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Sample records for atomic ag-o chains

  1. Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adatom chains, precise structures artificially created on an atomically regulated surface, are the smallest possible candidates for future nanoelectronics. Since all the devices are created by combining adatom chains precisely prepared with atomic precision, device characteristics are predictable, and free from deviations due to accidental structural defects. In this atomic dimension, however, an analogy to the current semiconductor devices may not work. For example, Si structures are not always semiconducting. Adatom states do not always localize at the substrate surface when adatoms form chemical bonds to the substrate atoms. Transport properties are often determined for the entire system of the chain and electrodes, and not for chains only. These fundamental issues are discussed, which will be useful for future device considerations.

  2. Doping of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid progress in atom manipulation technology, atomic chain electronics would not be a dream, where foreign atoms are placed on a substrate to form a chain, and its electronic properties are designed by controlling the lattice constant d. It has been shown theoretically that a Si atomic chain is metallic regardless of d and that a Mg atomic chain is semiconducting or insulating with a band gap modified with d. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along the chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome this dilemma, we may place a dopant atom beside the chain at every N lattice periods (N > 1). Because of the periodic arrangement of dopant atoms, we can avoid the unwanted Anderson localization. Moreover, since the dopant atoms do not constitute the chain, the overlap interaction between them is minimized, and the band structure modification can be made smallest. Some tight-binding results will be discussed to demonstrate the present idea.

  3. DOS cones along atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapiński, Tomasz

    2017-03-01

    The electron transport properties of a linear atomic chain are studied theoretically within the tight-binding Hamiltonian and the Green’s function method. Variations of the local density of states (DOS) along the chain are investigated. They are crucial in scanning tunnelling experiments and give important insight into the electron transport mechanism and charge distribution inside chains. It is found that depending on the chain parity the local DOS at the Fermi level can form cone-like structures (DOS cones) along the chain. The general condition for the local DOS oscillations is obtained and the linear behaviour of the local density function is confirmed analytically. DOS cones are characterized by a linear decay towards the chain which is in contrast to the propagation properties of charge density waves, end states and Friedel oscillations in one-dimensional systems. We find that DOS cones can appear due to non-resonant electron transport, the spin–orbit scattering or for chains fabricated on a substrate with localized electrons. It is also shown that for imperfect chains (e.g. with a reduced coupling strength between two neighboring sites) a diamond-like structure of the local DOS along the chain appears.

  4. Doping Scheme of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Atomic chains, precise structures of atomic scale created on an atomically regulated substrate surface, are candidates for future electronics. A doping scheme for intrinsic semiconducting Mg chains is considered. In order to suppress the unwanted Anderson localization and minimize the deformation of the original band shape, atomic modulation doping is considered, which is to place dopant atoms beside the chain periodically. Group I atoms are donors, and group VI or VII atoms are acceptors. As long as the lattice constant is long so that the s-p band crossing has not occurred, whether dopant atoms behave as donors or acceptors is closely related to the energy level alignment of isolated atomic levels. Band structures are calculated for Br-doped (p-type) and Cs-doped (n-type) Mg chains using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, and it is shown that the band deformation is minimized and only the Fermi energy position is modified.

  5. Doping Scheme in Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada

    1997-01-01

    Due to the dramatic reduction in MOS size, there appear many unwanted effects. In these small devices, the number of dopant atoms in the channel is not macroscopic and electrons may suffer significantly different scattering from device to device since the spatial distribution of dopant atoms is no longer regarded as continuous. This prohibits integration, while it is impossible to control such dopant positions within atomic scale. A fundamental solution is to create electronics with simple but atomically precise structures, which could be fabricated with recent atom manipulation technology. All the constituent atoms are placed as planned, and then the device characteristics are deviation-free, which is mandatory for integration. Atomic chain electronics belongs to this category. Foreign atom chains or arrays form devices, and they are placed on the atomically flat substrate surface. We can design the band structure and the resultant Fermi energy of these structures by manipulating the lattice constant. Using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, it has been predicted that isolated Si chains and arrays are metallic, Mg chains are insulating, and Mg arrays have metallic and insulating phases [1]. The transport properties along a metallic chain have been studied, emphasizing the role of the contact to electrodes [2]. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along die chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome

  6. Substrate Effects for Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A substrate for future atomic chain electronics, where adatoms are placed at designated positions and form atomically precise device components, is studied theoretically. The substrate has to serve as a two-dimensional template for adatom mounting with a reasonable confinement barrier and also provide electronic isolation, preventing unwanted coupling between independent adatom structures. For excellent structural stability, we demand chemical bonding between the adatoms and substrate atoms, but then good electronic isolation may not be guaranteed. Conditions are clarified for good isolation. Because of the chemical bonding, fundamental adatom properties are strongly influenced: a chain with group IV adatoms having two chemical bonds, or a chain with group III adatoms having one chemical bond is semiconducting. Charge transfer from or to the substrate atoms brings about unintentional doping, and the electronic properties have to be considered for the entire combination of the adatom and substrate systems even if the adatom modes are well localized at the surface.

  7. On Substrate for Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A substrate for future atomic chain electronics, where adatoms are placed at designated positions and form atomically precise device components, is studied theoretically. The substrate has to serve as a two-dimensional template for adatom mounting with a reasonable confinement barrier and also provide electronic isolation, preventing unwanted coupling between independent adatom structures. However, the two requirements conflict. For excellent electronic isolation, we may seek adatom confinement via van der Waals interaction without chemical bonding to the substrate atoms, but the confinement turns out to be very weak and hence unsatisfactory. An alternative chemical bonding scheme with excellent structural strength is examined, but even fundamental adatom chain properties such as whether chains are semiconducting or metallic are strongly influenced by the nature of the chemical bonding, and electronic isolation is not always achieved. Conditions for obtaining semiconducting chains with well-localized surface-modes, leading to good isolation, are clarified and discussed.

  8. Toward Single Atom Chains with Exfoliated Tellurium.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Hugh O H; Salamo, Gregory J; Yu, Shui-Qing; Hironaka, Takayuki; Hu, Xian; Stacy, Jeb; Shih, Ishiang

    2017-08-10

    We demonstrate that the atom chain structure of Te allows it to be exfoliated as ultra-thin flakes and nanowires. Atomic force microscopy of exfoliated Te shows that thicknesses of 1-2 nm and widths below 100 nm can be exfoliated with this method. The Raman modes of exfoliated Te match those of bulk Te, with a slight shift (4 cm(-1)) due to a hardening of the A1 and E modes. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is used to determine the crystal orientation of exfoliated Te flakes. These experiments establish exfoliation as a route to achieve nanoscale trigonal Te while also demonstrating the potential for fabrication of single atom chains of Te.

  9. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  10. Parity breaking in a double atomic chain system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, J.; Erwin, S. C.; Kemmer, J.; Bode, M.; Schäfer, J.; Claessen, R.

    2017-08-01

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate the interactions between atomic chains, of two different types, formed by the adsorption of submonolayer Au onto a stepped Si surface. The first chain consists of a double row of Au atoms. The second is a single row of Si dangling bonds at the edges of the steps. The two chains are interspersed and hence each could, in principle, influence the other structurally as well as electronically. However, we find this interaction to be highly unidirectional: The Au chains modulate the Si chains, breaking their parity and lending them directionality, while the Si chains leave the Au chains unaffected.

  11. Carbon nanotube-clamped metal atomic chain

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Yin, Li-Chang; Li, Feng; Liu, Chang; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wu, Bo; Lee, Young-Hee; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Metal atomic chain (MAC) is an ultimate one-dimensional structure with unique physical properties, such as quantized conductance, colossal magnetic anisotropy, and quantized magnetoresistance. Therefore, MACs show great potential as possible components of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices. However, MACs are usually suspended between two macroscale metallic electrodes; hence obvious technical barriers exist in the interconnection and integration of MACs. Here we report a carbon nanotube (CNT)-clamped MAC, where CNTs play the roles of both nanoconnector and electrodes. This nanostructure is prepared by in situ machining a metal-filled CNT, including peeling off carbon shells by spatially and elementally selective electron beam irradiation and further elongating the exposed metal nanorod. The microstructure and formation process of this CNT-clamped MAC are explored by both transmission electron microscopy observations and theoretical simulations. First-principles calculations indicate that strong covalent bonds are formed between the CNT and MAC. The electrical transport property of the CNT-clamped MAC was experimentally measured, and quantized conductance was observed. PMID:20427743

  12. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accepted theory of atomization, more data on the roles of cavitation, capillary waves, and even heat deposition or boiling would be valuable. In this paper, we experimentally test whether bubbles are a significant mechanism of atomization in drop-chain fountains. High-speed photography was used to observe the formation and atomization of drop-chain fountains composed of water and other liquids. For a range of ultrasonic frequencies and liquid sound speeds, it was found that the drop diameters approximately equalled the ultrasonic wavelengths. When water was exchanged for other liquids, it was observed that the atomization threshold increased with shear viscosity. Upon heating water, it was found that the time to commence atomization decreased with increasing temperature. Finally, water was atomized in an overpressure chamber where it was found that atomization was significantly diminished when the static pressure was increased. These results indicate that bubbles, generated by either acoustic cavitation or boiling, contribute significantly to atomization in the drop-chain fountain. PMID:25977591

  13. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains.

    PubMed

    Simon, Julianna C; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accepted theory of atomization, more data on the roles of cavitation, capillary waves, and even heat deposition or boiling would be valuable. In this paper, we experimentally test whether bubbles are a significant mechanism of atomization in drop-chain fountains. High-speed photography was used to observe the formation and atomization of drop-chain fountains composed of water and other liquids. For a range of ultrasonic frequencies and liquid sound speeds, it was found that the drop diameters approximately equalled the ultrasonic wavelengths. When water was exchanged for other liquids, it was observed that the atomization threshold increased with shear viscosity. Upon heating water, it was found that the time to commence atomization decreased with increasing temperature. Finally, water was atomized in an overpressure chamber where it was found that atomization was significantly diminished when the static pressure was increased. These results indicate that bubbles, generated by either acoustic cavitation or boiling, contribute significantly to atomization in the drop-chain fountain.

  14. Emerging magnetic order in platinum atomic contacts and chains

    PubMed Central

    Strigl, Florian; Espy, Christopher; Bückle, Maximilian; Scheer, Elke; Pietsch, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The development of atomic-scale structures revealing novel transport phenomena is a major goal of nanotechnology. Examples include chains of atoms that form while stretching a transition metal contact or the predicted formation of magnetic order in these chains, the existence of which is still debated. Here we report an experimental study of the magneto-conductance (MC) and anisotropic MC with atomic-size contacts and mono-atomic chains of the nonmagnetic metal platinum. We find a pronounced and diverse MC behaviour, the amplitude and functional dependence change when stretching the contact by subatomic distances. These findings can be interpreted as a signature of local magnetic order in the chain, which may be of particular importance for the application of atomic-sized contacts in spintronic devices of the smallest possible size. PMID:25649440

  15. Substrate Effects on Electronic Properties of Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Atomic chains, precise structures of adatoms created on an atomically regulated surface, are candidates for constituent elements in future electronics. It was predicted that Si chains were metallic and Mg chains were semiconducting, and a doping method was also discussed. The substrate was assumed to work as a non-interacting template holding the adatoms. However, this scheme requires a low-temperature environment so that the adatoms will not displace from their ideal positions due to unwanted thermal agitation. For better structural stability, we may seek a scheme to allow the adatoms to form chemical bonding with the substrate atoms and secure their positions. The chemical bonding has two major effects on the chain electronic properties. First, only the remaining s and p orbitals in an adatom not used for the chemical bonding can decide chain band structures, rather than the full set of orbitals previously assumed. Second, because of a possible HOMO energy difference between adatom and substrate atom, semiconducting chains are unintentionally doped. These effects are studied with a self-consistent tight-binding method with universal parameters. With one adatom per unit cell, adatom chains are semiconducting: (1) if adatoms are of group III and form one chemical bond per adatom, or (2) if adatoms are of group IV and form two chemical bonds. 'Me previous result [I I of realizing semiconducting chains by group II adatoms without chemical bonds is consistent with this picture. When the HOMO energy in an adatom is shallower than that in a substrate atom, the entire chain is positively polarized, unintentionally achieving p-type doping. When deeper, the chain is negatively charged, achieving n-type doping.

  16. Chains of carbon atoms: A vision or a new nanomaterial?

    PubMed

    Banhart, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Linear strings of sp(1)-hybridized carbon atoms are considered as a possible phase of carbon since decades. Whereas the debate about the stability of the corresponding bulk phase carbyne continues until today, the existence of isolated chains of carbon atoms has meanwhile been corroborated experimentally. Since graphene, as the two-dimensional sp(2)-bonded allotrope of carbon, has become a vast field, the question about the importance of one-dimensional carbon became of renewed interest. The present article gives an overview of the work that has been carried out on chains of carbon atoms in the past one or two decades. The review concentrates on isolated chains of carbon atoms and summarizes the experimental observations to date. While the experimental information is still very limited, many calculations of the physical and chemical properties have been published in the past years. Some of the most important theoretical studies and their importance in the present experimental situation are reviewed.

  17. Chains of carbon atoms: A vision or a new nanomaterial?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Linear strings of sp1-hybridized carbon atoms are considered as a possible phase of carbon since decades. Whereas the debate about the stability of the corresponding bulk phase carbyne continues until today, the existence of isolated chains of carbon atoms has meanwhile been corroborated experimentally. Since graphene, as the two-dimensional sp2-bonded allotrope of carbon, has become a vast field, the question about the importance of one-dimensional carbon became of renewed interest. The present article gives an overview of the work that has been carried out on chains of carbon atoms in the past one or two decades. The review concentrates on isolated chains of carbon atoms and summarizes the experimental observations to date. While the experimental information is still very limited, many calculations of the physical and chemical properties have been published in the past years. Some of the most important theoretical studies and their importance in the present experimental situation are reviewed. PMID:25821697

  18. Supersolitons: Solitonic Excitations in Atomic Soliton Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, David; Michinel, Humberto; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2008-10-03

    We show that, by tuning interactions in nonintegrable vector nonlinear Schroedinger equations modeling Bose-Einstein condensates and other relevant physical systems, it is possible to achieve a regime of elastic particlelike collisions between solitons. This would allow one to construct a Newton's cradle with solitons and supersolitons: localized collective excitations in solitary-wave chains.

  19. Probing atomic structure and Majorana wavefunctions in mono-atomic Fe chains on superconducting Pb surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Rémy; Kisiel, Marcin; Klinovaja, Jelena; Meier, Tobias; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Loss, Daniel; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the striking promise of quantum computation, Majorana bound states (MBSs) in solid-state systems have attracted wide attention in recent years. In particular, the wavefunction localisation of MBSs is a key feature and is crucial for their future implementation as qubits. Here we investigate the spatial and electronic characteristics of topological superconducting chains of iron atoms on the surface of Pb(110) by combining scanning tunnelling microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate that the Fe chains are mono-atomic, structured in a linear manner and exhibit zero-bias conductance peaks at their ends, which we interpret as signature for a MBS. Spatially resolved conductance maps of the atomic chains reveal that the MBSs are well localised at the chain ends (≲25 nm), with two localisation lengths as predicted by theory. Our observation lends strong support to use MBSs in Fe chains as qubits for quantum-computing devices.

  20. End and central plasmon resonances in linear atomic chains.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Yuan, Zhe; Gao, Shiwu

    2007-05-25

    The existence and nature of end and central plasmon resonances in a linear atomic chain, the 1D analog to surface and bulk plasmons in 2D metals, has been predicted by ab initio time-dependent density functional theory. Length dependence of the absorption spectra shows the emergence and development of collectivity of these resonances. It converges to a single resonance in the longitudinal mode, and two transverse resonances, which are localized at the ends and center of the atom chains. These collective modes bridge the gaps, in concept and scale, between the collective excitation of atomic physics and nanoplasmonics. It also outlines a route to atomic-scale engineering of collective excitations.

  1. Formation of pentagonal atomic chains in BCC Fe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainath, G.; Choudhary, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    For the first time, we report the formation of pentagonal atomic chains during tensile deformation of ultra thin BCC Fe nanowires. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on <100>/{110} BCC Fe nanowires with different cross section width varying from 0.404 to 3.634 nm at temperatures ranging from 10 to 900 K. The results indicate that above certain temperature, long and stable pentagonal atomic chains form in BCC Fe nanowires with cross section width less than 2.83 nm. The temperature, above which the pentagonal chains form, increases with increase in nanowire size. The pentagonal chains have been observed to be highly stable over large plastic strains and contribute to high ductility in Fe nanowires.

  2. Plasmon excitations in the dimers formed by atom chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Hong-jie; Hao, Da-peng; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Xiao-mei

    2017-02-01

    Based on the linear response theory in the random-phase approximation and the free-electron gas model, we study the plasmon excitations in the dimers formed by atom chains. With the help of energy absorption spectrum and charge distribution, the evolutions of longitudinal and transverse plasmon, and the effect of the system parameters such as size, atomic separation and electron filling on plasmon are obtained. In addition, the dipole, quadrupole, end and central plasmon are observed.

  3. Stability of conductance oscillations in carbon atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Hou, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Xiu-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The conductance stabilities of carbon atomic chains (CACs) with different lengths are investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method combined with density functional theory. Regular even-odd conductance oscillation is observed as a function of the wire length. This oscillation is influenced delicately by changes in the end carbon or sulfur atoms as well as variations in coupling strength between the chain and leads. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in odd-numbered chains is the main transmission channel, whereas the conductance remains relatively small for even-numbered chains and a significant drift in the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance toward higher energies is observed as the number of carbon atoms increases. The amplitude of the conductance oscillation is predicted to be relatively stable based on a thiol joint between the chain and leads. Results show that the current-voltage evolution of CACs can be affected by the chain length. The differential and second derivatives of the conductance are also provided. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304079, 11404094, and 51201059), the Priority Scientific and Technological Project of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 14A140027), the School Fund (Grant No. 2012BS055), and the Plan of Natural Science Fundamental Research of Henan University of Technology, China (Grant No. 2014JCYJ15).

  4. Approaching the quantum limit for plasmonics: linear atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Emily; Bryant, Garnett

    Linear atomic chains, such as atom chains on surfaces, linear arrays of dopants in semiconductors, or linear molecules, provide ideal testbeds for studying quantum plasmonics in nanosystems. We study the many-body excitations of finite (10-25) linear atomic chains. We use both time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and exact diagonalization to analyze the excitations. TDDFT reveals optically driven excitations that can be single-particle-like, plasmon-like or mixed states. Such states can have very different dependencies on the electron-electron interaction strength, which can be used to help identify the states. TDDFT can identify plasmonic resonances, but it does not reveal how to quantize them. Exact diagonalization is used to get the full quantum description. However, exact diagonalization results can be very different from TDDFT results. Highly correlated, multi-excitonic states, also strongly dependent on the electron-electron interaction strength, appear in the exact response but not in TDDFT excitation spectra. These excitonic many-body states make it hard to identify plasmonic excitations. Exact results are also strongly dependent on the strength of the exchange interaction. We present these results to show how quantum plasmons appear in linear atomic chains.

  5. Substrate Effects on Electronic Properties of Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    When the device size is reduced down to 0.07 micrometers, the number of dopant atoms in the channel will no longer be macroscopic, typically less than a hundred. A spatial distribution of these dopant atoms will fluctuate statistically from device to device even in identically designed devices, and this places a serious limitation for integration. It is, however, impractical to control dopant positions within atomic dimension. One fundamental solution to this problem is to create electronics with atomically precise, but preferably simple structures. Atomic chains, precise structures of adatoms created on an atomically regulated surface, are candidates for constituent components in future electronics. All the adatoms will be placed at designated positions on the substrate, and all the device structures will be precise, free from any deviations. It was predicted using the tight-binding calculation with universal parameters that silicon chains were metallic and magnesium chains were semiconducting regardless of the lattice spacing, and a possible doping method was also proposed. In these treatments, the substrate was assumed to serve as a non-interacting template holding the adatoms without a formation of chemical bonding with substrate atoms. However, this scheme may not be easy to implement experimentally. Adatoms will have to be fixed with a van der Waals force on the substrate, but the force is generally weak and an extremely low temperature environment has to be prepared to suppress their unwanted thermal displacement. It may be logical to seek a scheme to allow the adatoms to form chemical bonding with the substrate atoms and secure their positions. The substrate effects are studied in detail.

  6. Mirror and cavity formations by chains of collectively radiating atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulfam, Qurrat-ul-Ain; Ficek, Zbigniew

    2016-11-01

    We search for mirror and cavitylike features of a linear chain of atoms in which one of the atoms is specially chosen as a probe atom that is initially prepared in its excited state or is continuously driven by a laser field. Short chains are considered, composed of only three and five atoms. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the interatomic dipole-dipole interaction, which may lead to a collective ordering of the emission along some specific directions. We examine the conditions under which the radiative modes available for the emission are only those contained inside a cone centered about the interatomic axis. Particular interest is in achieving one-way emission along the interatomic axis, in either the left (backward) or the right (forward) direction, which is referred to as a mirrorlike behavior of the atomic chain. A direction-dependent quantity called the directivity function, which determines how effective the system is in concentrating the radiation in a given direction, is introduced. We show that the function depends crucially on the distance between the atoms and find that there is a threshold for the interatomic distances above which a strongly directional emission can be achieved. The one-sided emission as a manifestation of the mirrorlike behavior and a highly focused emission along the interatomic axis as a characteristic of a single-mode cavity are demonstrated to occur in the stationary field. Below the threshold the directivity function is spherically symmetric. However, we find that the population can be trapped in one of the atoms, and sometimes in all atoms, indicating that at these short distances the system decays to a state for which there are no radiative modes available for emission.

  7. High-resolution studies of the Majorana atomic chain platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Benjamin E.; Randeria, Mallika T.; Li, Jian; Jeon, Sangjun; Xie, Yonglong; Wang, Zhijun; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Andrei Bernevig, B.; Yazdani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Ordered assemblies of magnetic atoms on the surface of conventional superconductors can be used to engineer topological superconducting phases and realize Majorana fermion quasiparticles (MQPs) in a condensed matter setting. Recent experiments have shown that chains of Fe atoms on Pb generically have the required electronic characteristics to form a one-dimensional topological superconductor and have revealed spatially resolved signatures of localized MQPs at the ends of such chains. Here we report higher-resolution measurements of the same atomic chain system performed using a dilution refrigerator scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). With significantly better energy resolution than previous studies, we show that the zero-bias peak (ZBP) in Fe chains has no detectable splitting from hybridization with other states. The measurements also reveal that the ZBP exhibits a distinctive `double eye’ spatial pattern on nanometre length scales. Theoretically we show that this is a general consequence of STM measurements of MQPs with substantial spectral weight in the superconducting substrate, a conclusion further supported by measurements of Pb overlayers deposited on top of the Fe chains. Finally, we report experiments performed with superconducting tips in search of the particle-hole symmetric MQP signature expected in such measurements.

  8. High-resolution studies of the Majorana atomic chain platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Benjamin E.; Randeria, Mallika T.; Li, Jian; Jeon, Sangjun; Xie, Yonglong; Wang, Zhijun; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Andrei Bernevig, B.; Yazdani, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Ordered assemblies of magnetic atoms on the surface of conventional superconductors can be used to engineer topological superconducting phases and realize Majorana fermion quasiparticles (MQPs) in a condensed matter setting. Recent experiments have shown that chains of Fe atoms on Pb generically have the required electronic characteristics to form a one-dimensional topological superconductor and have revealed spatially resolved signatures of localized MQPs at the ends of such chains. Here we report higher-resolution measurements of the same atomic chain system performed using a dilution refrigerator scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). With significantly better energy resolution than previous studies, we show that the zero-bias peak (ZBP) in Fe chains has no detectable splitting from hybridization with other states. The measurements also reveal that the ZBP exhibits a distinctive `double eye’ spatial pattern on nanometre length scales. Theoretically we show that this is a general consequence of STM measurements of MQPs with substantial spectral weight in the superconducting substrate, a conclusion further supported by measurements of Pb overlayers deposited on top of the Fe chains. Finally, we report experiments performed with superconducting tips in search of the particle-hole symmetric MQP signature expected in such measurements.

  9. First principles calculation of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Au-Pd atomic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, Mudra R.; Sharma, A. C.

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of free standing Au-Pd bimetallic atomic chain is studied using ab-initio method. It is found that electronic and magnetic properties of chains depend on position of atoms and number of atoms. Spin polarization factor for different atomic configuration of atomic chain is calculated predicting a half metallic behavior. It suggests a total spin polarised transport in these chains.

  10. Ab initio quantum transport in atomic carbon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello-Méndez, Andrés R.; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Banhart, Florian; NAPS Team; Carbyne Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Carbyne, the sp-hybridized phase of carbon, is still a missing link in the family of carbon allotropes. Recently, detailed electrical measurements and first-principles electronic transport calculations have been performed on monoatomic carbon chains. When the 1D system is under strain, the current-voltage curves exhibit a semiconducting behavior, which corresponds to the polyyne structure of the atomic chain with alternating single and triple bonds. Conversely, when the chain is unstrained, the ohmic behavior is observed in agreement with the metallic cumulene structure with double bonds, confirming recent theoretical predictions, namely that a metal-insulator transition can be induced by adjusting the strain. The key role of the contacting leads is also scrutinized by ab initio quantum conductance calculations, explaining the rectifying behavior measured in monoatomic carbon chains in a non-symmetric contact configuration.

  11. Approaching the quantum limit for plasmonics: linear atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Garnett W.

    2016-07-01

    Optical excitations in atomic-scale materials can be strongly mixed, with contributions from both single-particle transitions and collective response. This complicates the quantum description of these excitations, because there is no clear way to define their quantization. To develop a quantum theory for these optical excitations, they must first be characterized so that single-particle-like and collective excitations can be identified. Linear atomic chains, such as atom chains on surfaces, linear arrays of dopant atoms in semiconductors, or linear molecules, provide ideal testbeds for studying collective excitations in small atomic-scale systems. We use exact diagonalization to study the many-body excitations of finite (10 to 25) linear atomic chains described by a simplified model Hamiltonian. Exact diagonalization results can be very different from the density functional theory (DFT) results usually obtained. Highly correlated, multiexcitonic states, strongly dependent on the electron-electron interaction strength, dominate the exact spectral and optical response but are not present in DFT excitation spectra. The ubiquitous presence of excitonic many-body states in the spectra makes it hard to identify plasmonic excitations. A combination of criteria involving a many-body state’s transfer dipole moment, balance, transfer charge, dynamical response, and induced-charge distribution do strongly suggest which many-body states should be considered as plasmonic. This analysis can be used to reveal the few plasmonic many-body states hidden in the dense spectrum of low-energy single-particle-like states and many higher-energy excitonic-like states. These excitonic states are the predominant excitation because of the many possible ways to develop local correlations.

  12. Structural Transition in Atomic Chains Driven by Transient Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polei, S.; Snijders, P. C.; Erwin, S. C.; Himpsel, F. J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Barke, I.

    2013-10-01

    A reversible structural transition is observed on Si(553)-Au by scanning tunneling microscopy, triggered by electrons injected from the tip into the surface. The periodicity of atomic chains near the step edges changes from the 1×3 ground state to a 1×2 excited state with increasing tunneling current. The threshold current for this transition is reduced at lower temperatures. In conjunction with first-principles density-functional calculations it is shown that the 1×2 phase is created by temporary doping of the atom chains. Random telegraph fluctuations between two levels of the tunneling current provide direct access to the dynamics of the phase transition, revealing lifetimes in the millisecond range.

  13. CHARMM36 united atom chain model for lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah; Tran, Alan; Allsopp, Matthew; Lim, Joseph B; Hénin, Jérôme; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2014-01-16

    Molecular simulations of lipids and surfactants require accurate parameters to reproduce and predict experimental properties. Previously, a united atom (UA) chain model was developed for the CHARMM27/27r lipids (Hénin, J., et al. J. Phys. Chem. B. 2008, 112, 7008-7015) but suffers from the flaw that bilayer simulations using the model require an imposed surface area ensemble, which limits its use to pure bilayer systems. A UA-chain model has been developed based on the CHARMM36 (C36) all-atom lipid parameters, termed C36-UA, and agreed well with bulk, lipid membrane, and micelle formation of a surfactant. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of alkanes (heptane and pentadecane) were used to test the validity of C36-UA on density, heat of vaporization, and liquid self-diffusion constants. Then, simulations using C36-UA resulted in accurate properties (surface area per lipid, X-ray and neutron form factors, and chain order parameters) of various saturated- and unsaturated-chain bilayers. When mixed with the all-atom cholesterol model and tested with a series of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/cholesterol mixtures, the C36-UA model performed well. Simulations of self-assembly of a surfactant (dodecylphosphocholine, DPC) using C36-UA suggest an aggregation number of 53 ± 11 DPC molecules at 0.45 M of DPC, which agrees well with experimental estimates. Therefore, the C36-UA force field offers a useful alternative to the all-atom C36 lipid force field by requiring less computational cost while still maintaining the same level of accuracy, which may prove useful for large systems with proteins.

  14. Dynamical entanglement purification using chains of atoms and optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gonta, Denis; Loock, Peter van

    2011-10-15

    In the framework of cavity QED, we propose a practical scheme to purify dynamically a bipartite entangled state using short chains of atoms coupled to high-finesse optical cavities. In contrast to conventional entanglement purification protocols, we avoid controlled-not gates, thus reducing complicated pulse sequences and superfluous qubit operations. Our interaction scheme works in a deterministic way and, together with entanglement distribution and swapping, opens a route toward efficient quantum repeaters for long-distance quantum communication.

  15. Structure of self-assembled Mn atom chains on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Renan; Longobardi, Maria; Koester, Sigrun A.; Kirkham, Christopher J.; Bowler, David; Renner, Christoph

    Mn has been found to self-assemble into atomic chains running perpendicular to the surface dimer reconstruction on Si(001). They differ from other atomic chains by a striking asymmetric appearance in filled state scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. This has prompted complicated structural models involving up to three Mn atoms per chain unit. Combining STM, atomic force microscopy and density functional theory we find that a simple necklace-like chain of single Mn atoms reproduces all their prominent features, including their asymmetry not captured by current models. The upshot is a remarkably simpler structure for modelling the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn atom chains on Si(001).

  16. Structure of Self-Assembled Mn Atom Chains on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, R.; Longobardi, M.; Köster, S. A.; Kirkham, Ch. J.; Bowler, D.; Renner, Ch.

    2015-12-01

    Mn has been found to self-assemble into atomic chains running perpendicular to the surface dimer reconstruction on Si(001). They differ from other atomic chains by a striking asymmetric appearance in filled state scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. This has prompted complicated structural models involving up to three Mn atoms per chain unit. Combining STM, atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory we find that a simple necklacelike chain of single Mn atoms reproduces all their prominent features, including their asymmetry not captured by current models. The upshot is a remarkably simpler structure for modeling the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn atom chains on Si(001).

  17. Stretching of Single Polymer Chains Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C.; van der Vegte, E. W.; van Swieten, E.; Robillard, G. T.; Hadziioannou, G.

    1998-03-01

    A variety of macroscopic phenomenon involve "nanoscale" polymer deformation including rubber elasticity, shear yielding, strain hardening, stress relaxation, fracture, and flow. With the advent of new and improved experimental techniques, such as the atomic force microscope (AFM), the probing of physical properties of polymers has reached finer and finer scales. The development of mixed self-assembling monolayer techniques and the chemical functionalization of AFM probe tips has allowed for mechanical experiments on single polymer chains of molecular dimensions. In our experiments, mixed monolayers are prepared in which end-functionalized, flexible polymer chains of thiol-terminated poly(methacrylic acid) are covalently bonded, isolated, and randomly distributed on gold substrates. The coils are then imaged, tethered to a gold-coated AFM tip, and stretched between the tip and the substrate in a conventional force / distance experiment. An increase in the attractive force due to entropic, elastic resistance to stretching, as well as fracture of the polymer chain is observed. The effect of chain stiffness, topological constraints, strain rate, mechanical hysteresis, and stress relaxation were investigated. Force modulation techniques were also employed in order to image the viscoelastic character of the polymer chains. Parallel work includes similar studies of biological systems such as wheat gluten proteins and polypeptides.

  18. Correlated Exciton Transport in Rydberg-Dressed-Atom Spin Chains.

    PubMed

    Schempp, H; Günter, G; Wüster, S; Weidemüller, M; Whitlock, S

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the transport of excitations through a chain of atoms with nonlocal dissipation introduced through coupling to additional short-lived states. The system is described by an effective spin-1/2 model where the ratio of the exchange interaction strength to the reservoir coupling strength determines the type of transport, including coherent exciton motion, incoherent hopping, and a regime in which an emergent length scale leads to a preferred hopping distance far beyond nearest neighbors. For multiple impurities, the dissipation gives rise to strong nearest-neighbor correlations and entanglement. These results highlight the importance of nontrivial dissipation, correlations, and many-body effects in recent experiments on the dipole-mediated transport of Rydberg excitations.

  19. Realization of a particle-in-a-box: electron in an atomic Pd chain.

    PubMed

    Nilius, N; Wallis, T M; Ho, W

    2005-11-10

    Well-defined Pd chains were assembled from single atoms on a NiAl(110) surface with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic properties of the chains were determined by spatially resolved conductance measurements, revealing a series of quantum well states with parabolic dispersion. The particle-in-a-box states in Pd chains show higher onset energy and larger effective mass than those in Au chains investigated before, reflecting the influence of elemental composition on one-dimensional electronic systems. The intrinsic widths and spectral intensities of Pd induced states provide information on lifetime and spatial localization of states in the atomic chain.

  20. Quantitative high-resolution microscopy on a suspended chain of gold atoms.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, H; Oshima, Y; Kondo, Y; Takayanagi, K

    2001-06-01

    High-resolution electron microscope images of a suspended gold chain were analyzed quantitatively. The images of the suspended gold chain were recorded on videotapes, during in situ observation in an ultra-high-vacuum electron microscope. The chain consisted of four gold atoms free from any substrate. Image simulation verified that the gold chain has a center-top geometry. The simulation also showed that the chain has no glue atoms spinning around the axis of the chain. A spinning gold atom was shown to give 50% of the stationary atom in gray scale. By comparing the noise level of the observed image and the gray scale of single atoms such as C, Si, S, Cu, and Au, we verified that the Si and S atoms have almost twice as large contrast as the noise (peak-to-peak), and C atoms have almost the same contrast as the noise level. The analysis showed it critical to detect a single Si and S atoms.

  1. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wang, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μB for BnNn-1, 2 μB for BnNn, and 3 μB for BnNn+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short BnNn+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long BnNn+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (BnNn-1 and BnNn). The proposed short BnNn+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied.

  2. Dark Energy Drives Vibrating Atoms, Chain reactions, Etc.:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sven, Charles

    2010-03-01

    The 14 billion year old atom - destroyed Hiroshima, vibrates at a 100 trillion times/sec, emanates photons at the speed of light, contains atom sized proton force field that attracts electrons, all driven by ``Dark Energy.'' This ageless atom's superpowerful requirements, must be supplied from a huge, external, super high-frequency, super-cooled, ``Dark Energy field,'' undetected by current technology, existing for 14+ billion years without degradation. Demonstrating this age-old atom's ``dark energy'' power source requires the synthesis of a number of elements, forces, observations and experiments, many of which are combined in novel but only in replicable venues. Solution includes ``Dark Energy'' participation in celestial observations. Expanded excerpt from my presentation at: the American Physical Society's April meeting in Denver 2009 Section T8: Cosmology

  3. The potentials and challenges of electron microscopy in the study of atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banhart, Florian; Torre, Alessandro La; Romdhane, Ferdaous Ben; Cretu, Ovidiu

    2017-04-01

    The article is a brief review on the potential of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the investigation of atom chains which are the paradigm of a strictly one-dimensional material. After the progress of TEM in the study of new two-dimensional materials, microscopy of free-standing one-dimensional structures is a new challenge with its inherent potentials and difficulties. In-situ experiments in the TEM allowed, for the first time, to generate isolated atomic chains consisting of metals, carbon or boron nitride. Besides having delivered a solid proof for the existence of atomic chains, in-situ TEM studies also enabled us to measure the electrical properties of these fundamental linear structures. While ballistic quantum conductivity is observed in chains of metal atoms, electrical transport in chains of sp1-hybridized carbon is limited by resonant states and reflections at the contacts. Although substantial progress has been made in recent TEM studies of atom chains, fundamental questions have to be answered, concerning the structural stability of the chains, bonding states at the contacts, and the suitability for applications in nanotechnology. Contribution to the topical issue "The 16th European Microscopy Congress (EMC 2016)", edited by Richard Brydson and Pascale Bayle-Guillemaud

  4. Strain-induced metal-semiconductor transition observed in atomic carbon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre, A.; Botello-Mendez, A.; Baaziz, W.; Charlier, J.-C.; Banhart, F.

    2015-03-01

    Carbyne, the sp1-hybridized phase of carbon, is still a missing link in the family of carbon allotropes. While the bulk phases of carbyne remain elusive, the elementary constituents, that is, linear chains of carbon atoms, have already been observed using the electron microscope. Isolated atomic chains are highly interesting one-dimensional conductors that have stimulated considerable theoretical work. Experimental information, however, is still very limited. Here we show electrical measurements and first-principles transport calculations on monoatomic carbon chains. When the 1D system is under strain, the chains are semiconducting corresponding to the polyyne structure with alternating bond lengths. Conversely, when the chain is unstrained, the ohmic behaviour of metallic cumulene with uniform bond lengths is observed. This confirms the recent prediction of a metal-insulator transition that is induced by strain. The key role of the contacting leads explains the rectifying behaviour measured in monoatomic carbon chains in a nonsymmetric contact configuration.

  5. Strain-induced metal–semiconductor transition observed in atomic carbon chains

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, A.; Botello-Mendez, A.; Baaziz, W.; Charlier, J. -C.; Banhart, F.

    2015-01-01

    Carbyne, the sp1-hybridized phase of carbon, is still a missing link in the family of carbon allotropes. While the bulk phases of carbyne remain elusive, the elementary constituents, that is, linear chains of carbon atoms, have already been observed using the electron microscope. Isolated atomic chains are highly interesting one-dimensional conductors that have stimulated considerable theoretical work. Experimental information, however, is still very limited. Here we show electrical measurements and first-principles transport calculations on monoatomic carbon chains. When the 1D system is under strain, the chains are semiconducting corresponding to the polyyne structure with alternating bond lengths. Conversely, when the chain is unstrained, the ohmic behaviour of metallic cumulene with uniform bond lengths is observed. This confirms the recent prediction of a metal–insulator transition that is induced by strain. The key role of the contacting leads explains the rectifying behaviour measured in monoatomic carbon chains in a nonsymmetric contact configuration. PMID:25818506

  6. Area-efficient nonvolatile carry chain based on pass-transistor/atom-switch hybrid logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xu; Tsuji, Yukihide; Sakamoto, Toshitsugu; Morioka, Ayuka; Miyamura, Makoto; Tada, Munehiro; Banno, Naoki; Okamoto, Koichiro; Iguchi, Noriyuki; Hada, Hiromitsu

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an area-efficient nonvolatile carry chain combining look-up tables and a pass-transistor-logic-based adder is newly developed using complementary atom switches without additional CMOS circuits. A proposed tristate switch composed of three pairs of complementary atom switches selects one of “0”, “1”, and the “carry_in” signal as the input of a common multiplexer for both a look-up table and an adder. The developed nonvolatile carry chain achieves the reductions of 20% area, 17% delay, and 17% power consumption, respectively, in comparison with a conventional nonvolatile carry chain using dedicated CMOS gates.

  7. Plasmon-induced dynamics of H{sub 2} splitting on a silver atomic chain

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lei; Ding, Zijing; Song, Peng; Wang, Fangwei; Meng, Sheng

    2015-08-24

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) supported in metal nanostructures can be efficiently harnessed to drive photocatalytic reactions, whose atomic scale mechanism remains a challenge. Here, real-time dynamics of H{sub 2} photosplitting on a linear silver atomic chain, upon exposure to femtosecond laser pulses, has been investigated using time-dependent density functional theory. The wavelength dependent H{sub 2} splitting process is strongly coupled to LSPR excitation in silver chain. We identify that hot electrons produced in the silver chain by plasmon excitation are transferred to the antibonding state of the adsorbed H{sub 2} and trigger H{sub 2} dissociation, consistent with experimental observations. Increasing illumination intensity and the length of atomic chain promote H{sub 2} splitting, thanks to stronger LSPR. Dynamic electronic response can be quantitatively described within the present approach, providing insights towards a complete fundamental understanding on plasmon-induced chemical reactions at the microscopic scale.

  8. Study on nitrogen doped carbon atom chains with negative differential resistance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ji-Mei; Liu, Jing; Min, Yi; Zhou, Li-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Recent calculations (Mahmoud and Lugli, 2013, [21]) of gold leads sandwiching carbon chains which are separated by diphenyl-dimethyl demonstrated that the negative differential resistance (NDR) effect appears only for ;odd; numbers of carbon atoms. In this paper, according to a first-principles study based on non-equilibrium Green's function combining density functional theory, we find that the NDR effect appears both for ;odd; and for ;even; numbers of carbon atoms when the chains are doped by nitrogen atom. Our calculations remove the restriction of ;odd/even; chains for the NDR effect, which may promise the potential applications of carbon chains in the nano-scale or molecular devices in the future.

  9. Magnetic properties of Pd atomic chains formed during submonolayer deposition of 3d metals on Pd(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyuk, O. V.; Ignatiev, P. A.; Negulyaev, N. N.; Saletsky, A. M.; Hergert, W.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, an unusual intermixing-driven scenario for the growth of atomic Pd chains on a Pd(110) surface during deposition of 3d metal atoms has been predicted (Stepanyuk 2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 155410) and confirmed by STM and STS experiments (Wie et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 225504). Performing ab initio calculations we demonstrate that Pd atomic chains grown above embedded Fe atoms exhibit magnetic properties which depend on the substrate mediated exchange interaction between the Fe atoms.

  10. Magnetic properties of Pd atomic chains formed during submonolayer deposition of 3d metals on Pd(110).

    PubMed

    Stepanyuk, O V; Ignatiev, P A; Negulyaev, N N; Saletsky, A M; Hergert, W

    2012-06-13

    Recently, an unusual intermixing-driven scenario for the growth of atomic Pd chains on a Pd(110) surface during deposition of 3d metal atoms has been predicted (Stepanyuk 2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 155410) and confirmed by STM and STS experiments (Wie et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 225504). Performing ab initio calculations we demonstrate that Pd atomic chains grown above embedded Fe atoms exhibit magnetic properties which depend on the substrate mediated exchange interaction between the Fe atoms.

  11. Observation of Aubry-type transition in finite atom chains via friction.

    PubMed

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-07-01

    The highly nonlinear many-body physics of a chain of mutually interacting atoms in contact with a periodic substrate gives rise to complex static and dynamical phenomena, such as structural phase transitions and friction. In the limit of an infinite chain incommensurate with the substrate, Aubry predicted a transition with increasing substrate potential, from the chain's intrinsic arrangement free to slide on the substrate, to a pinned arrangement favouring the substrate pattern. So far, the Aubry transition has not been observed. Here, using spatially resolved position and friction measurements of cold trapped ions in an optical lattice, we observed a finite version of the Aubry transition and the onset of its hallmark fractal atomic arrangement. Notably, the observed critical lattice depth for few-ion chains agrees well with the infinite-chain prediction. Our results elucidate the connection between competing ordering patterns and superlubricity in nanocontacts-the elementary building blocks of friction.

  12. Tailoring Thermal Conductivity of Single-stranded Carbon-chain Polymers through Atomic Mass Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Quanwen; Zeng, Lingping; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Tailoring the thermal conductivity of polymers is central to enlarge their applications in the thermal management of flexible integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by fabricating materials with various nanostructures, but a clear relationship between various functional groups and thermal properties of polymers remains to be established. Here, we numerically study the thermal conductivity of single-stranded carbon-chain polymers with multiple substituents of hydrogen atoms through atomic mass modification. We find that their thermal conductivity can be tuned by atomic mass modifications as revealed through molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results suggest that heavy homogeneous substituents do not assist heat transport and trace amounts of heavy substituents can in fact hinder heat transport substantially. Our analysis indicates that carbon chain has the biggest contribution (over 80%) to the thermal conduction in single-stranded carbon-chain polymers. We further demonstrate that atomic mass modifications influence the phonon bands of bonding carbon atoms, and the discrepancies of phonon bands between carbon atoms are responsible for the remarkable drops in thermal conductivity and large thermal resistances in carbon chains. Our study provides fundamental insight into how to tailor the thermal conductivity of polymers through variable substituents.

  13. Tailoring Thermal Conductivity of Single-stranded Carbon-chain Polymers through Atomic Mass Modification.

    PubMed

    Liao, Quanwen; Zeng, Lingping; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-07

    Tailoring the thermal conductivity of polymers is central to enlarge their applications in the thermal management of flexible integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by fabricating materials with various nanostructures, but a clear relationship between various functional groups and thermal properties of polymers remains to be established. Here, we numerically study the thermal conductivity of single-stranded carbon-chain polymers with multiple substituents of hydrogen atoms through atomic mass modification. We find that their thermal conductivity can be tuned by atomic mass modifications as revealed through molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results suggest that heavy homogeneous substituents do not assist heat transport and trace amounts of heavy substituents can in fact hinder heat transport substantially. Our analysis indicates that carbon chain has the biggest contribution (over 80%) to the thermal conduction in single-stranded carbon-chain polymers. We further demonstrate that atomic mass modifications influence the phonon bands of bonding carbon atoms, and the discrepancies of phonon bands between carbon atoms are responsible for the remarkable drops in thermal conductivity and large thermal resistances in carbon chains. Our study provides fundamental insight into how to tailor the thermal conductivity of polymers through variable substituents.

  14. Tailoring Thermal Conductivity of Single-stranded Carbon-chain Polymers through Atomic Mass Modification

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Quanwen; Zeng, Lingping; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the thermal conductivity of polymers is central to enlarge their applications in the thermal management of flexible integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by fabricating materials with various nanostructures, but a clear relationship between various functional groups and thermal properties of polymers remains to be established. Here, we numerically study the thermal conductivity of single-stranded carbon-chain polymers with multiple substituents of hydrogen atoms through atomic mass modification. We find that their thermal conductivity can be tuned by atomic mass modifications as revealed through molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results suggest that heavy homogeneous substituents do not assist heat transport and trace amounts of heavy substituents can in fact hinder heat transport substantially. Our analysis indicates that carbon chain has the biggest contribution (over 80%) to the thermal conduction in single-stranded carbon-chain polymers. We further demonstrate that atomic mass modifications influence the phonon bands of bonding carbon atoms, and the discrepancies of phonon bands between carbon atoms are responsible for the remarkable drops in thermal conductivity and large thermal resistances in carbon chains. Our study provides fundamental insight into how to tailor the thermal conductivity of polymers through variable substituents. PMID:27713563

  15. Single-photon transport through an atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a single-photon pulse traveling through a linear atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional (1D) single mode photonic waveguide. We derive a time-dependent dynamical theory for this collective many-body system which allows us to study the real time evolution of the photon transport and the atomic excitations. Our analytical result is consistent with previous numerical calculations when there is only one atom. For an atomic chain, the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode can significantly change the dynamics of the system. The reflectivity of a photon can be tuned by changing the ratio of coupling strength and the photon linewidth or by changing the number of atoms in the chain. The reflectivity of a single-photon pulse with finite bandwidth can even approach 100 % . The spectrum of the reflected and transmitted photon can also be significantly different from the single-atom case. Many interesting physical phenomena can occur in this system such as the photonic band-gap effects, quantum entanglement generation, Fano-like interference, and superradiant effects. For engineering, this system may serve as a single-photon frequency filter, single-photon modulation, and may find important applications in quantum information.

  16. Unexpected Huge Dimerization Ratio in One-Dimensional Carbon Atomic Chains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Chang; Morishita, Shigeyuki; Koshino, Masanori; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Teng, Po-Yuan; Chiu, Po-Wen; Sawada, Hidetaka; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2017-01-11

    Peierls theory predicted atomic distortion in one-dimensional (1D) crystal due to its intrinsic instability in 1930. Free-standing carbon atomic chains created in situ in transmission electron microscope (TEM)1-3 are an ideal example to experimentally observe the dimerization behavior of carbon atomic chain within a finite length. We report here a surprisingly huge distortion found in the free-standing carbon atomic chains at 773 K, which is 10 times larger than the value expected in the system. Such an abnormally distorted phase only dominates at the elevated temperatures, while two distinct phases, distorted and undistorted, coexist at lower or ambient temperatures. Atom-by-atom spectroscopy indeed shows considerable variations in the carbon 1s spectra at each atomic site but commonly observes a slightly downshifted π* peak, which proves its sp(1) bonding feature. These results suggest that the simple model, relaxed and straight, is not fully adequate to describe the realistic 1D structure, which is extremely sensitive to perturbations such as external force or boundary conditions.

  17. Visualization of Fermi's golden rule through imaging of light emission from atomic silver chains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Bobisch, C A; Ho, W

    2009-08-21

    Atomic-scale spatial imaging of one-dimensional chains of silver atoms allows Fermi's golden rule, a fundamental principle governing optical transitions, to be visualized. We used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to assemble a silver atom chain on a nickel-aluminum alloy surface. Photon emission was induced with electrons from the tip of the STM. The emission was spatially resolved with subnanometer resolution by changing the tip position along the chain. The number and positions of the emission maxima in the photon images match those of the nodes in the differential conductance images of particle-in-a-box states. This surprising correlation between the emission maxima and nodes in the density of states is a manifestation of Fermi's golden rule in real space for radiative transitions and provides an understanding of the mechanism of STM-induced light emission.

  18. Tuning the conductivity along atomic chains by selective chemisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Miccoli, I.; Stöckmann, J. P.; Pfnür, H.; Braun, C.; Neufeld, S.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2017-03-01

    Adsorption of Au on vicinal Si(111) surfaces results in growth of long-range ordered metallic quantum wires. In this paper, we utilized site-specific and selective adsorption of oxygen to modify chemically the transport via different channels in the systems Si(553)-Au and Si(557)-Au. They were analyzed by electron diffraction and four-tip STM-based transport experiments. Modeling of the adsorption process by density functional theory shows that the adatoms and rest atoms on Si(557)-Au provide energetically favored adsorption sites, which predominantly alter the transport along the wire direction. Since this structural motif is missing on Si(553)-Au, the transport channels remain almost unaffected by oxidation.

  19. One-photon scattering by an atomic chain in a two-mode resonator: cyclic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a chain of N identical two-level atoms coupled with a quantized electromagnetic field, initially prepared via a single-photon Fock state, is investigated. The N-particle state amplitude of the system is calculated for several space configurations of the atoms in the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation. It was shown that the space configuration of an atomic chain, the total number of atoms, and even the available volume for the field modes define the behavior of the system state amplitude with time. Applying the condition of ‘cyclic bonds’, presented in this work, to the elaborated theory allows to describe the system time evolution, practically, for any space configuration. PMID:24860278

  20. Theoretical realization of cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated carbon atomic chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Guo, Ling-Ju; Zeng, Zhi; Ju, Xin

    2011-01-14

    The capacity of carbon atomic chains with different terminations for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Unlike the physisorption of H(2) on the H-terminated chain, we show that two Li (Na) atoms each capping one end of the odd- or even-numbered carbon chain can hold ten H(2) molecules with optimal binding energies for room temperature storage. The hybridization of the Li 2p states with the H(2)σ orbitals contributes to the H(2) adsorption. However, the binding mechanism of the H(2) molecules on Na arises only from the polarization interaction between the charged Na atom and the H(2). Interestingly, additional H(2) molecules can be bound to the carbon atoms at the chain ends due to the charge transfer between Li 2s2p (Na 3s) and C 2p states. More importantly, dimerization of these isolated metal-capped chains does not affect the hydrogen binding energy significantly. In addition, a single chain can be stabilized effectively by the C(60) fullerenes termination. With a hydrogen uptake of ∼10 wt.% on Li-coated C(60)-C(n)-C(60) (n = 5, 8), the Li(12)C(60)-C(n)-Li(12)C(60) complex, keeping the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules per Li and stabilizing the dispersion of individual Li atoms, can serve as better building blocks of polymers than the (Li(12)C(60))(2) dimer. These findings suggest a new route to design cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated sp carbon chains.

  1. Lattice Dynamics of the Binary Aperiodic Chains of Atoms I:. Fractal Dimension of Phonon Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salejda, Włodzimierz

    The microscopic harmonic model of lattice dynamics of the binary chains of atoms is formulated and studied numerically. The dependence of spring constants of the nearest-neighbor (NN) interactions on the average distance between atoms are taken into account. The covering fractal dimensions Df{( c ; )} of the Cantor-set-like phonon spec-tra (PS) of generalized Fibonacci and non-Fibonaccian aperiodic chains containing of 16384≤N≤33461 atoms are determined numerically. The dependence of Df{( c ; )} on the strength Q of NN interactions and on R=mH/mL, where mH and mL denotes the mass of heavy and light atoms, respectively, are calculated for a wide range of Q and R. In particular we found: (1) The fractal dimension Df{( c ; )} of the PS for the so-called goldenmean, silver-mean, bronze-mean, dodecagonal and Severin chain shows a local maximum at increasing magnitude of Q and R>1 (2) At sufficiently large Q we observe power-like diminishing of Df{( c ; )} , i.e. Df{( c ; )} ( {R > 1, Q} ; ) = a ḑot Qα , where α=-0.14±0.02 and α=-0.10±0.02 for the above specified chains and so-called octagonal, copper-mean, nickel-mean, Thue-Morse, Rudin-Shapiro chain, respectively.

  2. Computational studies of gas phase reactions of carbon chain anions with N and O atoms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhibo; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2010-10-28

    Experimental studies of gas phase reactions of carbanions with N and O atoms have been reported previously to understand ion chemistry relevant to the interstellar medium. In all cases reactions of anions with O atoms exhibit larger reaction rate constants compared to the corresponding N atom reactions. In addition, the open-shell carbon chain anions exhibit higher reactivities than the corresponding closed-shell species in N atom reactions, whereas similar reactivities were observed for both open and closed-shell anions in O atom reactions. These trends are investigated by the current theoretical study of the reactions of HC(n)(-)(n = 2, 4, and 6) and C(n)(-) (n = 2, 4-7) with N and O atoms. Our results indicate that spin-forbidden processes are the probable pathways in reactions of closed-shell anions HC(n)(-) with N atoms, and spin conversion limits the reaction efficiency. In reactions of open-shell anions C(n)(-) with N atoms, about 50% of the collisions may proceed through spin-allowed barrierless pathways, which results in relatively higher reaction efficiencies than for the closed-shell reactions. For reactions of all anions with O atoms, the spin-allowed barrierless pathways are the only channels, such that all reactions occur with very high efficiencies. This work provides a greater understanding of the influence of spin effects on the reactivities of anion reactions involving N and O atoms that may be important in the interstellar medium.

  3. Mediator and label free estimation of stress biomarker using electrophoretically deposited Ag@AgO-polyaniline hybrid nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Vasudev, Abhay; Arya, Sunil K; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2013-12-15

    Cortisol, a steroid hormone, is an important biomarker for psychological stress and its detection is gaining prominence for personalized health monitoring. In present work, electrophoretically deposited nanocomposite films of polyaniline (PANI) and core-shell Ag@AgO nanoparticles (NP~5 nm) have been explored as an electro-active nanostructured platform for Anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-Cab) immobilization for electrochemical immunosensing of cortisol. Covalent binding of Anti-Cab onto Ag@AgO-PANI nanocomposite was achieved using EDC/NHS chemistry, which results in the amide bond formation between amino groups of PANI and COOH groups of anti-Cab. Nonspecific binding sites on the immunosensing electrodes were blocked using bovine serum albumin (BSA). The uniform distribution of electro-active and surface charged Ag@AgO NP in PANI matrix results in a nanoporous granular morphology (roughness~10 nm) that provides a functionalized conductive microenvironment for Anti-Cab immobilization. The BSA/Anti-Cab/Ag@AgO-PANI/Au bioelectrodes have been characterized using electrochemical impedance technique (EIS), cyclic voltammetric (CV) technique and atomic force microscopic (AFM) technique, respectively. In CV studies nanocomposite exhibited characteristic response current peak corresponding to AgO NP (0.25 V) with large magnitude of current response and resulted in high electron transport at the electrode-electrolyte interface without a mediator. Electrochemical response studies via CV for the fabricated BSA/Anti-Cab/Ag@AgO-PANI/Au immunosensor as a function of cortisol concentration exhibited a wide linear detection range of 1 pM-1 µM, a detection limit of 0.64 pM mL(-1)(lower than ELISA), and high sensitivity 66 µA M(-1) with a regression coefficient of 0.998. The findings of present work may explore the application of Ag@AgO-PANI hybrid nanocomposite to detect cortisol and other biomarkers for point-of-care application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Catalytic behavior of `Pt-atomic chain encapsulated gold nanotube': A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2016-05-01

    With an aim to design novel material and explore its catalytic performance towards CO oxidation, Pt atomic chain was introduced inside gold nanotube (Au-NT). Theoretical calculations at the level of first principles formalism was carried out to investigate the atomic and electronic properties of the composite. Geometrically Pt atoms prefer to align in zig-zag fashion. Significant electronic charge transfer from inside Pt atoms to the outer wall Au atoms is observed. Interaction of O2 with Au-NT wall follows by injection of additional electronic charge in the anti-bonding orbital of oxygen molecule leading to activation of the O-O bond. Further interaction of CO molecule with the activated oxygen molecule leads to spontaneous oxidation reaction and formation of CO2.

  5. Catalytic behavior of ‘Pt-atomic chain encapsulated gold nanotube’: A density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, Sandeep Majumder, Chiranjib

    2016-05-23

    With an aim to design novel material and explore its catalytic performance towards CO oxidation, Pt atomic chain was introduced inside gold nanotube (Au-NT). Theoretical calculations at the level of first principles formalism was carried out to investigate the atomic and electronic properties of the composite. Geometrically Pt atoms prefer to align in zig-zag fashion. Significant electronic charge transfer from inside Pt atoms to the outer wall Au atoms is observed. Interaction of O{sub 2} with Au-NT wall follows by injection of additional electronic charge in the anti-bonding orbital of oxygen molecule leading to activation of the O-O bond. Further interaction of CO molecule with the activated oxygen molecule leads to spontaneous oxidation reaction and formation of CO{sub 2}.

  6. Crystallization behavior of single isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) chains visualized by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Takahiro; Kawauchi, Mariko; Kawauchi, Takehiro; Kumaki, Jiro

    2015-01-08

    We have, for the first time, successfully visualized the crystallization behavior of a single isolated polymer chain at the molecular level by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Previously, we found that isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) (it-PMMA) formed two-dimensional folded chain crystals composed of double-stranded helices upon compression of its Langmuir monolayer on a water surface, and the molecular images of the crystals deposited on mica were clearly visualized by AFM (Kumaki, J.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5788). In the present study, a high-molecular-weight it-PMMA was diluted in a monolayer of an it-PMMA oligomer which cannot crystallize at the experimental temperature due to its low molecular weight. At a low surface pressure, isolated amorphous chains of the high-molecular-weight it-PMMA solubilized in the oligomer monolayer were observed. On compression, the isolated chains converted to crystals composed of a single chain, typically some small crystallites linked by an amorphous chain like a necklace. Detailed AFM observations of the crystals indicated that the crystalline nuclei preferentially formed at the ends of the chains, and the size of the nuclei was almost independent of the molecular weight of it-PMMA over a wide range. At an extremely slow compression, crystallization was promoted, resulting in crystallization of the whole chain. The crystallization behavior of a single isolated chain provides new insights in understanding the polymer crystallization process.

  7. High performance current and spin diode of atomic carbon chain between transversely symmetric ribbon electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yao-Jun; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yang, Shuo-Wang; Wu, Xue-Mei

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that giant current and high spin rectification ratios can be achieved in atomic carbon chain devices connected between two symmetric ferromagnetic zigzag-graphene-nanoribbon electrodes. The spin dependent transport simulation is carried out by density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the transverse symmetries of the electronic wave functions in the nanoribbons and the carbon chain are critical to the spin transport modes. In the parallel magnetization configuration of two electrodes, pure spin current is observed in both linear and nonlinear regions. However, in the antiparallel configuration, the spin-up (down) current is prohibited under the positive (negative) voltage bias, which results in a spin rectification ratio of order 104. When edge carbon atoms are substituted with boron atoms to suppress the edge magnetization in one of the electrodes, we obtain a diode with current rectification ratio over 106. PMID:25142376

  8. Topological matter. Observation of Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic atomic chains on a superconductor.

    PubMed

    Nadj-Perge, Stevan; Drozdov, Ilya K; Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Jeon, Sangjun; Seo, Jungpil; MacDonald, Allan H; Bernevig, B Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    2014-10-31

    Majorana fermions are predicted to localize at the edge of a topological superconductor, a state of matter that can form when a ferromagnetic system is placed in proximity to a conventional superconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction. With the goal of realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor, we have fabricated ferromagnetic iron (Fe) atomic chains on the surface of superconducting lead (Pb). Using high-resolution spectroscopic imaging techniques, we show that the onset of superconductivity, which gaps the electronic density of states in the bulk of the Fe chains, is accompanied by the appearance of zero-energy end-states. This spatially resolved signature provides strong evidence, corroborated by other observations, for the formation of a topological phase and edge-bound Majorana fermions in our atomic chains. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Observation of Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic atomic chains on a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadj-Perge, Stevan; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Jeon, Sangjun; Seo, Jungpil; MacDonald, Allan H.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    2014-10-01

    Majorana fermions are predicted to localize at the edge of a topological superconductor, a state of matter that can form when a ferromagnetic system is placed in proximity to a conventional superconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction. With the goal of realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor, we have fabricated ferromagnetic iron (Fe) atomic chains on the surface of superconducting lead (Pb). Using high-resolution spectroscopic imaging techniques, we show that the onset of superconductivity, which gaps the electronic density of states in the bulk of the Fe chains, is accompanied by the appearance of zero-energy end-states. This spatially resolved signature provides strong evidence, corroborated by other observations, for the formation of a topological phase and edge-bound Majorana fermions in our atomic chains.

  10. Bolalipid fiber aggregation can be modulated by the introduction of sulfur atoms into the spacer chains.

    PubMed

    Graf, Gesche; Drescher, Simon; Meister, Annette; Haramus, Vasyl M; Dobner, Bodo; Blume, Alfred

    2013-03-01

    The aggregation behavior in aqueous suspension of two symmetrical single-chain bolaamphiphiles, namely 12,21-dithiadotriacontane-1,32-diyl-bis [2-(tri-methylammonio)ethylphosphate] (PC-C32SS-PC) and 12,21-dithiadotriacontane-1,32-diyl-bis[2-(dimethylammonio)ethylphosphate] (Me(2)PE-C32SS-Me(2)PE), containing sulfur as heteroatoms in the chains, was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The rheological properties of hydrogels formed by the aggregation into nanofibers were studied by oscillatory rheology. Based on the well-characterized behavior of bolalipids with long alkyl chains which at room temperature can form a network of nanofibers leading to the formation of a hydrogel, we investigated whether the incorporation of two heteroatoms of sulfur into the spacer chain of the molecules has an influence on the aggregation properties. Compared to the analogues without sulfur, the fibrous aggregates formed by sulfur containing compounds are less stable and build weaker viscoelastic gels. This is due to a perturbation of the packing of the chains as the sulfur atoms change the bond angle in the chain compared to the molecules with pure alkyl chains leading to kinks in the chain. For the bolaamphiphile with the Me(2)PE headgroups this effect is less pronounced due to the possibility of forming stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the headgroups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pd atomic chain formation as a result of submonolayer deposition of 3d metals on Pd(110).

    PubMed

    Wei, D H; Gao, C L; Zakeri, Kh; Przybylski, M

    2009-11-27

    Submonolayer deposition of 3d transition metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni on Pd(110) at room temperature causes the formation of monoatomic chains of Pd as identified with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. In agreement with recent theoretical predictions [Phys. Rev. B 79, 155410 (2009)], the substitution of Pd substrate atoms with the deposited atoms of 3d metals is found to be responsible for the formation of Pd atomic chains. This finding clarifies the long-debated issue about the chemical composition of the atomic chains grown on Pd(110) and points out the intriguing processes in the formation of self-assembled and self-organized nanostructures.

  12. Correlation between morphology, electron band structure, and resistivity of Pb atomic chains on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface.

    PubMed

    Jałochowski, M; Kwapiński, T; Łukasik, P; Nita, P; Kopciuszyński, M

    2016-07-20

    Structural and electron transport properties of multiple Pb atomic chains fabricated on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface are investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, reflection high electron energy diffraction, angular resolved photoemission electron spectroscopy and in situ electrical resistance. The study shows that Pb atomic chains growth modulates the electron band structure of pristine Si(5 5 3)-Au surface and hence changes its sheet resistivity. Strong correlation between chains morphology, electron band structure and electron transport properties is found. To explain experimental findings a theoretical tight-binding model of multiple atomic chains interacting on effective substrate is proposed.

  13. Correlation between morphology, electron band structure, and resistivity of Pb atomic chains on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jałochowski, M.; Kwapiński, T.; Łukasik, P.; Nita, P.; Kopciuszyński, M.

    2016-07-01

    Structural and electron transport properties of multiple Pb atomic chains fabricated on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface are investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, reflection high electron energy diffraction, angular resolved photoemission electron spectroscopy and in situ electrical resistance. The study shows that Pb atomic chains growth modulates the electron band structure of pristine Si(5 5 3)-Au surface and hence changes its sheet resistivity. Strong correlation between chains morphology, electron band structure and electron transport properties is found. To explain experimental findings a theoretical tight-binding model of multiple atomic chains interacting on effective substrate is proposed.

  14. Accelerated CO2 transport on surface of AgO nanoparticles in ionic liquid BMIMBF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Dahye; Kang, Yong Soo; Kang, Sang Wook

    2015-11-01

    The AgO nanoparticles were utilized for a CO2 separation membrane. The AgO nanoparticles were successfully generated in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIMBF4) by favorable interaction between the surface of particles and the counteranion of BMIMBF4. The generated AgO nanoparticles were confirmed by TEM, and the average size was 20 nm. Coordinative interactions of dissociated AgO particles with BMIM+BF4- were investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy. When the ionic liquid BMIMBF4 containing AgO nanoparticles was utilized as a CO2 separation membrane, the separation performance was largely enhanced.

  15. Accelerated CO2 transport on surface of AgO nanoparticles in ionic liquid BMIMBF4

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Dahye; Kang, Yong Soo; Kang, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    The AgO nanoparticles were utilized for a CO2 separation membrane. The AgO nanoparticles were successfully generated in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIMBF4) by favorable interaction between the surface of particles and the counteranion of BMIMBF4. The generated AgO nanoparticles were confirmed by TEM, and the average size was 20 nm. Coordinative interactions of dissociated AgO particles with BMIM+BF4− were investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy. When the ionic liquid BMIMBF4 containing AgO nanoparticles was utilized as a CO2 separation membrane, the separation performance was largely enhanced. PMID:26549605

  16. Topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in chains of magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Chain of magnetic atoms on the surface of a BCS superconductor is a versatile platform for the realization of one-dimensional superconductors with Majorana bound states that lends itself to high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy studies. In this talk, I will describe experimental efforts to realize this platform using self-assembled chains of Fe atoms on the surface of Pb (110) and to directly visualize Majorana quasi-particle bound states at their edges. Using spin-polarized STM studies, we show that Fe chains are ferromagnetic while tunneling into Pb's substrate demonstrates signatures of strong spin-orbit interaction at its surface. Comparison of experimental measurements of structure and normal state electronic structure with DFT calculations suggest that these are triple zigzag chains with an odd number of band-crossings at the Fermi level. The onset of superconductivity in the Pb strongly modifies the low energy density of states of the Fe chains and induces a zero energy state at their ends. I will describe how these observations are consistent with the formation of a topological superconducting phase with Majorana edge states. Work supported by ONR, NSF-DMR, NSF-MRSEC, ARO-MURI, and LPS-ARO grants.

  17. Visualizing Majorana fermions in a chain of magnetic atoms on a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Ali

    2015-12-01

    A chain of magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor provides a versatile platform for realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductivity phase with edge-bounded Majorana fermions zero modes. This platform lends itself to spatial resolved measurements with scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that enables direct visualization of the presence of a localized Majorana zero mode. Experiments on self-assembled chains of Fe atoms on the surface of Pb show that such a system can be experimentally fabricated and studied using various high-resolution STM measurement techniques. Spatial and energy resolved STM experiments provide strong evidence for Majorana bound states that emerge due to the combination of Fe’s ferromagnetism and spin-orbit coupling of the superconducting Pb substrate. These studies provide a roadmap for optimizing topological superconductivity in this one-dimensional platform and its extension to realize chiral two-dimensional superconductors.

  18. Low-temperature study of the magnetic properties of finite atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    A simple method for the calculation of the spontaneous remagnetization time and magnetization curves of atomic finite-length ferromagnetic chains at a low temperature within the Heisenberg model has been proposed. The applicability limits of the method have been studied. It has been shown that the proposed method gives results being in good agreement with the kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results. Formulas obtained within our model can also be used to determine the lower bound for the Curie temperature.

  19. Spin polarization measurements of ferromagnetic atomic chains on a superconductor: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yonglong; Jeon, Sangjun; Drozdov, Ilya; Li, Jian; Bernevig, Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    Introduction of magnetic defects in superconductors gives rise to spin polarized in-gap Shiba states. Recently chains of magnetic atoms, which give rise to a band of Shiba states, have been proposed as a platform for topological superconductivity. Spectroscopic evidence for in-gap Shiba states and Majorana end mode has been reported in previous studies of self-assembled chains of ferromagnetic Fe atoms on the surface of Pb. In this talk, we introduce the technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (SP-STM) and discuss how we prepare tips that can show spin contrast at zero magnetic field, without disrupting superconductivity on the Pb surface. We use this technique, combined with the use of a vector magnet to orient the tip magnetization to probe the spin polarization of the Shiba states induced by the Fe atomic chains onto the Pb surface. A key to interpreting such experiments with spin-polarized STM tip is to understand the role of spin-polarization in the setpoint effect, which will be discussed in the next talk. Work supported by ONR and Moore Foundation.

  20. Atomic spin-chain realization of a model for quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toskovic, R.; van den Berg, R.; Spinelli, A.; Eliens, I. S.; van den Toorn, B.; Bryant, B.; Caux, J.-S.; Otte, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms has opened up the door to constructing interesting and useful quantum structures from the ground up. On the one hand, nanoscale arrangements of magnetic atoms are at the heart of future quantum computing and spintronic devices; on the other hand, they can be used as fundamental building blocks for the realization of textbook many-body quantum models, illustrating key concepts such as quantum phase transitions, topological order or frustration as a function of system size. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy to construct arrays of magnetic atoms on a surface, designed to behave like spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg chains in a transverse field, for which a quantum phase transition from an antiferromagnetic to a paramagnetic phase is predicted in the thermodynamic limit. Site-resolved measurements on these finite-size realizations reveal a number of sudden ground state changes when the field approaches the critical value, each corresponding to a new domain wall entering the chains. We observe that these state crossings become closer for longer chains, suggesting the onset of critical behaviour. Our results present opportunities for further studies on quantum behaviour of many-body systems, as a function of their size and structural complexity.

  1. Interplay between exotic superfluidity and magnetism in a chain of four-component ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szirmai, E.; Barcza, G.; Sólyom, J.; Legeza, Ö.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the spin-polarized chain of ultracold alkaline-earth-metal atoms with spin-3/2 described by the fermionic Hubbard model with SU(4) symmetric attractive interaction. The competition of bound pairs, trions, quartets, and unbound atoms is studied analytically and by density-matrix renormalization-group simulations. We find several distinct states where bound particles coexist with the ferromagnetic state of unpaired fermions. In particular, an exotic inhomogeneous Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO)-type superfluid of quartets in a magnetic background of uncorrelated atoms is found for weaker interactions. We show that the system can be driven from this quartet-FFLO state to a molecular state of localized quartets where spatial segregation between molecular crystals and ferromagnetic liquids emerges, and this transition is reflected in the static structure factor.

  2. Bromine atom production and chain propagation during springtime Arctic ozone depletion events in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Chelsea R.; Shepson, Paul B.; Liao, Jin; Huey, L. Greg; Cantrell, Chris; Flocke, Frank; Orlando, John

    2017-03-01

    Ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the Arctic are primarily controlled by a bromine radical-catalyzed destruction mechanism that depends on the efficient production and recycling of Br atoms. Numerous laboratory and modeling studies have suggested the importance of heterogeneous recycling of Br through HOBr reaction with bromide on saline surfaces. On the other hand, the gas-phase regeneration of bromine atoms through BrO-BrO radical reactions has been assumed to be an efficient, if not dominant, pathway for Br reformation and thus ozone destruction. Indeed, it has been estimated that the rate of ozone depletion is approximately equal to twice the rate of the BrO self-reaction. Here, we use a zero-dimensional, photochemical model, largely constrained to observations of stable atmospheric species from the 2009 Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) campaign in Barrow, Alaska, to investigate gas-phase bromine radical propagation and recycling mechanisms of bromine atoms for a 7-day period during late March. This work is a continuation of that presented in Thompson et al. (2015) and utilizes the same model construct. Here, we use the gas-phase radical chain length as a metric for objectively quantifying the efficiency of gas-phase recycling of bromine atoms. The gas-phase bromine chain length is determined to be quite small, at < 1.5, and highly dependent on ambient O3 concentrations. Furthermore, we find that Br atom production from photolysis of Br2 and BrCl, which is predominately emitted from snow and/or aerosol surfaces, can account for between 30 and 90 % of total Br atom production. This analysis suggests that condensed-phase production of bromine is at least as important as, and at times greater than, gas-phase recycling for the occurrence of Arctic ODEs. Therefore, the rate of the BrO self-reaction is not a sufficient estimate for the rate of O3 depletion.

  3. Observation of Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic atomic chains on a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadj-Perge, Stevan

    2015-03-01

    Majorana fermions are zero-energy excitations predicted to localize at the edge of a topological superconductor, a state of matter that can form when a ferromagnetic system is placed in proximity to a conventional superconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction. With the goal of realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor, we have fabricated ferromagnetic iron atomic chains on the surface of superconducting lead. Using high-resolution spectroscopic imaging techniques, we show that the onset of superconductivity, which gaps the electronic density of states in the bulk of the chains, is accompanied by the appearance of zero-energy end-states. This spatially resolved signature provides strong evidence, corroborated by other observations and theoretical modeling, for the formation of a topological phase and edge-bound Majorana states in this system. Our results demonstrates that atomic chains are viable platform for future experiments to manipulate Majorana bound states and to realize other related 1D or 2D topological superconducting phases. This work has done in collaboration with Ilya K. Drozdov, Jian Li, Hua Chen, Sangjun Jeon, Jungpil Seo, Allan H. MacDonald, B. Andrei Bernevig and Ali Yazdani. We acknowledge ONR, NSF-MRSEC, ARO-MRUI, NSF-DMR and EU Marie Curie for support.

  4. A New One-dimensional Quantum Material - Ta2Pd3Se8 Atomic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue; Liu, Jinyu; Hu, Jin; Yue, Chunlei; Mao, Zhiqiang; Wei, Jiang; Antipina, Liubov; Sorokin, Pavel; Sanchez, Ana

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotube, there has been a persistent effort to search for other one dimensional (1D) quantum systems. However, only a few examples have been found. We report a new 1D example - semiconducting Ta2Pd3Se8. We demonstrate that the Ta2Pd3Se8 nanowire as thin as 1.3nm can be easily obtained by applying simple mechanical exfoliation from its bulk counterpart. High resolution TEM shows an intrinsic 1D chain-like crystalline morphology on these nano wires, indicating weak bonding between these atomic chains. Theoretical calculation shows a direct bandgap structure, which evolves from 0.53eV in the bulk to 1.04eV in single atomic chain. The field effect transistor based on Ta2Pd3Se8 nanowire achieved a promising performance with 104On/Off ratio and 80 cm2V-1s-1 mobility. Low temperature transport study reflects two different mechanisms, variable range hopping and thermal activation, which dominate the transport properties at different temperature regimes. Ta2Pd3Se8 nanowire provides an intrinsic 1D material system for the study low dimensional condensed matter physics.

  5. Spin Polarization Measurements of Ferromagnetic Atomic Chains on a Supercondcutor: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sangjun; Xie, Yonglong; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Li, Jian; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    A key property of the Majorana fermions edge mode when realized at the edge of a topological superconductor is their spin. Unlike other low energy excitation in a conventional superconductor, which are made up of time-reverse partners of up and down spin, Majorana is expected to have a definite spin orientation. We utilize the technique of spin-polarized STM as described in the last talk to probe the nature of Majorana excitations in chains of Fe atoms on the surface of Pb. Previous effort on this system has detected signature of Majorana as a zero bias peak at end of such chains. While this previous study shows evidence of ferromagnetism and spin-orbit coupling in such atomic chains on Pb, they did not probe the spin properties of the end mode specifically. We describe energy-resolved spin-polarized STM experiments designed to probe whether the previously reported zero energy end modes are spin-polarized or not. Work supported by ONR and the Moore Foundation.

  6. Influence of Defects on Vibrational Characteristics of Linear Chains of Inert Gases Atoms Adsorbed on Carbon Nanobundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhelii, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    The study of vibrational characteristics of chains of rare gas atoms adsorbed in the grooves between nanotubes in nanobundles is reduced to the analyses of the phonon spectrum and the vibrational characteristics of linear chains of atoms in an external field. Atoms in the chain have three degrees of freedom. The analytical expressions for the vibrational characteristics of the atoms in the chain, depending on the ratio between the interatomic distance in the chain r and the equilibrium distance between atoms in the chain r_0 , are obtained. It is shown that at ratoms is modified. It is the defect that can entail discrete states split off from the quasi-continuous spectrum band. The discrete levels with frequencies below the quasi-continuous spectrum band shift the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity to lower temperatures. The conditions for appearing of discrete frequency levels are obtained, and their characteristics are found.

  7. Influence of Defects on Vibrational Characteristics of Linear Chains of Inert Gases Atoms Adsorbed on Carbon Nanobundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhelii, E. V.

    2017-04-01

    The study of vibrational characteristics of chains of rare gas atoms adsorbed in the grooves between nanotubes in nanobundles is reduced to the analyses of the phonon spectrum and the vibrational characteristics of linear chains of atoms in an external field. Atoms in the chain have three degrees of freedom. The analytical expressions for the vibrational characteristics of the atoms in the chain, depending on the ratio between the interatomic distance in the chain r and the equilibrium distance between atoms in the chain r_0, are obtained. It is shown that at ratoms is modified. It is the defect that can entail discrete states split off from the quasi-continuous spectrum band. The discrete levels with frequencies below the quasi-continuous spectrum band shift the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity to lower temperatures. The conditions for appearing of discrete frequency levels are obtained, and their characteristics are found.

  8. The first defective extended chromium atom chain complex with amine ligand containing naphthyridine and pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Zhen; Geng, Shu-Bo; Liu, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Jia, Xin-Gang; Wei, Hai-Long; Ismayilov, Rayyat H.; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Through a pyrazine and naphthyridine-containing diamino ligand, N2,N7-di(pyrazin-2-yl)-1,8-naphthyridine-2,7-diamine (H2dpznda), defective extended metal atom chain complexes with one chromium(II) metal absent in centre, [Cr5(μ5-dpznda)4Cl2] (1) and [Cr5(μ5-dpznda)4(NCS)2] (2) were obtained. An electrochemistry research showed that the pentachromium(II) complexes were quite resistant to reduction although accessible to oxidation, with two reversible redox couples at E1/2 = +0.59 and +0.30 V.

  9. Monitoring the assembly of Ig light-chain amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ionescu-Zanetti, C; Khurana, R; Gillespie, J R; Petrick, J S; Trabachino, L C; Minert, L J; Carter, S A; Fink, A L

    1999-11-09

    Aggregation of Ig light chains to form amyloid fibrils is a characteristic feature of light-chain amyloidosis, a light-chain deposition disease. A recombinant variable domain of the light chain SMA was used to form amyloid fibrils in vitro. Fibril formation was monitored by atomic force microscopy imaging. Single filaments 2.4 nm in diameter were predominant at early times; protofibrils 4.0 nm in diameter were predominant at intermediate times; type I and type II fibrils 8.0 nm and 6.0 nm in diameter, respectively, were predominant at the endpoints. The increase in number of fibrils correlated with increased binding of the fluorescent dye thioflavin T. The fibrils and protofibrils showed a braided structure, suggesting that their formation involves the winding of protofibrils and filaments, respectively. These observations support a model in which two filaments combine to form a protofibril, two protofibrils intertwine to form a type I fibril, and three filaments form a type II fibril.

  10. A first-principle study of one-dimensional carbon atomic chain inserted single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuliang; Zhong, JianXin; Yuan, JianMei; Zhao, Xinluo; Ando, Yoshinori

    2006-05-01

    Using first principles calculations, we investigate the atomic and electronic structure of carbon nanowires (CNWs) as the carbon chain inserted into single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It indicates that the (5,5) CNW system exhibits metallic character, however, the insertion of carbon chain can transit a semi-conducting (9,0) SWCNT into a metallic.

  11. Contribution of main chain and side chain atoms and their locations to the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Dharma Rao; Gromiha, M Michael; Saraboji, K

    2016-03-01

    Proteins belonging to the same class, having similar structures thus performing the same function are known to have different thermal stabilities depending on the source- thermophile or mesophile. The variation in thermo-stability has not been attributed to any unified factor yet and understanding this phenomenon is critically needed in several areas, particularly in protein engineering to design stable variants of the proteins. Toward this motive, the present study focuses on the sequence and structural investigation of a dataset of 373 pairs of proteins; a thermophilic protein and its mesophilic structural analog in each pair, from the perspectives of hydrophobic free energy, hydrogen bonds, physico-chemical properties of amino acids and residue-residue contacts. Our results showed that the hydrophobic free energy due to carbon, charged nitrogen and charged oxygen atoms was stronger in 65% of thermophilic proteins. The number of hydrogen bonds which bridges the buried and exposed regions of proteins was also greater in case of thermophiles. Amino acids of extended shape, volume and molecular weight along with more medium and long range contacts were observed in many of the thermophilic proteins. These results highlight the preference of thermophiles toward the amino acids with larger side chain and charged to make up greater free energy, better packing of residues and increase the overall compactness.

  12. New thermoplastic poly(carbonate-urethane)s based on chain extenders with sulfur atoms.

    PubMed

    Rogulska, Magdalena; Kultys, Anna; Puszka, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    New thermoplastic segmented polyurethanes were obtained by a one-step melt polyaddition using 40, 50 and 60 mol% poly(hexane-1,6-diyl carbonate) diol of [Formula: see text] g mol(-1), 1,1'-methanediylbis(4-isocyanatobenzene) and 2,2'-[sulfanediylbis(benzene-1,4-diyloxy)]diethanol, 2,2'-[oxybis(benzene-1,4-diylsulfanediyl)]diethanol or 2,2'-[sulfanediylbis(benzene-1,4-diylsulfanediyl)]diethanol as a chain extender. FTIR, atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry were used to examine the polyurethanes' structure and thermal properties. Moreover, their Shore A/D hardness, tensile, adhesive and optical attributes were determined. They were transparent high-molar-mass materials showing good tensile strength (up to 51.9 MPa). The polyurethanes exhibited improved adhesion to copper taking into consideration that of conventional ones, and middle or high refractive index values (1.57-1.60), and both these parameters increased with an increase of the content of sulfur atoms in the polyurethane chain. The newly obtained polyurethanes can be considered as materials for numerous medical and optical appliances.

  13. Average-atom model combined with the hypernetted chain approximation applied to warm dense matter.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yong; Bredow, Richard; Yuan, Jianmin; Redmer, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    We have combined the average-atom model with the hypernetted chain approximation (AAHNC) to describe the electronic and ionic structure in the warm dense matter regime. On the basis of the electronic and ionic structures, the x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectrum is calculated using the random-phase approximation. While the electronic structure is described within the average-atom model, the effects of other ions on the electronic structure are considered using an integral equation method of the theory of liquids, namely the hypernetted chain approximation. The ion-ion pair potential is calculated using the modified Gordon-Kim model based on the electronic density distribution. Finally, the electronic and ionic structures are determined self-consistently. The XRTS spectrum is calculated according to the Chihara formula, where the scattering contributions are divided into three components: elastic, bound-free, and free-free. Comparison of the present AAHNC results with other theoretical models and experimental data shows very good agreement. Thus the AAHNC model can give a reasonable description of the electronic and ionic structure in warm dense matter.

  14. Average-atom model combined with the hypernetted chain approximation applied to warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yong; Bredow, Richard; Yuan, Jianmin; Redmer, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    We have combined the average-atom model with the hypernetted chain approximation (AAHNC) to describe the electronic and ionic structure in the warm dense matter regime. On the basis of the electronic and ionic structures, the x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectrum is calculated using the random-phase approximation. While the electronic structure is described within the average-atom model, the effects of other ions on the electronic structure are considered using an integral equation method of the theory of liquids, namely the hypernetted chain approximation. The ion-ion pair potential is calculated using the modified Gordon-Kim model based on the electronic density distribution. Finally, the electronic and ionic structures are determined self-consistently. The XRTS spectrum is calculated according to the Chihara formula, where the scattering contributions are divided into three components: elastic, bound-free, and free-free. Comparison of the present AAHNC results with other theoretical models and experimental data shows very good agreement. Thus the AAHNC model can give a reasonable description of the electronic and ionic structure in warm dense matter.

  15. Atomic structure, energetics, and dynamicsof topological solitons inindium chains on Si(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Choi, Jin-Ho; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Zeng, Changgan; Zhang, Zhenyu; Hou, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    Besides the presence of exotic ground states, potentially more intriguing are the elementary excitations of the One-dimensional charge density waves (1D-CDWs), including the nonlinear topological excitation or soliton. Solitons may possess spin-charge inversion properties, and act as the effective carriers that account for the high conductivity in conducting polymers. Howevercomprehensive quantitative study of topological solitary excitations at the atomic level remains a challenge. In this talk, I will present our recent work on the quantitative haracterization of solitons in In chains grown on Si(111) surfaces at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure of the topological soliton in In/Si(111) is determined based on scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles calculations.Variable emperature measurements of the soliton population allow us to determine the soliton formation energy to be ˜60 meV, smaller than one-half of the band gap of ˜200 meV. Once created, these solitons have very low mobility; the sluggish nature is attributed to the exceptionally low attempt frequency for soliton migration. We furtherdemonstrate local electric ?eld enhanced soliton dynamics, and the feasibility of aggregating solitonsinto soliton polymers.

  16. Fast equilibration protocol for million atom systems of highly entangled linear polyethylene chains.

    PubMed

    Sliozberg, Yelena R; Kröger, Martin; Chantawansri, Tanya L

    2016-04-21

    Equilibrated systems of entangled polymer melts cannot be produced using direct brute force equilibration due to the slow reptationdynamics exhibited by high molecular weight chains. Instead, these dense systems are produced using computational techniques such as Monte Carlo-Molecular Dynamics hybrid algorithms, though the use of soft potentials has also shown promise mainly for coarse-grained polymeric systems. Through the use of soft-potentials, the melt can be equilibrated via molecular dynamics at intermediate and long length scales prior to switching to a Lennard-Jones potential. We will outline two different equilibration protocols, which use various degrees of information to produce the starting configurations. In one protocol, we use only the equilibrium bond angle, bond length, and target density during the construction of the simulation cell, where the information is obtained from available experimental data and extracted from the force field without performing any prior simulation. In the second protocol, we moreover utilize the equilibrium radial distribution function and dihedral angle distribution. This information can be obtained from experimental data or from a simulation of short unentangled chains. Both methods can be used to prepare equilibrated and highly entangled systems, but the second protocol is much more computationally efficient. These systems can be strictly monodisperse or optionally polydisperse depending on the starting chain distribution. Our protocols, which utilize a soft-core harmonic potential, will be applied for the first time to equilibrate a million particle system of polyethylene chains consisting of 1000 united atoms at various temperatures. Calculations of structural and entanglement properties demonstrate that this method can be used as an alternative towards the generation of entangled equilibrium structures.

  17. Loading effect of Ag/AgO on the photocatalytic performance of ZnO rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuddin, Aida Fitri; Aziz, Siti Nor Qurratu Aini Abd; Pung, Swee-Yong

    2017-01-01

    The photocatalytic performance of ZnO rods in degradation of Rhodamine B dye under UV light was improved by 7.3% via deposition of Ag/AgO using 1.0 × 10-3 g mL-1 of silver nitrate solution. However, its photodegradation efficiency decreased with the increase in silver nitrate concentration which was used to prepare the Ag/AgO-ZnO rods. This result suggests that the loading of Ag/AgO on the surface of ZnO rods affected the photocatalytic performance differently. The scavenger study indicates that the main reactive species responsible for the degradation of Rhodamine B dye by Ag-/AgO-deposited ZnO rods were holes, followed by superoxide anion free radicals, hydroxyl free radicals and electrons. Based on these findings, a refined photodegradation mechanism of Rhodamine B by Ag/AgO-ZnO rods is proposed.

  18. Electron nuclear dynamics for a zig-zag chain of nitrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Anna; Calais, Jean-Louis

    1995-02-01

    We study the nitrogen zig-zag chain with two atoms per unit cell within the electron nuclear dynamics (END) formalism. This amounts to an approximate solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for all the particles in the system. In the present approximation the nuclei are treated classically. The time dependence of the electronic motion is brought in through time-dependent linear combinations of fixed Bloch sums. This implies that the immediate mutual interaction between electronic and nuclear motion is taken into account. We investigate in particular the long-range terms of the interaction so as to arrive at convergent lattice sums. Before going to the general case when electronic and nuclear motion is coupled, we investigate the special cases of END traditional lattice dynamics and the random phase approximation (RPA) for the electrons.

  19. An Ab Initio Study of the Low-Lying Doublet States of AgO and AgS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Spectroscopic constants (D(sub o), r(sub e), mu(sub e), T(sub e)) are determined for the doublet states of AgO and AgS below approx. = 30000/cm. Large valence basis sets are employed in conjunction with relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Electron correlation is included using the modified coupled-pair functional (MCPF) and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) methods. The A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) - X(sup 2)Pi band system is found to occur in the near infrared (approx. = 9000/cm) and to be relatively weak with a radiative lifetime of 900 microns for A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) (upsilon = 0). The weakly bound C(sup 2)Pi state (our notation), the upper state of the blue system, is found to require high levels of theoretical treatment to determine a quantitatively accurate potential. The red system is assigned as a transition from the C(sup 2)Pi state to the previously unobserved A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) state. Several additional transitions are identified that should be detectable experimentally. A more limited study is performed for the vertical excitation spectrum of AgS. In addition, a detailed all-electron study of the X(sup 2)Pi and A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) states of AgO is carried out using large atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets. Our best calculated D(sub o) value for AgO is significantly less than the experimental value, which suggests that there may be some systematic error in the experimental determination.

  20. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s.

    PubMed

    Kurnosov, Arkady A; Rubtsov, Igor V; Maksymov, Andrii O; Burin, Alexander L

    2016-07-21

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  1. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, Arkady A.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Maksymov, Andrii O.; Burin, Alexander L.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  2. Quantifying the atomic-level mechanics of single long physisorbed molecular chains

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Shigeki; Koch, Matthias; Gnecco, Enrico; Sadeghi, Ali; Pawlak, Rémy; Glatzel, Thilo; Schwarz, Jutta; Goedecker, Stefan; Hecht, Stefan; Baratoff, Alexis; Grill, Leonhard; Meyer, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Individual in situ polymerized fluorene chains 10–100 nm long linked by C–C bonds are pulled vertically from an Au(111) substrate by the tip of a low-temperature atomic force microscope. The conformation of the selected chains is imaged before and after manipulation using scanning tunneling microscopy. The measured force gradient shows strong and periodic variations that correspond to the step-by-step detachment of individual fluorene repeat units. These variations persist at constant intensity until the entire polymer is completely removed from the surface. Calculations based on an extended Frenkel–Kontorova model reproduce the periodicity and magnitude of these features and allow us to relate them to the detachment force and desorption energy of the repeat units. The adsorbed part of the polymer slides easily along the surface during the pulling process, leading to only small oscillations as a result of the high stiffness of the fluorenes and of their length mismatch with respect to the substrate surface structure. A significant lateral force also is caused by the sequential detachment of individual units. The gained insight into the molecule–surface interactions during sliding and pulling should aid the design of mechanoresponsive nanosystems and devices. PMID:24591611

  3. Quantifying the atomic-level mechanics of single long physisorbed molecular chains.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeki; Koch, Matthias; Gnecco, Enrico; Sadeghi, Ali; Pawlak, Rémy; Glatzel, Thilo; Schwarz, Jutta; Goedecker, Stefan; Hecht, Stefan; Baratoff, Alexis; Grill, Leonhard; Meyer, Ernst

    2014-03-18

    Individual in situ polymerized fluorene chains 10-100 nm long linked by C-C bonds are pulled vertically from an Au(111) substrate by the tip of a low-temperature atomic force microscope. The conformation of the selected chains is imaged before and after manipulation using scanning tunneling microscopy. The measured force gradient shows strong and periodic variations that correspond to the step-by-step detachment of individual fluorene repeat units. These variations persist at constant intensity until the entire polymer is completely removed from the surface. Calculations based on an extended Frenkel-Kontorova model reproduce the periodicity and magnitude of these features and allow us to relate them to the detachment force and desorption energy of the repeat units. The adsorbed part of the polymer slides easily along the surface during the pulling process, leading to only small oscillations as a result of the high stiffness of the fluorenes and of their length mismatch with respect to the substrate surface structure. A significant lateral force also is caused by the sequential detachment of individual units. The gained insight into the molecule-surface interactions during sliding and pulling should aid the design of mechanoresponsive nanosystems and devices.

  4. Implementation of Outstanding Electronic Transport in Polar Covalent Boron Nitride Atomic Chains: another Extraordinary Odd-Even Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Weiqi; Liu, Linhua; Feng, Jikang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Tian, Wei Quan

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the unique electronic transport properties of the junctions composed of boron nitride atomic chains bridging symmetric graphene electrodes with point-contacts is executed through non-equilibrium Green’s function technique in combination with density functional theory. Compared with carbon atomic chains, the boron nitride atomic chains have an alternative arrangement of polar covalent B-N bonds and different contacts coupling electrodes, showing some unusual properties in functional atomic electronic devices. Remarkably, they have an extraordinary odd-even behavior of conductivity with the length increase. The rectification character and negative differential resistance of nonlinear current-voltage characteristics can be achieved by manipulating the type of contacts between boron nitride atomic chains bridges and electrodes. The junctions with asymmetric contacts have an intrinsic rectification, caused by stronger coupling in the C-N contact than the C-B contact. On the other hand, for symmetric contact junctions, it is confirmed that the transport properties of the junctions primarily depend on the nature of contacts. The junctions with symmetric C-N contacts have higher conductivity than their C-B contacts counterparts. Furthermore, the negative differential resistances of the junctions with only C-N contacts is very conspicuous and can be achieved at lower bias. PMID:27211110

  5. Implementation of Outstanding Electronic Transport in Polar Covalent Boron Nitride Atomic Chains: another Extraordinary Odd-Even Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Weiqi; Liu, Linhua; Feng, Jikang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Tian, Wei Quan

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical investigation of the unique electronic transport properties of the junctions composed of boron nitride atomic chains bridging symmetric graphene electrodes with point-contacts is executed through non-equilibrium Green’s function technique in combination with density functional theory. Compared with carbon atomic chains, the boron nitride atomic chains have an alternative arrangement of polar covalent B-N bonds and different contacts coupling electrodes, showing some unusual properties in functional atomic electronic devices. Remarkably, they have an extraordinary odd-even behavior of conductivity with the length increase. The rectification character and negative differential resistance of nonlinear current-voltage characteristics can be achieved by manipulating the type of contacts between boron nitride atomic chains bridges and electrodes. The junctions with asymmetric contacts have an intrinsic rectification, caused by stronger coupling in the C-N contact than the C-B contact. On the other hand, for symmetric contact junctions, it is confirmed that the transport properties of the junctions primarily depend on the nature of contacts. The junctions with symmetric C-N contacts have higher conductivity than their C-B contacts counterparts. Furthermore, the negative differential resistances of the junctions with only C-N contacts is very conspicuous and can be achieved at lower bias.

  6. Implementation of Outstanding Electronic Transport in Polar Covalent Boron Nitride Atomic Chains: another Extraordinary Odd-Even Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Weiqi; Liu, Linhua; Feng, Jikang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Tian, Wei Quan

    2016-05-23

    A theoretical investigation of the unique electronic transport properties of the junctions composed of boron nitride atomic chains bridging symmetric graphene electrodes with point-contacts is executed through non-equilibrium Green's function technique in combination with density functional theory. Compared with carbon atomic chains, the boron nitride atomic chains have an alternative arrangement of polar covalent B-N bonds and different contacts coupling electrodes, showing some unusual properties in functional atomic electronic devices. Remarkably, they have an extraordinary odd-even behavior of conductivity with the length increase. The rectification character and negative differential resistance of nonlinear current-voltage characteristics can be achieved by manipulating the type of contacts between boron nitride atomic chains bridges and electrodes. The junctions with asymmetric contacts have an intrinsic rectification, caused by stronger coupling in the C-N contact than the C-B contact. On the other hand, for symmetric contact junctions, it is confirmed that the transport properties of the junctions primarily depend on the nature of contacts. The junctions with symmetric C-N contacts have higher conductivity than their C-B contacts counterparts. Furthermore, the negative differential resistances of the junctions with only C-N contacts is very conspicuous and can be achieved at lower bias.

  7. Effects of the ether oxygen atom in alkyl side chains on the physical properties of piperidinium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nokami, T; Yamashita, T; Komura, T; Handa, N; Shimizu, M; Yamaguchi, K; Domi, Y; Usui, H; Sakaguchi, H; Itoh, T

    2017-09-21

    Various types of piperidinium ionic liquids (ILs) equipped with an oxygen atom-containing alkyl side chain on the positively charged nitrogen atom were systematically synthesized and their physical properties investigated. The thermal stability, viscosity, electrochemical window, and ion conductivity were influenced significantly by changing the position of the oxygen atom in the alkyl chain. Although the lowest viscosity was recorded for 1-((2-methoxyethoxy)methyl)-1-methylpiperidin-1-ium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([PP1MEM][Tf2N]), 1-methyl-1-(2-propoxyethyl)piperidin-1-ium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([PP1PE][Tf2N]) can be recommended as the best IL as an electrolyte due to its low viscosity and high thermal and electrochemical stability among the seven ILs tested.

  8. Two-dimensional folded chain crystals composed of a single isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) chain observed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaki, Jiro; Anzai, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    We successfully visualized crystallization behavior of a single isolated polymer chain at a molecular level by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Previously, we found that isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) (it-PMMA) formed two-dimensional folded chain crystals upon compression of its Langmuir monolayer on a water surface, and the molecular images of the crystals deposited on mica were clearly visualized by AFM (Kumaki, et al. JACS 2005, 127, 5788; J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 5594). In the present study, a high-molecular-weight it-PMMA was diluted in a monolayer of an it-PMMA oligomer which cannot crystallize due to the low molecular weight. At a low surface pressure, isolated amorphous chains of the high-molecular-weight it-PMMA solubilized in the oligomer monolayer were observed. On compression, the isolated chains converted to crystals composed of a single chain. Detailed AFM observations of the crystals indicated that the crystalline nuclei preferably formed at the ends of the chains, and the size of the nuclei was almost independent on the molecular weight of the it-PMMA in a wide range.

  9. Conductance and spin-filter effects of oxygen-incorporated Au, Cu, and Fe single-atom chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiaolong; Xie, Yi-Qun Ye, Xiang; Ke, San-Huang

    2015-01-28

    We studied the spin-polarized electron transport in oxygen-incorporated Au, Cu, and Fe single-atom chains (SACs) by first-principles calculations. We first investigated the mechanism responsible for the low conductance (<1G{sub 0}) of the Au and Cu SACs in an oxygen environment reported in recent experiments. We found that for the Au SACs, the low conductance plateau around 0.6G{sub 0} can be attributed to a distorted chain doped with a single oxygen atom, while the 0.1G{sub 0} conductance comes from a linear chain incorporated with an oxygen molecule and is caused by an antibonding state formed by oxygen's occupied frontier orbital with d{sub z} orbitals of adjacent Au atoms. For the Cu SACs, the conductance about 0.3G{sub 0} is ascribed to a special configuration that contains Cu and O atoms in an alternating sequence. This exhibits an even-odd conductance oscillation with an amplitude of ∼0.1G{sub 0}. In contrast, for the alternating Fe-O SACs, conductance overall decreases with an increase in O atoms and it approaches nearly zero for the chain with more than four O atoms. While the Cu-O SACs behave as perfect spin filters for one spin channel due to the half metallic nature, the Fe-O SACs can serve as perfect spin filters for two spin channels depending on the polarity of the applied gate voltage.

  10. Dissociation energies of Ag–RG (RG = Ar, Kr, Xe) and AgO molecules from velocity map imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Graham A.; Gentleman, Alexander S.; Iskra, Andreas; Wijk, Robert van; Mackenzie, Stuart R.; Kartouzian, Aras

    2015-09-28

    The near ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of silver atom—rare gas dimers have been studied by velocity map imaging. Ag–RG (RG = Ar, Kr, Xe) species generated by laser ablation are excited in the region of the C ({sup 2}Σ{sup +})←X ({sup 2}Σ{sup +}) continuum leading to direct, near-threshold dissociation generating Ag* ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) + RG ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) products. Images recorded at excitation wavelengths throughout the C ({sup 2}Σ{sup +})←X ({sup 2}Σ{sup +}) continuum, coupled with known atomic energy levels, permit determination of the ground X ({sup 2}Σ{sup +}) state dissociation energies of 85.9 ± 23.4 cm{sup −1} (Ag–Ar), 149.3 ± 22.4 cm{sup −1} (Ag–Kr), and 256.3 ± 16.0 cm{sup −1} (Ag–Xe). Three additional photolysis processes, each yielding Ag atom photoproducts, are observed in the same spectral region. Two of these are markedly enhanced in intensity upon seeding the molecular beam with nitrous oxide, and are assigned to photodissociation of AgO at the two-photon level. These features yield an improved ground state dissociation energy for AgO of 15 965 ± 81 cm{sup −1}, which is in good agreement with high level calculations. The third process results in Ag atom fragments whose kinetic energy shows anomalously weak photon energy dependence and is assigned tentatively to dissociative ionization of the silver dimer Ag{sub 2}.

  11. Thermal diffusion of supersonic solitons in an anharmonic chain of atoms.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Edward; Mertens, Franz G; Gaididei, Yuri; Bishop, A R

    2003-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium diffusion dynamics of supersonic lattice solitons in a classical chain of atoms with nearest-neighbor interactions coupled to a heat bath. As a specific example we choose an interaction with cubic anharmonicity. The coupling between the system and a thermal bath with a given temperature is made by adding noise, delta correlated in time and space, and damping to the set of discrete equations of motion. Working in the continuum limit and changing to the sound velocity frame we derive a Korteweg-de Vries equation with noise and damping. We apply a collective coordinate approach which yields two stochastic ODEs which are solved approximately by a perturbation analysis. This finally yields analytical expressions for the variances of the soliton position and velocity. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations for the original discrete system which confirm the predictions of our analytical calculations, namely, noise-induced superdiffusive behavior which scales with the temperature and depends strongly on the initial soliton velocity. A normal diffusion behavior is observed for solitons with very low energy, where the noise-induced phonons also make a significant contribution to the soliton diffusion.

  12. Reprint of Nonlinear vector waves of a flexural mode in a chain model of atomic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenkova, S. P.; Raj, N.; Stepanyants, Y. A.

    2015-04-01

    Flexural transverse waves in an anharmonic chain of atoms is considered and the nonlinear vector equation for the phonon modes in the long-wave approximation is derived taking into account the weak dispersion effects. Particular cases of the equation derived are discussed; among them the vector mKdV equation (Gorbacheva and Ostrovsky, 1983) [12], as well as the new model vector equations dubbed here the 'second order cubic Benjamin-Ono (socBO) equation' and 'nonlinear pseudo-diffusion equation'. Stationary solutions to the equation derived are studied and it is found in which cases physically reasonable periodic and solitary type solutions may exist. The simplest non-stationary interactions of solitary waves of different polarisation are studied by means of numerical simulation. A new interesting phenomenon is revealed when two solitons of the same or opposite polarities interact elastically, whereas the interaction of two solitons lying initially in the perpendicular planes is essentially inelastic resulting in the survival of only one soliton and destruction of another one.

  13. Nonlinear vector waves of a flexural mode in a chain model of atomic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenkova, S. P.; Raj, N.; Stepanyants, Y. A.

    2015-03-01

    Flexural transverse waves in an anharmonic chain of atoms is considered and the nonlinear vector equation for the phonon modes in the long-wave approximation is derived taking into account the weak dispersion effects. Particular cases of the equation derived are discussed; among them the vector mKdV equation (Gorbacheva and Ostrovsky, 1983) [12], as well as the new model vector equations dubbed here the 'second order cubic Benjamin-Ono (socBO) equation' and 'nonlinear pseudo-diffusion equation'. Stationary solutions to the equation derived are studied and it is found in which cases physically reasonable periodic and solitary type solutions may exist. The simplest non-stationary interactions of solitary waves of different polarisation are studied by means of numerical simulation. A new interesting phenomenon is revealed when two solitons of the same or opposite polarities interact elastically, whereas the interaction of two solitons lying initially in the perpendicular planes is essentially inelastic resulting in the survival of only one soliton and destruction of another one.

  14. Conformational change in an isolated single synthetic polymer chain on a mica surface observed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Jiro; Hashimoto, Takeji

    2003-04-23

    The random coil conformation of an isolated conventional synthetic polymer chain was clearly imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The sample used was a poly(styrene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) diblock copolymer. A very dilute solution of the copolymer with benzene was spread on a water surface. The structure thus formed on water was subsequently transferred and deposited onto mica at various surface pressures and observed under AFM. The AFM images obtained with films deposited at a low surface pressure (<0.1 mN/m) showed a single polystyrene (PS) block chain aggregated into a single PS particle with a single poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block chain emanating from the particle. Immediately after the deposition, the single PMMA block chain aggregated to form a condensed monolayer around the polystyrene particles. However, after exposing the deposited film to highly humid air for 1 day, the PMMA chains spread out so that the single PMMA block chain could be identified as a random coil on the substrate. The thin water layer formed on the mica substrate in humid air may enable the PMMA block chain to be mobilized on the substrate, leading to the conformational rearrangement from the condensed monolayer conformation to an expanded and elongated coil. The elongation of the PMMA chain was highly sensitive to the humidity; the maximum elongation was obtained at 79% relative humidity. The elongation was a slow process and took about 20 h.

  15. Evidence for non-conservative current-induced forces in the breaking of Au and Pt atomic chains

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, Carlos; Untiedt, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Summary This experimental work aims at probing current-induced forces at the atomic scale. Specifically it addresses predictions in recent work regarding the appearance of run-away modes as a result of a combined effect of the non-conservative wind force and a ‘Berry force’. The systems we consider here are atomic chains of Au and Pt atoms, for which we investigate the distribution of break down voltage values. We observe two distinct modes of breaking for Au atomic chains. The breaking at high voltage appears to behave as expected for regular break down by thermal excitation due to Joule heating. However, there is a low-voltage breaking mode that has characteristics expected for the mechanism of current-induced forces. Although a full comparison would require more detailed information on the individual atomic configurations, the systems we consider are very similar to those considered in recent model calculations and the comparison between experiment and theory is very encouraging for the interpretation we propose. PMID:26734525

  16. Evidence for non-conservative current-induced forces in the breaking of Au and Pt atomic chains.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Carlos; Untiedt, Carlos; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M

    2015-01-01

    This experimental work aims at probing current-induced forces at the atomic scale. Specifically it addresses predictions in recent work regarding the appearance of run-away modes as a result of a combined effect of the non-conservative wind force and a 'Berry force'. The systems we consider here are atomic chains of Au and Pt atoms, for which we investigate the distribution of break down voltage values. We observe two distinct modes of breaking for Au atomic chains. The breaking at high voltage appears to behave as expected for regular break down by thermal excitation due to Joule heating. However, there is a low-voltage breaking mode that has characteristics expected for the mechanism of current-induced forces. Although a full comparison would require more detailed information on the individual atomic configurations, the systems we consider are very similar to those considered in recent model calculations and the comparison between experiment and theory is very encouraging for the interpretation we propose.

  17. Visualization of two-dimensional single chain conformations solubilized in a miscible polymer blend monolayer by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Kouki; Kumaki, Jiro

    2012-06-07

    Polymer Langmuir monolayers spread on a water surface are one of the best models for two-dimensional (2D) polymer and have been extensively studied. However, the most fundamental issue in understanding a 2D film, the polymer chain packing in the film, is still not well-understood, especially from the experimental point of view. Direct observation of the chain packing by microscopy at a molecular level, such as by atomic force microscopy (AFM), might be one of the most promising ways to study this issue; however, because of the limited resolution of the method, the chain packing of polymer cannot be resolved by AFM, except for especially large polymers. Here, we show that a mixed monolayer of vinyl polymers, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(n-nonyl acrylate) (PNA), was miscible at a low surface pressure, and if a small amount of PMMA chains was solubilized in a PNA monolayer, the isolated PMMA chains in the PNA monolayer were, for the first time, successfully visualized by AFM with a clear contrast, which originated from a difference of rigidities of the polymers due to their different glass transition temperatures (105 °C(PMMA) and -89 °C(PNA)). The PMMA chains were found to strongly interpenetrate into the PNA monolayer, with a radius of gyration (R(g(PMMA))) that was several times larger than that of the 2D ideal chain (segregated-chain). Furthermore, the radius scaled with the molecular weight of the PMMA (M(PMMA)) as R(g(PMMA)) ∝ M(PMMA)(0.63), which was between the scaling of the 2D ideal chain (segregated chain), R(g) ∝ M(0.5), and the 2D chain in good solvent, R(g) ∝ M(0.75). On the other hand, R(g(PMMA)) was independent of the molecular weight of the PNA matrix over a wide range. These results indicate that the PNA/PMMA monolayer is a strongly miscible system, although the R(g(PMMA)) scaling with M(PMMA) (0.63) is somewhat smaller than that expected for a 2D chain in good solvent systems (0.75). The generation of molecular level information

  18. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of theA2Σ+-X2ΠiTransition of AgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, L. C.; Wall, S. J.; Sieber, M. K.

    1997-05-01

    TheA2Σ+-X2Πinear-infrared electronic transition of AgO was observed for the first time. The spectrum was recorded with the high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer associated with the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope at Kitt Peak. The excited AgO molecules were produced in a low pressure silver hollow cathode sputter source. Constants for theA2Σ+state of107AgO and109AgO and improvedX2Πiconstants for107AgO and109AgO are presented. These two states are not a unique perturber pair and they do not follow the pure precession model.

  19. Bridging of partially negative atoms by hydrogen bonds from main-chain NH groups in proteins: The crown motif.

    PubMed

    Leader, David P; Milner-White, E James

    2015-11-01

    The backbone NH groups of proteins can form N1N3-bridges to δ-ve or anionic acceptor atoms when the tripeptide in which they occur orients them appropriately, as in the RL and LR nest motifs, which have dihedral angles 1,2-αR αL and 1,2-αL αR , respectively. We searched a protein database for structures with backbone N1N3-bridging to anionic atoms of the polypeptide chain and found that RL and LR nests together accounted for 92% of examples found (88% RL nests, 4% LR nests). Almost all the remaining 8% of N1N3-bridges were found within a third tripeptide motif which has not been described previously. We term this a "crown," because of the disposition of the tripeptide CO groups relative to the three NH groups and the acceptor oxygen anion, and the crown together with its bridged anion we term a "crown bridge." At position 2 of these structures the dihedral angles have a tight αR distribution, but at position 1 they have a wider distribution, with ϕ and ψ values generally being lower than those at position 1. Over half of crown bridges involve the backbone CO group three residues N-terminal to the tripeptide, the remainder being to other main-chain or side-chain carbonyl groups. As with nests, bridging of crowns to oxygen atoms within ligands was observed, as was bridging to the sulfur atom of an iron-sulfur cluster. This latter property may be of significance for protein evolution. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Membrane protein simulations with a united-atom lipid and all-atom protein model: lipid-protein interactions, side chain transfer free energies and model proteins.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, D Peter; Maccallum, Justin L; Ash, Walter L; Kandt, Christian; Xu, Zhitao; Monticelli, Luca

    2006-07-19

    We have reparameterized the dihedral parameters in a commonly used united-atom lipid force field so that they can be used with the all-atom OPLS force field for proteins implemented in the molecular dynamics simulation software GROMACS. Simulations with this new combination give stable trajectories and sensible behaviour of both lipids and protein. We have calculated the free energy of transfer of amino acid side chains between water and 'lipid-cyclohexane', made of lipid force field methylene groups, as a hydrophobic mimic of the membrane interior, for both the OPLS-AA and a modified OPLS-AA force field which gives better hydration free energies under simulation conditions close to those preferred for the lipid force field. The average error is 4.3 kJ mol(-1) for water-'lipid-cyclohexane' compared to 3.2 kJ mol(-1) for OPLS-AA cyclohexane and 2.4 kJ mol(-1) for the modified OPLS-AA water-'lipid-cyclohexane'. We have also investigated the effect of different methods to combine parameters between the united-atom lipid force field and the united-atom protein force field ffgmx. In a widely used combination, the strength of interactions between hydrocarbon lipid tails and proteins is significantly overestimated, causing a decrease in the area per lipid and an increase in lipid ordering. Using straight combination rules improves the results. Combined, we suggest that using OPLS-AA together with the united-atom lipid force field implemented in GROMACS is a reasonable approach to membrane protein simulations. We also suggest that using partial volume information and free energies of transfer may help to improve the parameterization of lipid-protein interactions and point out the need for accurate experimental data to validate and improve force field descriptions of such interactions.

  1. Membrane protein simulations with a united-atom lipid and all-atom protein model: lipid protein interactions, side chain transfer free energies and model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieleman, D. Peter; MacCallum, Justin L.; Ash, Walter L.; Kandt, Christian; Xu, Zhitao; Monticelli, Luca

    2006-07-01

    We have reparameterized the dihedral parameters in a commonly used united-atom lipid force field so that they can be used with the all-atom OPLS force field for proteins implemented in the molecular dynamics simulation software GROMACS. Simulations with this new combination give stable trajectories and sensible behaviour of both lipids and protein. We have calculated the free energy of transfer of amino acid side chains between water and 'lipid-cyclohexane', made of lipid force field methylene groups, as a hydrophobic mimic of the membrane interior, for both the OPLS-AA and a modified OPLS-AA force field which gives better hydration free energies under simulation conditions close to those preferred for the lipid force field. The average error is 4.3 kJ mol-1 for water-'lipid-cyclohexane' compared to 3.2 kJ mol-1 for OPLS-AA cyclohexane and 2.4 kJ mol-1 for the modified OPLS-AA water-'lipid-cyclohexane'. We have also investigated the effect of different methods to combine parameters between the united-atom lipid force field and the united-atom protein force field ffgmx. In a widely used combination, the strength of interactions between hydrocarbon lipid tails and proteins is significantly overestimated, causing a decrease in the area per lipid and an increase in lipid ordering. Using straight combination rules improves the results. Combined, we suggest that using OPLS-AA together with the united-atom lipid force field implemented in GROMACS is a reasonable approach to membrane protein simulations. We also suggest that using partial volume information and free energies of transfer may help to improve the parameterization of lipid-protein interactions and point out the need for accurate experimental data to validate and improve force field descriptions of such interactions.

  2. Force spectroscopy of hyaluronan by atomic force microscopy: from hydrogen-bonded networks toward single-chain behavior.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Vancso, G Julius

    2007-09-01

    The conformational behavior of hyaluronan (HA) polysaccharide chains in aqueous NaCl solution was characterized directly at the single-molecule level. This communication reports on one of the first single-chain atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed at variable temperatures, investigating the influence of the temperature on the stability of the HA single-chain conformation. Through AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the temperature destabilization of a local structure was proven. This structure involved a hydrogen-bonded network along the polymeric chain, with hydrogen bonds between the polar groups of HA and possibly water, and a change from a nonrandom coil to a random coil behavior was observed when increasing the temperature from 29 +/- 1 to 46 +/- 1 degrees C. As a result of the applied force, this superstructure was found to break progressively at room temperature. The use of a hydrogen-bonding breaker solvent demonstrated the hydrogen-bonded water-bridged nature of the network structure of HA single chains in aqueous NaCl solution.

  3. AgO investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy: Evidence for mixed valence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielmann, M.; Schwaller, P.; Ruffieux, P.; Gröning, O.; Schlapbach, L.; Gröning, P.

    2002-06-01

    We present photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of in-situ prepared AgO. The sample was prepared by room temperature oxidation of Ag in an electron cyclotron resonance O2 plasma. In contrast to other measurements based on ex situ prepared AgO powder samples, our investigations show a distinct double peak structure of the O 1s signal with a remarkable chemical shift of 2.9 eV between the two O 1s components. These two components can not be motivated from a crystallographic point of view as the oxygen sites are all equivalent in the unit cell. We interpret this double peak structure as a characteristic feature of AgO and discuss it in terms of mixed valences.

  4. Computational simulations of solvation force and squeezing out of dodecane chain molecules in an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong-Guang; Xiang, Yuan; Leng, Yongsheng

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the squeeze out behaviors of liquid films at nanometer scale in an atomic force microscope (AFM) has been a significant interest since the 1990s. We carry out all-atom static-mode AFM simulations in a liquid-vapor molecular dynamics ensemble to investigate the solvation force oscillation and squeeze out mechanisms of a confined linear dodecane fluid between a gold AFM tip and a mica substrate. Solvation force oscillations are found to be associated with the layering transition of the liquid film and unstable jumps of the AFM tip. Detailed structural analyses and molecular animations show that the local permeation of chain molecules and the squeeze out of molecules near the edge of contact promote the layering transition under compression. The confinement-induced slow down dynamics is manifested by the decrease in diffusivity and increase in rotational relaxation times. However, the persistent diffusive behavior of dodecane chain molecules even in the single-monolayer film is attributed to the chain sliding motions in the film due to the substantial vacancy space and thermal fluctuations.

  5. Preserved Kondo effect of small cobalt atomic chains on Ru(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Liu, Qin; Zhou, Chunsheng; Lai, Xinchun; Li, Bin; Zhao, Aidi

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of the Kondo effect from a cobalt monomer to a compact dimer, a linear trimer and then a triangular trimer on Ru(0001) surface was studied by atomic manipulation and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). It is found that the Kondo resonances of a compact Co dimer and linear trimer still can be detected in their STS because of the weak ferromagnetic exchange interaction between the Co atoms. However, when the number of the nearest-neighbors for every Co atom in the compact Co clusters is larger than one, for the interaction between Co atoms enter into the regime of the strong ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the Kondo resonance disappear and a new state forms.

  6. Comparative Study on Effects of Armchair and Zigzag Graphene Electrodes on Ballistic Transport through C Atomic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambavale, S. K.; Sharma, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    We performed theoretical investigations on electronic transport through carbon atomic chain (CAC) attached to relaxed armchair graphene (ACG) and zigzag graphene (ZZG) electrodes with the use of scattering state formalism implemented in PWSCF code of Quantum Espresso package. Our computed results show that the equilibrium conductance of CAC attached to ZZG-electrodes tends to zero over a wide energy range covering Fermi energy. Similar behavior of conductance is not seen when ZZG electrodes are replaced by ACG electrodes. CAC connected to ACG electrode is found better conducting as compared to CAC connected to ZZG electrode.

  7. The direct observation of secondary radical chain chemistry in the heterogeneous reaction of chlorine atoms with submicron squalane droplets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Lin; Smith, Jared D; Che, Dung L; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-05-21

    The reaction of Cl atoms, in the presence of Cl(2) and O(2), with sub-micron squalane particles is used as a model system to explore how surface hydrogen abstraction reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. The heterogeneous reaction is measured in a photochemical flow tube reactor in which chlorine atoms are produced by the photolysis of Cl(2) at 365 nm. By monitoring the heterogeneous reaction, using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer, the effective reactive uptake coefficient and the distributions of both oxygenated and chlorinated reaction products are measured and found to depend sensitively upon O(2), Cl(2), and Cl concentrations in the flow reactor. In the absence of O(2), the effective reactive uptake coefficient monotonically increases with Cl(2) concentration to a value of ∼3, clearly indicating the presence of secondary chain chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. The effective uptake coefficient decreases with increasing O(2) approaching a diffusion corrected value of 0.65 ± 0.07, when 20% of the total nitrogen flow rate in the reactor is replaced with O(2). Using a kinetic model it is found that the amount of secondary chemistry and the product distributions in the aerosol phase are controlled by the competitive reaction rates of O(2) and Cl(2) with alkyl radicals. The role that a heterogeneous pathway might play in the reaction of alkyl radicals with O(2) and Cl(2) is investigated within a reasonable range of reaction parameters. These results show, more generally, that for heterogeneous reactions involving secondary chain chemistry, time and radical concentration are not interchangeable kinetic quantities, but rather the observed reaction rate and product formation chemistry depends sensitively upon the concentrations and time evolution of radical initiators and those species that propagate or terminate free radical chain reactions. © The Owner

  8. Spin relaxation signature of colossal magnetic anisotropy in platinum atomic chains

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Anders; Hellsvik, Johan; Bessarab, Pavel F.; Delin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental data demonstrate emerging magnetic order in platinum atomically thin nanowires. Furthermore, an unusual form of magnetic anisotropy – colossal magnetic anisotropy (CMA) – was earlier predicted to exist in atomically thin platinum nanowires. Using spin dynamics simulations based on first-principles calculations, we here explore the spin dynamics of atomically thin platinum wires to reveal the spin relaxation signature of colossal magnetic anisotropy, comparing it with other types of anisotropy such as uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA). We find that the CMA alters the spin relaxation process distinctly and, most importantly, causes a large speed-up of the magnetic relaxation compared to uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic behavior of the nanowire exhibiting CMA should be possible to identify experimentally at the nanosecond time scale for temperatures below 5 K. This time-scale is accessible in e.g., soft x-ray free electron laser experiments. PMID:27841287

  9. Spin relaxation signature of colossal magnetic anisotropy in platinum atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Anders; Hellsvik, Johan; Bessarab, Pavel F.; Delin, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Recent experimental data demonstrate emerging magnetic order in platinum atomically thin nanowires. Furthermore, an unusual form of magnetic anisotropy - colossal magnetic anisotropy (CMA) - was earlier predicted to exist in atomically thin platinum nanowires. Using spin dynamics simulations based on first-principles calculations, we here explore the spin dynamics of atomically thin platinum wires to reveal the spin relaxation signature of colossal magnetic anisotropy, comparing it with other types of anisotropy such as uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA). We find that the CMA alters the spin relaxation process distinctly and, most importantly, causes a large speed-up of the magnetic relaxation compared to uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic behavior of the nanowire exhibiting CMA should be possible to identify experimentally at the nanosecond time scale for temperatures below 5 K. This time-scale is accessible in e.g., soft x-ray free electron laser experiments.

  10. Aging characteristics of AgO in silver-zinc battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kenneth K.

    A brief review of the properties of chemically prepared AgO positive electrodes is presented. It is shown that the degradation rate of Ag-positive plate material is moisture- and temperature-dependent. These factors can be controlled by special handling, including the institution of a proper quality assurance program.

  11. Chains of benzenes with lithium-atom adsorption: Vibrations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Yenni P.; Stegmann, Thomas; Klein, Douglas J.; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-09-01

    We study effects of different configurations of adsorbates on the vibrational modes as well as symmetries of polyacenes and poly-p-phenylenes focusing on lithium atom adsorption. We found that the spectra of the vibrational modes distinguish the different configurations. For more regular adsorption schemes the lowest states are bending and torsion modes of the skeleton, which are essentially followed by the adsorbate. On poly-p-phenylenes we found that lithium adsorption reduces and often eliminates the torsion between rings thus increasing symmetry. There is spontaneous symmetry breaking in poly-p-phenylenes due to double adsorption of lithium atoms on alternating rings.

  12. Mitigating valley-driven localization in atomically thin dopant chains in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusko, Amintor; Saraiva, A. L.; Koiller, Belita

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical study of the localization properties of nanowires of dopants in silicon (Si) fabricated by ionic implantation or scanning tunnel microscope lithography is presented for a model incorporating the currently unavoidable imprecision in individual donor positioning. Experiments have shown that Ohm's law holds in some cases, in apparent defiance to the Anderson localization theory in one dimension. We investigate how valley interference affects the traditional theory of electronic structure of disordered systems. Each isolated donor orbital is realistically described by multivalley effective-mass theory. We extend this model to describe chains of donors as a linear combination of dopant orbitals. Disorder in donor positioning is taken into account, leading to an intricate disorder distribution of hoppings between nearest-neighbor donor sites (donor-donor tunnel coupling)—an effect of valley interference. A decay length, related to the usual localization length, is obtained for phosphorous (P) donor chains from a transfer-matrix approach and is further compared with the chain length. We quantitatively determine the impact of uncertainties δ R in the implantation position relative to a target and also compare our results with those obtained without valley interference. We analyze systematically the aimed interdonor separation dependence (R0) and show that fairly diluted donor chains (R0=7.7 nm) may be as long as 100 nm before the effective onset of Anderson localization, as long as the positioning error is under a lattice parameter (δ R <0.543 nm).

  13. A Cu-atom-chain current channel with a width of approximately 0.246 nm on (5, 0) single-wall carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Zhu, Kaigui; Shao, Qingyi

    2017-10-10

    Continuous miniaturization with improved performance has enabled the development of electronic devices. However, further shrinking of electronic circuits will push feature sizes (linewidths) firmly into the nanoscale. This can cause electronic devices built using current materials (silicon-based) and fabrication processes to not work as expected. Therefore, new materials or preparation technologies are needed for the further miniaturization of electron devices. Here, through theoretical simulation, we show that regular doping of a Cu-atom chain on a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can be used to realize an atomic-scale current channel (Cu-atom-chain current channel) with a linewidth of approximately 0.246 nm. Moreover, the atomic-scale Cu-atom-chain current channel shows enhanced conductivity (lower power consumption) compared to a pristine SWCNT. Such a Cu-atom-chain current channel with an atomic-scale linewidth and its method of fabrication (regular doping) may be suitable for the preparation of nanoelectronic devices.

  14. Hidden Rashba spin-split states in a quasi-one-dimensional Au atomic chain on ferromagnetic Ni(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warashina, Takuya; Nurmamat, Munisa; Miyamoto, Koji; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kimura, Akio; Okuda, Taichi

    2016-12-01

    An electronic structure of a Au atomic chain on Ni(110), which was investigated decades ago, has been reinvestigated by high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Clear evidence of a Rashba spin split, i.e., spin-polarization reversal between positive and negative wave vectors with respect to the symmetry point, has been observed in the electronic bands possessing quasi-one-dimensional character. The observed spin-split state caused by spin-orbit interaction (SOI) was overlooked in the previous spin-resolved photoemission study probably due to the dominant effect of exchange splitting of the Ni substrate than the Rashba effect and poorer resolution of the previous measurement. The system containing both the Rashba-type SOI and the exchange interaction with one-dimensional character will provide a platform to investigate the effect of exchange interaction on the spin-split states caused by SOI with low dimensionality.

  15. Magnetic properties of a single iron atomic chain encapsulated in armchair carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrour, R.; Jabar, A.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Hlil, E. K.

    2017-06-01

    The magnetic properties have been investigated of FeCuxC1-x for a Fe atom chain wrapped in armchair (N,N) carbon nanotubes (N = 4,6,8,10,12) diluted by Cu2+ ions using Monte Carlo simulations. The thermal total magnetization and magnetic susceptibility are found. The reduced transition temperatures of iron and carbon have been calculated for different N and the exchange interactions. The total magnetization is obtained for different exchange interactions and crystal field. The Magnetic hysteresis cycles are obtained for different N, the reduced temperatures and exchange interactions. The multiple magnetic hysteresis is found. This system shows it can be used as magnetic nanostructure possessing potential current and future applications in permanent magnetism, magnetic recording and spintronics.

  16. Dynamical phases in a one-dimensional chain of heterospecies Rydberg atoms with next-nearest-neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing; Zhang, Lu; Zhai, Jingjing; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamical phase diagram of a one-dimensional chain of laser-excited two-species Rydberg atoms. The existence of a variety of unique dynamical phases in the experimentally achievable parameter region is predicted under the mean-field approximation, and the change in those phases when the effect of the next-nearest-neighbor interaction is included is further discussed. In particular, we find that the com-petition of the strong Rydberg-Rydberg interactions and the optical excitation imbalance can lead to the presence of complex multiple chaotic phases, which are highly sensitive to the initial Rydberg-state population and the strength of the next-nearest-neighbor interactions.

  17. All-atom molecular dynamics study of EAK16 peptide: the effect of pH on single-chain conformation, dimerization and self-assembly behavior.

    PubMed

    Emamyari, Soheila; Fazli, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Single-chain equilibrium conformation and dimerization of the three types of ionic EAK16 peptide are studied under three pH conditions using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that both the single-chain conformation and the dimerization process of EAK16-IV are considerably different from those of the two other types, EAK16-I and EAK16-II. The value of pH is found to have a stronger effect on the single-chain conformation and dimerization of EAK16-IV. It is shown that in addition to the charge pattern on the peptide chains, the size of the side chains of the charged amino acids plays role in the conformation of the peptide chains and their dimerization. The results shed light on the pH-dependent self-assembly behavior of EAK16 peptide in the bulk solution, which has been reported in the literature.

  18. Beta-sheet side chain polymers synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Lee; Adams, P Hans H M; Löwik, Dennis W P M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2005-01-01

    Silks are a widely studied class of naturally occurring structural proteins. Dragline spider silk, in particular, is considered to be nature's high-performance material due to its remarkable combination of strength and toughness. These mechanical properties stem from the protein secondary structure, a combination of well-defined beta-sheets in a less well-defined glycine-rich matrix. The translation of this structure into a synthetic polymer was the aim of this investigation. To achieve this, a peptide-based monomer containing the sequence alanine-glycine-alanine-glycine, a well-known beta-sheet-forming sequence found in silk, was synthesized. Using atom-transfer radical polymerization and a bifunctional initiator, a well-defined peptide-based polymer was prepared. This was then used as the macroinitiator for the polymerization of methyl methacrylate. The resulting well-defined triblock copolymer was analyzed using IR spectroscopy, which clearly showed beta-sheet secondary structure had been introduced.

  19. Effects of carbon atom parity and alkyl side chain length on the crystallization and morphology of biscarbamates, a set of model compounds for polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mostofa Kamal; Sundararajan, Pudupadi R

    2011-07-14

    Solid state morphology and crystallization behavior of a homologous series of biscarbamate molecules having varying alkyl side chain lengths with different carbon atom parity were investigated. These are model compounds for polyurethanes. We synthesized a set of biscarbamates with double hydrogen bonding motifs separated by a (CH(2))(6) spacer and with alkyl side chains of various lengths ranging from C(3) to C(18) at the ends. Thermal analysis showed an odd-even alternation in their melting temperatures and heats of fusion, with the odd number of carbon atoms in the side chain having higher melting temperatures and heats of fusion than the even numbered ones, in contrast to the case of n-alkanes. The effect of carbon atom parity in the alkyl side chains on the spherulite size, spherulite growth rate, and isothermal crystallization kinetics was studied. Although the spherulite size increases with the alkyl side chain length, the maximum is seen at an intermediate length and not with a short or long alkyl chain for both the odd and even series. Along this series of molecules, a maximum in spherulite size, spherulite growth rate, and rate of crystallization is seen for C(7)C(6) (odd series) and C(8)C(6) (even series) biscarbamates. There is a significant difference in spherulite size with respect to carbon atom parity in the alkyl side chains as well as sample preparation protocol. Hence the length of the alkyl side chain, carbon atom parity in the alkyl side chains, and the sample preparation protocol (i.e., quenching versus slow cooling) play an important role in the morphology of these molecules. We rationalize this behavior with the relative contributions of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces as discerned from IR spectroscopy. While the van der Waals interaction increases with the alkyl side chain length in this series, the hydrogen bond contribution remains invariant. The rate of crystallization follows the trend seen with the spherulitic growth. The

  20. Molybdoenzyme That Catalyzes the Anaerobic Hydroxylation of a Tertiary Carbon Atom in the Side Chain of Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Dermer, Juri; Fuchs, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol is a ubiquitous hydrocarbon compound that can serve as substrate for microbial growth. This steroid and related cyclic compounds are recalcitrant due to their low solubility in water, complex ring structure, the presence of quaternary carbon atoms, and the low number of functional groups. Aerobic metabolism therefore makes use of reactive molecular oxygen as co-substrate of oxygenases to hydroxylate and cleave the sterane ring system. Consequently, anaerobic metabolism must substitute oxygenase-catalyzed steps by O2-independent hydroxylases. Here we show that one of the initial reactions of anaerobic cholesterol metabolism in the β-proteobacterium Sterolibacterium denitrificans is catalyzed by an unprecedented enzyme that hydroxylates the tertiary C25 atom of the side chain without molecular oxygen forming a tertiary alcohol. This steroid C25 dehydrogenase belongs to the dimethyl sulfoxide dehydrogenase molybdoenzyme family, the closest relative being ethylbenzene dehydrogenase. It is a heterotrimer, which is probably located at the periplasmic side of the membrane and contains one molybdenum cofactor, five [Fe-S] clusters, and one heme b. The draft genome of the organism contains several genes coding for related enzymes that probably replace oxygenases in steroid metabolism. PMID:22942275

  1. Chain-branching control of the atomic structure of alkanethiol-based gold-sulfur interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-09-28

    Density functional theory structure calculations at 0 K and simulations at 300 K of observed high-resolution in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal three different atomic-interface structures for the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three isomeric butanethiols on Au(111): direct binding to the Au(111) surface without pitting, binding to adatoms above a regular surface with extensive pitting, and binding to adatoms with local surface vacancies and some pitting. Thermal motions are shown to produce some observed STM features, with a very tight energy balance controlling the observed structures. Variation of the degree of substitution on the α carbon is found to significantly change the relative energies for interaction of the different types of adatom structures with the surface, while the nature of the surface cell, controlled primarily by inter-adsorbate steric interactions, controls substrate reorganization energies and adsorbate distortion energies. Most significantly, by manipulating these features, chemical control of the adsorbate can produce stable interfaces with surface pitting eliminated, providing new perspectives for technological applications of SAMs.

  2. Wave propagation in nonlinear metamaterial multi-atomic chains based on homotopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Wen, Jihong; Yin, Jianfei; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the dispersion properties and wave propagation in the tetratomic nonlinear acoustic metamaterial chain based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM). We perform a comparison between HAM and Perturbation approach, harmonic balance method (HBM) and equivalent method. Results indicate that HAM can filter the unstable multiple periodic solutions fined by HBM and be more accurate. The succinct equivalent formulas can estimate the bandgaps. There is a limit of the dispersion solution when the nonlinearity tends to infinity. Analyses demonstrate that the energy dispersion in spectrum replaces the linear energy localization because of the hyperchaos that is induced by period-doubling bifurcations. The hyper-chaotic phenomena are demonstrated with frequency spectra, bifurcation diagram and Lyapunov Exponents. This paper further proves the chaotic bands can significantly expand the bandwidth for wave suppression. Enhancing the nonlinearity will vary the behavior of nonlinear bandgaps from independent state to coupling state and then experience a transition. Approaches to manipulate bands are elucidated. The strong nonlinearity is beneficial to expand the total width about 6 times. Moreover, lightweight, low-frequency and broadband characteristics are compatible so can be achieved simultaneously for nonlinear acoustic metamaterial.

  3. Fractional Quantum Hall Effects for Bosonic Atoms in a Chain of Rotating Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Jacome, Louis; Gemelke, Nathan

    2015-05-01

    Fractional quantum Hall (FQH) physics familiar from two-dimensional electron systems has also been predicted to appear in a gas of interacting bosons that are confined to a rapidly rotating trap. Due to the emergent gauge physics, such states exhibit novel properties, including excitations with fractionalized mass and statistics. In this talk, we consider an experimental strategy of creating many FQH samples along a chain of lattice sites, coupled together via tunneling. We calculate a mean-field phase diagram and derive an effective field theory to describe this system and find that it supports novel insulator and superfluid states with localized FQH behavior. The coarse structure of the phase diagram and transport properties near phase transitions reveal novel properties of excitations in the parent FQH states, and exhibit new observable relations between thermodynamic quantities such as compressibility and moment of inertia attributable to topological constraints. We describe experimental pathways to create such states and extract new smoking gun signatures of FQH physics. Supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1068570.

  4. Chain conformation and nano-patterning of polymer brushes prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang

    Over the past decade, the development of surface-initiated living polymerization methods has brought a breakthrough to surface modification owing to their control ability. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (si-ATRP), as the most popular one, has been widely employed to give novel polymer structures and functionalities to various surfaces for the purposes of tailoring surface properties, introducing new functions, or preparing so-called "smart surfaces", which can respond to external stimuli such as solvent type, pH, temperature, electric and magnetic fields etc. In this thesis, the mechanistic study of the si-ATRP was first carried out through modeling to gain good understanding of si-ATRP. Si-ATRP was then employed to prepare different types of polymer brushes to produce "smart surfaces". The kinetic model was developed using the method of moment. Combined with experimental data, a quantitative analysis was carried out for the si-ATRP mechanism. All information of grafted polymer chains, including active chain concentration, radical concentration, chain length, polydispersity, was illustrated. A new radical termination mechanism, termed as migration-termination, was proposed for si-ATRP. Si-ATRP was then employed to graft poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (POEGMA) block poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes on silicon wafer surfaces. Simple solvent treatment gave nanoscale patterns via the phase segregation of POEGMA and PMMA segments. Various patterns including spherical aggregates, wormlike aggregates, stripe patterns, perforated layers and complete overlayers, were obtained by adjusting the upper block layer thickness. Furthermore, these nanopatterns had a unique stimuli-responsive property, i.e., switching between different morphologies reversibly after being treated with selective solvents. POEGMA-block-poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethylammonium chloride) (PMETAC) brushes, having two hydrophilic segments, were synthesized

  5. Inversion of the stereochemistry around the sulfur atom of the axial methionine side chain through alteration of amino acid side chain packing in Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome C552 and its functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hulin; Tonegawa, Ken; Shibata, Tomokazu; Hemmi, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Nagao; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2013-07-16

    In cytochrome c, the coordination of the axial Met Sδ atom to the heme Fe atom occurs in one of two distinctly different stereochemical manners, i.e., R and S configurations, depending upon which of the two lone pairs of the Sδ atom is involved in the bond; hence, the Fe-coordinated Sδ atom becomes a chiral center. In this study, we demonstrated that an alteration of amino acid side chain packing induced by the mutation of a single amino acid residue, i.e., the A73V mutation, in Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c552 (HT) forces the inversion of the stereochemistry around the Sδ atom from the R configuration [Travaglini-Allocatelli, C., et al. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 25729-25734] to the S configuration. Functional comparison between the wild-type HT and the A73V mutant possessing the R and S configurations as to the stereochemistry around the Sδ atom, respectively, demonstrated that the redox potential (Em) of the mutant at pH 6.00 and 25 °C exhibited a positive shift of ∼20 mV relative to that of the wild-type HT, i.e., 245 mV, in an entropic manner. Because these two proteins have similar enthalpically stabilizing interactions, the difference in the entropic contribution to the Em value between them is likely to be due to the effect of the conformational alteration of the axial Met side chain associated with the inversion of the stereochemistry around the Sδ atom due to the effect of mutation on the internal mobility of the loop bearing the axial Met. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the internal mobility of the loop bearing the axial Met, relevant to entropic control of the redox function of the protein, is affected quite sensitively by the contextual stereochemical packing of amino acid side chains in the proximity of the axial Met.

  6. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 2. A model for change in Young's modulus due to polymer chain scission.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Kruft, Marc-Anton

    2015-11-01

    Atomic simulations were undertaken to analyse the effect of polymer chain scission on amorphous poly(lactide) during degradation. Many experimental studies have analysed mechanical properties degradation but relatively few computation studies have been conducted. Such studies are valuable for supporting the design of bioresorbable medical devices. Hence in this paper, an Effective Cavity Theory for the degradation of Young's modulus was developed. Atomic simulations indicated that a volume of reduced-stiffness polymer may exist around chain scissions. In the Effective Cavity Theory, each chain scission is considered to instantiate an effective cavity. Finite Element Analysis simulations were conducted to model the effect of the cavities on Young's modulus. Since polymer crystallinity affects mechanical properties, the effect of increases in crystallinity during degradation on Young's modulus is also considered. To demonstrate the ability of the Effective Cavity Theory, it was fitted to several sets of experimental data for Young's modulus in the literature.

  7. Nonequilibrium generalised Langevin equation for the calculation of heat transport properties in model 1D atomic chains coupled to two 3D thermal baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, H.; Stella, L.; Lorenz, C. D.; Kantorovich, L.

    2017-04-01

    We use a generalised Langevin equation scheme to study the thermal transport of low dimensional systems. In this approach, the central classical region is connected to two realistic thermal baths kept at two different temperatures [H. Ness et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 174303 (2016)]. We consider model Al systems, i.e., one-dimensional atomic chains connected to three-dimensional baths. The thermal transport properties are studied as a function of the chain length N and the temperature difference Δ T between the baths. We calculate the transport properties both in the linear response regime and in the non-linear regime. Two different laws are obtained for the linear conductance versus the length of the chains. For large temperatures (T ≳500 K) and temperature differences (Δ T ≳500 K), the chains, with N >18 atoms, present a diffusive transport regime with the presence of a temperature gradient across the system. For lower temperatures (T ≲500 K) and temperature differences (Δ T ≲400 K), a regime similar to the ballistic regime is observed. Such a ballistic-like regime is also obtained for shorter chains (N ≤15 ). Our detailed analysis suggests that the behaviour at higher temperatures and temperature differences is mainly due to anharmonic effects within the long chains.

  8. Nonequilibrium generalised Langevin equation for the calculation of heat transport properties in model 1D atomic chains coupled to two 3D thermal baths.

    PubMed

    Ness, H; Stella, L; Lorenz, C D; Kantorovich, L

    2017-04-28

    We use a generalised Langevin equation scheme to study the thermal transport of low dimensional systems. In this approach, the central classical region is connected to two realistic thermal baths kept at two different temperatures [H. Ness et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 174303 (2016)]. We consider model Al systems, i.e., one-dimensional atomic chains connected to three-dimensional baths. The thermal transport properties are studied as a function of the chain length N and the temperature difference ΔT between the baths. We calculate the transport properties both in the linear response regime and in the non-linear regime. Two different laws are obtained for the linear conductance versus the length of the chains. For large temperatures (T≳500 K) and temperature differences (ΔT≳500 K), the chains, with N>18 atoms, present a diffusive transport regime with the presence of a temperature gradient across the system. For lower temperatures (T≲500 K) and temperature differences (ΔT≲400 K), a regime similar to the ballistic regime is observed. Such a ballistic-like regime is also obtained for shorter chains (N≤15). Our detailed analysis suggests that the behaviour at higher temperatures and temperature differences is mainly due to anharmonic effects within the long chains.

  9. Surface effects on the mechanical elongation of AuCu nanowires: De-alloying and the formation of mixed suspended atomic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, M. J.; Autreto, P. A. S.; Galvao, D. S. Ugarte, D.; Bettini, J.; Sato, F.; Dantas, S. O.

    2015-03-07

    We report here an atomistic study of the mechanical deformation of Au{sub x}Cu{sub (1−x)} atomic-size wires (nanowires (NWs)) by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to obtain deeper insights on the dynamical properties of stretched NWs. The mechanical properties are significantly dependent on the chemical composition that evolves in time at the junction; some structures exhibit a remarkable de-alloying behavior. Also, our results represent the first experimental realization of mixed linear atomic chains (LACs) among transition and noble metals; in particular, surface energies induce chemical gradients on NW surfaces that can be exploited to control the relative LAC compositions (different number of gold and copper atoms). The implications of these results for nanocatalysis and spin transport of one-atom-thick metal wires are addressed.

  10. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 2. Limiting parameters of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-08-31

    The final stages in the development of a branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) are analysed. Approximate expressions are derived to calculate the limiting parameters of the chain reaction: the final degree of iodide decomposition, the maximum concentration of excited iodine atoms, the time of its achievement, and concentrations of singlet oxygen and iodide at that moment. The limiting parameters, calculated by using these expressions for a typical composition of the active medium of a pulsed COIL, well coincide with the results of numerical calculations. (active media)

  11. Ultracold few fermionic atoms in needle-shaped double wells: spin chains and resonating spin clusters from microscopic Hamiltonians emulated via antiferromagnetic Heisenberg and t-J models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Brandt, Benedikt B.; Landman, Uzi

    2016-07-01

    Advances with trapped ultracold atoms intensified interest in simulating complex physical phenomena, including quantum magnetism and transitions from itinerant to non-itinerant behavior. Here we show formation of antiferromagnetic ground states of few ultracold fermionic atoms in single and double well (DW) traps, through microscopic Hamiltonian exact diagonalization for two DW arrangements: (i) two linearly oriented one-dimensional, 1D, wells, and (ii) two coupled parallel wells, forming a trap of two-dimensional, 2D, nature. The spectra and spin-resolved conditional probabilities reveal for both cases, under strong repulsion, atomic spatial localization at extemporaneously created sites, forming quantum molecular magnetic structures with non-itinerant character. These findings usher future theoretical and experimental explorations into the highly correlated behavior of ultracold strongly repelling fermionic atoms in higher dimensions, beyond the fermionization physics that is strictly applicable only in the 1D case. The results for four atoms are well described with finite Heisenberg spin-chain and cluster models. The numerical simulations of three fermionic atoms in symmetric DWs reveal the emergent appearance of coupled resonating 2D Heisenberg clusters, whose emulation requires the use of a t-J-like model, akin to that used in investigations of high T c superconductivity. The highly entangled states discovered in the microscopic and model calculations of controllably detuned, asymmetric, DWs suggest three-cold-atom DW quantum computing qubits.

  12. Extended metal-atom chains with an inert second row transition metal: [Ru5(mu5-tpda)4X2] (tpda2- = tripyridyldiamido dianion, X = Cl and NCS).

    PubMed

    Yin, Caixia; Huang, Gin-Chen; Kuo, Ching-Kuo; Fu, Ming-Dung; Lu, Hao-Cheng; Ke, Jhih-Hong; Shih, Kai-Neng; Huang, Yi-Lin; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Chen, Chun-hsien; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2008-08-06

    EMACs (extended metal-atom chains) offer a unique platform for the exploration of metal-metal interactions. There has been significant advances on the synthesis of EMACs, such as lengthening the chains up to 11 metal atoms thus far, integrating naphthyridine moieties for tuning the charge carried at metal centers, and manipulation of metal-metal interactions. However, the metal centers in EMACs hitherto are limited to first row transition metals which are more labile than those relatively inert ones with electrons filled in the 4d and 5d shells. In this Communication, the synthesis, crystallographic, magnetic, and electrical conducting studies of [Ru5(mu5-tpda)4Cl2] and [Ru5(mu5-tpda)4(NCS)2], the first pentanuclear EMACs of second-row transition metal, are reported.

  13. Chain structures of surface hydroxyl groups formed via line oxygen vacancies on TiO2(110) surfaces studied using noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Namai, Yoshimichi; Matsuoka, Osamu

    2005-12-22

    Structures of surface hydroxyl groups arranged on a reduced TiO2(110) surface that had line oxygen vacancies were studied using noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). NC-AFM results revealed that by increasing the density of oxygen vacancies on the TiO2(110) surface, line oxygen vacancies were formed by removal of oxygen atoms in a bridge oxygen row on the TiO2(110) surface. After the TiO2(110) surface with the line oxygen vacancies was exposed to water, the surface showed hydroxyl chain structures that were composed of hydroxyl groups linearly arranged in a form of two rows on the line oxygen vacancies and on a neighboring bridge oxygen row. In-situ NC-AFM measurements of these surfaces exposed to water at room temperature revealed that hydroxyl chain structures were formed at the line oxygen vacancy. Annealing above 500 K was sufficient to remove the hydroxyl chain structures on the TiO2(110) surface and allowed line oxygen vacancies to reappear on the surface. The line oxygen vacancies are active sites for water dissociation. In conclusion, the formation of the hydroxyl chain structure suggests that the surface hydroxyl groups on a TiO2(110) surface can be controlled by preparing oxygen vacancy structures on the surface.

  14. Assessing the viability of extended nonmetal atom chains in M(n)F(4n+2) (M=S and Se).

    PubMed

    Popov, Ivan A; Averkiev, Boris B; Starikova, Alyona A; Boldyrev, Alexander I; Minyaev, Ruslan M; Minkin, Vladimir I

    2015-01-26

    Theoretical investigations to evaluate the viability of extended nonmetal atom chains on the basis of molecular models with the general formula Mn F4n+2 (M=S and Se) and corresponding solid-state systems exhibiting direct SS or SeSe bonding were performed. The proposed high-symmetry molecules were found to be minima on the potential energy surface for all Sn F4n+2 systems studied (n=2-9) and for selenium analogues up to n=6. Phonon calculations of periodic structures confirmed the dynamic stability of the -(SF4 -SF4 )∞ - chain, whereas the analogous -(SeF4 -SeF4 )∞ - chain was found to have a number of imaginary phonon frequencies. Chemical bonding analysis of the dynamically stable -(SF4 -SF4 )∞ - structure revealed a multicenter character of the SS and SF bonds. A novel definition and abbreviation (ENAC) are proposed by analogy with extended metal atom chain (EMAC) complexes.

  15. AgH, Ag/sub 2/, and AgO revisited: Basis set extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    An extended basis set has been developed for Ag which significantly improves the agreement between theoretical and experimental spectroscopic parameters for AgH, AgO, and Ag/sub 2/. The major improvement comes about as a result of the improved treatment of electron correlation in the Ag d shell upon the introduction of f functions. Their inclusion produces very slight differences at the SCF level, but significant reductions in r/sub e/ and increases in ..omega../sub e/ and D/sub e/ in the Mo-dash-barller--Plesset perturbation theory expansion. At the MP4(SDTQ) level, typical results are 0.02 A too long for r/sub e/, 4% too low for ..omega../sub e/, and 10 kcal too small for D/sub e/. From a pragmatic standpoint, MP2 give results very similar to this at a much reduced level of effort.

  16. Stoichiometric and sodium-doped titanium silicate molecular sieve containing atomically defined -OTiOTiO- chains: Quantum ab initio calculations, spectroscopic properties, and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordiga, S.; Turnes Palomino, G.; Zecchina, A.; Ranghino, G.; Giamello, E.; Lamberti, C.

    2000-02-01

    Ab initio calculations on a linear -OTiOTiO- chain embedded in an envelope of (SiO4) tetrahedra, mimicking the structure of Na2TiSi5O13 molecular sieve (ETS-10), confirm that the peculiar optical properties of the solid are associated with the presence of -OTiOTiO- linear chains behaving as quantum wires. The optical [in the UV-Vis (ultraviolet-range)] and the magnetic [(ESR) electron spin resonance] properties of these chains can be modified by adsorbing Na vapors. The sodium atoms diffusing into the channels undergo a ionization process with formation of Na+ (localized in the main channels) and Ti3+ (in the -OTiOTiO- chain, which so becomes a nonstoichiometric wire) characterized by Ti/Na ratios in the 2-4 range. Successive adsorption of oxygen at room temperature leads to the partial (Ti/Na˜2) or total (Ti/Na˜4) restoration of the chain stoichiometry and to the predominant formation of sodium oxide. The formation of a minor fraction of superoxide negative ions whose magnetic properties are revealed by ESR spectroscopy is also observed. Total restoration of the optical properties of the original samples is always obtained when the oxygen adsorption is made at 473 K. The sample keeps its structural integrity during the reduction and successive oxidation process.

  17. Study of the atom-phonon coupling model for (SC) partition function: first order phase transition for an infinite linear chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasser, Jamil A.; Chassagne, Luc; Topçu, Suat; Linares, Jorge; Alayli, Yasser

    2014-03-01

    In spin-conversion (SC) compounds containing molecules organized around an iron (II) ion the fundamental level of the ion is low spin (LS), S = 0, and its first excited one is high spin (HS), S = 2. This energy diagram is due to the ligands field interaction on 3d electrons and to the spin pairing energy. Heating the compound increases the magnetic susceptibility which corresponds to a change of populations of both levels and consequently a change of spin value of the molecules. This mechanism, called spin conversion (SC), can be accompagnied by thermal hysteresis observed by studying magnetic susceptibility or high spin fraction. In that case one considers that the (SC) takes place through a first-order phase transition due to intermolecular interactions. In the atom-phonon coupling model the molecules are considered as two-level systems, or two-level atoms, and it is assumed that the elastic force constant value of the spring which links two atoms first neighbours is depending on the electronic states of both atoms. In this study we calculate the partition function of a linear chain of N atoms (N ≤ 16) and we describe the role of phonons and that of the parameter Δ which corresponds to the distance in energy between both levels. The chain free-energy function is Fatph. We introduce for the chain a free-energy function defined by the set (FHS, FLS, Fbarr) and we show that Fatph tends towards the previous set when N → ∞. The previous set allows to describe a first order phase transition between a (LS) phase and a (HS) one. At the crossing point between the function FLS and FHS, and around this point, there is an intermediate free-energy barrier which prevents the chain to change phase which can lead to thermal hysteresis. The energy gap between the free-energy function Fatph and that defined by the set (FHS, FLS, Fbarr) is small. So we can expect that a nanoparticule takes for free-energy function that defined by the set and then displays a thermal

  18. Electron correlation in extended systems: Fourth-order many-body perturbation theory and density-functional methods applied to an infinite chain of hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhai, Sándor

    1994-11-01

    Linear equidistant and bond-alternating infinite chains of hydrogen atoms have been investigated by the ab initio crystal-orbital method at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level, by including electron correlation up to the complete fourth order of the Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP4-PT), and by using different versions of density-functional theory (DFT). The Bloch functions have been expanded in all cases in a series of high-quality atomic-orbital basis sets and complemented by extended sets of polarization functions up to 6s3p2d1f per H atom. In order to compare the performance of the PT and DFT methods, several physical properties have been computed at all theoretical levels including lattice geometry, cohesive energy, mechanisms of bond alternation (Peierls instability), and energetic features of nonequilibrium configurations (dissociation). For these latter quantities, both spin-restricted (RHF) and unrestricted (UHF) wave functions have been employed in all orders of PT. The methods described have been used parallel to infinite chains and to the H2 molecule, to be able to check their accuracy on experiments. In the case of the DFT, six different functionals (combining Slater and Becke exchange with local and gradient-corrected correlation potentials) have been utilized to test their accuracy in comparison with the MP4 results.

  19. Fast atoms and negative chain-cluster fragments from laser-induced Coulomb explosions in a super-fluid film of ultra-dense deuterium D(-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Patrik U.; Holmlid, Leif

    2012-10-01

    Fragments from laser-induced Coulomb explosions (CE) in a thin super-fluid film of ultra-dense deuterium D(-1) on a vertical surface are now observed by both negative and positive time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The so-called normal phase of the super-fluid is probably associated with D4 clusters and gives only neutral atomic fragments with a kinetic energy from the CE of 945 eV. The super-fluid phase is associated with long chain clusters D2N with N deuteron pairs and gives cluster fragments by CE mainly with a kinetic energy of 315 eV from the central cleavage in a neutral, positive or negative form. This indicates that the chain clusters are standing perpendicularly to the surface. The fragment charge state is influenced by the external field, which indicates efficient charge transfer processes.

  20. A Monte Carlo sampling method of amino acid sequences adaptable to given main-chain atoms in the proteins.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Koji; Soejima, Kenji; Higo, Junichi

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a computational method of protein design to detect amino acid sequences that are adaptable to given main-chain coordinates of a protein. In this method, the selection of amino acid types employs a Metropolis Monte Carlo method with a scoring function in conjunction with the approximation of free energies computed from 3D structures. To compute the scoring function, a side-chain prediction using another Metropolis Monte Carlo method was performed to select structurally suitable side-chain conformations from a side-chain library. In total, two layers of Monte Carlo procedures were performed, first to select amino acid types (1st layer Monte Carlo) and then to predict side-chain conformations (2nd layers Monte Carlo). We applied this method to sequence design for the entire sequence on the SH3 domain, Protein G, and BPTI. The predicted sequences were similar to those of the wild-type proteins. We compared the results of the predictions with and without the 2nd layer Monte Carlo method. The results revealed that the two-layer Monte Carlo method produced better sequence similarity to the wild-type proteins than the one-layer method. Finally, we applied this method to neuraminidase of influenza virus. The results were consistent with the sequences identified from the isolated viruses.

  1. Solvothermal preparation of ZnO nanorods as anode material for improved cycle life Zn/AgO batteries.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Shafiq; Ahmed, Fiaz; Badshah, Amin; Ali Altaf, Ataf; Raza, Ramsha; Lal, Bhajan; Hussain, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Nano materials with high surface area increase the kinetics and extent of the redox reactions, thus resulting in high power and energy densities. In this study high surface area zinc oxide nanorods have been synthesized by surfactant free ethylene glycol assisted solvothermal method. The nanorods thus prepared have diameters in the submicron range (300 ~ 500 nm) with high aspect ratio. They have uniform geometry and well aligned direction. These nanorods are characterized by XRD, SEM, Specific Surface Area Analysis, solubility in alkaline medium, EDX analysis and galvanostatic charge/discharge studies in Zn/AgO batteries. The prepared zinc oxide nanorods have low solubility in alkaline medium with higher structural stability, which imparts the improved cycle life stability to Zn/AgO cells.

  2. Solvothermal Preparation of ZnO Nanorods as Anode Material for Improved Cycle Life Zn/AgO Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Shafiq; Ahmed, Fiaz; Badshah, Amin; Ali Altaf, Ataf; Raza, Ramsha; Lal, Bhajan; Hussain, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Nano materials with high surface area increase the kinetics and extent of the redox reactions, thus resulting in high power and energy densities. In this study high surface area zinc oxide nanorods have been synthesized by surfactant free ethylene glycol assisted solvothermal method. The nanorods thus prepared have diameters in the submicron range (300∼500 nm) with high aspect ratio. They have uniform geometry and well aligned direction. These nanorods are characterized by XRD, SEM, Specific Surface Area Analysis, solubility in alkaline medium, EDX analysis and galvanostatic charge/discharge studies in Zn/AgO batteries. The prepared zinc oxide nanorods have low solubility in alkaline medium with higher structural stability, which imparts the improved cycle life stability to Zn/AgO cells. PMID:24146807

  3. Reducing the contact resistance in bottom-contact-type organic field-effect transitors using an AgO x interface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masahiro; Kim, Yeongin; Claus, Martin; Bao, Zhenan

    2017-09-01

    Bottom-contact organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are prepared by inserting an AgO x layer between a pentacene layer and the source-drain electrodes. The contact resistance in the device is ˜8.1 kΩ·cm with an AgO x layer oxidized for 60 s but reaches 116.9 kΩ·cm with a non-oxidized Ag electrode. The drain current and mobility in the OFETs with the AgO x layer increase with the oxidization time and then gradually plateau, and this trend strongly depends on the work function of the Ag surface. Further, the hole injection is enhanced by the presence of Ag2O but inhibited by the presence of AgO.

  4. Towards a low-spin configuration in extended metal atom chains. Theoretical study of trimetallic systems with 22 metal electrons.

    PubMed

    Tabookht, Zahra; de Graaf, Coen; López, Xavier

    2012-01-14

    Different electronic configurations of a series of trinuclear heterometallic chains with 22 metallic electrons, MM'M(dpa)(4)X(2) (M = Co, Rh; M' = Ni, Pd; X = Cl, NCS), have been modelled in search of new systems with novel electrical properties. For this purpose, we explore the possibility of obtaining low-spin (extensively closed-shell) states by introducing chemical changes to the reference compound CoPdCo(dpa)(4)Cl(2) (1), isoelectronic to the herein studied systems, but possessing magnetically coupled localized electrons. The discussion is based on the orbital energies obtained by the DFT methodology. Among the systems herein analysed, CoNiCo(dpa)(4)(NCS)(2) has only two unpaired electrons vs. six in the case of 1, its closed-shell configuration appearing at high energies. For Rh(2)M-based chains, changes go a step further and the RhPdRh(dpa)(4)Cl(2) and RhPdRh(dpa)(4)(NCS)(2) molecules present a closed-shell ground state in close competition with the broken symmetry solution with S = ½ on each Rh(II). One-electron reduction of the latter compounds has been computed with marked structural changes. Our calculations show that the two lowest 23-electron states are separated by 7-8 kcal mol(-1) in favour of the state with an unpaired localized electron on the δ(Pd-N)* orbital instead of the delocalized one (σ(nb))(2)(σ*)(1).

  5. Molecular Spintronics: Theory of Spin-Dependent Electron Transport Between Iron Nano-Contacts Bridged by Organic Molecules and Fe Atomic Chains*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Hugh

    2005-03-01

    Recent experiments [1] have lent support to theoretical predictions [2] that organic molecules connecting nickel nano-contacts may exhibit magneto-resistance and spin-valve effects. Here we present predictions of spintronic phenomena in another class of ferromagnetic nano-systems: Fe nano-contacts bridged by single conducting or insulating molecules or chains of Fe atoms. Models are constructed based on semi-empirical considerations, the known electronic structure of bulk Fe and ab initio density functional calculations. Using Lippmann-Schwinger and Green's function techniques, and Landauer theory, significant magneto-resistance is predicted in these systems. Under appropriate conditions, novel device characteristics such as negative magneto-resistance are also predicted to emerge. * Supported by NSERC and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. 1 J. R. Petta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 136601 (2004). 2 E. G. Emberly and G. Kirczenow, Chem. Phys. 281, 311 (2002); R. Pati, et al., Phys. Rev. B 68, 100407 (2003).

  6. Calculation of the water-cyclohexane transfer free energies of neutral amino acid side-chain analogs using the OPLS all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, Justin L; Tieleman, D Peter

    2003-11-30

    We calculated the free energy of solvation of the neutral analogs of 18 amino acid side-chains (not including glycine and proline) using the OPLS all-atom force field in TIP4P water, SPC water, and cyclohexane by molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic integration. The average unsigned errors in the free energies of solvation in TIP4P, SPC, and cyclohexane are 4.4, 4.9, and 2.1 kJ/mol respectively. Most of the calculated hydration free energies are not favorable enough compared to experiment. The largest errors are found for tryptophan, histidine, glutamic acid, and glutamine. The average unsigned errors in the free energy of transfer from TIP4P to cyclohexane and from SPC to cyclohexane are 4.0 and 4.1 kJ/mol, respectively. The largest errors, of more than 7.5 kJ/mol, are found for histidine, glutamine, and glutamatic acid.

  7. Biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll c derivatives possessing chlorine and bromine atoms at the terminus of esterifying chains in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Keisuke; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-07-01

    The green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum newly produced BChl c derivatives possessing a chlorine or bromine atom at the terminus of the esterifying chain in the 17-propionate residue by cultivation with exogenous ω-halo-1-alkanols. The relative ratios of BChl c derivatives esterified with 8-chloro-1-octanol and 10-chloro-1-decanol were estimated to be 26.5% and 33.3% by cultivation with these ω-chloro-1-alkanols at the final concentrations of 300 and 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, smaller amounts of unnatural BChls c esterified with ω-bromo-1-alkanols were biosynthesized than those esterified with ω-chloro-1-alkanols: the ratios of BChl c derivatives esterified with 8-bromo-1-octanol and 10-bromo-1-decanol were 11.3% and 12.2% at the concentrations of 300 and 150 μM, respectively. These indicate that ω-chloro-1-alkanols can be incorporated into bacteriochlorophyllide c more than ω-bromo-1-alkanols in the BChl c biosynthetic pathway. The homolog compositions of the novel BChl c derivatives possessing a halogen atom were analogous to those of coexisting natural BChl c esterified with farnesol. These results demonstrate unique properties of BChl c synthase, BchK, which can utilize unnatural substrates containing halogen in the BChl c biosynthesis of Cba. tepidum.

  8. Catalytic Conversion of Short-Chain Alcohols on Atomically Dispersed Au and Pd Supported on Nanoscale Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongyang

    With the development of technologies for cellulosic biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, bio-alcohols are among the main alternative feedstocks to fossil fuels. The research pursued in my thesis was the investigation of gold and palladium as catalysts for the application of short aliphatic alcohols to hydrogen generation and value-added chemicals production. Specifically, selective methanol steam reforming and non-oxidative ethanol dehydrogenation to hydrogen and acetaldehyde were investigated in this thesis work. A major aim of the thesis was to develop atomically efficient catalysts with tuned surface chemistry for the desired reactions, using suitable synthesis methods. Methanol steam reforming (SRM) for hydrogen production has recently been investigated on gold catalysts to overcome the drawbacks of copper catalysts (deactivation, pyrophoricity). Previous work at Tufts University has shown that both CeO2 and ZnO are suitable supports for gold. In this thesis, nanoscale composite oxides ZnZrOx were prepared by a carbon hard-template method, which resulted in homogeneous distribution of Zn species in the matrix of ZrO2. Tunable surface chemistry of ZnZrO x was demonstrated by varying the Zn/Zr ratio to suppress the strong Lewis acidity of ZrO2, which leads to undesired production of CO through methanol decomposition. With atomic dispersion of gold, Au/ZnZrO x catalyzes the SRM reaction exclusively via the methanol self-coupling pathway up to 375°C. The activity of Au/ZnZrOx catalysts was compared to Au/TiO2, which is another catalyst system demonstrating atomic dispersion of gold. Similarity in the apparent activation energy of SRM on all the supported gold catalysts studied in this thesis and in the literature further confirms the same single-site Au-Ox-MO centers as active sites for SRM with indirect effects of the supports exploited. With this fundamental understanding of gold-catalyzed C1 alcohol reforming, the Au/ZnZrOx catalyst was evaluated for the

  9. Diffusion across the modified polyethylene separator GX in the heat-sterilizable AgO-Zn battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1973-01-01

    Models of diffusion across an inert membrane have been studied using the computer program CINDA. The models were constructed to simulate various conditions obtained in the consideration of the diffusion of Ag (OH)2 ions in the AgO-Zn battery. The effects on concentrations across the membrane at the steady state and on the fluxout as a function of time were used to examine the consequences of stepwise reducing the number of sources of ions, of stepwise blocking the source and sink surfaces, of varying the magnitude of the diffusion coefficient for a uniform membrane, of varying the diffusion coefficient across the membrane, and of excluding volumes to diffusion.

  10. Ag/AgO Nanoparticles Grown via Time Dependent Double Mechanism in a 2D Layered Ni-PCP and Their Antibacterial Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rashmi A.; Gupta, Neeraj K.; Singh, Rajan; Nigam, Shivansh; Ateeq, Bushra

    2017-01-01

    A simple synthesis route for growth of Ag/AgO nanoparticles (NPs) in large quantitative yields with narrow size distribution from a functional, non-activated, Ni (II) based highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) as a template has been demonstrated. This template is a stable storage media for the NPs larger than the pore diameters of the PCP. From EPR study it was concluded that NPs were synthesized via two mechanisms i.e. acid formation and the redox activity of the framework. Size range of Ag/AgO NPs is sensitive to choice of solvent and reaction time. Direct use of Ag/AgO@Ni-PCP shows influential growth inhibition towards Escherichia coli and the pathogen Salmonella typhimurium at extremely low concentrations. The pristine template shows no cytotoxic activity, even though it contains Ni nodes in the framework. PMID:28322256

  11. Ag/AgO Nanoparticles Grown via Time Dependent Double Mechanism in a 2D Layered Ni-PCP and Their Antibacterial Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Rashmi A.; Gupta, Neeraj K.; Singh, Rajan; Nigam, Shivansh; Ateeq, Bushra

    2017-03-01

    A simple synthesis route for growth of Ag/AgO nanoparticles (NPs) in large quantitative yields with narrow size distribution from a functional, non-activated, Ni (II) based highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) as a template has been demonstrated. This template is a stable storage media for the NPs larger than the pore diameters of the PCP. From EPR study it was concluded that NPs were synthesized via two mechanisms i.e. acid formation and the redox activity of the framework. Size range of Ag/AgO NPs is sensitive to choice of solvent and reaction time. Direct use of Ag/AgO@Ni-PCP shows influential growth inhibition towards Escherichia coli and the pathogen Salmonella typhimurium at extremely low concentrations. The pristine template shows no cytotoxic activity, even though it contains Ni nodes in the framework.

  12. Electron transfer mediating properties of hydrocarbons as a function of chain length: a differential scanning conductive tip atomic force microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Denis; Castronovo, Matteo; Casalis, Loredana; Scoles, Giacinto

    2008-03-01

    The development of novel molecular and biomolecular devices relies on the understanding of charge transport across molecule-substrate interfaces. However, different strategies adopted so far for fabricating and studying transport through metal-molecule-metal junctions yield values for the transport coefficients that differ by up to orders of magnitude even for the same junction. Conductive tip atomic force microscopy (CT-AFM) allows for the simultaneous measurement of transport and morphological properties of molecular assemblies, but absolute transport measurements depend on the nature of the AFM tip-molecule contact. In this work we present a differential approach to the study of metal-molecule-metal junctions based on the combination of AFM-driven nanolithography and CT-AFM. We nanograft patches of alkanethiol molecules in a self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiol molecules of different chain length and measure by CT-AFM the morphology and the transport properties of the nanopatches and of the reference layer. The method allows for the determination of the differential resistance between the two molecular layers and is thus independent of environmental factors. The validity of this approach is demonstrated by measuring the tunneling decay constant of alkanethiols as a function of their length.

  13. Development and testing of a high cycle life 30 A-h sealed AgO-Zn battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogner, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A two-phase program was initiated to investigate design parameters and technology to develop an improved AgO-Zn battery. The basic performance goal was 100 charge/discharge cycles (22 h/2 h) at 50 percent depth of discharge following a six-month period of charged stand at room temperature. Phase 1, cell evaluation, involved testing 70 cells in five-cell groups. The major design variables were active material ratios, electrolyte concentrations, separator systems, and negative plate shape. Phase 1 testing showed that cycle life could be improved 10 percent to 20 percent by using greater ratios of zinc to silver oxide and higher electrolyte concentrations. Wedge-shaped negatives increased cycle life by nearly 100 percent. Phase 2 battery evaluation, which was initiated before the Phase 1 results were known completely, involved evaluation of six designs as 19-cell batteries. Only one battery exceeded 100 cycles following nine months charged stand.

  14. Electrospun regenerated cellulose nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization method for catalase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Feng, Quan; Hou, Dayin; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Tao; Menkhaus, Todd J; Fong, Hao

    2014-12-10

    In this study, an electrospun regenerated cellulose (RC) nanofibrous membrane with fiber diameters of ∼200-400 nm was prepared first; subsequently, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and acrylic acid (AA) were selected as the monomers for surface grafting of polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Thereafter, four nanofibrous membranes (i.e., RC, RC-poly(HEMA), RC-poly(DMAEMA), and RC-poly(AA)) were explored as innovative supports for immobilization of an enzyme of bovine liver catalase (CAT). The amount/capacity, activity, stability, and reusability of immobilized catalase were evaluated, and the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for immobilized and free catalase were determined. The results indicated that the respective amounts/capacities of immobilized catalase on RC-poly(HEMA) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) nanofibrous membranes reached 78 ± 3.5 and 67 ± 2.7 mg g(-1), which were considerably higher than the previously reported values. Meanwhile, compared to that of free CAT (i.e., 18 days), the half-life periods of RC-CAT, RC-poly(HEMA)-CAT, RC-poly(DMAEMA)-CAT, and RC-poly(AA)-CAT were 49, 58, 56, and 60 days, respectively, indicating that the storage stability of immobilized catalase was also significantly improved. Furthermore, the immobilized catalase exhibited substantially higher resistance to temperature variation (tested from 5 to 70 °C) and lower degree of sensitivity to pH value (tested from 4.0 and 10.0) than the free catalase. In particular, according to the kinetic parameters of Vmax and Km, the nanofibrous membranes of RC-poly(HEMA) (i.e., 5102 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 44.89 mM) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) (i.e., 4651 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 46.98 mM) had the most satisfactory biocompatibility with immobilized catalase. It was therefore concluded that the electrospun RC nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with 3-dimensional nanolayers of polymer chains/brushes would be

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Energetics and electronic structure of a single copper atomic chain wrapped in a carbon nanotube: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Min; Du, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Su-Fang; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2009-12-01

    In the generalized gradient approximation, the energy and electronic structure are investigated for a single copper atomic chain wrapped in (4, 4), (5, 5) and (6, 6) armchair carbon nanotubes by using the first-principles projector-augmented wave potential within the framework of density functional theory. The results show that the (4, 4) and (5, 5) tubes are too narrow to wrap a Cu chain, but the (6, 6) tube is nearly ideal to wrap a Cu chain on its centre axis. Wider tubes are anticipated to wrap more than one Cu chain spontaneously with forces amounting to a fraction of a nanonewton. Although the tube-chain interaction decreases with the increase of the tube diameter of (4, 4), (5, 5) and (6, 6) successively, the charge density of the Cu@(6, 6) combined system still does not show complete superposition of that of the pristine (6, 6) tube and Cu chain. Successively reducing the restrictions of (4, 4), (5, 5) and (6, 6) tubes on the Cu chain leads to a reduction in shift of the highest peak of the Cu chain towards lower energies, that is from -0.5177 eV of the isolated Cu chain to -1.36785 eV, -0.668 eV and -0.588 eV for the Cu@(4, 4), Cu@(5, 5) and Cu@(6, 6) systems, respectively. In reverse, the strong metallic character of the Cu chain also enhances the metallic character of the combined systems so that the broader pseudogaps of the pristine carbon nanotubes around the Fermi level change into the narrow pseudogaps of the combined systems.

  16. Microbial degradation of steroid alkaloids. Effect of nitrogen atom in the side-chain on the microbial degradation of steroid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Belic, I; Socic, H

    1975-01-01

    The microbial dehydrogenation of steroid alkaloids follows the dehydrogenation pattern of steroids until the 3-keto-1,4-diene stage. No side-chain cleavage or degradation of the steroid nucleus is observed. Side-chain cleavage of tomatidine is achieved only by previous induction of side-chain splitting enzymes.

  17. Probing the conformation and 2D-distribution of pyrene-terminated redox-labeled poly(ethylene glycol) chains end-adsorbed on HOPG using cyclic voltammetry and atomic force electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe; Taofifenua, Cécilia

    2014-03-14

    The present paper aims at illustrating how end-attachment of water-soluble flexible chains bearing a terminal functional group onto graphene-like surfaces has to be carefully tuned to ensure the proper positioning of the functional moiety with respect to the anchoring surface. The model experimental system considered here consists of a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains, bearing an adsorbing pyrene foot and a ferrocene (Fc) redox functional head, self-assembled onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Cyclic voltammetry is used to accurately measure the chain coverage and gain insights into the microenvironment experienced by the Fc heads. Molecule-touching atomic force electrochemical microscopy (Mt/AFM-SECM) is used to simultaneously probe the chain conformation and the position of the Fc heads within the layer, and also to map the 2D-distribution of the chains over the surface. This multiscale electrochemical approach allows us to show that whereas Fc-PEG-pyrene readily self-assembles to form extremely homogeneous layers, the strongly hydrophobic nature of graphite planes results in a complex coverage-dependent structure of the PEG layer due to the interaction of the ferrocene label with the HOPG surface. It is shown that, even though pyrene is known to adsorb particularly strongly onto HOPG, the more weakly adsorbing terminal ferrocene can also act as the chain anchoring moiety especially at low coverage. However we show that beyond a critical coverage value the Fc-PEG-pyrene chains adopt an ideal "foot-on" end-attached conformation allowing the Fc head to explore a volume away from the surface solely limited by the PEG chain elasticity.

  18. Significant melting point depression of two-dimensional folded-chain crystals of isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate)s observed by high-resolution in situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yuma; Kumaki, Jiro

    2013-05-09

    The properties of polymer ultrathin films are a subject of intense study from both practical and academic viewpoints. Previously, we found that upon compression, an isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) (it-PMMA) Langmuir monolayer crystallized to form a two-dimensional (2D) folded-chain crystal, and the molecular image of the crystal with chain folding and tie chains was clearly visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the present study, the melting behaviors of the it-PMMA 2D crystals were successfully observed in situ by high-temperature AFM at the molecular lever for the first time. The chain-chain distances (~1.2 nm) of the crystals were clearly resolved even at temperatures close to the melting temperatures (Tm) of the 2D crystals. We found that the Tm of the 2D crystals was at most 90 °C lower than the bulk crystals. The Tm depression strongly depended on the molecular weight, while the molecular weight dependence of the bulk Tm was negligible in the molecular weight regime studied. The Tm depression also depended on the substrates, a slightly larger depression being observed on a sapphire substrate compared to that on a mica. The large Tm depressions of the 2D crystals could not be explained by a simple Thomson-Gibbs argument, theoretical developments are necessary to understand the melting of the 2D crystals.

  19. Preparation of Transparent Bulk TiO2/PMMA Hybrids with Improved Refractive Indices via an in Situ Polymerization Process Using TiO2 Nanoparticles Bearing PMMA Chains Grown by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoshi; Fujita, Masato; Idota, Naokazu; Matsukawa, Kimihiro; Sugahara, Yoshiyuki

    2016-12-21

    Transparent TiO2/PMMA hybrids with a thickness of 5 mm and improved refractive indices were prepared by in situ polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles bearing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains grown using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and the effect of the chain length of modified PMMA on the dispersibility of modified TiO2 nanoparticles in the bulk hybrids was investigated. The surfaces of TiO2 nanoparticles were modified with both m-(chloromethyl)phenylmethanoyloxymethylphosphonic acid bearing a terminal ATRP initiator and isodecyl phosphate with a high affinity for common organic solvents, leading to sufficient dispersibility of the surface-modified particles in toluene. Subsequently, SI-ATRP of MMA was achieved from the modified surfaces of the TiO2 nanoparticles without aggregation of the nanoparticles in toluene. The molecular weights of the PMMA chains cleaved from the modified TiO2 nanoparticles increased with increases in the prolonging of the polymerization period, and these exhibited a narrow distribution, indicating chain growth controlled by SI-ATRP. The nanoparticles bearing PMMA chains were well-dispersed in MMA regardless of the polymerization period. Bulk PMMA hybrids containing modified TiO2 nanoparticles with a thickness of 5 mm were prepared by in situ polymerization of the MMA dispersion. The transparency of the hybrids depended significantly on the chain length of the modified PMMA on the nanoparticles, because the modified PMMA of low molecular weight induced aggregation of the TiO2 nanoparticles during the in situ polymerization process. The refractive indices of the bulk hybrids could be controlled by adjusting the TiO2 content and could be increased up to 1.566 for 6.3 vol % TiO2 content (1.492 for pristine PMMA).

  20. Use of long-chain alkylamines for preconcentration and determination of traces of molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium by atomic-absorption spectroscopy-II: molybdenum in soils, sediments and natural waters.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Alexander, P W; Smythe, L E

    1976-03-01

    Molybdenum is extracted as the thiocyanate complex with the quaternary long-chain aliphatic amine Aliquat 336 in chloroform, followed by evaporation of the solvent, dissolution in MIBK, and atomic-absorption spectroscopy. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive, with few interference problems for the determination of the Mo content of soils and sediments in the range 0.1-1.0 ppm with a relative standard deviation better than 5% when 1-g samples are used. Quantitative extraction from large volumes of aqueous solution has also been confirmed, allowing the determination of Mo in natural waters in the ppM range.

  1. Interplay among tertiary contacts, secondary structure formation and side-chain packing in the protein folding mechanism: all-atom representation study of protein L.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Cecilia; García, Angel E; Onuchic, José N

    2003-02-21

    Experimental and theoretical results suggest that, since proteins are energetically minimally frustrated, the native fold, or topology, plays a primary role in determining the structure of the transition state ensemble and on-pathway intermediate states in protein folding. Although the central role of native state topology in determining the folding mechanism is thought to be a quite general result-at least for small two-state folding proteins-there are remarkable exceptions. Recent experimental findings have shown that topology alone cannot always determine the folding mechanism, and demonstrated that the balance between topology and energetics is very delicate. This balance seems to be particularly critical in proteins with a highly symmetrical native structure, such as proteins L and G, which have similar native structure topology but fold by different mechanisms. Simplified, C(alpha)-atom only protein models have shown not be sufficient to differentiate these mechanisms. An all-atom Gō model provides a valuable intermediate model between structurally simplified protein representations and all-atom protein simulations with explicit/implicit solvent descriptions. We present here a detailed study of an all-atom Gō-like representation of protein L, in close comparison with the experimental results and with the results obtained from a simple C(alpha)-atom representation of the same protein. We also perform simulations for protein G, where we obtain a folding mechanism in which the protein symmetry is broken exactly in the opposite way to protein L as has been observed experimentally. A detailed analysis for protein L also shows that the role of specific residues is correctly and quantitatively reproduced by the all-atom Gō model over almost the entire protein.

  2. Inulin crystal initiation via a glucose-fructose cross-link of adjacent polymer chains: atomic force microscopy and static molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Peter D; Rajapaksha, K Harinda; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-03-06

    Semi-crystalline microparticles of inulin (MPI) have clinical utility as potent human vaccine adjuvants but their relevant surface structure and crystal assembly remain undefined. We show inulin crystal surfaces to resemble multi-layered, discoid radial spherulites resulting from very rapid formation of complex tertiary structures, implying directed crystal initiation. Physical and in silico molecular modelling of unit cells confirm steric feasibility of initiation by hydrogen-bonded cross-linking of terminal glucose to a fructose of another chain, mimicking bonding in sucrose crystals. A strong, chelate-like dual H-bond is proposed to compel the known antiparallel alignment of inulin chains. Such cross-linking would require one extra fructose per chain in the native inulin crystal, as observed. Completion of five H-bonded internal ring-domains would 'lock in' each new 6-fructose structural unit of each antiparallel helix pair to create a new isoform. All known properties of inulin isoforms follow readily from these concepts.

  3. Inulin crystal initiation via a glucose-fructose cross-link of adjacent polymer chains: atomic force microscopy and static molecular modelling

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Peter D.; Rajapaksha, K. Harinda; Barclay, Thomas G.; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R.; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    Semi-crystalline microparticles of inulin (MPI) have clinical utility as potent human vaccine adjuvants but their relevant surface structure and crystal assembly remain undefined. We show inulin crystal surfaces to resemble multi-layered, discoid radial spherulites resulting from very rapid formation of complex tertiary structures, implying directed crystal initiation. Physical and in silico molecular modelling of unit cells confirm steric feasibility of initiation by hydrogen-bonded cross-linking of terminal glucose to a fructose of another chain, mimicking bonding in sucrose crystals. A strong, chelate-like dual H-bond is proposed to compel the known antiparallel alignment of inulin chains. Such cross-linking would require one extra fructose per chain in the native inulin crystal, as observed. Completion of five H-bonded internal ring-domains would ‘lock in’ each new 6-fructose structural unit of each antiparallel helix pair to create a new isoform. All known properties of inulin isoforms follow readily from these concepts. PMID:25498723

  4. Silver(I) nitrate complexes of three tetra-kis-thio-ether-substituted pyrazine ligands: metal-organic chain, network and framework structures.

    PubMed

    Assoumatine, Tokouré; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen

    2017-03-01

    pyridine N atom. A second nitrate anion, also lying about the twofold rotation axis, coordinates to this silver atom via an Ag-O bond, hence this second silver atom has a threefold N2O coordination sphere. In the crystal of (I), the nitrate anion plays an essential role in forming C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds that link the metal-organic chains to form a three-dimensional supra-molecular structure. In the crystal of (II), the metal-organic networks (lying parallel to the bc plane) stack up the a-axis direction but there are no significant inter-molecular inter-actions present between the layers. In the crystal of (III), there are a number of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds present within the metal-organic framework. The role of the nitrate anion in the formation of the coordination polymers is also examined.

  5. Comparison of Three Efficient Approximate Exact-Exchange Algorithms: The Chain-of-Spheres Algorithm, Pair-Atomic Resolution-of-the-Identity Method, and Auxiliary Density Matrix Method.

    PubMed

    Rebolini, Elisa; Izsák, Róbert; Reine, Simen Sommerfelt; Helgaker, Trygve; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo

    2016-08-09

    We compare the performance of three approximate methods for speeding up evaluation of the exchange contribution in Hartree-Fock and hybrid Kohn-Sham calculations: the chain-of-spheres algorithm (COSX; Neese , F. Chem. Phys. 2008 , 356 , 98 - 109 ), the pair-atomic resolution-of-identity method (PARI-K; Merlot , P. J. Comput. Chem. 2013 , 34 , 1486 - 1496 ), and the auxiliary density matrix method (ADMM; Guidon , M. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010 , 6 , 2348 - 2364 ). Both the efficiency relative to that of a conventional linear-scaling algorithm and the accuracy of total, atomization, and orbital energies are compared for a subset containing 25 of the 200 molecules in the Rx200 set using double-, triple-, and quadruple-ζ basis sets. The accuracy of relative energies is further compared for small alkane conformers (ACONF test set) and Diels-Alder reactions (DARC test set). Overall, we find that the COSX method provides good accuracy for orbital energies as well as total and relative energies, and the method delivers a satisfactory speedup. The PARI-K and in particular ADMM algorithms require further development and optimization to fully exploit their indisputable potential.

  6. An evaluation of atomic and molecular mixture rules and group additivity concepts for the estimation of radiation absorption by long-chained, saturated hydrocarbons at vacuum UV and soft X-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Jennifer W.; Cooper, Glyn; Burton, Gordon R.; Brion, C. E.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of using atomic and molecular mixture rules as well as group additivity concepts for predicting valence shell photoabsorption oscillator strengths (cross sections) for long-chained alkane molecules has been investigated over a wide energy range from 18 to 220 eV. The predictions are discussed with reference to recently reported experimental measurements (Chem. Phys. 173 (1993) 209) for normal alkanes, C nH 2 n+2 ( n=1-8). Atomic mixture rules based on either theoretical or experimental atomic oscillator strength sums are found to be unsatisfactory, giving very large errors at most photon energies. A wide range of molecular mixture rules based on linear combinations of measured oscillator strength values for small 'component' alkane molecules and molecular hydrogen have also been evaluated. Although good agreement with experiment is obtained with some linear combinations, many others result in substantial errors. Molecular mixture rules constructed using oscillator strength for larger component alkanes generally give better estimates of the experimentally measured data; however, since no other a priori physical or chemical reasons can be advanced for any particular choice of molecular mixture rule, this procedure is unsatisfactory for general application. In contrast, a group additivity procedure based on oscillator strength estimates for the methylene (CH 2) and methyl (CH 3) alkane group fragments, derived entirely from the photoabsorption measurements for lower alkanes, provides excellent agreement with the measured oscillator strengths for C 8H 18 over the entire energy range studied (18-220 eV). The absolute photoabsorption group oscillator strengths derived for the CH 2 and CH 3 fragments should be applicable to assessing the contributions from saturated hydrocarbon groupings to vacuum UV and soft X-ray absorption in larger chemical and biochemical systems.

  7. Sr7Ge6, Ba7Ge6 and Ba3Sn2 -Three new binary compounds containing dumbbells and four-membered chains of tetrel atoms with considerable Ge-Ge π-bonding character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siggelkow, Lisa; Hlukhyy, Viktor; Fässler, Thomas F.

    2012-07-01

    The germanides Sr7Ge6 and Ba7Ge6 as well as the stannide Ba3Sn2 were prepared by arc melting and annealing in welded tantalum ampoules using induction as well as resistance furnaces. The compounds were investigated by powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Sr7Ge6 and Ba7Ge6 crystallize in the Ca7Sn6 structure type (space group Pmna, Z=4: a=7.777(2) Å, b=23.595(4) Å, c=8.563(2) Å, wR2=0.081 (all data), 2175 independent reflections, 64 variable parameters for Sr7Ge6 and a=8.0853(6) Å, b=24.545(2) Å, c=8.9782(8) Å, wR2=0.085 (all data), 2307 independent reflections, 64 variable parameters for Ba7Ge6). Ba3Sn2 crystallizes in an own structure type with the space group P43212, Z=4, a=6.6854(2) Å, c=17.842(2) Å, wR2=0.037 (all data), 1163 independent reflections, 25 variable parameters. In Sr7Ge6 and Ba7Ge6 the Ge atoms are arranged as Ge2 dumbbells and Ge4 four-membered atom chains. Their crystal structures cannot be rationalized according to the (8-N) rule. In contrast, Ba3Sn2 presents Sn2 dumbbells as a main structural motif and thereby can be described as an electron precise Zintl phase. The chemical bonding situation in these structures is discussed on the basis of partial and total Density Of States (DOS) curves, band structures including fatbands, topological analysis of the Electron Localization Function (ELF) as well as Bader analysis of the bond critical points using the programs TB-LMTO-ASA and WIEN2K. While Ba3Sn2 reveals semiconducting behaviour, all germanides Ae7Ge6 (Ae=Ca, Sr, and Ba) show metallic properties and a considerable π-bonding character between the Ge atoms of the four-membered chains and the dumbbells. The π-bonding character of the germanides is best reflected by the resonance hybrid structures {[Ge-Ge]6-/[Ge-....Ge-....Ge-....Ge]8-}↔{[Ge=Ge]4-/[Ge-Ge-Ge-Ge]10-}.

  8. Investigation of Humidity Dependent Surface Morphology and Proton Conduction in Multi-Acid Side Chain Membranes by Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Economou, Nicholas J; Barnes, Austin M; Wheat, Andrew J; Schaberg, Mark S; Hamrock, Steven J; Buratto, Steven K

    2015-11-05

    In this report, we employ phase-contrast tapping mode and conductive probe atomic force microscopy (cp-AFM) as tools to investigate the nanoscale morphology and proton conductance of a 3M perfluoro-imide acid (PFIA) membrane (625 EW) over a large range of relative humidity (3-95% RH). As a point of comparison, we also investigate 3M perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) (825 EW) and Nafion 212. With AFM, we assess the membrane's water retention and mechanical stability at low RH and high RH, respectively. Cp-AFM allows us to spatially resolve the hydrophilic and electrochemically active domains under a similar set of conditions and observe directly the ties between membrane morphology and proton conductance. From our data, we are able to correlate the improved water retention indicated by the size of the hydrophilic domains with the proton conductance in the PFIA membrane at elevated temperature and compare the result with that observed for the PFSA and Nafion. At high RH conditions, we see evidence of a nearly continuous hydrophilic phase, which indicates a high degree of swelling.

  9. Comparison of united-atom potentials for the simulation of vapor-liquid equilibria and interfacial properties of long-chain n-alkanes up to n-C100.

    PubMed

    Müller, Erich A; Mejía, Andrés

    2011-11-10

    Canonical ensemble molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are reported which compute both the vapor-liquid equilibrium properties (vapor pressure and liquid and vapor densities) and the interfacial properties (density profiles, interfacial tensions, entropy and enthalpy of surface formation) of four long-chained n-alkanes: n-decane (n-C(10)), n-eicosane (n-C(20)), n-hexacontane (n-C(60)), and n-decacontane (n-C(100)). Three of the most commonly employed united-atom (UA) force fields for alkanes (SKS: Smit, B.; Karaborni, S.; Siepmann, J. I. J. Chem. Phys. 1995,102, 2126-2140; J. Chem. Phys. 1998,109, 352; NERD: Nath, S. K.; Escobedo, F. A.; de Pablo, J. J. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 108, 9905-9911; and TraPPE: Martin M. G.; Siepmann, J. I. J. Phys. Chem. B1998, 102, 2569-2577.) are critically appraised. The computed results have been compared to the available experimental data and those fitted using the square gradient theory (SGT). In the latter approach, the Lennard-Jones chain equation of state (EoS), appropriately parametrized for long hydrocarbons, is used to model the homogeneous bulk phase Helmholtz energy. The MD results for phase equilibria of n-decane and n-eicosane exhibit sensible agreement both to the experimental data and EoS correlation for all potentials tested, with the TraPPE potential showing the lowest deviations. However, as the molecular chain increases to n-hexacontane and n-decacontane, the reliability of the UA potentials decreases, showing notorious subpredictions of both saturated liquid density and vapor pressure. Based on the recommended data and EoS results for the heaviest hydrocarbons, it is possible to attest, that in this extreme, the TraPPE potential shows the lowest liquid density deviations. The low absolute values of the vapor pressure preclude the discrimination among the three UA potentials studied. On the other hand, interfacial properties are very sensitive to the type of UA potential thus allowing a differentiation of the

  10. Synthesis of Novel μ-Star Copolymers with Poly(N-Octyl Benzamide) and Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Miktoarms through Chain-Growth Condensation Polymerization, Styrenics-Assisted Atom Transfer Radical Coupling, and Ring-Opening Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Feng; Aimi, Junko; Lai, Kuan-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Star copolymers are known to phase separate on the nanoscale, providing useful self-assembled morphologies. In this study, the authors investigate synthesis and assembly behavior of miktoarm star (μ-star) copolymers. The authors employ a new strategy for the synthesis of unprecedented μ-star copolymers presenting poly(N-octyl benzamide) (PBA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) arms: a combination of chain-growth condensation polymerization, styrenics-assisted atom transfer radical coupling, and ring-opening polymerization. Gel permeation chromatography, mass-analyzed laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, and (1) H NMR spectroscopy reveal the successful synthesis of a well-defined (PBA11 )2 -(PCL15 )4 μ-star copolymer (Mn,NMR ≈ 12 620; Đ = 1.22). Preliminary examination of the PBA2 PCL4 μ-star copolymer reveals assembled nanofibers having a uniform diameter of ≈20 nm. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Falling chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chun Wa; Yasui, Kosuke

    2006-06-01

    The one-dimensional fall of a folded chain with one end suspended from a rigid support and a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Because their Lagrangians contain no explicit time dependence, the falling chains are conservative systems. Their equations of motion are shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred between subchains. We show that Cayley's 1857 energy nonconserving solution for a chain falling from a resting heap is incorrect because it neglects the energy gained when a link leaves a subchain. The maximum chain tension measured by Calkin and March for the falling folded chain is given a simple if rough interpretation. Other aspects of the falling folded chain are briefly discussed.

  12. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  13. Smallest Nanoelectronics with Adatom Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is focused on the general aspect of atomic chain electronics that I have been studying. Results have been published before, but are being rederived here using a new physical/mathematical picture/model, which deepens the physical understanding. Precise adatom structures can be used as a template on a regulated surface with no uncertainty.

  14. Precise Nanoelectronics with Adatom Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    Adatom chains on an atomically regulated substrate will be building components in future precise nanoelectronics. Adatoms need to be secured with chemical bonding, but then electronic isolation between the adatom and substrate systems is not guaranteed. A one-dimensional model shows that good isolation with existence of surface states is expected on an s-p crossing substrate such as Si, Ge, or GaAs, reflecting the bulk nature of the substrate. Isolation is better if adatoms are electronically similar to the substrate atoms, and can be manipulated by hydrogenation. Chain structures with group IV adatoms with two chemical bonds, or group III adatoms with one chemical bond, are semiconducting, reflecting the surface nature of the substrate. These structures are unintentionally doped due to the charge transfer across the chemical bonds. Physical properties of adatom chains have to be determined for the unified adatom-substrate system.

  15. Atomic Calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  16. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  17. Realization of a Strained Atomic Wire Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Song, Inkyung; Goh, Jung Suk; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Sung Won; Shin, Jin Sung; Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yeom, Han Woong

    2015-11-24

    A superlattice of strained Au-Si atomic wires is successfully fabricated on a Si surface. Au atoms are known to incorporate into the stepped Si(111) surface to form a Au-Si atomic wire array with both one-dimensional (1D) metallic and antiferromagnetic atomic chains. At a reduced density of Au, we find a regular array of Au-Si wires in alternation with pristine Si nanoterraces. Pristine Si nanoterraces impose a strain on the neighboring Au-Si wires, which modifies both the band structure of metallic chains and the magnetic property of spin chains. This is an ultimate 1D version of a strained-layer superlattice of semiconductors, defining a direction toward the fine engineering of self-assembled atomic-scale wires.

  18. Chain Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-08-01

    35609 Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command Redstone Arsenal...Ray Heathcock Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command...for Product Assurance has established a rather unique computer program for handling a variety of chain sampling schemes and is available for

  19. Structure and Stability of Monatomic Metallic Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Inder P.; Sen, Prasenjit; Ciraci, S.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated atomic and electronic structure of Au and Al monatomic chains by using first-principle plane wave method within density-functional theory. Despite their different valencies, Au and Al form planar zigzag chains with each atom having four nearest neighbors. The zigzag structure is stable against linearization and non-planar deformations. We performed an extensive charge density analysis and finite temperature calculations to reveal the origin of the unusual atomic structure in these one dimensional metallic systems. The implications of the zigzag structure on the electronic properties and the balistic electron conduction have been examined.

  20. Electronic bistability in linear beryllium chains.

    PubMed

    Helal, Wissam; Monari, Antonio; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2009-04-30

    A theoretical investigation on the mixed-valence behavior (bistability) of a series of cationic linear chains composed of beryllium atoms, Be(N)(+) (with N = 6,..., 12), is presented. The calculations were performed at CAS-SCF and MR-CI levels by using an ANO basis set containing 6s4p3d2f orbitals for each atom. Our results show a consistent gradual shift between different classes of mixed-valence compounds as the number of beryllium atoms increases, from class III strong coupling toward class II valence trapped. Indeed, in the largest cases (N > 10), the cationic chains were found to be closer to class I, where the coupling vanishes. The intramolecular electron transfer parameters V(ab), E(a), and E(opt) were calculated for each atomic chain. It is shown that the decrease of V(ab) with increasing N follows an exponential pattern.

  1. The high-bias stability of monatomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, R. H. M.; Untiedt, C.; van Ruitenbeek, J. M.

    2004-07-01

    For the metals Au, Pt and Ir it is possible to form freely suspended monatomic chains between bulk electrodes. The atomic chains sustain very large current densities, but finally fail at high bias. We investigate the breaking mechanism, that involves current-induced heating of the atomic wires and electromigration forces. We find good agreement of the observations for Au based on models due to Todorov and co-workers. The high-bias breaking of atomic chains for Pt can also be described by the models, although here the parameters have not been obtained independently. In the limit of long chains the breaking voltage decreases inversely proportional to the length.

  2. Modeling of polypeptide chains as C alpha chains, C alpha chains with C beta, and C alpha chains with ellipsoidal lateral chains.

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, F; Esposito, G; Viglino, P; Cattarinussi, S

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the number of degrees of freedom necessary to describe a polypeptide chain we analyze the statistical behavior of polypeptide chains when represented as C alpha chains, C alpha chains with C beta atoms attached, and C alpha chains with rotational ellipsoids as models of side chains. A statistical analysis on a restricted data set of 75 unrelated protein structures is performed. The comparison of the database distributions with those obtained by model calculation on very short polypeptide stretches allows the dissection of local versus nonlocal features of the distributions. The database distribution of the bend angles of polypeptide chains of pseudo bonded C alpha atoms spans a restricted range of values and shows a bimodal structure. On the other hand, the torsion angles of the C alpha chain may assume almost all possible values. The distribution is bimodal, but with a much broader probability distribution than for bend angles. The C alpha - C beta vectors may be taken as representative of the orientation of the lateral chain, as the direction of the bond is close to the direction of the vector joining C alpha to the ad hoc defined center of the "steric mass" of the side chain. Interestingly, both the bend angle defined by C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C beta i+1 and the torsional angle offset of the pseudo-dihedral C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C alpha i+2-C beta i+2 with respect to C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C alpha i+2-C alpha i+3 span a limited range of values. The latter results show that it is possible to give a more realistic representation of polypeptide chains without introducing additional degrees of freedom, i.e., by just adding to the C alpha chain a C beta with given side-chain properties. However, a more realistic description of side chains may be attained by modeling side chains as rotational ellipsoids that have roughly the same orientation and steric hindrance. To this end, we define the steric mass of an atom as proportional to its van der

  3. Anisotropic Transport of Electrons in a Novel FET Channel with Chains of InGaAs Nano-Islands Embedded along Quasi-Periodic Multi-Atomic Steps on Vicinal (111)B GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Y.; Kawazu, T.; Noda, T.; Sakaki, H.

    2010-01-04

    We have studied electron transport in n-AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction FET channels, in which chains of InGaAs nano-islands are embedded along quasi-periodic steps. By using two samples, conductance G{sub para}(V{sub g}) parallel to the steps and G{sub perp}(V{sub g}) perpendicular to them were measured at 80 K as functions of gate voltage V{sub g}. At sufficiently high V{sub g}, G{sub para} at 80 K is several times as high as G{sub perp}, which manifests the anisotropic two-dimensional transport of electrons. When V{sub g} is reduced to -0.7 V, G{sub perp} almost vanishes, while {sub Gpara} stays sizable unless V{sub g} is set below -0.8 V. These results indicate that 'inter-chain' barriers play stronger roles than 'intra-chain' barriers.

  4. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  5. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  6. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  7. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  8. Chain Gang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 August 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a chain of clustered and battered craters. These were formed by secondary impact. That is, somewhere to the south (beyond the bottom of this image), a large impact crater formed. When this occurred, material ejected from the crater was thrown tens to hundreds of kilometers away. This material then impacted the martian surface, forming clusters and chains of smaller craters.

    Location near: 15.8oN, 35.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Northern Spring

  9. Topological superconductivity induced by ferromagnetic metal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; MacDonald, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent experiments have provided evidence that one-dimensional (1D) topological superconductivity can be realized experimentally by placing transition-metal atoms that form a ferromagnetic chain on a superconducting substrate. We address some properties of this type of system by using a Slater-Koster tight-binding model to account for important features of the electronic structure of the transition-metal chains on the superconducting substrate. We predict that topological superconductivity is nearly universal when ferromagnetic transition-metal chains form straight lines on superconducting substrates and that it is possible for more complex chain structures. When the chain is weakly coupled to the substrate and is longer than superconducting coherence lengths, its proximity-induced superconducting gap is ˜Δ ESO/J where Δ is the s -wave pair potential on the chain, ESO is the spin-orbit splitting energy induced in the normal chain state bands by hybridization with the superconducting substrate, and J is the exchange splitting of the ferromagnetic chain d bands. Because of the topological character of the 1D superconducting state, Majorana end modes appear within the gaps of finite length chains. We find, in agreement with the experiment, that when the chain and substrate orbitals are strongly hybridized, Majorana end modes are substantially reduced in amplitude when separated from the chain end by less than the coherence length defined by the p -wave superconducting gap. We conclude that Pb is a particularly favorable substrate material for ferromagnetic chain topological superconductivity because it provides both strong s -wave pairing and strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling, but that there is an opportunity to optimize properties by varying the atomic composition and structure of the chain. Finally, we note that in the absence of disorder, a new chain magnetic symmetry, one that is also present in the crystalline topological insulators, can stabilize multiple

  10. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  11. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2016-07-12

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  12. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  13. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  14. Modifying the OPLS-AA force field to improve hydration free energies for several amino acid side chains using new atomic charges and an off-plane charge model for aromatic residues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhitao; Luo, Harry H; Tieleman, D Peter

    2007-02-01

    The hydration free energies of amino acid side chains are an important determinant of processes that involve partitioning between different environments, including protein folding, protein complex formation, and protein-membrane interactions. Several recent papers have shown that calculated hydration free energies for polar and aromatic residues (Trp, His, Tyr, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu) in several common molecular dynamics force fields differ significantly from experimentally measured values. We have attempted to improve the hydration energies for these residues by modifying the partial charges of the OPLS-AA force field based on natural population analysis of density functional theory calculations. The resulting differences between calculated hydration free energies and experimental results for the seven side chain analogs are less than 0.1 kcal/mol. Simulations of the synthetic Trp-rich peptide Trpzip2 show that the new charges lead to significantly improved geometries for interacting Trp-side chains. We also investigated an off-plane charge model for aromatic rings that more closely mimics their electronic configuration. This model results in an improved free energy of hydration for Trp and a somewhat altered benzene-sodium potential of mean force with a more favorable energy for direct benzene-sodium contact.

  15. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  16. Tunneling magnetoresistance of silicon chains

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-05-28

    The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a silicon chain sandwiched between nickel electrodes was examined by using first-principles density functional theory. The relative orientation of the magnetization in a parallel-alignment (PA) configuration of two nickel electrodes enhanced the current with a bias less than 0.4 V compared with that in an antiparallel-alignment configuration. Consequently, the silicon chain-nickel electrodes yielded good TMR characteristics. In addition, there was polarized spin current in the PA configuration. The spin polarization of sulfur atoms functioning as a linking bridge between the chain and nickel electrode played an important role in the magnetic effects of the electric current. Moreover, the hybridization of the sulfur 3p orbital and σ-conjugated silicon 3p orbital contributed to increasing the total current.

  17. Predictive Modeling of Metal-Organic Chains with Active Metal Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ud Din, Naseem; Le, Duy; Rahman, Talat

    Creation, stabilization, characterization and control of single atom transition metal (TM) sites may lead to significant advancement of the next-generation catalyst. Motivated by the experimental results of Skomski et al., we have performed density functional theory based calculations of TM-dipyridyltetrazine (DT) chains in which TM atoms are stabilized and separated by the DT molecules. Our calculations show that the formation energies of the chains are high, suggesting that these chains can easily be synthesized and stabilized. Moreover, by calculating the adsorption energies of CO, O2 and O atom on the metal atom sites of the chains we found that these molecules/atoms strongly bond to TM atoms Mo, Cr, Fe and Co occupying these sites, suggesting that these TM-DT chains are potential candidates for CO oxidation catalyst. Details of reaction pathway (energetic and kinetic) of CO oxidation on the chains will be also presented and discussed.

  18. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  19. Atomic rivals

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  20. Clathrin heavy chain, light chain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, F K; Stanley, K K

    1983-01-01

    Purified pig brain clathrin can be reversibly dissociated and separated into heavy chain trimers and light chains in the presence of non-denaturing concentrations of the chaotrope thiocyanate. The isolated heavy chain trimers reassemble into regular polygonal cage structures in the absence of light chains. The light chain fraction can be further resolved into its two components L alpha and L beta which give different one-dimensional peptide maps. Radiolabelled light chains bind with high affinity (KD < 10(-10) M) to heavy chain trimers, to heavy chain cages and to a 110,000 mol. wt. tryptic fragment of the heavy chain. Both light chains compete with each other and with light chains from other sources for the same binding sites on heavy chains and c.d. spectroscopy shows that the two pig brain light chains possess very similar structures. We conclude that light chains from different sources, despite some heterogeneity, have a highly conserved, high affinity binding site on the heavy chain but are not essential for the formation of regular cage structures. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 8. PMID:10872336

  1. Atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S.

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  2. Atomic Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Claudio

    2000-10-01

    Atomic and molecular data are required in a variety of fields ranging from the traditional astronomy, atmospherics and fusion research to fast growing technologies such as lasers, lighting, low-temperature plasmas, plasma assisted etching and radiotherapy. In this context, there are some research groups, both theoretical and experimental, scattered round the world that attend to most of this data demand, but the implementation of atomic databases has grown independently out of sheer necessity. In some cases the latter has been associated with the data production process or with data centers involved in data collection and evaluation; but sometimes it has been the result of individual initiatives that have been quite successful. In any case, the development and maintenance of atomic databases call for a number of skills and an entrepreneurial spirit that are not usually associated with most physics researchers. In the present report we present some of the highlights in this area in the past five years and discuss what we think are some of the main issues that have to be addressed.

  3. Theoretical Studies of Relatively Rigid Polymer Chains.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    energies Chain packing Intermolecular interactions Polarizability Polybenzobisoxazoles Electrical conductivitj 20. ATTRACT (Continue an reverse side if...of these materials, the ordering of the chains, and the mechanical strength of the resulting films or fibers . The basic goals are thus a molecular...be used to prepare films and fibers having unusual strength and thermal stability. They are, however, very nearly intract- able unless some atoms or

  4. 21 CFR 178.3780 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of long chain monobasic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... long chain monobasic acids containing from 9 to 49 carbon atoms obtained by the ozonization of long... alpha-olefins, obtained from the polymerization of ethylene, have 20 to 50 carbon atoms and contain a...

  5. 21 CFR 178.3780 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of long chain monobasic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... from 9 to 49 carbon atoms obtained by the ozonization of long chain alpha-olefins, the unreacted... polymerization of ethylene, have 20 to 50 carbon atoms and contain a minimum of 75 percent by weight straight...

  6. 21 CFR 178.3780 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of long chain monobasic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... long chain monobasic acids containing from 9 to 49 carbon atoms obtained by the ozonization of long... alpha-olefins, obtained from the polymerization of ethylene, have 20 to 50 carbon atoms and contain a...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3780 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of long chain monobasic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... long chain monobasic acids containing from 9 to 49 carbon atoms obtained by the ozonization of long... alpha-olefins, obtained from the polymerization of ethylene, have 20 to 50 carbon atoms and contain a...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3780 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of long chain monobasic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... long chain monobasic acids containing from 9 to 49 carbon atoms obtained by the ozonization of long... alpha-olefins, obtained from the polymerization of ethylene, have 20 to 50 carbon atoms and contain a...

  9. Sr{sub 7}Ge{sub 6}, Ba{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} and Ba{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} -Three new binary compounds containing dumbbells and four-membered chains of tetrel atoms with considerable Ge-Ge {pi}-bonding character

    SciTech Connect

    Siggelkow, Lisa; Hlukhyy, Viktor; Faessler, Thomas F.

    2012-07-15

    The germanides Sr{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} and Ba{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} as well as the stannide Ba{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} were prepared by arc melting and annealing in welded tantalum ampoules using induction as well as resistance furnaces. The compounds were investigated by powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Sr{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} and Ba{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} crystallize in the Ca{sub 7}Sn{sub 6} structure type (space group Pmna, Z=4: a=7.777(2) A, b=23.595(4) A, c=8.563(2) A, wR{sub 2}=0.081 (all data), 2175 independent reflections, 64 variable parameters for Sr{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} and a=8.0853(6) A, b=24.545(2) A, c=8.9782(8) A, wR{sub 2}=0.085 (all data), 2307 independent reflections, 64 variable parameters for Ba{sub 7}Ge{sub 6}). Ba{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} crystallizes in an own structure type with the space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, Z=4, a=6.6854(2) A, c=17.842(2) A, wR{sub 2}=0.037 (all data), 1163 independent reflections, 25 variable parameters. In Sr{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} and Ba{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} the Ge atoms are arranged as Ge{sub 2} dumbbells and Ge{sub 4} four-membered atom chains. Their crystal structures cannot be rationalized according to the (8-N) rule. In contrast, Ba{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} presents Sn{sub 2} dumbbells as a main structural motif and thereby can be described as an electron precise Zintl phase. The chemical bonding situation in these structures is discussed on the basis of partial and total Density Of States (DOS) curves, band structures including fatbands, topological analysis of the Electron Localization Function (ELF) as well as Bader analysis of the bond critical points using the programs TB-LMTO-ASA and WIEN2K. While Ba{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} reveals semiconducting behaviour, all germanides Ae{sub 7}Ge{sub 6} (Ae=Ca, Sr, and Ba) show metallic properties and a considerable {pi}-bonding character between the Ge atoms of the four-membered chains and the dumbbells. The {pi}-bonding character of the germanides is best reflected by the resonance hybrid structures {l_brace}[Ge-Ge]{sup 6

  10. Modelling of reversible single chain polymer self-assembly: from the polymer towards the protein limit.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Denis; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2015-04-07

    The thermodynamic properties of reversible single chain polymer self-assembly are characterized by all-atom simulations. The ensemble of closed chains collapses from multiple conformations for long chains to nearly unique conformations for shorter chains, suggesting that the engineered polymers can fold into stable unique conformations at moderate temperatures.

  11. Effects of carbon chain substituents on the P⋯N noncovalent bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Upendra; Scheiner, Steve

    2012-05-01

    The effects of carbon chains placed on the electron-accepting P atom of a P⋯N bond are examined via ab initio calculations. Saturated alkyl groups have a mild weakening effect, regardless of chain length. In contrast, incorporation of double bonds into the chain strengthens the interaction, Ctbnd C triple bonds even more so. These effects are only slightly enhanced by additional conjugated double bonds or an aromatic ring. Placing F atoms onto the carbon chains strengthens the P⋯N bond, but only by a small amount, which wanes as the F atom is displaced further from the P along the chain.

  12. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  13. Nuclear structure notes on element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D. Sarmiento, L. G.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-10-15

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory.

  14. Structure of confined films of chain alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Mugele, Friedrich; Baldelli, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Salmeron, Miquel

    1999-09-30

    The structure of thin films of simple chain alcohols (1-octanol and 1-undecanol) confined between two atomically smooth mica surfaces has been investigated using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). In both systems, the substrate-molecule interaction leads to a strongly bound first layer on each surface. Additional liquid organizes into highly compressible bilayers, which could be expelled by applying sufficiently high pressure.

  15. Atomic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, R. G.; Hahn, E. L.

    1984-12-01

    The fundamental principles of atomic-memory effects related to the Loschmidt paradox in the second law of thermodynamics are introduced and illustrated with simple analogies, photographs, and diagrams; and the results of RF and laser experiments are summarized. Nuclear-spin echoes in response to RF pulses and the NMR free-induction decay phenomenon are described, and the extension of these concepts to the visible spectrum in laser-frequency-switching and multipulsed-laser experiments is examined with an emphasis on studies of free-induction decay in LaF3 crystals containing Pr impurities (DeVoe and Brewster). The laser-induced phenomena can be applied to studies of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions, and an improved understanding of the RF effects is needed to enhance the performance of medical NMR imaging systems.

  16. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  17. Polyneutron Chain Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Fisher

    2000-11-12

    Although helium atoms do not form molecules, a sufficiently large number will bind into a stable liquid droplet. A comparable situation is expected for neutrons, with a sufficiently large number binding into a stable droplet of neutron matter. Such polyneutron droplets can be viewed as isotopes of an element with nuclear charge Z=0, tentatively denoted neutrium, symbol Nt. Because of the relatively weak binding of neutrons compared with that of a mix of neutrons and protons, the minimum number of neutrons required for stability of a droplet is fairly large. Early estimates of {approx}60 may be reduced to a dozen or so by the BCS pairing interaction. The Nt entries with N{>=}12 are new to the table of isotopes. Because all of them are beta-unstable, none is expected to persist as a free particle. Yet, some may occasionally be produced by means to be described below, and it is of interest to examine their decay chains and their interactions with charged nuclei to ascertain how their presence might be revealed. Although these reactions are interesting, they cannot be taken seriously without identifying a source for the initial Nt isotope that begins the chain. Here, we consider possible interactions between {sup 16}O and {sup A}Nt. Although there is no strong interaction between them, we can expect a very weak residual attraction that can form a loosely bound {sup 16}O {sup A}Nt nuclear molecule. This is not a compound nucleus in the usual sense because, considered as fluids, the {sup 16}O and {sup A}Nt droplets are immiscible. For a droplet with fewer than about 60 neutrons, beta decay of {sup A}Nt is prevented by the buildup of Coulomb energy associated with transforming {sup A}Nt into {sup A}H in close proximity to {sup 16}O. Thus, it is possible that {sup 16}O {sup A}Nt molecules can persist indefinitely and that a few of them may be present in ordinary water as supermassive oxygen nuclei. Because the binding of these molecules is weak, the {sup A}Nt component can

  18. Gasoline compositions containing branched chain amines or derivatives thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Schuettenberg, A.D.

    1987-02-03

    A detergent additive is described comprising a reaction product of (a) a C/sub 8-30/ branched chain monoamine having at least 7 carbon atoms in a straight chain and (b) a C/sub 1-12/ monocarboxylic acid or ester.

  19. Calculation of single chain cellulose elasticity using fully atomistic modeling

    Treesearch

    Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals, a potential base material for green nanocomposites, are ordered bundles of cellulose chains. The properties of these chains have been studied for many years using atomic-scale modeling. However, model predictions are difficult to interpret because of the significant dependence of predicted properties on model details. The goal of this study is...

  20. Health supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Rolf; Gallagher, Pat

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The actual application of supply chain practice and disciplines required for service delivery improvement within the current health environment. * A rationale for the application of Supply Chain Management (SCM) approaches to the Health sector. * The tools and methods available for supply chain analysis and benchmarking. * Key supply chain success factors.

  1. Adjusting the Chain Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloc, Z.; Korf, J.; Kavan, P.

    The adjustment (modification) deals with gear chains intermediating (transmitting) motion transfer between the sprocket wheels on parallel shafts. The purpose of the adjustments of chain gear is to remove the unwanted effects by using the chain guide on the links (sliding guide rail) ensuring a smooth fit of the chain rollers into the wheel tooth gap.

  2. Fibonacci chain polynomials: Identities from self-similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Wolfdieter

    1995-01-01

    Fibonacci chains are special diatomic, harmonic chains with uniform nearest neighbor interaction and two kinds of atoms (mass-ratio r) arranged according to the self-similar binary Fibonacci sequence ABAABABA..., which is obtained by repeated substitution of A yields AB and B yields A. The implications of the self-similarity of this sequence for the associated orthogonal polynomial systems which govern these Fibonacci chains with fixed mass-ratio r are studied.

  3. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  4. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  5. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  6. Closed Circular Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caglayan, Günhan

    2016-01-01

    A Steiner chain is defined as the sequence of n circles that are all tangent to two given non-intersecting circles. A closed chain, in particular, is one in which every circle in the sequence is tangent to the previous and next circles of the chain. In a closed Steiner chain the first and the "n"th circles of the chain are also tangent…

  7. Closed Circular Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caglayan, Günhan

    2016-01-01

    A Steiner chain is defined as the sequence of n circles that are all tangent to two given non-intersecting circles. A closed chain, in particular, is one in which every circle in the sequence is tangent to the previous and next circles of the chain. In a closed Steiner chain the first and the "n"th circles of the chain are also tangent…

  8. The chemistry and structure of ?222? CdO/Ag heterophase interfaces on an atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, D. K.; Seidman, D. N.; Merkle, K. L.

    1996-03-01

    The chemistry and structure of {222} CdO/Ag (ceramic/metal) heterophase interfaces are determined with sub-nanometer chemical and structural spatial resolution employing atom-probe field-ion and high-resolution electron microscopies. The interfaces are produced in a controlled manner via internal oxidation of a Ag1.62at%Cd alloy, which results in the formation of CdO precipitates in a Ag matrix. The CdO precipitates are octahedral-shaped with facets on the {222} polar planes, and have a cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Ag matrix. Atom-probe analyses are made along the chemically-ordered CdO <111>-type directions, thereby perpendicularly intersecting the {222} interfaces. A total of 35 {222} heterophase interfaces is chemically analyzed, of which 19 have the chemical sequence Ag|O|Cd|… and 16 the sequence Ag|Cd|O|…. High resolution electron microscopy analyses reveal that the {222} facet planes of the CdO precipitates con atomic height ledges, therefore indicating that the preciptates were in a coarsening stage. The combined atom-probe and high-resolution electron microscope results demonstrate that the chemistry of the terminating {222} facet plane of CdO is controlled by coarsening kinetics.

  9. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  10. Single color upconversion emission in Ho 3+/Yb 3+ and Tm 3+/Yb 3+ doped P 2O 5-MgO 2-Sb 2O 3-MnO 2-AgO glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Chengguo; Song, Feng; Hou, Jing; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Gong; Yu, Hua; Sun, Tongqing; Tian, Jianguo

    2011-06-01

    The Ho 3+/Yb 3+ and Tm 3+/Yb 3+ doped P 2O 5-MgO 2-Sb 2O 3-MnO 2-AgO glasses were prepared by high temperature melting method. Under a 975 nm laser diode (LD) excitation, the single red and single blue upconversion (UC) emissions were observed in Ho 3+/Yb 3+ and Tm 3+/Yb 3+ doped samples, respectively. By studying the spontaneous radiative and multiphonon relaxation probabilities, we find that the multiphonon relaxation probability of 5I 6 (Ho 3+) state is very large (1.39 × 10 6 s - 1 ), which is helpful to the population of 5I 7 state. The multiphonon relaxation probability of 3H 5 and 3F 2,3 (Tm 3+) is also very large, which results in lots of population in 3F 4 and 3H 4 states. The results are that the red UC emission of Ho 3+ and the blue UC emission of Tm 3+ are stronger.

  11. Magnetic conveyor belt for transporting and merging trapped atom clouds.

    PubMed

    Hänsel, W; Reichel, J; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2001-01-22

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic device which transports cold atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve mean fluxes up to 10(6) s(-1) with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this device allows merging of atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. The unification, which we demonstrate experimentally, can be performed without loss of phase space density. This novel, all-magnetic atom manipulation offers exciting perspectives, such as trapped-atom interferometry.

  12. Observation of Individual Fluorine Atom from Highly Oriented Poly (tetrafluoroethylene) Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.,; Paley, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Direct observation of the film thickness, molecular structure and individual fluorine atoms from highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films were achieved using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A thin PTFE film is mechanically deposited onto a smooth glass substrate at specific temperatures by a friction transfer technique. Atomic resolution images of these films show that the chain-like helical structures of the PTFE macromolecules are aligned parallel to each other with an intermolecular spacing of 5.72 A, and individual fluorine atoms are clearly observed along these twisted molecular chains with an interatomic spacing of 2.75 A. Furthermore, the first direct AFM measurements for the radius of the fluorine-helix, and of the carbon-helix in sub-angstrom scale are reported as 1.70 A and 0.54 A respectively.

  13. Observation of Individual Fluorine Atoms from Highly Oriented Poly(Tetrafluoroethylene) Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Direct observation of the film thickness, molecular structure, and individual fluorine atoms from highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films were achieved using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A thin PTFE film is mechanically deposited onto a smooth glass substrate at specific temperatures by a friction-transfer technique. Atomic resolution images of these films show that the chain-like helical structures of the PTFE macromolecules are aligned parallel to each other with an intermolecular spacing of 5.72 A, and individual fluorine atoms are clearly observed along these twisted molecular chains with an interatomic spacing of 2.75 A. Furthermore, the first direct AFM measurements for the radius of the fluorine-helix, and of the carbon-helix in sub-angstrom scale are reported as 1.7 and 0.54 A respectively.

  14. Observation of Individual Fluorine Atom from Highly Oriented Poly (tetrafluoroethylene) Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.,; Paley, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Direct observation of the film thickness, molecular structure and individual fluorine atoms from highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films were achieved using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A thin PTFE film is mechanically deposited onto a smooth glass substrate at specific temperatures by a friction transfer technique. Atomic resolution images of these films show that the chain-like helical structures of the PTFE macromolecules are aligned parallel to each other with an intermolecular spacing of 5.72 A, and individual fluorine atoms are clearly observed along these twisted molecular chains with an interatomic spacing of 2.75 A. Furthermore, the first direct AFM measurements for the radius of the fluorine-helix, and of the carbon-helix in sub-angstrom scale are reported as 1.70 A and 0.54 A respectively.

  15. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  16. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  17. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eronen, Tommi

    2011-11-01

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  18. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    SciTech Connect

    Eronen, Tommi; Collaboration: JYFLTRAP Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  19. Structure of Human Ferritin L Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Z.; Li, C.; Ellenburg, M.; Soistman, E.; Ruble, J.; Wright, B.; Ho, J.; Carter, D.

    2006-01-01

    Ferritin is the major iron-storage protein present in all cells. It generally contains 24 subunits, with different ratios of heavy chain (H) to light chain (L), in the shape of a hollow sphere hosting up to 4500 ferric Fe atoms inside. H-rich ferritins catalyze the oxidation of iron(II), while L-rich ferritins promote the nucleation and storage of iron(III). Several X-ray structures have been determined, including those of L-chain ferritins from horse spleen (HoSF), recombinant L-chain ferritins from horse (HoLF), mouse (MoLF) and bullfrog (BfLF) as well as recombinant human H-chain ferritin (HuHF). Here, structures have been determined of two crystal forms of recombinant human L-chain ferritin (HuLF) obtained from native and perdeuterated proteins. The structures show a cluster of acidic residues at the ferrihydrite nucleation site and at the iron channel along the threefold axis. An ordered Cd{sup 2+} structure is observed within the iron channel, offering further insight into the route and mechanism of iron transport into the capsid. The loop between helices D and E, which is disordered in many other L-chain structures, is clearly visible in these two structures. The crystals generated from perdeuterated HuLF will be used for neutron diffraction studies.

  20. Serum Free Light Chains

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Serum Free Light Chains Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Free Light Chains; SFLC; FLC; Kappa and Lambda Free Light ...

  1. o-, m-, and p-Pyridyl isomer effects on construction of 1D loop-and-chains: Silver(I) coordination polymers with Y-type tridentate ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Gyun; Cho, Yoonjung; Lee, Haeri; Lee, Young-A.; Jung, Ok-Sang

    2016-10-01

    Self-assembly of silver(I) hexafluorophosphate with unique Y-type tridentate ligands (2,6-bis[(2-picolinoyloxy-5-methylphenyl)methyl]-p-tolylpicolinate (o-L), 2-nicotinoyloxy- (m-L), and 2-isonicotinoyloxy- (p-L)) produces single crystals consisting of 1D loop-and-chain coordination polymers of [Ag(o-L)](PF6)·Me2CO·CHCl3, [Ag(m-L)](PF6)·Me2CO, and [Ag3(p-L)2](PF6)3·2H2O·2C2H5OH·4CH2Cl2 with quite different trigonal prismatic, trigonal, and linear silver(I) coordination geometry, respectively. Coordinating ability of the three ligands for AgPF6 is in the order of p-L > o-L > m-L. The solvate molecules of [Ag(o-L)](PF6)·Me2CO·CHCl3 can be removed, and be replaced reversibly in the order of acetone ≫ chloroform ≈ dichloromethane ≫ benzene, without destruction of its skeleton.

  2. Exotic Atoms and Muonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, D.

    In exotic atoms, one of the atomic electrons is replaced by a negatively charged particle, whereas muonium consists of a positive muon and an electron. After a general review of the theoretical and experimental aspects, the present knowledge of this field is summarized. These include muonium and the application of the muon spin resonance method in solid-state physics and chemistry, muonic hydrogen atoms, muonic molecules and muon-catalyzed fusion, pionic hydrogen atoms and their use in chemistry, testing quantum electrodynamics on heavy muonic atoms, measuring particle and nuclear properties using hadronic atoms, and testing basic symmetry principles with antiprotonic helium atoms and antihydrogen.

  3. Single Polymer Chain Elongation by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Joanny, J. F.; DiMeglio, J. M. Europhysics letters 1998, 41, 303- 308. (8) Florin, E. L.; Moy, V. T.; Gaub, H. E. Science, 1994,264,415-417. (9) Noy...388. (26) Haiperin, A.; Zhulina, E. B. Europhysics letters , 1991, 15, 417-421. Halperin, A.; Zhulina, E. B. Macromolecules, 1991, 24, 5393-5397

  4. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  5. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    2012 conference of the Division of Atomic , Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP) of the American Physical Society (APS). We have reconfigured the...Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...2015 J. M. Grossman Department of Physics St. Mary’s College of Maryland 18952 E. Fisher Road St. Mary’s City, MD 20686 jmgrossman @smcm. edu

  6. Gushing metal chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Sukhanov, Alexander; Tsvetkov, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    This article addresses the problem in which a chain falls from a glass from some height. This phenomenon demonstrates a paradoxical rise of the chain over the glass. To explain this effect, an initial hypothesis and an appropriate theory are proposed for calculating the steady fall parameters of the chain. For this purpose, the modified Cayley's problem of falling chain given its rise due to the centrifugal force of upward inertia is solved. Results show that the lift caused by an increase in linear density at the part of chain where it is being bent (the upper part) is due to the convergence of the chain balls to one another. The experiments confirm the obtained estimates of the lifting chain.

  7. MEANS FOR PRODUCING PLUTONIUM CHAIN REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1961-01-24

    A neutronic reactor is described with an active portion capable of operating at an energy level of 0.5 to 1000 ev comprising discrete bodies of Pu/ sup 239/ disposed in a body of water which contains not more than 5 molecules of water to one atom of plutonium, the total amount of Pu/sup 239/ being sufficient to sustain a chain reaction. (auth)

  8. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  9. Structure of confined films of chain alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Mugele, F.; Baldelli, S.; Somorjai, G.A.; Salmeron, M.

    2000-04-13

    The structure of thin films of simple chain alcohols (1-octanol and 1-undecanol) confined between two atomically smooth mica surfaces has been investigated using a surface forces apparatus. Contact angle measurements and optical sum frequency generation were used for additional characterization. In both systems, the substrate-molecule interaction leads to a strongly bound first layer on each surface. Additional liquid organizes into highly compressible bilayers, which could be expelled by applying sufficiently high pressure.

  10. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor…

  11. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  12. PHYSICS: Toward Atom Chips.

    PubMed

    Fortágh, József; Zimmermann, Claus

    2005-02-11

    As a novel approach for turning the peculiar features of quantum mechanics into practical devices, researchers are investigating the use of ultracold atomic clouds above microchips. Such "atom chips" may find use as sensitive probes for gravity, acceleration, rotation, and tiny magnetic forces. In their Perspective, Fortagh and Zimmermann discuss recent advances toward creating atom chips, in which current-carrying conductors in the chips create magnetic microtraps that confine the atomic clouds. Despite some intrinsic limits to the performance of atom chips, existing technologies are capable of producing atom chips, and many possibilities for their construction remain to be explored.

  13. Onset of energy dissipation in ballistic atomic wires.

    PubMed

    Agraït, Nicolás; Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Vieira, Sebastián

    2002-05-27

    Electronic transport at finite voltages in free-standing gold atomic chains of up to seven atoms in length is studied at low temperatures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The conductance vs voltage curves show that transport in these single-mode ballistic atomic wires is nondissipative up to a finite voltage threshold of the order of several mV. The onset of dissipation and resistance within the wire corresponds to the excitation of the atomic vibrations by the electrons traversing the wire and is very sensitive to strain.

  14. Chain entanglements. I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixman, Marshall

    1988-09-01

    A model of concentrated polymer solution dynamics is described. The forces in a linear generalized Langevin equation for the motion of a probe chain are derived on the assumption that all relaxation of the forces is due to motion of the surrounding matrix. Vicinal chain displacements are classified as viscoelastic deformation, reptation, and minor residual fluctuations. The latter provide a torsional relaxation of the primitive path that minimizes the significance of transverse forces on the probe chain. All displacements of vicinal segments are assumed proportional to the forces that they exert on the probe chain. In response to an external force, the displacement of the probe chain relative to a laboratory frame is increased by viscoelastic deformation of the matrix, but reptative diffusion relative to the deforming matrix is slowed down. The net effect on translational diffusion is negligible if the probe and vicinal chains have the same chain length N, but the friction constant for reptative motion is increased by a factor N1-xs. xs=1/2 if Gaussian conformational statistics applies during the disengagement process, while xs =0.6 if excluded volume statistics applies. The translational friction constant is βp ˜N2, as in reptation theory, but the viscosity is η˜N4-xs . The persistence of entanglements during the translational diffusion of the probe chain across many radii of gyration is rationalized pictorially in terms of correlated reptative motion of the probe and vicinal chains.

  15. Supply chain planning classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvolby, Hans-Henrik; Trienekens, Jacques; Bonde, Hans

    2001-10-01

    Industry experience a need to shift in focus from internal production planning towards planning in the supply network. In this respect customer oriented thinking becomes almost a common good amongst companies in the supply network. An increase in the use of information technology is needed to enable companies to better tune their production planning with customers and suppliers. Information technology opportunities and supply chain planning systems facilitate companies to monitor and control their supplier network. In spite if these developments, most links in today's supply chains make individual plans, because the real demand information is not available throughout the chain. The current systems and processes of the supply chains are not designed to meet the requirements now placed upon them. For long term relationships with suppliers and customers, an integrated decision-making process is needed in order to obtain a satisfactory result for all parties. Especially when customized production and short lead-time is in focus. An effective value chain makes inventory available and visible among the value chain members, minimizes response time and optimizes total inventory value held throughout the chain. In this paper a supply chain planning classification grid is presented based current manufacturing classifications and supply chain planning initiatives.

  16. Energy band modulation of graphane by hydrogen-vacancy chains: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bi-Ru; Yang, Chih-Kai

    2014-08-01

    We investigated a variety of configurations of hydrogen-vacancy chains in graphane by first-principles density functional calculation. We found that graphane with two zigzag H-vacancy chains segregated by one or more H chain is generally a nonmagnetic conductor or has a negligible band gap. However, the same structure is turned into a semiconductor and generates a magnetic moment if either one or both of the vacancy chains are blocked by isolated H atoms. If H-vacancy chains are continuously distributed, the structure is similar to a zigzag graphene nanoribbon embedded in graphane. It was also found that the embedded zigzag graphene nanoribbon is antiferromagnetic, and isolated H atoms left in the 2-chain nanoribbon can tune the band gap and generate net magnetic moments. Similar effects are also obtained if bare carbon atoms are present outside the nanoribbon. These results are useful for designing graphene-based nanoelectronic circuits.

  17. Energy band modulation of graphane by hydrogen-vacancy chains: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bi-Ru; Yang, Chih-Kai

    2014-08-15

    We investigated a variety of configurations of hydrogen-vacancy chains in graphane by first-principles density functional calculation. We found that graphane with two zigzag H-vacancy chains segregated by one or more H chain is generally a nonmagnetic conductor or has a negligible band gap. However, the same structure is turned into a semiconductor and generates a magnetic moment if either one or both of the vacancy chains are blocked by isolated H atoms. If H-vacancy chains are continuously distributed, the structure is similar to a zigzag graphene nanoribbon embedded in graphane. It was also found that the embedded zigzag graphene nanoribbon is antiferromagnetic, and isolated H atoms left in the 2-chain nanoribbon can tune the band gap and generate net magnetic moments. Similar effects are also obtained if bare carbon atoms are present outside the nanoribbon. These results are useful for designing graphene-based nanoelectronic circuits.

  18. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  19. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  20. Smallest Nanoelectronic with Atomic Devices with Precise Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    2000-01-01

    Since its invention in 1948, the transistor has revolutionized our everyday life - transistor radios and TV's appeared in the early 1960s, personal computers came into widespread use in the mid-1980s, and cellular phones, laptops, and palm-sized organizers dominated the 1990s. The electronics revolution is based upon transistor miniaturization; smaller transistors are faster, and denser circuitry has more functionality. Transistors in current generation chips are 0.25 micron or 250 nanometers in size, and the electronics industry has completed development of 0.18 micron transistors which will enter production within the next few years. Industry researchers are now working to reduce transistor size down to 0.13 micron - a thousandth of the width of a human hair. However, studies indicate that the miniaturization of silicon transistors will soon reach its limit. For further progress in microelectronics, scientists have turned to nanotechnology to advance the science. Rather than continuing to miniaturize transistors to a point where they become unreliable, nanotechnology offers the new approach of building devices on the atomic scale [see sidebar]. One vision for the next generation of miniature electronics is atomic chain electronics, where devices are composed of atoms aligned on top of a substrate surface in a regular pattern. The Atomic Chain Electronics Project (ACEP) - part of the Semiconductor Device Modeling and Nanotechnology group, Integrated Product Team at the NAS Facility has been developing the theory of understanding atomic chain devices, and the author's patent for atomic chain electronics is now pending.

  1. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  2. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  3. HYDROGEN ATOM THERMAL PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    JENSEN, L H; SUNDARALINGAM, M

    1964-09-11

    Isotropic hydrogen atom thermal parameters for N,N'- hexamethylenebispropionamide have been determined. They show a definite trend and vary from approximately the same as the mean thermal parameters for atoms other than hydrogen near the center of the molecule to appreciably greater for atoms near the end. The indicated trend for this compound, along with other results, provides the basis for a possible explanation of the anomolous values that have been obtained for hydrogen atom thermal parameters.

  4. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  5. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  6. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  7. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  8. Materials at Atomic Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Damien

    2010-06-10

    Atomic units give the scale at which quantum processes operate. As combinations of fundamental constants they concisely encapsulate qualities of the atom, e.g. atomic length and energy scales are given by the Bohr radius and the Hartree (or Rydberg) respectively. Although many of these quantities were probed in the early part of the 20th Century the atomic unit of time, at tens of attoseconds, was first probed in 2001. Today, the only atomic unit that remains to be studied experimentally is the atomic unit of pressure, at 294 Mbar (or 147 Mbar in Rydberg atomic units). This is nature’s definition of the ‘high’ in high-pressure science, and it sets the scale for new physics and chemistry. Among experimental facilities, only the NIF can attain and accurately probe atomic pressures. We propose to directly study material properties at these conditions by examining the short-range ordering of atoms using x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) of layers in spherical, ignition-type imploding shells. What happens at atomic pressures? The atomic unit of pressure represents the quantum mechanical pressure exerted by an orbiting electron to prevent collapse into the nucleus. Applying external pressure of this magnitude seriously disrupts orbitals and alters the character of the atom itself. Core electron orbitals overlap and chemical bonds are no longer constrained to occur between valence electron orbitals alone. The most direct probe of bonding requires a short-range order diagnostic such as XAFS.

  9. The Nature of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  10. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  11. Theory of Atomic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yikun

    2003-04-01

    A new atomic theory is proposed based on radiation mechanics. Atoms cannot be regarded as unrelated individuals, but in a game of claiming to emit photons. Every atom aims to minimize its expected energy by using mixed strategy in the game. Equilibrium points exist as the non-cooperative solution of an atomic game. In a gas composed of same atoms, every equilibrium point determines an optimum probability distribution of energy of each atom as well as of all atoms. The individual optimum is equivalent to the over-all optimum. In an ideal gas of identical atoms, the spin angular momentum of an electron in each atom can only take a series of discrete numerical values between the ground and excited states. There are two fundamental kinds of phase transitions, accomplished respectively by aggregation of atoms to form larger coalitions or by transformation of preexisting coalitions into new configurations. For the first kind, atomic games in both phases have the unique solution. The expected energies of two phases are equal at the critical point. For the second kind, atomic games have multiple solutions. There is often a fall of the expected energies between two phases at the critical point.

  12. Robustness of discrete semifluxons in closed Bose-Hubbard chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallemí, A.; Guilleumas, M.; Martorell, J.; Mayol, R.; Polls, A.; Juliá-Díaz, B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the properties of the ground state and low-energy excitations of Bose-Hubbard chains with a geometry that varies from open to closed and with a tunable twisted link. In the vicinity of the symmetric π-flux case the system behaves as an interacting gas of discrete semifluxons for finite chains and interactions in the Josephson regime. The energy spectrum of the system is studied by direct diagonalization and by solving the corresponding Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The atom-atom interactions are found to enhance the presence of strongly correlated macroscopic superpositions of semifluxons.

  13. Discrete-to-continuum modeling of weakly interacting incommensurate chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, Malena I.; Golovaty, Dmitry; Wilber, J. Patrick

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we use a formal discrete-to-continuum procedure to derive a continuum variational model for two chains of atoms with slightly incommensurate lattices. The chains represent a cross section of a three-dimensional system consisting of a graphene sheet suspended over a substrate. The continuum model recovers both qualitatively and quantitatively the behavior observed in the corresponding discrete model. The numerical solutions for both models demonstrate the presence of large commensurate regions separated by localized incommensurate domain walls.

  14. Unraveling the chain fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John; Warner, Mark

    2015-03-01

    If a chain is initially at rest in a beaker at a height h1 above the ground, and the end of the chain is pulled over the rim of the beaker and down towards the ground and then released, the chain will spontaneously ``flow'' out of the beaker under gravity. Furthermore, the beads do not simply drag over the edge of the beaker but form a fountain reaching a height h2 above it. I will show that the formation of a fountain requires that the beads come into motion not only by being pulled upwards by the part of the chain immediately above the pile, but also by being pushed upwards by an unexpected reaction force from the pile of stationary chain. I will propose possible origins for this force, argue that its magnitude will be proportional to the square of the chain velocity, and predict and verify experimentally that h2 ~h1 . I will also discuss the case where the pot is tilted, and show, experimentally and theoretically, that the chain rises and falls in an inverted catenary, and discuss the appropriate boundary conditions at the ends of the chain.

  15. Critical Chain Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, John Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Critical Chains project management focuses on holding buffers at the project level vs. task level, and managing buffers as a project resource. A number of studies have shown that Critical Chain project management can significantly improve organizational schedule fidelity (i.e., improve the proportion of projects delivered on time) and reduce…

  16. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  17. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  18. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  19. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  20. Plasmon resonances in linear noble-metal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth; Luo, Yi

    2012-11-01

    The electronic excitations of three noble-metall chains—copper, silver, and gold—have been investigated at the time-dependent density functional theory level. The reduced single-electron density matrix is propagated according to the Liouville-von Neumann equation in the real-time domain after an impulse excitation. The propagation in the real-time domain enables us to investigate the formation and size evolution of electronic excitations in these metallic chains with different number of atoms, up to a total of 26 atoms. The longitudinal oscillations at lower excitation energies are dominated by s → p transitions in these chains and have collective or central resonances, while the first peak involving d → p transitions in the longitudinal mode appears at a higher excitation energy and shows collective resonances. In the transverse oscillations, there are in most cases d → p transitions in each resonance, which can be attributed to either central or end resonances. Convergence of the oscillations, in particular those involving the collective and central resonances in the three noble-metal chains can only be observed for chains with 18 atoms or more. Different spectroscopic characteristics among these three metallic chains can be attributed to their different electronic structures, in particular the relativistic effects in the gold chains have a dramatic effect on their electronic structures and excitations.

  1. Visualizing redox dynamics of a single Ag/AgCl heterogeneous nanocatalyst at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yimin A.; Li, Liang; Li, Zheng; Kinaci, Alper; Chan, Maria K.; Sun, Yugang; Guest, Jeffrey R.; McNulty, Ian; Rajh, Tijana; Liu, Yuzi

    2016-03-01

    Operando characterization of gas solid reactions at the atomic scale is of great importance for determining the mechanism of catalysis. This is especially true in the study of heterostructures because of structural correlation between the different parts. However, such experiments are challenging and have rarely been accomplished. In this work, atomic scale redox dynamics of Ag/AgCl heterostructures have been studied using in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in combination with density function theory (DFT) calculations. The reduction of Ag/AgCl to Ag is likely a result of the formation of Cl vacancies while Ag+ ions accept electrons. The oxidation process of Ag/AgCl has been observed: rather than direct replacement of Cl by O, the Ag/AgCl nanocatalyst was first reduced to Ag, and then Ag was oxidized to different phases of silver oxide under different O-2 partial pressures. Ag2O formed at low O-2 partial pressure, whereas AgO formed at atmospheric pressure. By combining in situ ETEM observation and DFT calculations, this structural evolution is characterized in a distinct nanoscale environment.

  2. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  3. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-09-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  4. Atom-by-atom analysis of global downhill protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadqi, Mourad; Fushman, David; Muñoz, Victor

    2006-07-01

    Protein folding is an inherently complex process involving coordination of the intricate networks of weak interactions that stabilize native three-dimensional structures. In the conventional paradigm, simple protein structures are assumed to fold in an all-or-none process that is inaccessible to experiment. Existing experimental methods therefore probe folding mechanisms indirectly. A widely used approach interprets changes in protein stability and/or folding kinetics, induced by engineered mutations, in terms of the structure of the native protein. In addition to limitations in connecting energetics with structure, mutational methods have significant experimental uncertainties and are unable to map complex networks of interactions. In contrast, analytical theory predicts small barriers to folding and the possibility of downhill folding. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed experimentally in recent years, including the observation of global downhill folding. However, a key remaining question is whether downhill folding can indeed lead to the high-resolution analysis of protein folding processes. Here we show, with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), that the downhill protein BBL from Escherichia coli unfolds atom by atom starting from a defined three-dimensional structure. Thermal unfolding data on 158 backbone and side-chain protons out of a total of 204 provide a detailed view of the structural events during folding. This view confirms the statistical nature of folding, and exposes the interplay between hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic forces, backbone conformation and side-chain entropy. From the data we also obtain a map of the interaction network in this protein, which reveals the source of folding cooperativity. Our approach can be extended to other proteins with marginal barriers (less than 3RT), providing a new tool for the study of protein folding.

  5. Supply chain assessment methodology.

    PubMed

    Topor, E

    2000-08-01

    This article describes an assessment methodology based on the supply chain proficiency model that can be used to set realistic supply chain objectives. The assessment centers on a business model that identifies the logical stages of supply chain proficiency as measured against a comprehensive set of business characteristics. For each characteristic, an enterprise evolves from one stage to the next. The magnitude of change inherent in moving forward usually prohibits skipping stages. Although it is possible to be at different stages for each characteristic, it is usually desirable to maintain balance.

  6. Selected spectroscopic results on element 115 decay chains

    DOE PAGES

    Rudolph, D.; Forsberg, U.; Golubev, P.; ...

    2014-08-24

    We observed thirty correlated α-decay chains in an experiment studying the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung. The decay characteristics of the majority of these 30 chains are consistent with previous observations and interpretations of such chains to originate from isotopes of element Z = 115. High-resolution α-photon coincidence spectroscopy in conjunction with comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations allow to propose excitation schemes of atomic nuclei of the heaviest elements, thereby probing nuclear structure models near the 'Island of Stability' with unprecedented experimental precision.

  7. Selected spectroscopic results on element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D.; Forsberg, U.; Golubev, P.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Yakushev, A.; Andersson, L. -L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, C. J.; Herzberg, R. -D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, K.; Schädel, M.; Åberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Fahlander, C.; Gerl, J.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2014-08-24

    We observed thirty correlated α-decay chains in an experiment studying the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung. The decay characteristics of the majority of these 30 chains are consistent with previous observations and interpretations of such chains to originate from isotopes of element Z = 115. High-resolution α-photon coincidence spectroscopy in conjunction with comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations allow to propose excitation schemes of atomic nuclei of the heaviest elements, thereby probing nuclear structure models near the 'Island of Stability' with unprecedented experimental precision.

  8. Platinum atomic wire encapsulated in gold nanotubes: A first principle study

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, Sandeep Majumder, Chiranjib; Sahoo, Suman K.; Sarkar, Pranab

    2014-04-24

    The nanotubes of gold incorporated with platinum atomic wire have been investigated by means of firstprinciples density functional theory with plane wave pseudopotential approximation. The structure with zig-zag chain of Pt atoms in side gold is found to be 0.73 eV lower in energy in comparison to straight chain of platinum atoms. The Fermi level of the composite tube was consisting of d-orbitals of Pt atoms. Further interaction of oxygen with these tubes reveals that while tube with zig-zag Pt prefers dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecule, the gold tube with linear Pt wire favors molecular adsorption.

  9. Entangled States of Atoms upon Interaction with Narrowband Light

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V.N.; Zhiliba, A.I.; Rodichkina, A.A.; Trubilko, A.I.

    2005-08-15

    The process of resonant interaction of light with two-level atoms in the absence of relaxation is considered. For a special form of initial conditions, simple and exact solutions are found that describe coherent processes leading to the appearance of many-particle entangled W-class states. These processes can be used for preparation and transformation of entangled states, in particular, for problems of quantum memory and generation of entangled atomic chains.

  10. Controlling the electronic properties of monatomic carbon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z. Z.; Ning, X. J.

    2011-08-01

    Based on ab initio calculations, it is shown that the energy gap of pure monatomic carbon chains can be changed from 0.27 up to 1.42 eV when the chain is stretched by 10%, and the chains can be turned into n-type or p-type semiconductors by doping (B, N, Si, P) atoms or into rectification device by doping the BN molecule. The doping process was proved by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, and the lifetime of the doped chains is predicted to be about 1070 years at room temperature. The results suggest that short monatomic carbon chains are a good candidate for tunable laser medium.

  11. Quantum spin transistor with a Heisenberg spin chain

    PubMed Central

    Marchukov, O. V.; Volosniev, A. G.; Valiente, M.; Petrosyan, D.; Zinner, N. T.

    2016-01-01

    Spin chains are paradigmatic systems for the studies of quantum phases and phase transitions, and for quantum information applications, including quantum computation and short-distance quantum communication. Here we propose and analyse a scheme for conditional state transfer in a Heisenberg XXZ spin chain which realizes a quantum spin transistor. In our scheme, the absence or presence of a control spin excitation in the central gate part of the spin chain results in either perfect transfer of an arbitrary state of a target spin between the weakly coupled input and output ports, or its complete blockade at the input port. We also discuss a possible proof-of-concept realization of the corresponding spin chain with a one-dimensional ensemble of cold atoms with strong contact interactions. Our scheme is generally applicable to various implementations of tunable spin chains, and it paves the way for the realization of integrated quantum logic elements. PMID:27721438

  12. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  13. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, Andrew D.; Boyd, Martin M.; Ye, Jun; Peik, E.; Schmidt, P. O.

    2015-04-01

    Optical atomic clocks represent the state of the art in the frontier of modern measurement science. In this article a detailed review on the development of optical atomic clocks that are based on trapped single ions and many neutral atoms is provided. Important technical ingredients for optical clocks are discussed and measurement precision and systematic uncertainty associated with some of the best clocks to date are presented. An outlook on the exciting prospect for clock applications is given in conclusion.

  14. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    tremendous demand for the ability to electronically buy and sell goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work... commerce . It then briefly surveys some major types of electronic commerce pointing out flaws in atomicity. We pay special attention to the atomicity...problems of proposals for digital cash. The paper presents two examples of highly atomic electronic commerce systems: NetBill and Cryptographic Postage Indicia.

  15. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-25

    where an atomic layer of an element is deposited , or removed, in a surface limited reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in...the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as underpotential deposition (UPD). 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15, NUMBER OF...reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as

  16. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  17. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  18. The Software Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2017-03-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  19. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  20. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  1. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  2. Epitaxy: Programmable Atom Equivalents versus Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Gabrys, Paul A.; Fleischman, Dagny; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Youngeun; Atwater, Harry A.; MacFarlane, Robert J.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2017-01-01

    The programmability of DNA makes it an attractive structure-directing ligand for the assembly of nanoparticle superlattices in a manner that mimics many aspects of atomic crystallization. However, the synthesis of multilayer single crystals of defined size remains a challenge. Though previous studies considered lattice mismatch as the major limiting factor for multilayer assembly, thin film growth depends on many interlinked variables. Here, a more comprehensive approach is taken to study fundamental elements, such as the growth temperature and the thermodynamics of interfacial energetics, to achieve epitaxial growth of nanoparticle thin films. Under optimized equilibrium conditions, single crystal, multilayer thin films can be synthesized over 500 × 500 μm2 areas on lithographically patterned templates. Importantly, these superlattices follow the same patterns of crystal growth demonstrated in thin film atomic deposition, allowing for these processes to be understood in the context of well-studied atomic epitaxy, and potentially enabling a nanoscale model to study fundamental crystallization processes.

  3. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  4. Carbon atomic wires: charge transfer induced electron conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larade, Brian; Taylor, Jeremy; Mehrez, Hatem; Guo, Hong

    2001-03-01

    We report a first principles theoretical analysis of quantum transport properties of carbon atomic wires. Our theory is based on density functional theory within the LDA approximation, with standard norm conserving pseudopotentials defining the atomic core, and a localized orbital basis set to model the valence states. The charge density for the open atomic wire system is calculated using the non-equilibrium Green's functions. This theory is implemented in our molecular electronics modeling package McDCAL. For carbon atomic chains with different lengths in contact with metallic electrodes, we calculated linear DC conductance as a function of the chain-electrode distance and the current-voltage characteristics. Our results show that charge transfer from the electrodes to the atomic wire plays a most important role in aligning the Fermi level of the electrodes to the LUMO state of the atomic wire, inducing a substantial conductance variation due to this effect. Our results also show that the eigenstates of the carbon chain and band structure of the electrodes are of particular importance to the transport properties. We will compare our results to those obtained previously.

  5. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  6. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  7. Electron - Atom Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Longhuan

    In this work we study the features of bremsstrahlung radiation from neutral atoms and atoms in hot dense plasmas. Predictions for the distributions of electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation for both the point Coulomb potential and screened potentials are obtained using a classical numerical method. The results agree with exact quantum mechanical partial wave results for low incident electron energies in both the point Coulomb and screened potentials. In the screened potential the asymmetry parameter of a spectrum is reduced from the Coulomb values. The difference increases with decreasing energy and begins to oscillate at very low energies. We also studied the scaling properties of bremsstrahlung spectra and energy losses. It is found that the ratio of the radiative energy loss for positrons to that for electrons obeys a simple scaling law, being expressible fairly accurately as a function only of the quantity T(,1)/Z('2). This scaling is exact in the case of the point Coulomb potential, both for classical bremsstrahlung and for the nonrelativistic dipole Sommerfeld formula. We also studied bremsstrahlung from atoms in hot dense plasmas, describing the atomic potentials by the temperature-and-density dependent Thomas - Fermi model. Gaunt factors are obtained with the relativistic partial wave method for atoms in plasmas of various densities and temperatures. Features of the bremsstrahlung from atoms in such environments are discussed. The dependence of predicted bremsstrahlung spectra on the choice of potential from various average atom potential models for strongly coupled plasmas are also studied. For the energy range and plasma densities were considered, the choice of potential model among the elaborate atomic potentials is less important than the choice of the method of calculation. The use of a detailed configuration accounting method for bremsstrahlung processes in dense plasmas is less important than for some other atomic processes. We justify the usefulness

  8. Coherency of phason dynamics in Fibonacci chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, G. G.; Wang, Chumin; Thorpe, M. F.; Barrio, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    The effects of phason disorder on the dynamical structure factor of Fibonacci chains are studied, and the existence of a coherent phason field in real quasicrystals is addressed. The neutron-scattering response is modeled for coherent and random phasons. The results show that coherent and random phasons can be distinguished for high values of the momentum transfer. However, for both sorts of phasons the response in the acoustic-mode region is quite similar, since the only important quantity is the average length between atoms. In particular, it is shown that a random phason produced in the quasicrystal's hyperspace leads to a coherent phason field in real space.

  9. Freezing distributed entanglement in spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Irene; Lovett, Brendon W.; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2007-09-15

    We show how to freeze distributed entanglement that has been created from the natural dynamics of spin chain systems. The technique that we propose simply requires single-qubit operations and isolates the entanglement in specific qubits at the ends of branches. Such frozen entanglement provides a useful resource, for example for teleportation or distributed quantum processing. The scheme can be applied to a wide range of systems--including actual spin systems and alternative qubit embodiments in strings of quantum dots, molecules, or atoms.

  10. Hybrid ion chains inside an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zichao; Siverns, James; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    Trapped ions remain a leading candidate for the implementation of large-scale quantum networks. These networks require nodes that can store and process quantum information as well as communicate with each other though photonic flying qubits. We propose to use hybrid ion chains of barium, for communication, and ytterbium, for quantum information processing. We report on progress in setting up a hybrid ion chain in a versatile four-blade trap using high numerical aperture collection optics. Although the visible photons produced from barium ions are more favorable as they are not suitable for long distance fiber communication. With this in mind, we intend to implement frequency conversion to overcome this issue. Also, with the view toward increasing the flying-qubit production rate, we propose a cavity-based system to enhance interactions between the ions and photons. The cavity axis is to be placed along the axial direction of the trap allowing a chain of multiple ions to interact with the cavity at the same time. With this configuration the atom-photon coupling strength can be improved by sqrt(N), where N is the number of ions. Experiments will focus on exploring the dynamics of hybrid ion chain, dual species quantum information processing, two-colour entanglement and phase gates assisted by the ion-cavity coupling are to be explored.

  11. Greek Atomic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  12. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  13. Greek Atomic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  14. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  15. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  16. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  17. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  18. Atomic Power Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…

  19. Modified Embedded Atom Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R. E.

    2012-08-01

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine to be used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluated the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to a cubic spline-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) with a additional Stillinger-Weber (SW) contribution.

  20. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  1. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  3. Moving Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Dustin

    2016-05-01

    Single neutral atoms are promising candidates for qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum information. We have built a set of optical tweezers for trapping and moving single Rubidium atoms. The tweezers are based on a far off-resonant dipole trapping laser focussed to a 1 μm spot with a single aspheric lens. We use a digital micromirror device (DMD) to generate dynamic holograms of the desired arrangement of traps. The DMD has a frame rate of 20 kHz which, when combined with fast algorithms, allows for rapid reconfiguration of the traps. We demonstrate trapping of up to 20 atoms in arbitrary arrangements, and the transport of a single-atom over a distance of 14 μm with continuous laser cooling, and 5 μm without. In the meantime, we are developing high-finesse fibre-tip cavities, which we plan to use to couple pairs of single atoms to form a quantum network.

  4. Spatial Data Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajulu, P.; Azeem Saqiq, M.; Yu, F.; McMeekin, D. A.; West, G.; Arnold, L.; Moncrieff, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes current research into the supply of spatial data to the end user in as close to real time as possible via the World Wide Web. The Spatial Data Infrastructure paradigm has been discussed since the early 1990s. The concept has evolved significantly since then but has almost always examined data from the perspective of the supplier. It has been a supplier driven focus rather than a user driven focus. The current research being conducted is making a paradigm shift and looking at the supply of spatial data as a supply chain, similar to a manufacturing supply chain in which users play a significant part. A comprehensive consultation process took place within Australia and New Zealand incorporating a large number of stakeholders. Three research projects that have arisen from this consultation process are examining Spatial Data Supply Chains within Australia and New Zealand and are discussed within this paper.

  5. Atomic resolution imaging of graphene by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alex W.; Warner, Jamie H.

    2013-05-01

    The atomic structure of a material influences its electronic, chemical, magnetic and mechanical properties. Characterising carbon nanomaterials, such as fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene, at the atomic level is challenging due to their chemical reactivity and low atomic mass. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy are two of the leading methods for imaging graphene at the atomic level. Here, we report on recent advances in atomic resolution imaging of graphene using aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy and how it has revealed many of the structural deviations from the pristine monolayer form. Structures in graphene such as vacancy defects, edges, grain boundaries, linear chains, impurity dopants, layer number, layer stacking and bond rotations are explored.

  6. Solitons in Granular Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Manciu, M.; Sen, S.; Hurd, A.J.

    1999-04-12

    The authors consider a chain of elastic (Hertzian) grains that repel upon contact according to the potential V = a{delta}{sup u}, u > 2, where {delta} is the overlap between the grains. They present numerical and analytical results to show that an impulse initiated at an end of a chain of Hertzian grains in contact eventually propagates as a soliton for all n > 2 and that no solitons are possible for n {le} 2. Unlike continuous, they find that colliding solitons in discrete media initiative multiple weak solitons at the point of crossing.

  7. Supply-Chain Optimization Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiett, William F.; Sealing, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    The Supply-Chain Optimization Template (SCOT) is an instructional guide for identifying, evaluating, and optimizing (including re-engineering) aerospace- oriented supply chains. The SCOT was derived from the Supply Chain Council s Supply-Chain Operations Reference (SCC SCOR) Model, which is more generic and more oriented toward achieving a competitive advantage in business.

  8. The stocker cattle supply chain.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Lawrence L; Anderson, David P

    2006-07-01

    This article discusses supply chain management in the US beef industry and where stocker cattle procurement fits in that chain. The supply chain in the US beef industry is defined as well as grading mechanisms that signal prices used to manage the chain. Sources of stocker cattle are also described.

  9. Enumeration of ring-chain tautomers based on SMIRKS rules.

    PubMed

    Guasch, Laura; Sitzmann, Markus; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2014-09-22

    A compound exhibits (prototropic) tautomerism if it can be represented by two or more structures that are related by a formal intramolecular movement of a hydrogen atom from one heavy atom position to another. When the movement of the proton is accompanied by the opening or closing of a ring it is called ring-chain tautomerism. This type of tautomerism is well observed in carbohydrates, but it also occurs in other molecules such as warfarin. In this work, we present an approach that allows for the generation of all ring-chain tautomers of a given chemical structure. Based on Baldwin's Rules estimating the likelihood of ring closure reactions to occur, we have defined a set of transform rules covering the majority of ring-chain tautomerism cases. The rules automatically detect substructures in a given compound that can undergo a ring-chain tautomeric transformation. Each transformation is encoded in SMIRKS line notation. All work was implemented in the chemoinformatics toolkit CACTVS. We report on the application of our ring-chain tautomerism rules to a large database of commercially available screening samples in order to identify ring-chain tautomers.

  10. Enumeration of Ring–Chain Tautomers Based on SMIRKS Rules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A compound exhibits (prototropic) tautomerism if it can be represented by two or more structures that are related by a formal intramolecular movement of a hydrogen atom from one heavy atom position to another. When the movement of the proton is accompanied by the opening or closing of a ring it is called ring–chain tautomerism. This type of tautomerism is well observed in carbohydrates, but it also occurs in other molecules such as warfarin. In this work, we present an approach that allows for the generation of all ring–chain tautomers of a given chemical structure. Based on Baldwin’s Rules estimating the likelihood of ring closure reactions to occur, we have defined a set of transform rules covering the majority of ring–chain tautomerism cases. The rules automatically detect substructures in a given compound that can undergo a ring–chain tautomeric transformation. Each transformation is encoded in SMIRKS line notation. All work was implemented in the chemoinformatics toolkit CACTVS. We report on the application of our ring–chain tautomerism rules to a large database of commercially available screening samples in order to identify ring–chain tautomers. PMID:25158156

  11. 78 FR 58571 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic Electric Company... Power Company (Maine Yankee), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (Connecticut Yankee), and the Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee Atomic) (together, ``licensees'' or ``the Yankee Companies'')...

  12. Imaging and dynamics of light atoms and molecules on graphene.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jannik C; Girit, C O; Crommie, M F; Zettl, A

    2008-07-17

    Observing the individual building blocks of matter is one of the primary goals of microscopy. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope revolutionized experimental surface science in that atomic-scale features on a solid-state surface could finally be readily imaged. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy has limited applicability due to restrictions in, for example, sample conductivity, cleanliness, and data acquisition rate. An older microscopy technique, that of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has benefited tremendously in recent years from subtle instrumentation advances, and individual heavy (high-atomic-number) atoms can now be detected by TEM even when embedded within a semiconductor material. But detecting an individual low-atomic-number atom, for example carbon or even hydrogen, is still extremely challenging, if not impossible, via conventional TEM owing to the very low contrast of light elements. Here we demonstrate a means to observe, by conventional TEM, even the smallest atoms and molecules: on a clean single-layer graphene membrane, adsorbates such as atomic hydrogen and carbon can be seen as if they were suspended in free space. We directly image such individual adatoms, along with carbon chains and vacancies, and investigate their dynamics in real time. These techniques open a way to reveal dynamics of more complex chemical reactions or identify the atomic-scale structure of unknown adsorbates. In addition, the study of atomic-scale defects in graphene may provide insights for nanoelectronic applications of this interesting material.

  13. Imaging and dynamics of light atoms and molecules on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jannik C.; Girit, C. O.; Crommie, M. F.; Zettl, A.

    2008-07-01

    Observing the individual building blocks of matter is one of the primary goals of microscopy. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope revolutionized experimental surface science in that atomic-scale features on a solid-state surface could finally be readily imaged. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy has limited applicability due to restrictions in, for example, sample conductivity, cleanliness, and data acquisition rate. An older microscopy technique, that of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has benefited tremendously in recent years from subtle instrumentation advances, and individual heavy (high-atomic-number) atoms can now be detected by TEM even when embedded within a semiconductor material. But detecting an individual low-atomic-number atom, for example carbon or even hydrogen, is still extremely challenging, if not impossible, via conventional TEM owing to the very low contrast of light elements. Here we demonstrate a means to observe, by conventional TEM, even the smallest atoms and molecules: on a clean single-layer graphene membrane, adsorbates such as atomic hydrogen and carbon can be seen as if they were suspended in free space. We directly image such individual adatoms, along with carbon chains and vacancies, and investigate their dynamics in real time. These techniques open a way to reveal dynamics of more complex chemical reactions or identify the atomic-scale structure of unknown adsorbates. In addition, the study of atomic-scale defects in graphene may provide insights for nanoelectronic applications of this interesting material.

  14. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  15. Atomic mass evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2012-11-12

    The atomic masses are important input parameters for nuclear astrophysics calculations. The Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) is the most reliable source for comprehensive information related to atomic masses. The latest AME was published in 2003. A new version, which will include the impact of a wealth of new, high-precision experimental data, will be published in December 2012. In this paper we will give the current status of AME2012. The mass surface has been changed significantly compared to AME2003, and the impact on astrophysics calculations is discussed.

  16. CW Atom Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-04

    propagation and energy filtering of a cold atomic beam in a long high-gradient magnetic atom guide,” Spencer E. Olson, Rahul R. Mhaskar , and Georg...Open-channel fluorescence imaging of atoms in high-gradient magnetic fields,” Rahul R. Mhaskar , Spencer E. Olson and Georg Raithel (2006). 7 FIG. 6...graduate student, graduated in May 2006. He currently is employed as a NRC post-doc at the NRL in Washington, DC. R. Mhaskar , graduate student. R. van de

  17. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  18. Epitaxy: Programmable Atom Equivalents Versus Atoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary X; Seo, Soyoung E; Gabrys, Paul A; Fleischman, Dagny; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Youngeun; Atwater, Harry A; Macfarlane, Robert J; Mirkin, Chad A

    2017-01-24

    The programmability of DNA makes it an attractive structure-directing ligand for the assembly of nanoparticle (NP) superlattices in a manner that mimics many aspects of atomic crystallization. However, the synthesis of multilayer single crystals of defined size remains a challenge. Though previous studies considered lattice mismatch as the major limiting factor for multilayer assembly, thin film growth depends on many interlinked variables. Here, a more comprehensive approach is taken to study fundamental elements, such as the growth temperature and the thermodynamics of interfacial energetics, to achieve epitaxial growth of NP thin films. Both surface morphology and internal thin film structure are examined to provide an understanding of particle attachment and reorganization during growth. Under equilibrium conditions, single crystalline, multilayer thin films can be synthesized over 500 × 500 μm(2) areas on lithographically patterned templates, whereas deposition under kinetic conditions leads to the rapid growth of glassy films. Importantly, these superlattices follow the same patterns of crystal growth demonstrated in atomic thin film deposition, allowing these processes to be understood in the context of well-studied atomic epitaxy and enabling a nanoscale model to study fundamental crystallization processes. Through understanding the role of epitaxy as a driving force for NP assembly, we are able to realize 3D architectures of arbitrary domain geometry and size.

  19. Supply Chain Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jürgen

    Die Produktionslogistik hat im Rahmen der Materialbeschaffung und der Belieferung von externen Kunden vielfältige Beziehungen zu Lieferanten und Kunden. Im Ansatz des Supply Chain Managements (Lieferkettenmanagement), kurz auch als SCM bezeichnet, versucht man, sowohl Lieferanten als auch Kunden in die gesamte Logistikplanung zu integrieren. SCM umfasst dabei vor allem folgende Aufgaben: Bedarfs- und Bestandsplanung der Materialien entlang der Lieferkette

  20. Exploration Supply Chain Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Exploration Supply Chain Simulation project was chartered by the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop a software tool, with proper data, to quantitatively analyze supply chains for future program planning. This tool is a discrete-event simulation that uses the basic supply chain concepts of planning, sourcing, making, delivering, and returning. This supply chain perspective is combined with other discrete or continuous simulation factors. Discrete resource events (such as launch or delivery reviews) are represented as organizational functional units. Continuous resources (such as civil service or contractor program functions) are defined as enabling functional units. Concepts of fixed and variable costs are included in the model to allow the discrete events to interact with cost calculations. The definition file is intrinsic to the model, but a blank start can be initiated at any time. The current definition file is an Orion Ares I crew launch vehicle. Parameters stretch from Kennedy Space Center across and into other program entities (Michaud Assembly Facility, Aliant Techsystems, Stennis Space Center, Johnson Space Center, etc.) though these will only gain detail as the file continues to evolve. The Orion Ares I file definition in the tool continues to evolve, and analysis from this tool is expected in 2008. This is the first application of such business-driven modeling to a NASA/government-- aerospace contractor endeavor.

  1. Pursuing supply chain gains.

    PubMed

    Long, Gene

    2005-09-01

    Five hallmarks of an effective supply chain are: A strong relationship is developed with a single GPO. Physicians are involved in supply standardization. Supply contracts are routinely reviewed at time of renewal. Freight costs are understood and negotiated effectively. Products are distributed through an in-house distribution center.

  2. Breaking the Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2007-01-01

    In 1792 more than 350,000 people in Britain signed a petition calling for an end to the slave trade. It was, writes historian Adam Hochschild in his book "Bury the Chains," "the first time in history that a large number of people became outraged, and stayed outraged for many years, over someone else's rights". In 1807--after 15…

  3. Atwood's Heavy Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    While perusing various websites in search of a more challenging lab for my students, I came across a number of ideas where replacing the string in an Atwood's machine with a simple ball chain like the kind found in lamp pulls created an interesting system to investigate. The replacement of the string produced a nice nonuniform acceleration, but…

  4. Atwood's Heavy Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    While perusing various websites in search of a more challenging lab for my students, I came across a number of ideas where replacing the string in an Atwood's machine with a simple ball chain like the kind found in lamp pulls created an interesting system to investigate. The replacement of the string produced a nice nonuniform acceleration, but…

  5. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  6. Supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Palevich, R F

    1999-02-01

    This article describes how Do It Best Corp. has used technology to improve its supply chain management. Among other topics it discusses the company's use of electronic data interchange, the Internet, electronic forecasting, and warehouse management systems to gain substantial savings and increase its competitiveness.

  7. Nodal-chain metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdušek, Tomáš; Wu, Quansheng; Rüegg, Andreas; Sigrist, Manfred; Soluyanov, Alexey A.

    2016-10-01

    The band theory of solids is arguably the most successful theory of condensed-matter physics, providing a description of the electronic energy levels in various materials. Electronic wavefunctions obtained from the band theory enable a topological characterization of metals for which the electronic spectrum may host robust, topologically protected, fermionic quasiparticles. Many of these quasiparticles are analogues of the elementary particles of the Standard Model, but others do not have a counterpart in relativistic high-energy theories. A complete list of possible quasiparticles in solids is lacking, even in the non-interacting case. Here we describe the possible existence of a hitherto unrecognized type of fermionic excitation in metals. This excitation forms a nodal chain—a chain of connected loops in momentum space—along which conduction and valence bands touch. We prove that the nodal chain is topologically distinct from previously reported excitations. We discuss the symmetry requirements for the appearance of this excitation and predict that it is realized in an existing material, iridium tetrafluoride (IrF4), as well as in other compounds of this class of materials. Using IrF4 as an example, we provide a discussion of the topological surface states associated with the nodal chain. We argue that the presence of the nodal-chain fermions will result in anomalous magnetotransport properties, distinct from those of materials exhibiting previously known excitations.

  8. Breaking the Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2007-01-01

    In 1792 more than 350,000 people in Britain signed a petition calling for an end to the slave trade. It was, writes historian Adam Hochschild in his book "Bury the Chains," "the first time in history that a large number of people became outraged, and stayed outraged for many years, over someone else's rights". In 1807--after 15…

  9. Galileo Chain Thermometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    This relatively rare thermometer has a rather unusual display: lower temperatures are located at the top of the scale, higher ones at the bottom. A sphere on a chain floats in a suitable liquid, sinking at high temperatures when the density of the liquid decreases and rising in the increased density at low temperatures. With reasonable effort and…

  10. Supply chain quality.

    PubMed

    Feary, Simon

    2009-01-01

    As the development of complex manufacturing models and virtual companies become more prevalent in today's growing global markets, it is increasingly important to support the relationships between manufacturer and supplier. Utilising these relationships will ensure that supply chains operate more effectively and reduce costs, risks and time-to-market time frames, whilst maintaining product quality.

  11. Chain Saw Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark; Helbling, Wayne

    This curriculum is designed to supplement the Comprehensive Small Engine Repair guide by covering in detail all aspects of chain saw repair. The publication contains materials for both teacher and student and is written in terms of student performance using measurable objectives. The course includes six units. Each unit contains some or all of the…

  12. New insights into the properties and interactions of carbon chains as revealed by HRTEM and DFT analysis

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Gilberto; Mayoral, Alvaro; Liu, Mingjie; Ponce, Arturo; Artyukhov, Vasilii I.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Atomic carbon chains have raised interest for their possible applications as graphene interconnectors as the thinnest nanowires; however, they are hard to synthesize and subsequently to study. We present here a reproducible method to synthesize carbon chains in situ TEM. Moreover, we present a direct observation of the bond length alternation in a pure carbon chain by aberration corrected TEM. Also, cross bonding between two carbon chains, 5 nm long, is observed experimentally and confirmed by DFT calculations. Finally, while free standing carbon chains were observed to be straight due to tensile loading, a carbon chain inside the walls of a carbon nanotube showed high flexibility. PMID:24363453

  13. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razmi, H.; Abdollahi, M.

    2008-11-01

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock!

  14. Improved Atomizer Resists Clogging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dea, J. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Improved constant-output atomizer has conical orifice that permits air to sweep out all liquid thoroughly and prevent any buildup of liquid or dissolved solids. Capillary groove guides liquid to gas jet. Simple new design eliminates clogging.

  15. Atomic bomb health benefits.

    PubMed

    Luckey, T D

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment.

  16. Atomic Bomb Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Luckey, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment. PMID:19088902

  17. The Atomic Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummo, Evelyn; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to provide students with opportunities to practice drawing atomic models and discover the logical pairings of whole families on the periodic table. Follows the format of a television game show. (DDR)

  18. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  19. The Atomic Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummo, Evelyn; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to provide students with opportunities to practice drawing atomic models and discover the logical pairings of whole families on the periodic table. Follows the format of a television game show. (DDR)

  20. Atomic hydrogen rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Flurchick, K.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket using atomic hydrogen propellant is discussed. An essential feature of the proposed engine is that the atomic hydrogen fuel is used as it is produced, thus eliminating the necessity of storage. The atomic hydrogen flows into a combustion chamber and recombines, producing high velocity molecular hydrogen which flows out an exhaust port. Standard thermodynamics, kinetic theory and wall recombination cross-sections are used to predict a thrust of approximately 1.4 N for a RF hydrogen flow rate of 4 x 10 to the 22nd/sec. Specific impulses are nominally from 1000 to 2000 sec. It is predicted that thrusts on the order of one Newton and specific impulses of up to 2200 sec are attainable with nominal RF discharge fluxes on the order of 10 to the 22nd atoms/sec; further refinements will probably not alter these predictions by more than a factor of two.

  1. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  2. Sharing the atom bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Chace, J.

    1996-01-01

    Shaken by the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and fearful that the American atomic monopoly would spark an arms race, Dean Acheson led a push in 1946 to place the bomb-indeed, all atomic energy-under international control. But as the memories of wartime collaboration faded, relations between the superpowers grew increasingly tense, and the confrontational atmosphere undid his proposal. Had Acheson succeeded, the Cold War might not have been. 2 figs.

  3. Atom Interferometer Modeling Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    definition is to import conductor geometry from an outside CAD tool such as AutoCAD . This allows users to specify the more complex layouts using a...fully-featured tool of their choice, while significantly reducing the complexity of LiveAtom. Furthermore, most groups have already been using a 2D ...specifying conductor geometry LiveAtom offers the user a 3D visualization of their experiment. Once the experiment is fully specified, computing the

  4. Anonymous Atomic Transactions,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    We show here an example of a protocol that satisfies anonymity properties while providing strong ACID (atomic, consistent, isolated, durable...transactional properties, resolving an open question. Blinded signatures are used to certify an anonymous asymmetric key which authorizes the use of a...key is spent. We show here an example of a protocol that satisfies anonymity properties while providing strong ACID (atomic, consistent, isolated

  5. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  6. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  7. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  8. Fundamental Mechanism of Atomization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    2Sk, The relation between the spatial amplification rate and (21) the wavelength is shown in Fig. 2 for the case of A 2 = 100 where Tin ...hand without the interference from the pressure fluctuation. Finally, in order to induce the shear waves to assist the atomization, we require ’c - a and...condition is satisfied. This example demonstrates how hard it is to induce the shear wave to assist in the onset of atomization. It should be

  9. On Atomization in Carburetors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheubel, F N

    1931-01-01

    The outstanding quantity of the whole atomization problem is the characteristic K, and therefore the ratio of the static pressure of the air stream with respect to the liquid to the surface tension of the liquid. The higher its value, the better the atomization. The shape of the Venturi tube plays a secondary role. The increase of section beyond the throat had best not be too abrupt.

  10. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  11. Atomizing nozzle and method

    DOEpatents

    Ting, Jason; Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2000-03-16

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  12. Confined linear carbon chains as a route to bulk carbyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Rohringer, Philip; Suenaga, Kazu; Niimi, Yoshiko; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C.; Peterlik, Herwig; Wanko, Marius; Cahangirov, Seymur; Rubio, Angel; Lapin, Zachary J.; Novotny, Lukas; Ayala, Paola; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Strong chemical activity and extreme instability in ambient conditions characterize carbyne, an infinite sp1 hybridized carbon chain. As a result, much less has been explored about carbyne as compared to other carbon allotropes such as fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene. Although end-capping groups can be used to stabilize carbon chains, length limitations are still a barrier for production, and even more so for application. We report a method for the bulk production of long acetylenic linear carbon chains protected by thin double-walled carbon nanotubes. The synthesis of very long arrangements is confirmed by a combination of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and (near-field) resonance Raman spectroscopy. Our results establish a route for the bulk production of exceptionally long and stable chains composed of more than 6,000 carbon atoms, representing an elegant forerunner towards the final goal of carbyne’s bulk production.

  13. Proteoglycans and their heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans at the atomic scale

    PubMed Central

    Sattelle, Benedict M.; Shakeri, Javad; Cliff, Matthew J.; Almond, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycan spatiotemporal organization underpins extracellular matrix biology but atomic scale glimpses of this microarchitecture are obscured by glycosaminoglycan size and complexity. To overcome this, multi-microsecond aqueous simulations of chondroitin and dermatan sulfates were abstracted into a prior coarse-grained model, which was extended to heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans and small leucine-rich proteoglycans. Exploration of relationships between sequence and shape led to hypotheses that proteoglycan size is dependent on glycosaminoglycan unit composition but independent of sequence permutation. Uronic acid conformational equilibria were modulated by adjacent hexosamine sulfonation and iduronic acid increased glycosaminoglycan chain volume and rigidity, while glucuronic acid imparted chain plasticity. Consequently, block copolymeric glycosaminoglycans contained microarchitectures capable of multivalent binding to growth factors and collagen, with potential for interactional synergy at greater chain number. The described atomic scale views of proteoglycans and heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans provide structural routes to understanding their fundamental signaling and mechanical biological roles and development of new biomaterials. PMID:25645947

  14. Atoms talking to SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, J. E.; Grover, J. A.; Ravets, S.; Voigt, K. D.; Lee, J.; Kim, Z.; Wood, A. K.; Schoch, I.; Anderson, J. R.; Dragt, A. J.; Hafezi, M.; Lobb, C. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Taylor, J. M.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2012-02-01

    We present our advances towards a hybrid quantum system of ^87Rb atoms coupled to a superconducting flux qubit through the magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms in the evanescent field outside a 500 nm nanofiber. This will allow us to bring the atoms less than 5 μm above the surface of the superconductor without producing excessive heating or changing magnetic fields. As an intermediate step, we plan on coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator. Current progress includes production of nanofibers with >98% transmission, and a tunable high-Q superconducting resonator. Additionally, we show how to use our system as a unified interface for microwave and optical photons, in which the atoms act both as a quantum memory and transduce excitations between the two frequency domains. Using coherent control techniques, we examine conversion and storage of quantum information between microwave photons in superconducting resonators, ensembles of ultracold atoms, and optical photons as well as a method for transferring information between two resonators.

  15. Atomic mass compilation 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, B.; Venkataramaniah, K.; Czok, U.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2014-03-15

    Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

  16. NONLINEAR ATOM OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    T. MILONNI; G. CSANAK; ET AL

    1999-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objectives were to explore theoretically various aspects of nonlinear atom optics effects in cold-atom waves and traps. During the project a major development occurred the observation, by as many as a dozen experimental groups, of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in cold-atom traps. This stimulated us to focus our attention on those aspects of nonlinear atom optics relating to BEC, in addition to continuing our work on a nonequilibrium formalism for dealing with the interaction of an electromagnetic field with multi-level atomic systems, allowing for macroscopic coherence effects such as BEC. Studies of several problems in BEC physics have been completed or are near completion, including the suggested use of external electric fields to modify the nature of the interatomic interaction in cold-atom traps; properties of two-phase condensates; and molecular loss processes associated with BEC experiments involving a so-called Feshbach resonance.

  17. Extreme event statistics in a drifting Markov chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindermann, Farina; Hohmann, Michael; Lausch, Tobias; Mayer, Daniel; Schmidt, Felix; Widera, Artur

    2017-07-01

    We analyze extreme event statistics of experimentally realized Markov chains with various drifts. Our Markov chains are individual trajectories of a single atom diffusing in a one-dimensional periodic potential. Based on more than 500 individual atomic traces we verify the applicability of the Sparre Andersen theorem to our system despite the presence of a drift. We present detailed analysis of four different rare-event statistics for our system: the distributions of extreme values, of record values, of extreme value occurrence in the chain, and of the number of records in the chain. We observe that, for our data, the shape of the extreme event distributions is dominated by the underlying exponential distance distribution extracted from the atomic traces. Furthermore, we find that even small drifts influence the statistics of extreme events and record values, which is supported by numerical simulations, and we identify cases in which the drift can be determined without information about the underlying random variable distributions. Our results facilitate the use of extreme event statistics as a signal for small drifts in correlated trajectories.

  18. Driving atoms with light of arbitrary statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, C. W.; Parkins, A. S.

    1994-08-01

    The main objective of this article was to integrate the work of Kolobov and Sokolov, Gardiner, and Carmichael concerning the possibility of a kind of 'modular quantum optics' in which nonclassical light beams could be generated and then used as inputs to other quantum systems. In addition, to extend this consolidated study to include the feasibilities of multiple input and output into each system; longer chains of systems, each driving the next; and arbitrary quantum white noise inputs into the atoms. Thus, the coupled-systems approach was developed to the extent that its full practical use can be manifested. Included in the investigation were single and two-mode squeezed light, antibunched light of two different kinds, and highly nonclassical light from atom-cavity systems. One problem may be anticipated from realistic systems and that is the size of the matrices which may ensue.

  19. Titanium-capped carbon chains as promising new hydrogen storage media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Zeng, Zhi

    2011-02-14

    The capacity of Ti-capped sp carbon atomic chains for use as hydrogen storage media is studied using first-principles density functional theory. The Ti atom is strongly attached at one end of the carbon chains via d-p hybridization, forming stable TiC(n) complexes. We demonstrate that the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules on Ti through Kubas interactions depends upon the chain types. For polyyne (n even) or cumulene (n odd) structures, each Ti atom can hold up to five or six H(2) molecules, respectively. Furthermore, the TiC(5) chain effectively terminated on a C(20) fullerene can store hydrogen with an optimal binding energy of 0.52 eV per H(2) molecule. Our results reveal a possible way to explore high-capacity hydrogen storage materials in truly one-dimensional carbon structures.

  20. Atomic scale quantum circuits in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusko, A.; Korkusinski, M.; Saraiva, A.; Delgado, A.; Koiller, B.; Hawrylak, P.

    The atomic scale circuits in Si are now realized by manipulation of dangling bonds on Si surface or incorporating dopant atoms in Si by STM techniques. We describe the electronic properties of these atomic scale quantum dot circuits (QDC) by the extended Hubbard-Kanamori Hamiltonian (HK), including on site Coulomb repulsion (U) and interdot hopping (t) , direct interaction (V) and exchange (J) terms. The interdot terms strongly depend on dopant position (RD) in Si lattice--small changes in RD strongly impact t, Vand J. We study how disorder in RD impacts QDC electronic properties, in particular the interplay of disorder and interactions. With no disorder in RD the energy spectrum (ES) of quantum dot chain at half-filling as a function of U / t (V , J = 0) shows a transition from ES dominated by kinetic energy (U / t < < 1) to ES dominated by Coulomb interactions for U / t > > 1 . The excited states group by single particle energy spacing (Hubbard bands) for weak (strong) interactions. In the weak interaction regime, disorder leads to localization, which strongly affects the electronic properties. We explore the effect of interactions and disorder on HK atomic scale circuits and potential many-body localized phases using Lanczos and Density Matrix Renormalization Group approaches.

  1. Preparation of atomic oxygen resistant polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorelli, Victor J.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Connell, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Polyphenyl quinoxalines (PPQs) are an important family of high performance polymers that offer good chemical and thermal stability coupled with excellent mechanical properties. These aromatic heterocyclic polymers are potentially useful as films, coatings, adhesives, and composite materials that demand stability in harsh environments. Our approach was to prepare PPQs with pendent siloxane groups using the appropriate chemistry and then evaluate these polymers before and after exposure to simulated atomic oxygen. Either monomer, the bis(o-diamine)s or the bis(alpha-diketone)s can be synthesized with a hydroxy group to which the siloxane chain will be attached. Several novel materials were prepared.

  2. Correlations in thermal vibrations of crystal atoms. Effect on dechanneling and bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, X.

    2017-07-01

    In a crystal, thermal vibrations of neighboring atoms are correlated: long wavelength phonons make them displace in the same direction. These correlations can speed up the dechanneling of axially channeled particles, as shown by a simulation with binary collisions and a Markov chain model of atom vibrations. In the case of e+ or e- at small angle with a crystal axis, the correlated vibrations should give rise to a semi-coherent bremsstrahlung on several consecutive atoms of a row.

  3. Homogenizing atomic dynamics by fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we propose two ways to construct fractional differential equations (FDE) for approximating atomic chain dynamics. Taking harmonic chain as an example, we add a power function of fractional order to Taylor expansion of the dispersion relation, and determine the parameters by matching two selected wave numbers. This approximate function leads to an FDE after considering both directions for wave propagation. As an alternative, we consider the symbol of the force term, and approximate it by a similar function. It also induces an FDE. Both approaches produce excellent agreement with the harmonic chain dynamics. The accuracy may be improved by optimizing the selected wave numbers, or starting with higher order Taylor expansions. When resolved in the lattice constant, the resulting FDE's faithfully reproduce the lattice dynamics. When resolved in a coarse grid instead, they systematically generate homogenized algorithms. Numerical tests are performed to verify the proposed approaches. Moreover, FDE's are also constructed for diatomic chain and anharmonic lattice, to illustrate the generality of the proposed approaches.

  4. Atom-atom inelastic collisions and three-body atomic recombination in weakly ionized argon plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, C. G.; Kunc, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A stationary collisional-radiative model including both inelastic electron-atom and atom-atom collisions is used to examine nonequilibrium weakly ionized argon plasmas with atomic densities 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 20th/cu cm, temperatures below 6000 K, and with different degrees of radiation trapping. It is shown that three-body atomic recombination becomes important at high particle densities. Comparison is made between the present approach and Thomson's theory for atomic recombination.

  5. Atom-atom inelastic collisions and three-body atomic recombination in weakly ionized argon plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, C. G.; Kunc, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A stationary collisional-radiative model including both inelastic electron-atom and atom-atom collisions is used to examine nonequilibrium weakly ionized argon plasmas with atomic densities 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 20th/cu cm, temperatures below 6000 K, and with different degrees of radiation trapping. It is shown that three-body atomic recombination becomes important at high particle densities. Comparison is made between the present approach and Thomson's theory for atomic recombination.

  6. Cross-contact chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, U. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A system is provided for use with wafers that include multiple integrated circuits that include two conductive layers in contact at multiple interfaces. Contact chains are formed beside the integrated circuits, each contact chain formed of the same two layers as the circuits, in the form of conductive segments alternating between the upper and lower layers and with the ends of the segments connected in series through interfaces. A current source passes a current through the series-connected segments, by way of a pair of current tabs connected to opposite ends of the series of segments. While the current flows, voltage measurements are taken between each of a plurality of pairs of voltage tabs, the two tabs of each pair connected to opposite ends of an interface that lies along the series-connected segments. A plot of interface conductances on normal probability chart enables prediction of the yield of good integrated circuits from the wafer.

  7. Cross-contact chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A system is provided for use with wafers that include multiple integrated circuits that include two conductive layers in contact at multiple interfaces. Contact chains are formed beside the integrated circuits, each contact chain formed of the same two layers as the circuits, in the form of conductive segments alternating between the upper and lower layers and with the ends of the segments connected in series through interfaces. A current source passes a current through the series-connected segments, by way of a pair of current tabs connected to opposite ends of the series of segments. While the current flows, voltage measurements are taken between each of a plurality of pairs of voltage tabs, the two tabs of each pair connected to opposite ends of an interface that lies along the series-connected segments. A plot of interface conductances on a normal probability chart, enables prediction of the yield of good integrated circuits from the wafer.

  8. Perioperative supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, N R; Keck, B R

    2000-09-01

    Faced with declining revenues and increasing operating expenses, hospitals are evaluating numerous mechanisms designed to reduce costs while simultaneously maintaining quality care. Many facilities have targeted initial cost reduction efforts in the reduction of labor expenses. Once labor expenses have been "right sized," facilities have continued to focus on service delivery improvements by the optimization of the "supply chain" process. This report presents a case study of the efforts of Vanderbilt University Medical Center in the redesign of its supply chain management process in the department of Perioperative Services. Utilizing a multidisciplinary project management structure, 3 work teams were established to complete the redesign process. To date, the project has reduced costs by $2.3 million and enhanced quality patient care by enhancing the delivery of appropriate clinical supplies during the perioperative experience.

  9. Galileo chain thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H. J.

    2017-07-01

    This relatively rare thermometer has a rather unusual display: lower temperatures are located at the top of the scale, higher ones at the bottom. A sphere on a chain floats in a suitable liquid, sinking at high temperatures when the density of the liquid decreases and rising in the increased density at low temperatures. With reasonable effort and experimental dexterity, you can construct this thermometer yourself using ordinary materials.

  10. Streamlining the supply chain.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lydon

    2003-07-01

    Effective management of the supply chain requires attention to: Product management--formulary development and maintenance, compliance, clinical involvement, standardization, and demand-matching. Sourcing and contracting--vendor consolidation, GPO portfolio management, price leveling, content management, and direct contracting Purchasing and payment-cycle--automatic placement, web enablement, centralization, evaluated receipts settlement, and invoice matching Inventory and distribution management--"unofficial" and "official" locations, vendor-managed inventory, automatic replenishment, and freight management.

  11. The innovation value chain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Morten T; Birkinshaw, Julian

    2007-06-01

    The challenges of coming up with fresh ideas and realizing profits from them are different for every company. One firm may excel at finding good ideas but may have weak systems for bringing them to market. Another organization may have a terrific process for funding and rolling out new products and services but a shortage of concepts to develop. In this article, Hansen and Birkinshaw caution executives against using the latest and greatest innovation approaches and tools without understanding the unique deficiencies in their companies' innovation systems. They offer a framework for evaluating innovation performance: the innovation value chain. It comprises the three main phases of innovation (idea generation, conversion, and diffusion) as well as the critical activities performed during those phases (looking for ideas inside your unit; looking for them in other units; looking for them externally; selecting ideas; funding them; and promoting and spreading ideas companywide). Using this framework, managers get an end-to-end view of their innovation efforts. They can pinpoint their weakest links and tailor innovation best practices appropriately to strengthen those links. Companies typically succumb to one of three broad "weakest-link" scenarios. They are idea poor, conversion poor, or diffusion poor. The article looks at the ways smart companies - including Intuit, P&G, Sara Lee, Shell, and Siemens- modify the best innovation practices and apply them to address those organizations' individual needs and flaws. The authors warn that adopting the chain-based view of innovation requires new measures of what can be delivered by each link in the chain. The approach also entails new roles for employees "external scouts" and "internal evangelists," for example. Indeed, in their search for new hires, companies should seek out those candidates who can help address particular weaknesses in the innovation value chain.

  12. Folding of polyglutamine chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Manan; Reddy, Allam S.; Abbott, N. L.; de Pablo, J. J.

    2008-10-01

    Long polyglutamine chains have been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases. These include Huntington's disease, where expanded polyglutamine (PolyQ) sequences longer than 36 residues are correlated with the onset of symptoms. In this paper we study the folding pathway of a 54-residue PolyQ chain into a β-helical structure. Transition path sampling Monte Carlo simulations are used to generate unbiased reactive pathways between unfolded configurations and the folded β-helical structure of the polyglutamine chain. The folding process is examined in both explicit water and an implicit solvent. Both models reveal that the formation of a few critical contacts is necessary and sufficient for the molecule to fold. Once the primary contacts are formed, the fate of the protein is sealed and it is largely committed to fold. We find that, consistent with emerging hypotheses about PolyQ aggregation, a stable β-helical structure could serve as the nucleus for subsequent polymerization of amyloid fibrils. Our results indicate that PolyQ sequences shorter than 36 residues cannot form that nucleus, and it is also shown that specific mutations inferred from an analysis of the simulated folding pathway exacerbate its stability.

  13. The coprime quantum chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussardo, G.; Giudici, G.; Viti, J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we introduce and study the coprime quantum chain, i.e. a strongly correlated quantum system defined in terms of the integer eigenvalues n i of the occupation number operators at each site of a chain of length M. The n i ’s take value in the interval [2,q] and may be regarded as S z eigenvalues in the spin representation j  =  (q  ‑  2)/2. The distinctive interaction of the model is based on the coprimality matrix \\boldsymbolΦ : for the ferromagnetic case, this matrix assigns lower energy to configurations where occupation numbers n i and n i+1 of neighbouring sites share a common divisor, while for the anti-ferromagnetic case it assigns a lower energy to configurations where n i and n i+1 are coprime. The coprime chain, both in the ferro and anti-ferromagnetic cases, may present an exponential number of ground states whose values can be exactly computed by means of graph theoretical tools. In the ferromagnetic case there are generally also frustration phenomena. A fine tuning of local operators may lift the exponential ground state degeneracy and, according to which operators are switched on, the system may be driven into different classes of universality, among which the Ising or Potts universality class. The paper also contains an appendix by Don Zagier on the exact eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the coprimality matrix in the limit q\\to ∞ .

  14. Bucket chain excavator

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.F. Jr.

    1993-07-20

    A machine is described for excavating, elevating and loading material comprising: a main frame having forward and rearward ends; undercarriage means having forward and rearward movement capability for supporting said main frame; a transverse axle rigidly located with respect to said main frame at the forward end thereof; rotating means mounted on said axle so as to extend cantilever wider than any other part of said machine for excavating and for discharging excavated material rearward at an elevated position; chain drive means mounted inwardly on said axle for driving said rotating means and for digging and elevating a portion of the width of a path so that said rotating means and said chain drive means together dig a path wider than any other part of said machine; conveyor means located behind said rotating means for receiving and taking away all material excavated by said chain drive means and said rotating means and conveying said material rearwardly to a material delivery position; and adjustment means for raising and lowering said rotating means relative to said undercarriage.

  15. Deterministic features of side-chain main-chain hydrogen bonds in globular protein structures.

    PubMed

    Eswar, N; Ramakrishnan, C

    2000-04-01

    A total of 19 835 polar residues from a data set of 250 non-homologous and highly resolved protein crystal structures were used to identify side-chain main-chain (SC-MC) hydrogen bonds. The ratio of the number of SC-MC hydrogen bonds to the total number of polar residues is close to 1:2, indicating the ubiquitous nature of such hydrogen bonds. Close to 56% of the SC-MC hydrogen bonds are local involving side-chain acceptor/donor ('i') and a main-chain donor/acceptor within the window i-5 to i+5. These short-range hydrogen bonds form well defined conformational motifs characterized by specific combinations of backbone and side-chain torsion angles. (a) The Ser/Thr residues show the greatest preference in forming intra-helical hydrogen bonds between the atoms O(gamma)(i) and O(i-4). More than half the examples of such hydrogen bonds are found at the middle of alpha-helices rather than at their ends. The most favoured motif of these examples is alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)(g(-)). (b) These residues also show great preference to form hydrogen bonds between O(gamma)(i) and O(i-3), which are closely related to the previous type and though intra-helical, these hydrogen bonds are more often found at the C-termini of helices than at the middle. The motif represented by alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)(g(+)) is most preferred in these cases. (c) The Ser, Thr and Glu are the most frequently found residues participating in intra-residue hydrogen bonds (between the side-chain and main-chain of the same residue) which are characterized by specific motifs of the form beta(g(+)) for Ser/Thr residues and alpha(R)(g(-)g(+)t) for Glu/Gln. (d) The side-chain acceptor atoms of Asn/Asp and Ser/Thr residues show high preference to form hydrogen bonds with acceptors two residues ahead in the chain, which are characterized by the motifs beta (tt')alphaR and beta(t)alpha(R), respectively. These hydrogen bonded segments, referred to as Asx turns, are known to provide stability to type I

  16. Extremely long-lived magnetic excitations in supported Fe chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, J. P.; Lorente, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the lifetime of the first excited state of spin chains made of an odd number of Fe atoms on C u2N /Cu (100 ) . Yan, Choi, Burgess, Rolf-Pissarczyk, and Loth [Nat. Nanotech. 10, 40 (2015), 10.1038/nnano.2014.281] recently observed very long lifetimes in the case of F e3 chains. We consider the decay of the first excited state induced by electron-hole pair creation in the substrate. For a finite magnetic field, the two lowest-lying states in the chain have a quasi-Néel state structure. Decay from one state to the other strongly depends on the degree of entanglement of the local spins in the chain. The weak entanglement in the chain accounts for the long lifetimes that increase exponentially with chain length. Despite their apparently very different properties, the behavior of odd and even chains is governed by the same kind of phenomena, in particular entanglement effects. The present results account quite well for the lifetimes recently measured by Yan et al. on F e3 .

  17. Atomic resolution holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    Atomic resolution holography, such as X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH)[1] and photoelectron holography (PH), has the attention of researcher as an informative local structure analysis, because it provides three dimensional atomic images around specific elements within a range of a few nanometers. It can determine atomic arrangements around a specific element without any prior knowledge of structures. It is considered that the atomic resolution holographic is a third method of structural analysis at the atomic level after X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As known by many researchers, XRD and XAFS are established methods that are widespread use in various fields. XRD and XAFS provide information on long-range translational periodicities and very local environments, respectively, whereas the atomic resolution holography gives 3D information on the local order and can visualize surrounding atoms with a large range of coordination shells. We call this feature "3D medium-range local structure observation".In addition to this feature, the atomic resolution holography is very sensitive to the displacement of atoms from their ideal positions, and one can obtain quantitative information about local lattice distortions by analyzing reconstructed atomic images[2] When dopants with different atomic radii from the matrix elements are present, the lattices around the dopants are distorted. However, using the conventional methods of structural analysis, one cannot determine the extent to which the local lattice distortions are preserved from the dopants. XFH is a good tool for solving this problem.Figure 1 shows a recent achievement on a relaxor ferroelectric of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) using XFH. The structural studies of relaxor ferroelectrics have been carried out by X-ray or neutron diffractions, which suggested rhombohedral distortions of their lattices. However, their true pictures have not been obtained, yet. The Nb Kα holograms showed

  18. Importance of chirality and reduced flexibility of protein side chains: A study with square and tetrahedral lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Yu; Chen, Rong; Liang, Jie

    2004-07-01

    Side chains of amino acid residues are the determining factor that distinguishes proteins from other unstable chain polymers. In simple models they are often represented implicitly (e.g., by spin states) or simplified as one atom. Here we study side chain effects using two-dimensional square lattice and three-dimensional tetrahedral lattice models, with explicitly constructed side chains formed by two atoms of different chirality and flexibility. We distinguish effects due to chirality and effects due to side chain flexibilities, since residues in proteins are L residues, and their side chains adopt different rotameric states. For short chains, we enumerate exhaustively all possible conformations. For long chains, we sample effectively rare events such as compact conformations and obtain complete pictures of ensemble properties of conformations of these models at all compactness region. This is made possible by using sequential Monte Carlo techniques based on chain growth method. Our results show that both chirality and reduced side chain flexibility lower the folding entropy significantly for globally compact conformations, suggesting that they are important properties of residues to ensure fast folding and stable native structure. This corresponds well with our finding that natural amino acid residues have reduced effective flexibility, as evidenced by statistical analysis of rotamer libraries and side chain rotatable bonds. We further develop a method calculating the exact side chain entropy for a given backbone structure. We show that simple rotamer counting underestimates side chain entropy significantly for both extended and near maximally compact conformations. We find that side chain entropy does not always correlate well with main chain packing. With explicit side chains, extended backbones do not have the largest side chain entropy. Among compact backbones with maximum side chain entropy, helical structures emerge as the dominating configurations. Our

  19. Atomic research. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadaway, J.B.; Connatser, R.; Cothren, B.; Johnson, R.B.

    1993-07-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  20. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  1. Heavy-atom derivatization.

    PubMed

    Garman, Elspeth; Murray, James W

    2003-11-01

    Most of the standard methods of solving macromolecular structures involve producing a protein crystal that is derivatized by an anomalous scatterer or heavy atom (MIR, SIRAS, MAD, SAD etc.). The theoretical methodology which underpins the extraction of phase information from such derivatives is widely available in the literature. In addition, there are comprehensive sources of information on the chemistry of heavy-atom compounds and the ligands with which they are known to interact, as well as the Heavy Atom Databank accessible on the World Wide Web. This contribution therefore aims to provide some information on the less well documented practical problems of firstly deciding on an overall strategy for derivatization and secondly performing the physical manipulations involved in producing heavy-atom derivatives from native protein crystals and then cryocooling them. Ways to optimize the chances of isomorphous unit cells are suggested. Methods of determining whether or not the heavy atom is bound are outlined, including the powerful technique of PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission).

  2. Structural, Electronic, and Mechanical Properties of Chains of Silicon Clusters with Trigonal Bipiramidal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernatinsky, Alex; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2002-03-01

    We report here our investigation of structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of non-trivial silicon chains. These chains are built from elementary blocks of clusters of 5 and 8 silicon atoms, arranged into trigonal bipiramidal structures and periodically continued along the axial direction. The initial configurations are constructed such that there are no dangling bonds associated with any atom along the chains. The stable configurations of the chains are determined by molecular dynamics simulations based on the first-principles method of Sankey and Niklewski [1] using the self-consistency scheme given in Ref. [2]. Mechanical and electronic properties of the resulting stable chains will be presented. 1. O.F.Sankey, and D.J.Niklewski, Phys. Rev. B 40 3979(1989). 2. P.Ordejon, E.Artacho, and J.M.Soler, Phys.Rev. B 53,10441 (1996).

  3. Stepwise synthesis of two inorganic-organic hybrids based on the manganese monosubstituted Keggin polyanion chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Jing; Huang, Nan-Nan; Yang, Da-Yü; Chen, Ya-Guang; Pang, Hai-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Two new hybrid compounds based on the manganese monosubstituted Keggin polyanion chains, [H2bpy][Ag(bpy)]2[HPMnMo11O39] (1) and [H2bpy]2[Hbpy][PMnMo11O39]·H2O (2), (bpy = 4,4‧-bipyridine) have been stepwise synthesized under hydrothermal condition and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermogravimetry, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Structural characterization reveals that although both 1 and 2 contain manganese monosubstituted Keggin polyanion chains, the polyanion chains are not in the full consistent way. In 1, the neighboring manganese monosubstituted Keggin clusters are connected via sharing the para position oxygen atoms of the clusters to form a linear polyanion chain in which the monosubstituted Keggin clusters are further grafted by silver coordination polymer chains forming a 2D network. Whereas the polyanion chain in 2 exhibits a zigzag structure, which is formed by sharing the metaposition terminal oxygen atoms of the clusters, rather than para position terminal oxygen atoms as that in 1. Each zigzag chain contacts with four adjacent chains along four directions through short interspecies contacts, forming a 3D supramolecular framework. The protonated Hbipy+ and H2bipy2+ molecules as the counter cations exist in voids of the supramolecular framework in 2. Furthermore, photocatalytic experiments indicate that 1 has good activities for photocatalytic degradation of RhB under UV irradiation.

  4. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  5. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  6. Transport properties for carbon chain sandwiched between heteroatom-doped carbon nanotubes with different doping sites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenjiang; Deng, Xiaoqing E-mail: caish@mail.gufe.edu.cn; Cai, Shaohong E-mail: caish@mail.gufe.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    The First-principles calculation is used to investigate the transport properties of a carbon chain connected with N-and/or B-doped caped carbon nanotube acting as electrodes. The I-V curves of the carbon chain are affected by the N/B doping sites, and rectifying behavior can be obtained distinctly when the carbon chain is just connected onto two doping atom sites (N- chain-B), and a weak rectification occurs when N (B) doping at other sites. Interestingly, the spin-filtering effects exist in the junction when it is doped at other sites, undoped system, or N-terminal carbon chains. However, no this behavior is found in N-chain-B and B-chain-B systems. The analysis on the transmission spectra, PDOS, LDOS, spin density, and the electron transmission pathways give an insight into the observed results for the system.

  7. Transport properties for carbon chain sandwiched between heteroatom-doped carbon nanotubes with different doping sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjiang; Deng, Xiaoqing; Cai, Shaohong

    2016-07-01

    The First-principles calculation is used to investigate the transport properties of a carbon chain connected with N-and/or B-doped caped carbon nanotube acting as electrodes. The I-V curves of the carbon chain are affected by the N/B doping sites, and rectifying behavior can be obtained distinctly when the carbon chain is just connected onto two doping atom sites (N- chain-B), and a weak rectification occurs when N (B) doping at other sites. Interestingly, the spin-filtering effects exist in the junction when it is doped at other sites, undoped system, or N-terminal carbon chains. However, no this behavior is found in N-chain-B and B-chain-B systems. The analysis on the transmission spectra, PDOS, LDOS, spin density, and the electron transmission pathways give an insight into the observed results for the system.

  8. [Study on molecular chain morphology and chain parameters of konjac glucomannan].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Xie, Bi-jun

    2003-11-01

    To study the molecular chain morphology and chain parameters of konjac glucomannan (KGM). Solution behavior was studied by using light scattering(LS), gel permeation chromatograph (GPC) and method of viscosity. The molecular morphology was observed directly by atom force microscope (AFM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The average molecular weight (Mw), root-mean-square ratio of gyration(1/2), second Viral coefficients (A2) and multi-disperse coefficients (Mw/Mn) are 1.04 x 10(6), 105.0 +/- 0.9 nm, (-1.59 +/- 0.28) x 10(-3) mol.mL.g-2 and (1.020 +/- 0.003) respectively; Mark-Houwink equation was established as [eta] = 5.96 x 10(-2) Mw0.73, the molecular chain parameters were as follows: ML = 982.82 nm-1, q = 27.93 nm, d = 0.74 nm, h = 0.26 nm, L = 1,054.11 nm. Both the result showed by direct observation and the deduction drawn by solution behavior confirmed that the KGM molecular is stentering semi-flexible linear chain without branch.

  9. Atomic clusters with addressable complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    2017-02-01

    A general formulation for constructing addressable atomic clusters is introduced, based on one or more reference structures. By modifying the well depths in a given interatomic potential in favour of nearest-neighbour interactions that are defined in the reference(s), the potential energy landscape can be biased to make a particular permutational isomer the global minimum. The magnitude of the bias changes the resulting potential energy landscape systematically, providing a framework to produce clusters that should self-organise efficiently into the target structure. These features are illustrated for small systems, where all the relevant local minima and transition states can be identified, and for the low-energy regions of the landscape for larger clusters. For a 55-particle cluster, it is possible to design a target structure from a transition state of the original potential and to retain this structure in a doubly addressable landscape. Disconnectivity graphs based on local minima that have no direct connections to a lower minimum provide a helpful way to visualise the larger databases. These minima correspond to the termini of monotonic sequences, which always proceed downhill in terms of potential energy, and we identify them as a class of biminimum. Multiple copies of the target cluster are treated by adding a repulsive term between particles with the same address to maintain distinguishable targets upon aggregation. By tuning the magnitude of this term, it is possible to create assemblies of the target cluster corresponding to a variety of structures, including rings and chains.

  10. An all-atom structure-based potential for proteins: bridging minimal models with all-atom empirical forcefields.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Noel, Jeffrey K; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Onuchic, José N

    2009-05-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Go) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase, and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a C(alpha) structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include: (1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature, (2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters, (3) protein folding free-energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications, (4) the global folding mechanisms in a C(alpha) model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model, and (5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Because this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function.

  11. An All-atom Structure-Based Potential for Proteins: Bridging Minimal Models with All-atom Empirical Forcefields

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Paul C.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y.; Onuchic, José N.

    2012-01-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Gō) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a Cα structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include 1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature 2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters 3) protein folding free energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications 4) the global folding mechanisms in a Cα model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model 5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Since this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function. PMID:18837035

  12. Atomic-Resolution Kinked Structure of an Alkylporphyrin on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite.

    PubMed

    Chin, Yiing; Panduwinata, Dwi; Sintic, Maxine; Sum, Tze Jing; Hush, Noel S; Crossley, Maxwell J; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-20

    The atomic structure of the chains of an alkyl porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetranonadecylporphyrin) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at the solid/liquid interface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and 1-phenyloctane is resolved using calibrated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT) image simulations, and ONIOM-based geometry optimizations. While atomic structures are often readily determined for porphyrin SAMs, the determination of the structure of alkyl-chain connections has not previously been possible. A graphical calibration procedure is introduced, allowing accurate observation of SAM lattice parameters, and, of the many possible atomic structures modeled, only the lowest-energy structure obtained was found to predict the observed lattice parameters and image topography. Hydrogen atoms are shown to provide the conduit for the tunneling current through the alkyl chains.

  13. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  14. Atomic cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  15. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  16. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  17. Stationary Electron Atomic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressler, David E.

    1998-04-01

    I will present a novel theory concerning the position and nature of the electron inside the atom. This new concept is consistant with present experimental evidence and adheres strictly to the valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) model presently used in chemistry for predicting the shapes of molecules and ions. In addition, I will discuss the atomic model concept as being a true harmonic oscillator, periodic motion at resonant frequency which produces radiation at discrete frequencies or line spectra is possible because the electron is under the action of two restoring forces, electrostatic attraction and superconducting respulsion of the electron's magnetic field by the nucleus.

  18. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  19. Theoretical Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzikas, Zenonas

    2007-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Energy Spectrum of Many-electron Atom. Radiative and Autoionizing Transitions (Initial Formulas): 1. Non-relativistic atomic Hamiltonian and relativistic corrections; 2. Relativistic atomic Hamiltonian. New wave function; 3. Perturbation theory for the energy of an atom; 4. Radiative and autoionizing electronic transitions. Generalized expressions for electric multipole (Ek) transition operators; Part II. Foundations of the Angular Momentum Theory. Graphical Methods: 5. Angular momentum and tensorial algebra; 6. Main quantities of angular momentum theory; 7. Angular momentum theory for relativistic case; 8. Graphical methods: their generalization for perturbation theory; Part III. Description of Complex Electronic Configurations: 9. Non-relativistic and relativistic cases of a shell of equivalent electrons; 10. Two and more shells of equivalent electrons; 11. Classification of energy levels; 12. Relations between various coupling schemes; Part IV. Second-quantization in the Theory of an Atom: Quasispin and Isospin: 13. Second-quantization and irreducible tensorial sets; 14. Operators and matrix elements in second-quantization representation; 15. Quasispin for a shell of equivalent electrons; 16. Algebraic expressions for coefficients of fractional parentage (CFP); 17. Tensorial properties and quasispin of complex configurations; 18. Isospin in the theory of an atom; Part V. Matrix Elements of the Energy Operator: 19. The energy of a shell of equivalent electrons; 20. Interaction energy of two shells in LS coupling; 21. Semi-empirical methods of calculation of the energy spectra; 22. Hyperfine structure of the energy spectra, isotopic and Lamb shift; 23. Quasispin and isospin for relativistic matrix elements; Part VI. Electric and Magnetic Multipole Transitions: 24. General expressions for electric (Ek) and magnetic (Mk) multipole radiation quantities; 25. Non relativistic matrix elements of the Ek-transitions; 26. Relativistic matrix

  20. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  1. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  2. Computer Modeling Of Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M.; Ibrahim, E.; Przekwas, A.; Cheuch, S.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mathematical models based on fundamental principles of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum developed for use in computer simulation of atomization of jets of liquid fuel in rocket engines. Models also used to study atomization in terrestrial applications; prove especially useful in designing improved industrial sprays - humidifier water sprays, chemical process sprays, and sprays of molten metal. Because present improved mathematical models based on first principles, they are minimally dependent on empirical correlations and better able to represent hot-flow conditions that prevail in rocket engines and are too severe to be accessible for detailed experimentation.

  3. Fundamental symmetries studies with cold trapped francium atoms at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Orozco, L. A.; Perez Galvan, A.; Sheng, D.; Zhao, Y.; Sprouse, G. D.; Behr, J. A.; Jackson, K. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Aubin, S.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-09-01

    Francium combines a heavy nucleus ( Z = 87) with the simple atomic structure of alkalis and is a very promising candidate for precision tests of fundamental symmetries such as atomic parity non-conservation measurements. Fr has no stable isotopes, and the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF, equipped with an actinide target, promises to provide record quantities of Fr atoms, up to 1010/s for some isotopes. We discuss our plans for a Fr on-line laser trapping facility at ISAC and experiments with samples of cold Fr atoms. We outline our plans for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment a parity non-conserving, time-reversal conserving moment that arises from weak interactions between nucleons in a chain of Fr isotopes. Its measurement is a unique probe for neutral weak interactions inside the nucleus.

  4. Fundamental symmetries studies with cold trapped francium atoms at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Orozco, L. A.; Gaivan, A. Perez; Sheng, D.; Zhao, Y.; Sprouse, G. D.; Behr, J. A.; Jackson, K. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Aubin, S.; Flambaum, V. V.

    Francium combines a heavy nucleus (Z = 87) with the simple atomic structure of alkalis and is a very promising candidate for precision tests of fundamental symmetries such as atomic parity non-conservation measurements. Fr has no stable isotopes, and the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF, equipped with an actinide target, promises to provide record quantities of Fr atoms, up to 1010/s for some isotopes. We discuss our plans for a Fr on-line laser trapping facility at ISAC and experiments with samples of cold Fr atoms. We outline our plans for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment — a parity non-conserving, time-reversal conserving moment that arises from weak interactions between nucléons — in a chain of Fr isotopes. Its measurement is a unique probe for neutral weak interactions inside the nucleus.

  5. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  6. Tuning magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic chains by exchange interactions: ab initio studies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kun; Guo, Qing; Jena, Puru; Xue, Desheng; Stepanyuk, Valeri S

    2015-10-21

    The possibility of using exchange interactions to manipulate the spin state of an antiferromagnetic nanostructure is explored using ab initio calculations. By considering M (M = Mn, Fe, Co) mono-atomic chains supported on Cu2N islands on a Cu(001) surface as a model system, it is demonstrated that two indistinguishable Néel states of an antiferromagnetic chain can be tailored into a preferred state by the exchange interaction with a magnetic STM tip. The magnitude and direction of the anisotropy for antiferromagnetic chains can also be tuned by exchange coupling upon varying the tip-chain separation.

  7. Two-dimensional folded chain crystals of a synthetic polymer in a Langmuir-Blodgett film.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Jiro; Kawauchi, Takehiro; Yashima, Eiji

    2005-04-27

    Isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) monolayers deposited from a water surface onto mica at different surface pressures were studied by atomic force microscopy, and their structure formation from single chains to two-dimensional folded chain crystals was clearly observed. Furthermore, gentle crystallization of the monolayer by slow compression on the water surface enabled the observation of crystals at a molecular level, thus visualizing the chain foldings and tie-chains for the first time. The resulting molecular level information will provide an important clue toward the understanding of polymer crystals not only in two dimensions but also in three dimensions.

  8. A first-principles investigation on the Electronic and Magnetic properties of Hydrogen vacancy chains in Graphane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bi Ru; Yang, Chih-Kai

    2015-03-01

    We investigated a variety of configurations of hydrogen-vacancy (HV) chains in graphane with density functional theory. We found the configurations that each of zigzagged HV chains separated by one or more H chains exhibit nonmagnetic conductor or has a tiny gap. Once as the neighbored zigzag HV chains blocked by isolated H atoms, the structure transformed from a nonmagnetic conductor into a magnetic semiconductor. If the HV chains are continuously distributed, it looks like a graphene nanoribbon embedded in graphane. The zigzag edged embedded graphene nanoribbons also show antiferromagnetic. An additional H atom on the ribbon can tune the band gap and generate magnetic moment; moreover, if bare C atoms are present outside the nanoribbon also have similar effect. The results will be helpful for designing graphene-based nanoelectronic devices.

  9. Covalent bond orders and atomic anisotropies from iterated stockholder atoms.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Richard J; Gopal, Angelica A

    2012-02-14

    Iterated stockholder atoms are produced by dividing molecular electron densities into sums of overlapping, near-spherical atomic densities. It is shown that there exists a good correlation between the overlap of the densities of two atoms and the order of the covalent bond between the atoms (as given by simple valence rules). Furthermore, iterated stockholder atoms minimise a functional of the charge density, and this functional can be expressed as a sum of atomic contributions, which are related to the deviation of the atomic densities from spherical symmetry. Since iterated stockholder atoms can be obtained uniquely from the electron density, this work gives an orbital-free method for predicting bond orders and atomic anisotropies from experimental or theoretical charge density data.

  10. Strong gold atom strands formed by incorporation of carbon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yoshifumi; Kurui, Yoshihiko; Nguyen, Huy Duy; Ono, Tomoya; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2011-07-01

    Single metal atom strands have attracted significant interest because of their unique properties, such as quantization effects and a high degree of strength. Recently it was suggested that the strength of a gold atom strand can be enhanced by the insertion of an impurity atom, but it has not been experimentally investigated. Using a transmission electron microscope under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, we observed that gold atoms were pulled out one by one from a carbon-contaminated gold (111) surface to form a long atom strand. The strand was so strong that it did not break even upon bending. Supported by first-principles calculations, the strand was found to have two carbon atoms at each gold atom interval. Our observations suggest that the carbon atoms act as a glue to form a long gold atom strand.

  11. Spatially resolved photoionization of ultracold atoms on an atom chip

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, S.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-06-15

    We report on photoionization of ultracold magnetically trapped Rb atoms on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at 5 {mu}K in a strongly anisotropic trap. Through a hole in the chip with a diameter of 150 {mu}m, two laser beams are focused onto a fraction of the atomic cloud. A first laser beam with a wavelength of 778 nm excites the atoms via a two-photon transition to the 5D level. With a fiber laser at 1080 nm the excited atoms are photoionized. Ionization leads to depletion of the atomic density distribution observed by absorption imaging. The resonant ionization spectrum is reported. The setup used in this experiment is suitable not only to investigate mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates and ions but also for single-atom detection on an atom chip.

  12. Musical Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchenkov, Dima; Dawin, Jean René

    A system for using dice to compose music randomly is known as the musical dice game. The discrete time MIDI models of 804 pieces of classical music written by 29 composers have been encoded into the transition matrices and studied by Markov chains. Contrary to human languages, entropy dominates over redundancy, in the musical dice games based on the compositions of classical music. The maximum complexity is achieved on the blocks consisting of just a few notes (8 notes, for the musical dice games generated over Bach's compositions). First passage times to notes can be used to resolve tonality and feature a composer.

  13. Monte Carlo without chains

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, Alexandre J.

    2007-12-12

    A sampling method for spin systems is presented. The spin lattice is written as the union of a nested sequence of sublattices, all but the last with conditionally independent spins, which are sampled in succession using their marginals. The marginals are computed concurrently by a fast algorithm; errors in the evaluation of the marginals are offset by weights. There are no Markov chains and each sample is independent of the previous ones; the cost of a sample is proportional to the number of spins (but the number of samples needed for good statistics may grow with array size). The examples include the Edwards-Anderson spin glass in three dimensions.

  14. The polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Welch, Hazel M

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has had a significant impact on all aspects of the molecular biosciences, from cancer research to forensic science. The sensitivity and specificity inherent in the technique allow minute quantities of genetic material to be detected while the unique properties of thermostable DNA polymerase ensure that abundant copies are reliably reproduced to levels that can be visualized and/or used for further applications. This chapter describes applications of PCR and PCR-RT to investigate primary cancer and metastatic disease at both the DNA and mRNA expression levels.

  15. Structural Distortions and Charge Density Waves in Iodine Chains Encapsulated inside Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V

    2017-06-14

    Atomic chains are perfect systems for getting fundamental insights into the electron dynamics and coupling between the electronic and ionic degrees of freedom in one-dimensional metals. Depending on the band filling, they can exhibit Peierls instabilities (or charge density waves), where equally spaced chain of atoms with partially filled band is inherently unstable, exhibiting spontaneous distortion of the lattice that further leads to metal-insulator transition in the system. Here, using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, we directly image the atomic structures of a chain of iodine atoms confined inside carbon nanotubes. In addition to long equidistant chains, the ones consisting of iodine dimers and trimers were also observed, as well as transitions between them. First-principles calculations reproduce the experimentally observed bond lengths and lattice constants, showing that the ionic movement is largely unconstrained in the longitudinal direction, while naturally confined by the nanotube in the lateral directions. Moreover, the trimerized chain bears the hallmarks of a charge density wave. The transition is driven by changes in the charge transfer between the chain and the nanotube and is enabled by the charge compensation and additional screening provided by the nanotube.

  16. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  17. Energy from the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  18. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  19. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  20. Chiral atomically thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm(-1)) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  1. Atoms in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Paul A.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. A Basic Topics section discusses atomic structure, emphasizing states of matter at high temperature and spectroscopic analysis of light from the stars. A section…

  2. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  3. Energy from the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  4. Chiral atomically thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  5. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  6. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  7. Single-Atom Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Shi, Qiurong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-05-23

    Recent years have witnessed the increasing production of the sustainable and renewable energy. The limitations of electrochemical performances are closely associated with the search for highly efficient electrocatalysts with more rational control of size, shape, composition and structure. Specifically, the rapidly emerging studies on single-atom catalysts (SACs) have sparked new interests in electrocatalysis because of the unique properties such as high catalytic activity, selectivity and 100% atom utilization. In this review, we introduce the innovative synthesis and advanced characterizations of SACs and primarily focus on their electrochemical applications in oxygen reduction/evolution reaction, hydrogen evolution reaction, hydrocarbon conversion reactions for fuel cells (methanol, ethanol and formic acid electrooxidation) and other related fields. Significantly, this unique single atom-depended electrocatalytic performance together with the underlying mechanism will also be discussed. Furthermore, future research directions and challenges are proposed to further realize the ultimate goal of tailoring single-atoms for electrochemical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Atomic and Molecular Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-25

    The topics investigated experimentally and theoretically by the Pittsburgh Atomic Sciences Institute with applications to high power laser development and atmospheric IR backgrounds are enumerated. Reports containing the detailed scientific progress in these studies are cited. Finally, a list of the journal articles describing the results of the programs, with full references, is given.

  9. Experiments with Ξ- atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with Ξ- atoms are proposed in order to study the nuclear interaction of Ξ hyperons. The production of Ξ- in the (K-,K+) reaction, the Ξ- stopping in matter, and its atomic cascade are incorporated within a realistic evaluation of the results expected for Ξ- x-ray spectra across the periodic table, using an assumed Ξ-nucleus optical potential Vopt. Several optimal targets for measuring the strong-interaction shift and width of the x-ray transition to the ``last'' atomic level observed are singled out: F, Cl, I, and Pb. The sensitivity of these observables to the parameters of Vopt is considered. The relevance of such experiments is discussed in the context of strangeness -2 nuclear physics and multistrange nuclear matter. Finally, with particular reference to searches for the H dibaryon, the properties of Ξ-d atoms are also discussed. The role of Stark mixing and its effect on S and P state capture of Ξ- by the deuteron together with estimates of the resulting probability for producing the H dibaryon are considered in detail.

  10. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Josh B.; Dick, Don D.; McDonnell, Stephen J.; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H. G.; Owen, William R.; Alexander, Justin D.; Jaeger, David L.; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J.; Wallace, Robert M.; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M.; Randall, John N.; Von Ehr, James

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure. PMID:26274555

  11. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  12. Carbon Slurry Secondary Atomization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    ELEMENT NO. NO. N ACCESSION NO. 1 62203F 3048 I 05 I 34 11 TITLE (Include Securty Clasification ) Carbon Slurry Secondary Atomization 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...density, size, and induction time. Any continuing program in this area should attempt to keep these criteria in mind . IV. VOLATILE ADDITIVE STUDIES 1

  13. [Trophic chains in soil].

    PubMed

    Goncharov, A A; Tiunov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Trophic links of soil animals are extensively diverse but also flexible. Moreover, feeding activity of large soil saprotrophs often cascades into a range of ecosystem-level consequences via the ecological engineering. Better knowledge on the main sources of energy utilized by soil animals is needed for understanding functional structure of soil animal communities and their participation in the global carbon cycling. Using published and original data, we consider the relative importance of dead organic matter and saprotrophic microorganisms as a basal energy source in the detritus-based food chains, the feeding of endogeic macrofauna on the stabilized soil organic matter, and the role of recent photosynthate in the energy budget of soil communities. Soil food webs are spatially and functionally compartmentalized, though the separation of food chains into bacteria- and fungi-based channels seems to be an over-simplification. The regulation of the litter decomposition rates via top-down trophic interactions across more than one trophic level is only partly supported by experimental data, but mobile litter-dwelling predators play a crucial role in integrating local food webs within and across neighboring ecosystems.

  14. Action Minimising Fronts in General FPU-type Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Michael

    2011-02-01

    We study atomic chains with nonlinear nearest neighbour interactions and prove the existence of fronts (heteroclinic travelling waves with constant asymptotic states). Generalising recent results of Herrmann and Rademacher we allow for non-convex interaction potentials and find fronts with non-monotone profile. These fronts minimise an action integral and can only exists if the asymptotic states fulfil the macroscopic constraints and if the interaction potential satisfies a geometric graph condition. Finally, we illustrate our findings by numerical simulations.

  15. The rheology of chain molecules under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jonathan David

    The rheology of chain molecules is a subject that comprises a wide variety of complex physical phenomena, challenging scientific questions, and fundamentally important practical applications. In this work, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) is employed to study linear and branched alkane chains in the melt state under transient and steady-state shearing conditions. This study focuses on three isomers of C30H62 (n- triacontane, squalane, and 9-n- octyldocosane) as well as a linear short-chain polyethylene (C100H202). A transferable united atom potential is used to model these alkane chains, and the simulations of planar Couette flow are performed using the SLLOD algorithm and a multi- timestep, simulation technique. The strain rates studied in this work (108-10 12 s-1) are extremely difficult to study experimentally yet typical of the severe conditions commonly found in engines and other machinery. NEMD and the united atom model underpredict the kinematic viscosities of n-triacontane and 9- n-octyldocosane but accurately predict the values for squalane (within 15%) at temperatures of 311 and 372 K. The predicted kinematic viscosity index values for both 9- n-octyldocosane and squalane are in quantitative agreement with experiment and represent the first such predictions by molecular simulation. Thus, this same general potential model and computational approach can be used to predict this important lubricant property for potential lubricants prior to their synthesis, offering the possibility of simulation-guided lubricant design. Simulations of C100H202 under steady-state shearing conditions reveal a pronounced minimum in the hydrostatic pressure at an intermediate strain rate that is associated with a minimum in the intermolecular potential energy as well as transitions in the strain-rate-dependent behavior of several other viscous and structural properties of the system. Upon onset of shear, the stress overshoot curves calculated for C100 are in good

  16. Protein-ligand docking with multiple flexible side chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Sanner, Michel F.

    2008-09-01

    In this work, we validate and analyze the results of previously published cross docking experiments and classify failed dockings based on the conformational changes observed in the receptors. We show that a majority of failed experiments (i.e. 25 out of 33, involving four different receptors: cAPK, CDK2, Ricin and HIVp) are due to conformational changes in side chains near the active site. For these cases, we identify the side chains to be made flexible during docking calculation by superimposing receptors and analyzing steric overlap between various ligands and receptor side chains. We demonstrate that allowing these side chains to assume rotameric conformations enables the successful cross docking of 19 complexes (ligand all atom RMSD < 2.0 Å) using our docking software FLIPDock. The number of side receptor side chains interacting with a ligand can vary according to the ligand's size and shape. Hence, when starting from a complex with a particular ligand one might have to extend the region of potential interacting side chains beyond the ones interacting with the known ligand. We discuss distance-based methods for selecting additional side chains in the neighborhood of the known active site. We show that while using the molecular surface to grow the neighborhood is more efficient than Euclidian-distance selection, the number of side chains selected by these methods often remains too large and additional methods for reducing their count are needed. Despite these difficulties, using geometric constraints obtained from the network of bonded and non-bonded interactions to rank residues and allowing the top ranked side chains to be flexible during docking makes 22 out of 25 complexes successful.

  17. HPAM: Hirshfeld Partitioned Atomic Multipoles

    PubMed Central

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2011-01-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank lmax on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from lmax = 0 (atomic charges) to lmax = 4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank lmax are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L ≤ lmax. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only (lmax = 0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. PMID:22140274

  18. Origin of the smaller conductances of Rh, Pb, and Co atomic junctions in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xue; Chen, Mingyan; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yi-qun; Ke, San-huang

    2015-02-14

    We study theoretically the structural and electronic origins of the smaller conductances (one conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, and smaller) of Rh, Pb, and Co metal atomic junctions (MAJs) in a hydrogen environment, as were measured in recent experiments. For the Rh MAJs, the 1G{sub 0} conductance is attributed to a stable contact bridged by a single hydrogen molecule whose antibonding state provides a single transport channel. For the Pb and Co MAJs the 1G{sub 0} conductance is, however, ascribed to a linear atomic chain adsorbing two dissociated H atoms, which largely reduces the density of states at the Fermi energy with respect to the pure ones. On the other hand, the small conductances of 0.3G{sub 0} (Rh) and 0.2G{sub 0} (Co) are due to H-decorated atomic chains connected to electrodes by a H atom.

  19. Creation and transfer of nonclassical states of motion using Rydberg dressing of atoms in a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, L. F.; Mølmer, K.; Petrosyan, D.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the manipulation of the motional states of trapped ground-state atoms using Rydberg dressing via nonresonant laser fields. The forces resulting from Rydberg state interaction between dressed neighboring atoms in an array of microtraps or an optical lattice can strongly couple their motion. We show that intensity modulation of the dressing field allows us to squeeze the relative motion of a pair of atoms and generate nonclassical mechanical states. Extending this pairwise scheme to one-dimensional chains provides flexible control over the mechanical degrees of freedom of the whole system. We illustrate our findings with protocols to manipulate all motional degrees of freedom of a pair of atoms and create entangled states. We also present a method to transfer nonclassical correlations along an atomic chain of nontrivial length. The long-lived nature of motional states, together with the high tunability of Rydberg dressing, makes our proposal feasible for current experimental setups.

  20. Structurally driven magnetic state transition of biatomic Fe chains on Ir(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrousov, Yuriy; Thiess, Alexander; Heinze, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the magnetic exchange interaction and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of biatomic Fe chains grown in the trenches of the (5×1) reconstructed Ir(001) surface depend sensitively on the atomic arrangement of the Fe atoms. Two structural configurations have been considered which are suggested from recent experiments. They differ by the local symmetry and the spacing between the two strands of the biatomic Fe chain. Since both configurations are very close in total energy they may coexist in experiment. We have investigated collinear ferro- and antiferromagnetic solutions as well as a collinear state with two moments in one direction and one in the opposite direction ( ↑↓↑ -state). For the structure with a small interchain spacing, there is a strong exchange interaction between the strands and the ferromagnetic state is energetically favorable. In the structure with larger spacing, the two strands are magnetically nearly decoupled and exhibit antiferromagnetic order along the chain. In both cases, due to hybridization with the Ir substrate the exchange interaction along the chain axis is relatively small compared to free-standing biatomic iron chains. The easy magnetization axis of the Fe chains also switches with the structural configuration and is out-of-plane for the ferromagnetic chains with small spacing and along the chain axis for the antiferromagnetic chains with large spacing between the two strands. Calculated scanning tunneling microscopy images and spectra suggest the possibility to experimentally distinguish between the two structural and magnetic configurations.

  1. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  2. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, H.

    2013-05-01

    I describe one-dimensional photonic crystals that support a guided mode suitable for atom trapping within a unit cell, as well as a second probe mode with strong atom-photon interactions. A new hybrid trap is analyzed that combines optical and Casimir-Polder forces to form stable traps for neutral atoms in dielectric nanostructures. By suitable design of the band structure, the atomic spontaneous emission rate into the probe mode can exceed the rate into all other modes by more than tenfold. The unprecedented single-atom reflectivity r0 ~= 0 . 9 for the guided probe field could create new scientific opportunities, including quantum many-body physics for 1 D atom chains with photon-mediated interactions and high-precision studies of vacuum forces. Towards these goals, my colleagues and I are pursuing numerical simulation, device fabrication, and cold-atom experiments with nanoscopic structures. Funding is provided by by the IQIM, an NSF PFC with support of the Moore Foundation, by the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, by the DoD NSSEFF program (HJK), and by NSF Grant PHY0652914 (HJK). DEC acknowledges funding from Fundacio Privada Cellex Barcelona.

  3. High-gradient Magnetic Guide for Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhaskar, R.; Hempel, C.; Traxler, M.; Vaidya, V.; Raithel, G.

    2008-05-01

    The theory of guided Rydberg atoms and one-dimensional systems of Rydberg atoms has attracted immense interest recently in context of spin chains and one dimensional quantum random walks. Here we describe an experimental setup to guide Rydberg atoms in a high-gradient magnetic trap and provide an outlook toward implementing traps for Rydberg atoms with a very large aspect ratio of 1:1000. The magnetic guide consists of a two-dimensional quadrupole field generated by two parallel wires carrying parallel currents, producing a magnetic-field gradient at the guide center of 2.7 kGauss-cm-1. The magnetic guiding of cold, dense beams of ^87Rb atoms is described in [1]. In the guide, the atoms are subjected to a two-step excitation 5S1/2->5P3/2->nD5/2 process, where n is the principal quantum number of the Rydberg state. For detection, the Rydberg atoms are field-ionized, and the ions are imaged onto a spatially resolving Multi-Channel Plate detector. Due to the high density of the guided atomic beam, the density of the Rydberg atoms is expected to be high, leading to state-mixing collisions. These will populate high angular momentum states having a large magnetic moment and long lifetimes. It is expected that a fraction of the atoms will become trapped and magnetically guided. [1] S. E. Olson, R. R. Mhaskar, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. A 73, 033622 (2006).

  4. Carbon chain abundance in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Hudgins, D. M.; Bauschlicher, C. W. Jr; Langhoff, S. R.

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to the mid-IR sensitivities of the ISO and IRTS orbiting spectrometers it is now possible to search the diffuse interstellar medium for heretofore inaccessible molecular emission. In view of the recent strong case for the presence of C(7-) (Kirkwood et al. 1998, Tulej et al. 1998),and the fact that carbon chains possess prominent infrared active modes in a very clean portion of the interstellar spectrum, we have analyzed the IRTS spectrum of the diffuse interstellar medium for the infrared signatures of these species. Theoretical and experimental infrared band frequencies and absolute intensities of many different carbon chain species are presented. These include cyanopolyynes, neutral and anionic linear carbon molecules, and neutral and ionized, even-numbered, hydrogenated carbon chains. We show that--as a family--these species have abundances in the diffuse ISM on the order of 10(-10) with respect to hydrogen, values consistent with their abundances in dense molecular clouds. Assuming an average length of 10 C atoms per C-chain implies that roughly a millionth of the cosmically available carbon is in the form of carbon chains and that carbon chains can account for a few percent of the visible to near-IR diffuse interstellar band (DIB) total equivalent width (not DIB number).

  5. Potential enhancement of antibacterial activity of graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite by introducing C2 carbon chain linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hyosuk; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; Lee, Kyungmi; Jeon, Seungwon; Lee, Chul Won

    2016-01-01

    Various carbon chain linkages were introduced during the process of synthesizing silver-nanoparticles (AgNPs)-decorated graphene nanocomposites [referred to as GO-Cx-Ag where, HS-(CH2)x-SH = Cx and x = 0, 2, or 4] to evaluate antibacterial properties. The nano-structures of GO-Cx-Ag were characterized using TEM and XPS, revealing that GO-C2-Ag comprises well-dispersed and smaller AgNPs anchored onto the surface of graphene sheets than the GO-C0-Ag and GO-C4-Ag. The antibacterial activities of those nanocomposites were assessed using paper-disk diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The results showed that carbon chain linkers enhanced the antibacterial activity against Gram-negative Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. In particular, GO-C2-Ag showed higher antibacterial activity than GO-C0-Ag and GO-C4-Ag due to nearly eight times higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation which determined by fluorescence-based ROS detection experiment. Also, LC-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LC-ICP-MS) demonstrated that the Ag release from GO-Cx-Ag was insignificant (0.03%). However, the higher ROS formation from GO-C2-Ag was facilitated by higher dispersion, smaller size, and well attachment of AgNPs with AgO species onto graphene sheets. These results suggest that the medium length carbon chain linkers in between Ag and GO can be utilized to improve antibacterial activity.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arnhelm, N. ); Levenson, C.H. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) an in-vitro method of amplifying DNA sequences. Beginning with DNA of any origin- bacterial, viral, plant, or animal- PCR can increase the amount of a DNA sequence hundreds of millions to billions of times. The procedure can amplify a targeted sequence even when it makes up less than one part in a million of the total initial sample. PCR is an enzymatic process that is carried out in discrete cycles of amplification, each of which can double the amount of target DNA in the sample. Thus, n cycles can produce 2{sup n} times as much target as was present to begin with. This paper discusses how PCR has had an impact on molecular biology, human genetics, infectious and genetic disease diagnosis, forensic science, and evolutionary biology.

  7. NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrick, Steven; Cordaro, Joseph; Founds, Nanette; Chambellan, Curtis

    2013-08-21

    Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

  8. Atwood's Heavy Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2011-11-01

    While perusing various websites in search of a more challenging lab for my students, I came across a number of ideas where replacing the string in an Atwood's machine with a simple ball chain like the kind found in lamp pulls created an interesting system to investigate. The replacement of the string produced a nice nonuniform acceleration, but one that my AP® students found difficult to analyze given their current math background. As the year progressed, we began to explore the importance of work and its utility in making predictions on systems that did not lend themselves to easy analysis using Newtonian mechanics. The effort made it apparent that the heavy rope Atwood's machine would make a perfect system for investigation using the lessons gained from work and energy.

  9. Crystal structure of an ethylene sorption complex of fully vacuum-dehydrated fully Ag+-exchanged zeolite X (FAU). Silver atoms have reduced ethylene to give CH2 2- carbanions at framework oxide vacancies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mi; Choi, Seo Jung; Kim, Yang; Seff, Karl

    2005-11-03

    The crystal structure of an ethylene sorption complex of fully vacuum-dehydrated fully Ag(+)-exchanged zeolite X (FAU), a = 24.865(2) A, has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques in the cubic space group Fd at 21 degrees C. It is very different from the ethylene complex of Ag(92)-X that had been dehydrated at 400 degrees C in flowing oxygen, as were the two dehydrated structures. The crystal was prepared by ion exchange in a flowing stream of aqueous 0.05 M AgNO(3) for 3 days, followed by dehydration at 400 degrees C and 2 x 10(-6) Torr for 2 days, followed by exposure to 300 Torr of zeolitically dry ethylene gas for 2 h at 21 degrees C. The structure was determined in this atmosphere and was refined using all data to the final error indices (based upon the 534 reflections for which F(o) > 4sigma(F(o))) R(1) = 0.062 and wR(2) = 0.135. In this structure, per unit cell, 14 Ag(+) ions were found at the octahedral site I (Ag-O = 2.611(9) A), and 32 partially reduced Ag(+) ions fill two different site I' positions deep in the sodalite cavities (Ag-O = 2.601(13) and 2.618(12) A). The sodalite cavities host two different cationic silver clusters. In about 47% of sodalite units, eight silver atoms form interpenetrating tetrahedra, Ag(8)(n+) (n = 4 is suggested), with T(d)() symmetry. The other 53% of the sodalite units host cyclo-Ag(4)(m+) (m = 2 is suggested) cations with near S(4) symmetry. These clusters are very similar to those in vacuum-dehydrated Ag(92)-X. Thirty-two Ag(+) ions fill the single 6-rings, 15 at site II' (Ag-O = 2.492(10) A), and 17 at site II (Ag-O = 2.460(9) A). The latter 17 lie in supercages where each forms a lateral pi-complex with an ethylene molecule. In turn, each C(2)H(4) molecule forms two cis electrostatic hydrogen bonds to framework oxygens. The remaining 14 Ag+ ions occupy three different II' sites. Vacuum dehydration had caused substantial decomposition: per unit cell, 30 of the 92 Ag(+) ions were reduced and 15

  10. The CHAIN program: forging evolutionary links to underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Neuwald, Andrew F

    2007-11-01

    Proteins evolve new functions by modifying and extending the molecular machinery of an ancestral protein. Such changes show up as divergent sequence patterns, which are conserved in descendent proteins that maintain the divergent function. After multiply-aligning a set of input sequences, the CHAIN program partitions the sequences into two functionally divergent groups and then outputs an alignment that is annotated to reveal the selective pressures imposed on divergent residue positions. If atomic coordinates are also provided, hydrogen bonds and other atomic interactions associated with various categories of divergent residues are graphically displayed. Such analyses establish links between protein evolutionary divergence and functionally crucial atomic features and, as a result, can suggest plausible molecular mechanisms for experimental testing. This is illustrated here by its application to bacterial clamp-loader ATPases.

  11. Food chains in freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Sabo, John L; Finlay, Jacques C; Post, David M

    2009-04-01

    There are three hypothesized controls on food-chain length (FCL): energy supply (or "resource availability"), ecosystem size and disturbance (or "environmental variation"). In this article, the evidence for controls on FCL in freshwater ecosystems is evaluated. First, the various ways FCL can be measured are defined. Food-chain length typically is estimated as (1) connectance-based FCL--an average connectance between basal resources and top consumers, (2) functional FCL--by experimental determination of functionally significant effects of a top predator on lower trophic-level biomass patterns, and (3) realized FCL--an average connectance measure weighted by energy flow between basal consumers and the consumer occupying the maximum trophic position in the food web. Second, all evidence for relationships between the three hypothetical controls and FCL in freshwater ecosystems are evaluated. The review includes studies from streams, lakes, ponds, wetlands, phytotelmata, and experimental containers. Surprisingly, few studies of FCL in freshwaters that test the same suite of controls using the same methods are found. Equally compelling results arise from case studies based on functional, realized, and connectance-based measures of FCL. Third, 10 rules of thumb that could increase similarity of future studies, thereby facilitating synthesis across systems, are suggested. Fourth, it is discussed how FCL influences the concentration of contaminants in large-bodied animals (many of which are consumed by humans) as well as the efficacy of biocontrol applications in agriculture. Finally, there is a discussion of the potential relationships between global climate change, hydrology, and FCL in freshwaters.

  12. Equilibrium distribution of the wave energy in a carbyne chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovriguine, D. A.; Nikitenkova, S. P.

    2016-03-01

    The steady-state energy distribution of thermal vibrations at a given ambient temperature has been investigated based on a simple mathematical model that takes into account central and noncentral interactions between carbon atoms in a one-dimensional carbyne chain. The investigation has been performed using standard asymptotic methods of nonlinear dynamics in terms of the classical mechanics. In the first-order nonlinear approximation, there have been revealed resonant wave triads that are formed at a typical nonlinearity of the system under phase matching conditions. Each resonant triad consists of one longitudinal and two transverse vibration modes. In the general case, the chain is characterized by a superposition of similar resonant triplets of different spectral scales. It has been found that the energy equipartition of nonlinear stationary waves in the carbyne chain at a given temperature completely obeys the standard Rayleigh-Jeans law due to the proportional amplitude dispersion. The possibility of spontaneous formation of three-frequency envelope solitons in carbyne has been demonstrated. Heat in the form of such solitons can propagate in a chain of carbon atoms without diffusion, like localized waves.

  13. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  14. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  15. Chain Transfer of Vegetable Oil Macromonomers in Acrylic Solution Copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Micah; Messman, Jamie M; Rawlins, James

    2011-01-01

    Use of vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) as comonomers in emulsion polymerization enables good film coalescence without the addition of solvents that constitute volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOMMs are derived from renewable resources and offer the potential of post-application crosslinking via auto-oxidation. However, chain transfer reactions of VOMMs with initiator and/or polymer radicals during emulsion polymerization reduce the amount of allylic hydrogen atoms available for primary auto-oxidation during drying. Vegetable oils and derivatives were reacted in combination with butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate via solution polymerization. The copolymerization was monitored using in situ infrared spectroscopy to determine the extent of chain transfer. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the loci of chain transfer and the molecular weight characteristics of the polymers were characterized by SEC. Solution polymerization was utilized to minimize temperature fluctuations and maintain polymer solubility during the initial characterization.

  16. Fluctuations in a Spin Chain and the Entanglement Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ari; Demler, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    How are quantum fluctuations and thermal fluctuations different in many-body systems? I will compare the variance of the fluctuations of spin in a segment of a spin chain in the ground state and at a finite temperature, showing that fluctuations in the ground state are much more correlated than in the thermal state. The full distribution function of spin can also be determined, and is non-Gaussian. These effects could possibly be measured in a chain of sodium atoms in an optical lattice. The method involves mapping the system to an imaginary thermal system called the ``entanglement Hamiltonian.'' Measuring the ground state fluctuations of the spin chain gives an indirect way of measuring the entanglement Hamiltonian.

  17. Trapping and moving metal atoms with a six-leg molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Leo; Rieder, Karl-Heinz; Moresco, Francesca; Stojkovic, Sladjana M.; Gourdon, André; Joachim, Christian

    2005-12-01

    Putting to work a molecule able to collect and carry adatoms in a controlled way on a surface is a solution for fabricating atomic structures atom by atom. Investigations have shown that the interaction of an organic molecule with the surface of a metal can induce surface reconstruction down to the atomic scale. In this way, well-defined nanostructures such as chains of adatoms, atomic trenches and metal-ligand compounds have been formed. Moreover, the progress in manipulation techniques induced by a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) has opened up the possibility of studying artificially built molecular-metal atomic scale structures, and allowed the atom-by-atom doping of a single C60 molecule by picking up K atoms. The present work goes a step further and combines STM manipulation techniques with the ability of a molecule to assemble an atomic nanostructure. We present a well-designed six-leg single hexa-t-butyl-hexaphenylbenzene (HB-HPB) molecule, which collects and carries up to six copper adatoms on a Cu(111) surface when manipulated with a STM tip. The `HB-HPB-Cu atoms' complex can be further manipulated, bringing its Cu freight to a predetermined position on the surface where the metal atoms can finally be released.

  18. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  20. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.