry combined with UV-vis spectrometry, and forced convection method. As to the electrochemical response of redox of adrenaline/adrenalinequinone couple in 0.50 M H 2SO 4, at a nitric acid treated CAW modified electrode, the anodic and cathodic peak potentials Epa and Epc shifted by 87 mV negatively and 139 mV in the positive direction, respectively, and standard heterogeneous rate constant k0 increased by 16 times compared to the corresponding bare electrode, indicating the extraordinary activity of CAWs in electrocatalysis for the process.

  15. Atomization and particle-jet interactions in the wire-arc spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussary, N. A.; Heberlein, J. V. R.

    2001-12-01

    The wire-arc spraying process, one of several thermal spray processes, has gained a sizable part of the thermal spray market. However, better control is needed for this process to be used for applications of high precision coatings. This study is aimed at investigating the liquid-metal droplet formation process in order to identify methods for droplet trajectory control. A high speed Kodak imaging system has been used to observe the droplet formation for different operating conditions. Decreasing the upstream pressure and the current levels leads to a reduction in the asymmetric melting of both the anode and cathode. By decreasing the interactions of the large eddy structures with the formed metal agglomerates, one can achieve better control of the particle trajectories and jet divergence. Thus, coatings can be obtained with higher definition and improved reliability.

  16. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigge, T.; Hafke, B.; Witte, T.; Krenzer, B.; Streubühr, C.; Samad Syed, A.; Mikšić Trontl, V.; Avigo, I.; Zhou, P.; Ligges, M.; von der Linde, D.; Bovensiepen, U.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.; Wippermann, S.; Lücke, A.; Sanna, S.; Gerstmann, U.; Schmidt, W. G.

    2017-03-01

    Transient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In-In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic). This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.

  17. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Frigge, T; Hafke, B; Witte, T; Krenzer, B; Streubühr, C; Samad Syed, A; Mikšić Trontl, V; Avigo, I; Zhou, P; Ligges, M; von der Linde, D; Bovensiepen, U; Horn-von Hoegen, M; Wippermann, S; Lücke, A; Sanna, S; Gerstmann, U; Schmidt, W G

    2017-03-29

    Transient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In-In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic). This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.

  18. Anisotropic Formation of Quantum Turbulence Generated by a Vibrating Wire in Superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, H.; Ogawa, K.; Chiba, Y.; Obara, K.; Ishikawa, O.

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the formation of quantum turbulence in superfluid 4He, we have studied the emission of vortex rings with a ring size of larger than 38 μm in diameter from turbulence generated by a vibrating wire. The emission rate of vortex rings from a turbulent region remains low until the beginning of high-rate emissions, suggesting that some of the vortex lines produced by the wire combine to form a vortex tangle, until an equilibrium is established between the rate of vortex line combination with the tangle and dissociation. The formation times of equilibrium turbulence are proportional to ɛ^{-1.2} and ɛ^{-0.6} in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the vibrating direction of the generator, respectively, indicating the anisotropic formation of turbulence. Here, ɛ is the generation power of the turbulence. This power dependence may be associated with the characteristics of quantum turbulence with a constant energy flux.

  19. Multiple Majorana zero modes in atomic Fermi double wires with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang-Liang; Gong, Ming; Liu, W.-M.

    2017-08-01

    Majorana zero modes, quasiparticles with non-Abelian statistics, have gained increasing interest for their fundamental role as building blocks in topological quantum computation. Previous studies have mainly focused on two well-separated Majorana zero modes, which could form two degenerate states serving as one nonlocal qubit for fault-tolerant quantum memory. However, creating and manipulating multiple Majorana zero modes, which could encode more qubits, remain an ongoing research topic. Here we report that multiple Majorana zero modes can exist in atomic Fermi double wires with spin-orbit coupling and perpendicular Zeeman field. This system belongs to the topological BDI class, thus all the topological superfluids are classified by integer numbers. Especially, diverse topological superfluids can be formed in a trap, where the zero energy modes can be found at the interfaces between different topological superfluids. The structure of these zero energy modes in the trap can be engineered by the trapping potential as well as other system parameters. This system would be a significant step towards utilization of Majorana zero modes in quantum computation.

  20. Direct observation of the spin polarization in Au atomic wires on Si(553)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, H. W.; Jung, S. W.; Shin, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, K. S.; Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, T.; Namatame, H.; Kimura, A.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-09-01

    The spin-resolved electronic band structure of Au-induced metallic atomic wires on a vicinal silicon surface, Si(553), was investigated using spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. We directly measured the spin polarization of three partially filled one-dimensional metallic bands, a one-third-filled band, and the doublet of nearly half-filled bands. For the half-filled doublet, the strong apparent spin polarization was observed near the Fermi energy with a minor out-of-plane spin component. This observation is consistent with the Rashba-type spin-orbit splitting and with a recent experiment on a similar doublet of Si(557)-Au. In contrast, the one-third-filled band does not show a substantial spin polarization within the experimental accuracy, indicating a much smaller spin splitting, if any. These results are discussed for the origin of the partially filled bands and for the intriguing broken-symmetry ground state observed at low temperature.

  1. V-shaped metallic-wire cantilevers for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Charles A.; Workman, Richard K.; Yao, Xiaowei; Hunt, Jeffery P.; Sarid, Dror

    1998-12-01

    A method for fabricating V-shaped cantilevers from a flattened Pt/Ir metal wire for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging is described. These novel cantilevers have been found to be more robust then conventional ones used for scanning capacitance and magnetic force microscopy as their conductivity is maintained even after a large number of surface scans. The use of a V-shaped geometry improves on earlier single-beam geometries by reducing rms imaging noise. Characterization of these cantilevers and combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim images are reported.

  2. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, C. Gonzalo E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Valenzuela, Vicente E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Veloso, Felipe E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Favre, Mario E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Wyndham, Edmund E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl

    2014-12-15

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ∼5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  3. InAs/InP single quantum wire formation and emission at 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Alen, B.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martinez-Pastor, J.

    2006-12-04

    Isolated InAs/InP self-assembled quantum wires have been grown using in situ accumulated stress measurements to adjust the optimal InAs thickness. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows highly asymmetric nanostructures with average length exceeding more than ten times their width. High resolution optical investigation of as-grown samples reveals strong photoluminescence from individual quantum wires at 1.5 {mu}m. Additional sharp features are related to monolayer fluctuations of the two-dimensional InAs layer present during the early stages of the quantum wire self-assembling process.

  4. Mid-Atomic-Number Cylindrical Wire Array Precursor Plasma Studies on Zebra

    DOE PAGES

    Stafford, A; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; ...

    2014-12-30

    The precursor plasmas from low wire number cylindrical wire arrays (CWAs) were previously shown to radiate at temperatures >300 eV for Ni-60 (94% Cu and 6% Ni) wires in experiments on the 1-MA Zebra generator. Continued research into precursor plasmas has studied additional midatomic-number materials including Cu and Alumel (95% Ni, 2% Al, 2% Mn, and 1% Si) to determine if the >300 eV temperatures are common for midatomic-number materials. Additionally, current scaling effects were observed by performing CWA precursor experiments at an increased current of 1.5 MA using a load current multiplier. Our results show an increase in amore » linear radiation yield of ~50% (16 versus 10 kJ/cm) for the experiments at increased current. However, plasma conditions inferred through the modeling of X-ray time-gated spectra are very similar for the precursor plasma in both current conditions.« less

  5. Mid-Atomic-Number Cylindrical Wire Array Precursor Plasma Studies on Zebra

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, A; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2014-12-30

    The precursor plasmas from low wire number cylindrical wire arrays (CWAs) were previously shown to radiate at temperatures >300 eV for Ni-60 (94% Cu and 6% Ni) wires in experiments on the 1-MA Zebra generator. Continued research into precursor plasmas has studied additional midatomic-number materials including Cu and Alumel (95% Ni, 2% Al, 2% Mn, and 1% Si) to determine if the >300 eV temperatures are common for midatomic-number materials. Additionally, current scaling effects were observed by performing CWA precursor experiments at an increased current of 1.5 MA using a load current multiplier. Our results show an increase in a linear radiation yield of ~50% (16 versus 10 kJ/cm) for the experiments at increased current. However, plasma conditions inferred through the modeling of X-ray time-gated spectra are very similar for the precursor plasma in both current conditions.

  6. Atomic scale investigation of redistribution of alloying elements in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and annealing.

    PubMed

    Li, Y J; Choi, P; Goto, S; Borchers, C; Raabe, D; Kirchheim, R

    2013-09-01

    A local electrode atom probe has been employed to analyze the redistribution of alloying elements including Si, Mn, and Cr in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and subsequent annealing. It has been found that the three elements undergo mechanical mixing upon cold-drawing at large strains, where Mn and Cr exhibit a nearly homogeneous distribution throughout both ferrite and cementite, whereas Si only dissolves slightly in cementite. Annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a reversion of the mechanical alloying. Si atoms mainly segregate at well-defined ferrite (sub)grain boundaries formed during annealing. Cr and Mn are strongly concentrated in cementite adjacent to the ferrite/cementite interface due to their lower diffusivities in cementite than in ferrite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of heavy metals in bee honey with connected and not connected metal wires using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Al Juhaimi, Fahad Y

    2012-04-01

    Two honey samples are taken from two parts of the same honeycomb: one that contacts to the surface of the wire and the other taken from the surface that does not contact the wires. Heavy metal contents of these two samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). The Mo, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn contents of the honey in contact with wire is higher when compared to the other. Especially, Fe and Zn contents of honey in contact with wire is much higher than the non-contact one. These values are, respectively, 190.21 and 112.76 ppm. Besides, Ni content of honey in contact with wire is approximately 50% higher.

  8. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, A.; Stancari, M.; Steffens, E.

    2009-08-01

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC) [2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  9. Molecular hydrogen formation by excited atom radiative association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latter, William B.; Black, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The results from a semiclassical calculation of the thermal rate coefficient for the radiative association process H(n = 2) + H(n = 1) - H2 + hv are presented (n is the principal quantum number of the separated hydrogen atoms). The relative importance of this reaction in various environments is briefly discussed. Models of the early universe around the epoch of recombination and protostellar winds have been calculated which include the excited atom process. Not surprisingly, it is shown that the excited atom process will not be important in the general interstellar medium, except possibly in environments where the amount of Ly-alpha photon trapping is large. Examples may be the material surrounding quasars, active galactic nuclei, and bright H II regions. The most likely application of this process might be within rapidly evolving systems where a large transient n = 2 population of neutral hydrogen could result in a burst of molecular hydrogen formation.

  10. Exploring excited-state hydrogen atom transfer along an ammonia wire cluster: Competitive reaction paths and vibrational mode selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Christian; Manca, Carine; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2005-05-01

    The excited-state hydrogen-atom transfer (ESHAT) reaction of the 7-hydroxyquinoline•(NH3)3 cluster involves a crossing from the initially excited π1π* to a π1σ* state. The nonadiabatic coupling between these states induces homolytic dissociation of the O-H bond and H-atom transfer to the closest NH3 molecule, forming a biradical structure denoted HT1, followed by two more Grotthus-type translocation steps along the ammonia wire. We investigate this reaction at the configuration interaction singles level, using a basis set with diffuse orbitals. Intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of the enol→HT1 step predict that the H-atom transfer is preceded and followed by extensive twisting and bending of the ammonia wire, as well as large O -H⋯NH3 hydrogen bond contraction and expansion. The calculations also predict an excited-state proton transfer path involving synchronous proton motions; however, it lies 20-25kcal/mol above the ESHAT path. Higher singlet and triplet potential curves are calculated along the ESHAT reaction coordinate: Two singlet-triplet curve crossings occur within the HT1 product well and intersystem crossing to these Tn states branches the reaction back to the enol reactant side, decreasing the ESHAT yield. In fact, a product yield of ≈40% 7-ketoquinoline•(NH3)3 is experimentally observed. The vibrational mode selectivity of the enol→HT1 reaction step [C. Manca, C. Tanner, S. Coussan, A. Bach, and S. Leutwyler, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 2578 (2004)] is shown to be due to the large sensitivity of the diffuse πσ* state to vibrational displacements along the intermolecular coordinates.

  11. Positronium Formation During Inelastic Collisions of Positrons with Sodium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bakry, Salah Yaseen

    The positronium (Ps) formation in different states of the inelastic collisions of positrons with sodium atoms is a multi-channel scattering process. In the present work, a wide region of incident energies is considered, ranging from 4eV to 100eV. The coupled-static and frozen-core approximations are employed for calculating the corresponding elastic, positronium (Ps (1s)) and excited positronium (Ps* (2s+np)) formation cross sections. np states are represented in form of their polarization potentials. The total cross sections which corresponding to eight partial cross sections (calculated at eight values of the total angular momentum l=0 to l=7) of the three channel problem have been calculated. The basis set of Clementi and Roetti [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 14, 177 (1974)] is used for describing the target atom. The resulting total cross sections are compared with experimental results and those calculated by other authors.

  12. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  13. Rapid formation of molecular clouds from turbulent atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, S. C. O.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    The characteristic lifetimes of molecular clouds remain uncertain and a topic of frequent debate, with arguments having recently been advanced both in support of short-lived clouds, with lifetimes of a few Myr or less (see e.g. Elmegreen 2000; Hartmann et al. 2001) and in support of much longer-lived clouds, with lifetimes of the order of 10 Myr or more (see e.g. Tassis & Mouschovias, 2004; Goldsmith & Li, 2005). An argument that has previously been advanced in favour of longer lived clouds is the apparent difficulty involved in converting sufficient atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen within the short timescale required by the rapid cloud formation scenario. However, previous estimates of the time required for this conversion to occur have not taken into account the effects of the supersonic turbulence which is inferred to be present in the atomic gas. In this contribution, we present results from a set of high resolution three-dimensional simulations of turbulence in gravitationally unstable atomic gas. These simulations were performed using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP hydrodynamical code (Norman 2000), and include a detailed treatment of the thermal balance of the gas and of the formation of molecular hydrogen. The effects of photodissociation of H2 by the Galactic UV field are also included, with a simple local approximation used to compute the effects of H2 self-shielding. The results of our simulations demonstrate that H2 formation occurs rapidly in turbulent atomic gas. Starting from purely atomic gas, large quantities of molecular gas can be produced on timescales of less than a Myr, given turbulent velocity dispersions and magnetic field strengths consistent with observations. Moreover, as our simulations underestimate the effectiveness of H2 self-shielding and dust absorption, we can be confident that the molecular fractions which we compute are strong lower limits on the true values. The formation of large quantities of molecular gas on the

  14. Atomically dispersed Pd catalysts in graphyne nanopore: formation and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongbing; Chen, Xianlang; Cao, Yongyong; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jianguo

    2017-07-01

    The formation of single-atom noble metal catalysts on carbon materials remains a challenge due to the weak interaction between metals and pristine carbon. By means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, it is found that the atomically dispersed Pd in graphyne nanopore is much more stable than that of relative Pd clusters. The large diffusion barrier of Pd from the most stable hollow site to the bridge site confirms the kinetic stability of such structures. While CO adsorption causes the pulling of Pd from graphyne nanopore due to the low diffusion barrier, based on DFT calculations, which can be further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamic simulations. Finally, CO oxidation on the reconstruction of Pd@graphyne exhibits an energy barrier of 0.62 eV in the rate-limiting step through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. After the reaction, the catalyst can be restored to the original atomically dispersed state again. This study shows graphyne is an excellent support for an atomically dispersed or single-metal catalyst.

  15. Formation of pentagonal atomic chains in BCC Fe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainath, G.; Choudhary, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    For the first time, we report the formation of pentagonal atomic chains during tensile deformation of ultra thin BCC Fe nanowires. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on <100>/{110} BCC Fe nanowires with different cross section width varying from 0.404 to 3.634 nm at temperatures ranging from 10 to 900 K. The results indicate that above certain temperature, long and stable pentagonal atomic chains form in BCC Fe nanowires with cross section width less than 2.83 nm. The temperature, above which the pentagonal chains form, increases with increase in nanowire size. The pentagonal chains have been observed to be highly stable over large plastic strains and contribute to high ductility in Fe nanowires.

  16. Formation of Antihydrogen Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic field traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2008-08-08

    It is shown that several features of antihydrogen production in nested Penning traps can be described with accurate and efficient Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that cold deeply-bound Rydberg states of antihydrogen (H-bar) are produced in three-body capture in the ATRAP experiments and an additional formation mechanism -Rydberg charge transfer-, particular to the nested Penning trap geometry, is responsible for the observed fast (hot) H-bar atoms. Detailed description of the numerical propagation technique for following extreme close encounters is given. An analytic derivation of the power law behavior of the field ionization spectrum is provided.

  17. Formation of Compound Semiconductors by Electrochemical Atomic Layer Epitaxy (ECALE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-26

    by using Underpotential Deposition (UPD). UPD is a phenomena where an atomic layer of an element deposits at a potential prior to that needed to...atomic layers of the constituent elements. Atomic layers are formed in ECALE by using Underpotential Deposition (UPD). UPD is a phenomena where an atomic...atomic layers of the constituent elements which make up a compound. Deposition is limited to an atomic layer by the use of underpotential deposition (UPD

  18. Fabrication of Microstripline Wiring for Large Format Transition Edge Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.; Adams, J. M.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S.; Brekosky, R. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Erwin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a process to integrate microstripline wiring with transition edge sensors (TES). The process includes additional layers for metal-etch stop and dielectric adhesion to enable recovery of parameters achieved in non-microstrip pixel designs. We report on device parameters in close-packed TES arrays achieved with the microstrip process including R(sub n), G, and T(sub c) uniformity. Further, we investigate limits of this method of producing high-density, microstrip wiring including critical current to determine the ultimate scalability of TES arrays with two layers of wiring.

  19. Origin of the metal-insulator transition of indium atom wires on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Woo; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2016-06-01

    As a prototypical one-dimensional electron system, self-assembled indium (In) nanowires on the Si(111) surface have been believed to drive a metal-insulator transition by a charge-density-wave (CDW) formation due to Fermi surface nesting. Here, our first-principles calculations demonstrate that the structural phase transition from the high-temperature 4 ×1 phase to the low-temperature 8 ×2 phase occurs through an exothermic reaction with the consecutive bond-breaking and bond-making processes, giving rise to an energy barrier between the two phases as well as a gap opening. This atomistic picture for the phase transition not only identifies its first-order nature but also solves a long-standing puzzle of the origin of the metal-insulator transition in terms of the ×2 periodic lattice reconstruction of In hexagons via bond breakage and new bond formation, not by the Peierls-instability-driven CDW formation.

  20. Soft versus hard junction formation for α-terthiophene molecular wires and their charge transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain M.; Brooke, Carly; Nichols, Richard J.; Lambert, Colin J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2017-03-01

    We used a range of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM)-based methods to conduct a detailed study of single molecule junction conductance enhancement upon charge transfer complex formation, using bis(thiaalkyl)arene molecular wires as electron donors and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) as an electron acceptor. Using the "hard" STM break junction (STM-BJ) method, in which a Au STM tip is pushed into a Au substrate and then withdrawn in the presence of molecules, we see a single, very broad, peak in the resulting conductance histogram when all data are used; the conductance enhancement is 25-fold for a terthiophene donor and 15-fold for a phenyl group. After rational data selection, in which only current-distance curves that contain a current plateau >0.2 nm long are used in the conductance histogram, three sharper peaks are resolved in the histograms for the charge transfer complexes; two substantially lower-conductance peaks are resolved for the uncomplexed molecules. Using the "soft" STM I(s) technique, in which initial contact between tip and substrate is avoided and the current limit is about an order of magnitude lower, we were able to resolve two peaks for the uncomplexed molecules depending upon the initial set point current (i.e., tip height), one at the same value as the lower of the two data-selected STM-BJ histogram peaks and an additional peak beyond the low-current limit for the STM-BJ experiment. For the terthiophene, the low, medium, and high conductance peaks for the TCNE complex are, respectively, ca. 70, 70, and 46 times higher in conductance than the corresponding peaks for the free molecule.

  1. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-09-01

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s → n l m excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20-300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s → n l m inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

  2. Atomic scale contact formation: A combined Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Till; El Ouali, Mehdi; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2008-03-01

    We are investigating contact formation at the atomic scale, in particular the interplay of forces and conductivity [1]. As it has been shown (e.g. in the case of C60 in between a STM tip and an Au(111) sample [2]), the conductivity in molecular junctions depends strongly on the contact geometry. In order to fully characterize the junction, we use a homebuilt ultra high vacuum (UHV) (p < 10-10 mbar) microscope which runs in simultaneous scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) modes. Additionally we image the STM tip structure with field ion microscopy (FIM) prior to using it in our experiments [3]. In order to realize a controlled contact we use the STM tip as one electrode and the sample as counter electrode. We are investigating bare Au(111) samples and W STM tips as an example of a nano metal-metal contact and one C60 molecule sandwiched between the W-tip and the Au(111) sample as a model for a controlled metal-molecule-metal contact. We will present new measurements of I(z), F(z) and dI/dV (z) curves of the above mentioned systems, where z is the tip-sample separation as well as images of the sample and tip structure. [1] Sun et. al. PRB 71 193407, 2005 [2] De Menech et. al. PRB 73, 155407, 2006 [3] Lucier et. al. PRB 72, 235420, 2005

  3. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-09-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s→nlm excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s→nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

  4. Atomically thin cesium lead bromide perovskite quantum wires with high luminescence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongwen; Liu, Mei; Li, Jing; Luo, Laihao; Zhao, Jiangtao; Luo, Zhenlin; Wang, Xiaoping; Ye, Zhizhen; He, Haiping; Zeng, Jie

    2017-01-07

    We report a room-temperature colloidal synthesis of few-unit-cell-thick CsPbBr3 QWs with lengths over a hundred nanometers. The surfactant-directed oriented attachment growth mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of such CsPbBr3 QWs. Owing to the strong quantum confinement effect, the photoluminescence (PL) emission peak of few-unit-cell-thick CsPbBr3 QWs blue-shifted to 430 nm. The ensemble PL quantum yield (PLQY) of the few-unit-cell-thick CsPbBr3 QWs increased to 21.13% through a simple heat-treatment process. The improvement of PLQY was ascribed to the reduction of the density of surface trap states and defect states induced by the heat-treatment process. Notably, the dependence of the bandgap on the diameter with different numbers of unit cells was presented for the first time in 1-D CsPbBr3 QWs on the basis of the produced few-unit-cell-thick CsPbBr3 QWs.

  5. Advanced modulation formats for delivery of heterogeneous wired and wireless access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, C. W.; Yeh, C. H.

    2009-12-01

    It is believed that the integration of wired and wireless access networks (or heterogeneous network) will provide high bandwidth and flexibility for both fixed and mobile users in a single and cost-effective platform. Here, we propose and demonstrate a signal remodulated wired and wireless network with wireless signal broadcast. Dark-return-to-zero (DRZ) and polarization-shift-keying (PolSK) signals are used for the downstream wired and wireless applications respectively. At the remote antenna unit (RAU), the PolSK signal is demodulated to produce the binary-phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signal, which will be used for the wireless broadcast application. Signal remodulation is demonstrated using reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) as a colorless reflective modulator in the optical networking unit (ONU)/RAU. The downstream signal is remodulated at the ONU/RAU to produce the non-return-to-zero (NRZ) upstream signal.

  6. Cavitation and formation of foam-like structures inside exploding wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakhovsky, Vasily V.; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Tkachenko, Svetlana I.; Sasorov, Pavel V.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Saylor, Charles C.; Hammer, David A.

    2012-03-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study explosions of aluminum wires heated by electric current pulses. It is shown that the observed nonuniform radial expansion of the heated wire is associated with a liquid-vapor phase transition, which is caused by convergence of a radial tensile wave towards the center of the wire. Tension within the wave leads to cavitation in stretched melt that subsequently forms into a low-density foam-like material surrounded by a dense liquid shell. The foam decays into liquid droplets before the outer shell breaks apart. Simulated density profiles demonstrate good qualitative agreement with experimental high-resolution X-ray images showing the complex hollow structures within the long-living dense core.

  7. Optical Pattern Formation in Cold Atoms: Explaining the Red-Blue Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Gauthier, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The study of pattern formation in atomic systems has provided new insight into fundamental many-body physics and low-light-level nonlinear optics. Pattern formation in cold atoms in particular is of great interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because atoms undergo self-organization at ultralow input powers. We recently reported the first observation of pattern formation in cold atoms but found that our results were not accurately described by any existing theoretical model of pattern formation. Previous models describing pattern formation in cold atoms predict that pattern formation should occur using both red and blue-detuned pump beams, favoring a lower threshold for blue detunings. This disagrees with our recent work, in which we only observed pattern formation with red-detuned pump beams. Previous models also assume a two-level atom, which cannot account for the cooling processes that arise when beams counterpropagate through a cold atomic vapor. We describe a new model for pattern formation that accounts for Sisyphus cooling in multi-level atoms, which gives rise to a new nonlinearity via spatial organization of the atoms. This spatial organization causes a sharp red-blue detuning asymmetry, which agrees well with our experimental observations. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  8. Effect of Punica granatum L. Flower Water Extract on Five Common Oral Bacteria and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Orthodontic Wire

    PubMed Central

    VAHID DASTJERDI, Elahe; ABDOLAZIMI, Zahra; GHAZANFARIAN, Marzieh; AMDJADI, Parisa; KAMALINEJAD, Mohammad; MAHBOUBI, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of herbal extracts and essences as natural antibacterial compounds has become increasingly popular for the control of oral infectious diseases. Therefore, finding natural antimicrobial products with the lowest side effects seems necessary. The present study sought to assess the effect of Punica granatum L. water extract on five oral bacteria and bacterial biofilm formation on orthodontic wire. Methods: Antibacterial property of P. granatum L. water extract was primarily evaluated in brain heart infusion agar medium using well-plate method. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined by macro-dilution method. The inhibitory effect on orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation was evaluated using viable cell count in biofilm medium. At the final phase, samples were fixed and analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results: The growth inhibition zone diameter was proportional to the extract concentration. The water extract demonstrated the maximum antibacterial effect on Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556 with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 6.25 mg/ml and maximum bactericidal effect on S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 and S. sobrinus ATCC 27607 with minimum bactericidal concentration of 25 mg/ml. The water extract decreased bacterial biofilm formation by S. sanguinis, S. sobrinus, S. salivarius, S. mutans ATCC 35608 and E. faecalis CIP 55142 by 93.7–100%, 40.6–99.9%, 85.2–86.5%, 66.4–84.4% and 35.5–56.3% respectively. Conclusion: Punica granatum L. water extract had significant antibacterial properties against 5 oral bacteria and prevented orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation. However, further investigations are required to generalize these results to the clinical setting. PMID:26171362

  9. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-11-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1 s → nlm excitations of hydrogen by positron impact, for arbitrary n, l, m, in dense quantum plasma has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogen wave function, it has been possible to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made to explore the structure of differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1 s → nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions in dense quantum plasma is the first reported in the literature.

  10. Sintered wire annode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2007-12-25

    A plurality of high atomic number wires are sintered together to form a porous rod that is parted into porous disks which will be used as x-ray targets. A thermally conductive material is introduced into the pores of the rod, and when a stream of electrons impinges on the sintered wire target and generates x-rays, the heat generated by the impinging x-rays is removed by the thermally conductive material interspersed in the pores of the wires.

  11. Improvements in the Formation of Boron-Doped Diamond Coatings on Platinum Wires Using the Novel Nucleation Process (NNP)

    PubMed Central

    Fhaner, Mathew; Zhao, Hong; Bian, Xiaochun; Galligan, James J.; Swain, Greg M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to increase the initial nucleation density for the growth of boron-doped diamond on platinum wires, we employed the novel nucleation process (NNP) originally developed by Rotter et al. and discussed by others [1–3]. This pretreatment method involves (i) the initial formation of a thin carbon layer over the substrate followed by (ii) ultrasonic seeding of this “soft” carbon layer with nanoscale particles of diamond. This two-step pretreatment is followed by the deposition of boron-doped diamond by microwave plasma-assisted CVD. Both the diamond seed particles and sites on the carbon layer itself function as the initial nucleation zones for diamond growth from an H2-rich source gas mixture. We report herein on the characterization of the pre-growth carbon layer formed on Pt as well as boron-doped films grown for 2, 4 and 6 h post NNP pretreatment. Results from scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical studies are reported. The NNP method increases the initial nucleation density on Pt and leads to the formation of a continuous diamond film in a shorter deposition time than is typical for wires pretreated by conventional ultrasonic seeding. The results indicate that the pregrowth layer itself consists of nanoscopic domains of diamond and functions well to enhance the initial nucleation of diamond without any diamond powder seeding. PMID:21617759

  12. Improvements in the Formation of Boron-Doped Diamond Coatings on Platinum Wires Using the Novel Nucleation Process (NNP).

    PubMed

    Fhaner, Mathew; Zhao, Hong; Bian, Xiaochun; Galligan, James J; Swain, Greg M

    2011-02-01

    In order to increase the initial nucleation density for the growth of boron-doped diamond on platinum wires, we employed the novel nucleation process (NNP) originally developed by Rotter et al. and discussed by others [1-3]. This pretreatment method involves (i) the initial formation of a thin carbon layer over the substrate followed by (ii) ultrasonic seeding of this "soft" carbon layer with nanoscale particles of diamond. This two-step pretreatment is followed by the deposition of boron-doped diamond by microwave plasma-assisted CVD. Both the diamond seed particles and sites on the carbon layer itself function as the initial nucleation zones for diamond growth from an H(2)-rich source gas mixture. We report herein on the characterization of the pre-growth carbon layer formed on Pt as well as boron-doped films grown for 2, 4 and 6 h post NNP pretreatment. Results from scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical studies are reported. The NNP method increases the initial nucleation density on Pt and leads to the formation of a continuous diamond film in a shorter deposition time than is typical for wires pretreated by conventional ultrasonic seeding. The results indicate that the pregrowth layer itself consists of nanoscopic domains of diamond and functions well to enhance the initial nucleation of diamond without any diamond powder seeding.

  13. Formation of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x /Ag multifilamentary metallic precursor powder-in-tube wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Koch, Carl C.; Schwartz, Justin

    2016-12-01

    Previously, a metallic precursor (MP) approach to synthesizing Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x (Bi2212), with a homogeneous mixture of Bi, Sr, Ca, Cu and Ag was produced by mechanical alloying. Here, Bi2212/Ag round multifilamentary wire is manufactured using a metallic precursor powder-in-tube (MPIT) process. The MP powders were packed into a pure Ag tube in an Ar atmosphere and then sealed. After deformation, multifilamentary round wires and rolled tapes were heat treated in flowing oxygen through three stages: oxidation, conversion and partial-melt processing (PMP). Processing-microstructure-property relationships on 20-50 mm long multifilamentary round wires and rolled tapes were studied extensively. It is shown that conventional wire deformation processes, optimized for oxide-powder-in-tube wires, are not effective for deforming MPIT wires, and that as with prior studies of MPIT Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O y conductors, hot extrusion is required for obtaining a multifilamentary structure with fine filaments. As a result, the Bi2212 MPIT wires reported here have low engineering critical current density. Nonetheless, by focusing on sections of wires that remain intact after deformation, it is also shown that the first heat treatment stage, the oxidation stage, plays a crucial role in chemical homogeneity, phase transformation, and microstructural evolution and three reaction pathways for MP oxidation are presented. Furthermore, it is found the Bi2212 grain alignment within an MPIT filament is significantly different from that found in OPIT filaments after PMP, indicating the formation of highly dense filaments containing Bi2212 fine grains and Ag particles before PMP aids the formation of large, c-axis textured Bi2212 filaments during PMP. These results show that, with improved wire deformation, high critical current density may be obtained via a MPIT process.

  14. Mirror and cavity formations by chains of collectively radiating atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulfam, Qurrat-ul-Ain; Ficek, Zbigniew

    2016-11-01

    We search for mirror and cavitylike features of a linear chain of atoms in which one of the atoms is specially chosen as a probe atom that is initially prepared in its excited state or is continuously driven by a laser field. Short chains are considered, composed of only three and five atoms. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the interatomic dipole-dipole interaction, which may lead to a collective ordering of the emission along some specific directions. We examine the conditions under which the radiative modes available for the emission are only those contained inside a cone centered about the interatomic axis. Particular interest is in achieving one-way emission along the interatomic axis, in either the left (backward) or the right (forward) direction, which is referred to as a mirrorlike behavior of the atomic chain. A direction-dependent quantity called the directivity function, which determines how effective the system is in concentrating the radiation in a given direction, is introduced. We show that the function depends crucially on the distance between the atoms and find that there is a threshold for the interatomic distances above which a strongly directional emission can be achieved. The one-sided emission as a manifestation of the mirrorlike behavior and a highly focused emission along the interatomic axis as a characteristic of a single-mode cavity are demonstrated to occur in the stationary field. Below the threshold the directivity function is spherically symmetric. However, we find that the population can be trapped in one of the atoms, and sometimes in all atoms, indicating that at these short distances the system decays to a state for which there are no radiative modes available for emission.

  15. Controlling the formation process and atomic structures of single pyrazine molecular junction by tuning the strength of the metal-molecule interaction.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Takahashi, Ryoji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-04-12

    The formation process and atomic structures were investigated for single pyrazine molecular junctions sandwiched by three different Au, Ag, and Cu electrodes using a mechanically controllable break junction technique in ultrahigh vacuum conditions at 300 K. We demonstrated that the formation process of the single-molecule junction crucially depended on the choice of the metal electrodes. While single-molecule junction showing two distinct conductance states were found for the Au electrodes, only the single conductance state was evident for the Ag electrodes, and there was no junction formation for the Cu electrodes. These results suggested that metal-molecule interaction dominates the formation process and probability of the single-molecule junction. In addition to the metal-molecule interaction, temperature affected the formation process of the single-molecule junction. The single pyrazine molecular junction formed between Au electrodes exhibited significant temperature dependence where the junction-formation probability was about 8% at 300 K, while there was no junction-formation at 100 K. Instead of the junction formation, an Au atomic wire was formed at the low temperature. This study provides insight into the tuning of the junction-forming process for single-molecule junctions, which is needed to construct device structures on a single molecule scale.

  16. Bifurcation Diagram and Pattern Formation of Phase Slip Centers in Superconducting Wires Driven with Electric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J.; Sternberg, P.; Ma, Q.

    2007-10-01

    We provide here new insights into the classical problem of a one-dimensional superconducting wire exposed to an applied electric current using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model. The most striking feature of this system is the well-known appearance of oscillatory solutions exhibiting phase slip centers (PSC’s) where the order parameter vanishes. Retaining temperature and applied current as parameters, we present a simple yet definitive explanation of the mechanism within this nonlinear model that leads to the PSC phenomenon and we establish where in parameter space these oscillatory solutions can be found. One of the most interesting features of the analysis is the evident collision of real eigenvalues of the associated PT-symmetric linearization, leading as it does to the emergence of complex elements of the spectrum.

  17. Annealing twin formation and recrystallization study of cold-drawn copper wires from EBSD measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Baudin, T. Etter, A.L.; Penelle, R.

    2007-10-15

    The crystallographic texture and microstructure of an electrolytic tough pitch copper have been investigated by Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) after cold wire drawing (reduction in area between 52% and 94%) and after primary recrystallization. The material presents a deformation texture composed of major <111> and minor <100> fibers. The evolution of the quality index of the Kikuchi patterns shows that the stored energy is lower in the <100> fiber than in the <111> fiber. Then, after recrystallization, the volume fraction of the <100> fiber increases at the expense of the other texture components. The study of the grain boundary nature shows that the recrystallization twin fraction decreases with increasing strain. It is shown that this evolution is the consequence of the grain size reduction.

  18. A model to predict image formation in Atom probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Vurpillot, F; Gaillard, A; Da Costa, G; Deconihout, B

    2013-09-01

    A model devoted to the modelling of the field evaporation of a tip is presented in this paper. The influence of length scales from the atomic scale to the macroscopic scale is taken into account in this approach. The evolution of the tip shape is modelled at the atomic scale in a three dimensional geometry with cylindrical symmetry. The projection law of ions is determined using a realistic representation of the tip geometry including the presence of electrodes in the surrounding area of the specimen. This realistic modelling gives a direct access to the voltage required to field evaporate, to the evolving magnification in the microscope and to the understanding of reconstruction artefacts when the presence of phases with different evaporation fields and/or different dielectric permittivity constants are modelled. This model has been applied to understand the field evaporation behaviour in bulk dielectric materials. In particular the role of the residual conductivity of dielectric materials is addressed.

  19. Transformation of a tungsten wire to the plasma state by nanosecond electrical explosion in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Sarkisov, G S; Rosenthal, S E; Struve, K W

    2008-05-01

    Experiment demonstrates the first direct transformation of a tungsten wire core to the plasma state by Joule heating during nanosecond electrical explosion in vacuum. Energy of approximately 130 eV/atom was deposited into the 12 microm W wire coated by 2 microm polyimide during the first approximately 10 ns. All the metal rapidly transformed to highly ionized plasma, while the surrounding polyimide coating remained primarily in a gaseous state. This coating totally suppressed corona formation. The expansion velocity of the wire was approximately 12-18 km/s, the average wire ionization at 50 ns reached approximately 67% with corresponding LTE temperature of approximately 1.2 eV . Explosion of bare W wire demonstrated earlier termination of the wire core heating due to shunting corona generation. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation reproduces the main features of coated and uncoated W wire explosion.

  20. The formation and evolution of the core-corona structure in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum: experimental and numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Shi, Zongqian; Shi, Yuanjie

    2017-08-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations on the formation and evolution of the core-corona structure in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum are presented. In the experiments of aluminum wire explosion, shadowgraphy, interferometry and schlieren optical diagnostics are constructed with a laser probe to study the morphological evolution and distribution of the core and corona. A set of computational models with cold start conditions, consisting of a thermodynamic calculation and magnetohydrodynamic model combined with a semi-empirical equation of state and transport coefficients, are established to reproduce the behavior of the electrical explosion of aluminum wire. The radial profiles of the density, temperature, current density and magnetic field, addressing the physical scenario of the formation and evolution of the core-corona structure are analyzed. The numerical results are also compared with relevant experimental data.

  1. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mengdi Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  2. Four-body treatment of the K-shell positronium formation from multi-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim; Velayati, Azime

    2014-03-01

    The four-body Coulomb-Born distorted-wave approximation with correct boundary conditions (CBDW-4B) is applied to the K-shell positronium formation from multi-electron atoms at intermediate and high impact energies. In the present approach, both K-shell electrons are treated as active electrons. For collisions of positrons with helium, carbon, and neon atoms, both the post and prior forms of the transition amplitude are calculated and the corresponding differential and integral cross sections are compared with the results of the three-body version of the formalism (CBDW-3B). In order to investigate the effects of the static electronic correlations on the process, initial bound states of the active electrons in helium atoms are described by Hylleraas and Silverman wave functions. Also for positronium formation from helium atoms the obtained cross sections are compared with the available experimental data and also with the results of the other theories.

  3. Four-body treatment of the K-shell positronium formation from multi-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim; Velayati, Azime Najafabadi

    2014-03-01

    The four-body Coulomb-Born distorted-wave approximation with correct boundary conditions (CBDW-4B) is applied to the K-shell positronium formation from multi-electron atoms at intermediate and high impact energies. In the present approach, both K-shell electrons are treated as active electrons. For collisions of positrons with helium, carbon, and neon atoms, both the post and prior forms of the transition amplitude are calculated and the corresponding differential and integral cross sections are compared with the results of the three-body version of the formalism (CBDW-3B). In order to investigate the effects of the static electronic correlations on the process, initial bound states of the active electrons in helium atoms are described by Hylleraas and Silverman wave functions. Also for positronium formation from helium atoms the obtained cross sections are compared with the available experimental data and also with the results of the other theories.

  4. Crossed-Wire Laser Microwelding of Pt-10 Pct Ir to 316 Low-Carbon Vacuum Melted Stainless Steel: Part I. Mechanism of Joint Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, G. S.; Huang, Y. D.; Pequegnat, A.; Li, X. G.; Khan, M. I.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The excellent biocompatibility and corrosion properties of Pt alloys and 316 low-carbon vacuum melted (LVM) stainless steel (SS) make them attractive for biomedical applications. With the increasing complexity of medical devices and in order to lower costs, the challenge of joining dissimilar materials arises. In this study, laser microwelding (LMW) of crossed Pt-10 pct Ir to 316 LVM SS wires was performed and the weldability of these materials was determined. The joint geometry, joining mechanism, joint breaking force (JBF), and fracture modes were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and microtensile testing. It was shown that the mechanisms of joint formation transitioned from (1) brazing, (2) a combination of brazing and fusion welding, and (3) fusion welding with increasing pulsed laser energy. The joints demonstrated various tensile failure modes including (1) interfacial failure below a peak power of 0.24 kW, (2) partial interfacial failure that propagated into the Pt-Ir wire, (3) failure in the Pt-Ir wire, and (4) failure in the SS wire due to porosity and severe undercutting caused by overwelding. During this study, the optimal laser peak power range was identified to produce joints with good joint geometry and 90 pct of the tensile strength of the Pt-10 pct Ir wire.

  5. Formation Mechanism of SiO2-Type Inclusions in Si-Mn-Killed Steel Wires Containing Limited Aluminum Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Jiang, Min; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Haoqian; Cao, Zhanmin

    2015-10-01

    The origin, formation mechanism, and evolution of SiO2-type inclusions in Si-Mn-killed steel wires were studied by pilot trials with systematical samplings at the refining ladle, casting tundish, as-cast bloom, reheated bloom, and hot-rolled rods. It was found that the inclusions in tundish were well controlled in the low melting point region. By contrast, MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions in the as-cast bloom were with compositions located in the primary region of SiO2, and most CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MnO inclusions lied in primary phase region of anorthite. Therefore, precipitation of SiO2 particles in MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions can be easier than in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MnO inclusions to form dual-phase inclusions in the as-cast bloom. Thermodynamic calculation by the software FactSage 6.4 (CRCT-ThermFact Inc., Montréal, Canada) showed that mass transfer between liquid steel and inclusions resulted in the rise of SiO2 content in inclusions from tundish to as-cast bloom and accelerated the precipitation of pure SiO2 phase in the formed MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions. As a result, the inclusions characterized by dual-phase structure of pure SiO2 in MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 matrix were observed in both as-cast and reheated blooms. Moreover, the ratio of such dual-phase SiO2-type inclusions witnessed an obvious increase from 0 to 25.4 pct before and after casting, whereas it changed little during the reheating and rolling. Therefore, it can be reasonably concluded that they were mainly formed during casting. Comparing the evolution of the inclusions composition and morphology in as-cast bloom and rolled products, a formation mechanism of the SiO2-type inclusions in wire rods was proposed, which included (1) precipitation of SiO2 in the formed MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusion during casting and (2) solid-phase separation of the undeformed SiO2 precipitation from its softer MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 matrix during multipass rolling.

  6. Kinetics of the gas phase reactions of chlorine atoms with a series of formates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallington, T. J.; Hurley, M. D.; Haryanto, A.

    2006-12-01

    Relative rate techniques were used to study the reactivity of Cl atoms with a series of formates in 700 Torr of N 2 diluent at 296 K. Rate constants were determined for the following compounds: methyl formate, (1.30 ± 0.13) × 10 -12; ethyl formate, (9.57 ± 1.27) × 10 -12; n-propyl formate, (4.65 ± 0.47) × 10 -11; and n-butyl formate, (1.12 ± 0.14) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1. These results are consistent with previous relative rate studies but are approximately 20-30% lower than the results from an absolute rate study of the reactivity of chlorine atoms towards esters. Likely explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  7. Formation of Deeply Bound Pionic Atoms and Pion Properties in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeno, Natsumi; Yamagata-Sekihara, Junko; Nagahiro, Hideko; Hirenzaki, Satoru

    We report the recent theoretical studies for the formation of deeply bound pionic atoms. It is important to know the pion properties in nuclei since they are believed to provide valuable information on the aspects of the symmetry of strong interaction at finite density. In order to deduce precise information on the pion properties in nuclei from observables of the deeply bound pionic atom, we consider the pionic atom formation on the even-even and neutron-odd nucleus targets. Furthermore, we also calculate the formation spectra using the Green's function method. Theoretical results using the Green's function method will be necessary to investigate the high precision data which will be obtained in near future.

  8. Formation and rupture of capillary bridges in atomic scale friction.

    PubMed

    Barel, Itay; Filippov, Aleksander E; Urbakh, M

    2012-10-28

    While formation of capillary bridges significantly contributes to the adhesion and friction at micro- and nanoscales, many key aspects of dynamics of capillary condensation and its effect on friction forces are still not well understood. Here, by analytical model and numerical simulations, we address the origin of reduction of friction force with velocity and increase of friction with temperature, which have been experimentally observed under humid ambient conditions. These observations differ significantly from the results of friction experiments carried out under ultrahigh vacuum, and disagree with predictions of thermal Prandtl-Tomlinson model of friction. Our calculations demonstrate what information on the kinetics of capillary condensation can be extracted from measurements of friction forces and suggest optimal conditions for obtaining this information.

  9. Formation and rupture of capillary bridges in atomic scale friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barel, Itay; Filippov, Aleksander E.; Urbakh, M.

    2012-10-01

    While formation of capillary bridges significantly contributes to the adhesion and friction at micro- and nanoscales, many key aspects of dynamics of capillary condensation and its effect on friction forces are still not well understood. Here, by analytical model and numerical simulations, we address the origin of reduction of friction force with velocity and increase of friction with temperature, which have been experimentally observed under humid ambient conditions. These observations differ significantly from the results of friction experiments carried out under ultrahigh vacuum, and disagree with predictions of thermal Prandtl-Tomlinson model of friction. Our calculations demonstrate what information on the kinetics of capillary condensation can be extracted from measurements of friction forces and suggest optimal conditions for obtaining this information.

  10. Local Control of Lung Derived Tumors by Diffusing Alpha-Emitting Atoms Released From Intratumoral Wires Loaded With Radium-224

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Tomer; Schmidt, Michael; Bittan, Hadas; Lazarov, Elinor; Arazi, Lior; Kelson, Itzhak; Keisari, Yona

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DART) is a new form of brachytherapy enabling the treatment of solid tumors with alpha radiation. The present study examines the antitumoral effects resulting from the release of alpha emitting radioisotopes into solid lung carcinoma (LL2, A427, and NCI-H520). Methods and Materials: An in vitro setup tested the dose-dependent killing of tumor cells exposed to alpha particles. In in vivo studies, radioactive wires (0.3 mm diameter, 5 mm long) with {sup 224}Ra activities in the range of 21-38 kBq were inserted into LL/2 tumors in C57BL/6 mice and into human-derived A427 or NCI-H520 tumors in athymic mice. The efficacy of the short-lived daughters of {sup 224}Ra to produce tumor growth retardation and prolong life was assessed, and the spread of radioisotopes inside tumors was measured using autoradiography. Results: The insertion of a single DART wire into the center of 6- to 7-mm tumors had a pronounced retardation effect on tumor growth, leading to a significant inhibition of 49% (LL2) and 93% (A427) in tumor development and prolongations of 48% (LL2) in life expectancy. In the human model, more than 80% of the treated tumors disappeared or shrunk. Autoradiographic analysis of the treated sectioned tissue revealed the intratumoral distribution of the radioisotopes, and histological analysis showed corresponding areas of necrosis. In vitro experiments demonstrated a dose-dependent killing of tumors cells exposed to alpha particles. Conclusions: Short-lived diffusing alpha-emitters produced tumor growth retardation and increased survival in mice bearing lung tumor implants. These results justify further investigations with improved dose distributions.

  11. Formation of deeply bound kaonic atoms in (K-,N) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, J.; Nagahiro, H.; Kimura, R.; Hirenzaki, S.

    2007-10-01

    We study theoretically the (K-,N) reactions for the formation of the deeply bound kaonic atoms, which were predicted to be quasistable with narrow widths, using the Green's function method. We systematically consider various cases with different target nuclei and energies and find clear signals in the theoretical spectra for all cases considered in this article. The signals show very interesting structures, such as a RESONANCE DIP instead of a resonance peak. We discuss the origins of the interesting structures and the possibilities of obtaining new information on the existence of kaonic nuclei from the spectra of atomic state formations.

  12. Basic Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This module is the first in a series of three wiring publications; it serves as the foundation for students enrolled in a wiring program. It is a prerequisite to either "Residential Wiring" or "Commercial and Industrial Wiring." The module contains 16 instructional units that cover the following topics: occupational…

  13. Wiring a plant: genetic networks for phloem formation in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Villalon, Antia

    2016-04-01

    In plants, phloem conduits form a specialized vascular network mediating the exchange of nutrients and signaling molecules between distantly separated organs. To become effective transport elements, protophloem cells undergo a rather unique, differentiation program that involves nucleus degradation, organelle rearrangement and cell wall thickening. Yet, protophloem sieve elements remain alive because their essential metabolic functions are supported by their neighboring companion cells. In spite of the importance of the phloem, the molecular mechanisms orchestrating protophloem specification and differentiation remain still poorly understood. In this review, I provide a summary of recent discoveries regarding morphogenetic events that determine phloem formation, and also a discussion of the systemic effects on root architecture derived from impaired protophloem differentiation programs.

  14. The Formation of Formaldehyde on Interstellar Carbonaceous Grain Analogs by O/H Atom Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas; Jonusas, Mindaugas; Krim, Lahouari

    2017-09-01

    An understanding of possible scenarios for the formation of astrophysically relevant molecules, particularly complex organic molecules, will bring us one step closer to the understanding of our astrochemical heritage. In this context, formaldehyde is an important molecule as a precursor of methanol, which in turn is a starting point for the formation of more complex organic species. In the present experiments, for the first time, following the synthesis of CO, formaldehyde has been produced on the surface of interstellar grain analogs, hydrogenated fullerene-like carbon grains, by O and H atom bombardment. The formation of H2CO is an indication for a possible methanol formation route in such systems.

  15. Study on Formation Mechanism of CaO-SiO2-Based Inclusions in Saw Wire Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun-Peng; Jiang, Min; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Hao-Qian; Cao, Zhan-Min

    2017-08-01

    Attempts were made to elucidate the formation mechanism of CaO-SiO2-based inclusions in saw wires by both laboratory experiments and industrial trials. The key point was to make clear the origin of CaO in such oxide inclusions. Probable origins of [Ca] in steel were first discussed, which can be taken into steel from the steel-slag reaction or ferrous alloy. As a result, slag-steel chemical reaction equilibrium was carefully evaluated at 1873 K (1600 °C) to classify the changes of dissolved aluminum ([Al]), total magnesium (Mg), and total calcium (Ca) in steel and the caused composition variations of inclusions. With the rise of slag basicity from 0.5 to 1.8, [Al] was remarkably increased from 0.00045 to 0.00139 mass pct, whereas Mg varied in the range of 0.00038 to 0.00048 mass pct. By contrast, Ca was constantly kept below 0.00003 mass pct. Accordingly, Al2O3 and MgO in inclusions witnessed obvious rises from 5 to 23 mass pct and from 2 to 8 mass pct, respectively. By contrast, inclusions were free of CaO when slag basicity was below 1.5. With slag basicity further increased to 1.8, CaO witnessed a negligible rise to only 1.0 mass pct on average. This phenomenon agreed well with thermodynamic calculations, which revealed that chemical reaction between steel and CaO in slag (for example, between [Si] and CaO) was weak to hardly supplying sufficient [Ca] to steel to increase CaO in inclusions. Ca contained in ferrous alloys as contaminations was not the cause of CaO-SiO2-based inclusions, either. The industrial trial results indicated that CaO-SiO2-based inclusions have been readily produced in short time just after BOF tapping. Also, a percentage of them changed slightly with the proceeding of refining. Based on the good agreement of laboratory, industrial, and thermodynamics calculations results, it can be reasonably concluded that CaO-SiO2-based inclusions in saw wire were exogenous particles from entrapped/emulsified top slag, but not products of slag

  16. Optical Pattern Formation in Spatially Bunched Atoms: A Self-Consistent Model and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear optics and optomechanical physics communities use different theoretical models to describe how optical fields interact with a sample of atoms. There does not yet exist a model that is valid for finite atomic temperatures but that also produces the zero temperature results that are generally assumed in optomechanical systems. We present a self-consistent model that is valid for all atomic temperatures and accounts for the back-action of the atoms on the optical fields. Our model provides new insights into the competing effects of the bunching-induced nonlinearity and the saturable nonlinearity. We show that it is crucial to keep the fifth and seventh-order nonlinearities that arise when there exists atomic bunching, even at very low optical field intensities. We go on to apply this model to the results of our experimental system where we observe spontaneous, multimode, transverse optical pattern formation at ultra-low light levels. We show that our model accurately predicts our experimentally observed threshold for optical pattern formation, which is the lowest threshold ever reported for pattern formation. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  17. Spectal Responsivity Calibration of the Large Format Si:As FPAs in the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J.; Sevilla, P.; Gibbons, W.; Herter, T.

    1998-09-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) is a small cryogenic spaceborne infrared telescope being readied for launch in September 1998 as the fifth of NASA's Small Explorers. WIRE illuminates two 128 x 128 Si:As Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) produced by Boeing North American with a 30 cm diameter Ritchey Cretien diamond turned mirror system. A dichroic beam splitter and band-pass filter define two broad pass bands for a deep pointed survey to search for protogalaxies and to study the evolution of starburst galaxies. The Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University (SDL/USU) measured the spectral responsivity of the WIRE sensor using the SDL multifunction infrared calibrator (MIC2) and a step- scan interferometer. The primary objective of the spectral responsivity calibration was the array-average relative spectral responsivity (RSR) measurement of each WIRE FPA under nominal operating conditions. The array-average RSR measurement is composed of two parts, a high spectral resolution in-band measurement and an out-of-band measurement that extended the noise floor of the RSR measurement outside the WIRE spectral passbands to approximately 1E-5 of the in-band peak. In addition to the array average RSR at nominal operating conditions, SDL personnel also investigated the WIRE RSR sensitivity to FPA position, temperature and bias voltage. The WIRE spectral calibration method is described, and the results are presented.

  18. Formation of hexagonal boron nitride by metal atomic vacancy-assisted B-N molecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjun; Lee, Jinyeong; Kim, Han Sol; Park, Jong-Bong; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Han, Sang A; Hwang, Sungwoo; Kim, Sang-Woo; Shin, Hyeon-Jin

    2015-01-27

    Because of the low solubility of N atoms in metals, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) growth has explained by surface reaction on metal rather than by penetration/precipitation of B and N atoms in metal. Here, we present an impressive pathway of h-BN formation at the interface between Ni and oxide substrate based on B-N molecular diffusion into Ni through individual atomic vacancies. First-principles calculations confirmed the formation energies of the h-BN layers on and under the metal and the probability of B-N molecular diffusion in metal. The interface growth behavior depends on the species of metal catalysts, and these simulation results well support experimental results.

  19. Dynamics of Hollow Atom Formation in Intense X-Ray Pulses Probed by Partial Covariance Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, L. J.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Siano, M.; Eland, J. H. D.; Linusson, P.; v. d. Meulen, P.; Salén, P.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Foucar, L.; Ullrich, J.; Motomura, K.; Mondal, S.; Ueda, K.; Osipov, T.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B. F.; Berrah, N.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Schorb, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Cryan, J. P.; Coffee, R. N.; Takahashi, O.; Wada, S.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Feifel, R.

    2013-08-01

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called “partial covariance mapping” to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  20. Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    Antihydrogen production in a neutral atom trap formed by an octupole-based magnetic field minimum is demonstrated using field-ionization of weakly bound anti-atoms. Using our unique annihilation imaging detector, we correlate antihydrogen detection by imaging and by field-ionization for the first time. We further establish how field-ionization causes radial redistribution of the antiprotons during antihydrogen formation and use this effect for the first simultaneous measurements of strongly and weakly bound antihydrogen atoms. Distinguishing between these provides critical information needed in the process of optimizing for trappable antihydrogen. These observations are of crucial importance to the ultimate goal of performing CPT tests involving antihydrogen, which likely depends upon trapping the anti-atom.

  1. Theoretical survey on positronium formation and ionisation in positron atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Madhumita; Ghosh, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The recent theoretical studies are surveyed and reported on the formation of exotic atoms in positron-hydrogen, positron-helium and positron-lithium scattering specially at intermediate energy region. The ionizations of these targets by positron impact was also considered. Theoretical predictions for both the processes are compared with existing measured values.

  2. WIP and WICH/WIRE co-ordinately control invadopodium formation and maturation in human breast cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    García, Esther; Ragazzini, Chiara; Yu, Xinzi; Cuesta-García, Elena; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Zech, Tobias; Sarrió, David; Machesky, Laura M.; Antón, Inés M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells form actin-rich degradative protrusions (invasive pseudopods and invadopodia), which allows their efficient dispersal during metastasis. Using biochemical and advanced imaging approaches, we demonstrate that the N-WASP-interactors WIP and WICH/WIRE play non-redundant roles in cancer cell invasion. WIP interacts with N-WASP and cortactin and is essential for invadopodium assembly, whereas WICH/WIRE regulates N-WASP activation to control invadopodium maturation and degradative activity. Our data also show that Nck interaction with WIP and WICH/WIRE modulates invadopodium maturation; changes in WIP and WICH/WIRE levels induce differential distribution of Nck. We show that WIP can replace WICH/WIRE functions and that elevated WIP levels correlate with high invasiveness. These findings identify a role for WICH/WIRE in invasiveness and highlight WIP as a hub for signaling molecule recruitment during invadopodium generation and cancer progression, as well as a potential diagnostic biomarker and an optimal target for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27009365

  3. Formation of surface oxides and Ag2O thin films with atomic oxygen on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derouin, Jonathan; Farber, Rachael G.; Heslop, Stacy L.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2015-11-01

    The nature of the oxygen species adsorbed to silver surfaces is a key component of the heterogeneously catalyzed epoxidation of ethylene and partial oxidation of methanol over silver catalysts. We report the formation of two different silver-oxygen species depending on the flux and energy of incident gas-phase oxygen atoms on an Ag(111) surface. A combination of surface science techniques was used to characterize the oxidized surfaces. Atomic oxygen was generated with an Ir filament; lower temperatures created surface oxides previously reported. When O was deposited with a higher filament temperature, the surface became highly corrugated, little subsurface oxygen was observed, and thin layers of Ag2O were likely formed. These results show that the energy and flux of oxygen are important parameters in the chemical identity and abundance of oxygen on silver surfaces and suggest that formation of the Ag2O thin film hinders formation of subsurface oxygen.

  4. Pd atomic chain formation as a result of submonolayer deposition of 3d metals on Pd(110).

    PubMed

    Wei, D H; Gao, C L; Zakeri, Kh; Przybylski, M

    2009-11-27

    Submonolayer deposition of 3d transition metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni on Pd(110) at room temperature causes the formation of monoatomic chains of Pd as identified with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. In agreement with recent theoretical predictions [Phys. Rev. B 79, 155410 (2009)], the substitution of Pd substrate atoms with the deposited atoms of 3d metals is found to be responsible for the formation of Pd atomic chains. This finding clarifies the long-debated issue about the chemical composition of the atomic chains grown on Pd(110) and points out the intriguing processes in the formation of self-assembled and self-organized nanostructures.

  5. "Atomic Force Masking" Induced Formation of Effective Hot Spots along Grain Boundaries of Metal Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chae, Soo Sang; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O; Lee, Tae Il

    2016-11-30

    We present an interesting phenomenon, "atomic force masking", which is the deposition of a few-nanometer-thick gold film on ultrathin low-molecular-weight (LMW) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) engineered on a polycrystalline gold thin film, and demonstrated the formation of hot spot based on SERS. The essential principle of this atomic force masking phenomenon is that an LMW PDMS layer on a single crystalline grain of gold thin film would repel gold atoms approaching this region during a second cycle of evaporation, whereas new nucleation and growth of gold atoms would occur on LMW PDMS deposited on grain boundary regions. The nanostructure formed by the atomic force masking, denoted here as "hot spots on grain boundaries" (HOGs), which is consistent with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and the mechanism of atomic force masking were investigated by carrying out systematic experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were made to carefully explain the related fundamental physics. Also, to highlight the manufacturing advantages of the proposed method, we demonstrated the simple synthesis of a flexible HOG SERS, and we used this substrate in a swabbing test to detect a common pesticide placed on the surface of an apple.

  6. Modeling the formation of tropical rings of atomic bromine and iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Fernandez, Rafael; Gomez Martin, Juan Carlos; Salawitch, Ross; Kinnison, Douglas; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone

    2015-04-01

    Very short-lived (VSL) bromo- and iodocarbons are produced at a prodigious rate by ocean biology and these source compounds (SGVSL), together with their degradation inorganic products (PGVSL), are lofted by vigorous convection to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Using a state-of-the-art photochemical mechanism within a global model, we investigate the partitioning and loading of reactive inorganic halogens within the TTL. The specific low ozone and low temperature conditions of this region of the atmosphere changes the steady-state between halogen atoms and oxides, making the atoms the dominant species. We suggest that this leads to the formation of two daytime "tropical rings" of both atomic bromine and iodine that circle the tropics with the sun. In addition to a description of this photochemical phenomenon, this communication the partitioning of inorganic halogen reservoirs within the TTL and assess its relevance for the injection of bromine to stratosphere.

  7. Modeling the Formation of Tropical Rings of Atomic Bromine and Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz-Lopez, A.; Fernandez, R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Ordoñez, C.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Tilmes, S.

    2014-12-01

    Very short-lived (VSL) bromo- and iodocarbons are produced at a prodigious rate by ocean biology and these source compounds (SGVSL), together with their degradation inorganic products (PGVSL), are lofted by vigorous convection to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Using a state-of-the-art photochemical mechanism within a global model, we investigate the partitioning and loading of reactive inorganic halogens within the TTL. The specific low ozone and low temperature conditions of this region of the atmosphere changes the steady-state between halogen atoms and oxides, making the atoms the dominant species. We suggest that this leads to the formation of two daytime "tropical rings" of both atomic bromine and iodine that circle the tropics with the sun. In addition to a description of this photochemical phenomenon, this communication the partitioning of inorganic halogen reservoirs within the TTL and assess its relevance for the injection of bromine to stratosphere.

  8. Kinetics of oxygen atom formation during the oxidation of methane behind shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the formation of oxygen atoms during the oxidation of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures behind incident shock waves was carried out over the temperature range 1790-2584 K at reaction pressures between 1.2 and 1.7 atm. Oxygen atom levels were determined indirectly by measurement of emission from reaction of O with CO. On the basis of these data and ignition-delay data reported in the literature, a kinetic scheme for methane oxidation was assembled. The proposed kinetic mechanism, in general, predicts higher peak oxygen atom levels than the current oxidation mechanisms proposed by Bowman and Seery and by Skinner and his co-workers.

  9. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  10. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  11. Muonic Atom Deexcitation via Formation of Metastable Molecular States, in Light of Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallenius, J.; Jonsell, S.; Kino, Y.; Froelich, P.

    2001-12-01

    In a recent experiment performed at PSI, a peak in the time-of-flight distribution of pμ(1s) atoms could be identified with decay of ppμ* molecular ions situated below the 2s threshold, providing 900 eV of kinetic energy to the pμ atom. This finding may be interpreted in terms of the side path model which suggests that metastable muonic molecules may form with high probability in resonant collisions between muonic hydrogen in the 2s state and hydrogen molecules, e.g. pμ (2s) + {text{H}}_{text{2}} to [(ppμ ^* )_{vJ}^{pq} - pee]_{vK} to [(ppμ ^* )_{v'J'}^{p'q'} - pe]^ + + e^ - . The Coulombic decay of the Auger stabilised ppμ* molecular ion then leads to the formation of highly energetic pμ(1s) atoms. In the present paper calculations of resonant formation rates in pure hydrogen are presented and compared to the quenching rate of pμ(2s) atoms measured at low hydrogen density.

  12. Atomic Step Formation on Sapphire Surface in Ultra-precision Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongrong; Guo, Dan; Xie, Guoxin; Pan, Guoshun

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces with controlled atomic step structures as substrates are highly relevant to desirable performances of materials grown on them, such as light emitting diode (LED) epitaxial layers, nanotubes and nanoribbons. However, very limited attention has been paid to the step formation in manufacturing process. In the present work, investigations have been conducted into this step formation mechanism on the sapphire c (0001) surface by using both experiments and simulations. The step evolutions at different stages in the polishing process were investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The simulation of idealized steps was constructed theoretically on the basis of experimental results. It was found that (1) the subtle atomic structures (e.g., steps with different sawteeth, as well as steps with straight and zigzag edges), (2) the periodicity and (3) the degree of order of the steps were all dependent on surface composition and miscut direction (step edge direction). A comparison between experimental results and idealized step models of different surface compositions has been made. It has been found that the structure on the polished surface was in accordance with some surface compositions (the model of single-atom steps: Al steps or O steps). PMID:27444267

  13. Atomic Step Formation on Sapphire Surface in Ultra-precision Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongrong; Guo, Dan; Xie, Guoxin; Pan, Guoshun

    2016-07-22

    Surfaces with controlled atomic step structures as substrates are highly relevant to desirable performances of materials grown on them, such as light emitting diode (LED) epitaxial layers, nanotubes and nanoribbons. However, very limited attention has been paid to the step formation in manufacturing process. In the present work, investigations have been conducted into this step formation mechanism on the sapphire c (0001) surface by using both experiments and simulations. The step evolutions at different stages in the polishing process were investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The simulation of idealized steps was constructed theoretically on the basis of experimental results. It was found that (1) the subtle atomic structures (e.g., steps with different sawteeth, as well as steps with straight and zigzag edges), (2) the periodicity and (3) the degree of order of the steps were all dependent on surface composition and miscut direction (step edge direction). A comparison between experimental results and idealized step models of different surface compositions has been made. It has been found that the structure on the polished surface was in accordance with some surface compositions (the model of single-atom steps: Al steps or O steps).

  14. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom in dense quantum plasmas: Positronium formation in Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2017-04-01

    Effects of dense quantum plasmas on positronium (Ps) formation in an arbitrary nlm-state in the scattering of positrons from the ground state of hydrogen atoms have been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave theory that incorporates the effect of screened dipole polarization potential. The interaction of charged particles in plasmas has been modeled by a modified Debye-Huckel potential. Effects of plasma screening on the structures of differential and total cross sections have been explored for various incident positron energies in the range 20-300 eV. For the free atomic case, our results are in conformity with the existing results available in the literature. It has been found that for small screening effects, the cross section presents the oscillatory behaviour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to estimate the screening effects on the differential and total cross sections for Ps formation in Rydberg states in dense quantum plasmas.

  15. Measurements of Polyatomic Molecule Formation on an Icy Grain Analog Using Fast Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Madsunkov, S.; Shortt, B. J.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide has been produced from the impact of a monoenergetic O(P-3) beam upon a surface cooled to 4.8 K and covered with a CO ice. Using temperature-programmed desorption and mass spectrometer detection, we have detected increasing amounts of CO2 formation with O(P-3) energies of 2, 5, 10, and 14 eV. This is the first measurement of polyatomic molecule formation on a surface with superthermal atoms. The goal of this work is to detect other polyatomic species, such as CH3OH, which can be formed under conditions that simulate the grain temperature, surface coverage, and superthermal atoms present in shock-heated circumstellar and interstellar regions.

  16. Wire stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economu, M. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An insulation stripper is described which is especially useful for shielded wire, the stripper including a first pair of jaws with blades extending substantially perpendicular to the axis of the wire, and a second pair of jaws with blades extending substantially parallel to the axis of the wire. The first pair of jaws is pressed against the wire so the blades cut into the insulation, and the device is turned to form circumferential cuts in the insulation. Then the second pair of jaws is pressed against the wire so the blades cut into the insulation, and the wire is moved through the device to form longitudinal cuts that permit easy removal of the insulation. Each of the blades is located within the concave face of a V-block, to center the blades on the wire and to limit the depth of blade penetration.

  17. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation, Imaging, Observations, and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    This report presents particle formation observations and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Hydrogen was frozen into particles in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. These newly analyzed data are from the test series held on February 28, 2001. Particle sizes from previous testing in 1999 and the testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed: microparticles and delayed particle formation. These experiment image analyses are some of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and they allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  18. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation Energy and Imaging Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents particle formation energy balances and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium during the Phase II testing in 2001. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. The particle formation efficiency is also estimated. Particle sizes from the Phase I testing in 1999 and the Phase II testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles and it allows designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  19. Designing potentials by sculpturing wires

    SciTech Connect

    Della Pietra, Leonardo; Aigner, Simon; Groth, Soenke; Hagen, Christoph von; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Bar-Joseph, Israel; Lezec, Henri J.

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic trapping potentials for atoms on atom chips are determined by the current flow in the chip wires. By modifying the shape of the conductor we can realize specialized current flow patterns and therefore microdesign the trapping potentials. We have demonstrated this by nano-machining an atom chip using the focused ion beam technique. We built a trap, a barrier, and using a Bose-Einstein Condensate as a probe we showed that by polishing the conductor edge the potential roughness on the selected wire can be reduced. Furthermore, we give different other designs and discuss the creation of a one-dimensional magnetic lattice on an atom chip.

  20. Kinetics of spin relaxation in quantum wires and channels: Boundary spin echo and formation of a persistent spin helix

    SciTech Connect

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2011-10-15

    In this paper we use a spin kinetic equation to study spin-polarization dynamics in one-dimensional (1D) wires and 2D channels. The spin kinetic equation is valid in both diffusive and ballistic spin transport regimes and therefore is more general than the usual spin drift-diffusion equations. In particular, we demonstrate that in infinite 1D wires with Rashba spin-orbit interaction the exponential spin-relaxation decay can be modulated by an oscillating function. In the case of spin relaxation in finite length 1D wires, it is shown that an initially homogeneous spin polarization spontaneously transforms into a persistent spin helix. We find that a propagating spin-polarization profile reflects from a system boundary and returns back to its initial position similarly to the reflectance of sound waves from an obstacle. The Green's function of the spin kinetic equation is derived for both finite and infinite 1D systems. Moreover, we demonstrate explicitly that the spin relaxation in specifically oriented 2D channels with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of equal strength occurs similarly to that in 1D wires of finite length. Finally, a simple transformation mapping 1D spin kinetic equation into the Klein-Gordon equation with an imaginary mass is found thus establishing an interesting connection between semiconductor spintronics and relativistic quantum mechanics.

  1. A standard format for reporting atomic positions in measured or calculated surface structures: The CIF file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Laurence D.

    2010-06-01

    In his editorial in this issue, the editor-in-chief emphasizes the editorial policy that any paper which involves a crystallographic structure (whether experimentally measured or theoretically calculated) must also include a complete listing of all the atomic positions within the crystal structure, either as supporting information or directly within the paper itself. He also strongly recommends that the complete crystallographic data set be included as supporting information. At the request of the editor-in-chief, I outline here the reasons why this is scientifically desirable. Furthermore, I propose here that the Surface Science community adopt the same standard format for reporting these as is already widely used in bulk crystallography publications, namely the inclusion of a Crystallographic Information Format file (or CIF file) as supporting information. Finally, I describe the details of this specific file format, with illustrative examples.

  2. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol.

  3. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source.

    PubMed

    Pitters, Jason L; Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A

    2012-04-21

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  4. Spray formation of biodiesel-water in air-assisted atomizer using Schlieren photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirnordin, S. H.; Khalid, A.; Sapit, A.; Salleh, H.; Razali, A.; Fawzi, M.

    2016-11-01

    Biodiesels are attractive renewable energy sources, particularly for industrial boiler and burner operators. However, biodiesels produce higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions compared with diesel. Although water-emulsified fuels can lower NOx emissions by reducing flame temperature, its influence on atomization needs to be investigated further. This study investigates the effects of water on spray formation in air-assisted atomizers. The Schlieren method was used to capture the spray images in terms of tip penetration, spray angle, and spray area. The experiment used palm oil biodiesel at different blending ratios (B5, B10, and B15) and water contents (0vol%-15vol%). Results show that water content in the fuel increases the spray penetration and area but reduces the spray angle because of the changes in fuel properties. Therefore, biodiesel-water application is applicable to burner systems.

  5. Detection of nickel atom by laser induced fluorescence during carbon nanotube formation in a laser produced plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boer, G.; Arepalli, S.; Holmes, W.; Nikolaev, P.; Range, C.; Scott, C.

    2001-05-01

    In situ monitoring of catalyst nickel atoms by laser induced fluorescence during carbon nanotube formation in a laser-produced plume was performed at the Johnson Space Center nanotube production laboratory. The results indicate that ablation of nickel and plume dynamics are strongly related to the oven temperature. Nickel atoms have a long lifetime of several milliseconds and have an electronic temperature of at least 1500 K during carbon nanotube formation.

  6. Galaxy Zoo and ALFALFA: atomic gas and the regulation of star formation in barred disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Haynes, Martha P.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Skibba, Ramin; Bamford, Steven; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-08-01

    We study the observed correlation between atomic gas content and the likelihood of hosting a large-scale bar in a sample of 2090 disc galaxies. Such a test has never been done before on this scale. We use data on morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo project and information on the galaxies' H I content from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) blind H I survey. Our main result is that the bar fraction is significantly lower among gas-rich disc galaxies than gas-poor ones. This is not explained by known trends for more massive (stellar) and redder disc galaxies to host more bars and have lower gas fractions: we still see at fixed stellar mass a residual correlation between gas content and bar fraction. We discuss three possible causal explanations: (1) bars in disc galaxies cause atomic gas to be used up more quickly, (2) increasing the atomic gas content in a disc galaxy inhibits bar formation and (3) bar fraction and gas content are both driven by correlation with environmental effects (e.g. tidal triggering of bars, combined with strangulation removing gas). All three explanations are consistent with the observed correlations. In addition our observations suggest bars may reduce or halt star formation in the outer parts of discs by holding back the infall of external gas beyond bar co-rotation, reddening the global colours of barred disc galaxies. This suggests that secular evolution driven by the exchange of angular momentum between stars in the bar, and gas in the disc, acts as a feedback mechanism to regulate star formation in intermediate-mass disc galaxies. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 200 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at South East Physics Network, E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.ukEinstein fellow.

  7. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  8. Residential Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark

    The second in a series of three curriculum packages on wiring, these materials for a five-unit course were developed to prepare postsecondary students for entry-level employment in the residential wiring trade. The five units are: (1) blueprint reading and load calculations; (2) rough-in; (3) service; (4) trim out and troubleshooting; and (5) load…

  9. H{sup −} formation by neutral resonant ionization of H(n=2) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, John S.

    2015-04-08

    A mechanism for producing hydrogen anions in a low density, low energy hydrogen plasma is proposed. The observation in a plasma ion source that the anion output is quadratically related to the Lyman-α radiation suggests that anions could be formed in collisions between atoms in the first excited state. A potential energy plot for the hydrogen molecule is developed that includes a high energy ionic state, comprising a proton and the weakly bound H{sup −}(2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sup e}) ion, revealing a path to stable anion formation.

  10. Gas-phase formation of silicon carbides, oxides, and sulphides from atomic silicon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohme, Diethard K.; Wlodek, Stanislaw; Fox, Arnold

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental study of the kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions in the gas phase between ground-state Si(+)2p and a variety of astrophysical molecules. The aim of this study is to identify the reactions which trigger the formation of chemical bonds between silicon and carbon, oxygen and sulphur, and the chemical pathways which lead to further molecular growth. Such knowledge is valuable in the identification of new extraterrestrial silicon-bearing molecules and for an assessment of the gas-phase transition from atomic silicon to silicon carbide and silicate grain particles in carbon-rich and oxygen-rich astrophysical environments.

  11. Investigation of the effect of process parameters on the formation and characteristics of recast layer in wire-EDM of Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Thomas R; Melkote, Shreyes N; Watkins, Thomas R; Trejo, Rosa M; Riester, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Inconel 718 is a high nickel content superalloy possessing high strength at elevated temperatures and resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The non-traditional manufacturing process of wire-electrical discharge machining (EDM) possesses many advantages over traditional machining during the manufacture of Inconel 718 parts. However, certain detrimental effects are also present and are due in large part to the formation of the recast layer. An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the main EDM parameters which contribute to recast layer formation in Inconel 718. It was found that average recast layer thickness increased primarily with energy per spark, peak discharge current, and current pulse duration. Over the range of parameters tested, the recast layer was observed to be between 5 and 9 {micro}m in average thickness, although highly variable in nature. The recast material was found to possess in-plane tensile residual stresses, as well as lower hardness and elastic modulus than the bulk material.

  12. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with themore » metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.« less

  13. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  14. Dislocation formation and gettering mechanism of impurity atoms close to the active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadiyak, G. V.

    1997-05-01

    High-energy beams are starting to play an important role in silicon device technology. The most important potential use is the formation of CMOS profiled tubs by high-energy ion implantation which can give substantial economic advantages as well as enhanced device performance over the conventional furnace drive-in diffusion technology. Coupled with this technology is the use of MeV B beams to form gettering layers close to the active region. Here the gettering mechanism for iron (Fe) and theoretical model will be presented and compared with experimental data of Jacobson et al. The model consists of diffusion equations for Fe atoms, pairs (defect-boron), and point defects, the rate equation for boron atoms at the substitutional positions and also for structural damage: dislocation density and their size-radius of dislocation loops. The dislocations are the main gettering centers in which Fe atoms are precipitated during annealing. The results of numerical simulation modeling are in qualitative agreement with the experiments and the numerical fitting parameters are in the physically justifiable range.

  15. Direct collapse black hole formation from synchronized pairs of atomic cooling haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbal, Eli; Haiman, Zoltán; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-11-01

    High-redshift quasar observations imply that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) larger than ˜109 M⊙ formed before z ˜ 6. That such large SMBHs formed so early in the history of the Universe remains an open theoretical problem. One possibility is that gas in atomic cooling haloes exposed to strong Lyman-Werner (LW) radiation forms 104-106 M⊙ supermassive stars which quickly collapse into black holes. We propose a scenario for direct collapse black hole (DCBH) formation based on synchronized pairs of pristine atomic cooling haloes. We consider haloes at very small separation with one halo being a subhalo of the other. The first halo to surpass the atomic cooling threshold forms stars. Soon after these stars are formed, the other halo reaches the cooling threshold and due to its small distance from the newly formed galaxy, it is exposed to the critical LW intensity required to form a DCBH. The main advantage of this scenario is that synchronization can potentially prevent photoevaporation and metal pollution in DCBH-forming haloes. We use N-body simulations and an analytic approximation to estimate the abundance of DCBHs formed in this way. The density of DCBHs formed in this scenario could explain the SMBHs implied by z ˜ 6 quasar observations. Metal pollution and photoevaporation could potentially reduce the abundance of DCBHs below that required to explain the observations in other models that rely on a high LW flux.

  16. Conductance oscillations of a metallic quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapinski, T.

    2005-09-01

    The electron transport through a monatomic metallic wire connected to leads is investigated using the tight-binding Hamiltonian and the Green function technique. Analytical formulae for the transmittance are derived and M-atom oscillations of the conductance versus the length of the wire are found. Maxima of the transmittance function versus the energy, for a wire consisting of N atoms, determine the (N+1) period of the conductance. The periods of conductance oscillations are discussed and the local and average quantum wire charges are presented. The average charge of the wire is linked with the period of the conductance oscillations and for M-atom periodicity there are possible (M-1) average occupations of the wire states.

  17. Surface effects on the mechanical elongation of AuCu nanowires: De-alloying and the formation of mixed suspended atomic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, M. J.; Autreto, P. A. S.; Galvao, D. S. Ugarte, D.; Bettini, J.; Sato, F.; Dantas, S. O.

    2015-03-07

    We report here an atomistic study of the mechanical deformation of Au{sub x}Cu{sub (1−x)} atomic-size wires (nanowires (NWs)) by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to obtain deeper insights on the dynamical properties of stretched NWs. The mechanical properties are significantly dependent on the chemical composition that evolves in time at the junction; some structures exhibit a remarkable de-alloying behavior. Also, our results represent the first experimental realization of mixed linear atomic chains (LACs) among transition and noble metals; in particular, surface energies induce chemical gradients on NW surfaces that can be exploited to control the relative LAC compositions (different number of gold and copper atoms). The implications of these results for nanocatalysis and spin transport of one-atom-thick metal wires are addressed.

  18. Atomic-Scale Snapshots of the Formation and Growth of Hollow PtNi/C Nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chattot, Raphaël; Asset, Tristan; Drnec, Jakub; Bordet, Pierre; Nelayah, Jaysen; Dubau, Laetitia; Maillard, Frédéric

    2017-03-30

    Determining the formation and growth mechanism of bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with atomic detail is fundamental to synthesize efficient "catalysts by design". However, an understanding of the elementary steps which take place during their synthesis remains elusive. Herein, we have exploited scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, operando wide angle and small-angle X-ray scattering, and electrochemistry to unveil the formation and growth mechanism of hollow PtNi/C NPs. Such NPs, composed of a PtNi shell surrounding a nanoscale void, catalyze efficiently and sustainably the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an acidic electrolyte. Our step-by-step study reveals that (i) Ni-rich/C NPs form first, before being embedded in a NixByOz shell, (ii) the combined action of galvanic displacement and the nanoscale Kirkendall effect then results in the sequential formation of Ni-rich core@Pt-rich/C shell and ultimately hollow PtNi/C NPs. The electrocatalytic properties for the ORR and the stability of the different synthesis intermediates were tested and structure-activity-stability relationships established both in acidic and alkaline electrolytes. Beyond its interest for the ORR electrocatalysis, this study also presents a methodology that is capable to unravel the formation and growth mechanism of various nanomaterials including preferentially shaped metal NPs, core@shell NPs, onion-like NPs, Janus NPs, or a combination of several of these structures.

  19. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Atomic Gas Dominated Regions - Results from the HERACLES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruba, Andreas; Leroy, A. K.; Walter, F.; HERACLES Team

    2012-01-01

    We perform a sensitive search for faint CO emission and study how it is related to star formation in HI-dominated regions of 45 nearby spiral and dwarf galaxies using observations of CO (HERACLES), HI (THINGS), IR & Halpha (SINGS/LVL), and UV (GALEX NGS). Constraining the molecular gas content in HI-dominated regions is a crucial measurement to distinguish the role of atomic and molecular gas in the star formation process. We apply a novel technique, leveraging HI velocity fields from THINGS and wide area coverage of HERACLES to stack CO spectra and significantly increase the sensitivity. For spiral galaxies, CO (and thus H2) is linearly related to tracers of star formation (IR, Halpha, FUV) and does not depend on gas density. Meanwhile, the H2-to-HI ratio varies by several orders of magnitude with radius and total gas surface density and thus sensitively regulates the supply of star-forming molecular gas. For dwarf galaxies, we determine sensitive upper limits on the CO luminosity both near star-forming peaks and the entire galaxy and find CO emission to be faint both in an absolute sense and normalized by B-band luminosity and star formation rate (SFR). The ratio SFR/CO increases by more than an order of magnitude toward low metallicities which likely indicates a dramatic increase in the CO-to-H2 conversion factor.

  20. The effects of cooking on wire and stone barbecue at different cooking levels on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in beef steak.

    PubMed

    Oz, Fatih; Yuzer, M Onur

    2016-07-15

    The effects of type of barbecue (wire and stone) and cooking levels (rare, medium, well-done and very well-done) on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in beef steak were investigated. Varying levels of IQx (up to 0.29 ng/g), IQ (up to 0.93 ng/g), MeIQx (up to 0.08 ng/g), MeIQ (up to 0.75 ng/g), 7,8-DiMeIQx (up to 0.08 ng/g), 4,8-DiMeIQx (up to 4.95 ng/g), PhIP (up to 6.24 ng/g) and AαC (up to 0.20 ng/g) were determined, while MeAαC was not detected. The total HCA amounts in wire barbecued samples were higher than stone barbecued samples. Total HCA contents of the samples ranged between nd and 13.52 ng/g. In terms of PAHs, varying levels of BaA (up to 0.34 ng/g), Chry (up to 0.28 ng/g), BbF (up to 0.39 ng/g), BkF (up to 0.90 ng/g), BaP (up to 0.29 ng/g) and Bghip (up to 0.43 ng/g) were determined, while DahA and IncdP were not detected. The total PAH amounts in stone barbecued samples were higher than those of wire barbecued samples. Total PAH amounts of the samples ranged between nd and 2.63 ng/g.

  1. Charge exchange and cluster formation in an rf Paul trap: interaction of alkali atoms with C +60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Stuart; Cameron, Douglas; Rokni, Mordechai; Hill, Winfield; Parks, J. H.

    1996-06-01

    A Paul ion trap was used to study the formation of clusters under controlled temperature and pressure conditions. Exposure of cold C +60 ions to Li flux leads to the formation of Li nC +60 clusters ( n = 1-18) occurring by the sequential association of Li atoms. Cluster formation dependence on He pressure displayed a competition between vibrational relaxation and unimolecular dissociation. Collisions with Na, K, Rb and Cs atoms resulted in dissociative charge exchange. Decay rates of C +60 ions resulting from these low-energy charge exchange collisions were consistent with Langevin capture rates.

  2. Mg line formation in late-type stellar atmospheres. I. The model atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Y.; Barklem, P. S.; Lind, K.; Belyaev, A. K.; Spielfiedel, A.; Guitou, M.; Feautrier, N.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Magnesium is an element of significant astrophysical importance, often traced in late-type stars using lines of neutral magnesium, which is expected to be subject to departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The importance of Mg , together with the unique range of spectral features in late-type stars probing different parts of the atom, as well as its relative simplicity from an atomic physics point of view, makes it a prime target and test bed for detailed ab initio non-LTE modelling in stellar atmospheres. Previous non-LTE modelling of spectral line formation has, however, been subject to uncertainties due to lack of accurate data for inelastic collisions with electrons and hydrogen atoms. Aims: In this paper we build and test a Mg model atom for spectral line formation in late-type stars with new or recent inelastic collision data and no associated free parameters. We aim to reduce these uncertainties and thereby improve the accuracy of Mg non-LTE modelling in late-type stars. Methods: For the low-lying states of Mg i, electron collision data were calculated using the R-matrix method. Hydrogen collision data, including charge transfer processes, were taken from recent calculations by some of us. Calculations for collisional broadening by neutral hydrogen were also performed where data were missing. These calculations, together with data from the literature, were used to build a model atom. This model was then employed in the context of standard non-LTE modelling in 1D (including average 3D) model atmospheres in a small set of stellar atmosphere models. First, the modelling was tested by comparisons with observed spectra of benchmark stars with well-known parameters. Second, the spectral line behaviour and uncertainties were explored by extensive experiments in which sets of collisional data were changed or removed. Results: The modelled spectra agree well with observed spectra from benchmark stars, showing much better agreement with line

  3. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; ...

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  4. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  5. Wire Wise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanquist, Barry

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how today's technology is encouraging schools to invest in furnishings that are adaptable to computer use and telecommunications access. Explores issues concerning modularity, wiring management, ergonomics, durability, price, and aesthetics. (GR)

  6. Wire Wise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanquist, Barry

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how today's technology is encouraging schools to invest in furnishings that are adaptable to computer use and telecommunications access. Explores issues concerning modularity, wiring management, ergonomics, durability, price, and aesthetics. (GR)

  7. Numerical investigation on the growth process and size distribution of nanoparticles obtained through electrical explosion of aluminum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jun; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli

    2017-02-01

    Numerical investigations on the formation process and the final size distribution of nanoparticles during electrical explosion of Al wire are carried out. Firstly, the formation of the atomic vapor clusters is investigated. It indicates that the Al wire does not reach its atomization conditions. The size of the atomic vapor clusters is obtained, and it increases with the temperature at explosion. Then the growth process of Al nanoparticles from the formed atomic vapor clusters is modeled and the size distribution is predicted. The size distribution at different temperatures indicates that the growth process of Al nanoparticles becomes inactive gradually as the temperature decreases. The investigation of the size distribution under different cooling rates indicates that the bigger cooling rate is favorable for the formation of Al nanoparticles with smaller size dispersion and lower average dimension. The size distribution of Al nanoparticles obtained by the model is qualitatively consistent with the experimental data, which demonstrates the feasibility of this model.

  8. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  9. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  10. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  11. Secondary aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons by chlorine atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuyi; Griffin, Robert J.

    2006-07-01

    The chlorine atom (Cl) is a potential oxidant of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere and is hypothesized to lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in coastal and industrialized areas. The purpose of this paper is to test this hypothesis and to quantify the SOA formation potentials of the common monoterpenes α-pinene, β-pinene, and d-limonene when oxidized by Cl in laboratory chamber experiments. Results indicate that the oxidation of these monoterpenes generates significant amounts of aerosol. The SOA yields of α-pinene, β-pinene, and d-limonene in this study are comparable to those when they are oxidized by ozone, by nitrate radical, and in photooxidation scenarios. For aerosol mass up to 30.0 μg m-3, their yields reach approximately 0.20, 0.20, and 0.30, respectively. For d-limonene, data indicate two yield curves that depend on the initial concentration ratio of Cl precursor to d-limonene. It is argued theoretically that multiple SOA yield curves may be common for VOCs, depending on the initial concentration ratio of oxidant to VOC. SOA formation from the three typical monoterpenes when oxidized by Cl in the marine boundary layer, coastal areas, and inland industrialized areas could be a source of organic aerosol in the early morning.

  12. Life prediction of aging aircraft wiring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenski, George

    1995-01-01

    The program goal is to develop a computerized life prediction model capable of identifying present aging progress and predicting end of life for aircraft wiring. A summary is given in viewgraph format of progress made on phase 1 objectives, which were to identify critical aircraft wiring problems; relate most common failures identified to the wire mechanism causing the failure; assess wiring requirments, materials, and stress environment for fighter aircraft; and demonstrate the feasibility of a time-temperature-environment model.

  13. Effect of Current Rise-time on the Formation of Precursor Structures and Mass Ablation Rate in Cylindrical Wire Array Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, S. C.; Eshaq, Y.; Ueda, U.; Haas, D. M.; Beg, F. N.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B.; Greenly, J.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Douglass, J. D.; Bell, K.; Knapp, P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki, F. A.

    2009-01-21

    We present the first study to directly compare the mass ablation rates of cylindrical wire arrays as a function of the current rise-rate. Formation of the precursor column is investigated on both the MAPGIE (1 MA, 250 ns) and COBRA (1 MA, 100 ns) generators, and results are used to infer the change in the mass ablation rate induced by the rise-rate of the drive current. Laser shadowography, gated XUV imaging and x-ray diodes are used to compare the dynamical behavior both generators, and x-pinch radiography and XUV spectroscopy and provide density evolution and temperature measurements respectively. Results are compared to predictions from an analytical scaling model based on a fixed ablation rate, and the close correlation achieved suggests that the effective ablation velocity is not a strong function of the current rise rate.

  14. The formation of excited atoms during charge exchange between hydrogen ions and alkali atoms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieman, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    The charge exchange cross sections for protons and various alkali atoms are calculated using the classical approximation of Gryzinski. It is assumed that the hydrogen atoms resulting from charge exchange exist in all possible excited states. Charge transfer collisions between protons and potassium as well as protons and sodium atoms are studied. The energy range investigated is between 4 and 30 keV. The theoretical calculations of the capture cross section and the cross section for the creation of metastable 2S hydrogen are compared to experimental values. Good quantitative agreement is found for the capture cross section but only qualitative agreement for the metastable cross section. Analysis of the Lyman alpha window in molecular oxygen suggests that measured values of the metastable cross section may be in error. Thick alkali target data are also presented. This allows the determination of the total electron loss cross section. Finally, some work was done with H2(+).

  15. Formation mechanism of atomic cluster structures in Al-Mg alloy during rapid solidification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fengxiang; Liu Rangsu Hou Zhaoyang; Liu Hairong; Tian Zean; Zhou Lili

    2009-02-15

    The rapid solidification processes of Al{sub 50}Mg{sub 50} liquid alloy consisting of 50,000 atoms have been simulated by using molecular dynamics method based on the effective pair potential derived from the pseudopotential theory. The formation mechanisms of atomic clusters during the rapid solidification processes have been investigated adopting a new cluster description method-cluster-type index method (CTIM). The simulated partial structure factors are in good agreement with the experimental results. And Al-Mg amorphous structure characterized with Al-centered icosahedral topological short-range order (SRO) is found to form during the rapid solidification processes. The icosahedral cluster plays a key role in the microstructure transition. Besides, it is also found that the size distribution of various clusters in the system presents a magic number sequence of 13, 19, 23, 25, 29, 31, 33, 37, .... The magic clusters are more stable and mainly correspond to the incompact arrangements of linked icosahedra in the form of rings, chains or dendrites. And each magic number point stands correspondingly for one certain combining form of icosahedra. This magic number sequence is different from that generated in the solidification structure of liquid Al and those obtained by methods of gaseous deposition and ionic spray, etc.

  16. FORMATION OF FORMALDEHYDE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ON AN ICY GRAIN ANALOG USING FAST HYDROGEN ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Madzunkov, S. M.; MacAskill, J. A.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M. R.; Vidali, G.; Shortt, B. J.

    2009-05-20

    Formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) were produced in collisions of a superthermal, 3 eV beam of H({sup 2}S) atoms with CO molecules adsorbed on a gold surface at 4.8 K. The reaction-generated products were detected and analyzed using the techniques of temperature programmed desorption (TPD), quadrupole mass spectrometry, and a novel application of the Metropolis algorithm, random-walk procedure to identify the unique fractionation patterns of H{sub 2}CO and CO{sub 2} from the patterns of other species such as N{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O embedded in the CO blanket and devolved in the TPD/mass spectrometry process. Reaction sequences are given to account for the formation of H{sub 2}CO and CO{sub 2}.

  17. The formation of anomalous Hall effect depending on W atoms in ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, Musa Mutlu; Shah, S. Ismat; Fırat, Tezer

    2014-06-01

    This article investigates the effects of intrinsic point defects and extrinsic W atoms on magneto electrical properties in the ZnO lattice. The analyses were accomplished for ∼0.5% W including ZnO thin films, grown using a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system. The polarized spin current dependent magnetic formation was investigated by longitudinal and transverse magneto electrical measurements in a temperature range of 5 K to 300 K. The positive magneto resistivity (PMR) ratios reached 28.8%, 12.7%, and 17.6% at 5 K for thin films, having different post-deposition annealing conditions as a consequence of ionic W dependent defects in the lattice. Furthermore, an anomalous Hall effect, originating from polarized spin currents, was understood from the split in Hall resistance versus magnetic field (Rxy(H)) curves for the thin film with high amount of Zn2+ and W6+ ionic defects.

  18. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  19. Log-normal diameter distribution of Pd-based metallic glass droplet and wire

    PubMed Central

    Yaginuma, S.; Nakajima, C.; Kaneko, N.; Yokoyama, Y.; Nakayama, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the formation of Pd42.5Cu30Ni7.5P20 metallic glass droplets and wires in the gas atomization process. We demonstrate that the sizes of droplets and wires can be distinguished by the Ohnesorge number (Oh), which is the proportion of the spinnability to the capillary instability, and the diameter distributions follow a log-normal distribution function, implying cascade fragmentation. For droplets, the number significantly increases at Oh < 1 but the diameter gradually decreases. For wires, the number greatly increases at Oh > 1 while the diameter steadies below 400 nm. Further, the wire diameter is quadrupled at Oh = 16 due to the high viscosity which suppresses both capillary breakup and ligament elongation. PMID:26030090

  20. Formation of hydrogen atom in 2s state in proton-sodium inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, A. Elkilany

    2015-03-01

    The inelastic collision of protons with sodium atoms are treated for the first time within the framework of the coupled-static and frozen core approximations. The method is used for calculating partial and total cross-sections with the assumption that only two channels (elastic and hydrogen formation in 2s state) are open. In each case, the calculations are carried out for seven values of the total angular momentum ℓ(0 ≤ ℓ ≤ 6). The target is described using the Clementi Roetti wave functions within the framework of the one valence electron model. We use Lipmann-Swinger equation to solve the derived equations of the problem, then apply an iterative numerical method to obtain the code of computer to calculate iterative partial cross-sections. This can be done through calculating the reactance matrix at different values of considered energies to obtain the transition matrix that gives partial and total cross sections. The present results for total hydrogen (2s state) formation cross sections are in agreement with results of other available ones in wide range of incident energy.

  1. On the interplay between relaxation, defect formation, and atomic Sn distribution in Ge{sub (1−x)}Sn{sub (x)} unraveled with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A. Bran, J. Melkonyan, D. Shimura, Y. Vandervorst, W.; Demeulemeester, J. Bogdanowicz, J. Fleischmann, C. Loo, R.; Gencarelli, F. Wang, W.

    2015-07-14

    Ge{sub (1−x)}Sn{sub (x)} has received a lot of interest for opto-electronic applications and for strain engineering in advanced complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, because it enables engineering of the band gap and inducing strain in the alloy. To target a reliable technology for mass application in microelectronic devices, the physical problem to be addressed is to unravel the complex relationship between strain relaxation (as induced by the growth of large layer thicknesses or a thermal anneal) and defect formation, and/or stable Sn-cluster formation. In this paper, we study the onset of Sn-cluster formation and its link to strain relaxation using Atom Probe Tomography (APT). To this end, we also propose a modification of the core-linkage [Stephenson et al., Microsc. Microanal. 13, 448 (2007)] cluster analysis method, to overcome the challenges of limited detection efficiency and lateral resolution of APT, and the quantitative assessment for very small clusters (<40 atoms) embedded in a random distribution of Sn-atoms. We concluded that the main relaxation mechanism for these layers is defect generation (misfit dislocations, threading dislocations, etc.), irrespective of the cause (thickness of layer or thermal anneal) of relaxation and is independent of the cluster formation. The low thermodynamic solubility limit of Sn in Ge seems to be the driving force for Sn-cluster formation. Finally, we also discuss the spatial distribution of Sn in clusters and relate them to the theoretically predicted stable Sn clusters [Ventura et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 155202 (2009)].

  2. First analysis of radiative properties of moderate-atomic-number planar wire arrays on Zebra at UNR at higher current of 1.7 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, S. F.; Chuvatin, Alexander S.; Osborne, Glenn C.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Presura, R.; Shrestha, I.; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Shlyaptseva, V.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Williamson, K. M.; Ouart, Nicholas D.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Safronova, Alla S.; LeGalloudec, B.

    2010-11-01

    The analysis of implosions of Cu and Ag planar wire array (PWA) loads recently performed at the enhanced 1.7 MA Zebra generator at UNR is presented. Experiments were performed with a Load Current Multiplier with a 1cm anode-cathode gap (twice shorter than in a standard 1 MA mode). A full diagnostic set included more than ten different beam-lines with the major focus on time-gated and time-integrated x-ray imaging and spectra, total radiation yields, and fast, filtered x-ray detector data. In particular, the experimental results for a double PWA load consisting of twelve 10 {micro}m Cu wires in each row (total mass M {approx} 175 {micro}g) and a much heavier single PWA load consisting of ten 30 {micro}m Ag wires (M {approx} 750 {micro}g) were analyzed using a set of theoretical codes. The effects of both a decreased a-c gap and an increased current on radiative properties of these loads are discussed.

  3. First Analysis of Radiative Properties of Moderate-atomic-number Planar Wire Arrays on Zebra at UNR at Higher Current of 1.7 MA*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Legalloudec, B.; Presura, R.; Shrestha, I.; Williamson, K. M.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Weller, M. E.; Ouart, N. D.; Keim, S. F.; Osborne, G. C.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.

    2010-11-01

    The analysis of implosions of Cu and Ag planar wire array (PWA) loads recently performed at the enhanced 1.7 MA Zebra generator at UNR is presented. Experiments were performed with a Load Current Multiplier with a 1cm anode-cathode gap (twice shorter than in a standard 1 MA mode). A full diagnostic set included more than ten different beam-lines with the major focus on time-gated and time-integrated x-ray imaging and spectra, total radiation yields, and fast, filtered x-ray detector data. In particular, the experimental results for a double PWA load consisting of twelve 10μm Cu wires in each row (total mass M ˜ 175 μg) and a much heavier single PWA load consisting of ten 30μm Ag wires (M ˜ 750 μg) were analyzed using a set of theoretical codes. The effects of both a decreased a-c gap and an increased current on radiative properties of these loads are discussed. * This work was supported by NNSA/DOE Coop. Agr. DE-FC52-06NA27588, 27586, and 27616. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Co., a LMC, for the US DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. No Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLoughry, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California at Santa Cruz has completed a successful test of a wireless computer network that would enable students and professors to get on line from anywhere on campus. The network, linked by radio waves, could save millions of dollars in campus wiring costs and would better meet student and faculty information needs. (MSE)

  5. No Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLoughry, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California at Santa Cruz has completed a successful test of a wireless computer network that would enable students and professors to get on line from anywhere on campus. The network, linked by radio waves, could save millions of dollars in campus wiring costs and would better meet student and faculty information needs. (MSE)

  6. Secondary Aerosol Formation from Oxidation of Aromatics Hydrocarbons by Cl atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Griffin, R.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol Formation From the Oxidation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Chlorine Atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) affects regional and global air quality. The formation mechanisms of SOA via the oxidation of volatile organic compounds by hydroxyl radicals, ozone, and nitrate radicals have been studied intensively during the last decade. Chlorine atoms (Cl) also have been hypothesized to be effective oxidants in marine and industrially influenced areas. Recent work by the authors has indicated that significant amounts of SOA are formed from the oxidation of monoterpenes by Cl. Aromatic hydrocarbons are important for generation of both SOA and ozone in urban areas because of their large emission rates and high reactivity. The goal of this work was to quantify the SOA formation potentials of two representative aromatic hydrocarbons through laboratory chamber experiments in which oxidation was initiated by Cl. The system constructed for this study includes an experimental chamber, a gas chromatograph for quantification of aromatic mixing ratios, a Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer to measure SOA size distributions, a zero air generator, and an illuminating system. The model aromatic hydrocarbons chosen for this study are toluene and m-xylene. Aerosol yields are estimated based on measured aerosol volume concentration, the concentration of consumed hydrocarbon, and estimation of wall loss of the newly formed aerosol. Toluene and m-xylene exhibit similar SOA yields from the oxidation initiated by Cl. The toluene SOA yield from Cl-initiated oxidation, however, depends on the ratio between the mixing ratios of the initial chlorine source and toluene in the chamber. For toluene experiments with higher such ratios, SOA yields vary from 0.05 to 0.079 for generated aerosol ranging from 4.2 to12.0 micrograms per cubic meter. In the lower ratio experiments, SOA yields are from 0.033 to 0.064, corresponding to generated aerosol from 3.0 to 11.0 micrograms per cubic

  7. Atomic scale analysis of phase formation and diffusion kinetics in Ag/Al multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulfadl, Hisham; Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf; Mücklich, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Thin films generally exhibit unusual kinetics leading to chemical reactions far from equilibrium conditions. Binary metallic multilayer thin films with miscible elements show some similar behaviors with respect to interdiffusion and phase formation mechanisms. Interfacial density, lattice defects, internal stresses, layer morphologies and deposition conditions strongly control the mass transport between the individual layers. In the present work, Ag/Al multilayer thin films are used as a simple model system, in which the effects of the sputtering power and the bilayer period thickness on the interdiffusion and film reactions are investigated. Multilayers deposited by DC magnetron sputtering undergo calorimetric and microstructural analyses. In particular, atom probe tomography is extensively used to provide quantitative information on concentration gradients, grain boundary segregations, and reaction mechanisms. The magnitude of interdiffusion was found to be inversely proportional to the period thickness for the films deposited under the same conditions, and was reduced using low sputtering power. Both the local segregation at grain boundaries as well as pronounced non-equilibrium supersaturation effects play crucial roles during the early stages of the film reactions. For multilayers with small periods of 10 nm supersaturation of the Al layers with Ag precedes the polymorphic nucleation and growth of the hcp γ-Ag2Al phase. In larger periods the γ phase formation is triggered at junctions between grain boundaries and layers interfaces, where the pathway to heterogeneous nucleation is local supersaturation. Other Ag-rich phases also form as intermediate phases due to asymmetric diffusion rates of parent phases in the γ phase during annealing.

  8. Effect of an Axial Wire on Conical Wire Array Z-Pinch Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Presura, R.; Martinez, D.; Wright, S.; Plechaty, C.; Neff, S.; Wanex, L.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2009-01-21

    Adding a wire on the axis of wire arrays significantly affects the x-ray emission of the conical arrays, and much less that of the cylindrical ones. The radiation of the conical wire arrays increases with the thickness of the central wire, surpassing that of the equivalent cylindrical arrays. Significant energy is emitted early on, around the time of the conical shock formation, before the pinch stagnation.

  9. A proton wire to couple aminoacyl-tRNA accommodation and peptide-bond formation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Steitz, Thomas A; Innis, C Axel

    2014-09-01

    During peptide-bond formation on the ribosome, the α-amine of an aminoacyl-tRNA attacks the ester carbonyl carbon of a peptidyl-tRNA to yield a peptide lengthened by one amino acid. Although the ribosome's contribution to catalysis is predominantly entropic, the lack of high-resolution structural data for the complete active site in complex with full-length ligands has made it difficult to assess how the ribosome might influence the pathway of the reaction. Here, we present crystal structures of preattack and postcatalysis complexes of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome at ~2.6-Å resolution. These structures reveal a network of hydrogen bonds along which proton transfer could take place to ensure the concerted, rate-limiting formation of a tetrahedral intermediate. We propose that, unlike earlier models, the ribosome and the A-site tRNA facilitate the deprotonation of the nucleophile through the activation of a water molecule.

  10. Thermal equilibrium concentration of intrinsic point defects in heavily doped silicon crystals - Theoretical study of formation energy and formation entropy in area of influence of dopant atoms-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamaoka, S.; Sueoka, K.; Vanhellemont, J.

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that p-type, neutral and n-type dopants affect the intrinsic point defect (vacancy V and self-interstitial I) behavior in single crystal Si. By the interaction with V and/or I, (1) growing Si crystals become more V- or I-rich, (2) oxygen precipitation is enhanced or retarded, and (3) dopant diffusion is enhanced or retarded, depending on the type and concentration of dopant atoms. Since these interactions affect a wide range of Si properties ranging from as-grown crystal quality to LSI performance, numerical simulations are used to predict and to control the behavior of both dopant atoms and intrinsic point defects. In most cases, the thermal equilibrium concentrations of dopant-point defect pairs are evaluated using the mass action law by taking only the binding energy of closest pair to each other into account. The impacts of dopant atoms on the formation of V and I more distant than 1st neighbor and on the change of formation entropy are usually neglected. In this study, we have evaluated the thermal equilibrium concentrations of intrinsic point defects in heavily doped Si crystals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to obtain the formation energy (Ef) of the uncharged V and I at all sites in a 64-atom supercell around a substitutional p-type (B, Ga, In, and Tl), neutral (C, Ge, and Sn) and n-type (P, As, and Sb) dopant atom. The formation (vibration) entropies (Sf) of free I, V and I, V at 1st neighboring site from B, C, Sn, P and As atoms were also calculated with the linear response method. The dependences of the thermal equilibrium concentrations of trapped and total intrinsic point defects (sum of free I or V and I or V trapped with dopant atoms) on the concentrations of B, C, Sn, P and As in Si were obtained. Furthermore, the present evaluations well explain the experimental results of the so-called ;Voronkov criterion; in B and C doped Si, and also the observed dopant dependent void sizes in P and As doped Si

  11. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of −3.0 ± 0.4 nN and −330 ± 43 aJ (10−18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions. PMID:26585552

  12. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10-18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  13. Inorganic and Organometallic Molecular Wires for Single-Molecule Devices.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuya; Kiguchi, Manabu; Akita, Munetaka

    2017-04-06

    Recent developments of single-molecule conductance measurements allow us to understand fundamental conducting properties of molecular wires. While a wide variety of organic molecular wires have been studied so far, inorganic and organometallic molecular wires have received much less attention. However, molecular wires with transition-metal atoms show interesting features and functions distinct from those of organic wires. These properties originate mainly from metal-ligand dπ-pπ interactions and metal-metal d-d interactions. Thanks to the rich combination of metal atoms and supporting ligands, frontier orbital energies of the molecular wires can be finely tuned to lead to highly conducting molecular wires. Moreover, the unique electronic structures of metal complexes are susceptible to subtle environmental changes, leading to potential functional molecular devices. This article reviews recent advances in the single-molecule conductance study of inorganic and organometallic molecular wires. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Formation of a beam of cold atoms by laser frequency tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhdestvenskii, Yu. V.; Vershovskii, A. K.; Ageichik, E. A.; Zholnerov, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    We report the possibility of producing a beam of slow atoms with a characteristic velocity of ∼ 1 {\\text{m s}}-1 by the ‘chirp’ method, namely, cooling by variable-frequency radiation. Method modifications are considered, which substantially reduce dimensions of the slower, the width of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the atomic beam, and the area of its cross section. The modified method of laser radiation frequency tuning for cooling rubidium atoms is mathematically simulated.

  15. Wire diameter dependence in the catalytic decomposition of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Jansen et al. have demonstrated that the dissociaiton rate of H2 molecules on hot wire surfaces, normalized per unit surface area, depends on the wire diameter based on the electrical power consumption measurements [J. Appl. Phys. 66, 5749 (1989)]. Mathematical modeling calculations have also been presented to support their experimental results. In the present paper, it is shown that such a wire diameter dependence cannot be observed and that the H-atom density normalized by the wire surface area depends little on the wire diameter. Modeling calculations also show that the wire diameter dependence of the dissociation rate cannot be expected under typical decomposition conditions.

  16. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Eldon D.; Hooper, Frederick M.; Reichenbach, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

  17. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

    1992-08-11

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

  18. NASA wiring for space applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program and its relationship to NASA's space technology enterprise is given in viewgraph format. The mission of the space technology enterprise is to pioneer, with industry, the development and use of space technology to secure national economic competitiveness, promote industrial growth, and to support space missions. The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program is to improve the safety, performance, and reliability of wiring systems for space applications and to develop improved wiring technologies for NASA flight programs and commercial applications. Wiring system failures in space and commercial applications have shown the need for arc track resistant wiring constructions. A matrix of tests performed versus wiring constructions is presented. Preliminary data indicate the performance of the Tensolite and Filotex hybrid constructions are the best of the various candidates.

  19. A Novel Type of Colony Formation in Marine Planktonic Diatoms Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bosak, Sunčica; Pletikapić, Galja; Hozić, Amela; Svetličić, Vesna; Sarno, Diana; Viličić, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms have evolved a variety of colonial life forms in which cells are connected by organic threads, mucilage pads or silicate structures. In this study, we provide the first description of a novel strategy of colony formation among marine planktonic diatoms. Bacteriastrum jadranum forms loose but regular chains with distinct heterovalvate terminal cells. The colonial cells and their siliceous projections, the setae, are not in direct contact; instead, they are enclosed within the optically transparent organic matrix. This cell jacket structure was detected by staining procedure with Alcian Blue, which showed that the polysaccharides are predominant matrix constituents and revealed that the jacket reaches the span of the setae. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed distinguishable fibrillar network firmly associated with cells. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we were able to visualise and characterise the cell jacket structure at molecular resolution. At nanoscale resolution, the cell jacket appears as a cross-linked fibrillar network organised into a recognisable structure. The circular patches of self-repeating pattern (hexagonal pores with openings of 8–100 nm) are connected through thicker surrounding fibrils and reinforced by branching fibrils. The pore-forming fibrils within the patches are only 0.6–1.6 nm high, the surrounding fibrils connecting patches are 2.0–2.8 nm high, and the branching fibrils are considerably wider but not higher than 4.0 nm. The discovered polysaccharide fibrillar network is highly organised and delicately structured with a monomolecular fibril height of 0.6 nm. We conclude that the Bacteriastrum polysaccharide jacket represents an essential part of the cell, as the conjunction of the polymer network with the frustule appears to be extremely tight and such specific and unique patterns have never been found in self-assembled polysaccharide gel networks, which are usually encountered in the marine

  20. A novel type of colony formation in marine planktonic diatoms revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bosak, Sunčica; Pletikapić, Galja; Hozić, Amela; Svetličić, Vesna; Sarno, Diana; Viličić, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms have evolved a variety of colonial life forms in which cells are connected by organic threads, mucilage pads or silicate structures. In this study, we provide the first description of a novel strategy of colony formation among marine planktonic diatoms. Bacteriastrum jadranum forms loose but regular chains with distinct heterovalvate terminal cells. The colonial cells and their siliceous projections, the setae, are not in direct contact; instead, they are enclosed within the optically transparent organic matrix. This cell jacket structure was detected by staining procedure with Alcian Blue, which showed that the polysaccharides are predominant matrix constituents and revealed that the jacket reaches the span of the setae. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed distinguishable fibrillar network firmly associated with cells. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we were able to visualise and characterise the cell jacket structure at molecular resolution. At nanoscale resolution, the cell jacket appears as a cross-linked fibrillar network organised into a recognisable structure. The circular patches of self-repeating pattern (hexagonal pores with openings of 8-100 nm) are connected through thicker surrounding fibrils and reinforced by branching fibrils. The pore-forming fibrils within the patches are only 0.6-1.6 nm high, the surrounding fibrils connecting patches are 2.0-2.8 nm high, and the branching fibrils are considerably wider but not higher than 4.0 nm. The discovered polysaccharide fibrillar network is highly organised and delicately structured with a monomolecular fibril height of 0.6 nm. We conclude that the Bacteriastrum polysaccharide jacket represents an essential part of the cell, as the conjunction of the polymer network with the frustule appears to be extremely tight and such specific and unique patterns have never been found in self-assembled polysaccharide gel networks, which are usually encountered in the marine

  1. Formation of Triplet Positron-helium Bound State by Stripping of Positronium Atoms in Collision with Ground State Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of triplet positron-helium bound state by stripping of positronium atoms in collision with ground state helium JOSEPH DI RlENZI, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, RICHARD J. DRACHMAN, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center - The system consisting of a positron and a helium atom in the triplet state e(+)He(S-3)(sup e) was conjectured long ago to be stable [1]. Its stability has recently been established rigorously [2], and the values of the energies of dissociation into the ground states of Ps and He(+) have also been reported [3] and [4]. We have evaluated the cross-section for this system formed by radiative attachment of a positron in triplet He state and found it to be small [5]. The mechanism of production suggested here should result in a larger cross-section (of atomic size) which we are determining using the Born approximation with simplified initial and final wave functions.

  2. Formation of Triplet Positron-helium Bound State by Stripping of Positronium Atoms in Collision with Ground State Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of triplet positron-helium bound state by stripping of positronium atoms in collision with ground state helium JOSEPH DI RlENZI, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, RICHARD J. DRACHMAN, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center - The system consisting of a positron and a helium atom in the triplet state e(+)He(S-3)(sup e) was conjectured long ago to be stable [1]. Its stability has recently been established rigorously [2], and the values of the energies of dissociation into the ground states of Ps and He(+) have also been reported [3] and [4]. We have evaluated the cross-section for this system formed by radiative attachment of a positron in triplet He state and found it to be small [5]. The mechanism of production suggested here should result in a larger cross-section (of atomic size) which we are determining using the Born approximation with simplified initial and final wave functions.

  3. On the formation of tropical rings of atomic halogens: Causes and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Fernandez, Rafael P.

    2016-03-01

    Halogens produced by ocean biological and photochemical processes reach the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), where cold temperatures and the prevailing low ozone abundances favor the diurnal photochemical enhancement of halogen atoms. Under these conditions atomic bromine and iodine are modeled to be the dominant inorganic halogen species in the sunlit TTL, surpassing the abundance of the commonly targeted IO and BrO radicals. We suggest that due to the rapid photochemical equilibrium between halogen oxides and halogen atoms a natural atmospheric phenomenon evolves, which we have collectively termed "tropical rings of atomic halogens." We describe the main causes controlling the modeled appearance and variability of these superposed rings of bare bromine and iodine atoms that circle the tropics following the Sun. Some potential implications for atmospheric oxidizing capacity are also explored. Our model results suggest that if experimentally confirmed, the extent and intensity of the halogen rings would directly respond to changes in oceanic halocarbon emissions, their atmospheric transport, and photochemistry.

  4. Atomic-level elucidation of the initial stages of self-assembled monolayer metallization and nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Keith, John A; Jacob, Timo

    2010-11-02

    The development of high-performance molecular electronics and nanotech applications requires deep understanding of atomic level structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of electrode/molecular interfaces. Recent electrochemical experiments on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have identified highly practical means to generate nanoparticles and metal monolayers suspended above substrate surfaces through SAM metallizations. A rational basis why this process is even possible is not yet well-understood. To clarify the initial stages of interface formation during SAM metallization, we used first-principles spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study Pd diffusion on top of 4-mercaptopyridine (4MP) SAMs on Au(111). After distinguishing potential-energy surfaces (PESs) for different spin configurations for transition metal atoms on the SAM, we find adatom diffusion is not possible over the clean 4MP-SAM surface. Pre-adsorption of transition-metal atoms, however, facilitates atomic diffusion that appears to explain multiple reports on experimentally observed island and monolayer formation on top of SAMs. Furthermore, these diffusions most likely occur by moving across low-lying and intersecting PESs of different spin states, opening the possibility of magnetic control over these systems. Vertical diffusion processes were also investigated, and the electrolyte was found to play a key role in preventing metal permeation through the SAM to the substrate.

  5. Exploring star formation in high-z galaxies using atomic and molecular emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullberg, Bitten

    2016-03-01

    The conditions under which stars are formed and the reasons for triggering and quenching of starburst events in high-z galaxies, are still not well understood. Studying the interstellar medium (ISM) and the morphology of high-z galaxies are therefore key points in order to understand galaxy evolution. The cosmic star formation rate density peaks between 1formation triggering and quenching mechanisms. Phenomena such as major mergers and galactic nuclear activity are believed to be mechanisms dominating the star formation activity at this period of time. It is therefore necessary to study galaxy populations which show signs of major merger events and active galactic nuclei (AGN). This thesis presents three studies of the ISM in high-z galaxies and their morphologies by: Exploring the physical conditions of the ISM in a sample of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) using the relative observed line strength of ionised carbon ([CII]) and carbon monoxide (CO). We find that the line ratios can best be described by a medium of [CII] and CO emitting gas with a higher [CII] than CO excitation temperature, high CO optical depth tau(CO)>>1, and low to moderate [CII] optical depth tau(CII)<1. Combining millimetre/sub-millimetre and optical data cubes for the high-z radio galaxy (HzRG) MRC0943-242, has revealed a much more complicated morphology than seen in the individual data sets. The millimetre/sub-millimetre observations data have allowed us to spatially separate of the AGN and starburst dominated components, which ~65 kpc apart. The optical data reveal structures of emitting and absorbing gas at multiple wavelengths. A deep high resolution millimetre/sub-millimetre study of the HzRG MRC1138-262, shows emission from water (H2O) and an unusually large amount of neutral atomic carbon ([CI]) relative to highly excited CO compared to lensed DSFGs. The

  6. Towards understanding MgO/Fe interface formation: Adsorption of O and Mg atoms on an Fe(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśnios, Damian; Kiejna, Adam; Korecki, Józef

    2017-09-01

    We report results of first-principles study of the adsorption of atomic oxygen and magnesium on the Fe(001) surface. Two adsorption scenarios were considered. In the first process, the Mg atoms were adsorbed on the Fe(001) surface with preadsorbed O atoms, whereas in the second scenario metallic Mg preadsorbed on the Fe(001) surface was exposed to oxygen. For both O and Mg atoms, fourfold hollow sites were found as the energetically most favorable adsorption sites on the clean Fe(001) surface. The result of both adsorption scenarios was the formation of a MgO adlayer on the Fe(001) surface with a sharp MgO/Fe interface. In particular, the deposition of Mg atoms on O/Fe(001) showed that magnesium can pull out O adatoms from the Fe surface. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties were analyzed as a function of O and Mg coverages. The calculated electronic structure and magnetic moments showed that the full MgO monolayer affects the properties of the Fe surface much weaker than an incomplete MgO adsorbate layer.

  7. Room temperature deintercalation of alkali metal atoms from epitaxial graphene by formation of charge-transfer complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.-C.; Ahn, S. J.; Kim, H. W.; Moon, Y.; Rai, K. B.; Woo, S. H.; Ahn, J. R.

    2016-08-22

    Atom (or molecule) intercalations and deintercalations have been used to control the electronic properties of graphene. In general, finite energies above room temperature (RT) thermal energy are required for the intercalations and deintercalations. Here, we demonstrate that alkali metal atoms can be deintercalated from epitaxial graphene on a SiC substrate at RT, resulting in the reduction in density of states at the Fermi level. The change in density of states at the Fermi level at RT can be applied to a highly sensitive graphene sensor operating at RT. Na atoms, which were intercalated at a temperature of 80 °C, were deintercalated at a high temperature above 1000 °C when only a thermal treatment was used. In contrast to the thermal treatment, the intercalated Na atoms were deintercalated at RT when tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) molecules were adsorbed on the surface. The RT deintercalation occurred via the formation of charge-transfer complexes between Na atoms and F4-TCNQ molecules.

  8. An atom in molecules study of infrared intensity enhancements in fundamental donor stretching bands in hydrogen bond formation.

    PubMed

    Terrabuio, Luiz A; Richter, Wagner E; Silva, Arnaldo F; Bruns, Roy E; Haiduke, Roberto L A

    2014-12-07

    Vibrational modes ascribed to the stretching of X-H bonds from donor monomers (HXdonor) in complexes presenting hydrogen bonds (HF···HF, HCl···HCl, HCN···HCN, HNC···HNC, HCN···HF, HF···HCl and H2O···HF) exhibit large (4 to 7 times) infrared intensity increments during complexation according to CCSD/cc-pVQZ-mod calculations. These intensity increases are explained by the charge-charge flux-dipole flux (CCFDF) model based on multipoles from the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) as resulting from a reinforcing interaction between two contributions to the dipole moment derivatives with respect to the vibrational displacements: charge and charge flux. As such, variations that occur in their intensity cross terms in hydrogen bond formation correlate nicely with the intensity enhancements. These stretching modes of HXdonor bonds can be approximately modeled by sole displacement of the positively charged hydrogens towards the acceptor terminal atom with concomitant electronic charge transfers in the opposite direction that are larger than those occurring for the H atom displacements of their isolated donor molecules. This analysis indicates that the charge-charge flux interaction reinforcement on H-bond complexation is associated with variations of atomic charge fluxes in both parent molecules and small electronic charge transfers between them. The QTAIM/CCFDF model also indicates that atomic dipole flux contributions do not play a significant role in these intensity enhancements.

  9. The roles of atomic and molecular gas on the redshift evolution of star formation and metallicity in galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2013-03-01

    We study the redshift evolution of neutral and molecular gas in the interstellar medium with the results from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution, which track the cold gas related physical processes in radially resolved galaxy disks. Two kinds of prescriptions are adopted to describe the conversion between molecular and neutral gas in the ISM: one is related to the gas surface density and gas metallicity based on the model results by Krumholz, Mckee & Tumlinson; the other is related the pressure of ISM. We try four types of star formation laws in the models to study the effect of the molecular gas component and the star formation time scale on the model results, and find that the H2 dependent star formation rate with constant star formation efficiency is the preferred star formation law. We run the models based on both Millennium and Millennium II Simulation haloes, and the model parameters are adjusted to fit the observations at z = 0 from THINGS/HERACLES and ALFALFA/COLD GASS. We give predictions for the redshift evolution of cosmic star formation density, H2 to HI cosmic ratios, gas to star mass ratios and gas metallicity vs stellar mass relation. Based on the model results, we find that: (i) the difference in the H2 to HI ratio at z > 3 between the two H2 fraction prescriptions can help future observations to test which prescription is better; (ii) a constant redshift independent star formation time scale will postpone the star formation processes at high redshift and cause obvious redshift evolution for the relation between gas metallicity and stellar mass in galaxies at z < 3.

  10. Self-Organized Growth of Microsized Ge Wires on Si (111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,Z.; Zhang, Y.; Headrick, R.; Zhou, H.; Zhou, L.; Fukamachi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Microsized Ge wires can appear spontaneously when grown on a vicinal Si (111) surface miscut by 4 along the [11-2] direction by using molecular-beam epitaxy. Time-resolved in situ grazing incidence small-angle scattering of x rays, atomic force microscopy, and micro-Raman scattering show that the formation of Ge microwires is due to coalescence of islands along the step edges and ripening of the structures accompanied by a partial consumption of the wetting layer.

  11. Formation of bimetallic clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets analysed by atomic resolution electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haberfehlner, Georg; Thaler, Philipp; Knez, Daniel; Volk, Alexander; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Structure, shape and composition are the basic parameters responsible for properties of nanoscale materials, distinguishing them from their bulk counterparts. To reveal these in three dimensions at the nanoscale, electron tomography is a powerful tool. Advancing electron tomography to atomic resolution in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope remains challenging and has been demonstrated only a few times using strong constraints or extensive filtering. Here we demonstrate atomic resolution electron tomography on silver/gold core/shell nanoclusters grown in superfluid helium nanodroplets. We reveal morphology and composition of a cluster identifying gold- and silver-rich regions in three dimensions and we estimate atomic positions without using any prior information and with minimal filtering. The ability to get full three-dimensional information down to the atomic scale allows understanding the growth and deposition process of the nanoclusters and demonstrates an approach that may be generally applicable to all types of nanoscale materials. PMID:26508471

  12. Formation of bimetallic clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets analysed by atomic resolution electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberfehlner, Georg; Thaler, Philipp; Knez, Daniel; Volk, Alexander; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2015-10-01

    Structure, shape and composition are the basic parameters responsible for properties of nanoscale materials, distinguishing them from their bulk counterparts. To reveal these in three dimensions at the nanoscale, electron tomography is a powerful tool. Advancing electron tomography to atomic resolution in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope remains challenging and has been demonstrated only a few times using strong constraints or extensive filtering. Here we demonstrate atomic resolution electron tomography on silver/gold core/shell nanoclusters grown in superfluid helium nanodroplets. We reveal morphology and composition of a cluster identifying gold- and silver-rich regions in three dimensions and we estimate atomic positions without using any prior information and with minimal filtering. The ability to get full three-dimensional information down to the atomic scale allows understanding the growth and deposition process of the nanoclusters and demonstrates an approach that may be generally applicable to all types of nanoscale materials.

  13. Atomic-scale insight into the formation, mobility and reaction of Ullmann coupling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily A; Murphy, Colin J; Liriano, Melissa L; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-01-28

    The Ullmann reaction of bromobenzene, the simplest coupling reagent, to form biphenyl on a Cu surface proceeds via a highly mobile organometallic intermediate in which two phenyl groups extract and bind a single surface Cu atom.

  14. A mechanism for the formation of the active medium of a chemical laser in the presence of exploding wires in an oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Kochelap, V. A.; Shvarchuk, E. A.; Shpak, M. T.

    1985-07-01

    The dynamic characteristics of chemical infrared lasers (IR-lasers) are analyzed, in connection with a new pumping mechanism, electrical wire explosion (EWE). The mechanism occurs during high speed spraying of molten metal droplets, and is followed by combustion in an oxygen atmosphere. Experimental results are presented for wire explosion of Li in a Cl2 atmosphere. Criteria are given which demonstrate the amplification of IR radiation due to the combustion of Li droplets in an oxygen atmosphere.

  15. Local Stoichiometry and Atomic Interdiffusion during Reactive Metal/Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Junction Formation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-23

    CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS- 1963-A IfP LOCAL STOICHIOMETRY AND ATOMIC INTERDIFFUSION DURING REACTIVE METAL/ MERCURY- CADMIUM -TELLURIDE...TITLE rand Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT PERIOED LOCAL STOICHIOMETRY AND ATOMIC INTERDIFFUSION Interim, 1/8 DURING REACTIVE METAL/MERCURY- CADMIUM ...identliy by block nuembw) Ag, Ge and Sm overlayers on Mercury- Cadmium -Telluride surfaces exhibit widely different interface reactivity and yield a

  16. Corrosion and biocompatibility of orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Widu, F; Drescher, D; Junker, R; Bourauel, C

    1999-05-01

    With the increasing number of orthodontic treatments using devices containing nickel and the growing prevalence of nickel allergy in the average population, biocompatibility studies of these devices have become a topic of major interest. The corrosion behavior of orthodontic wires is a decisive factor determining their biocompatibility. Therefore four nickel-titanium guiding arches, a titanium-molybdenum and a stainless steel wire were analyzed for corrosion behavior under realistic conditions. Pure potentiostatic, pure mechanical and combined potentiostatic and mechanical stresses were applied to the specimens. Subsequently, the surfaces of the wires were investigated employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nickel loss was measured with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results yield information about the relative corrosion tendency of the wires under in vitro conditions. The wires examined can be classified into two groups, one with a high and a second group with a low tendency towards corrosion, that is American Orthodontics Memory wire as well as GAC Neo Sentalloy and Ormco Ni-Ti as well as Unitek Nitinol respectively. Although corrosion behavior under clinical conditions can not be directly derived from these results, analyses of wires after clinical usage indicate that changes of wire surfaces might show the same characteristics under in vitro conditions.

  17. Wire Retrieves Broken Pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burow, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    Safety wire retains pieces of broken tool. Retrieval wire running through shaft of tool used to pull pieces of tool out of hole, should tool break during use. Safety wire concept suitable for pins subject to deflection or breakage.

  18. THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. I. A QUINTESSENTIAL MODEL ATOM OF Mg II AND GENERAL FORMATION PROPERTIES OF THE Mg II h and k LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B.; Uitenbroek, H. E-mail: tiago.pereira@astro.uio.no E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com

    2013-08-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h and k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations will require forward modeling of Mg II h and k line formation from three-dimensional (3D) radiation-MHD models. This paper is the first in a series where we undertake this forward modeling. We discuss the atomic physics pertinent to h and k line formation, present a quintessential model atom that can be used in radiative transfer computations, and discuss the effect of partial redistribution (PRD) and 3D radiative transfer on the emergent line profiles. We conclude that Mg II h and k can be modeled accurately with a four-level plus continuum Mg II model atom. Ideally radiative transfer computations should be done in 3D including PRD effects. In practice this is currently not possible. A reasonable compromise is to use one-dimensional PRD computations to model the line profile up to and including the central emission peaks, and use 3D transfer assuming complete redistribution to model the central depression.

  19. In Situ Atomic-Scale Studies of the Formation of Epitaxial Pt Nanocrystals on Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Sawada, Hidetaka; Chen, Qu; Han, Grace G D; Allen, Christopher; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2017-09-26

    Pt-nanocrystal:MoS2 hybrid materials have promising catalytic properties for hydrogen evolution, and understanding their detailed structures at the atomic scale is crucial to further development. Here, we use an in situ heating holder in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope to study the formation of Pt nanocrystals directly on the surface of monolayer MoS2 from a precursor on heating to 800 °C. Isolated single Pt atoms and small nanoclusters are observed after in situ heating, with two types of preferential alignment between the Pt nanocrystals and the underlying monolayer MoS2. Strain effects and thickness variations of the ultrasmall Pt nanocrystal supported on MoS2 are studied, revealing that single atomic planes are formed from a nonlayered face-centered cubic bulk Pt configuration with a lattice expansion of 7-10% compared to that of bulk Pt. The Pt nanocrystals are surrounded by an amorphous carbon layer and in some cases have etched the local surrounding MoS2 material after heating. Electron beam irradiation also initiates Pt nanocrystal etching of the local MoS2, and we study this process in real time at atomic resolution. These results show that the presence of carbon around the Pt nanocrystals does not affect their epitaxial relationship with the MoS2 lattice. Single Pt atoms within the carbon layer are also immobilized at high temperature. These results provide important insights into the formation of Pt:MoS2 hybrid materials.

  20. Automated wire preparation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulley, Deborah J.

    The first step toward an automated wire harness facility for the aerospace industry has been taken by implementing the Wire Vektor 2000 into the wire harness preparation area. An overview of the Wire Vektor 2000 is given, including the facilities for wire cutting, marking, and transporting, for wire end processing, and for system control. Production integration in the Wire Vektor 2000 system is addressed, considering the hardware/software debug system and the system throughput. The manufacturing changes that have to be made in implementing the Wire Vektor 2000 are discussed.

  1. In situ atomic-scale observation of oxygen-driven core-shell formation in Pt3Co nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dai, Sheng; You, Yuan; Zhang, Shuyi; Cai, Wei; Xu, Mingjie; Xie, Lin; Wu, Ruqian; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2017-08-07

    The catalytic performance of core-shell platinum alloy nanoparticles is typically superior to that of pure platinum nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cell cathodes. Thorough understanding of core-shell formation is critical for atomic-scale design and control of the platinum shell, which is known to be the structural feature responsible for the enhancement. Here we reveal details of a counter-intuitive core-shell formation process in platinum-cobalt nanoparticles at elevated temperature under oxygen at atmospheric pressure, by using advanced in situ electron microscopy. Initial segregation of a thin platinum, rather than cobalt oxide, surface layer occurs concurrently with ordering of the intermetallic core, followed by the layer-by-layer growth of a platinum shell via Ostwald ripening during the oxygen annealing treatment. Calculations based on density functional theory demonstrate that this process follows an energetically favourable path. These findings are expected to be useful for the future design of structured platinum alloy nanocatalysts.Core-shell platinum alloy nanoparticles are promising catalysts for oxygen reduction, however a deeper understanding of core-shell formation is still required. Here the authors report oxygen-driven formation of core-shell Pt3Co nanoparticles, seen at the atomic scale with in situ electron microscopy at ambient pressure.

  2. An atomically controlled Si film formation process at low temperatures using atmospheric-pressure VHF plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutake, K.; Kakiuchi, H.; Ohmi, H.; Inagaki, K.; Oshikane, Y.; Nakano, M.

    2011-10-01

    To grow epitaxial Si films with atomic- and electronic-level perfection, a high-temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process (>1000 °C) has been generally employed. To reduce the growth temperature below 600 °C but keeping a high deposition rate, other energy sources than thermal heating are required. Atmospheric pressure plasma CVD (AP-PCVD) is considered to be suitable for fabricating high-quality films at high deposition rates due both to the high radical density and to the low ion bombardment against the film surface, because the collision frequency among ions and neutral atoms is high. The present study focuses on the low-temperature growth of epitaxial Si, and experimentally demonstrates that AP-PCVD is capable of growing epitaxial Si films with high perfection applicable for semiconductor devices. It is found that the pre-growth cleaning of the Si surface by H2 AP plasma is effective to grow high-purity Si films, and that the exposure of a film-growing surface to AP plasma during growth is important to form particle-free and defect-free Si films. From the experimental results and the first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of surface atomic reactions, it can be mentioned that both H atoms in the AP plasma and high-density He atoms having thermal kinetic energy contribute to the reduction of growth temperature by supplying considerable energy to the surface.

  3. Sensory and short-term memory formations observed in a Ag2S gap-type atomic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Nayak, Alpana; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Gimzewski, James K.; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-11-01

    Memorization caused by the change in conductance in a Ag2S gap-type atomic switch was investigated as a function of the amplitude and width of input voltage pulses (Vin). The conductance changed little for the first few Vin, but the information of the input was stored as a redistribution of Ag-ions in the Ag2S, indicating the formation of sensory memory. After a certain number of Vin, the conductance increased abruptly followed by a gradual decrease, indicating the formation of short-term memory (STM). We found that the probability of STM formation depends strongly on the amplitude and width of Vin, which resembles the learning behavior of the human brain.

  4. Molecule formation mechanisms of strontium mono fluoride in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the molecule formation mechanisms of strontium mono fluoride used for the determination of fluorine in a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrophotometer was investigated. To distinguish between the gas-phase and the condensed-phase mechanisms, the analyte (F) and the molecule forming element (Sr) were injected on the solid sampling platform manually, as mixed or separately, and the absorbances/peak shapes were compared. There was no significant difference between the absorbances. In addition, the peak shapes and the appearance times were almost the same for the two cases. It was proposed that the main pathway for SrF formation is a gas-phase combination reaction between Sr and F. When Sr and F were mixed on the platform, it was expected that at first SrF2 would be formed in the condensed phase, and then at elevated temperatures it was partly decomposed while either losing one F atom to form SrF, or completely decomposed to its atoms in the gas phase.

  5. Dynamics of the formation and loss of boron atoms in a H2/B2H6 microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duluard, C. Y.; Aubert, X.; Sadeghi, N.; Gicquel, A.

    2016-09-01

    For further improvements in doped-diamond deposition technology, an understanding of the complex chemistry in H2/CH4/B2H6 plasmas is of general importance. In this context, a H2/B2H6 plasma ignited by microwave power in a near resonant cavity at high pressure (100-200 mbar) is studied to measure the B-atom density in the ground state. The discharge is ignited in the gas mixture (0-135 ppm B2H6 in H2) by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator, leading to the formation of a hemispheric plasma core, surrounded by a faint discharge halo filling the remaining reactor volume. Measurements with both laser induced fluorescence and resonant absoption with a boron hollow cathode lamp indicate that the B-atom density is higher in the halo than in the plasma core. When the absorption line-of-sight is positioned in the halo, the absorption is so strong that the upper detection limit is reached. To understand the mechanisms of creation and loss of boron atoms, time-resolved absorption measurements have been carried out in a pulsed plasma regime (10 Hz, duty cycle 50%). The study focuses on the influence of the total pressure, the partial pressure of B2H6, as well as the source power, on the growth and decay rates of boron atoms when the plasma is turned off.

  6. Formation of the bismuth-bilayer film at BiTeCl surface by atomic hydrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, I. A.; Eremeev, S. V.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2017-07-01

    On the base of density functional theory calculations we investigate the atomic hydrogen adsorption on Cl- and Te-terminations of giant Rashba-split semiconductor BiTeCl and show that it leads to removal of the halogen and chalcogen top layer atoms by means of desorption of HCl and H2Te molecules. This mechanism accompanied by swapping of next Bi and deeper Te(Cl) layers with subsequent hydrogen-induced removal of Te(Cl) layer results in formation of Bi2 layer covering BiTeCl. The electronic structure of the formed Bi2@BiTeCl[Cl-term] and Bi2@BiTeCl[Te-term] interfaces shows a strong hybridization between Bi2-derived spin-split bands and BiTeCl interface states.

  7. In-flight (K-,p) reactions for the formation of kaonic atoms and kaonic nuclei using the Green function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, J.; Nagahiro, H.; Hirenzaki, S.

    2006-07-01

    We study theoretically the kaonic atom and kaonic nucleus formations in the in-flight (K-,p) reactions using the Green function method, which is suited to evaluate formation rates both of stable and unstable bound systems. We consider C12 and O16 as the targets and calculate the spectra of the (K-,p) reactions. We conclude that no peak structure resulting from kaonic nucleus formation is expected in the reaction spectra calculated with the chiral unitary kaon-nucleus optical potential. In the spectra with the phenomenological deep kaon-nucleus potential, it may be possible to observe some structures because of the formation of the kaonic nucleus states. For all cases, we find clear signals because of the kaonic atom formations in the reaction spectra, which show very interesting structures, such as the RESONANCE DIP instead of the resonance peak for the atomic 1s state formation.

  8. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  9. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. Trolley wires, trolley feeder wires, and bare signal wires shall be insulated...

  10. Impact of hollow-atom formation on coherent x-ray scattering at high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Sang-Kil; Young, Linda; Santra, Robin

    2011-03-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are promising tools for structural determination of macromolecules via coherent x-ray scattering. During ultrashort and ultraintense x-ray pulses with an atomic-scale wavelength, samples are subject to radiation damage and possibly become highly ionized, which may influence the quality of x-ray scattering patterns. We develop a toolkit to treat detailed ionization, relaxation, and scattering dynamics for an atom within a consistent theoretical framework. The coherent x-ray scattering problem including radiation damage is investigated as a function of x-ray FEL parameters such as pulse length, fluence, and photon energy. We find that the x-ray scattering intensity saturates at a fluence of {approx}10{sup 7} photon/A{sup 2} per pulse but can be maximized by using a pulse duration much shorter than the time scales involved in the relaxation of the inner-shell vacancy states created. Under these conditions, both inner-shell electrons in a carbon atom are removed, and the resulting hollow atom gives rise to a scattering pattern with little loss of quality for a spatial resolution >1 A. Our numerical results predict that in order to scatter from a carbon atom 0.1 photon per x-ray pulse, within a spatial resolution of 1.7 A, a fluence of 1x10{sup 7} photons/A{sup 2} per pulse is required at a pulse length of 1 fs and a photon energy of 12 keV. By using a pulse length of a few hundred attoseconds, one can suppress even secondary ionization processes in extended systems. The present results suggest that high-brightness attosecond x-ray FELs would be ideal for single-shot imaging of individual macromolecules.

  11. Formation rate for Rb 2 + molecular ions created in collisions of Rb Rydberg and ground-state atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojevic, Jovica; Côté, Robin

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the formation rate of the molecular Rb2+ion in its various bound states produced in the associative ionization of a Rydberg and a ground-state atom. Before the formation takes place, the colliding atoms are accelerated by an attractive force between the collision partners. In this way the ground-state atom is first captured by the Rydberg electron and then guided towards the positive ion-core where a molecular ion is subsequently formed. As recently demonstrated, this process results in giant collisional cross sections for the molecular ion formation, with the cross sections essentially determined by the size of the Rydberg atom. For sufficient high principal quantum numbers and atomic densities, many ground-state atoms are already located inside the Rydberg atom and ready to participate in the associative ionization. The same process can occur between a Rydberg and a ground-state atom that form a long-range Rydberg molecule, possibly contributing to the shortening of the lifetimes of Rydberg atoms and molecules. Partial support from the US Army Research Office (ARO-MURI W911NF-14-1-0378), and from NSF (Grant No. PHY-1415560).

  12. Ripples and the formation of anisotropic lipid domains: imaging two-component supported double bilayers by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, Chad; Kaasgaard, Thomas; Crowe, John H; Mouritsen, Ole G; Jørgensen, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Direct visualization of the fluid-phase/ordered-phase domain structure in mica-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine mixtures is performed with atomic force microscopy. The system studied is a double bilayer supported on a mica surface in which the top bilayer (which is not in direct contact with the mica) is visualized as a function of temperature. Because the top bilayer is not as restricted by the interactions with the surface as single supported bilayers, its behavior is more similar to a free-standing bilayer. Intriguing straight-edged anisotropic fluid-phase domains were observed in the fluid-phase/ordered-phase coexistence temperature range, which resemble the fluid-phase/ordered-phase domain patterns observed in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of such phospholipid mixtures. With the high resolution provided by atomic force microscopy, we investigated the origin of these anisotropic lipid domain patterns, and found that ripple phase formation is directly responsible for the anisotropic nature of these domains. The nucleation and growth of fluid-phase domains are found to be directed by the presence of ripples. In particular, the fluid-phase domains elongate parallel to the ripples. The results show that ripple phase formation may have implications for domain formation in biological systems. PMID:12414696

  13. Influence of supersaturation and spontaneous catalyst formation on the growth of PbS wires: toward a unified understanding of growth modes.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Patricia L; Sun, Minghua; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2011-11-22

    High quality stoichiometric lead sulfide (PbS) wires were synthesized by a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using pure PbS powder as the material source. Growth mechanisms were systematically investigated under various growth conditions, with three modes of growth identified: direct vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) wire growth nucleating from the substrate surface, bulk PbS crystallites by vapor-solid (VS) deposition, and subsequent VLS growth nucleating on top of the bulk deposition through spontaneously formed catalyst particles. Furthermore, we found that these growth modes can be organized in terms of different levels of supersaturation, with VS bulk deposition dominating at high supersaturation and VLS wire growth on the substrate dominating at low supersaturation. At intermediate supersaturation, the bulk VS deposition can form larger crystallites with domains of similarly oriented wires extending from the flat facets. Both predeposited catalysts and spontaneously formed Pb particles were observed as nucleation catalysts, and their interplay leads to various interesting growth scenarios such as reversely tapered growth with increasing diameter. The VLS growth mechanism was confirmed by the presence of Pb-rich caps revealed in an elaborate cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiment after focused ion beam milling in a modified lift-out procedure. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) of PbS wires was performed in the mid-infrared wavelength range for the first time, demonstrating strong light emission from band edge, blue-shifted with increasing temperature. The high optical quality of PbS wires may lead to important applications in mid-infrared photonics. The substrate growth temperature as low as 400 °C allows for silicon-compatible processing for integrated optoelectronics applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Windows: Life after Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Although wired glass is extremely common in school buildings, the International Building Code adopted new standards that eliminate the use of traditional wired glass in K-12 schools, daycare centers, and athletic facilities. Wired glass breaks easily, and the wires can cause significant injuries by forming dangerous snags when the glass breaks.…

  15. Windows: Life after Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Although wired glass is extremely common in school buildings, the International Building Code adopted new standards that eliminate the use of traditional wired glass in K-12 schools, daycare centers, and athletic facilities. Wired glass breaks easily, and the wires can cause significant injuries by forming dangerous snags when the glass breaks.…

  16. The dream and reality of automated wiring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Manno, R.; Dugan, D.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the use of computer programs for automated substation/switchgear wiring in order to cut production costs associated with wiring diagrams and documentation. The topics of the article include automating the process, schematic capture editor, wiring diagram editor, design aids and documentation, display formats, and system benefits.

  17. [Prognostic assessment for formation of a group of cardiovascular high risk among personnel participating in atomic submarines utilization].

    PubMed

    Sosiukin, A E; Vasiliuk, V B; Ivanchenko, A V; Saenko, S A; Semenchuk, O A; Dokhov, M A; Verveda, A B

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound scanning of main vessels (common carotid, internal carotid, common and superficial femoral, posterior tibial arteries) in staffers of shipyard "Nerpa"--branch of JSC "Shipbuilding center Zvezdochka" (Snezhnogorsk city Murmansk region)--engaged into atomic submarines utilization. Findings are atherosclerotic changes in common carotid and common femoral arteries--increased thickness of intima-media complex over the reference values or atherosclerotic plaque formation. The changes were maximal in a group of males aged over 50 with length of service over 25 years. Discriminant analysis helped to suggest a mathematic model to forecast cardiovascular diseases in personnel of "Nerpa" shipyard.

  18. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis by gold supported on reducible oxides has been extensively studied, yet issues such as the nature of the catalytic site and the role of the reducible support remain fiercely debated topics. Here we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of an unprecedented dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism for the oxidation of carbon monoxide by ceria-supported gold clusters. The reported dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism results from the ability of the gold cation to strongly couple with the redox properties of the ceria in a synergistic manner, thereby lowering the energy of redox reactions. The gold cation can break away from the gold nanoparticle to catalyse carbon monoxide oxidation, adjacent to the metal/oxide interface and subsequently reintegrate back into the nanoparticle after the reaction is completed. Our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in catalysis. PMID:25735407

  19. The formation of molecules in interstellar clouds from singly and multiply ionized atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The suggestion is considered that multiply ionized atoms produced by K- and L-shell X-ray ionization and cosmic-ray ionization can undergo ion-molecule reactions and also initiate molecule production. The role of X-rays in molecule production in general is discussed, and the contribution to molecule production of the C(+) radiative association with hydrogen is examined. Such gas-phase reactions of singly and multiply ionized atoms are used to calculate molecular abundances of carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-bearing species. The column densities of the molecules are evaluated on the basis of a modified version of previously developed isobaric cloud models. It is found that reactions of multiply ionized carbon with H2 can contribute a significant fraction of the observed CH in diffuse interstellar clouds in the presence of diffuse X-ray structures or discrete X-ray sources and that substantial amounts of CH(+) can be produced under certain conditions.

  20. Studies of silicon cluster--metal atom compound formation in a supersonic molecular beam

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, S.M.

    1987-10-01

    The first observation of a reaction between a metal atom and silicon in a supersonic jet to form metal atom silicon clusters is reported. Using the technique of laser vaporization supersonic expansion with metal carbonyl seeded carrier gas, clusters of the form MSi/sub n/ have been detected by ArF and KrF laser photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Three transition metals have been investigated, Cr, Mo, and W. The dominant product cluster peaks observed in the mass spectra obtained for all three metals corresponds to identical but remarkable cluster stoichiometries. The dominant peaks have formulas given by MSi/sub n/ where n = 15 and n = 16. The metal--semiconductor clusters are relatively more stable towards photofragmentation than the bare silicon cluster of the same size. The observation of these new species may be relevant to reactions which occur at the interface between a silicon wafer and deposited metals.

  1. The formation of molecules in interstellar clouds from singly and multiply ionized atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The suggestion is considered that multiply ionized atoms produced by K- and L-shell X-ray ionization and cosmic-ray ionization can undergo ion-molecule reactions and also initiate molecule production. The role of X-rays in molecule production in general is discussed, and the contribution to molecule production of the C(+) radiative association with hydrogen is examined. Such gas-phase reactions of singly and multiply ionized atoms are used to calculate molecular abundances of carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-bearing species. The column densities of the molecules are evaluated on the basis of a modified version of previously developed isobaric cloud models. It is found that reactions of multiply ionized carbon with H2 can contribute a significant fraction of the observed CH in diffuse interstellar clouds in the presence of diffuse X-ray structures or discrete X-ray sources and that substantial amounts of CH(+) can be produced under certain conditions.

  2. Formation of palladium nanofilms using electrochemical atomic layer deposition (E-ALD) with chloride complexation.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Leah B; Gebregziabiher, Daniel K; Stickney, John L; Robinson, David B

    2013-02-05

    Pd thin films were formed by electrochemical atomic layer deposition (E-ALD) using surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR) of Cu underpotential deposits (UPD) on polycrystalline Au substrates. An automated electrochemical flow deposition system was used to deposit Pd atomic layers using a sequence of steps referred to as a cycle. The initial step was Cu UPD, followed by its exchange for Pd ions at open circuit, and finishing with a blank rinse to complete the cycle. Deposits were formed with up to 75 cycles and displayed proportional deposit thicknesses. Previous reports by this group indicated excess Pd deposition at the flow cell ingress, from electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Those results suggested that the SLRR mechanism did not involve direct transfer between a Cu(UPD) atom and a Pd(2+) ion that would take its position. Instead, it was proposed that electrons are transferred through the metallic surface to reduce Pd(2+) ions near the surface where their activity is highest. It was proposed that if the cell was filled completely before a significant fraction of the Cu(UPD) atoms had been oxidized then the deposit would be homogeneous. Previous work with EDTA indicated that the hypothesis had merit, but it proved to be very sensitive to the EDTA concentration. In the present study, chloride was used to complex Pd(2+) ions, forming PdCl(4)(2-), to slow the exchange rate. Both complexing agents led to a decrease in the rate of replacement, producing more homogeneous films. Although the use of EDTA improved the homogeneity, it also decreased the deposit thickness by a factor of 3 compared to the thickness obtained via the use of chloride.

  3. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n and for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.

  4. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  5. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L.; Hamze, Ali K.; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-02-01

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  6. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001).

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L; Hamze, Ali K; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J; Demkov, Alexander A; Ekerdt, John G

    2017-02-07

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  7. Plasma spraying with wire feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, M.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma spraying has been limited to using powder feedstocks for a number of reasons. One limitation has been the low energy output of conventional plasma guns. The advent of high energy plasma spraying (HEPS) devices and the associated technology has effectively removed this functional limitation. With HEPS, the combination of high gas velocities and high thermal plasma temperatures coupled with a large exit gas volume enables wire and rod feedstocks to be effectively utilized. Rather than a bulk melting mechanism, a model based on ablation phenomena is considered. The paper examines an analysis of melting phenomena and presents a simple model for molten droplet formation for plasma spraying using wire feedstocks.

  8. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hägglund, Carl; Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H.; Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Mullings, Marja N.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; MacIsaac, Callisto; Bent, Stacey Francine; Yee, Ye Sheng; Clemens, Bruce M.

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.

  9. Modeling three-dimensional network formation with an atomic lattice model: Application to silicic acid polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lin; Auerbach, Scott M.; Monson, Peter A.

    2011-04-01

    We present an atomic lattice model for studying the polymerization of silicic acid in sol-gel and related processes for synthesizing silica materials. Our model is based on Si and O atoms occupying the sites of a body-centered-cubic lattice, with all atoms arranged in SiO4 tetrahedra. This is the simplest model that allows for variation in the Si-O-Si angle, which is largely responsible for the versatility in silica polymorphs. The model describes the assembly of polymerized silica structures starting from a solution of silicic acid in water at a given concentration and pH. This model can simulate related materials—chalcogenides and clays—by assigning energy penalties to particular ring geometries in the polymerized structures. The simplicity of this approach makes it possible to study the polymerization process to higher degrees of polymerization and larger system sizes than has been possible with previous atomistic models. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of the model at two concentrations: a low density state similar to that used in the clear solution synthesis of silicalite-1, and a high density state relevant to experiments on silica gel synthesis. For the high concentration system where there are NMR data on the temporal evolution of the Qn distribution, we find that the model gives good agreement with the experimental data. The model captures the basic mechanism of silica polymerization and provides quantitative structural predictions on ring-size distributions in good agreement with x-ray and neutron diffraction data.

  10. Modeling three-dimensional network formation with an atomic lattice model: application to silicic acid polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Auerbach, Scott M; Monson, Peter A

    2011-04-07

    We present an atomic lattice model for studying the polymerization of silicic acid in sol-gel and related processes for synthesizing silica materials. Our model is based on Si and O atoms occupying the sites of a body-centered-cubic lattice, with all atoms arranged in SiO(4) tetrahedra. This is the simplest model that allows for variation in the Si-O-Si angle, which is largely responsible for the versatility in silica polymorphs. The model describes the assembly of polymerized silica structures starting from a solution of silicic acid in water at a given concentration and pH. This model can simulate related materials-chalcogenides and clays-by assigning energy penalties to particular ring geometries in the polymerized structures. The simplicity of this approach makes it possible to study the polymerization process to higher degrees of polymerization and larger system sizes than has been possible with previous atomistic models. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of the model at two concentrations: a low density state similar to that used in the clear solution synthesis of silicalite-1, and a high density state relevant to experiments on silica gel synthesis. For the high concentration system where there are NMR data on the temporal evolution of the Q(n) distribution, we find that the model gives good agreement with the experimental data. The model captures the basic mechanism of silica polymerization and provides quantitative structural predictions on ring-size distributions in good agreement with x-ray and neutron diffraction data.

  11. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan; ...

    2017-06-20

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. In this paper, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with themore » IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe2O3)-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Finally, tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.« less

  12. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan; Leonard, Donovan N; Qu, Jun; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2017-07-12

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. Here, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with the IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe2O3)-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.

  13. Formation and atomic structure of boron nitride nanotubes with a cup-stacked structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Takeo; Koi, Naruhiro; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Belosludov, Rodion V.; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2007-08-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were synthesized by annealing Fe 4N/B powder at 1000 ∘C for 1 h in a nitrogen gas atmosphere, and large amounts of BN nanotubes with a cup-stacked structure were obtained after a purification process. The atomic structures of the cup-stacked BN nanotubes were investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy as well as molecular mechanics calculations, and compared with double walled BN nanotubes. The present results indicate that the cup-stacked structure with a cone angle of 20 ∘ is more stable than the structure with an angle of 38 ∘ and ordinary nanotube structures.

  14. Experiments to examine the contribution of gas atoms to void formation in irradiated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Y.; Mukoda, I.; Kiritani, M.; Kojima, S.; Garner, F.A.

    1993-12-31

    Vacuum-melting has been employed to demonstrate that residual cases, especially hydrogen, strongly influence void nucleation of copper, copper binary alloys and various Fe-Cr-Ni base alloys during either neutron or electron irradiation. Void nucleation in nickel appears not to be strongly affected by residual gases, however. Solute-free and solute-bearing, Fe-Cr-Ni alloys appear to respond differently to differences in gas content. When contamination of specimens with sodium occurs during neutron irradiation, void nucleation in both as fabricated and vacuum-melted specimens is similar, suggesting that gas atoms re-enter the specimens during irradiation.

  15. Ultimate capabilities for few-cycle pulse formation via resonant interaction of XUV radiation with IR-field-dressed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, T. R.; Emelin, M. Yu.; Antonov, V. A.; Radeonychev, Y. V.; Ryabikin, M. Yu.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2017-02-01

    We perform an ab initio study of the ultimate capabilities and limits of applicability of the method for few-cycle pulse formation via the resonant interaction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation with atoms dressed by a moderately strong infrared (IR) laser field proposed in two earlier works [Y. V. Radeonychev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 183902 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.183902 and V. A. Polovinkin et al., Opt. Lett. 36, 2296 (2011), 10.1364/OL.36.002296]. Taking into account all the multiphoton processes in the systems under consideration on the basis of numerical solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) in the single-active-electron approximation, we show the possibilities to produce 1.1-fs pulses from 124.6-nm XUV radiation via the linear Stark effect in atomic hydrogen, as well as 500-as pulses from 58.4-nm XUV radiation via excited-state ionization in helium. We derive a generalized analytical solution, which takes into account the interplay between sub-laser-cycle Stark effect and excited-state ionization and allows us to analyze the results of TDSE calculations. We found that the ultimate intensity of the IR field suitable for few-cycle pulse formation via the linear Stark effect or excited-state ionization is limited by the threshold for atomic ionization from the resonant excited state or the ground state, respectively. We show that the pulses with shorter duration can be produced in the medium of ions with higher values of the ionization potential.

  16. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest.

  17. Influence of Pt atoms on the low temperature formation of epitaxial Pd monosilicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarada, H.; Mizugaki, K.; Ohdomari, I.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Pt concentration in Pd thin films on the nucleation and growth of PdSi and PdxPt1-xSi (ternary monosilicide) has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Low concentration of Pt (10 at. %) in Pd film enhances PdSi formation at lower temperature than previously reported. It has been proposed that PdSi formation is governed by its slow nucleation. However, in our studies, the nucleation of PtSi, which is substituted for that of PdSi, triggers the subsequent PdSi growth at low temperatures. High concentration of Pt (55 at. %) in Pd-Pt alloy film lowers the temperature of the phase transformation from metal-rich silicide to monosilicide (PdxPt1-xSi). The temperature is the same as that of PtSi formation. In both cases, the monosilicide layers (about 20 nm) have an epitaxial relationship with (111) Si substrates.

  18. Wire Test Grip Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Wire-testing issues, such as the gripping strains imposed on the wire, play a critical role in obtaining clean data. In a standard test frame fitted with flat wedge grips, the gripping action alone creates stresses on the wire specimen that cause the wire to fail at the grip location. A new test frame, which is outfitted with a vacuum chamber, negated the use of any conventional commercially available wire test fixtures, as only 7 in. (17.8 cm) existed between the grip faces. An innovative grip fixture was designed to test thin gauge wire for a variety of applications in an existing Instron test frame outfitted with a vacuum chamber.

  19. Atomic structure of water/Au, Ag, Cu and Pt atomic junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-08

    Much progress has been made in understanding the transport properties of atomic-scale conductors. We prepared atomic-scale metal contacts of Cu, Ag, Au and Pt using a mechanically controllable break junction method at 10 K in a cryogenic vacuum. Water molecules were exposed to the metal atomic contacts and the effect of molecular adsorption was investigated by electronic conductance measurements. Statistical analysis of the electronic conductance showed that the water molecule(s) interacted with the surface of the inert Au contact and the reactive Cu ant Pt contacts, where molecular adsorption decreased the electronic conductance. A clear conductance signature of water adsorption was not apparent at the Ag contact. Detailed analysis of the conductance behaviour during a contact-stretching process indicated that metal atomic wires were formed for the Au and Pt contacts. The formation of an Au atomic wire consisting of low coordination number atoms leads to increased reactivity of the inert Au surface towards the adsorption of water.

  20. Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, G.M.; Verdaguer, A.; Salmeron, M.

    2006-02-22

    We present an analytical model that explains how in humidenvironments the electric field near a sharp tip enhances the formationof water meniscii and bridges between tip and sample. The predictions ofthe model are compared with experimental measurements of the criticaldistance where the field strength causes bridge formation.

  1. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  2. Effect of Dy2O3 doping on phase formation and properties of MgB2 wires made by the modified internal magnesium diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, B.; Rosová, A.; Kováč, P.; Reissner, M.; Dobročka, E.

    2017-02-01

    A series of single-core MgB2 wires was produced by the modified internal magnesium diffusion process, starting with a Mg tube filled with carbon predoped boron powder, which resulted in an extractable MgB2 core allowing thorough investigation of superconducting properties. Carbon contained in the boron powder enhances critical current density (J c), however, it also reduces the reactivity of boron and thus acts as a MgB2 growth inhibitor. In order to compensate this negative effect, Dy2O3 nanopowder was added into boron powder and the composites were subjected to heat-treatment at increased temperature for a longer time. By this approach, the reactivity of carbon predoped boron was substantially improved, yielding wires with an increased amount of MgB2 of high phase purity with enhanced J c.

  3. Formation and disruption of current paths of anodic porous alumina films by conducting atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyoshi, K.; Nigo, S.; Inoue, J.; Sakai, O.; Kitazawa, H.; Kido, G.

    2010-11-01

    Anodic porous alumina (APA) films have a honeycomb cell structure of pores and a voltage-induced bi-stable switching effect. We have applied conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a method to form and to disrupt current paths in the APA films. A bi-polar switching operation was confirmed. We have firstly observed terminals of current paths as spots or areas typically on the center of the triangle formed by three pores. In addition, though a part of the current path showed repetitive switching, most of them were not observed again at the same position after one cycle of switching operations in the present experiments. This suggests that a part of alumina structure and/or composition along the current paths is modified during the switching operations.

  4. Spinor dynamics-driven formation of a dual-beam atom laser.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, N; Thompson, R J; Aveline, D C; Maleki, L

    2006-10-30

    We demonstrate a novel dual-beam atom laser formed by outcoupling oppositely polarized components of an all-optical F = 1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate whose Zeeman sublevel populations have been coherently evolved through spin dynamics. The condensate is formed through all-optical means using a single-beam running-wave dipole trap. We create a condensate in the magnetic field-insensitive m(F) = 0 state, and drive coherent spin-mixing evolution through adiabatic compression of the initially weak trap. Such dual beams, number-correlated through the angular momentum-conserving reaction 2m(0) ?m(+1) +m(-1), have been proposed as tools to explore entanglement and squeezing in Bose-Einstein condensates, and have potential use in precision phase measurements.

  5. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; da Silva, Humberto, Jr.; Aymar, Mireille; Raoult, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca+ , Sr+ , Ba+) and Yb+ are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions show that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level. Supported by the Marie-Curie ITN ``COMIQ: Cold Molecular Ions at the Quantum limit'' of the EU (#607491).

  6. Femtosecond laser patterning, synthesis, defect formation, and structural modification of atomic layered materials

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Eunpa; Hwang, David J.

    2016-12-06

    This article summarizes recent research on laser-based processing of twodimensional (2D) atomic layered materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Ultrafast lasers offer unique processing routes that take advantage of distinct interaction mechanisms with 2D materials to enable extremely localized energy deposition. Experiments have shown that ablative direct patterning of graphene by ultrafast lasers can achieve resolutions of tens of nanometers, as well as single-step pattern transfer. Ultrafast lasers also induce non-thermal excitation mechanisms that are useful for the thinning of TMDCs to tune the 2D material bandgap. Laser-assisted site-specific doping was recently demonstrated where ultrafast laser radiation undermore » ambient air environment could be used for the direct writing of high-quality graphene patterns on insulating substrates. This article concludes with an outlook towards developing further advanced laser processing with scalability, in situ monitoring strategies and potential applications.« less

  7. Formation of AN Extended Halo of Hot Oxygen Atoms in the Wake Region of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying; Ip, Wing Huen

    From the detailed measurements in Venusian ionosphere by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, it was well-known that there is a large day-to-night flow of ionospheric plasma with the horizontal speed reaching a value as high as 5 km/s at 500 km altitude near the terminator. This large-scale anti-sunward convective motion could lead to a significant distortion of the hot oxygen corona maintained by oxygen atoms from {\\text{O}}_2^ + dissociation recombination into a tadpole-like structure. A Monte-Carlo model is developed to simulate the two-dimensional configuration of such a hot oxygen corona.

  8. Femtosecond laser patterning, synthesis, defect formation, and structural modification of atomic layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Eunpa; Hwang, David J.

    2016-12-06

    This article summarizes recent research on laser-based processing of twodimensional (2D) atomic layered materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Ultrafast lasers offer unique processing routes that take advantage of distinct interaction mechanisms with 2D materials to enable extremely localized energy deposition. Experiments have shown that ablative direct patterning of graphene by ultrafast lasers can achieve resolutions of tens of nanometers, as well as single-step pattern transfer. Ultrafast lasers also induce non-thermal excitation mechanisms that are useful for the thinning of TMDCs to tune the 2D material bandgap. Laser-assisted site-specific doping was recently demonstrated where ultrafast laser radiation under ambient air environment could be used for the direct writing of high-quality graphene patterns on insulating substrates. This article concludes with an outlook towards developing further advanced laser processing with scalability, in situ monitoring strategies and potential applications.

  9. Heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in Rydberg atom collisions: Probing dissociative electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Buathong, Sitti; Dunning, F. Barry

    2015-05-01

    While electron transfer in Rydberg atom collisions with attaching targets forms a valuable technique with which to create heavy-Rydberg ion pairs to examine their properties, we demonstrate here that measurements of their velocity distributions can also provide insights into the behavior of the excited intermediates formed through initial electron transfer. The experimental results are analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models the details of electron transfer reactions. Results for a variety of targets are presented that demonstrate the use of this approach to examine the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment, the lifetimes of the intermediates created, and the channels by which they decay. Research supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation under Grant C-0734.

  10. HPDB-Haskell library for processing atomic biomolecular structures in Protein Data Bank format.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Michał Jan

    2013-11-23

    Protein DataBank file format is used for the majority of biomolecular data available today. Haskell is a lazy functional language that enjoys a high-level class-based type system, a growing collection of useful libraries and a reputation for efficiency. I present a fast library for processing biomolecular data in the Protein Data Bank format. I present benchmarks indicating that this library is faster than other frequently used Protein Data Bank parsing programs. The proposed library also features a convenient iterator mechanism, and a simple API modeled after BioPython. I set a new standard for convenience and efficiency of Protein Data Bank processing in a Haskell library, and release it to open source.

  11. Base Information Transport Infrastructure Wired (BITI Wired)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Base Information Transport Infrastructure Wired (BITI Wired) Defense Acquisition Management ...Major Automated Information System MAIS OE - MAIS Original Estimate MAR – MAIS Annual Report MDA - Milestone Decision Authority MDD - Materiel...Combat Information Transport System program was restructured into two pre-Major Automated Information System (pre-MAIS) components: Information

  12. Multi-step formation of a hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion revealed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Chang, Che-Ming; Lee, Jian-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for intracellular trafficking and virus infection, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the fusion process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the membrane fusion mechanism using vesicle models which were pre-bound by inter-vesicle Ca(2+)-lipid clusters to approximate Ca(2+)-catalyzed fusion. Our results show that the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion is a multi-step event. This result contrasts with the assumptions made in most continuum models. The neighboring hemifused states are separated by an energy barrier on the energy landscape. The hemifusion diaphragm is much thinner than the planar lipid bilayers. The thinning of the hemifusion diaphragm during its formation results in the opening of a fusion pore for vesicle fusion. This work provides new insights into the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm and thus increases understanding of the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1999-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 degree C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire (2) bundle of 15 or more wires (3) 70 C environment (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  14. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: 3.7 amps per wire, bundle of 15 or more wires, 70 C environment, and vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  15. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire; (2) bundle of 15 or more wires; (3) 70 C environment: and (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  16. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: 3.7 amps per wire, bundle of 15 or more wires, 70 C environment, and vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  17. Solar power wires based on organic photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R; Eckert, Robert D; Forberich, Karen; Dennler, Gilles; Brabec, Christoph J; Gaudiana, Russell A

    2009-04-10

    Organic photovoltaics in a flexible wire format has potential advantages that are described in this paper. A wire format requires long-distance transport of current that can be achieved only with conventional metals, thus eliminating the use of transparent oxide semiconductors. A phase-separated, photovoltaic layer, comprising a conducting polymer and a fullerene derivative, is coated onto a thin metal wire. A second wire, coated with a silver film, serving as the counter electrode, is wrapped around the first wire. Both wires are encased in a transparent polymer cladding. Incident light is focused by the cladding onto to the photovoltaic layer even when it is completely shadowed by the counter electrode. Efficiency values of the wires range from 2.79% to 3.27%.

  18. Wire harness twisting aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, E. J.; Commadore, C. C.; Ingles, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Long wire bundles twist into uniform spiral harnesses with help of simple apparatus. Wires pass through spacers and through hand-held tool with hole for each wire. Ends are attached to low speed bench motor. As motor turns, operator moves hand tool away forming smooth twists in wires between motor and tool. Technique produces harnesses that generate less radio-frequency interference than do irregularly twisted cables.

  19. Wire harness twisting aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, E. J.; Commadore, C. C.; Ingles, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Long wire bundles twist into uniform spiral harnesses with help of simple apparatus. Wires pass through spacers and through hand-held tool with hole for each wire. Ends are attached to low speed bench motor. As motor turns, operator moves hand tool away forming smooth twists in wires between motor and tool. Technique produces harnesses that generate less radio-frequency interference than do irregularly twisted cables.

  20. Force-controlled lifting of molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, N.; Wagner, C.; Weiss, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Lifting a single molecular wire off the surface with a combined frequency-modulated atomic force and tunneling microscope it is possible to monitor the evolution of both the wire configuration and the contacts simultaneously with the transport conductance experiment. In particular, critical points where individual bonds to the surface are broken and instabilities where the wire is prone to change its contact configuration can be identified in the force gradient and dissipation responses of the junction. This additional mechanical information can be used to unambiguously determine the conductance of a true molecular wire, that is, of a molecule that is contacted via a pointlike “crocodile clip” to each of the electrodes but is otherwise free.

  1. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes on metal oxides and energy storage application.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Li, Xianglin; Cao, Xiehong; Fan, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Pan, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-01-29

    Nanostructured carbon is widely used in energy storage devices (e.g., Li-ion and Li-air batteries and supercapacitors). A new method is developed for the generation of carbon nanoflakes on various metal oxide nanostructures by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and glucose carbonization. Various metal oxide@nanoflake carbon (MO@f-C) core-branch nanostructures are obtained. For the mechanism, it is proposed that the ALD Al2 O3 and glucose form a composite layer. Upon thermal annealing, the composite layer becomes fragmented and moves outward, accompanied by carbon deposition on the alumina skeleton. When tested as electrochemical supercapacitor electrode, the hierarchical MO@f-C nanostructures exhibit better properties compared with the pristine metal oxides or the carbon coating without ALD. The enhancement can be ascribed to increased specific surface areas and electric conductivity due to the carbon flake coating. This peculiar carbon coating method with the unique hierarchical nanostructure may provide a new insight into the preparation of 'oxides + carbon' hybrid electrode materials for energy storage applications.

  2. Ultrafast formation of interlayer hot excitons in atomically thin MoS2/WS2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hailong; Wen, Xiewen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Tianmin; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Jiangtan; Yi, Chongyue; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Guangyu; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-08-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures composed of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides layers have recently emerged as a new family of materials, with great potential for atomically thin opto-electronic and photovoltaic applications. It is puzzling, however, that the photocurrent is yielded so efficiently in these structures, despite the apparent momentum mismatch between the intralayer/interlayer excitons during the charge transfer, as well as the tightly bound nature of the excitons in 2D geometry. Using the energy-state-resolved ultrafast visible/infrared microspectroscopy, we herein obtain unambiguous experimental evidence of the charge transfer intermediate state with excess energy, during the transition from an intralayer exciton to an interlayer exciton at the interface of a WS2/MoS2 heterostructure, and free carriers moving across the interface much faster than recombining into the intralayer excitons. The observations therefore explain how the remarkable charge transfer rate and photocurrent generation are achieved even with the aforementioned momentum mismatch and excitonic localization in 2D heterostructures and devices.

  3. Formation of Triboelectric Series via Atomic-Level Surface Functionalization for Triboelectric Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Ho; Bae, Young Eun; Moon, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jungkil; Choi, Suk-Ho; Kim, Yongho; Yoon, Hyo Jae; Lee, Min Hyung; Nah, Junghyo

    2017-06-27

    Triboelectric charging involves frictional contact of two different materials, and their contact electrification usually relies on polarity difference in the triboelectric series. This limits the choices of materials for triboelectric contact pairs, hindering research and development of energy harvest devices utilizing triboelectric effect. A progressive approach to resolve this issue involves modification of chemical structures of materials for effectively engineering their triboelectric properties. Here, we describe a facile method to change triboelectric property of a polymeric surface via atomic-level chemical functionalizations using a series of halogens and amines, which allows a wide spectrum of triboelectric series over single material. Using this method, tunable triboelectric output power density is demonstrated in triboelectric generators. Furthermore, molecular-scale calculation using density functional theory unveils that electrons transferred through electrification are occupying the PET group rather than the surface functional group. The work introduced here would open the ability to tune triboelectric property of materials by chemical modification of surface and facilitate the development of energy harvesting devices and sensors exploiting triboelectric effect.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of Pd and Pt nanoparticles for catalysis: on the mechanisms of nanoparticle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; Weber, Matthieu J.; Thissen, Nick F. W.; Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Assali, Simone; Bol, Ageeth A.; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of Pd and Pt nanoparticles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been studied extensively in recent years for the synthesis of nanoparticles for catalysis. For these applications, it is essential to synthesize nanoparticles with well-defined sizes and a high density on large-surface-area supports. Although the potential of ALD for synthesizing active nanocatalysts for various chemical reactions has been demonstrated, insight into how to control the nanoparticle properties (i.e. size, composition) by choosing suitable processing conditions is lacking. Furthermore, there is little understanding of the reaction mechanisms during the nucleation stage of metal ALD. In this work, nanoparticles synthesized with four different ALD processes (two for Pd and two for Pt) were extensively studied by transmission electron spectroscopy. Using these datasets as a starting point, the growth characteristics and reaction mechanisms of Pd and Pt ALD relevant for the synthesis of nanoparticles are discussed. The results reveal that ALD allows for the preparation of particles with control of the particle size, although it is also shown that the particle size distribution is strongly dependent on the processing conditions. Moreover, this paper discusses the opportunities and limitations of the use of ALD in the synthesis of nanocatalysts.

  5. Discharge formation systems for generating atomic iodine in a pulse-periodic oxygen–iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aksinin, V I; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N; Antsiferov, S A; Velikanov, S D; Gerasimov, A Yu; Gostev, I V; Kalinovskii, V V; Konovalov, V V; Mikhalkin, V N; Sevryugin, I V

    2014-01-31

    Generation characteristics of a pulse-periodic oxygen–iodine laser with the electro-discharge production of atomic iodine were compared with inductively stabilised edged or anisotropic- resistive cathodes used for ignition of the volume discharge. The discharge was initiated by the radiation of a barrier discharge from the side of a grid anode. It was found that at equal specific electrical energy depositions to the gas-discharge plasma, the system with the anisotropic-resistive cathode provides a more stable and uniform volume discharge with the possibility of varying the composition and pressure of working mixtures over a wide range and a greater specific extraction of laser energy is observed (up to 2.4 J L{sup -1}). At a high pulse repetition rate of laser pulses (50 – 100 Hz) and long duration of the pulse trains (longer than a minute) the surface of anisotropic-resistive cathode became eroded. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Dichotomy in ultrafast atomic dynamics as direct evidence of polaron formation in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junjie; Yin, Wei-Guo; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Pengfei; Konstantinova, Tatianna; Tao, Jing; Yang, Junjie; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Carbone, Fabrizio; Misewich, James A.; Hill, John P.; Wang, Xijie; Cava, Robert J.; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-11-01

    Polaron transport, in which electron motion is strongly coupled to the underlying lattice deformation or phonons, is crucial for understanding electrical and optical conductivities in many solids. However, little is known experimentally about the dynamics of individual phonon modes during polaron motion. It remains elusive whether polarons have a key role in materials with strong electronic correlations. Here we report the use of a new experimental technique, ultrafast MeV-electron diffraction, to quantify the dynamics of both electronic and atomic motions in the correlated LaSr2Mn2O7. Using photoexcitation to set the electronic system in motion, we find that Jahn-Teller-like O, Mn4+ and La/Sr displacements dominate the lattice response and exhibit a dichotomy in behaviour—overshoot-and-recovery for one sublattice versus normal behaviour for the other. This dichotomy, attributed to slow electronic relaxation, proves that polaron transport is a key process in doped manganites. Our technique promises to be applicable for specifying the nature of electron-phonon coupling in complex materials.

  7. Ultrafast formation of interlayer hot excitons in atomically thin MoS2/WS2 heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hailong; Wen, Xiewen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Tianmin; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Jiangtan; Yi, Chongyue; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Guangyu; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures composed of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides layers have recently emerged as a new family of materials, with great potential for atomically thin opto-electronic and photovoltaic applications. It is puzzling, however, that the photocurrent is yielded so efficiently in these structures, despite the apparent momentum mismatch between the intralayer/interlayer excitons during the charge transfer, as well as the tightly bound nature of the excitons in 2D geometry. Using the energy-state-resolved ultrafast visible/infrared microspectroscopy, we herein obtain unambiguous experimental evidence of the charge transfer intermediate state with excess energy, during the transition from an intralayer exciton to an interlayer exciton at the interface of a WS2/MoS2 heterostructure, and free carriers moving across the interface much faster than recombining into the intralayer excitons. The observations therefore explain how the remarkable charge transfer rate and photocurrent generation are achieved even with the aforementioned momentum mismatch and excitonic localization in 2D heterostructures and devices. PMID:27539942

  8. Defect formation on the GaSb (001) surface induced by hydrogen atom adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, V. M.

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory has been used to characterize the effects of adsorbed H on the electronic structure of the GaSb (001)-α(4×3) surface, which consists of a combination of Ga-Sb and Sb-Sb dimers. Adsorption of two H atoms at a Ga-Sb adatom dimer either has little effect on surface states above the bulk valence band maximum (VBM) or else eliminates them, depending on the mode of adsorption. However, adsorption at the Sb-Sb dimer in the terminating layer produces a state farther into the gap at ~0.10 eV above the clean-surface VBM. Relaxation accompanying the breaking of the Sb-Sb dimer bond leads to increased interactions involving three-fold-coordinated Sb sites in the terminating layer, which in turn raises the energies of the non-bonding lone-pair orbitals. This defect state, which appears to be unique to the reconstructed GaSb (001) surface, could potentially function as a hole trap on the surface of p-type GaSb.

  9. Ferromagnetism of the repulsive atomic Fermi gas: three-body recombination and domain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zintchenko, Ilia; Wang, Lei; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The simplest model for itinerant ferromagnetism, the Stoner model, has so far eluded experimental observation in repulsive ultracold fermions due to rapid three-body recombination at large scattering lengths. Here we show that a ferromagnetic phase can be stabilised by imposing a moderate optical lattice. The reduced kinetic energy drop upon formation of a polarized phase in an optical lattice extends the ferromagnetic phase to smaller scattering lengths where three-body recombination is small enough to permit experimental detection of the phase. We also show, using time dependent density functional theory, that in such a setup ferromagnetic domains emerge rapidly from a paramagnetic initial state.

  10. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  11. EMF wire code research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.

    1993-11-01

    This paper examines the results of previous wire code research to determines the relationship with childhood cancer, wire codes and electromagnetic fields. The paper suggests that, in the original Savitz study, biases toward producing a false positive association between high wire codes and childhood cancer were created by the selection procedure.

  12. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-09-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H f L of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity ( ϕ L) and bonding electron density ( n b L ). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n b L , together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H f L for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  13. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950–1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters. PMID:28217547

  14. Atomic scale observation of phase separation and formation of silicon clusters in Hf higk-{kappa} silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, E.; Roussel, M.; Genevois, C.; Pareige, P.; Khomenkova, L.; Portier, X.; Gourbilleau, F.

    2012-05-15

    Hafnium silicate films were fabricated by RF reactive magnetron sputtering technique. Fine microstructural analyses of the films were performed by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. A thermal treatment of as-grown homogeneous films leads to a phase separation process. The formation of SiO{sub 2} and HfO{sub 2} phases as well as pure Si one was revealed. This latter was found to be amorphous Si nanoclusters, distributed uniformly in the film volume. Their mean diameter and density were estimated to be about 2.8 nm and (2.9 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 17} Si-ncs/cm{sup 3}, respectively. The mechanism of the decomposition process was proposed. The obtained results pave the way for future microelectronic and photonic applications of Hf-based high-{kappa} dielectrics with embedded Si nanoclusters.

  15. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950-1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters.

  16. Formation of an ensemble of nanoclusters under rapid deposition of atoms on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, V. D.; Zenkevich, A. V.; Nevolin, V. N.; Pushkin, M. A.; Tronin, V. N.; Troyan, V. I.

    2006-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the formation of nanometer-size Au clusters on NaCl(100) and HOPG(0001) surfaces under pulsed laser deposition are presented. No clusters of small sizes (d {<=} 1 nm) have been found in the cluster size distribution. The distribution itself at d < 5 nm has the form of a percolation distribution. It has been established that the perimeter of clusters with sizes d < 5 nm has a fractal structure. The fractal dimension of clusters is different for NaCl(100) and HOPG(0001) surfaces with different symmetries; it decreases with increasing cluster size from D{sub f} {approx} 1.2-1.4 at d {approx} 1.5 nm to D{sub f} {approx} 1 at d {approx} 5 nm. A physical mechanism of nanocluster formation is suggested. Under pulsed laser deposition, the attainable densities of adatoms are close to the percolation threshold in the region of thermodynamically unstable states and many-particle correlation regions are formed in a spatially inhomogeneous adsorbate. Clusters are formed on the surface from many-particle correlation regions in several diffusion jumps. The suggested mechanism allows the fractal dimension of the clusters forming on surfaces with different symmetries, its dependence on cluster size, and the cluster size distribution functions to be calculated.

  17. Flicking-wire drag tensioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dassele, M. A.; Fairall, H.

    1978-01-01

    Wire-drag system improves wire profile and applies consistent drag to wire. Wire drag is continuously adjustable from zero drag to tensile strength of wire. No-sag wire drag is easier to thread than former system and requires minimal downtime for cleaning and maintenance.

  18. Formation and decay of (3P(J))O atoms in the laser flash photolysis of chlorine dioxide (OClO) at 308 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colussi, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The quantum yields of O(3P(J)) and Cl(2P(3/2)) atoms released in the laser flash photolysis of OClO at 308 and 298 K were determined and the kinetics of the subsequent oxygen atom decay was investigated using time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence measurements. The results are consistent with the formation of sym-ClO3 having a Delta Hf(ClO3) (formed in the reaction O + OClO + Ar) of 55.6 +/-4 kcal/mol.

  19. FOURTH SEMINAR TO THE MEMORY OF D.N. KLYSHKO: Formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets in the field of two standing light waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, M. A.; Petropavlovsky, S. V.; Fedorov, Mikhail V.; Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2005-08-01

    The formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets produced in the interaction of a beam of two-level atoms with two standing light waves polarised in the same plane is considered. The mechanism providing a dispersionless particle dynamics is the balance of two processes: a rapid decay of the atomic wave function away from the field nodes due to spontaneous transitions to nonresonance states and the quantum broadening of the wave packets formed in the close vicinity of field nodes. Coordinate-dependent amplitudes and phases of the two-dimensional wave packets were found for the jg=0 <--> je=1 transition.

  20. Atomic insights into nanoparticle formation of hydroxyfluorinated anatase featuring titanium vacancies

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; ...

    2016-06-28

    Anatase TiO2 with exposed highly reactive (001) surface is commonly prepared using solution-based synthesis in the presence of a fluorinating agent acting as a structure directing agent. Here, the solvothermal reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide in the presence of aqueous HF has resulted in the stabilization of an oxyhydroxyfluorinated anatase phase featuring cationic vacancies. In the present work, we have studied its formation mechanism, revealing a solid-state transformation of a highly defective anatase phase having a hydroxyfluoride composition that subsequently evolves through an oxolation reaction into an oxyhydroxyfluoride phase. Importantly, this work confirms that titanium alkoxide precursors can react with HFmore » via a fluorolysis process yielding fluorinated molecular precursors, which further condense to produce new composition and structural features deviating from a well ordered anatase network.« less

  1. Atomic insights into nanoparticle formation of hydroxyfluorinated anatase featuring titanium vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Borkiewicz, Olaf J.; Dambournet, Damien

    2016-06-28

    Anatase TiO2 with exposed highly reactive (001) surface is commonly prepared using solution-based synthesis in the presence of a fluorinating agent acting as a structure directing agent. Here, the solvothermal reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide in the presence of aqueous HF has resulted in the stabilization of an oxyhydroxyfluorinated anatase phase featuring cationic vacancies. In the present work, we have studied its formation mechanism, revealing a solid-state transformation of a highly defective anatase phase having a hydroxyfluoride composition that subsequently evolves through an oxolation reaction into an oxyhydroxyfluoride phase. Importantly, this work confirms that titanium alkoxide precursors can react with HF via a fluorolysis process yielding fluorinated molecular precursors, which further condense to produce new composition and structural features deviating from a well ordered anatase network.

  2. Atomic insights into nanoparticle formation of hydroxyfluorinated anatase featuring titanium vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Borkiewicz, Olaf J.; Dambournet, Damien

    2016-06-28

    Anatase TiO2 with exposed highly reactive (001) surface is commonly prepared using solution-based synthesis in the presence of a fluorinating agent acting as a structure directing agent. Here, the solvothermal reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide in the presence of aqueous HF has resulted in the stabilization of an oxyhydroxyfluorinated anatase phase featuring cationic vacancies. In the present work, we have studied its formation mechanism, revealing a solid-state transformation of a highly defective anatase phase having a hydroxyfluoride composition that subsequently evolves through an oxolation reaction into an oxyhydroxyfluoride phase. Importantly, this work confirms that titanium alkoxide precursors can react with HF via a fluorolysis process yielding fluorinated molecular precursors, which further condense to produce new composition and structural features deviating from a well ordered anatase network.

  3. Conditions for the formation of nanostructures on electrode surfaces during atomic scale scratching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielinger, Michael; Berenz, Peter; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Baltruschat, Helmut

    2005-12-01

    A nanoscale place selective electrochemical deposition of foreign metals on different single crystal electrodes induced by a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) tip was achieved by scanning with the STM tip very closely to an electrode surface which is covered by a monolayer of a foreign metal by underpotential deposition (UPD). Measuring the minimal conductance G, which is necessary for generating nanostructures, shows that a point contact between the STM tip and the UPD covered surface is formed. This is considered to be responsible for the tip-induced deposition. On Au(1 1 1) in Cu 2+ containing solutions at potentials positive of submonolayer formation, nanoscale scratches are achieved in this way, whereas in the absence of any foreign metal ions only large defects are introduced under the same conditions.

  4. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. - Highlights: • There is evidence for a close association between ASIC and ENaC. • We used AFM to test whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits form cross-clade ion channels. • Isolated proteins were incubated with subunit-specific antibodies and Fab fragments. • Some proteins were doubly decorated at ∼120° by an antibody and a Fab fragment. • Our results indicate the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers.

  5. In Situ Studies of Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) Formation on Crystalline Carbon Surfaces by Neutron Reflectometry and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Steinhauer, Miriam; Stich, Michael; Kurniawan, Mario; Seidlhofer, Beatrix-Kamelia; Trapp, Marcus; Bund, Andreas; Wagner, Norbert; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2017-10-05

    The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is a complex and fragile passivation layer with crucial importance for the functionality of lithium-ion batteries. Due to its fragility and reactivity, the use of in situ techniques is preferable for the determination of the SEI's true structure and morphology during its formation. In this study, we use in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the SEI formation on a carbon surface. It was found that a lithium-rich adsorption layer is already present at the open circuit voltage on the carbon sample surface and that the first decomposition products start to deposit close to this potential. During the negative potential sweep, the growth of the SEI can be observed in detail by AFM and NR. This allows precise monitoring of the morphology evolution and the resulting heterogeneities of individual SEI features. NR measurements show a maximum SEI thickness of 192 Å at the lower cutoff potential (0.02 V vs Li/Li(+)), which slightly decreases during the positive potential scan. The scattering length density (SLD) obtained by NR provides additional information on the SEI's chemical nature and structural evolution.

  6. Formation and upper critical fields of the two distinct A15 phases in the subelements of powder-in-tube Nb3Sn wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senatore, Carmine; Flükiger, René

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the A15 layer in the subelements of a powder-in-tube (PIT) Nb3Sn wire exhibits two different grain morphologies: a region with fine grains (˜200 nm in size) representing about 60% of the total A15 area and one with large grains (1-2 μm in size). By means of high field specific heat and magnetization measurements, we have shown that these two A15 phases correspond to two distinctly different Tc distributions, the large grains region exhibiting a higher Tc and a lower Bc2, the fine grains region a lower Tc and a higher Bc2. We report here the values of the superconducting parameters (Tc, Bc2) of the two A15 phases, as determined from an original model to fit the experimental Tc distribution. After a prolonged reaction treatment (625 °C /320 h), an increase of the fine grain region was observed at the expenses of the large grain region, the Bc2(0 K) value of the former being raised from 28.8 to 31.7 T. These changes explain the marked increase of Jc to 2700 A /cm2 at 4.2 K/12 T, the highest value measured so far in PIT wires.

  7. Formation of manganese {delta}-doped atomic layer in wurtzite GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Meng; Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang Kangkang; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Liu Yinghao; Smith, Arthur R.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the formation of a {delta}-doped manganese layer embedded within c-plane wurtzite gallium nitride using a special molecular beam epitaxy growth process. Manganese is first deposited on the gallium-poor GaN (0001) surface, forming a {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstructed phase. This well-defined surface reconstruction is then nitrided using plasma nitridation, and gallium nitride is overgrown. The manganese content of the {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign phase, namely one Mn per each {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign unit cell, implies that the MnGaN alloy layer has a Mn concentration of up to 33%. The structure and chemical content of the surface are monitored beginning from the initial growth stage up through the overgrowth of 20 additional monolayers (MLs) of GaN. An exponential-like drop-off of the Mn signal with increasing GaN monolayers, as measured by Auger electron spectroscopy, indicates that the highly concentrated Mn layer remains at the {delta}-doped interface. A model of the resultant {delta}-doped structure is formulated based on the experimental data, and implications for possible spintronic applications are discussed.

  8. Positronium Formation Cross-Sections for Positron Scattering by Rubidium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bakry, Salah Yaseen

    Cross-sections for positron-rubidium (37Rb) scattering have been calculated using the Clementi-Roetti wavefunctions and a combination of the coupled-static and frozen-core approximations. The total cross-sections, calculated with eight partial waves corresponding to the total angular momentum ℓ=0 to ℓ=7, are determined over a wide region of scattering energies ranging from 2.7 to 300 eV. The resulting total cross-sections are compared with experimental results and those calculated by other authors. Our total collisional cross-sections display a pronounced peak at 5 eV, nearly consistent with the measurements of Parikh et al. [Phys. Rev. A 47, 1535 (1993)] and also reveal another peak at 7 eV, consistent with the experimental cross-section of Stein et al.23 in the neighborhood of 7 eV. The oscillating behavior of our total collisional cross-sections supports the possible existence of resonance, especially at low energy region. The effect of positronium formation on the total collisional cross-sections diminishes when the incident energy is larger than 100 eV.

  9. Visualization of the evolution of charged droplet formation and jet transition in electrostatic atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Yuanping Wang, Junfeng Zuo, Ziwen; Fan, Yajun

    2015-11-15

    A detailed experimental study on the evolution of charged droplet formation and jet transition from a capillary is reported. By means of high-speed microscopy, special attention has been paid to the dynamics of the liquid thread and satellite droplets in the dripping mode, and a method for calculating the surface charge on the satellite droplet is proposed. Jet transition behavior based on the electric Bond number has been visualized, droplet sizes and velocities are measured to obtain the ejection characteristic of the spray plume, and the charge and hydrodynamic relaxation are linked to give explanations for ejection dynamics with different properties. The results show that the relative length is very sensitive to the hydrodynamic relaxation time. The magnitude of the electric field strength dominates the behavior of coalescence and noncoalescence, with the charge relationship between the satellite droplet and the main droplet being clear for every noncoalescence movement. Ejection mode transitions mainly depend on the magnitude of the electric Bond number, and the meniscus dynamics is determined by the ratio of the charge relaxation time to the hydrodynamic relaxation time.

  10. Spectroscopy of a plasma formed in the vicinity of implosion of the shock wave generated by underwater electrical explosion of spherical wire array

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, O.; Efimov, S.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2015-05-15

    The results of visible spectroscopy of the plasma formed inside a copper capillary placed at the equatorial plane of an underwater electrically exploded spherical wire array (30 mm in diameter; 40 wires, each of 100 μm in diameter) are reported. In the experiments, a pulsed power generator with current amplitude of ∼300 kA and rise time of ∼1.1 μs was used to produce wire array explosion accompanied by the formation of a converging strong shock wave. The data obtained support the assumption of uniformity of the shock wave along the main path of its convergence. The spectroscopic measurements show that this rather simple method of formation of a converging strong shock wave can be used successfully for studying the shock wave's interaction with matter and the evaporation processes of atoms from a target.

  11. Spectroscopy of a plasma formed in the vicinity of implosion of the shock wave generated by underwater electrical explosion of spherical wire array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, O.; Efimov, S.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Bernshtam, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-05-01

    The results of visible spectroscopy of the plasma formed inside a copper capillary placed at the equatorial plane of an underwater electrically exploded spherical wire array (30 mm in diameter; 40 wires, each of 100 μm in diameter) are reported. In the experiments, a pulsed power generator with current amplitude of ˜300 kA and rise time of ˜1.1 μs was used to produce wire array explosion accompanied by the formation of a converging strong shock wave. The data obtained support the assumption of uniformity of the shock wave along the main path of its convergence. The spectroscopic measurements show that this rather simple method of formation of a converging strong shock wave can be used successfully for studying the shock wave's interaction with matter and the evaporation processes of atoms from a target.

  12. The effect of the electronic structure, phase transition, and localized dynamics of atoms in the formation of tiny particles of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mubarak; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-01-01

    In addition to self-governing properties, tiny-sized particles of metallic colloids are the building blocks of large-sized particles; thus, their study has been the subject of a large number of publications. In the present work, it has been discussed that geometry structure of tiny particle made through atom-to-atom amalgamation depends on attained dynamics of gold atoms along with protruded orientations. The localized process conditions direct two-dimensional structure of a tiny particle at atomically flat air-solution interface while heating locally dynamically approached atoms, thus, negate the role of van der Waals interactions. At electronphoton-solution interface, impinging electrons stretch or deform atoms of tiny particles depending on the mechanism of impingement. In addition, to strike regular grid of electrons ejected on split of atoms not executing excitations and de-excitations of their electrons, atoms of tiny particles also deform or stretch while occupying various sites depending on the process of synergy. Under suitable impinging electron streams, those tiny particles in monolayer two-dimensional structure electron states of their atoms are diffused in the direction of transferred energy, thus, coincide to the next adjacent atoms in each one-dimensional array dealing the same sort of behavior. Instantaneously, photons of adequate energy propagate on the surfaces of such electronic structures and modify those into smooth elements, thus, disregard the phenomenon of localized surface plasmons. This study highlights the fundamental process of formation of tiny particles where the role of localized dynamics of atoms and their electronic structure along with interaction to light are discussed. Such a tool of processing materials, in nonequilibrium pulse-based process, opens a number of possibilities to develop engineered materials with specific chemical, optical, and electronic properties.

  13. Role of low-energy ion irradiation in the formation of an aluminum germanate layer on a germanium substrate by radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Yukio Yamada, Daichi; Yokohira, Tomoya; Yanachi, Kosei; Yamamoto, Chiaya; Yoo, Byeonghak; Sato, Tetsuya; Yamanaka, Junji; Takamatsu, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition uses oxygen radicals generated by a remote microwave-induced plasma as an oxidant to change the surface reactions of the alternately supplied trimethylaluminum precursor and oxygen radicals on a Ge substrate, which leads to the spontaneous formation of an aluminum germanate layer. In this paper, the effects that low-energy ions, supplied from a remote microwave plasma to the substrate along with the oxygen radicals, have on the surface reactions were studied. From a comparative study of aluminum oxide deposition under controlled ion flux irradiation on the deposition surface, it was found that the ions enhance the formation of the aluminum germanate layer. The plasma potential measured at the substrate position by the Langmuir probe method was 5.4 V. Assuming that the kinetic energy of ions arriving at the substrate surface is comparable to that gained by this plasma potential, such ions have sufficient energy to induce exchange reactions of surface-adsorbed Al atoms with the underlying Ge atoms without causing significant damage to the substrate. This ion-induced exchange reaction between Al and Ge atoms is inferred to be the background kinetics of the aluminum germanate formation by radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition.

  14. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and...

  15. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and...

  17. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and...

  20. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare...

  1. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare...

  2. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare..., and bare signal wires shall be adequately guarded: (a) At all points where men are required to work or...

  3. The formation of the W43 complex: constraining its atomic-to-molecular transition and searching for colliding clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, F.; Nguyên Luong, Q.; Schneider, N.; Heitsch, F.; Glover, S.; Carlhoff, P.; Hill, T.; Bontemps, S.; Schilke, P.; Louvet, F.; Hennemann, M.; Didelon, P.; Beuther, H.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Numerical simulations have explored the possibility of forming molecular clouds through either a quasi-static, self-gravitating mechanism or the collision of gas streams or lower density clouds. They also quantitatively predict the distribution of matter at the transition from atomic to molecular gases. Aims: We aim to observationally test these models by studying the environment of W43, a molecular cloud complex recently identified near the tip of the Galactic long bar. Methods: Using Galaxy-wide H i and 12CO 1-0 surveys, we searched for gas flowing toward the W43 molecular cloud complex. We also estimated the H i and H2 mass surface densities to constrain the transition from atomic to molecular gas around and within W43. Results: We found three cloud ensembles within the position-velocity diagrams of 12CO and H i gases. They are separated by ~20 km s-1 along the line of sight and extend into the 13CO velocity structure of W43. Since their velocity gradients are consistent with free fall, they could be nearby clouds attracted by and streaming toward the W43 ~107 M⊙ potential well. We show that the H i surface density, ΣH i = 45-85 M⊙pc-2, does not reach any threshold level but increases when entering the 130 pc-wide molecular complex previously defined. This suggests that an equilibrium between H2 formation and photodissociation has not yet been reached. The H2-to-H i ratio measured over the W43 region and its surroundings, RH2 ~ 3.5±23, is high, indicating that most of the gas is already in molecular form in W43 and in structures several hundred parsecs downstream along the Scutum-Centaurus arm. Conclusions: The W43 molecular cloud complex may have formed and, in fact may still be accreting mass from the agglomeration of clouds. Already in the molecular-dominated regime, most of these clouds are streaming from the Scutum-Centaurus arm. This clearly disagrees with quasi-static and steady-state models of molecular cloud formation.

  4. Influence of silicon processing in atomic hydrogen on the formation of local molten regions as a result of pulsed irradiation with optical photons

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, M. V. Kagadei, V. A.; L'vova, T. N.; Nefedtsev, E. V.; Oskomov, K. V.; Proskurovsky, D. I.; Romanenko, S. V.; Fattakhov, Ya. V.; Khaibullin, I. B.

    2006-01-15

    The effect of intense atomic hydrogen flux on the defect density in the surface layer of single-crystal silicon is studied. It is shown that the formation of local molten regions by pulsed-light heating of Si samples and further analysis of the local melting pattern can be an efficient tool for determining the number of defects introduced by the processing in atomic hydrogen. It was found that the processing conditions in atomic hydrogen with an exposure dose lower than 2.7 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} do not change the number of defects in Si; in contrast, conditions with an exposure dose above 3.6 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} significantly increase the defect density. The increase in the number of defects can be caused by the interaction of atomic hydrogen with the Si surface.

  5. Gas infall into atomic cooling haloes: on the formation of protogalactic discs and supermassive black holes at z > 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Jimenez, Raul; Haiman, Zoltán

    2013-12-01

    We have performed hydrodynamical simulations from cosmological initial conditions using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) code RAMSES to study atomic cooling haloes (ACHs) at z = 10 with masses in the range 5 × 107 M⊙ ≲ M ≲ 2 × 109 M⊙. We assume the gas has primordial composition and H2-cooling and prior star formation in the haloes have been suppressed. We present a comprehensive analysis of the gas and dark matter (DM) properties of 19 haloes at a spatial resolution of ˜10 (proper) pc, selected from simulations with a total volume of ˜2000 (comoving) Mpc3. This is the largest statistical hydro-simulation study of ACHs at z > 10 to date. We examine the morphology, angular momentum, thermodynamical state and turbulent properties of these haloes, in order to assess the prevalence of discs and massive overdensities that may lead to the formation of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We find no correlation between either the magnitude or the direction of the angular momentum of the gas and its parent DM halo. Only three of the haloes form rotationally supported cores. Two of the most massive haloes, however, form massive, compact overdense blobs, which migrate to the outer region of the halo. These blobs have an accretion rate between ˜10-1 and 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 (at a distance of 100 pc from their centre), and are possible sites of SMBH formation. Our results suggest that the degree of rotational support and the fate of the gas in a halo is determined by its large-scale environment and merger history. In particular, the two haloes that form overdense blobs are located at knots of the cosmic web, cooled their gas early on (z > 17) and experienced many mergers. The gas in these haloes is thus lumpy and highly turbulent, with Mach numbers M≳ 5. In contrast, the haloes forming rotationally supported cores are relatively more isolated, located mid-way along filaments of the cosmic web, cooled their gas more recently and underwent fewer mergers. As a result, the

  6. Thin wire pointing method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, G.; Mattauch, R. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for forming sharp tips on thin wires, in particular phosphor bronze wires of diameters such as one-thousandth inch used to contact micron size Schottky barrier diodes, which enables close control of tip shape and which avoids the use of highly toxic solutions. The method includes dipping an end of a phosphor bronze wire into a dilute solution of sulfamic acid and applying a current through the wire to electrochemically etch it. The humidity in the room is controlled to a level of less than 50%, and the voltage applied between the wire and another electrode in the solutions is a half wave rectified voltage. The current through the wire is monitored, and the process is stopped when the current falls to a predetermined low level.

  7. Method for reuse of wafers for growth of vertically-aligned wire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Spurgeon, Joshua M; Plass, Katherine E; Lewis, Nathan S; Atwater, Harry A

    2013-06-04

    Reusing a Si wafer for the formation of wire arrays by transferring the wire arrays to a polymer matrix, reusing a patterned oxide for several array growths, and finally polishing and reoxidizing the wafer surface and reapplying the patterned oxide.

  8. H-atom addition and abstraction reactions in mixed CO, H2CO and CH3OH ices - an extended view on complex organic molecule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-01-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been observed not only in the hot cores surrounding low- and high-mass protostars, but also in cold dark clouds. Therefore, it is interesting to understand how such species can be formed without the presence of embedded energy sources. We present new laboratory experiments on the low-temperature solid state formation of three complex molecules - methyl formate (HC(O)OCH3), glycolaldehyde (HC(O)CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (H2C(OH)CH2OH) - through recombination of free radicals formed via H-atom addition and abstraction reactions at different stages in the CO→H2CO→CH3OH hydrogenation network at 15 K. The experiments extend previous CO hydrogenation studies and aim at resembling the physical-chemical conditions typical of the CO freeze-out stage in dark molecular clouds, when H2CO and CH3OH form by recombination of accreting CO molecules and H-atoms on ice grains. We confirm that H2CO, once formed through CO hydrogenation, not only yields CH3OH through ongoing H-atom addition reactions, but is also subject to H-atom-induced abstraction reactions, yielding CO again. In a similar way, H2CO is also formed in abstraction reactions involving CH3OH. The dominant methanol H-atom abstraction product is expected to be CH2OH, while H-atom additions to H2CO should at least partially proceed through CH3O intermediate radicals. The occurrence of H-atom abstraction reactions in ice mantles leads to more reactive intermediates (HCO, CH3O and CH2OH) than previously thought, when assuming sequential H-atom addition reactions only. This enhances the probability to form COMs through radical-radical recombination without the need of UV photolysis or cosmic rays as external triggers.

  9. X-ray generation mechanisms in three-dimensional simulations of wire array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Jennings, C. A.; Bland, S. N.; Ciardi, A.

    2004-12-01

    Resistive magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used to evaluate the influence of three-dimensional inhomogeneities on x-ray power production in wire array Z-pinches. In particular, we concentrate on simulations of wire array Z-pinch experiments on the MAGPIE generator at Imperial College. An initial temperature perturbation is used to stimulate variations in wire core ablation rates that result in a highly non-uniform final implosion. Results indicate that x-ray power production is governed by the symmetry of the implosion surface and by the rate at which current can transfer to the axis through a three-dimensional debris field that trails behind the main implosion. The peak power is ultimately limited by the growth of MHD instabilities in the stagnated pinch. The individual contributions of the implosion kinetic energy, compression of the stagnated pinch, ohmic heating and MHD instabilities to the radiation yield are quantified. The onset of m = 1 instabilities is found to provide an efficient mechanism for dissipation of the magnetic energy surrounding the stagnated pinch. The formation of a helical plasma column not only allows the magnetic field to do work in driving an expansion of the helix but also enhances the ohmic heating by elongating the path of the current through the pinch. The effect of these energy sources combined is to increase the radiation yield to typically 3½ times the kinetic energy of the implosion. Simulations of arrays with different wire numbers, wire material and with nested arrays are used to examine the mechanisms that influence the peak soft x-ray power. In the simulations, peak power can be increased by: increasing the number of wires (which improves the implosion symmetry), by increasing the atomic number of the material (which increases the compressibility of the plasma) and by using a nested inner array (which brings the mass and the current to the axis more efficiently than a single array).

  10. Self-assembly of tin wires via phase transformation of heteroepitaxial germanium-tin on germanium substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Lingzi; Tok, Eng Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-06-01

    This work demonstrates and describes for the first time an unusual strain-relaxation mechanism by the formation and self-assembly of well-ordered tin wires during the thermal annealing of epitaxial Ge0.83Sn0.17-on-Ge(001) substrate. Fully strained germanium-tin alloys (Ge0.83Sn0.17) were epitaxially grown on Ge(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The morphological and compositional evolution of Ge0.83Sn0.17 during thermal annealing is studied by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy. Under certain annealing conditions, the Ge0.83Sn0.17 layer decomposes into two stable phases, and well-defined Sn wires that are preferentially oriented along two orthogonal ⟨100⟩ azimuths are formed. The formation of the Sn wires is related to the annealing temperature and the Ge0.83Sn0.17 thickness, and can be explained by the nucleation of a grain with Sn islands on the outer front, followed by grain boundary migration. The Sn wire formation process is found to be thermally activated, and an activation enthalpy (Ec) of 0.41 eV is extracted. This thermally activated phase transformation, i.e., 2D epitaxial layer to 3D wires, occurs via a mechanism akin to "cellular precipitation." This synthesis route of Sn wires opens new possibilities for creation of nanoscale patterns at high-throughput without the need for lithography.

  11. Self-assembly of tin wires via phase transformation of heteroepitaxial germanium-tin on germanium substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Lingzi; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Tok, Eng Soon

    2015-06-14

    This work demonstrates and describes for the first time an unusual strain-relaxation mechanism by the formation and self-assembly of well-ordered tin wires during the thermal annealing of epitaxial Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}-on-Ge(001) substrate. Fully strained germanium-tin alloys (Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}) were epitaxially grown on Ge(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The morphological and compositional evolution of Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} during thermal annealing is studied by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy. Under certain annealing conditions, the Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} layer decomposes into two stable phases, and well-defined Sn wires that are preferentially oriented along two orthogonal 〈100〉 azimuths are formed. The formation of the Sn wires is related to the annealing temperature and the Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} thickness, and can be explained by the nucleation of a grain with Sn islands on the outer front, followed by grain boundary migration. The Sn wire formation process is found to be thermally activated, and an activation enthalpy (E{sub c}) of 0.41 eV is extracted. This thermally activated phase transformation, i.e., 2D epitaxial layer to 3D wires, occurs via a mechanism akin to “cellular precipitation.” This synthesis route of Sn wires opens new possibilities for creation of nanoscale patterns at high-throughput without the need for lithography.

  12. Wire-inhomogeneity detector

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, G.H.; Smits, R.G.; Eberhard, P.H.

    1982-08-31

    A device for uncovering imperfections in electrical conducting wire, particularly superconducting wire, by detecting variations in eddy currents. Eddy currents effect the magnetic field in a gap of an inductor, contained in a modified commercial ferrite core, through which the wire being tested is passed. A small increase or decrease in the amount of conductive material, such as copper, in a fixed cross section of wire will unbalance a bridge used to measure the impedance of the inductor, tripping a detector and sounding an alarm.

  13. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface is disclosed. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest. 4 figs.

  14. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  15. Microstructure evolution of Ag–8Au–3Pd alloy wire during electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Rui; Gao, Liming; Li, Ming; Mao, Dali; Qian, Kaiyou; Chiu, Hope

    2015-12-15

    As the continuous shrinkage of the interconnect line width in microelectronics devices, there is a growing concern about the electromigration (EM) failure of bonding wire. In addition, an innovative Ag–8Au–3Pd alloy wire has shown promise as an economical substitute for gold wire interconnects due to the cost pressure of gold in the last decade. In present study of the Ag–8Au–3Pd alloy wire, the surface diffusion occupied the dominant position during EM failure, and the activation energy was found to be 0.61 eV. In order to reveal the failure mechanism, the cross-sections of the Ag–8Au–3Pd alloy wire during EM were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) micro-machining for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. The microstructure evolution of the Ag–8Au–3Pd alloy wire was characterized by the grain size and grain boundary. As a result, the EM failure originates in the atom transportation, which causes grain size increasing and atom diffusion on the wire surface. - Highlights: • The activation energy of Ag–8Au–3Pd alloy wire was obtained as 0.61 eV. • During EM, the silver atoms diffused from negative to the positive terminal on the wire surface. • The microstructure (grain size and grain boundary) was characterized by FIB-EBSD. • During EM, the atom transportation was found to cause grain size growth and atom diffusion on the wire surface.

  16. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

  17. Reactions of OOH radical with beta-carotene, lycopene, and torulene: hydrogen atom transfer and adduct formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Francisco-Marquez, Misaela

    2009-08-13

    The relative free radical scavenging activity of beta-carotene, lycopene, and torulene toward OOH radicals has been studied using density functional theory. Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF) mechanisms have been considered. All the possible reaction sites have been included in the modeling, and detailed branching ratios are reported for the first time. The reactions of hydrocarbon carotenoids (Car) with peroxyl radicals, in both polar and nonpolar environments, are predicted to proceed via RAF mechanism, with contributions higher than 98% to the overall OOH + Car reactions. Lycopene and torulene were found to be more reactive than beta-carotene. In nonpolar environments the reactivity of the studied carotenoids toward peroxyl radical follows the trend LYC > TOR > BC, whereas in aqueous solutions it is TOR > LYC > BC. OOH adducts are predicted to be formed mainly at the terminal sites of the conjugated polyene chains. The main addition sites were found to be C5 for beta-carotene and lycopene and C30 for torulene. The general agreement between the calculated magnitudes and the available experimental data supports the predictions from this work.

  18. Peptide Aggregation and Pore Formation in a Lipid Bilayer: A Combined Coarse-Grained and All Atom Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Thøgersen, Lea; Schiøtt, Birgit; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation study where different resolutions, namely coarse-grained (CG) and all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics simulations, are used sequentially to combine the long timescale reachable by CG simulations with the high resolution of AA simulations, to describe the complete processes of peptide aggregation and pore formation by alamethicin peptides in a hydrated lipid bilayer. In the 1-μs CG simulations the peptides spontaneously aggregate in the lipid bilayer and exhibit occasional transitions between the membrane-spanning and the surface-bound configurations. One of the CG systems at t = 1 μs is reverted to an AA representation and subjected to AA simulation for 50 ns, during which water molecules penetrate the lipid bilayer through interactions with the peptide aggregates, and the membrane starts leaking water. During the AA simulation significant deviations from the α-helical structure of the peptides are observed, however, the size and arrangement of the clusters are not affected within the studied time frame. Solid-state NMR experiments designed to match closely the setup used in the molecular dynamics simulations provide strong support for our finding that alamethicin peptides adopt a diverse set of configurations in a lipid bilayer, which is in sharp contrast to the prevailing view of alamethicin oligomers formed by perfectly aligned helical alamethicin peptides in a lipid bilayer. PMID:18676652

  19. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms.

    PubMed

    Douberly, Gary E; Miller, Roger E; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2017-03-22

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic "3 + 1" clusters, which are ∼5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenching the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.

  20. Investigation about the Chrome Steel Wire Arc Spray Process and the Resulting Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilden, J.; Bergmann, J. P.; Jahn, S.; Knapp, S.; van Rodijnen, F.; Fischer, G.

    2007-12-01

    Nowadays, wire-arc spraying of chromium steel has gained an important market share for corrosion and wear protection applications. However, detailed studies are the basis for further process optimization. In order to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the effects of the spray parameters DoE-based experiments had been carried out with high-speed camera shoots. In this article, the effects of spray current, voltage, and atomizing gas pressure on the particle jet properties, mean particle velocity and mean particle temperature and plume width on X46Cr13 wire are presented using an online process monitoring device. Moreover, the properties of the coatings concerning the morphology, composition and phase formation were subject of the investigations using SEM, EDX, and XRD-analysis. These deep investigations allow a defined verification of the influence of process parameters on spray plume and coating properties and are the basis for further process optimization.

  1. VIEW SOUTHEASTBUILDING 4 NO. 1 WIRE MILL (1871) WIRE DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTHEAST-BUILDING 4 NO. 1 WIRE MILL (1871) WIRE DRAWING MACHINE - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  2. Observations of the long distance exploding wire restrike mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, Rowan; Herel, Ryan van; Enright, Wade; Bodger, Pat

    2010-09-15

    An exploding wire restrike mechanism is applied to create plasma paths up to 9 m in length. The mechanism uses enameled copper wires in a 5 to 10 kV/m region of average electric field (AEF). This relatively low AEF restrike mechanism appears to be linked to the formation of plasma beads along the wire's length. Voltage traces, measurement of relative emitted light intensity and photographs are presented at AEFs below, inside and above the identified restrike region.

  3. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  4. Formation of H2O2 on Au20 and Au19Pd clusters: understanding the structure effect on the atomic level.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, Anna V; Pichugina, Daria A; Shestakov, Alexander F; Kuz'menko, Nikolay E

    2013-08-08

    Supported gold nanoparticles are promising catalysts for production of H2O2 from O2 and H2. Size, structure, and palladium doping effects play the key role in activity and selectivity of a gold catalyst. We performed a study of the influence of Au20 and Au19Pd structure features on the main steps of H2O2 formation on the atomic level, using the DFT/PBE approach with relativistic all electron basis set. The top, edge, and facet atoms of the tetrahedral Au20 cluster as well as a palladium atom of Au19Pd located on the top, edge, and facet of a tetrahedron have been considered as active sites of steps involved in H2O2 synthesis. The thermodynamic and kinetic data including Gibbs free energies and the activation Gibbs free energies were calculated for the steps determining the formation of H2O2 (H(s) + OOH(s) = H2O(2(s)), H2O(2(s)) = H2O(2(g))) and for one step decreasing the selectivity (H2O(2(s)) = OH(s) + OH(s)). Gold tends to have low activity and high selectivity in H2O2 synthesis regardless of the structure of active site. Low coordinated palladium atoms promote H2O2 formation as well as its dissociation. Pd on a facet of a cluster facilitates H2O2 production with high activity and selectivity.

  5. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  6. Imagination Visualized in Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson achieved with a Very Special Artist (VSA) in residence for sixth- and seventh-grade students in which they created wire sculptures. Discusses how the VSA taught the students. Includes a list of art materials and characteristics of wire. (CMK)

  7. Imagination Visualized in Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson achieved with a Very Special Artist (VSA) in residence for sixth- and seventh-grade students in which they created wire sculptures. Discusses how the VSA taught the students. Includes a list of art materials and characteristics of wire. (CMK)

  8. 2016 MOST WIRED.

    PubMed

    Barr, Paul; Butcher, Lola; Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2016-07-01

    This year's IT survey shows that hospitals are aggressively fighting cyber crime and looking for ways to use data to help in the transition to value-based care. Find out who made the 2016 lists of Most Wired, Most Advanced, Most Improved and Most Wired-Small and Rural.

  9. Reaction kinetics and isotope effect of water formation by the surface reaction of solid H2O2 with H atoms at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Osaka, Kazuya; Watanabe, Naoki; Chigai, Takeshi; Kouchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We performed laboratory experiments on the formation of water and its isotopologues by surface reactions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with hydrogen (H) atoms and their deuterated counterparts (D2O2, D) at 10-30 K. High-purity H2O2 (> 95%) was prepared in situ by the codeposition of molecular oxygen and H atoms at relatively high temperatures (45-50 K). We determined that the high-purity H2O2 solid reacts with both H and deuterium (D) atoms at 10-30 K despite the large activation barriers (-2000 K). Moreover, the reaction rate for H atoms is approximately 45 times faster than that for D atoms at 15 K. Thus, the observed large isotope effect indicates that these reactions occurred through quantum tunneling. We propose that the observed HDO/H2O ratio in molecular clouds might be a good tool for the estimation of the atomic D/H ratio in those environments.

  10. Formation and stimulated photodissociation of metastable molecules with emission of photon at the collision of two atoms in a laser radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazazyan, E.; Gazazyan, A.

    2017-04-01

    The formation of metastable molecules (Feshbach resonances) at the collision of two atoms and subsequent stimulated transition to a lower unbound electronic molecular state, with emission of a photon of the laser radiation has been investigated. This can develop, in particular, for Rb 2 molecules due to resonance scattering of two Rb atoms. This process is a basis for the creation of excimer lasers. Expressions have been obtained for the cross sections of elastic and inelastic resonance scattering and the intensity of the stimulated emission of the photons.

  11. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    PubMed

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media.

  12. Formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons revisited: diffusion-controlled reactions and hydrogen atom losses in solid noble gases.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Räsänen, Markku; Johansson, Susanna; Khyzhniy, Ivan; Savchenko, Elena

    2008-02-07

    UV photolysis and annealing of C2H2/Xe, C2H2/Xe/Kr, and HBr/Xe matrices lead to complicated photochemical processes and reactions. The dominating products in these experiments are noble-gas hydrides with general formula HNgY (Ng = noble-gas atom, Y = electronegative fragment). We concentrate on distinguishing the local and global mobility and losses of H atoms, barriers of the reactions, and the decay of solvated protons. Different deposition temperatures change the amount of lattice imperfections and thus the amount of traps for H atoms. The averaged distance between reacting species influencing the reaction kinetics is controlled by varying the precursor concentration. A number of solid-state processes connected to the formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons are discussed using a simple kinetic model. The most efficient formation of noble-gas hydrides is connected with global (long-range) mobility of H atoms leading to the H + Xe + Y reaction. The highest concentration of noble-gas hydrides was obtained in matrices of highest optical quality, which probably have the lowest concentration of defects and H-atom losses. In matrices with high amount of geometrical imperfections, the product formation is inefficient and dominated by a local (short-range) process. The decay of solvated protons is rather local than a global process, which is different from the formation of noble-gas molecules. However, the present data do not allow distinguishing local proton and electron mobilities. Our previous results indicate that these are electrons which move to positively-charged centers and neutralize them. It is believed that the image obtained here for solid xenon is applicable to solid krypton whereas the case of argon deserves special attention.

  13. Atomic collisions in suprafluid helium-nanodroplets: timescales for metal-cluster formation derived from He-density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Collision times for the coinage metal atoms Cu, Ag and Au in He-droplets are derived from helium density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The strength of the attractive interaction between the metal atoms turns out to be less important than the mass of the propagating metal atoms. Even for small droplets consisting of a few thousand helium atoms, the collision times are shortest for Cu, followed by Ag and Au, despite the higher binding energy of Au2 compared to Cu2. PMID:25812719

  14. Atomic collisions in suprafluid helium-nanodroplets: timescales for metal-cluster formation derived from He-density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Andreas W; Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2015-04-28

    Collision times for the coinage metal atoms Cu, Ag and Au in He-droplets are derived from helium density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The strength of the attractive interaction between the metal atoms turns out to be less important than the mass of the propagating metal atoms. Even for small droplets consisting of a few thousand helium atoms, the collision times are shortest for Cu, followed by Ag and Au, despite the higher binding energy of Au2 compared to Cu2.

  15. The pecularities of formation of dynamic gratings in metal vapors at the optical pumping of atomic hyperfine sublevels

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, V.N.

    1994-07-01

    The properties of the resonant dynamic gratings produced in atomic cesium vapors by low-power beams of a semiconductor laser are studied. It is shown, both experimentally and theoretically, that the efficiency of laser-beam diffraction on dynamic gratings in a three-level atomic medium can be appreciably increased owing to the compensation of medium bleaching by the increase in initial atomic concentration. The spatial frequency response of an atomic medium during optical pumping is shown to be substantially non-uniform and to have a strong rise in the range of low spatial frequencies of the gratings. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Body of Knowledge (BOK) for Copper Wire Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutkowski, E.; Sampson, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper wire bonds have replaced gold wire bonds in the majority of commercial semiconductor devices for the latest technology nodes. Although economics has been the driving mechanism to lower semiconductor packaging costs for a savings of about 20% by replacing gold wire bonds with copper, copper also has materials property advantages over gold. When compared to gold, copper has approximately: 25% lower electrical resistivity, 30% higher thermal conductivity, 75% higher tensile strength and 45% higher modulus of elasticity. Copper wire bonds on aluminum bond pads are also more mechanically robust over time and elevated temperature due to the slower intermetallic formation rate - approximately 1/100th that of the gold to aluminum intermetallic formation rate. However, there are significant tradeoffs with copper wire bonding - copper has twice the hardness of gold which results in a narrower bonding manufacturing process window and requires that the semiconductor companies design more mechanically rigid bonding pads to prevent cratering to both the bond pad and underlying chip structure. Furthermore, copper is significantly more prone to corrosion issues. The semiconductor packaging industry has responded to this corrosion concern by creating a palladium coated copper bonding wire, which is more corrosion resistant than pure copper bonding wire. Also, the selection of the device molding compound is critical because use of environmentally friendly green compounds can result in internal CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) mismatches with the copper wire bonds that can eventually lead to device failures during thermal cycling. Despite the difficult problems associated with the changeover to copper bonding wire, there are billions of copper wire bonded devices delivered annually to customers. It is noteworthy that Texas Instruments announced in October of 2014 that they are shipping microcircuits containing copper wire bonds for safety critical automotive applications

  17. In vitro and in vivo biofilm adhesion to esthetic coated arch wires and its correlation with surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mahasen; El-Fallal, Abeer; Degla, Heba

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the in vitro ability of esthetic coated rectangular arch wires to retain oral biofilms and in vivo biofilm formation on these wires after 4 and 8 weeks of clinical use and to correlate the findings with the surface roughness of these wires. Three brands of esthetic coated nickel-titanium (NiTi) arch wires were selected. Arch wires retrieved after 4 and 8 weeks of intraoral use were obtained from 30 orthodontic patients. Surface roughness (SR) was assessed with an atomic force microscope. In vitro adhesion assays were performed using Streptococcus mutans (MS), Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. The amount of bacterial adhesion was quantified using the colony-count method. Paired t-test, analysis of variance, post hoc Tukey's test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient test were used for statistical analysis at the .05 level of significance. In vitro bacterial adhesion showed significant differences between wires in terms of MS adhesion (P  =  .01). All wires showed significant increases in SR (P  =  .001 after 4 weeks and .007 after 8 weeks) and biofilm adhesion (P  =  .0001 after 4 weeks and .045 after 8 weeks) after intraoral exposure. A significant positive correlation (P  =  .001 after 4 weeks and .05 after 8 weeks) was observed between these two variables in vivo, but the correlation was not significant for in vitro bacterial adhesion. SR and biofilm adhesion increased after intraoral use at all time intervals. There was a positive correlation between SR and biofilm adhesion in vivo only.

  18. Time-resolved EPR studies of charge recombination and triplet-state formation within donor-bridge-acceptor molecules having wire-like oligofluorene bridges.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomoaki; Carmieli, Raanan; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2010-05-13

    Spin-selective charge recombination of photogenerated radical ion pairs within a series of donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) molecules, where D = phenothiazine (PTZ), B = oligo(2,7-fluorenyl), and A = perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI), PTZ-FL(n)-PDI, where n = 1-4 (compounds 1-4), is studied using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) spectroscopy in which the microwave source is either continuous-wave or pulsed. Radical ion pair TREPR spectra are observed for 3 and 4 at 90-294 K, while the neutral triplet state of PDI ((3)*PDI) is observed at 90-294 K for 2-4 and at 90 K for 1. (3)*PDI is produced by three mechanisms, as elucidated by its zero-field splitting parameters and spin polarization pattern. The mechanisms are spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing (SO-ISC) in PDI aggregates, direct spin-orbit charge-transfer intersystem crossing (SOCT) from the singlet radical pair within 1, and radical pair intersystem crossing (RP-ISC) as a result of S-T(0) mixing of the radical ion pair states in 2-4. The temperature dependence of the spin-spin exchange interaction (2J) shows a dramatic decrease at low temperatures, indicating that the electronic coupling between the radical ions decreases due to an increase in the average fluorene-fluorene dihedral angle at low temperatures. The charge recombination rates for 3 and 4 decrease at low temperature, but that for 2 is almost temperature-independent. These results strongly suggest that the dominant mechanism of charge recombination for n >or= 3 is incoherent thermal hopping, which results in wire-like charge transfer.

  19. The formation of diethyl ether via the reaction of iodoethane with atomic oxygen on the Ag(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. Scott; Barteau, Mark A.; Vohs, John M.

    1999-01-01

    The reactions of iodoethane (ICH 2CH 3) on clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces were investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Iodoethane adsorbs dissociatively at 150 K to produce surface ethyl groups on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces. The ethyl species couple to form butane on both surfaces, with the desorption peak maximum located between 218 and 238 K, depending on the ethyl coverage. In addition to butane, a number of oxidation products including diethyl ether, ethanol, acetaldehyde, surface acetate, ethylene, carbon dioxide and water were formed on the oxygen-dosed Ag(110) surface. Diethyl ether was the major oxygenate produced at all ethyl:oxygen ratios, and the peak temperature for ether evolution varied from 220 to 266 K depending on the relative coverages of these reactants. The total combustion products, CO 2 and H 2O, were primarily formed at low ethyl coverages in the presence of excess oxygen. The formation of ethylene near 240 K probably involves an oxygen-assisted dehydrogenation pathway since ethylene is not formed from ethyl groups on the clean surface. Acetaldehyde and ethanol evolve coincidentally with a peak centered at 270-280 K, and are attributed to the reactions of surface ethoxide species. The surface acetate which decomposes near 620 K is formed from subsequent reactions of acetaldehyde with oxygen atoms. The addition of ethyl to oxygen to form surface ethoxides was verified by HREELS results. The yields of all products exhibited a strong dependence on the relative coverages of ethyl and oxygen.

  20. Pulsed laser photolysis vacuum UV laser-induced fluorescence kinetic study of the reactions of Cl( 2P 3/2) atoms with ethyl formate, n-propyl formate, and n-butyl formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Tomoyuki; Iwasaki, Erika; Matsumi, Yutaka; Xing, Jia-Hua; Takahashi, Kenshi; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2008-12-01

    Cl( 2P 3/2) atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl 2 at 351 nm in the presence of alkyl formates and monitored by LIF spectroscopy at 134.72 nm. Rate coefficients of k(Cl + C 2H 5OC(O)H) = (9.5 ± 0.3)×10 -12, k(Cl + n-C 3H 7OC(O)H) = (4.5 ± 0.3) × 10 -11 and k(Cl + n-C 4H 9OC(O)H) = (1.2 ± 0.1) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 were determined at 295 ± 2 K in 6-7 Torr of Ar diluent. These values are 15-30% lower than reported in a previous pulsed laser photolysis resonance fluorescence study. The discrepancy may reflect complications arising from the fact that the time scales for chlorine atom loss and regeneration were not sufficiently decoupled in the previous study.

  1. Radiation from mixed multi-planar wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Shrestha, I.; Keim, S. F.; Stafford, A.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Apruzese, J. P.; Ouart, N. D.; Giuliani, J. L.

    2014-03-15

    The study of radiation from different wire materials in wire array Z-pinch plasma is a very challenging topic because it is almost impossible to separate different plasmas at the stagnation. A new approach is suggested based on planar wire array (PWA) loads to assess this problem. Multi-planar wire arrays are implemented that consist of few planes, each with the same number of wires and masses but from different wire materials, arranged in parallel rows. In particular, the experimental results obtained with triple PWAs (TPWAs) on the UNR Zebra generator are analyzed with Wire Ablation Dynamics Model, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium kinetic model, and 2D radiation magneto-hydrodynamic to illustrate this new approach. In TPWAs, two wire planes were from mid-atomic-number wire material and another plane was from alloyed Al, placed either in the middle or at the edge of the TPWA. Spatial and temporal properties of K-shell Al and L-shell Cu radiations were analyzed and compared from these two configurations of TPWAs. Advantages of the new approach are demonstrated and future work is discussed.

  2. Nanosecond electrical explosion of bare and dielectric coated tungsten wire in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun

    2017-02-01

    Experiments of the electrical explosion of tungsten wire with and without insulating coatings demonstrate that the insulating coatings exert a significant influence on the exploding characteristics. The shadowgraphy and interferometry diagnostics are applied to present the morphology of the exploding products. In the experiments, energy of ˜3.2 eV/atom is deposited into the bare tungsten wire at the instant of voltage breakdown, giving a velocity of 0.38 km/s for the high density core. The value and structure of the energy deposition for the tungsten wire explosions are substantially improved by employing the thin dielectric coatings. Energy of ˜15.2 eV/atom is deposited into the coated tungsten wire transforming the wire into gaseous state and the expanding velocity of the high density core is 5.64 km/s. The interference phase shift and atomic density are reconstructed from the interferogram for the exploding coated tungsten wire.

  3. Seeded perturbations in wire array Z-Pinches.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Allen Conrad; Fedin, Dmitry; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Wunsch, Scott Edward; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Ouart, Nicholas D.; LePell, Paul David; Safronova, Alla S.; Shrestha, I.; McKenney, John Lee; Ampleford, David J.; Rapley, J.; Bott, S. C.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Sotnikov, Vladimir Isaakovich; Bland, Simon Nicholas; Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Jones, B.; Garasi, Christopher Joseph; Hall, Gareth Neville; Yilmaz, M. Faith; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Deeney, Christopher; Pokala, S.; Nalajala, V.

    2005-07-01

    Controlled seeding of perturbations is employed to study the evolution of wire array z-pinch implosion instabilities which strongly impact x-ray production when the 3D plasma stagnates on axis. Wires modulated in radius exhibit locally enhanced magnetic field and imploding bubble formation at discontinuities in wire radius due to the perturbed current path. Wires coated with localized spectroscopic dopants are used to track turbulent material flow. Experiments and MHD modeling offer insight into the behavior of z-pinch instabilities.

  4. [Fracture healing under intramedullary insertion of wires with hydroxyapatite coating].

    PubMed

    Ir'ianov, Iu M; Kir'ianov, N A; Popkov, A V

    2014-01-01

    To study morphological features of the bone formation process in consolidation of fractures of long tubular bones in conditions of intramedullary wires insertion with bioactive calcium-phosphate coating of hydroxyapatite. In experimental study in dogs was simulated open comminuted tibia fracture and performed intramedullary insertion of wires with hydroxyapatite coating. Using light and electron microscopy, using X-ray electron microprobe microanalyses were studied bone regenerates in 14-360 days after surgery. It was found that around wires there is a formation of an area of active reparative bone formation and angiogenesis, bone shaped case with the properties of the conductor and inducer of osteogenesis. Fracture consolidation is carried out in the early stages of the primary type without formation of cartilage and connective tissue in the bone adhesion. Study results testify that intramedullary wires with hydroxyapatite coating positively influence on the process and intensity of reparative bone formation in fracture healing.

  5. Next Generation Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Petro; Jolley, Scott; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Vinje, Rubiela; Williams, Martha; Clayton, LaNetra; Roberson, Luke; Smith, Trent; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    Wiring is a major operational component on aerospace hardware that accounts for substantial weight and volumetric space. Over time wire insulation can age and fail, often leading to catastrophic events such as system failure or fire. The next generation of wiring must be reliable and sustainable over long periods of time. These features will be achieved by the development of a wire insulation capable of autonomous self-healing that mitigates failure before it reaches a catastrophic level. In order to develop a self-healing insulation material, three steps must occur. First, methods of bonding similar materials must be developed that are capable of being initiated autonomously. This process will lead to the development of a manual repair system for polyimide wire insulation. Second, ways to initiate these bonding methods that lead to materials that are similar to the primary insulation must be developed. Finally, steps one and two must be integrated to produce a material that has no residues from the process that degrades the insulating properties of the final repaired insulation. The self-healing technology, teamed with the ability to identify and locate damage, will greatly improve reliability and safety of electrical wiring of critical systems. This paper will address these topics, discuss the results of preliminary testing, and remaining development issues related to self-healing wire insulation.

  6. Applications of surface analysis in the wire industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, David A.

    The quality of wire is judged not only by its physical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue resistance, but also by its surface finish. The surface roughness, oxide formation, cleanliness, and plating homogeneity and porosity are just a few of the surface properties than can influence the performance of a wire product. Coupled to this is the large amount of surface area generated in drawing wire. For example, a ten pound spool holds nine miles of 0.006″ diameter stainless steel wire. For these reasons surface analysis has become important both to the manufacturer and consumer of wire products. When surface analysis equipment such as AES, ESCA, and SIMS was first becoming commercially available in the late sixties and early seventies, the wire industry was beginning to enter a phase of technological development for many of its products. Wire manufacturers and users began using surface analysis to investigate such topics as adhesion of brass plated automobile tire cord to rubber and diffusion of layered deposits. Examples of surface analysis used for process control, problem solving, and project development include discoloration problems on stainless steel wire, welding problems with composite wires, diffusion formed brass coatings, and diffusion problems with solder coated and Cu plated steel wire.

  7. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  8. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  9. Dynamics of vapor emissions at wire explosion threshold.

    PubMed

    Belony, Paul A; Kim, Yong W

    2010-10-01

    X-pinch plasmas have been actively studied in the recent years. Numerical simulation of the ramp-up of metallic vapor emissions from wire specimens shows that under impulsive Ohmic heating the wire core invariably reaches a supercritical state before explosion. The heating rate depends sensitively on the local wire resistance, leading to highly variable vapor emission flux along the wire. To examine the vapor emission process, we have visualized nickel wire explosions by means of shock formation in air. In a single explosion as captured by shadowgraphy, there usually appear several shocks with spherical or cylindrical wave front originating from different parts of the wire. Growth of various shock fronts in time is well characterized by a power-law scaling in one form or another. Continuum emission spectra are obtained and calibrated to measure temperature near the explosion threshold. Shock front structures and vapor plume temperature are examined.

  10. Orbiter Kapton wire operational requirements and experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The agenda of this presentation includes the Orbiter wire selection requirements, the Orbiter wire usage, fabrication and test requirements, typical wiring installations, Kapton wire experience, NASA Kapton wire testing, summary, and backup data.

  11. Orbiter Kapton wire operational requirements and experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. V.

    1994-09-01

    The agenda of this presentation includes the Orbiter wire selection requirements, the Orbiter wire usage, fabrication and test requirements, typical wiring installations, Kapton wire experience, NASA Kapton wire testing, summary, and backup data.

  12. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce3+ upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce(3+), while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  13. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce3+ upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-01

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce3+, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  14. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce{sup 3+} upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce{sup 3+}, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  15. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-Dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Ooutskirts of Star-Forming Galaxies From z approx. 1 to z approx. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR)efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in damped Ly(alpha) systems (DLAs) at z approx. 3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS)relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z approx. 1, z approx. 2, and z approx. 3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of H I gas at z > 1 is approx. 1%-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift. Our analysis instead suggests that the reduced SFR efficiency is driven by the low molecular content of this atomic-dominated phase, with metallicity playing a secondary effect in regulating the conversion between atomic and molecular gas. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between the observed SFR efficiency and that observed in local atomic-dominated gas, such as in the outskirts of local spiral galaxies and local dwarf galaxies.

  16. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-Dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Ooutskirts of Star-Forming Galaxies From z approx. 1 to z approx. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR)efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in damped Ly(alpha) systems (DLAs) at z approx. 3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS)relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z approx. 1, z approx. 2, and z approx. 3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of H I gas at z > 1 is approx. 1%-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift. Our analysis instead suggests that the reduced SFR efficiency is driven by the low molecular content of this atomic-dominated phase, with metallicity playing a secondary effect in regulating the conversion between atomic and molecular gas. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between the observed SFR efficiency and that observed in local atomic-dominated gas, such as in the outskirts of local spiral galaxies and local dwarf galaxies.

  17. Development of the Axial Instability in Low Wire Number Wire Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Bell, K. S.; Blesener, I. C.; Chalenski, D. A.; Greenly, J. B.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2008-11-01

    We are investigating the development of the axial instability that occurs on wires in wire-array Z-pinches, which manifests itself as a modulation of the size of the coronal plasma. The modulation is evidently a result of non-uniform ablation of material from the wire core. It is known that the wavelength of this modulation reaches a constant as the pinch develops that is a strong function of the material and little else, thus it is known as the fundamental mode. In these experiments we have been imaging individual wires with laser shadowgraphy primarily in low wire number, large wire diameter arrays made with Al, Cu, Ag and other wires. We document the development of this modulation from the beginning of plasma formation and show the wavelength and amplitude growth as a function of time. The magnetic field is also measured using B-dot probes inside the array. The change from a closed to an open field topology and its relation to the instability growth will be discussed.This research was supported by the Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances program of the National Nuclear Security Administration under DOE Cooperative agreement DE-FC03-02NA00057 and by Sandia National Laboratories contract AO258.

  18. Formation and atomic configuration of binary metallic glasses studied by ion beam mixing and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-06-15

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Ag-Nb system with overall composition ranging from 25 to 90 at. % of Nb by ion beam mixing. Interestingly, the diffraction analysis shows that the formed Nb-rich metallic glass features are two distinct atomic configurations. In atomistic modeling, an n-body Ag-Nb potential is derived, under the assistance of ab initio calculation, and then applied in molecular dynamics simulations. An atomic configuration is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, and as well as an icosahedral ordering observed in the Ag-Nb metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems. Simulations confirm that the two dominate local atomic packing units are formed through a structural phase transition from the Nb-based bcc and fcc solid solutions, respectively, suggesting a concept of structural heredity that the crystalline structure of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the resultant metallic glasses.

  19. Quantum yield of chlorine-atom formation in the photodissociation of chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) at 308 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M. J.; Colussi, A. J.; Molina, L. T.; Schindler, R. N.; Tso, T.-L.

    1990-01-01

    The production of Cl atoms in the laser flash photolysis of ClOOCl at 308 nm has been investigated by time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence at 235 K. A value of phi = 1.03 +/-0.12 has been obtained for the primary quantum yield based on an absorption cross section ratio sigma(245)/phi(308) = 22 for ClOOCl at 245 and 308 nm.

  20. Quantum yield of chlorine-atom formation in the photodissociation of chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) at 308 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M. J.; Colussi, A. J.; Molina, L. T.; Schindler, R. N.; Tso, T.-L.

    1990-01-01

    The production of Cl atoms in the laser flash photolysis of ClOOCl at 308 nm has been investigated by time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence at 235 K. A value of phi = 1.03 +/-0.12 has been obtained for the primary quantum yield based on an absorption cross section ratio sigma(245)/phi(308) = 22 for ClOOCl at 245 and 308 nm.

  1. Superconducting wire manufactured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuexian; Sun, Yue; Xu, Shiming; Peng, Ying

    1985-10-01

    The MF Nb/Cu Extrusion Tube Method was used to manufacture 3 kg of stable practical MF Nb2Sn composite superconducting wire containing pure Cu(RRR approx. 200)/Ta. The draw state composite wire diameter was 0.56 mm, it contained 11,448 x 2.6 micron Nb core, and the twist distance was 1.5 cm. The composite wire cross-section was pure Cu/Ta/11,448 Nb core/Cu/ 91Sn-Cu; containing 22.8 v. % pure Cu, 13.3 v. % Ta; within the Ta layer to prevent Sn diffusion. The wire was sheathed in nonalkaline glass fiber as an insulating layer. A section of wire weighing 160 g was cut off and coiled it into a small solenoid. After reaction diffusion processing at 675 C/30 and curing by vacuum dipping in paraffin, it was measured in a Nb-Ti backfield of 7.2 T intensity, a current of 129 A was passed through the Nb3Sn solenoid and produced a strength of 2.5 T, the overall magnetic field intensity of the composite magnet reached 9.7 T. At this time, the wire full current density J sub c.w. = 5.2 x 10 to the 4th power A/sq cm; the effective current density J sub c (Nb + Sn - Cu) = 8.2 x 10 to the 4th power A/sq cm.

  2. Cavitation during wire brushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen

    2016-11-01

    In our daily life, brush is often used to scrub the surface of objects, for example, teeth, pots, shoes, pool, etc. And cleaning rust and stripping paint are accomplished using wire brush. Wire brushes also can be used to clean the teeth for large animals, such as horses, crocodiles. By observing brushing process in water, we capture the cavitation phenomenon on the track of moving brush wire. It shows that the cavitation also can affect the surface. In order to take clear and entire pictures of cavity, a simplified model of one stainless steel wire brushing a boss is adopted in our experiment. A transparent organic tank filled with deionized water is used as a view box. And a high speed video camera is used to record the sequences. In experiment, ambient pressure is atmospheric pressure and deionized water temperature is kept at home temperature. An obvious beautiful flabellate cavity zone appears behind the moving steel wire. The fluctuation of pressure near cavity is recorded by a hydrophone. More movies and pictures are used to show the behaviors of cavitation bubble following a restoring wire. Beautiful tracking cavitation bubble cluster is captured and recorded to show.

  3. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  4. Coupled spatial multimode solitons in microcavity wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavcheva, G.; Gorbach, A. V.; Pimenov, A.

    2016-12-01

    A modal expansion approach is developed and employed to investigate and elucidate the nonlinear mechanism behind the multistability and formation of coupled multimode polariton solitons in microcavity wires. With pump switched on and realistic dissipation parameters, truncating the expansion up to the second-order wire mode, our model predicts two distinct coupled soliton branches: stable and unstable. Modulational stability of the stationary homogeneous solution and soliton branches stability are studied. Our simplified 1D model is in remarkably good agreement with the full 2D mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii model, reproducing correctly the soliton existence domain upon variation of pump amplitude and the onset of multistability.

  5. Heat treatment effect on the mechanical properties of industrial drawn copper wires

    SciTech Connect

    Beribeche, Abdellatif Boumerzoug, Zakaria; Ji, Vincent

    2013-12-16

    In this present investigation, the mechanical properties of industrial drawn copper wires have been studied by tensile tests. The effect of prior heat treatments at 500°C on the drawn wires behavior was the main goal of this investigation. We have found that the mechanical behavior of drawn wires depends strongly on those treatments. SEM observations of the wire cross section after tensile tests have shown that the mechanism of rupture was mainly controlled by the void formation.

  6. Wire chambers revisited.

    PubMed

    Ott, R J

    1993-04-01

    Detectors used for radioisotope imaging have, historically, been based on scintillating crystal/photomultiplier combinations in various forms. From the rectilinear scanner through to modern gamma cameras and positron cameras, the basic technology has remained much the same. Efforts to overcome the limitations of this form of technology have foundered on the inability to reproduce the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and sensitive area at acceptable cost. Multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) have long been used as position-sensitive charged particle detectors in nuclear and high-energy physics. MWPCs are large-area gas-filled ionisation chambers in which large arrays of fine wires are used to measure the position of ionisation produced in the gas by the passage of charged particles. The important properties of MWPCs are high-spatial-resolution, large-area, high-count-rate performance at low cost. For research applications, detectors several metres square have been built and small-area detectors have a charged particle resolution of 0.4 mm at a count rate of several million per second. Modification is required to MWPCs for nuclear medicine imaging. As gamma rays or X-rays cannot be detected directly, they must be converted into photo- or Compton scatter electrons. Photon-electron conversion requires the use of high atomic number materials in the body of the chamber. Pressurised xenon is the most useful form of "gas only" photon-electron convertor and has been used successfully in a gamma camera for the detection of gamma rays at energies below 100 keV. This camera has been developed specifically for high-count-rate first-pass cardiac imaging. This high-pressure xenon gas MWPC is the key to a highly competitive system which can outperform scintillator-based systems. The count rate performance is close to a million counts per second and the intrinsic spatial resolution is better than the best scintillator-based camera. The MWPC camera produces quantitative

  7. Dynamics of charge carriers at the place of the formation of a muonic atom in diamond and silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. A.; Belousov, Yu. M.; Solov'ev, V. R.

    2012-11-15

    The space-time distribution of charge carriers at the place of the location of a muonic atom formed when a negative muon is captured by an atom of the lattice has been numerically simulated taking into account the self-consistent electric field. The results of {mu}SR experiments with negative muons in diamond crystals have been explained and reasons for the difference in the behavior of the spin polarization of the negative muon in boron-doped diamond and in silicon have been revealed. The condition of the validity of the analytical solution of this problem has been obtained. It has been shown that the muonic atom in diamond, in contrast to silicon, does not form a neutral acceptor center in the paramagnetic state during the muon experiment and remains in the diamagnetic state of a positive ion.

  8. Metallurgical investigation of wire breakage of tyre bead grade

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Piyas; Das, Souvik; Mathur, Jitendra

    2015-01-01

    Tyre bead grade wire is used for tyre making application. The wire is used as reinforcement inside the polymer of tyre. The wire is available in different size/section such as 1.6–0.80 mm thin Cu coated wire. During tyre making operation at tyre manufacturer company, wire failed frequently. In this present study, different broken/defective wire samples were collected from wire mill for detailed investigation of the defect. The natures of the defects were localized and similar in nature. The fracture surface was of finger nail type. Crow feet like defects including button like surface abnormalities were also observed on the broken wire samples. The defect was studied at different directions under microscope. Different advanced metallographic techniques have been used for detail investigation. The analysis revealed that, white layer of surface martensite was formed and it caused the final breakage of wire. In this present study we have also discussed about the possible reason for the formation of such kind of surface martensite (hard-phase). PMID:26973808

  9. Hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from tertiary amines by benzyloxyl and cumyloxyl radicals: influence of structure on the rate-determining formation of a hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-08-05

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from a series of tertiary amines by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. With the sterically hindered triisobutylamine, comparable hydrogen atom abstraction rate constants (k(H)) were measured for the two radicals (k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) = 2.8), and the reactions were described as direct hydrogen atom abstractions. With the other amines, increases in k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios of 13 to 2027 times were observed. k(H) approaches the diffusion limit in the reactions between BnO(•) and unhindered cyclic and bicyiclic amines, whereas a decrease in reactivity is observed with acyclic amines and with the hindered cyclic amine 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethylpiperidine. These results provide additional support to our hypothesis that the reaction proceeds through the rate-determining formation of a C-H/N hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex between the benzyloxyl α-C-H and the nitrogen lone pair wherein hydrogen atom abstraction occurs, and demonstrate the important role of amine structure on the overall reaction mechanism. Additional mechanistic information in support of this picture is obtained from the study of the reactions of the amines with a deuterated benzyloxyl radical (PhCD(2)O(•), BnO(•)-d(2)) and the 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyloxyl radical.

  10. Atom chips on direct bonded copper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, Matthew B.; Stickney, James A.; Carlson, Evan J.; Baker, Paul M.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Wentzell, Sandra; Miller, Steven M.

    2011-02-15

    We present the use of direct bonded copper (DBC) for the straightforward fabrication of high power atom chips. Atom chips using DBC have several benefits: excellent copper/substrate adhesion, high purity, thick (>100 {mu}m) copper layers, high substrate thermal conductivity, high aspect ratio wires, the potential for rapid (<8 h) fabrication, and three-dimensional atom chip structures. Two mask options for DBC atom chip fabrication are presented, as well as two methods for etching wire patterns into the copper layer. A test chip, able to support 100 A of current for 2 s without failing, is used to determine the thermal impedance of the DBC. An assembly using two DBC atom chips is used to magnetically trap laser cooled {sup 87}Rb atoms. The wire aspect ratio that optimizes the magnetic field gradient as a function of power dissipation is determined to be 0.84:1 (height:width).

  11. Metastable phase formation during α2(D019) to γ(L10) transformation in as-atomized γ-TiAl alloy powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadge, M.; Gouma, P. I.

    2004-11-01

    α2(D019) to γ(L10) transformation during heating of as-atomized γ-TiAl powder was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffraction. The as-atomized coarse powder particles (γ-TiAl powder: Ti -45Al-2Nb-0.7Mo-0.1W-2Cr-0.27O-0.2Si) with large amounts of retained α2 are a perfect candidate to investigate this transformation. It was observed that α2 to γ transformation is a two-step process involving the formation of a disordered face-centered-cubic γ 'TiAl [with a (γ')=c(γ)] as an intermediate phase followed by ordering.

  12. The aging of tungsten filaments and its effect on wire surface kinetics in hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason K.; Swiatek, Maribeth; Goodwin, David G.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2002-10-01

    Wire-desorbed radicals present during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition growth have been measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry. New wires produce Si as the predominant radical for temperatures above 1500 K, with a minor contribution from SiH3, consistent with previous measurements; the activation energy for the SiH3 signal suggests its formation is catalyzed. Aged wires also produce Si as the predominant radical (above 2100 K), but show profoundly different radical desorption kinetics. In particular, the Si signal exhibits a high temperature activation energy consistent with evaporation from liquid silicon. The relative abundance of the other SiHx species suggests that heterogeneous pyrolysis of SiH4 on the wire may be occurring to some extent. Chemical analysis of aged wires by Auger electron spectroscopy suggests that the aging process is related to the formation of a silicide at the surface, with silicon surface concentrations as high as 15 at. %. A limited amount (2 at. %) of silicon is observed in the interior as well, suggesting that diffusion into the wire occurs. Calculation of the relative rates for the various wire kinetic processes, coupled with experimental observations, reveals that silicon diffusion through the silicide is the slowest process, followed by Si evaporation, with SiH4 decomposition being the fastest.

  13. Wire brush fastening device

    SciTech Connect

    Meigs, R.A.

    1993-08-31

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  14. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, R.A.

    1995-09-19

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

  15. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  16. 2. TYPICAL OVERHEAD WIRE CONSTRUCTION CURVE GUY WIRE ARRANGEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. TYPICAL OVERHEAD WIRE CONSTRUCTION - CURVE GUY WIRE ARRANGEMENT (ABANDONED WEST LEG OF WYE AT SIXTH AVENUE AND PINE STREET) - Yakima Valley Transportation Company Interurban Railroad, Trackage, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  17. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Atomic force microscopy of a ctpA mutant in Rhizobium leguminosarum reveals surface defects linking CtpA function to biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Signo, Karla S L; Vanderlinde, Elizabeth M; Yost, Christopher K; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2011-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the surface ultrastructure, adhesive properties and biofilm formation of Rhizobium leguminosarum and a ctpA mutant strain. The surface ultrastructure of wild-type R. leguminosarum consists of tightly packed surface subunits, whereas the ctpA mutant has much larger subunits with loose lateral packing. The ctpA mutant strain is not capable of developing fully mature biofilms, consistent with its altered surface ultrastructure, greater roughness and stronger adhesion to hydrophilic surfaces. For both strains, surface roughness and adhesive forces increased as a function of calcium ion concentration, and for each, biofilms were thicker at higher calcium concentrations.

  19. The early stage of formation of self-organized nanocolumns in thin films: Monte Carlo simulations versus atomic-scale observations in Ge-Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Mouton, I.; Talbot, E. Pareige, C.; Lardé, R.; Blavette, D.

    2014-02-07

    Formation kinetics of self-organized nanocolumns during epitaxial growth of a thin film composed of immiscible elements (A,B) has been investigated using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Simulated nanostructures show a good agreement with those observed in Ge-Mn using Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Self organisation is observed although the rigid lattice simulations used do not account for misfit elastic strain. Simulations reveal that the final nanostructure, in term of number density and diameter of nanocolumns, is controlled by the early stages of growth of the film. The influence of both growth temperature and solute concentration on the nanostructure features is discussed in details.

  20. Exposure of Pt(5 5 3) and Rh(1 1 1) to atomic and molecular oxygen: do defects enhance subsurface oxygen formation?

    PubMed

    Farber, Rachael G; Turano, Marie E; Oskorep, Eleanor C N; Wands, Noelle T; Juurlink, Ludo B F; Killelea, Daniel R

    2017-04-26

    Subsurface oxygen is known to form in transition metals, and is thought to be an important aspect of their ability to catalyze chemical reactions. The formation of subsurface oxygen is not, however, equivalent across all catalytically relevant metals. As a result, it is difficult to predict the stability and ease of the formation of subsurface oxygen in metals, as well as how the absorbed oxygen affects the chemical and physical properties of the metal. In comparing how a stepped platinum surface, Pt(5 5 3), responds to exposure to gas-phase oxygen atoms under ultra-high vacuum conditions to planar Rh(1 1 1), we are able to determine what role, if any, steps have on the capacity of a metal for subsurface oxygen formation. Despite the presence of regular defects, we found that only surface-bound oxygen formed on Pt(5 5 3). Alternatively, on the Rh(1 1 1) surface, oxygen readily absorbed into the selvedge of the metal. These results suggest that defects alone are insufficient for the formation of subsurface oxygen, and the ability of the metal to absorb oxygen is the primary factor in the formation and stabilization of subsurface oxygen.

  1. Exposure of Pt(5 5 3) and Rh(1 1 1) to atomic and molecular oxygen: do defects enhance subsurface oxygen formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Rachael G.; Turano, Marie E.; Oskorep, Eleanor C. N.; Wands, Noelle T.; Juurlink, Ludo B. F.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2017-04-01

    Subsurface oxygen is known to form in transition metals, and is thought to be an important aspect of their ability to catalyze chemical reactions. The formation of subsurface oxygen is not, however, equivalent across all catalytically relevant metals. As a result, it is difficult to predict the stability and ease of the formation of subsurface oxygen in metals, as well as how the absorbed oxygen affects the chemical and physical properties of the metal. In comparing how a stepped platinum surface, Pt(5 5 3), responds to exposure to gas-phase oxygen atoms under ultra-high vacuum conditions to planar Rh(1 1 1), we are able to determine what role, if any, steps have on the capacity of a metal for subsurface oxygen formation. Despite the presence of regular defects, we found that only surface-bound oxygen formed on Pt(5 5 3). Alternatively, on the Rh(1 1 1) surface, oxygen readily absorbed into the selvedge of the metal. These results suggest that defects alone are insufficient for the formation of subsurface oxygen, and the ability of the metal to absorb oxygen is the primary factor in the formation and stabilization of subsurface oxygen.

  2. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase.

  3. Low-temperature surface formation of NH3 and HNCO: hydrogenation of nitrogen atoms in CO-rich interstellar ice analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Zhao, D.; Lamberts, T.; Linnartz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state astrochemical reaction pathways have the potential to link the formation of small nitrogen-bearing species, like NH3 and HNCO, and prebiotic molecules, specifically amino acids. To date, the chemical origin of such small nitrogen-containing species is still not well understood, despite the fact that ammonia is an abundant constituent of interstellar ices towards young stellar objects and quiescent molecular clouds. This is mainly because of the lack of dedicated laboratory studies. The aim of this work is to experimentally investigate the formation routes of NH3 and HNCO through non-energetic surface reactions in interstellar ice analogues under fully controlled laboratory conditions and at astrochemically relevant temperatures. This study focuses on the formation of NH3 and HNCO in CO-rich (non-polar) interstellar ices that simulate the CO freeze-out stage in dark interstellar cloud regions, well before thermal and energetic processing start to become relevant. We demonstrate and discuss the surface formation of solid HNCO through the interaction of CO molecules with NH radicals - one of the intermediates in the formation of solid NH3 upon sequential hydrogenation of N atoms. The importance of HNCO for astrobiology is discussed.

  4. From single atoms to self-assembled quantum single-atomic nanowires: noble metal atoms on black phosphorene monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X J; Shan, Wen-Wen; He, Hao; Xue, Xinlian; Guo, Z X; Li, S F

    2017-03-15

    Transition metal (TM) nanostructures, such as one dimensional (1D) nanowires with/without substrates, usually possess drastically different properties from their bulk counterparts, due to their distinct stacking and electronic confinement. Correspondingly, it is of great importance to establish the dominant driving force in forming 1D single-metal-atom-wires (SMAWs). Here, with first-principles calculations, taking the black phosphorene (BP) monolayer as a prototype 2D substrate, we investigate the energetic and kinetic properties of all the 5d-TM atoms on the 2D substrate to reveal the mechanism of formation of SMAWs. In contrast to other 5d- and 4d-TMs, noble metal elements Pd and Pt are found to prefer to grow along the trough in an atom-by-atom manner, self-assembling into SMAWs with a significant magic growth behavior. This is due to distinct binding energies and diffusion barriers along the trough, i.e., zig-zag direction, as compared to other directions of the BP. The present findings are valuable in the fabrication and modulation of 1D nanostructures which can be anticipated to possess desirable functionalities for potential applications such as in nanocatalysis, nanosensors, and related areas.

  5. Wiring for space applications program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad

    1994-01-01

    The insulation testing and analysis consists of: identifying and prioritizing NASA wiring requirements; selecting candidate wiring constructions; developing test matrix and formulating test program; managing, coordinating, and conducting tests; and analyzing and documenting data, establishing guidelines and recommendations.

  6. One hundred angstrom niobium wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, H. E.; Rose, R. M.; Wulff, J.

    1968-01-01

    Composite of fine niobium wires in copper is used to study the size and proximity effects of a superconductor in a normal matrix. The niobium rod was drawn to a 100 angstrom diameter wire on a copper tubing.

  7. Easily-wired toggle switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. T.; Stringer, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Crimp-type connectors reduce assembly and disassembly time. With design, no switch preparation is necessary and socket contracts are crimped to wires inserted in module attached to back of toggle switch engaging pins inside module to make electrical connections. Wires are easily removed with standard detachment tool. Design can accommodate wires of any gage and as many terminals can be placed on switch as wire gage and switch dimensions will allow.

  8. Numerical model for electrical explosion of copper wires in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Lee, Kern; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, Deok-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a simple but quite accurate numerical model for analyzing electrical explosion of copper wires in water. The numerical model solves a circuit equation coupled with one-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equations with the help of appropriate wide-range equation of state (EOS) and electrical conductivity for copper. The MHD equations are formulated in a Lagrangian form to identify the interface between the wire and surrounding water clearly. A quotidian EOS (QEOS) that is known as the simplest form of EOS is utilized to build wide-range EOS for copper. In the QEOS, we consider the liquid-vapor phase transition, which is critical in analyzing the wire explosion system. For the electrical conductivity of copper, a semi-empirical set of equations covering from solid state to partially ionized plasma state are employed. Experimental validation has been performed with copper wires of various diameters, which are exploded by a microsecond timescale pulsed capacitive discharge. The simulation results show excellent agreements with the experimental results in terms of temporal motions of a plasma channel boundary and a shock front as well as current and voltage waveforms. It is found that the wire explodes (vaporizes) along the liquid branch of a binodal curve irrespective of wire dimension and operating voltage. After the explosion, the wire becomes a plasma state right away or after the current pause (dwell), depending on the operating conditions. It is worth noting that such a peculiar characteristic of wire explosion, i.e., current pause and restrike, is well simulated with the present numerical model. In particular, it is shown that the wire cools down along the vapor branch of the binodal curve during the current dwell, due to a significant difference of thermodynamic characteristics across the binodal curve. The influence of radiation for studying nonideal plasmas with a wire explosion technique and a physical process for shock wave formation

  9. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  10. Impurity and silicate formation dependence on O3 pulse time and the growth temperature in atomic-layer-deposited La2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Tae Joo; Byun, Young-Chul; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Jiyoung

    2017-02-01

    Atomic-layer-deposited La2O3 films were grown on Si with different O3 pulse times and growth temperatures. The interfacial reactions and impurity behaviors were observed using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Longer pulse time of O3 formed the solid SiO2 interfacial barrier layer, which suppressed La-silicate formation. Meanwhile, the carboxyl compound acting as an impurity phase was replaced with LaCO3 on increasing the O3 pulse time due to further oxidation and reaction of La. Higher growth temperatures enhanced La-silicate formation by mixed diffusion of Si and La2O3, during which most of the La2O3 phase was consumed at 400 °C. C and N impurities decreased with increasing growth temperature and completely disappear at 400 °C.

  11. SCALING UNDERWATER EXPLODING WIRES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    heat of detonation of TNT in calories per gram. This scaling behavior extends the law of similarity six decades in terms of weight, from pounds to micropounds. The peak pressure for exploding-wire phenomena has been obtained from data and is emprically expressed as pm = 26,800 (cube root of W/R) to

  12. Hopkins installs wire harnesses

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-24

    ISS038-E-008291 (24 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, installs wire harnesses in the International Space Station?s Harmony node to support the installation of Ethernet video cables for the station?s local area network. These new cables will provide Ethernet connectivity to the visiting vehicles that dock to Harmony?s Earth-facing port.

  13. Gaseous wire detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article represents a series of three lectures describing topics needed to understand the design of typical gaseous wire detectors used in large high energy physics experiments; including the electrostatic design, drift of electrons in the electric and magnetic field, the avalanche, signal creation, limits on the position accuracy as well as some problems one encounters in practical operations.

  14. A World without Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    The wireless bandwagon is rolling across Mississippi, picking up a fresh load of converts and turning calamity into opportunity. Traditional wired school networks, many of which unraveled during Hurricane Katrina, are giving way to advanced wireless mesh networks that frequently include voice-over-IP (VoIP) capabilities. Vendor funding is helping…

  15. Residential Wiring. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist teachers conducting a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in the residential wiring trade. Included in the guide are six instructional units and the following sections of information for teachers: guidelines in using the unit components; academic and workplace skills classifications and…

  16. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  17. Debate: Wired versus Wireless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Glenn; Nair, Prakash

    2000-01-01

    Debates the issue of investing in wiring schools for desktop computer networks versus using laptops and wireless networks. Included are cost considerations and the value of technology for learning. Suggestions include using wireless networks for existing schools, hardwiring computers for new construction, and not using computers for elementary…

  18. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  19. Basic Wiring. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist teachers conducting a foundation course to prepare students for additional courses of training for entry-level employment in either the residential or commercial and industrial wiring trades. Included in the guide are 17 instructional units and the following sections of information for teachers: guidelines in using…

  20. Residential Wiring. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark

    This competency-based curriculum guide contains materials for conducting a course in residential wiring. A technically revised edition of the 1978 publication, the guide includes 28 units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of the following basic components: performance objectives, suggested activities for teachers and students,…

  1. One-wire thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Staimach, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Nickel alloy/constantan device accurately measures surface temperature at precise locations. Device is moderate in cost and simplifies fabrication of highly-instrumented seamless-surface heat-transfer models. Device also applies to metal surfaces if constantan wire has insulative coat.

  2. A World without Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    The wireless bandwagon is rolling across Mississippi, picking up a fresh load of converts and turning calamity into opportunity. Traditional wired school networks, many of which unraveled during Hurricane Katrina, are giving way to advanced wireless mesh networks that frequently include voice-over-IP (VoIP) capabilities. Vendor funding is helping…

  3. Reliable Wiring Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    New harness for electrical wiring includes plugs that do not loosen from vibration. Ground braids prevented from detaching from connectors and constrained so braids do not open into swollen "birdcage" sections. Spring of stainless steel encircles ground braid. Self-locking connector contains ratchet not only preventing connector from opening, but tightens when vibrated.

  4. Classification of surface structures on fine metallic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabeu, E.; Sanchez-Brea, L. M.; Siegmann, P.; Martinez-Antón, J. C.; Gomez-Pedrero, J. A.; Wilkening, G.; Koenders, L.; Müller, F.; Hildebrand, M.; Hermann, H.

    2001-08-01

    In this report a classification of the main surface structures found on fine metallic wires is carried out (between ˜20 and 500 μm in diameter). For this, we have analyzed a series of wires of different metallic materials, diameters and production environments by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and confocal microscopy. A description and the images of the structures is given and, in addition, a nomenclature to be used by manufacturers, customers and researches is proposed. With this information the surface quality of fine metallic wires may be improved in a fabrication level. One of the objectives of this catalogue of defects is to serve as a basis for measuring the quality of the surface of the wires during the production process and the development of a measuring device for that purpose.

  5. Computer simulation of metal wire explosion under high rate heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolnikov, K. P.; Kryzhevich, D. S.; Korchuganov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Synchronous electric explosion of metal wires and synthesis of bicomponent nanoparticles were investigated on the base of molecular dynamics method. Copper and nickel nanosized crystallites of cylindrical shape were chosen as conductors for explosion. The embedded atom approximation was used for calculation of the interatomic interactions. The agglomeration process after explosion metal wires was the main mechanism for particle synthesis. The distribution of chemical elements was non-uniform over the cross section of the bicomponent particles. The copper concentration in the surface region was higher than in the bulk of the synthesized particle. By varying the loading parameters (heating temperature, the distance between the wires) one can control the size and internal structure of the synthesized bicomponent nanoparticles. The obtained results showed that the method of molecular dynamics can be effectively used to determine the optimal technological mode of nanoparticle synthesis on the base of electric explosion of metal wires.

  6. Chemical stabilization and improved thermal resilience of molecular arrangements: possible formation of a surface network of bonds by multiple pulse atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    de Pauli, Muriel; Matos, Matheus J S; Siles, Pablo F; Prado, Mariana C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Ferreira, Sukarno O; Mazzoni, Mário S C; Malachias, Angelo

    2014-08-14

    In this work, we make use of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reaction based on trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and water to modify O-H terminated self-assembled layers of octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA). The structural modifications were investigated by X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. We observed a significant improvement in the thermal stability of ALD-modified molecules, with the existence of a supramolecular packing structure up to 500 °C. Following the experimental observations, density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate the possibility of formation of a covalent network with aluminum atoms connecting OPA molecules at terrace surfaces. Chemical stability is also achieved on top of such a composite surface, inhibiting further ALD oxide deposition. On the other hand, in the terrace edges, where the covalent array is discontinued, the chemical conditions allow for oxide growth. Analysis of the DFT results on band structure and density of states of modified OPA molecules suggests that besides the observed thermal resilience, the dielectric character of OPA layers is preserved. This new ALD-modified OPA composite is potentially suitable for applications such as dielectric layers in organic devices, where better thermal performance is required.

  7. Very strong Rydberg atom scattering in K(12p)-CH3NO2 collisions: Role of transient ion pair formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M.; Buathong, S.; Dunning, F. B.

    2017-05-01

    Collisions between K(12p) Rydberg atoms and CH3NO2 target molecules are studied. Whereas CH3NO2 can form long-lived valence-bound CH3NO2-ions, the data provide no evidence for production of long-lived K+⋯ CH3NO2 - ion pair states. Rather, the data show that collisions result in unusually strong Rydberg atom scattering. This behavior is attributed to ion-ion scattering resulting from formation of transient ion pair states through transitions between the covalent K(12p) + CH3NO2 and ionic K+ + (dipole bound) CH3NO2-terms in the quasimolecule formed during collisions. The ion-pair states are destroyed through rapid dissociation of the CH3NO2 - ions induced by the field of the K+ core ion, the detached electron remaining bound to the K+ ion in a Rydberg state. Analysis of the experimental data shows that ion pair lifetimes ≳10 ps are sufficient to account for the present observations. The present results are consistent with recent theoretical predictions that Rydberg collisions with CH3NO2 will result in strong collisional quenching. The work highlights a new mechanism for Rydberg atom scattering that could be important for collisions with other polar targets. For purposes of comparison, results obtained following K(12p)-SF6 collisions are also included.

  8. Extending wire rope service life

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Selecting the proper wire rope is not a simple procedure. Wire rope is a precision mining machine with scores of moving parts. It is therefore important for mining equipment users to know wire rope and how it is designed and constructed. Good lubrication and regular inspection is important for a safe and long service life.

  9. 1997 wire development workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This conference is divided into the following sections: (1) First Generation Wires I; (2) First Generation Wires II; (3) Coated conductors I; and (4) Coated conductors II. Applications of the superconducting wires include fault current limiters, superconducting motors, transformers, and power transmission lines.

  10. Parametric Study of Amorphous High-Entropy Alloys formation from two New Perspectives: Atomic Radius Modification and Crystalline Structure of Alloying Elements

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Q.; Guo, S.; Wang, J.M.; Yan, Y.H.; Chen, S.S.; Lu, D.P.; Liu, K.M.; Zou, J.Z.; Zeng, X.R.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical and topological parameters have been widely used for predicting the phase selection in high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Nevertheless, previous studies could be faulted due to the small number of available data points, the negligence of kinetic effects, and the insensitivity to small compositional changes. Here in this work, 92 TiZrHfM, TiZrHfMM, TiZrHfMMM (M = Fe, Cr, V, Nb, Al, Ag, Cu, Ni) HEAs were prepared by melt spinning, to build a reliable and sufficiently large material database to inspect the robustness of previously established parameters. Modification of atomic radii by considering the change of local electronic environment in alloys, was critically found out to be superior in distinguishing the formation of amorphous and crystalline alloys, when compared to using atomic radii of pure elements in topological parameters. Moreover, crystal structures of alloying element were found to play an important role in the amorphous phase formation, which was then attributed to how alloying hexagonal-close-packed elements and face-centered-cubic or body-centered-cubic elements can affect the mixing enthalpy. Findings from this work not only provide parametric studies for HEAs with new and important perspectives, but also reveal possibly a hidden connection among some important concepts in various fields. PMID:28051186

  11. Parametric Study of Amorphous High-Entropy Alloys formation from two New Perspectives: Atomic Radius Modification and Crystalline Structure of Alloying Elements.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Guo, S; Wang, J M; Yan, Y H; Chen, S S; Lu, D P; Liu, K M; Zou, J Z; Zeng, X R

    2017-01-04

    Chemical and topological parameters have been widely used for predicting the phase selection in high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Nevertheless, previous studies could be faulted due to the small number of available data points, the negligence of kinetic effects, and the insensitivity to small compositional changes. Here in this work, 92 TiZrHfM, TiZrHfMM, TiZrHfMMM (M = Fe, Cr, V, Nb, Al, Ag, Cu, Ni) HEAs were prepared by melt spinning, to build a reliable and sufficiently large material database to inspect the robustness of previously established parameters. Modification of atomic radii by considering the change of local electronic environment in alloys, was critically found out to be superior in distinguishing the formation of amorphous and crystalline alloys, when compared to using atomic radii of pure elements in topological parameters. Moreover, crystal structures of alloying element were found to play an important role in the amorphous phase formation, which was then attributed to how alloying hexagonal-close-packed elements and face-centered-cubic or body-centered-cubic elements can affect the mixing enthalpy. Findings from this work not only provide parametric studies for HEAs with new and important perspectives, but also reveal possibly a hidden connection among some important concepts in various fields.

  12. Parametric Study of Amorphous High-Entropy Alloys formation from two New Perspectives: Atomic Radius Modification and Crystalline Structure of Alloying Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Guo, S.; Wang, J. M.; Yan, Y. H.; Chen, S. S.; Lu, D. P.; Liu, K. M.; Zou, J. Z.; Zeng, X. R.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical and topological parameters have been widely used for predicting the phase selection in high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Nevertheless, previous studies could be faulted due to the small number of available data points, the negligence of kinetic effects, and the insensitivity to small compositional changes. Here in this work, 92 TiZrHfM, TiZrHfMM, TiZrHfMMM (M = Fe, Cr, V, Nb, Al, Ag, Cu, Ni) HEAs were prepared by melt spinning, to build a reliable and sufficiently large material database to inspect the robustness of previously established parameters. Modification of atomic radii by considering the change of local electronic environment in alloys, was critically found out to be superior in distinguishing the formation of amorphous and crystalline alloys, when compared to using atomic radii of pure elements in topological parameters. Moreover, crystal structures of alloying element were found to play an important role in the amorphous phase formation, which was then attributed to how alloying hexagonal-close-packed elements and face-centered-cubic or body-centered-cubic elements can affect the mixing enthalpy. Findings from this work not only provide parametric studies for HEAs with new and important perspectives, but also reveal possibly a hidden connection among some important concepts in various fields.

  13. Formation of atomic clusters through the laser ablation of refractory materials in a supersonic molecular beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.; Puretzky, A.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Concepts which guide the design of atomic cluster supersonic beam sources have been developed. These ideas are founded on the knowledge of laser ablation dynamics and are structured in order to take advantage of certain features of the ablation event. Some of the drawbacks of previous cluster source designs become apparent when the sequence of events following laser ablation are clarified. Key features of the new cluster source design include control of the cluster size distribution, uniform performance with a variety of solid materials and elements, high beam intensity, and significant removal of internal energy during the supersonic expansion.

  14. Formation of the muonic helium atom /alpha particle-muon-electron/ and observation of its Larmor precession

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souder, P. A.; Casperson, D. E.; Crane, T. W.; Hughes, V. W.; Lu, D. C.; Yam, M. H.; Orth, H.; Reist, H. W.; Zu Putlitz, G.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments are described in which it proved possible to form the muonic helium atom by stopping polarized negative muons in a helium gas with a 2% xenon admixture at a pressure of 14 atm. The observed Larmor precession amplitudes are plotted against the gyromagnetic ratio for both muons and antimuons stopped in He + 2% Xe. In addition, a non-zero residual polarization of 0.06 plus or minus 0.01 was measured for muons stopped in pure helium gas, which corresponds to a depolarization factor of 18 plus or minus 3.

  15. Formation of the muonic helium atom /alpha particle-muon-electron/ and observation of its Larmor precession

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souder, P. A.; Casperson, D. E.; Crane, T. W.; Hughes, V. W.; Lu, D. C.; Yam, M. H.; Orth, H.; Reist, H. W.; Zu Putlitz, G.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments are described in which it proved possible to form the muonic helium atom by stopping polarized negative muons in a helium gas with a 2% xenon admixture at a pressure of 14 atm. The observed Larmor precession amplitudes are plotted against the gyromagnetic ratio for both muons and antimuons stopped in He + 2% Xe. In addition, a non-zero residual polarization of 0.06 plus or minus 0.01 was measured for muons stopped in pure helium gas, which corresponds to a depolarization factor of 18 plus or minus 3.

  16. Formation of nitrate and ammonium ions in titanium dioxide mediated photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds containing nitrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Low, G.K.-C.; McEvoy, S.R.; Matthews, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation of a related series of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines and other nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organic compounds over a UV-illuminated film of TiO{sub 2} has been studied. The compounds were as follows: n-pentylamine, piperidine, pyridine, phenylalanine, desipramine, thioridazine, penicillamine, isosorbide dinitrate, 4-nitrocatechol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, atrazine, ethylenediaminetetracetic acid, and tetrabutylammonium phosphate. Both ammonium and nitrate ions were formed. The relative concentration of the two ions depended on the nature of the nitrogen in a compound, but was also influenced by the illumination time and concentration of the solute. It was found that for n-pentylamine, piperidine and pyridine, the rate of formation of ammonium ions was n-pentylamine {much gt} pyridine > piperidine. The order of rates of nitrate formation was pyridine = piperidine {much gt} pentylamine. For n-pentylamine the rate of formation of ammonium ions was {approximately}100 times that of nitrate.

  17. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  18. Seal Wire Integrity Verification Instrument: Evaluation of Laboratory Prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Good, Morris S.; Skorpik, James R.; Kravtchenko, Victor; Wishard, Bernard; Prince, James M.; Pardini, Allan F.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Mathews, Royce; Khayyat, Sakher; Tanner, Jennifer E.; Undem, Halvor A.

    2009-10-07

    Tamper indicating devices (TIDs) provide evidence that sensitive items, to which they have been applied, have been tampered with or not. Passive wire-loop seals, a class of TIDs, are generally comprised of a multi-strand seal wire that is threaded through or around key features and a unique seal body that captures and restrains the seal wire. Seal integrity resides with unique identification of the seal and the integrity of the seal body and the seal wire. Upon inspection, the seal wire may be cut and the full length inspected. A new seal may be applied in the field as a replacement, if desired. Seal wire inspection typically requires visual and tactile examinations, which are both subjective. A need therefore exists to develop seal wire inspection technology that is easy to use in the field, is objective, provides an auditable data trail, and has low error rates. Expected benefits, if successfully implemented, are improved on-site inspection reliability and security. The work scope for this effort was restricted to integrity of seal wire used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and resulted in development of a wire integrity verification instrument (WIVI) laboratory prototype. Work included a performance evaluation of a laboratory-bench-top system, and design and delivery of two WIVI laboratory prototypes. The paper describes the basic physics of the eddy current measurement, a description of the WIVI laboratory prototype, and an initial evaluation performed by IAEA personnel. --- Funding was provided by the U.S. Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS).

  19. Topography and transport properties of oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecular wires studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Geetha R.; Fan, Wendy; Koehne, Jessica; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Conjugated phenylene(ethynylene) molecular wires are of interest as potential candidates for molecular electronic devices. Scanning tunneling microscopic study of the topography and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of self-assembled monolayers of two types of molecular wires are presented here. The study shows that the topography and I-Vs, for small scan voltages, of the two wires are quite similar and that the electronic and structural changes introduced by the substitution of an electronegative N atom in the central phenyl ring of these wires does not significantly alter the self-assembly or the transport properties.

  20. Optical technique for the automatic detection and measurement of surface defects on thin metallic wires.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Brea, L M; Siegmann, P; Rebollo, M A; Bernabeu, E

    2000-02-01

    In industrial applications of thin metallic wires it is important to characterize the surface defects of the wires. We present an optical technique for the automatic detection of surface defects on thin metallic wires (diameters, 50-2000 microm) that can be used in on-line systems for surface quality control. This technique is based on the intensity variations on the scattered cone generated when the wire is illuminated with a beam at oblique incidence. Our results are compared with those obtained by atomic-force microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy.

  1. Catalytic decomposition of phosphorus compounds to produce phosphorus atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Hironobu; Kanemitsu, Taijiro; Kuroda, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum-ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence identified atomic phosphorus in the gas phase when phosphine, triethylphosphine, or molecular phosphorus sublimated from solid red phosphorus was decomposed on heated metal wire surfaces. Atomic phosphorus was found to be one of the major products in all systems, and its density increased monotonically with wire temperature but showed saturation at high temperatures. A wire material dependence of density was observed for molecular phosphorus, suggesting that the decomposition of the compound is catalytic. Electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) measurement showed that the wires are not phosphorized when heated in the presence of phosphine or molecular phosphorus.

  2. Atomic emission spectrometric determination of ephedrine, cinchonine, chlorpheniramine, atropine and diphenhydramine based on formation of ion associates with ammonium reineckate.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S

    1999-12-01

    Ion-associate complexes of ephedrine HCl (I), cinchonine HCl (II), chlorpheniramine maleate (III), atropine sulphate (IV) and diphenhydramine HCl (V) with ammonium reineckate were precipitated and their solubilities were studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature. Saturated solutions of each ion-associate under the optimum precipitation conditions were prepared and the Cr ion content in the supernatant was determined. The solubility products were thus elucidated at different temperatures. A new accurate and precise method using direct current plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of the investigated drugs in pure solutions and in pharmaceutical preparations is described. The drugs can determined by the present method in the ranges 1.6-52,2.64-85.8,3.12-101.4,5.52-180.4 and 2.72-75.85 microg/ml solutions of I, II, III, IV and V, respectively.

  3. Indirect atomic absorption determination of atropine, diphenhydramine, tolazoline, and levamisole based on formation of ion-associates with potassium tetraiodometrcurate.

    PubMed

    El Ries, M A; Khalil, S

    2001-04-01

    Ion-associate complexes of atropine sulphate (I), diphenhydramine HCl (II), tolazoline HCl (III) and levamisole HCl (IV) with potassium tetraiodomercurate were precipitated and their solubilities were studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature. Saturated solutions of each ion-associate under the optimum precipitation conditions were prepared and the metal ion-content in the supernatant was determined. The solubility products were thus calculated at different temperatures. A new accurate and precise method using atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of the investigated drugs in pure solutions and in pharmaceutical preparations is described. The drugs can be determined by the present method in the ranges 13.6--138.8, 5.6-58, 3.6--39.6 and 4.8--48 microg/ml solutions of I--IV, respectively.

  4. Lipid membrane domain formation and alamethicin aggregation studied by calorimetry, sound velocity measurements, and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Jäger, Markus; Heimburg, Thomas; Buckin, Vitaly; Kaatze, Udo

    2008-05-01

    An experimental study of phosphocholine membranes made from one lipid, from mixtures of DPPC and DLPC, and also from lipids and small amounts of alamethicin is presented. We used atomic force microscopy to investigate the spatial organization and structure of lipid domains and also of the defects induced by the peptide. Alamethicin was found to alter the state of lipids in the gel state in a way that domains of fluid lipids are formed close to the defects. Differential calorimetry revealed phase characteristics of the lipid mixtures and the effect of small amounts of alamethicin on the phase behavior. It was also shown that the sound velocity profiles of the membranes suspensions can be well calculated from the heat capacity traces of the samples. This result confirms the correlation between the mechanical properties and the specific heat of membrane systems.

  5. Formation and decay of fluorobenzene radical anions affected by their isomeric structures and the number of fluorine atoms.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Saki; Saeki, Akinori; Okamoto, Kazumasa; Tagawa, Seiichi; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2010-08-12

    Aryl fluoride has attracted much attention as a resist component for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, because of the high absorption cross section of fluorine for EUV photons; however, less is known about electron attachment to fluorobenzene (FBz) and the stability of the reduced state. Picosecond and nanosecond pulse radiolysis of tetrahydrofuran solutions of FBz from mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexafluorobenzene was performed, and the effects of isomeric structure and number of fluorine atoms were examined. Scavenging of solvated electrons was found to correlate with the electron affinity obtained by density functional theory in the gas phase, whereas the decay of FBz radical anions was dominated by the activation energy of fluorine anion dissociation calculated using a polarized continuum model (PCM). A sharp contrast in the lifetimes of ortho-, meta-, and para-position difluorobenzene was observed, which could provide information on the molecular design of functional materials.

  6. Material and biofilm load of K wires in toe surgery: titanium versus stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Martin; Graf, Susanne; Gersbach, Silke; Hintermann, Beat; Ilchmann, Thomas; Knupp, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Recurrence rates for toe deformity correction are high and primarily are attributable to scar contractures. These contractures may result from subclinical infection. We hypothesized that (1) recurrence of toe deformities and residual pain are related to low-grade infections from biofilm formation on percutaneous K wires, (2) biofilm formation is lower on titanium (Ti) K wires compared with stainless steel (SS) K wires, and (3) clinical outcome is superior with the use of Ti K wires compared with SS K wires. In this prospective nonrandomized, comparative study, we investigated 135 lesser toe deformities (61 patients; 49 women; mean ± SD age, 60 ± 15 years) temporarily fixed with K wires between August 2010 and March 2011 (81 SS, 54 Ti). K wires were removed after 6 weeks. The presence of biofilm-related infections was analyzed by sonication. High bacterial loads (> 500 colony-forming units [CFU]/mL) were detected on all six toes requiring revision before 6 months. Increased bacterial load was associated with pain and swelling but not recurrence of the deformity. More SS K wires had greater than 100 CFU/mL bacteria than Ti K wires. For K wires with a bacterial count greater than 100 CFU/mL, toes with Ti K wires had a lower recurrence rate, less pain, and less swelling than toes with SS K wires. Ti K wires showed superior clinical outcomes to SS K wires. This appears to be attributable to reduced infection rates. Although additional study is needed, we currently recommend the use of Ti K wires for the transfixation of toe deformities. Level II, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  7. From wires to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Baumann, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We provide a statistical framework for characterizing stochastic particle production in the early universe via a precise correspondence to current conduction in wires with impurities. Our approach is particularly useful when the microphysics is uncertain and the dynamics are complex, but only coarse-grained information is of interest. We study scenarios with multiple interacting fields and derive the evolution of the particle occupation numbers from a Fokker-Planck equation. At late times, the typical occupation numbers grow exponentially which is the analog of Anderson localization for disordered wires. Some statistical features of the occupation numbers show hints of universality in the limit of a large number of interactions and/or a large number of fields. For test cases, excellent agreement is found between our analytic results and numerical simulations.

  8. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  9. Wire insulation defect detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Wiring defects are located by detecting a reflected signal that is developed when an arc occurs through the defect to a nearby ground. The time between the generation of the signal and the return of the reflected signal provides an indication of the distance of the arc (and therefore the defect) from the signal source. To ensure arcing, a signal is repeated at gradually increasing voltages while the wire being tested and a nearby ground are immersed in a conductive medium. In order to ensure that the arcing occurs at an identifiable time, the signal whose reflection is to be detected is always made to reach the highest potential yet seen by the system.

  10. From wires to cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Baumann, Daniel E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2016-02-01

    We provide a statistical framework for characterizing stochastic particle production in the early universe via a precise correspondence to current conduction in wires with impurities. Our approach is particularly useful when the microphysics is uncertain and the dynamics are complex, but only coarse-grained information is of interest. We study scenarios with multiple interacting fields and derive the evolution of the particle occupation numbers from a Fokker-Planck equation. At late times, the typical occupation numbers grow exponentially which is the analog of Anderson localization for disordered wires. Some statistical features of the occupation numbers show hints of universality in the limit of a large number of interactions and/or a large number of fields. For test cases, excellent agreement is found between our analytic results and numerical simulations.

  11. Wiring for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. L., Jr.; Dickman, J. E.; Bercaw, R. W.; Myers, I. T.; Hammoud, A. N.; Stavnes, M.; Evans, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize the current state of knowledge of arc propagation in aerospace power wiring and efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) towards the understanding of the arc tracking phenomena in space environments. Recommendations will be made for additional testing. A database of the performance of commonly used insulating materials will be developed to support the design of advanced high power missions, such as Space Station Freedom and Lunar/Mars Exploration.

  12. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  13. Printed wiring assembly cleanliness

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    This work installed a product cleanliness test capability in a manufacturing environment. A previously purchased testing device was modified extensively and installed in a production department. The device, the testing process, and some soldering and cleaning variables were characterized to establish their relationship to the device output. The characterization provided information which will be required for cleanliness testing to be an adequate process control of printed wiring assembly soldering and cleaning processes.

  14. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  15. Impact Wire Dislodges Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Steven K.; Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1990-01-01

    Snakelike tool loosens trapped debris obstructing narrow passages in normally inaccessible locations. Flexible tool threaded into obstructed channel, much like common plumbing snake. Wire fed along inner tube of tool until tip reaches obstruction. Delivers impact from impact tool to obstruction. Designed for use in narrow, intricate coolant channels of rocket engine. Lends itself readily to modification for use in engine blocks, heat exchangers, general plumbing, and like.

  16. Ohm's law survives to the atomic scale.

    PubMed

    Weber, B; Mahapatra, S; Ryu, H; Lee, S; Fuhrer, A; Reusch, T C G; Thompson, D L; Lee, W C T; Klimeck, G; Hollenberg, L C L; Simmons, M Y

    2012-01-06

    As silicon electronics approaches the atomic scale, interconnects and circuitry become comparable in size to the active device components. Maintaining low electrical resistivity at this scale is challenging because of the presence of confining surfaces and interfaces. We report on the fabrication of wires in silicon--only one atom tall and four atoms wide--with exceptionally low resistivity (~0.3 milliohm-centimeters) and the current-carrying capabilities of copper. By embedding phosphorus atoms within a silicon crystal with an average spacing of less than 1 nanometer, we achieved a diameter-independent resistivity, which demonstrates ohmic scaling to the atomic limit. Atomistic tight-binding calculations confirm the metallicity of these atomic-scale wires, which pave the way for single-atom device architectures for both classical and quantum information processing.

  17. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  18. Magnetoconductance of quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Gerson J.; Sammarco, Filipe; Egues, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    At low temperatures the conductance of a quantum wires exhibit characteristic plate-aus due to the quantization of the transverse modes [1]. In the presence of high in-plane magnetic fields these spin-split transverse modes cross. Recently, these crossings were observed experimentally [2] via measurements of the differential conductance as a function of the gate voltage and the in-plane magnetic-field. These show structures described as either anti-crossings or magnetic phase transitions. Motivated by our previous works on magnetotransport in 2DEGs via the Spin Density Functional Theory (SDFT) [3], here we propose a similar model to investigate the magnetoconductance of quantum wires. We use (i) the SDFT via the Kohn-Sham self-consistent scheme within the local spin density approximation to obtain the electronic structure and (ii) the Landauer-Buettiker formalism to calculate the conductance of a quantum wire. Our results show qualitative agreement with the data of Ref. [2]. [1] B. J. van Wees et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 848 (1988). [2] A. C. Graham et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 226804 (2008). [3] H. J. P. Freire, and J. C. Egues, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 026801 (2007); G. J. Ferreira, and J. Carlos Egues, J. Supercond. Nov. Mag., in press; G. J. Ferreira, H. J. P. Freire, J. Carlos Egues, submitted.

  19. Electronic and magnetic properties of silicon supported organometallic molecular wires: a density functional theory (DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Tan, Yingzi; Li, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaojun; Pei, Yong

    2015-08-28

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to the well-studied gas phase TM-benzene molecular wires. Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ and Si-[Cr(styrene)]∞ single molecular wires (SMWs) are a ferromagnetic semiconductor and half metal, respectively. Creation of H-atom defects on the silicon surface can introduce an impurity metallic band, which leads to novel half-metallic magnetism of a Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ system. Moreover, double molecular wires (DMWs) containing two identical or hetero SMWs are theoretically designed. The [Mn(styrene)]∞-[Cr(styrene)]∞ DMW exhibits half-metallic magnetism where the spin-up and spin-down channels are contributed by two single molecular wires. Finally, we demonstrate that introducing a TM-defect may significantly affect the electronic structure and magnetic properties of molecular wires. These studies provide new insights into the structure and properties of surface supported 1-D sandwiched molecular wires and may inspire the future experimental synthesis of substrate confined organometallic sandwiched molecular wires.

  20. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOEpatents

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  1. The effect of resist dissolution process on pattern formation variability: an in situ analysis using high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, Julius Joseph; Shichiri, Motoharu; Itani, Toshiro

    2015-03-01

    This work focuses on the application of a high speed atomic force microscope for the in situ visualization / quantification of the pattern formation phenomenon during resist dissolution. Specifically, this paper discusses on the quantification of various factors (e.g. pattern roughness, defects, etc.) that affect pattern quality. Comparing two typical positive-tone, extreme-ultraviolet lithography resists of dissimilar lithographic performance, results show that the differences in LER between such resists already exists even during the resist dissolution. This implies the significance of the dissolution process in further improving the final LER of lines-and-spaces (L/S) patterns. Moreover, results have shown the effectiveness of applying the same analysis technique in understanding pattern defect dynamics during dissolution, not only for L/S but also for contact hole (CH) patterns. Preliminary investigations on CH pattern formation during dissolution showed position-dependent variabilities / randomness in the timing of CH formation. Such variabilities in timing imply possible pointers in defining the origin of missing CH defects, from the resist dissolution point-of-view.

  2. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis - chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min- 1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values.

  3. Assembly of streptolysin O pores assessed by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy provides evidence for the formation of anchored but incomplete oligomers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Michael E; Paintavigna, Stefania; Tabor, Rico F; Martin, Lisandra L; Bird, Phillip I

    2015-01-01

    Streptolysin O (SLO) is a bacterial pore forming protein that is part of the cholesterol dependent cytolysin (CDC) family. We have used quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to examine SLO membrane binding and pore formation. In this system, SLO binds tightly to cholesterol-containing membranes, and assembles into partial and complete pores confirmed by atomic force microscopy. SLO binds to the lipid bilayer at a single rate consistent with the Langmuir isotherm model of adsorption. Changes in dissipation illustrate that SLO alters the viscoelastic properties of the bilayer during pore formation, but there is no loss of material from the bilayer as reported for small membrane-penetrating peptides. SLO mutants were used to further dissect the assembly and insertion processes by QCM-D. This shows the signature of SLO in QCM-D changes when pore formation is inhibited, and that bound and inserted SLO forms can be distinguished. Furthermore a pre-pore locked SLO mutant binds reversibly to lipid, suggesting that the partially complete wtSLO forms observed by AFM are anchored to the membrane.

  4. Molecular wires, switches and memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia

    Molecular electronics, an emerging field, makes it possible to build individual molecules capable of performing functions identical or analogous to present- day conductors, switches, or memories. These individual molecules, with a nano-meter scale characteristic length, can be designed and chemically synthesized with specific atoms, geometries and charge distribution. This thesis focuses on the design, and measurements of molecular wires, and related strategically engineered structures-molecular switches and memories. The experimental system relies on a thermodynamically driven self-assembling process to attach molecules onto substrate surfaces without intervention from outside. The following topics will be discussed: directed nanoscale manipulation of self-assembled molecules using scanning tunneling microscope; investigation on through-bond transport of nanoscale symmetric metal/conjugated self- assembled monolayers (SAM)/metal junctions, where non- Ohmic thermionic emission was observed to be the dominant process, with isocyanide-Pd contacts showing the lowest thermionic barrier of 0.22 eV; the first realization of robust and large reversible switching behavior in an electronic device that utilizes molecules containing redox centers as the active component, exhibiting negative differential resistance (NDR) and large on-off peak-to-valley ratio (PVR); observation of erasable storage of higher conductivity states in these redox- center containing molecular devices, and demonstration of a two-terminal electronically programmable and erasable molecular memory cell with long bit retention time.

  5. Manually Operated Welding Wire Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A manual welding wire feeder apparatus comprising a bendable elongate metal frame with a feed roller mounted at the center thereof for rotation about an axis transverse to the longitudinal axis of the frame. The frame ends are turned up as tabs and each provided with openings in alignment with each other and the mid-width center of the roller surface. The tab openings are sized to accommodate welding wire and each extends to a side edge of the tab, both opening on the same side of the frame, whereby welding wire can be side-loaded onto the frame. On the side of the frame, opposite the roller a lock ring handle is attached tangentially and is rotatable about the attachment point and an axis perpendicular to the frame. The device is grasped in the hand normally used to hold the wire. A finger is placed through the loop ring and the frame positioned across the palm and lower fingers. The thumb is positioned atop the wire so it can be moved from the back of the frame across the roller, and towards the front. In doing so, the wire is advanced at a steady rate in axial alignment with the tab openings and roller. To accommodate different wire diameters the frame is bendable about its center in the plane of the frame axis and wire so as to keep the wire in sufficient tension against the roller and to keep the wire fixed when the frame is tilted and thumb pressure released.

  6. Formation of a ZnO{sub 2} layer on the surface of single crystal ZnO substrates with oxygen atoms by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwaba, Y.; Abe, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Niikura, I.; Kashiwaba, Y.; Daibo, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Osada, H.

    2013-03-21

    Formation of a ZnO{sub 2} layer by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment for single crystal ZnO (0001) substrates was studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks of ZnO{sub 2} with a pyrite structure were observed in XRD 2{theta}-{omega} scan patterns of the O-face of single crystal ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment, but these peaks were not observed in patterns of the Zn-face of ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. XRD {omega} scan patterns of the ZnO (0002) plane of the O-face of single crystal ZnO (0001) substrates were broadened at the tail of the pattern by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment, but such broadening was not observed in that plane of the Zn-face. Grain structure of ZnO{sub 2} layers was clearly observed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images for the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment showed a definite peak shift of the O 1s peak. It is thought that a pyrite structure of ZnO{sub 2} is easily formed around an O atom of the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates. Results of XRD measurements, the AFM image, and XPS measurement of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated single crystal ZnO (1010) substrate that has oxygen atoms on the surface appeared to be the same as those of the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates.

  7. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using ammonium reineckate ion-pair complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Gamal H.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2004-03-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric, conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of norfloxacin (NRF), ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and enrofloxacin (ENF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone in the range 5.0-65, 4.0-48, 5.0-56 and 6.0-72 μg ml -1 of NRF, CPF, OFL and ENF, respectively. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. The results obtained showed good recoveries of 99.15±1.15, 99.30±1.40, 99.60±1.50, and 99.00±1.25% with relative standard deviations of 0.81, 1.06, 0.97, and 0.69% for NRF, CPF, OFL, and ENF, respectively. Applications of the proposed methods to representative pharmaceutical formulations are successfully presented.

  8. Direct formation of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition and their photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Hsin; Liao, Shih-Yun; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Kei, Chi-Chung; Gan, Jon-Yiew; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 with different morphology was deposited on acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by atomic layer deposition at 100 °C-300 °C to form a TiO2@CNT structure. The TiO2 fabricated at 100 °C was an amorphous film, but became crystalline anatase nanoparticles when fabricated at 200 °C and 300 °C. The saturation growth rates of TiO2 nanoparticles at 300 °C were about 1.5 and 0.4 Å/cycle for substrate-enhanced growth and linear growth processes, respectively. It was found that the rate constants for methylene blue degradation by the TiO2@CNT structure formed at 300 °C were more suitable to fit with second-order reaction. The size of 9 nm exhibited the best degradation efficiency, because of the high specific area and appropriate diffusion length for the electrons and holes.

  9. Formation, stability, and mechanical properties of bovine serum albumin stabilized air bubbles produced using coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, S; Meinders, M B J; Edirisinghe, M

    2014-06-17

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) microbubbles were generated using coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEDHA) using various concentrations of BSA solutions. The bubble characteristics and the long-term stability of the microbubbles were studied through adjustment of processing parameters and the collection media. Bubbles in the range of 40-800 μm were obtained in a controlled fashion, and increasing the flow rate of the BSA solution reduced the polydispersity of the microbubbles. Use of distilled water-glutaraldehyde, glycerol, and glycerol-Tween 80 collection media allowed a remarkable improvement in bubble stability compared to BSA solution collection medium. Possible physical mechanisms were developed to explain the stability of the microbubbles. The collection distance showed a marked influence on stability of the microbubbles. Near-monodisperse particle-reinforced microbubbles were formed with various concentrations of 2,2'-azobis(isobutyramidine) dihydrochloride (AIBA)-polystyrene particle in BSA solution. The bubble size and the size distribution showed negligible change over a period of time irrespective of the concentration of particles at the bubble surface. The compression stiffness of the microbubbles was determined using nanoindentation at ambient temperature and showed that the stiffness of the microbubbles increased from 8 N/m to 20 N/m upon changing the concentration of BSA solution from 5 wt % to 15 wt %.

  10. Metering Wheel-Wire Track Wire Boom Deployment Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granoff, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA MMS Spin Plane Double Probe (SDP) Deployer utilizes a helical path, rotating Metering Wheel and a spring loaded Wire "Holding" Track to pay out a "fixed end" 57 meter x 1.5 mm diameter Wire Boom stored between concentric storage cylinders. Unlike rotating spool type storage devices, the storage cylinders remain stationary, and the boom wire is uncoiled along the length of the cylinder via the rotation of the Metering Wheel. This uncoiling action avoids the need for slip-ring contacts since the ends of the wire can remain stationary. Conventional fixed electrical connectors (Micro-D type) are used to terminate to operational electronics.

  11. Relationship between population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state and oligomer formation times of peptides: insights from all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hoang Bao; Kouza, Maksim; Zung, Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2010-04-28

    Despite much progress in understanding the aggregation process of biomolecules, the factors that govern its rates have not been fully understood. This problem is of particular importance since many conformational diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, and type-II diabetes are associated with the protein oligomerization. Having performed all-atom simulations with explicit water and various force fields for two short peptides KFFE and NNQQ, we show that their oligomer formation times are strongly correlated with the population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state. The larger the population the faster the aggregation process. Our result not only suggests that this quantity plays a key role in the self-assembly of polypeptide chains but also opens a new way to understand the fibrillogenesis of biomolecules at the monomeric level. The nature of oligomer ordering of NNQQ is studied in detail.

  12. Influence of PE-CVD and PE-ALD on defect formation in permeation barrier films on PET and correlation to atomic oxygen fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitschker, F.; Steves, S.; Gebhard, M.; Rudolph, M.; Schücke, L.; Kirchheim, D.; Jaritz, M.; Brochhagen, M.; Hoppe, Ch; Dahlmann, R.; Böke, M.; Benedikt, J.; Giner, I.; de los Arcos, T.; Hopmann, Ch; Grundmeier, G.; Devi, A.; Awakowicz, P.

    2017-06-01

    Defects in SiO x , TiO2 and a-Si:H inorganic barrier films on PET are investigated. Visualization is achieved by reactive oxygen etching in capacitively coupled plasma that leads to the undercutting of the barrier films at defect sites, and defect densities are deduced by SEM imaging. Defect formation is analyzed as a function of absolutely quantified steady state atomic oxygen fluence during the deposition of silicon oxide films and the effect of an additional substrate bias is presented. Macro-defect densities as a function of film thickness are tracked. Barrier films with a barrier improvement of one order of magnitude exhibit macro-defect densities below 160 defects mm-2.

  13. Rate constants of atomic hydrogen formation in H3O+(H2O) n + e → H + (H2O) n gas-phase processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, N. F.; Novakovskaya, Yu. V.

    2009-09-01

    Using the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and the Breit-Wigner approximation of the reaction cross section, the kinetic parameters of the hydrogen atom formation upon the electron capture by positively charged hydronium-water clusters are estimated. Calculations of the cross sections and rate constants are based on the data of quantum chemical studies of H3O+(H2O) n and H3O(H2O) n clusters, particularly on the detailed analysis of the spacing of high-lying states of the radicals and the character of the unpaired electron density distribution, as well as on the general trend in the electron affinity change of the cations depending on the number of water molecules. The lifetimes of the radicals before the dissociation are taken from the classical nonempirical molecular dynamics runs. The results are compared to available experimental data.

  14. Evaluation of Pd-Cr Wires for Strain Gage Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Greer, L. C., III; Oberle, L. G.

    1995-01-01

    A newly developed alloy, palladium-13 weight percent chromium (Pd13Cr), was identified by United Technologies Research Center under a NASA contract to be the best material for high temperature strain gage applications. An electrical resistance strain gage that can provide accurate static strain measurement to a temperature higher than that of a commercially available gage is urgently needed in aerospace and aeronautics research. A strain gage made of a 25.4 micron (1 mil) diameter Pd13Cr wire has been recently demonstrated to be usable for static strain measurements to 800 C. This compares to the 400 C temperature limit of the commercially available strain gages. The performance of the Pd-Cr gage, however, strongly depends on the quality of the Pd13Cr wire. Four batches of Pd-Cr wires purchased from three different manufacturers were therefore evaluated to determine the best source of the wire for strain gage applications. The three suppliers were Precious Metal Institute in China, Sigmund Cohn Co., and G & S Titanium, Inc. in the United States. Two batches of wires obtained from Previous Metal Institute in 1987 and 1992, respectively are referred to herein as China87 and China92 wires. The mechanical, chemical and electrical properties of these wires, both as-received and after high temperature exposures at 800 C for 50 hours were analyzed. The elastic modulus and the failure strength of the wires were evaluated using a tensile test machine equipped with a laser speckle strain measurement system. The chemical and microstructural properties of the wires were inspected using a plasma atomic emission spectrometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS). The electrical stability and repeatability of the wires were determined by measuring the electrical resistance of the wires during three thermal cycles to 1000 C and a ten-hour soak at 1000 C. As a result of this study, the wire which has the highest

  15. Magnetic behavior of nanostructured glass covered metallic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, H.; Óvári, T. A.; Pop, Gh.; Barariu, Firuta

    1997-04-01

    We present a study of the evolution of the magnetic properties and behavior of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 glass covered wires and wires after glass removal with the annealing temperature up to 600 °C starting from the amorphous state. The changes induced in the magnetic properties of these wires are determined by the stress relief process occurring at temperatures below 550 °C, and by the appearance of the nanosized α-FeSi crystalline grains after annealing for 1 h at 550 °C. The nanocrystalline phase formation leads to an improvement of the soft magnetic properties of these wires—increase of permeability and decrease of the coercive force—but also determines the disappearance of the large Barkhausen effect presented by these wires in the amorphous state. Annealing at temperatures over 550 °C determines a depreciation of the soft magnetic properties of both glass covered wires and wires after glass removal. The magnetic behavior of such wires can be fully explained by taking into account the relaxation of the internal stresses with increasing the annealing temperature as well as the changes in the magnetostriction constant due to the appearance of the nanocrystalline grains.

  16. Laser microwelding of small diameter wire to a contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcicki, M.A.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    This work is an attempt to evaluate feasibility of the laser welding process of small diameter wire to a contact. In particular, the paper addresses characterization of laser spot welded 32 AWG solid copper/silver plated wires to contacts on 0.050 in. centers. The copper alloy contacts were provided on strips in two lots, one unplated, and the other with 75 {mu}in. of plated Nickel. An industrial type IR, Nd:YAG, pulsed laser was used to produce welds, in order to simulate manufacturing environment. Metallurgical analysis, SEM, and nanoindentation characterization have been used in setting up the welding process and in final evaluation. Quality of welds was also evaluated by a tensile test and the results are presented in a statistical format. The test results indicate that the tensile strength of the laser welded wire, relative to the bare (unwelded) wire, yielded 95.47% for joints on unplated contacts, and 98.25% for Nickel plated contacts. Microscope examination of samples, after pull test, shows that all wires broke behind the weld area. These results significantly exceed the required minimum tensile of a welded joint, which is 60% of the tensile strength of a bare wire. They also indicate that laser welding of small diameter wires to high density contacts can be considered as a valuable process alternative.

  17. Atomic-scale understanding of dichlorobenzene-assisted poly 3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl nanowire formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagmurcukardes, M.; Kiymaz, D.; Zafer, C.; Senger, R. T.; Sahin, H.

    2017-04-01

    Low-dimensional Poly 3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT) structures that serve efficient exciton dissociation in organic solar cells, play a major role in increasing the charge collection, and hence, the efficiency of organic devices. In this study, we theoretically and experimentally investigate the Dichlorobenzene (DCB)-assisted formation of P3HT nanowires. Our experiments show that the solution of DCB molecules drive randomly oriented P3HT polymers to form well-stacked nanowires by stabilizing tail-tail and π-π interactions. Here the question is how DCB molecules migrate into the P3HT layers while forming the nanowire structure. Our density functional theory-based calculations reveal that the vertical migration of the DCB molecules between P3HT layers is forbidden due to a high energy barrier that stems from strong alkyl chain-DCB interaction. In contrast to vertical diffusion, lateral diffusion of DCB molecules in between P3HT layers is much more likely. Our results show that migration of a DCB molecule occurs through the alkyl groups with a low energy barrier. Therefore, laterally diffused DCB molecules assist nucleation of top-to-top stacking of P3HT polymers and formation of well-ordered nanowires.

  18. The Drag of Streamline Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N

    1933-01-01

    Preliminary results are given of drag tests of streamline wires. Full-size wires were tested over a wide range of speeds in the N.A.C.A. high speed tunnel. The results are thus directly applicable to full-scale problems and include any compressibility effects encountered at the higher speeds. The results show how protuberances may be employed on conventional streamline wires to reduce the drag, and also show how the conventional wires compare with others having sections more like strut or symmetrical airfoil sections. Because the new wire sections developed are markedly superior aerodynamically to conventional wires, it is recommended that some of them be tested in service in order to investigate their relative susceptibility to vibration and to fatigue failure.

  19. Effect of heparin and heparan sulphate on open promoter complex formation for a simple tandem gene model using ex situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chammas, Oliver; Bonass, William A; Thomson, Neil H

    2017-05-01

    The influence of heparin and heparan sulphate (HepS) on the appearance and analysis of open promoter complex (RPo) formation by E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme (σ(70)RNAP) on linear DNA using ex situ imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been investigated. Introducing heparin or HepS into the reaction mix significantly reduces non-specific interactions of the σ(70)RNAP and RNAP after RPo formation allowing for better interpretation of complexes shown within AFM images, particularly on DNA templates containing more than one promoter. Previous expectation was that negatively charged polysaccharides, often used as competitive inhibitors of σRNAP binding and RPo formation, would also inhibit binding of the DNA template to the mica support surface and thereby lower the imaging yield of active RNAP-DNA complexes. We found that the reverse of this was true, and that the yield of RPo formation detected by AFM, for a simple tandem gene model containing two λPR promoters, increased. Moreover and unexpectedly, HepS was more efficient than heparin, with both of them having a dispersive effect on the sample, minimising unwanted RNAP-RNAP interactions as well as non-specific interactions between the RNAP and DNA template. The success of this method relied on the observation that E. coli RNAP has the highest affinity for the mica surface of all the molecular components. For our system, the affinity of the three constituent biopolymers to muscovite mica was RNAP>Heparin or HepS>DNA. While we observed that heparin and HepS can inhibit DNA binding to the mica, the presence of E. coli RNAP overcomes this effect allowing a greater yield of RPos for AFM analysis. This method can be extended to other DNA binding proteins and enzymes, which have an affinity to mica higher than DNA, to improve sample preparation for AFM studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic control of the lateral Si wire growth

    SciTech Connect

    Dedyulin, Sergey N. Goncharova, Lyudmila V.

    2014-03-24

    Reproducible lateral Si wire growth has been realized on the Si (100) surface. In this paper, we present experimental evidence showing the unique role that carbon plays in initiating lateral growth of Si wires on a Si (100) substrate. Once initiated in the presence of ≈5 ML of C, lateral growth can be achieved in the range of temperatures, T = 450–650 °C, and further controlled by the interplay of the flux of incoming Si atoms with the size and areal density of Au droplets. Critical thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the growth are discussed in detail.

  1. Diagnostics for exploding wires (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosman, B.; Bystritskii, Vitaly; Wessel, F. J.; Van Drie, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two diagnostics, capable of imaging fast, high temperature, plasmas were used on exploding wire experiments at UC Irvine. An atmospheric pressure nitrogen laser (λ=337.1 nm) was used to generate simultaneous shadow and shearing interferogram images with a temporal resolution of ˜1 ns and a spatial resolution of 10 μm. An x-ray backlighter imaged the exploding wire 90° with respect to the laser and at approximately the same instant in time. The backlighter spatial resolution as determined by geometry and film resolution was 25 μm. Copper wires of diameters (25, 50, and 100 μm) and steel wire d=25 μm were exploded in vacuum (10-5 Torr) at a maximum current level of 12 kA, by a rectified marx bank at a voltage of 50 kV and a current rise time (quarter period) of 900 ns. Copper wires which were cleaned and then resistively heated under vacuum to incandescence for several hours prior to high current initiation, exhibited greater expansion velocities at peak current than wires which had not been heated prior to discharge. Axial variations on the surface of the wire observed with the laser were found to correlate with bulk axial mass differences from x-ray backlighting. High electron density, measured near the opaque surface of the exploding wire, suggests that much of the current is shunted outward away from the bulk of the wire.

  2. Texture development in Galfenol wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesenberg, A. J.; Restorff, J. B.; Wun-Fogle, M.; Sailsbury, H.; Summers, E.

    2013-05-01

    Galfenol (Fe-Ga alloy) wire fabrication provides a low cost alternative to directional solidification methods. This work evaluates the compositional dependence of the wire drawing suitability of Fe-Ga and characterizes the microstructural and magnetic properties of these wires. Wire has been produced with Ga contents between 10 at. % and 17 at. % to allow determination of the ductile to brittle transition (DTBT) in wire manufacture. Published results on chill cast bend specimens indicated that a DTBT occurs at roughly 15 at. % Ga. This DTBT was observed under tensile loading with a corresponding change in fracture behavior from transverse fracture to intergranular fracture. For improved magnetostrictive performance, higher Ga contents are desired, closer to the 17 at. % Ga evaluated in this work. Electron backscattered diffraction B-H loop and resonance measurements as a function of magnetic field (to determine modulus and coupling factor) are presented for as-drawn, furnace, and direct current (DC) annealed wire. Galfenol wire produced via traditional drawing methods is found to have a strong <110> (α) texture parallel to the drawing direction. As-drawn wire was observed to have a lower magnetic permeability and larger hysteresis than DC annealed wire. This is attributed to the presence of a large volume of crystalline defects; such as vacancies and dislocations.

  3. Subminiature Hot-Wire Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Lemos, F. R.; Ligrani, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Class of improved subminiature hot-wire flow-measuring probes developed. Smaller sizes yield improved resolution in measurements of practical aerodynamic flows. Probe made in one-wire, two-perpendicular-wire, and three-perpendicular-wire version for measurement of one, two, or all three components of flow. Oriented and positioned on micromanipulator stage and viewed under microscope during fabrication. Tested by taking measurements in constant-pressure turbulent boundary layer. New probes give improved measurements of turbulence quantities near surfaces and anisotropies of flows strongly influence relative errors caused by phenomena related to spatial resolution.

  4. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  5. Neural wiring optimization.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial network optimization theory concerns minimization of connection costs among interconnected components in systems such as electronic circuits. As an organization principle, similar wiring minimization can be observed at various levels of nervous systems, invertebrate and vertebrate, including primate, from placement of the entire brain in the body down to the subcellular level of neuron arbor geometry. In some cases, the minimization appears either perfect, or as good as can be detected with current methods. One question such best-of-all-possible-brains results raise is, what is the map of such optimization, does it have a distinct neural domain?

  6. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be...

  7. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be...

  8. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be...

  9. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be...

  10. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be...

  11. 49 CFR 234.231 - Fouling wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fouling wires. 234.231 Section 234.231..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.231 Fouling wires. Each set of fouling wires in a highway... single duplex wire with single plug acting as fouling wires is prohibited. Existing installations having...

  12. 49 CFR 234.231 - Fouling wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fouling wires. 234.231 Section 234.231..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.231 Fouling wires. Each set of fouling wires in a highway... single duplex wire with single plug acting as fouling wires is prohibited. Existing installations having...

  13. Corrosion of Wires on Wooden Wire-Bound Packaging Crates

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Stan Lebow

    2015-01-01

    Wire-bound packaging crates are used by the US Army to transport materials. Because these crates may be exposed to harsh environments, they are dip-treated with a wood preservative (biocide treatment). For many years, zinc-naphthenate was the most commonly used preservative for these packaging crates and few corrosion problems with the wires were observed. Recently,...

  14. Two-Wire to Four-Wire Audio Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, G. L., Jr; Seale, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    Simple circuit provides interface between normally incompatible voicecommunication lines. Circuit maintains 40 dB of isolation between input and output halves of four-wire line permitting two-wire line to be connected. Balancing potentiometer, Rg, adjusts gain of IC2 to null feed through from input to output. Adjustment is done on workbench just after assembly.

  15. The bond-forming reactions of atomic dications with neutral molecules: formation of ArNH+ and ArN+ from collisions of Ar2+ with NH3.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Natalie; Kearney, Dominic; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Price, Stephen D

    2004-03-24

    An experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the bond-forming reactivity between Ar(2+) and NH(3). Experimentally, we detect two previously unobserved bond-forming reactions between Ar(2+) and NH(3) forming ArN(+) and ArNH(+). This is the first experimental observation of a triatomic product ion (ArNH(+)) following a chemical reaction of a rare gas dication with a neutral. The intensity of ArNH(+) was found to decrease with increasing collision energy, with a corresponding increase in the intensity of ArN(+), indicating that ArN(+) is formed by the dissociation of ArNH(+). Key features on the potential energy surface for the reaction were calculated quantum chemically using CASSCF and MRCI methods. The calculated reaction mechanism, which takes place on a singlet surface, involves the initial formation of an Ar-N bond to give Ar-NH(3)(2+). This complexation is followed by proton loss via a transition state, and then loss of the two remaining hydrogen atoms in two subsequent activationless steps to give the products (3)ArN(+) + H(+) + 2H. This calculated pathway supports the sequential formation of ArN(+) from ArNH(+), as suggested by the experimental data. The calculations also indicate that no bond-forming pathway exists on the ground triplet surface for this system.

  16. Enhanced formation of a confined nano-water meniscus using a 780 nm laser with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    An, Sangmin; Lee, Kunyoung; Moon, Geol; Bak, Wan; Kim, Gunn; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-07-01

    Demonstrated herein is the optical-field-induced enhancement of the formation of a confined nanowater meniscus using a distance-regulated quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) with a 780 nm laser. While a pulled optical fiber tip approaches the surface, the laser is suddenly turned on and focuses on the front spot of the tip by the shape of the pulled optical fiber, which plays the role of an objective lens and induces the gathering effect of the water molecules directed to the electromagnetic-field gradient in air. This phenomenon facilitates a new boundary condition to form a long-range confined nano-scale liquid bridge between the tip and the surface. After the pulling of the optical fiber, 20-nm-thick gold was sputtered on the apex (diameter: approximately 100 nm) of the tip to guide and focus the beam on the spot. The critical power of the laser to overcome the barrier for the formation of a new boundary is 100 microW at the distance of 22 nm from the substrate.

  17. Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Mook, William M; Nogan, John; Dayeh, Shadi A

    2017-04-12

    Alloyed and compound contacts between metal and semiconductor transistor channels enable self-aligned gate processes which play a significant role in transistor scaling. At nanoscale dimensions and for nanowire channels, prior experiments focused on reactions along the channel length, but the early stage of reaction in their cross sections remains unknown. Here, we report on the dynamics of the solid-state reaction between metal (Ni) and semiconductor (In0.53Ga0.47As), along the cross-section of nanowires that are 15 nm in width. Unlike planar structures where crystalline nickelide readily forms at conventional, low alloying temperatures, nanowires exhibit a solid-state amorphization step that can undergo a crystal regrowth step at elevated temperatures. In this study, we capture the layer-by-layer reaction mechanism and growth rate anisotropy using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our kinetic model depicts this new, in-plane contact formation which could pave the way for engineered nanoscale transistors.

  18. Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Renjie; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Mook, William M.; ...

    2017-03-23

    In the alloyed and compound contacts between metal and semiconductor transistor channels we see that they enable self-aligned gate processes which play a significant role in transistor scaling. At nanoscale dimensions and for nanowire channels, prior experiments focused on reactions along the channel length, but the early stage of reaction in their cross sections remains unknown. We report on the dynamics of the solid-state reaction between metal (Ni) and semiconductor (In0.53Ga0.47As), along the cross-section of nanowires that are 15 nm in width. Unlike planar structures where crystalline nickelide readily forms at conventional, low alloying temperatures, nanowires exhibit a solid-state amorphizationmore » step that can undergo a crystal regrowth step at elevated temperatures. Here, we capture the layer-by-layer reaction mechanism and growth rate anisotropy using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our kinetic model depicts this new, in-plane contact formation which could pave the way for engineered nanoscale transistors.« less

  19. Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen Interaction with Ti-Doped Al (100): Hydrogen Dissociation and Surface Alane Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Erik; Sutter, Peter; Zahl, Percy; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Muckerman, James

    2006-03-01

    A comprehensive research effort on the atomistic mechanisms underlying hydrogen storage in Ti-doped NaAlH4 is aimed at deriving a knowledge base for the rational optimization of this and other related complex hydride materials. Our investigation focuses on the role of the Ti dopants in promoting reversible hydrogenation, a key requirement for any practical hydrogen storage material. The re-hydrogenation reaction proceeds from the crucial initial step of dissociative adsorption of molecular hydrogen on Al or NaH. A specific Al:Ti complex was recently predicted as an active site for H2 dissociation on extended Al(100) surfaces [1]. Combining high-resolution surface imaging experiments (scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron microscopy) with density functional theory, we are investigating the dissociative adsorption of H2 on Ti-doped Al(100) prepared in ultrahigh vacuum. We will discuss our progress toward identifying catalytically active sites for H2 dissociation on this surface, as well as pathways toward the formation of mobile Al-species. [1] S. Chaudhuri and J.T. Muckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 6952 (2005).

  20. Influence of inelastic collisions with hydrogen atoms on the formation of AlI and SiI lines in stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L. I.; Belyaev, A. K.; Shi, J.-R.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed calculations by abandoning the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (within the so-called non-LTE approach) for Al I and Si I with model atmospheres corresponding to stars of spectral types F-G-Kwith differentmetal abundances. To take into account inelastic collisions with hydrogen atoms, for the first time we have applied the cross sections calculated by Belyaev et al. using model approaches within the formalism of the Born-Oppenheimer quantum theory. We show that for Al I non-LTE leads to higher ionization (overionization) than in LTE in the spectral line formation region and to a weakening of spectral lines, which is consistent with earlier non-LTE studies. However, our results, especially for the subordinate lines, differ quantitatively from the results of predecessors. Owing to their large cross sections, the ion-pair production and mutual neutralization processes Al I( nl) + HI(1 s) ↔ Al II(3 s 2) + H- provide a close coupling of highly excited Al I levels with the Al II ground state, which causes the deviations from the equilibrium level population to decrease compared to the calculations where the collisions only with electrons are taken into account. For three moderately metal-deficient dwarf stars, the aluminum abundance has been determined from seven Al I lines in different models of their formation. Under the assumption of LTE and in non-LTE calculations including the collisions only with electrons, the Al I 3961 ˚A resonance line gives a systematically lower abundance than the mean abundance from the subordinate lines, by 0.25-0.45 dex. The difference for each star is removed by taking into account the collisions with hydrogen atoms, and the rms error of the abundance derived from all seven Al I lines decreases by a factor of 1.5-3 compared to the LTE analysis. We have calculated the non- LTE corrections to the abundance for six subordinate Al I lines as a function of the effective temperature (4500 K ≤ T eff ≤ 6500 K