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Sample records for atomic beam source

  1. Atomic oxygen beam source for erosion simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    A device for production of low-energy (5-10 eV) neutral atomic beams for surface modification studies, which recreates the flux of atomic oxygen in LEO, is described. The beam is produced by acceleration of plasma ions onto a negatively biased plate of high-Z metal; the ions are neutralized and reflected by the surface, retaining a large fraction of their incident kinetic energy, forming a beam of atoms. The device is based on a magnetically confined (3-4 kG) coaxial plasma source and the atom energy can be varied by adjusting the bias voltage. The source provides a neutral flux of roughly 5 x 10 to the 16th/sq cm/s at a distance of 10 cm and a fluence of roughly 10 to the 21st/sq cm in five hours. The source has been characterized with plasma diagnostics and by measuring the energy of an atomic argon beam using a mass spectrometer. Samples of carbon film, carbon-based paint, Kapton, Mylar, and Teflon exposed to atomic O beams show erosion quite similar to those observed in orbit on the Space Shuttle.

  2. Atomic oxygen beam source for erosion simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.; Vaughn, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    A device for the production of low energy (3 to 10 eV) neutral atomic beams for surface modification studies is described that reproduces the flux of atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit. The beam is produced by the acceleration of plasma ions onto a negatively biased plate of high-Z metal; the ions are neutralized and reflected by the surface, retaining some fraction of their incident kinetic energy, forming a beam of atoms. The plasma is generated by a coaxial RF exciter which produces a magnetically-confined (4 kG) plasma column. At the end of the column, ions fall through the sheath to the plate, whose bias relative to the plasma can be varied to adjust the beam energy. The source provides a neutral flux approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp 16)/sq cm at a distance of 9 cm and a fluence approximately equal to 10(exp 20)/sq cm in five hours. The composition and energy of inert gas beams was diagnosed using a mass spectometer/energy analyzer. The energy spectra of the beams demonstrate energies in the range 5 to 15 eV, and qualitatively show expected dependences upon incident and reflecting atom species and potential drop. Samples of carbon film, carbon-based paint, Kapton, mylar, and teflon exposed to atomic O beams show erosion quite similar to that observed in orbit on the space shuttle.

  3. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, A.; Steffens, E.; Stancari, M.

    2009-08-04

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC)[2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  4. Method for producing uranium atomic beam source

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.

    1976-06-15

    A method for producing a beam of neutral uranium atoms is obtained by vaporizing uranium from a compound UM.sub.x heated to produce U vapor from an M boat or from some other suitable refractory container such as a tungsten boat, where M is a metal whose vapor pressure is negligible compared to that of uranium at the vaporization temperature. The compound, for example, may be the uranium-rhenium compound, URe.sub.2. An evaporation rate in excess of about 10 times that of conventional uranium beam sources is produced.

  5. The HERMES Polarized Atomic Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, A.

    2003-07-30

    The atomic beam source (ABS) provides nuclear polarized hydrogen or deuterium atoms for the HERMES target at flow rates of about 6.5 {center_dot} 1016H-vector/s (hydrogen in two hyperfine substates) and 6.0 {center_dot} 1016D-vector/s (deuterium in three hyperfine substates). The degree of dissociation of 93% for H (95% for D) at the entrance of the storage cell and the nuclear polarization of around 0.97 (H) and 0.92 (D) have been found to be constant within a a couple of percent over the whole running period of the HERMES experiment. A new dissociator (MWD) based on a microwave discharge at 2.45 GHz has been developed and installed into the HERMES-ABS in 2000. Since the velocity distribution of the MWD differs from that of the RFD the intensity could be increased further with a modified sextupole magnet system. For this purpose the way for a new start generator for sextupole tracking calculations was opened. Monte-Carlo simulations were successfully used to describe the gas expansion between nozzle, skimmer and collimator. A new type of beam monitor was used to study the beam formation after the nozzle.

  6. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  7. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  8. A concentrated radioactive beam source for atom cooling and trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Maddi, J.; Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a novel oven to obtain concentrated beams of radioactive atoms. The Orthotropic oven works by ionizing atoms on its interior walls and electrostatically concentrating them on a neutralizer. Once neutralized the atoms can escape from the oven and form a narrow beam. Atoms that fail to escape become ionized again and repeat the cycle. The authors demonstrate the operation of this oven using {sup 221}Fr and compare both the theoretical and experimental efficiency of this source with standard effusive and channeled ovens.

  9. Development of a Supersonic Atomic Oxygen Nozzle Beam Source for Crossed Beam Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Buss, R. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    A high pressure, supersonic, radio frequency discharge nozzle beam source was developed for the production of intense beams of ground state oxygen atoms. An efficient impedance matching scheme was devised for coupling the radio frequency power to the plasma as a function of both gas pressure and composition. Techniques for localizing the discharge directly behind the orifice of a water-cooled quartz nozzle were also developed. The above combine to yield an atomic oxygen beam source which produces high molecular dissociation in oxygen seeded rare gas mixtures at total pressures up to 200 torr: 80 to 90% dissociation for oxygen/argon mixtures and 60 to 70% for oxygen/helium mixtures. Atomic oxygen intensities are found to be greater than 10{sup 17} atom sr{sup -1} sec{sup -1}. A brief discussion of the reaction dynamics of 0 + IC1 ..-->.. I0 + C1 is also presented.

  10. Hypervelocity supersonic nozzle beam source of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A.; Unkel, W.; Silver, J.; Kolb, C.

    1984-01-01

    A hypervelocity source of atomic oxygen was developed. Dissociation of molecular oxygen is accomplished by injection into a flow of helium and/or argon which has been heated in a commercial plasma torch. Atomic velocities of up to 4 kms(-1) were produced; recent improvements offer the possibility of even higher velocities. This source was utilized in studies of translational-to-vibrational energy transfer in carbon dioxide and in an investigation of the shuttle glow effect.

  11. Atomic hydrogen beam source: a convenient, extended cavity, microwave discharge design.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E J; Brophy, J H

    1979-05-01

    An extended cavity design of a microwave discharge source for production of intense beams of atomic, radical, and metastable species in vacuo is described. The extended cavity enables the discharge to be run at the beam source nozzle while the power connection and tuning elements remain conveniently outside the apparatus. This design minimizes wall recombination losses to produce intense atomic hydrogen beams with considerably less engineering than previous discharge sources.

  12. High-intensity pulsed source of polarized protons with an atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Esin, S.K.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.E.; Stepanov, A.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1985-10-25

    A source of polarized protons with a beam current up to 2.5 mA in the pulse, a degree of polarization 0.78 +- 0.01, a current pulse length of 120 ..mu..s, and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz is described. This is the first source of polarized protons which makes use of the charge exchange of polarized hydrogen atoms with ions of a deuterium plasma.

  13. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future. PMID:27239245

  14. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review, we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future.

  15. A modification of the laser detonation-type hyperthermal oxygen atom beam source for a long-term operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Yatani, Hideaki; Ohmae, Nobuo

    2008-07-15

    It has been an impedimental problem, for the laser detonation-type atom beam generator, that a poppet in the pulsed supersonic valve is rapidly eroded by the irradiation of powerful laser light and high temperature plasma. In order to operate the atom beam source for a long duration, a modification was made to hide the poppet from direct irradiation of laser and plasma. The alteration of device configuration resulted in great improvement in endurance of poppet more than 300 000 repetitions. Morphology of a polyimide film exposed to approximately 200 000 pulses of hyperthermal oxygen atom beam showed a shaglike carpet structure, which is a characteristic to that exposed to energetic oxygen atoms. A flux of the oxygen atom beam was estimated to be 5x10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2}/pulse at a location of 30 cm away from the nozzle throat.

  16. New source of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-02-01

    The scenario of "electron-capture and -loss" was recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with MeV kinetic energies. However, it does not explain why the formation of negative ions in a liquid spray is much more efficient than with an isolated atom. The role of atomic excited states in the charge-exchange processes is considered, and it is shown that it cannot account for the observed phenomena. The processes are more complex than the single electron-capture and -loss approach. It is suggested that the shell effects in the electronic structure of the projectile ion and/or target atoms may influence the capture/loss probabilities.

  17. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmogorov, A. Stupishin, N.; Atoian, G.; Ritter, J.; Zelenski, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The RHIC polarized H{sup −} ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H{sub 2} gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce “geometrical” beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  18. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade.

    PubMed

    Kolmogorov, A; Atoian, G; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Ritter, J; Stupishin, N; Zelenski, A

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H(-) ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ∼0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  19. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, A.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ritter, J.; Stupishin, N.; Zelenski, A.

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H- ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ˜0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  20. An orthotropic source of thermal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1995-07-01

    A source of thermal atoms that emits 100% of its atoms into a narrow beam with small angular divergence is described. It uses both surface ionization and surface neutralization in conjunction with electric fields to selectively emit a highly directional (orthotropic) beam of neutral atoms. The ion recycling process can be modulated electronically and lends itself to scanning. This orthotropic source is ideal for the efficient use of rare atomic species, well suited for atomic clocks, essential in the efficient delivery of radioactive atoms to optical traps, and has potential to produce ultra high intensity beams of stable atoms.

  1. Atomic laser-beam finder.

    PubMed

    Viering, Kirsten; Medellin, David; Mo, Jianyong; Raizen, Mark G

    2012-11-01

    We report on an experimental method to align a laser beam to a cloud of atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We show how balanced lock-in detection leads to a very sensitive method to align the laser beam to the atoms in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. This provides a very reliable and fast way of aligning laser beams to atoms trapped in a MOT.

  2. Hydrogen as an atomic beam standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    After a preliminary discussion of feasibility, new experimental work with a hydrogen beam is described. A space focused magnetic resonance technique with separated oscillatory fields is used with a monochromatic beam of cold hydrogen atoms which are selected from a higher temperature source. The first resonance curves and other experimental results are presented. These results are interpreted from the point of view of accuracy potential and frequency stability, and are compared with hydrogen maser and cesium beam capabilities.

  3. An orthotropic source of thermal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1995-06-01

    A highly efficient source that produces a narrow beam of neutral atoms at thermal velocity with small angular divergence is described. It uses a high work function interior surface to evaporate alkali atoms as ions and a low work function neutralizer, biased to collect the ions and evaporated them as neutral atoms. The neutralizer is located opposite an exit aperture so that the beam characteristics are determined by the geometry of the neutralizer and aperture. The orthotropic source is especially well suited for atomic clocks and for efficient loading of short lived radioactive alkali atoms into an optical trap.

  4. A continuous cold atomic beam interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hongbo; Feng, Yanying Yan, Xueshu; Jiang, Zhikun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2015-03-07

    We demonstrate an atom interferometer that uses a laser-cooled continuous beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms having velocities of 10–20 m/s. With spatially separated Raman beams to coherently manipulate the atomic wave packets, Mach–Zehnder interference fringes are observed at an interference distance of 2L = 19 mm. The apparatus operates within a small enclosed area of 0.07 mm{sup 2} at a bandwidth of 190 Hz with a deduced sensitivity of 7.8×10{sup −5} rad/s/√(Hz) for rotations. Using a low-velocity continuous atomic source in an atom interferometer enables high sampling rates and bandwidths without sacrificing sensitivity and compactness, which are important for applications in real dynamic environments.

  5. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  6. Three-beam atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderthür, H.; Pautz, A.; Rieger, V.; Ruschewitz, F.; Peng, J. L.; Sengstock, K.; Ertmer, W.

    1997-09-01

    We present an atom interferometer based on the interference of three partial matter waves in three different internal and external states. Coherent laser excitation acts as a beamsplitter to create a superposition state of the ground state and two Zeeman sublevels of the metastable state of magnesium atoms. The interference pattern of the output ports shows high contrast and the characteristics of three-beam interferences as known from optical interferometry. In comparison to two-beam interferometry a reduction of the fringe width of (32+/-8)% is observed. This offers various possibilities for improved measurements of quantum-mechanical phases due to the internal atomic-state sensitive coupling of external potentials. This is demonstrated for the interaction of magnesium atoms with an external magnetic field.

  7. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C4+ beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C4+ was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C4+ beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10-7 mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C4+ beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed.

  8. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C(4+) beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C(4+) was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C(4+) beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10(-7) mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C(4+) beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed. PMID:24593482

  9. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  10. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  11. Femtosecond Beam Sources and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2004-12-01

    Short particle beam science has been promoted by electron linac and radiation chemistry up to picoseconds. Recently, table-top TW laser enables several kinds of short particle beams and pump-and-probe analyses. 4th generation SR sources aim to generation and application of about 100 fs X-ray. Thus, femtosecond beam science has become one of the important field in advanced accelerator concepts. By using electron linac with photoinjector, about 200 fs single bunch and 3 fs multi-bunches are available. Tens femtoseconds monoenergetic electron bunch is expected by laser plasma cathode. Concerning the electron bunch diagnosis, we have seen remarkable progress in streak camera, coherent radiation spectroscopy, fluctuation method and E/O crystal method. Picosecond time-resolved pump-and-probe analysis by synchronizing electron linac and laser is now possible, but the timing jitter and drift due to several fluctuations in electronic devices and environment are still in picoseconds. On the other hand, the synchronization between laser and secondary beam is done passively by an optical beam-splitter in the system based on one TW laser. Therefore, the timing jitter and drift do not intrinsically exist there. The author believes that the femtosecond time-resolved pump-and-probe analysis must be initiated by the laser plasma beam sources. As to the applications, picosecond time-resolved system by electron photoinjector/linac and femtosecond laser are operating in more than 5 facilities for radiation chemistry in the world. Ti:Sapphire-laser-based repetitive pump-and-probe analysis started by time-resolved X-ray diffraction to visualize the atomic motion. Nd:Glass-laser-based single-shot analysis was performed to visualize the laser ablation via the single-shot ion imaging. The author expects that protein dynamics and ultrafast nuclear physics would be the next interesting targets. Monograph titled "Femtosecond Beam Science" is published by Imperial College Press

  12. Slow metastable atomic hydrogen beam by optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, K. C.

    1982-05-01

    A beam source of atomic hydrogen is described which produces metastable atoms in the 2S1/2 state by optical pumping. A beam flux of 1016 atoms/s is generated in the ground state. The atoms in the beam pass in front of a lamp producing Lyman-β (1026 Å) radiation, where some of them are excited to the 3P level and cascade with a branching ratio of 12% to the 2S1/2 state. The number of metastable atoms produced is measured by quenching them with an electric field and detecting the emitted Lyman-α (1216 Å) radiation. Beams of 106 metastable atoms/s were obtained. Using the Bethe-Lamb theory for the quenching process, a metastable beam effective temperature of 100 K was measured.

  13. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  14. Atom beams split by gentle persuasion

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1994-02-25

    Two different research teams have taken a big step toward atom interferometry. They have succeeded in splitting atomic beams by using atoms in spin states that neither absorb nor reemit laser light. By proper adjustment of experimental conditions, atoms are changed from one spin state to another, without passing through the intermediary excited state. The atoms in essence absorb momentum from the laser photons, without absorption or emission of photons. The change in momentum deflects atoms in the proper spin state.

  15. Molecular beam studies of oxygen atom reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoltner, A.-M.

    1989-10-01

    The dynamics of several elementary reactions relevant to combustion was investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state oxygen atoms with small unsaturated hydrocarbons was studied using a crossed molecular beam apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The infrared and ultraviolet photodissociation of anisole was studied using a rotating beam source/fixed detector apparatus. 253 refs., 64 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  17. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  18. Pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    A pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen was designed, built, and successfully demonstrated. Molecular oxygen at several atmospheres pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. An 18 J pulsed CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10(9) W/sq cm in the nozzle throat to generate a laser-induced breakdown. The resulting plasma is heated in excess of 20,000 K by a laser supported detonation wave, and then rapidly expands and cools. Nozzle geometry confines the expansion to provide rapid electron-ion recombination into atomic oxygen. Average O atom beam velocities from 5 to 13 km/s were measured at estimated fluxes to 10(18) atoms per pulse. Preliminary materials testing has produced the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as obtained on the STS-8 mission. Scanning electron microscope examinations of irradiated polymer surfaces reveal an erosion morphology similar to that obtained in low Earth orbit, with an estimated mass removal rate of approx. 10(-24) cu cm/atom. The characteristics of the O atom source and the results of some preliminary materials testing studies are reviewed.

  19. Atom interferometry with polarizing beam splitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderthür, H.; Pautz, A.; Ruschewitz, F.; Sengstock, K.; Ertmer, W.

    1998-06-01

    A special kind of atomic beam splitter using a four-level atomic system in combination with polarized light fields is demonstrated. These specific atom optical elements are used to operate an atom interferometer where the beam-splitting mechanism acts selectively on specific paths only and therefore allows for several different interferometer geometries. Based on a Ramsey-Bordé configuration, the experimental data show considerably better accuracy and a contrast enhanced by 65% compared to the two-level interferometer. Our concept appears to be especially interesting in the context of metrological aspects in matter-wave interferometry.

  20. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  1. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  2. High brilliance negative ion and neutral beam source

    DOEpatents

    Compton, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    A high brilliance mass selected (Z-selected) negative ion and neutral beam source having good energy resolution. The source is based upon laser resonance ionization of atoms or molecules in a small gaseous medium followed by charge exchange through an alkali oven. The source is capable of producing microampere beams of an extremely wide variety of negative ions, and milliampere beams when operated in the pulsed mode.

  3. An MCNPX accelerator beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Durkee, Joe W.; Elson, Jay S.; Jason, Andrew; Johns, Russell C.; Waters, Laurie S.

    2009-06-04

    MCNPX is a powerful Monte Carlo code that can be used to conduct sophisticated radiation-transport simulations involving complex physics and geometry. Although MCNPX possesses a wide assortment of standardized modeling tools, there are instances in which a user's needs can eclipse existing code capabilities. Fortunately, although it may not be widely known, MCNPX can accommodate many customization needs. In this article, we demonstrate source-customization capability for a new SOURCE subroutine as part of our development to enable simulations involving accelerator beams for active-interrogation studies. Simulation results for a muon beam are presented to illustrate the new accelerator-source capability.

  4. Laboratory Apparatus Generates Dual-Species Cold Atomic Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Klipstein, William; Kohel, James; Maleki, Lute; Lundblad, Nathan; Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Aveline, Dave; Yu, Nan; Enzer, Daphna

    2004-01-01

    A laser cooling apparatus that generates a cold beam of rubidium and cesium atoms at low pressure has been constructed as one of several intermediate products of a continuing program of research on laser cooling and atomic physics. Laser-cooled atomic beams, which can have temperatures as low as a microkelvin, have been used in diverse applications that include measurements of fundamental constants, atomic clocks that realize the international standard unit of time, atom-wave interferometers, and experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation. The present apparatus is a prototype of one being evaluated for use in a proposed microgravitational experiment called the Quantum Interferometric Test of Equivalence (QuITE). In this experiment, interferometric measurements of cesium and rubidium atoms in free fall would be part of a test of Einstein s equivalence principle. The present apparatus and its anticipated successors may also be useful in other experiments, in both microgravity and normal Earth gravity, in which there are requirements for dual-species atomic beams, low temperatures, and low pressures. The apparatus includes a pyramidal magneto-optical trap in which the illumination is provided by multiple lasers tuned to frequencies characteristic of the two atomic species. The inlet to the apparatus is located in a vacuum chamber that contains rubidium and cesium atoms at a low pressure; the beam leaving through the outlet of the apparatus is used to transfer the atoms to a higher-vacuum (lower-pressure) chamber in which measurements are performed. The pyramidal magneto-optical trap is designed so that the laser cooling forces in one direction are unbalanced, resulting in a continuous cold beam of atoms that leak out of the trap (see figure). The radiant intensity (number of atoms per unit time per unit solid angle) of the apparatus is the greatest of any other source of the same type reported to date. In addition, this is the first such apparatus capable of producing

  5. Random sources for cusped beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-08-01

    We introduce two novel classes of partially coherent sources whose degrees of coherence are described by the rectangular Lorentz-correlated Schell-model (LSM) and rectangular fractional multi-Gaussian-correlated Schell-model (FMGSM) functions. Based on the generalized Collins formula, analytical expressions are derived for the spectral density distributions of these beams propagating through a stigmatic ABCD optical system. It is shown that beams belonging to both classes form the spectral density apex that is much higher and sharper than that generated by the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam with a comparable coherence state. We experimentally generate these beams by using a nematic, transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM) that serves as a random phase screen controlled by a computer. The experimental data is consistent with theoretical predictions. Moreover, it is illustrated that the FMGSM beam generated in our experiments has a better focusing capacity than the GSM beam with the same coherence state. The applications that can potentially benefit from the use of novel beams range from material surface processing, to communications and sensing through random media. PMID:27505746

  6. Development of francium atomic beam for the search of the electron electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-03-01

    For the measurement of the electron electric dipole moment using Fr atoms, a Fr ion-atom conversion is one of the most critical process. An ion-atom converter based on the "orthotropic" type of Fr source has been developed. This converter is able to convert a few keV Fr ion beam to a thermal atomic beam using a cycle of the surface ionization and neutralization. In this article, the development of the converter is reported.

  7. Beam transport of low temperature atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, W. A.

    1993-12-01

    Analytic calculations and particle tracking simulations are presented for a polarized atomic hydrogen beam produced by extraction from an ultra-cold (T=300 mK) helium film coated cell in a large solenoidal magnetic field (12 T). Initial focusing of states 1 and 2 by the solenoidal field and subsequent focusing by a sextupole are examined within the constraints imposed by the requirements of the polarized jet for the experiments NEPTUN and NEPTUN-A at UNK.

  8. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  9. A high flux source of swift oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    A source of swift oxygen atoms is described which has several unique features. A high current ion beam is produced by a microwave discharge, accelerated to 10 keV and the mass selected by a modified Du Pont 21-110 mass spectrometer. The O(+) beam exciting the mass spectrometer is focused into a rectangular shape with an energy spread of less than 1 eV. The next section of the machine decelerates the ion beam into a counterpropagating electron beam in order to minimize space charge effects. After deceleration, the ion beam intersects at 90 deg, a neutral oxygen atom beam, which via resonant charge exchange produces a mixture of O(+) and O. Any remaining O(+) are swept out of the beam by an electric field and differentially pumped away while the desired O beam, collimated by slits, impinges on the target. In situ monitoring of the target surface is done by X-ray photoelectron or Auger spectroscopy. Faraday cups provide flux measurements in the ion sections while the neutral flux is determined by a special torsion balance or by a quadrupole mass spectrometer specially adapted for swift atoms. While the vacuum from the source through the mass spectrometer is maintained by diffusion pumps, the rest of the machine is UHV.

  10. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgeland, H.; Kole, P. R.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.; Jardine, A. P.

    2009-07-15

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5x10{sup 19} atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed.

  11. Atomic Structure and Fundamental Symmetry Measurements in a Thallium Atomic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, P. K.; Nicholas, P. C.

    1998-05-01

    We have completed construction and testing of a new high-flux thallium atomic beam apparatus. Using a multiple slit oven source we achieve a favorable combination of throughput and modest Doppler narrowing. An in-vacuum chopper wheel provides ≈ 100 Hz modulation of the atomic beam and allows lock-in detection in the case of weak atomic beam absorption. Electric field plates allow precise application of ± 30 kV/cm fields in the interaction region. We will describe ongoing atomic beam spectroscopy of the 378 nm E1 transition, and a planned measurement of the Stark-induced amplitudes within the thallium 6P_1/2 - 6P_3/2 1283 nm M1 transition. We will also present the details of a new experimental proposal to search for time reversal-violating (T-odd, P-even) forces in thallium. In this new scheme, the 1283 nm M1 laser, tuned near the F=0arrowF'=1 transition, would be directed into high-finesse cavity which incorporates the atomic beam. In the presence of a longitudinal static electric field, E, a `TOPE' signature is revealed here by a cavity phase shift proportional to (hatk\\cdotE). We would search for a differential phase shift of counterpropagating (± hatk) laser beams correlated to electric field reversal. The cavity finesse both amplifies any TOPE effect and increases the precision with which it can be detected, while the differencing technique greatly reduces sensitivity to laser frequency or mechanical fluctuations.

  12. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Magee, E. W.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-11-01

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  13. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  14. Ion mobility studies of electronically excited States of atomic transition metal cations: development of an ion mobility source for guided ion beam experiments.

    PubMed

    Iceman, Christopher; Rue, Chad; Moision, Robert M; Chatterjee, Barun K; Armentrout, P B

    2007-07-01

    The design of an ion mobility source developed to couple to a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer is presented. In these exploratory studies, metal ions are created continuously by electron ionization of the volatile hexacarbonyls of the three group 6 transition metals. These ions are focused into a linear hexapole ion trap, which collects the ions and then creates high intensity pulses of ions, avoiding excessive ion losses resulting from the low duty cycle of pulsed operation. The ion pulses are injected into a six-ring drift cell filled with helium where ions having different electronic configurations can separate because they have different ion mobilities. Such separation is observed for chromium ions and compares favorably with the pioneering work of Kemper and Bowers (J. Phys. Chem.1991, 95, 5134). The results are then extended to Mo(+) and W(+), which also show efficient configuration separation. The source conditions needed for high intensities and good configuration separation are discussed in detail and suggestions for further improvements are also provided.

  15. Production of high brightness H- beam by charge exchange of hydrogen atom beam in sodium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V.; Zelenski, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

    2010-11-16

    Production of H{sup -} beam for accelerators applications by charge exchange of high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in joint BNL-BINP experiment. In the experiment, a hydrogen-neutral beam with 3-6 keV energy, equivalent current up to 5 A and 200 microsecond pulse duration is used. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. Formation of the proton beam is performed in an ion source by four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system. To achieve small beam emittance, the apertures in the ion-optical system have small enough size, and the extraction of ions is carried out from the surface of plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of {approx}0.2 eV formed as a result of plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. Developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, the sodium jet target with recirculation and aperture diameter of 2 cm is used in the experiment. At the first stage of the experiment H{sup -} beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}0.15 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained. To increase H{sup -} beam current ballistically focused hydrogen neutral beam will be applied. The effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach.

  16. Note: Design principles of a linear array multi-channel effusive metal-vapor atom source

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, B.; Majumder, A.; Thakur, K. B.; Das, A. K.

    2013-10-15

    Atomic beams can easily be produced by allowing atoms to effuse through a channel. In an earlier investigation [A. Majumder et al., Vacuum 83, 989 (2009)], we had designed, fabricated, and characterized an effusive metal-vapor source using collinear-array of multi-channel. In this note, we describe the theoretical basis of designing the source. Atom density in atomic beam has been estimated using a set of analytical expressions for long-channel operated in transparent mode. Parametric studies on aspect ratio of channel, inter-channel separation, beam width, and vertical distance from the source are carried out. They are useful in providing physical picture and optimizing design parameters.

  17. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up - a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture - in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam.

  18. A beam source model for scanned proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  19. A beam source model for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  20. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Del Corro, Pablo G.; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A.; Lally, Richard W.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A document containing further information about device characterization

  1. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  2. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold (23)Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  3. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    PubMed Central

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  4. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-21

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold (23)Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  5. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  6. Variable energy, high flux, ground-state atomic oxygen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A variable energy, high flux atomic oxygen source is described which is comprised of a means for producing a high density beam of molecules which will emit O(-) ions when bombarded with electrons; a means of producing a high current stream of electrons at a low energy level passing through the high density beam of molecules to produce a combined stream of electrons and O(-) ions; means for accelerating the combined stream to a desired energy level; means for producing an intense magnetic field to confine the electrons and O(-) ions; means for directing a multiple pass laser beam through the combined stream to strip off the excess electrons from a plurality of the O(-) ions to produce ground-state O atoms within the combined stream; electrostatic deflection means for deflecting the path of the O(-) ions and the electrons in the combined stream; and, means for stopping the O(-) ions and the electrons and for allowing only the ground-state O atoms to continue as the source of the atoms of interest. The method and apparatus are also adaptable for producing other ground-state atoms and/or molecules.

  7. Versatile atomic force microscopy setup combined with micro-focused X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodskyy, T. Tholapi, R.; Liefeith, L.; Hansen, W.; Zozulya, A. V. Fester, M.; Sprung, M.

    2015-06-15

    Micro-focused X-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron sources offer new perspective of studying strains and processes at nanoscale. Atomic force microscope setup combined with a micro-focused synchrotron beam allows precise positioning and nanomanipulation of nanostructures under illumination. In this paper, we report on integration of a portable commercial atomic force microscope setup into a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline. Details of design, sample alignment procedure, and performance of the setup are presented.

  8. Characteristics of low energy atom and molecule beams generated by the charge exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Takashima, Seigo; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Yamakawa, Koji; Den, Shoji

    2008-03-01

    A low energy NB source, which consisted of a surface wave plasma (SWP) source and two large diameter carbon electrodes, was developed for damageless etching of ultralarge-scale integrated devices. Ion beams were extracted from the SWP using two carbon electrodes, accelerated and injected to the process chamber, and then neutralized without energy loss by a charge exchange reaction. The energy distribution functions of an Ar ion beam and an Ar atom beam was observed using a quadrupole mass spectroscope equipped with an energy analyzer. The energy of the Ar ion beam and the Ar atom beam was controlled by the acceleration voltage. N{sub 2} ion and N ion beams were also extracted from a nitrogen plasma source. The intensity ratio of the N ion beam to the N{sub 2} ion beam was 5:9, indicating that N ions were efficiently generated in the nitrogen SWP. The N{sub 2} ion and N ion beams were changed to N{sub 2} molecule and N atom beams, respectively, through a charge exchange reaction without energy loss. The energy of these beams was controlled by the acceleration voltage and was in the region less of than 100 eV. When the acceleration voltage is higher than 40 V, not only the primary peaks due to the N{sub 2} ion beam or N ion beam were observed but also a low energy second peak was observed in the energy distribution. The energy of the low energy second peak was controlled by the acceleration voltage. It was concluded that the low energy second peak corresponds to the N{sub 2} molecule ion beam and the N ion beam, which is extracted from the second plasma generated in the space between the two carbon electrodes.

  9. Novel cryogenic sources for liquid droplet and solid filament beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Michael P.

    Two novel atomic and molecular beam sources have been created and tested consisting first of a superfluid helium liquid jet, and secondly a solid filament of argon. The superfluid helium apparatus is the second of its kind in the world and uses a modified liquid helium cryostat to inject a cylindrical stream of superfluid helium into vacuum through glass capillary nozzles with diameters on the order of one micron created on-site at Arizona State University. The superfluid beam is an entirely new way to study superfluid behavior, and has many new applications such as superfluid beam-surface scattering, beam-beam scattering, and boundary-free study of superfluidity. The solid beam of argon is another novel beam source created by flowing argon gas through a capillary 50 microns in diameter which is clamped by a small copper plate to a copper block kept at liquid nitrogen temperature. The gas subsequently cools and solidifies plugging the capillary. Upon heating, the solid plug melts and liquid argon exits the capillary and immediately freezes by evaporative cooling. The solid filaments may find application as wall-less cryogenic matrices, or targets for laser plasma sources of extreme UV and soft x-ray sources.

  10. Discrimination of ionic species from broad-beam ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a broad-beam, three-grid, ion extraction system incorporating radio frequency (RF) mass discrimination was investigated experimentally. This testing demonstrated that the system, based on a modified single-stage Bennett mass spectrometer, can discriminate between ionic species having about a 2-to-1 mass ratio while producing a broad-beam of ions with low kinetic energy (less than 15 eV). Testing was conducted using either argon and krypton ions or atomic and diatomic oxygen ions. A simple one-dimensional model, which ignores magnetic field and space-charge effects, was developed to predict the species separation capabilities as well as the kinetic energies of the extracted ions. The experimental results correlated well with the model predictions. This RF mass discrimination system can be used in applications where both atomic and diatomic ions are produced, but a beam of only one of the species is desired. An example of such an application is a 5 eV atomic oxygen source. This source would produce a beam of atomic oxygen with 5 eV kinetic energy, which would be directed onto a material specimen, to simulate the interaction between the surface of a satellite and the rarefied atmosphere encountered in low-Earth orbit.

  11. Emerging Beam Resonances in Atom Diffraction from a Reflection Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Meijer, Gerard; Schoellkopf, Wieland

    2010-06-18

    We report on the observation of emerging beam resonances, well known as Rayleigh-Wood anomalies and threshold resonances in photon and electron diffraction, respectively, in an atom-optical diffraction experiment. Diffraction of He atom beams reflected from a blazed ruled grating at grazing incidence has been investigated. The total reflectivity of the grating as well as the intensities of the diffracted beams reveal anomalies at the Rayleigh angles of incidence, i.e., when another diffracted beam emerges parallel to the grating surface. The observed anomalies are discussed in terms of the classical wave-optical model of Rayleigh and Fano.

  12. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  13. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  14. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  15. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-09

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  16. Demonstration of a cold atom beam splitter on atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a new scheme to split cold atoms on an atom chip. The atom chip consists of a U-wire and a Z-wire. The cold atom cloud is initially loaded and prepared in the Z-trap, which is split into two separate parts by switching on the current of the U-wire. The two separate atom clouds have a distance more than one millimeter apart from each other and show almost symmetrical profiles, corresponding to about a 50/50 splitting ratio. Project supported by the State Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921504) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91536107).

  17. Demonstration of a cold atom beam splitter on atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a new scheme to split cold atoms on an atom chip. The atom chip consists of a U-wire and a Z-wire. The cold atom cloud is initially loaded and prepared in the Z-trap, which is split into two separate parts by switching on the current of the U-wire. The two separate atom clouds have a distance more than one millimeter apart from each other and show almost symmetrical profiles, corresponding to about a 50/50 splitting ratio. Project supported by the State Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921504) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91536107).

  18. Focused Ion beam source method and Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    1998-08-17

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  19. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  20. Fermilab HINS Proton Ion Source Beam Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, W.M.; Apollinari, G.; Chaurize, S.; Hays, S.; Romanov, G.; Scarpine, V.; Schmidt, C.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The proton ion source for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac front-end at Fermilab has been successfully commissioned. It produces a 50 keV, 3 msec beam pulse with a peak current greater than 20mA at 2.5Hz. The beam is transported to the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) by a low energy beam transport (LEBT) that consists of two focusing solenoids, four steering dipole magnets and a beam current transformer. To understand beam transmission through the RFQ, it is important to characterize the 50 keV beam before connecting the LEBT to the RFQ. A wire scanner and a Faraday cup are temporarily installed at the exit of the LEBT to study the beam parameters. Beam profile measurements are made for different LEBT settings and results are compared to those from computer simulations. In lieu of direct emittance measurements, solenoid variation method based on profile measurements is used to reconstruct the beam emittance.

  1. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2002-01-01

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  2. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  3. A sputtering derived atomic oxygen source for studying fast atom reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrieri, Richard A.; Yung, Y. Chu; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for the generation of fast atomic oxygen was developed. These atoms are created by ion beam sputtering from metal oxide surfaces. Mass resolved ion beams at energies up to 60 KeV are produced for this purpose using a 150 cm isotope separator. Studies have shown that particles sputtered with 40 KeV Ar(+) on Ta2O5 were dominantly neutral and exclusively atomic. The atomic oxygen also resided exclusively in its 3P ground state. The translational energy distribution for these atoms peaked at ca 7 eV (the metal-oxygen bond energy). Additional measurements on V2O5 yielded a bimodal distribution with the lower energy peak at ca 5 eV coinciding reasonably well with the metal-oxygen bond energy. The 7 eV source was used to investigate fast oxygen atom reactions with the 2-butene stereoisomers. Relative excitation functions for H-abstraction and pi-bond reaction were measured with trans-2-butene. The abstraction channel, although of minor relative importance at thermal energy, becomes comparable to the addition channel at 0.9 eV and dominates the high-energy regime. Structural effects on the specific channels were also found to be important at high energy.

  4. Ion sources and targets for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    A high-intensity ISOL-type radioactive beam facility depends critically on the performance of the target/ion source system. We developed a concept for producing high-intensity secondary beams of fission fragments, such as {sup 132}Sn, using a two-part target and ion source combination. The idea involves stopping a 1000-kW beam of 200-MeV deuterons in a target of Be or U to produce a secondary beam of neutrons. Just behind the neutron production target is a second target, typically a porous form of UC, coupled to an ISOL-type ion source. In December 1994, we tested this concept with 200-MeV deuterons at low intensity in an experiment at the NSCL. The yields of characteristic gamma rays were measured and confirmed our predictions.

  5. Coherent control of atomic beam diffraction by standing light waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Bijoy K.

    2003-02-01

    Quantum interference is shown to deliver a means of regulating the diffraction pattern of a thermal atomic beam interacting with two standing-wave electric fields. Parameters have been identified to enhance the diffraction probability of one momentum component over the others, with specific application to Rb atoms.

  6. Transverse laser cooling of a thermal atomic beam of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Leefer, N.; Cingoez, A.; Gerber-Siff, B.; Sharma, Arijit; Torgerson, J. R.; Budker, D.

    2010-04-15

    A thermal atomic beam of dysprosium atoms is cooled using the 4f{sup 10}6s{sup 2}(J=8){yields}4f{sup 10}6s6p(J=9) transition at 421 nm. The cooling is done via a standing light wave orthogonal to the atomic beam. Efficient transverse cooling to the Doppler limit is demonstrated for all observable isotopes of dysprosium. Branching ratios to metastable states are demonstrated to be <5x10{sup -4}. A scheme for enhancement of the nonzero-nuclear-spin-isotope cooling and a method for direct identification of possible trap states are proposed.

  7. Linac Coherent Light Source Electron Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2007-04-27

    This paper describes the design and simulation of the electron beam collimation system in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dark current is expected from the gun and some of the accelerating cavities. Particle tracking of the expected dark current through the entire LCLS linac, from gun through FEL undulator, is used to estimate final particle extent in the undulator as well as expected beam loss at each collimator or aperture restriction. A table of collimators and aperture restrictions is listed along with halo particle loss results, which includes an estimate of average continuous beam power lost. In addition, the transverse wakefield alignment tolerances are calculated for each collimator.

  8. Robust population transfer in atomic beams induced by Doppler shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unanyan, R. G.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of photon momentum recoil on adiabatic population transfer in an atomic three-level lambda system is studied. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shifts, due to atomic motion, can play an important role in adiabatic population transfer processes of atomic internal states by a pair of laser fields. For the limiting case of slow atoms (Doppler shift much smaller than the photon recoil energy), the atoms occupy the same target state regardless of the order of switching of laser fields, while for the case of fast atoms interacting with the intuitive sequence of pulses, the target state is the intermediate atomic state. Furthermore, it is shown that this novel technique for adiabatic population transfer is related to a level crossing in the bright-intermediate state basis (rather than in the original atomic basis). It is shown that these processes are robust with respect to parameter fluctuations, such as the laser pulse area and the relative spatial offset (delay) of the laser beams. The obtained results can be used for the control of temporal evolution of atomic populations in cold atomic beams by externally adjustable Doppler shifts.

  9. Realization of a twin beam source based on four-wave mixing in Cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenier, G.; Calonico, D.; Micalizio, S.; Samantaray, N.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Berchera, I. Ruo

    2016-05-01

    Four-wave mixing (4WM) is a known source of intense non-classical twin beams. It can be generated when an intense laser beam (the pump) and a weak laser beam (the seed) overlap in a χ(3) medium (here Cesium vapor), with frequencies close to resonance with atomic transitions. The twin beams generated by 4WM have frequencies naturally close to atomic transitions, and can be intense (gain ≫1) even in the CW pump regime, which is not the case for PDC χ(2) phenomenon in nonlinear crystals. So, 4WM is well suited for atom-light interaction and atom-based quantum-protocols. Here, we present the first realization of a source of 4-wave mixing exploiting D2 line of Cesium atoms.

  10. Intense proton beam source for ITER neutral-beam spectroscopy diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J. B.

    An intense proton beam has been developed to evaluate a gas-cell neutralizer for use in an intense-neutral beam source for Tokomak Spectroscopy diagnostics. The allowed energy range of the proton stream is determined to be 50 to 70 keV from neutralization and reionization cross-sections and from the alpha particle charge exchange recombination intensity as a function of energy (baseline diagnostic). The neutralization evaluation source uses a flashover anode, magnetized, ion-diode. Neutral probes sensitive to energetic atomic and molecular hydrogen, developed to evaluate neutralizer performance, show neutral fluence from the ion-diode during the beam pulse. An array of Rogowski current probes, used to study the evolution of the current path, suggests that expansion of the anode plasma along the radial insulating magnetic field leads to impedance collapse.

  11. Intense proton beam source for ITER neutral-beam spectroscopy diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1994-09-01

    An intense proton beam has been developed to evaluate a gas-cell neutralizer for use in an intense-neutral beam source for Tokomak Spectroscopy diagnostics. The allowed energy range of the proton stream is determined to be 50 to 70 keV from neutralization and reionization cross-sections and from the alpha particle charge exchange recombination intensity as a function of energy (baseline diagnostic). The neutralization evaluation source uses a flashover anode, magnetized, ion-diode. Neutral probes sensitive to energetic atomic and molecular hydrogen, developed to evaluate neutralizer performance, show neutral fluence from the ion-diode during the beam pulse. An array of Rogowski current probes, used to study the evolution of the current path, suggests that expansion of the anode plasma along the radial insulating magnetic field leads to impedance collapse.

  12. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Jan; Herr, Waldemar; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a challenging endeavor. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of 4× {{10}5} quantum degenerate 87Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of 1× {{10}5} atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based BEC experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. Additionally, the flux is approaching those of current interferometers employing Raman-type velocity selection of laser-cooled atoms. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for transportable high-precision quantum sensors.

  13. CANCELLED Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for anAccelerator-Driven Neut ron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt,B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-02-27

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable of producing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm{sup 2} and with atomic fraction > 90% was designed and tested with an electrostatic low energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source was incorporated into the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source (ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQ accelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gas target. In this design a 40 mA D{sup +} beam is produced from a 6 mm diameter aperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5 electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into the RFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used to create {approx} 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HV breakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize the field in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguide to the plasma is done by an autotuner. They observed significant improvement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride liner inside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared with PBGUNS simulations.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  15. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  16. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1985-12-01

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented.

  17. Neutral beam source commercialization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.J.

    1980-06-01

    The basic tasks of this Phase II project were to: generate a set of design drawings suitable for quantity production of sources of this design; fabricate a functional neutral beam source incorporating as many of the proposed design changes as proved feasible; and document the procedures and findings developed during the contract. These tasks have been accomplished and represent a demonstrated milestone in the industrialization of this complete device.

  18. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  19. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Vane, C Randy; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Mattolat, C.; Lassen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A resonant ionization laser ion source based on all-solid-state, tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers is being developed for the production of pure radioactive ion beams. It consists of a hot-cavity ion source and three pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers operating at a 10 kHz pulse repetition rate. Spectroscopic studies are being conducted to develop ionization schemes that lead to ionizing an excited atom through an auto-ionization or a Rydberg state for numerous elements of interest. Three-photon resonant ionization of 12 elements has been recently demonstrated. The overall efficiency of the laser ion source measured for some of these elements ranges from 1 to 40%. The results indicate that Ti:Sapphire lasers could be well suited for laser ion source applications. The time structures of the ions produced by the pulsed lasers are investigated. The information may help to improve the laser ion source performance.

  20. Hyperthermal molecular beam source using a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a hyperthermal molecular beam source employing a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube for gas-surface interaction studies. Unlike conventional shock-heated beam sources, the capability of repetitive beam generation without the need for replacing a diaphragm makes our beam source suitable for scattering experiments, which require signal accumulation for a large number of beam pulses. The short duration of shock heating alleviates the usual temperature limit due to the nozzle material, enabling the generation of a molecular beam with higher translational energy or that containing dissociated species. The shock-heated beam is substantially free from surface-contaminating impurities that are pronounced in arc-heated beams. We characterize the properties of nitrogen and oxygen molecular beams using the time-of-flight method. When both the timing of beam extraction and the supply quantity of nitrogen gas are appropriately regulated, our beam source can generate a nitrogen molecular beam with translational energy of approximately 1 eV, which corresponds to the typical activation energy of surface reactions. Furthermore, our beam source can generate an oxygen molecular beam containing dissociated oxygen atoms, which can be a useful probe for surface oxidation. The dissociation fraction along with the translational energy can be adjusted through the supply quantity of oxygen gas.

  1. Sensitivity of MSE measurements on the beam atomic level population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Anderson, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of variation in atomic level population of a neutral beam on the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) measurements is investigated in the low density plasmas of HSX stellarator. A 30 KeV, 4 A, 3 ms hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam is injected into HSX plasmas of line averaged electron density ranging from 2 to 4 ṡ 1018 m-3 at a magnetic field of 1 T. For this density range, the excited level population of the hydrogen neutral beam is expected to undergo variations. Doppler shifted and Stark split Hα and Hβ emissions from the beam are simultaneously measured using two cross-calibrated spectrometers. The emission spectrum is simulated and fit to the experimental measurements and the deviation from a statistically populated beam is investigated.

  2. Application of an atomic oxygen beam facility to the investigation of shuttle glow chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, G. S.; Peplinski, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A facility for the investigation of the interactions of energetic atomic oxygen with solids is described. The facility is comprised of a four chambered, differentially pumped molecular beam apparatus which can be equipped with one of a variety of sources of atomic oxygen. The primary source is a dc arc heated supersonic nozzle source which produces a flux of atomic oxygen in excess of 10 to the 15th power sq cm/sec at the target, at a velocity of 3.5 km/sec. Results of applications of this facility to the study of the reactions of atomic oxygen with carbon and polyimide films are briefly reviewed and compared to data obtained on various flights of the space shuttle. A brief discussion of possible application of this facility to investigation of chemical reactions which might contribute to atmosphere induced vehicle glow is presented.

  3. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    Energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams were generated by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin films of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films were carried out by mass spectrometry. The peak flux, found to occur at 10 eV, is estimated from this data to be 3 x 10(20) m(-2) s(-1). Analysis of the time-of-flight data indicates a number of processes contribute to the formation of the atomic oxygen beam. The absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3) 3s(1) (5S) level of atomic oxygen blown off from ITO films is supported by the failure to observe emission at 777.3 nm from the 2p(3) 3p(1) (5P sub J) levels. Reactive scattering experiments with polymer film targets for atomic oxygen bombardment are planned using a universal crossed molecular beam apparatus.

  4. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  5. Atomic trajectories in compact cesium-beam clocks.

    PubMed

    Jaduszliwer, B

    1990-01-01

    The author presents accurate calculations of atomic trajectories in conventional CBTs (cesium-beam tubes) using dispersive two-wire field magnets, and also in a novel configuration using two orthogonal one-dimensional focusing dipoles of the type described P. Kartaschoff (1974). In the first configuration, the author explains the observed differences in atomic velocity distribution in terms of small variations in the oven and/or detector offsets. The second configuration yields beam intensities that are significantly higher than the ones obtained with dispersive magnets and/or substantially lower atomic velocities, and thus could improve the frequency stability of compact cesium clocks in the white-noise regime. The present design differs from Kartaschoff's prescription in that a 1-D focusing dipole, rather than a hexapole or quadrupole magnet, is used as the A magnet in the CBT, making the tube manufacturing simpler.

  6. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  7. Photoionization research on atomic beams. 2: The photoionization cross section of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comes, F. J.; Speier, F.; Elzer, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment to determine the absolute value of the photo-ionization cross section of atomic oxygen is described. The atoms are produced in an electrical discharge in oxygen gas with 1% hydrogen added. In order to prevent recombination a crossed beam technique is employed. The ions formed are detected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The concentration of oxygen atoms in the beam is 57%. The measured photoionization cross section of atomic oxygen is compared with theoretical data. The results show the participation of autoionization processes in ionization. The cross section at the autoionizing levels detected is considerably higher than the absorption due to the unperturbed continuum. Except for wavelengths where autoionization occurs, the measured ionization cross section is in fair agreement with theory. This holds up to 550 A whereas for shorter wavelengths the theoretical values are much higher.

  8. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10{sup {minus}11}-Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2{1/2}-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Cold-atom dynamics in crossed-laser-beam waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Echanobe, J.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of neutral cold atoms in an L-shaped crossed-beam optical waveguide formed by two perpendicular red-detuned lasers of different intensities and a blue-detuned laser at the corner. The motion in one sense is optimized, and the motion in the other sense may be suppressed even if it is energetically allowed. Quantum and classical simulations are performed and give similar results. Complemented with a vibrational cooling process we find a range of parameters for which this setting works as a one-way device or 'atom diode'.

  10. A cost-effective high-flux source of cold ytterbium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Zou, Yueyang; Zhang, Shanchao; Cho, Chang-woo; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2016-10-01

    We report a cost-effective way to prepare high-flux slow ytterbium atoms with extremely low-power 399-nm light suitable for the production of quantum degenerate ytterbium gases. By collimating an atomic beam through an array of micro-capillary tubes, we obtain a bright atomic beam through the Zeeman slower operating at low light power of only 15 mW for the source. We achieve the loading rate of 2 × 107 s-1 into the intercombination magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a sufficient steady-state MOT atom number of 2 × 108 for 174Yb atoms. Our apparatus highlights an efficient method to obtain slow ytterbium atoms using a simple low-power 399-nm laser system.

  11. MULTIPLE ELECTRON BEAM ION PUMP AND SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, R.E.

    1962-02-27

    A vacuum pump is designed which operates by ionizing incoming air and by withdrawing the ions from the system by means of electrical fields. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical housing communicable with the vessel to be evacuated and having a thin wall section in one end. Suitable coils provide a longitudinal magnetic field within the cylinder. A broad cathode and an anode structure is provided to establish a plurality of adjacent electron beams which are parallel to the cylinder axis. Electron reflector means are provided so that each of the beams constitutes a PIG or reflex discharge. Such structure provides a large region in which incoming gas molecules may be ionized by electron bombardment. A charged electrode assembly accelerates the ions through the thin window, thereby removing the gas from the system. The invention may also be utilized as a highly efficient ion source. (AEC)

  12. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C.

    2013-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants.

  13. Focusing Light Beams To Improve Atomic-Vapor Optical Buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2010-01-01

    Specially designed focusing of light beams has been proposed as a means of improving the performances of optical buffers based on cells containing hot atomic vapors (e.g., rubidium vapor). There is also a companion proposal to improve performance by use of incoherent optical pumping under suitable conditions. Regarding the proposal to use focusing: The utility of atomic-vapor optical buffers as optical storage and processing devices has been severely limited by nonuniform spatial distributions of intensity in optical beams, arising from absorption of the beams as they propagate in atomic-vapor cells. Such nonuniformity makes it impossible to optimize the physical conditions throughout a cell, thereby making it impossible to optimize the performance of the cell as an optical buffer. In practical terms simplified for the sake of brevity, "to optimize" as used here means to design the cell so as to maximize the group delay of an optical pulse while keeping the absorption and distortion of the pulse reasonably small. Regarding the proposal to use incoherent optical pumping: For reasons too complex to describe here, residual absorption of light is one of the main impediments to achievement of desirably long group delays in hot atomic vapors. The present proposal is directed toward suppressing residual absorption of light. The idea of improving the performance of slow-light optical buffers by use of incoherent pumping overlaps somewhat with the basic idea of Raman-based slow-light systems. However, prior studies of those systems did not quantitatively answer the question of whether the performance of an atomic vapor or other medium that exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Raman gain is superior to that of a medium that exhibits EIT without Raman gain.

  14. A beam transport system for an intense He(-) beam source.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Kikuchi, M; Nagamura, T; Sugawara, H; Takeuchi, S; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Shinto, K; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Wada, M

    2008-02-01

    We have been developing a test stand for fast He(0) beam production. One of the major issues is how to transport effectively the He(+) and He(-) beams from which the He(0) beam is produced. The beam should be focused in two transverse focal points, the center of the charge exchange cell and the electrostatic accelerator. We studied the beam transport system and effect of space charge neutralization in the test stand by experiments and calculation.

  15. X-ray spectra from the Cornell Electron-Beam Ion Source (CEBIS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Janson, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation emitted from the Cornell electron beam ion source (CEBIS I) has been surveyed with a Si(Li) x-ray detector. These spectra can be used to estimate backgrounds from electron bremsstrahlung and to evaluate the feasibility of atomic physics experiments using the CEBIS I source in this configuration. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  16. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  17. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, David G.

    1993-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  18. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  19. Surface damage correction, and atomic level smoothing of optics by Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, M.; Chau, K.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Svrluga, R.

    2014-10-01

    Surface damage and surface contamination of optics has long been a source of problems for laser, lithography and other industries. Nano-sized surface defects may present significant performance issues in optical materials for deep UV and EUV applications. The effects of nanometer sized surface damage (scratches, pits, and organics) on the surface of optics made of traditional materials and new more exotic materials is a limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, zinc sulfide, BK7 and others presents a unique set of challenges. Exogenesis Corporation, using its proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and contamination and leaves many material surfaces with roughness typically around one angstrom. This process technology has been demonstrated on nonlinear crystals, and various other high-end optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for various materials that have been processed with ANAB. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply normal forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface contaminants, nano-scale scratches, bumps and other asperities under low energy physical sputtering conditions as the removal action proceeds. ANAB may be used to remove a precisely controlled, uniform thickness of material without any increase of surface roughness, regardless of the total amount of material removed. The ANAB process does not

  20. An Atmospheric Atomic Oxygen Source for Cleaning Smoke Damaged Art Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Norris, Mary Jo

    1998-01-01

    Soot and other carbonaceous combustion products deposited on the surfaces of porous ceramic, stone, ivory and paper can be difficult to remove and can have potentially unsatisfactory results using wet chemical and/or abrasive cleaning techniques. An atomic oxygen source which operates in air at atmospheric pressure, using a mixture of oxygen and helium, has been developed to produce an atomic oxygen beam which is highly effective in oxidizing soot deposited on surfaces by burning candles made of paraffin, oil or rendered animal fat. Atomic oxygen source operating conditions and the results of cleaning soot from paper, gesso, ivory, limestone and water color-painted limestone are presented,

  1. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  2. Performance predictions of a focused ion beam from a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Haaf, G. ten; Wouters, S. H. W.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Geer, S. B. van der

    2014-12-28

    Focused ion beams are indispensable tools in the semiconductor industry because of their ability to image and modify structures at the nanometer length scale. Here, we report on performance predictions of a new type of focused ion beam based on photo-ionization of a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam. Particle tracing simulations are performed to investigate the effects of disorder-induced heating after ionization in a large electric field. They lead to a constraint on this electric field strength which is used as input for an analytical model which predicts the minimum attainable spot size as a function of, amongst others, the flux density of the atomic beam, the temperature of this beam, and the total current. At low currents (I < 10 pA), the spot size will be limited by a combination of spherical aberration and brightness, while at higher currents, this is a combination of chromatic aberration and brightness. It is expected that a nanometer size spot is possible at a current of 1 pA. The analytical model was verified with particle tracing simulations of a complete focused ion beam setup. A genetic algorithm was used to find the optimum acceleration electric field as a function of the current. At low currents, the result agrees well with the analytical model, while at higher currents, the spot sizes found are even lower due to effects that are not taken into account in the analytical model.

  3. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reisler, H.

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  4. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  5. Generation of a fast atomic-oxygen beam from O - ions by resonant cavity radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, T. M.; Van Zyl, B.; Amme, R. C.

    1996-04-01

    An apparatus has been developed for producing a beam of ground-electronic-state oxygen atoms with energies variable from 4 to 1000 eV with a 1.5 eV FWHM energy distribution. The technique involves extraction of negative ions from a low-voltage gas-discharge source, mass selection of the extracted O- with a Wien-type velocity filter, O- acceleration or deceleration and focusing by electrostatic ion optics, and electron detachment from O- by intracavity laser radiation. A 25 W argon-ion-laser cavity has been extended to include the ion-beam vacuum chamber so that the intracavity radiation intersects the O- ion trajectories normally. Depending on the laser configuration in use, ion-neutralization efficiencies between 5% and 25% have been achieved at 5 eV O- energy. Thus, 5 eV O-atom fluxes of ˜1011 atoms/s (˜1012 atoms/cm2 s) have been achieved for O- currents of ˜10-7 A. The advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed, and preliminary measurements of the secondary-negative-charge production from low-energy O-atom impact on copper and stainless-steel surfaces are presented.

  6. The development of the high intensity electron cyclotron resonance ion source at China Institute of Atomic Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Liang, H.; Cui, B.; Jiang, W.

    2014-02-01

    High-current microwave ion source has been under development over 15 years for accelerator driven sub-critical system research at China Institute of Atomic Energy, and the beam intensity higher than 140 mA proton beam is produced by this ion source with long lifetime and high reliability. The emittance of high intensity continue-wave and pulse beam is measured on a test-bench in the laboratory. Based on the good performance of this proton ion source, a new 120 mA deuterium ion source is proposed for a high intensity neutron generator. The ion source details and status will be presented.

  7. Coherence and its application in the beam-foil light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Bashkin, S.

    1974-01-01

    The beam-foil light source is shown to be very useful in spectroscopic work. Not only the lifetimes of highly excited, multiply charged atoms can be measured in a straightforward way, but also the fine-structure and hyperfine-structure separations and the Lande factors can be obtained due to the fact that the coherent excitations are created in the impulsive beam-foil collision. The theories suggested to explain the origin of coherence are presently incomplete.

  8. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.; Oliveira, A. N.; Li, M. S.

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  9. A fully coherent electron beam from a noble-metal covered W(111) single-atom emitter.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Cheng; Kuo, Hong-Shi; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Tsong, Tien T

    2009-03-18

    In quantum mechanics, a wavefunction contains two factors: the amplitude and the phase. Only when the probing beam is fully phase coherent, can complete information be retrieved from a particle beam based experiment. Here we use the electron beam field emitted from a noble-metal covered W(111) single-atom tip to image single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in an electron point projection microscope (PPM). The interference fringes of an SWNT bundle exhibit a very high contrast and the fringe pattern extends throughout the entire beam width. This indicates good phase correlation at all points transverse to the propagation direction. Application of these sources can significantly improve the performance and expand the capabilities of current electron beam based techniques. New instrumentation based on the full spatial coherence may allow determination of the three-dimensional atomic structures of nonperiodic nanostructures and make many advanced experiments possible.

  10. Thermal beam of metastable krypton atoms produced by optical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Hu, S.-M.; Bailey, K.; Davis, A. M.; Dunford, R. W.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2007-02-15

    A room-temperature beam of krypton atoms in the metastable 5s[3/2]{sub 2} level is demonstrated via an optical excitation method. A Kr-discharge lamp is used to produce vacuum ultraviolet photons at 124 nm for the first-step excitation from the ground level 4p{sup 6} {sup 1}S{sub 0} to the 5s[3/2]{sub 1} level. An 819 nm Ti:sapphire laser is used for the second-step excitation from 5s[3/2]{sub 1} to 5s[3/2]{sub 2} followed by a spontaneous decay to the 5s[3/2]{sub 2} metastable level. A metastable atomic beam with an angular flux density of 3x10{sup 14} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} is achieved at the total gas flow rate of 0.01 cm{sup 3}/s at STP (or 3x10{sup 17} at./s). The dependences of the flux on the gas flow rate, laser power, and lamp parameters are investigated.

  11. Advancing atomic nanolithography: cold atomic Cs beam exposure of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dwyer, C.; Gay, G.; Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Weiner, J.; Mützel, M.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.; Ludolph, K.; Georgiev, G.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of a study into the quality of functionalized surfaces for nanolithographic imaging. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coverage, subsequent post-etch pattern definition and minimum feature size all depend on the quality of the Au substrate used in atomic nanolithographic experiments. We find sputtered Au substrates yield much smoother surfaces and a higher density of {111} oriented grains than evaporated Au surfaces. A detailed study of the self-assembly mechanism using molecular resolution AFM and STM has shown that the monolayer is composed of domains with sizes typically of 5-25 nm, and multiple molecular domains can exist within one Au grain. Exposure of the SAM to an optically-cooled atomic Cs beam traversing a two-dimensional array of submicron material masks ans also standing wave optical masks allowed determination of the minimum average Cs dose (2 Cs atoms per SAM molecule) and the realization of < 50 nm structures. The SAM monolayer contains many non-uniformities such as pin-holes, domain boundaries and monoatomic depressions which are present in the Au surface prior to SAM adsorption. These imperfections limit the use of alkanethiols as a resist in atomic nanolithography experiments. These studies have allowed us to realize an Atom Pencil suitable for deposition of precision quantities of material at the microand nanoscale to an active surface.

  12. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  13. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  14. Atom trap for 221Fr from 225Ac ion beam implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandecki, M.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Zhang, J.; Orozco, L.; Collister, R.; Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.

    2012-10-01

    A neutral atom trap for francium parity violation experiments is being set up at TRIUMF. The half-lives of the longest isotopes are minutes, which mostly will be produced by the online mass separator of the ISAC facility. For systematic error studies for precision measurements, it can help to have a longer-lived source. ^221Fr is produced by t1/2=10 day ^225Ac α decay, and has been trapped at JILA [Z.-T. Lu PRL 79 994 (1997)]. Our approach would implant the mass-separated ^225Ac beam produced by ISAC at 1x10^7/s for a day after the production proton beam is turned off. The scheme to be tested: 30 keV ^225Ac beam is implanted in tantalum for a day; the sample is held in front of an yttrium foil (normally used to stop a mass-separated Fr beam) for 1 minute; 100 keV ^221Fr recoils escape and implant in the yttrium; tantalum is withdrawn, yttrium is moved to trap and heated; cycle repeats. First tests are planned for September, and one goal is precise measurements of atomic hyperfine splittings sensitive to the spatial distribution of nuclear magnetism.

  15. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  16. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M. S.; Mago, V. K.

    2008-09-15

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data.

  17. Single-beam three-axis atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haichao; Dong, Haifeng; Chen, Lin; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A single-beam atomic magnetometer being operated near zero-field and measuring three-axis fields simultaneously is demonstrated. We produce a rotating field on the x-0-y plane with the frequency of 90 Hz and a modulation field in the z axis at 130 Hz. The rotating field enables a nonzero z axis output when the transverse fields are zeroed using feedback systems. Based on the phase difference of π / 2 , x and y axes fields can be measured using one lock-in amplifier. Magnetic field sensitivities of 300 fT/Hz1/2 in x and y axes and 3 pT/Hz1/2 in the z axis are achieved.

  18. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications. PMID:26932050

  19. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  20. Production of a high brightness H{sup -} beam by charge exchange of a hydrogen atom beam in a sodium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2011-09-26

    Production of H{sup -} beams for applications in accelerators via charge exchange of a high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in a joint experiment by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physcis (BINP). In the experiment, a hydrogen atomic beam with an energy 3-6 keV, an equivalent current up to 5 A and a pulse duration 200 microseconds is used. Initial results demonstrate that an H{sup -} beam with a current 36 mA, an energy 5 keV and {approx}0.15 cm{center_dot}mrad normalized emittance was obtained. The recirculating sodium jet target with an entrance aperture 2 cm, which was developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, is used in the experiment. To increase the H{sup -} beam current, geometric focusing of the hydrogen neutral beam will be used in the future experiments. In addition, the effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. The proton beam is formed by an ion source with a four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system with small-size apertures. The plasma emission surface is formed by the plasma expansion from an arc plasma generator. The transverse ion temperature at the emission surface is 0.2 eV.

  1. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

  2. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  3. Laser supported detonation wave source of atomic oxygen for aerospace material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A pulsed high-flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen was developed to perform accelerated erosion testing of spacecraft materials in a simulated low-earth orbit (LEO) environment. Molecular oxygen is introduced into an evacuated conical expansion nozzle at several atmospheres pressure through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A laser-induced breakdown is generated in the nozzle throat by a pulsed CO2 TEA laser. The resulting plasma is heated by the ensuing laser-supported detonation wave, and then it rapidly expands and cools. An atomic oxygen beam is generated with fluxes above 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse at 8 + or - 1.6 km/s with an ion content below 1 percent for LEO testing. Materials testing yielded the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as observed on the STS mission, and scanning electron micrographs of the irradiated polymer surfaces showed an erosion morphology similar to that obtained on low earth orbit.

  4. A high flux pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen. [for spacecraft materials ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1986-01-01

    The design and demonstration of a pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen are reported. In the present test setup, molecular oxygen under several atmospheres of pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A 10J CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10 to the 9th W/sq cm in the nozzle throat, generating a laser-induced breakdown with a resulting 20,000-K plasma. Plasma expansion is confined by the nozzle geometry to promote rapid electron-ion recombination. Average O-atom beam velocities from 5-13 km/s at fluxes up to 10 to the 18th atoms/pulse are measured, and a similar surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples to that obtained on the STS-8 mission is found.

  5. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  6. Operating characteristics of a new ion source for KSTAR neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Seong Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2014-02-15

    A new positive ion source for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research neutral beam injection (KSTAR NBI-1) system was designed, fabricated, and assembled in 2011. The characteristics of the arc discharge and beam extraction were investigated using hydrogen and helium gas to find the optimum operating parameters of the arc power, filament voltage, gas pressure, extracting voltage, accelerating voltage, and decelerating voltage at the neutral beam test stand at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2012. Based on the optimum operating condition, the new ion source was then conditioned, and performance tests were primarily finished. The accelerator system with enlarged apertures can extract a maximum 65 A ion beam with a beam energy of 100 keV. The arc efficiency and optimum beam perveance, at which the beam divergence is at a minimum, are estimated to be 1.0 A/kW and 2.5 uP, respectively. The beam extraction tests show that the design goal of delivering a 2 MW deuterium neutral beam into the KSTAR Tokamak plasma is achievable.

  7. Operating characteristics of a new ion source for KSTAR neutral beam injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2014-02-01

    A new positive ion source for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research neutral beam injection (KSTAR NBI-1) system was designed, fabricated, and assembled in 2011. The characteristics of the arc discharge and beam extraction were investigated using hydrogen and helium gas to find the optimum operating parameters of the arc power, filament voltage, gas pressure, extracting voltage, accelerating voltage, and decelerating voltage at the neutral beam test stand at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2012. Based on the optimum operating condition, the new ion source was then conditioned, and performance tests were primarily finished. The accelerator system with enlarged apertures can extract a maximum 65 A ion beam with a beam energy of 100 keV. The arc efficiency and optimum beam perveance, at which the beam divergence is at a minimum, are estimated to be 1.0 A/kW and 2.5 uP, respectively. The beam extraction tests show that the design goal of delivering a 2 MW deuterium neutral beam into the KSTAR Tokamak plasma is achievable.

  8. Studies of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Space-charge forces limit the possible transverse compression of high perveance ion beams that are used in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics applications; the minimum radius to which a beam can be focused is an increasing function of perveance. The limit can be overcome if a plasma is introduced in the beam path between the focusing element and the target in order to neutralize the space charge of the beam. This concept has been implemented on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL using Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPS). In our experiment at PPPL, we propagate a perveance-dominated ion beam through a FEPS to study the effect of the neutralizing plasma on the beam envelope and its evolution in time. A 30-60 keV space-charge-dominated Argon beam is focused with an Einzel lens into a FEPS located at the beam waist. The beam is intercepted downstream from the FEPS by a movable Faraday cup that provides time-resolved 2D current density profiles of the beam spot on target. We report results on: (a) dependence of charge neutralization on FEPS plasma density; (b) effects on beam emittance, and (c) time evolution of the beam envelope after the FEPS pulse. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Multiple species beam production on laser ion source for electron beam ion source in Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Hayashizaki, N.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2014-02-15

    Extracted ion beams from the test laser ion source (LIS) were transported through a test beam transport line which is almost identical to the actual primary beam transport in the current electron beam ion source apparatus. The tested species were C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Cu, Ag, Ta, and Au. The all measured beam currents fulfilled the requirements. However, in the case of light mass ions, the recorded emittance shapes have larger aberrations and the RMS values are higher than 0.06 π mm mrad, which is the design goal. Since we have margin to enhance the beam current, if we then allow some beam losses at the injection point, the number of the single charged ions within the acceptance can be supplied. For heaver ions like Ag, Ta, and Au, the LIS showed very good performance.

  10. Flow velocity measurement of zirconium and copper atomic beams generated using a strip electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, S.; Sahu, G. K.; Patankar, R. A.; Thakur, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) is an established method of isotope separation for various elements used in the nuclear industry. Real-time knowledge of vapor flux, density and flow velocity of the atomic beam is essential in the AVLIS process to estimate the throughput, ionization yield and laser repetition rate, respectively. Conventional techniques used in EB-PVD and thin film coating do not provide these parameters independently. The microbalance technique, on the contrary, provides atomic flux, flow velocity and atom density simultaneously. In the present work, flux and flow velocity of copper and zirconium atomic beams are measured using the microbalance technique. The atomic beams are generated by electron beam heating using a strip-type electron gun with the electron beam power ranging from 36 kW up to 100 kW corresponding to the temperature ranges of 1740 to 1950 K (Kn=0.73 to 0.08) for copper and 2606 to 3269 K (Kn=20.95 to 0.12) for zirconium. The measurement on copper was carried out as a benchmark as the copper atomic beam has been reported to behave as an ideal monatomic gas due to the absence of any low-lying metastable states of copper. However, the velocity of the copper atomic beam was found to be much higher than that reported earlier. This is explained on the basis of electron impact excitation. For the atomic beam of zirconium, which has two low-lying metastable states, it was observed that the measured velocities approached the maximum velocity due to adiabatic free expansion, but could not attain it. This implicates only partial contributions to the atomic beam velocity from both thermal as well as electron impact excitation as the atom density of zirconium was not high enough even at the highest applied electron beam power.

  11. Preparation of state purified beams of He, Ne, C, N, and O atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Jankunas, Justin; Reisyan, Kevin S.; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2015-03-14

    The production and guiding of ground state and metastable C, N, and O atoms in a two-meter-long, bent magnetic guide are described. Pure beams of metastable He({sup 3}S{sub 1}) and Ne({sup 3}P{sub 2}), and of ground state N({sup 4}S{sub 3/2}) and O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) are obtained using an Even-Lavie valve paired with a dielectric barrier discharge or electron bombardment source. Under these conditions no electronically excited C, N, or O atoms are observed at the exit of the guide. A general valve with electron impact excitation creates, in addition to ground state atoms, electronically excited C({sup 3}P{sub 2}; {sup 1}D{sub 2}) and N({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}; {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) species. The two experimental conditions are complimentary, demonstrating the usefulness of a magnetic guide in crossed or merged beam experiments such as those described in Henson et al. [Science 338, 234 (2012)] and Jankunas et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244302 (2014)].

  12. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  13. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  14. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2012-02-01

    The H(-) injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ∼38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ∼1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  15. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is <2.5 eV [2]. Using a simple Einzel lens with magnification of about 0.1, a focused current density of about 40 mAcm-2 is obtained. It is estimated that an additional magnification of about 0.1 can yield a focused current density of > 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  16. Rare isotope beams at ISAC—target & ion source systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricault, Pierre G.; Ames, Friedhelm; Dombsky, Marik; Kunz, Peter; Lassen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The present status of the ISAC facility for rare isotopes beams after its first 10 years of operation is presented. Planning for the ISAC facility started in 1985 with the Parksville workshop on radioactive ion beams (Buchmann and D'Auria 1985). It was put on halt by the KAON proposal and planning was only resumed in 1993 after the cancellation of KAON. The ISAC facility was built to satisfy the scientific need for accelerated beams of rare isotopes for use in applications such as nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, atomic and condensed matter physics as well as medicine. At the time of the ISAC proposal submission, a number of facilities were either planned or under construction. In order to have an impact in the field, the requirements and specifications for the driver beam intensity on target was set to 100 μA, 500 MeV protons, which for ISAC results in a driver beam power of 50 kW.

  17. Simulation of the low earth orbital atomic oxygen interaction with materials by means of an oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Steuber, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is the predominant species in low-Earth orbit between the altitudes of 180 and 650 km. These highly reactive atoms are a result of photodissociation of diatomic oxygen molecules from solar photons having a wavelength less than or equal to 2430A. Spacecraft in low-Earth orbit collide with atomic oxygen in the 3P ground state at impact energies of approximately 4.2 to 4.5 eV. As a consequence, organic materials previously used for high altitude geosynchronous spacecraft are severely oxidized in the low-Earth orbital environment. The evaluation of materials durability to atomic oxygen requires ground simulation of this environment to cost effectively screen materials for durability. Directed broad beam oxygen sources are necessary to evaluate potential spacecraft materials performance before and after exposure to the simulated low-Earth orbital environment. This paper presents a description of a low energy, broad oxygen ion beam source used to simulate the low-Earth orbital atomic oxygen environment. The results of materials interaction with this beam and comparison with actual in-space tests of the same meterials will be discussed. Resulting surface morphologies appear to closely replicate those observed in space tests.

  18. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  19. Automation of neutral beam source conditioning with artificial intelligence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.R.; Canales, T.W.; Lager, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a system that automates neutral beam source conditioning. The system achieves this with artificial intelligence techniques. The architecture of the system is presented followed by a description of its performance.

  20. Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2012-07-20

    A calibration method is presented for determining the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, which is a modification of the established Cleveland added mass technique. A focused ion beam (FIB) is used to remove a well-defined volume from a cantilever with known density, substantially reducing the uncertainty usually present in the added mass method. The technique can be applied to any type of AFM cantilever; but for the lowest uncertainty it is best applied to silicon cantilevers with spring constants above 0.7 N m(-1), where uncertainty is demonstrated to be typically between 7 and 10%. Despite the removal of mass from the cantilever, the calibration method presented does not impair the probes' ability to acquire data. The technique has been extensively tested in order to verify the underlying assumptions in the method. This method was compared to a number of other calibration methods and practical improvements to some of these techniques were developed, as well as important insights into the behavior of FIB modified cantilevers. These results will prove useful to research groups concerned with the application of microcantilevers to nanoscience, in particular for cases where maintaining pristine AFM tip condition is critical.

  1. Simulation of a beam rotation system for a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Tibor; Reggiani, Davide; Seidel, Mike; Talanov, Vadim; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2015-04-01

    With a nominal beam power of nearly 1 MW on target, the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), ranks among the world's most powerful spallation neutron sources. The proton beam transport to the SINQ target is carried out exclusively by means of linear magnetic elements. In the transport line to SINQ the beam is scattered in two meson production targets and as a consequence, at the SINQ target entrance the beam shape can be described by Gaussian distributions in transverse x and y directions with tails cut short by collimators. This leads to a highly nonuniform power distribution inside the SINQ target, giving rise to thermal and mechanical stresses. In view of a future proton beam intensity upgrade, the possibility of homogenizing the beam distribution by means of a fast beam rotation system is currently under investigation. Important aspects which need to be studied are the impact of a rotating proton beam on the resulting neutron spectra, spatial flux distributions and additional—previously not present—proton losses causing unwanted activation of accelerator components. Hence a new source description method was developed for the radiation transport code MCNPX. This new feature makes direct use of the results from the proton beam optics code TURTLE. Its advantage to existing MCNPX source options is that all phase space information and correlations of each primary beam particle computed with TURTLE are preserved and transferred to MCNPX. Simulations of the different beam distributions together with their consequences in terms of neutron production are presented in this publication. Additionally, a detailed description of the coupling method between TURTLE and MCNPX is provided.

  2. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOEpatents

    Cross, Jon B.; Cremers, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  3. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOEpatents

    Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

    1986-01-10

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  4. Proposal of a truncated atomic beam fountain for reduction of collisional frequency shift

    SciTech Connect

    Takamizawa, A.; Yanagimachi, S.; Ikegami, T.; Shirakawa, Y.

    2010-07-15

    We propose an atomic fountain clock with a truncated cold atomic beam to achieve both a low collisional frequency shift and high frequency stability. In this clock, the launching velocity of a cold atomic beam can be swept to reduce the atomic density in the interrogation region for the Ramsey resonance and to increase the atomic density in the detection region. Before the top of the beam arrives at the interrogation region, the cold atomic beam is truncated by turning off the cooling laser beams to remove the unnecessary light shift. The atomic density in the interrogation region is theoretically evaluated to be 0.04 times that in an ordinary atomic fountain with optical molasses for the same number of detected atoms. The frequency stability limit due to quantum projection noise is calculated to reach 6.4x10{sup -14} in 1 s from the number of detected atoms while the fractional collisional shift is estimated to be {approx}{sup -}2x10{sup -16}.

  5. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  6. Atomic absorption spectrometry with a flame emission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calloway, Clifton P.; Jones, Bradley T.

    1994-12-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer with flame atomization and a flame emission light source is described. The light source is prepared by aspirating a solution containing a high concentration of analyte into the emission flame. Two different source flames (air/acetylene and nitrous oxide/acetylene) have been evaluated, with the N 2O flame providing better signal to noise ratios ( S/N) in most cases. Source S/N values as high as 5900 (Cr) have been observed. Experimental parameters have been optimized for nine test elements to give limits of detection obtained with this system that are in some cases as good as those obtained with the traditional hollow cathode lamp source; for example, Cu (4 ng/ml), Mn (3 ng/ml) and Ni (5 ng/ml). Linear dynamic ranges typically span 2-3 orders of magnitude. This system offers an inexpensive emission source with the ability to quickly change the setup to accommodate different analytes.

  7. Extraction simulations and emittance measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility electron beam plasma source for radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Liu, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility HRIBF at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams RIBs. Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma EBP ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 IRIS2, for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  8. Extraction simulations and emittance measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility electron beam plasma source for radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, A. J. II; Liu, Y.

    2010-02-15

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma (EBP) ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  9. Extraction Simulations and Emittance Measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Electron Beam Plasma Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Liu, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma (EBP) ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  10. Characterization of a 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Linton, R. C.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Whitaker, A. F.; Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental effort to characterize an existing 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is described. This characterization effort includes atomic oxygen flux and flux distribution measurements using a catalytic probe, energy determination using a commercially designed quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and the exposure of oxygen-sensitive materials in this beam facility. Also, comparisons were drawn between the reaction efficiencies of materials exposed in plasma ashers, and the reaction efficiencies previously estimated from space flight experiments. The results of this study show that the beam facility is capable of producing a directional beam of neutral atomic oxygen atoms with the needed flux and energy to simulate low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions for real time accelerated testing. The flux distribution in this facility is uniform to +/- 6 percent of the peak flux over a beam diameter of 6 cm.

  11. Dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, V; Geiger, R; Stern, G; Zahzam, N; Battelier, B; Bresson, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2011-11-01

    We present a compact and stable dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry with two different atomic species. It is based on frequency-doubled telecom lasers locked on a femtosecond optical frequency comb. We take advantage of the maturity of fiber telecom technology to reduce the number of free-space optical components, which are intrinsically less stable, and to make the setup immune to vibrations and thermal fluctuations. The source provides the frequency agility and phase stability required for atom interferometry and can easily be adapted to other cold atom experiments. We have shown its robustness by achieving the first dual-species K-Rb magneto-optical trap in microgravity during parabolic flights.

  12. A reflex electron beam discharge as a plasma source for electron beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.; Szapiro, B. )

    1988-10-01

    A reflex electron beam glow discharge has been used as a plasma source for the generation of broad-area electron beams. An electron current of 120 A (12 A/cm/sup 2/) was extracted from the plasma in 10 ..mu..s pulses and accelerated to energies greater than 1 keV in the gap between two grids. The scaling of the scheme for the generation of multikiloamp high-energy beams is discussed.

  13. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  14. Measurement of the force on microparticles in a beam of energetic ions and neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Trottenberg, Thomas; Schneider, Viktor; Kersten, Holger

    2010-10-15

    The force on microparticles in an energetic ion beam is investigated experimentally. Hollow glass microspheres are injected into the vertically upward directed beam and their trajectories are recorded with a charge-coupled device camera. The net force on the particles is determined by means of the measured vertical acceleration. The resulting beam pressures are compared with Faraday cup measurements of the ion current density and calorimetric measurements of the beam power density. Due to the neutral gas background, the beam consists, besides the ions, of energetic neutral atoms produced by charge-exchange collisions. It is found that the measured composition of the drag force by an ion and a neutral atom component agrees with a beam model that takes charge-exchange collisions into account. Special attention is paid to the momentum contribution from sputtered atoms, which is shown to be negligible in this experiment, but should become measurable in case of materials with high sputtering yields.

  15. Transverse coupling property of beam from ECR ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Yuan, Y. J.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-11-15

    Experimental evidence of the property of transverse coupling of beam from Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source is presented. It is especially of interest for an ECR ion source, where the cross section of extracted beam is not round along transport path due to the magnetic confinement configuration. When the ions are extracted and accelerated through the descending axial magnetic field at the extraction region, the horizontal and vertical phase space strongly coupled. In this study, the coupling configuration between the transverse phase spaces of the beam from ECR ion source is achieved by beam back-tracking simulation based on the measurements. The reasonability of this coupling configuration has been proven by a series of subsequent simulations.

  16. Extracting source parameters from beam monitors on a chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, Douglas L; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    The intensity distributions of beam monitors in direct-geometry time-of-flight neutron spectrometers provide important information about the instrument resolution. For short-pulse spallation neutron sources in particular, the asymmetry of the source pulse may be extracted and compared to Monte Carlo source simulations. An explicit formula using a Gaussian-convolved Ikeda-Carpenter distribution is given and compared to data from the ARCS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  17. Electron temperature and concentration in a thermal atomic oxygen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrow, Patrick Dennis

    1990-01-01

    A thermal atomic oxygen source for materials screening was built for NASA by Boeing Aerospace. The objective here was to use a microwave interferometer and Langmuir probe to characterize the electron concentration in this thermal atomic oxygen source. Typical operating conditions in the thermal atomic oxygen source were found to produce electron concentrations that were well below the detection threshold of the interferometer (10(exp 8) cm (sup -3)). The researchers calibrated (with the interferometer) the Langmuir probe at an artificially high plasma density and then used the circular and the square Langmuir probes to measure the low electron concentrations that exist during materials exposure tests. Electron concentration was measured as a function of power and position. The electrons were lost to the walls through ambipolar diffusion, and their concentration was accurately described by an equation. The electron concentration was proportional to power squared and decayed exponentially with distance.

  18. Development of series H{sup −} multicusp ion source at China Institute of Atomic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    TianJue, Zhang; XianLu, Jia ZhenGuo, Li; Yinlong, Lu; JiuChang, Qin; Xia, Zheng; Hongjuan, Yao; JunQing, Zhong; GaoFeng, Pan; Tao, Ge; Fengping, Guan

    2014-02-15

    The development of H{sup −} multicusp ion sources has been carried out at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for more than ten years. The first H{sup −} ion source with 5.2 mA was made in 2002. After improving the configured magnetic field, a H{sup −} ion source of 10 mA was made in 2004, and the beam intensity of 15 mA was obtained in 2008 after further improvements of the filter field. The beam intensity of 18 mA was achieved in 2010 following the in-depth study and optimization on some essential operation conditions. Now a series of H{sup −} cusp sources with different sizes and beam intensity ranging from 3 mA to 18 mA have been successfully developed at CIAE. All the ion sources can fast finish the test on the test stand now, since all the connections are modularized and can fit all kinds of H{sup −} mulitcusp source of CIAE. The development status of the various H{sup −} multicusp ion sources at CIAE are presented in the paper.

  19. ALLIGATOR - An apparatus for ion beam assisted deposition with a broad-beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wituschek, H.; Barth, M.; Ensinger, W.; Frech, G.; Rück, D. M.; Leible, K. D.; Wolf, G. K.

    1992-04-01

    Ion beam assisted deposition is a versatile technique for preparing thin films and coatings for various applications. Up to now a prototype setup for research purposes has been used in our laboratory. Processing of industrial standard workpieces requires a high current ion source with broad beam and high uniformity for homogeneous bombardment. In this contribution a new apparatus for large area samples will be described. It is named ALLIGATOR (German acronym of facility for ion assisted evaporation on transverse movable or rotary targets). In order to have a wide energy range available two ion sources are used. One delivers a beam energy up to 1.3 keV. The other is suitable for energies from 5 keV up to 40 keV. The ``high-energy'' ion source is a multicusp multiaperture source with 180-mA total current and a beam diameter of 280 mm at the target position.

  20. Antimony-assisted carbonization of Si(111) with solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Sarney, Wendy L.

    2013-11-15

    The carbonization of an antimony-terminated Si (111) surface in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system is presented. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize samples grown with and without antimony termination. It is shown that the antimony-terminated surface promotes the formation of thin, smooth and continuous SiC films at a relatively low temperature of 800 °C.

  1. Numerical simulation of ion charge breeding in electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L. Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Source particle-in-cell code (EBIS-PIC) tracks ions in an EBIS electron beam while updating electric potential self-consistently and atomic processes by the Monte Carlo method. Recent improvements to the code are reported in this paper. The ionization module has been improved by using experimental ionization energies and shell effects. The acceptance of injected ions and the emittance of extracted ion beam are calculated by extending EBIS-PIC to the beam line transport region. An EBIS-PIC simulation is performed for a Cs charge-breeding experiment at BNL. The charge state distribution agrees well with experiments, and additional simulation results of radial profiles and velocity space distributions of the trapped ions are presented.

  2. Cryogenic Microjet Source for Orthotropic Beams of Ultralarge Superfluid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisenti, Robert E.; Toennies, J. Peter

    2003-06-01

    Liquid 4He at pressures P0=0.5 30 bars and temperatures T0=1.5 4.2 K is discharged into vacuum through two different 2 μm nozzles. The velocities of the beam of particles obey the Bernoulli equation down to 15 m/sec. With decreasing T0 and increasing P0 the velocity and angular distributions become exceedingly narrow with Δv/v≲1% and Δϑ≲1 mrad. Optical observations indicate that the beam consists of micron-sized droplets (N≳109 atoms). This new droplet source provides opportunities for novel experimental studies of superfluid behavior.

  3. Small radio frequency driven multicusp ion source for positive hydrogen ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.T.; Herz, P.R.; Leung, K.N.; Pickard, D.S. )

    1994-04-01

    A compact, 2.5 cm diam rf-driven multicusp ion source has been developed and tested for H[sup +] ion production in pulse mode operation. The source is optimized for atomic hydrogen ion species and extractable current. It is found that hydrogen ion beam current densities in excess of 650 mA/cm[sup 2] can be achieved with H[sup +] species above 80%. The geometry and position of the porcelain-coated copper antenna were found to be of great significance in relation to the efficiency of the ion source.

  4. Beam extraction and delivery at compact neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezei, F.

    2016-11-01

    The beam performance of a source of radiation is primarily characterized by its brightness, which remains constant in a conservative force field along the propagation of the beam. The neutron flux at an area with direct view to a homogenous radiation emitting moderator surface will just depend on the solid angle of beam divergence as determined by the moderator size. Recently it was found that by reducing the size of neutron moderators their brightness can be enhanced by a factor in the range of up to 3-6. In direct view of such moderators from sizable distances often required in neutron scattering applications the beam divergence will become reduced. Supermirror based neutron optical guide systems allow us to deliver neutron beam divergences independently of distance from the source. Due to the low radiation fields at compact sources such systems can be placed close to the neutron emitting moderators, a specific advantage and a new design feature. Focusing type neutron guides with phase space acceptance properly matched to the phase space to be delivered over distance can provide for beam delivery with small losses of brightness within a convenient and flexible range of beam parameters.

  5. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kolchin, P.; Davidson, E.C.; Yu, S.S.; Logan, B.G.

    2002-05-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond the space-charge limit. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-2 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. An ECR source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to support a joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The ECR source operates at 13.6 MHz and with solenoid magnetic fields of 1-10 gauss. The goal is to operate the source at pressures {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10{sup -4}-10{sup -1} Torr. Electron densities in the range of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} have been achieved. Low-pressure operation is important to reduce ion beam ionization. A cusp magnetic field has been installed to improve radial confinement and reduce the field strength on the beam axis. In addition, axial confinement is believed to be important to achieve lower-pressure operation. To further improve breakdown at low pressure, a weak electron source will be placed near the end of the ECR source.

  6. Beam dynamics calculations for the LAMPF optically pumped ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, R.J.; Jakobson, M.J.; van Dyck, O.B.; York, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The space charge code SCHAR has been used to interpret some of the measurements made with the LAMPF ECR source. Calculations were made for rectangular hole, single hole and multihole electrodes. Measured rotation of the plane of the ribbon beam in the constant solenoid field showed that when the polarizer cell was not utilized the beam was essentially not neutralized after it emerged from the extraction electrodes. There is evidence that when the polarizer cell is ''turned on'' the beam becomes neutralized from the polarizer back toward the electrode structure. The total measured current from single and multihole electrodes with the polarizer cell ''on'' is proportional to the area of the electrode apertures. Beam simulation calculations indicate that if the beam extracted from the source is uniform across the multihole structure, then in order for the perimeter holes to provide as much current per area, the beam would have to be at least partially neutralized after existing from the electrode structure. POISSON calculated fields were used for the single and multihole electrode fields. For a ribbon beam the field used was that of a very long slit. The initial transverse velocity and energy of the beam at the entrance to the three electrodes were adjusted to provide agreement with the measured harp histograms. The energy of the ions leaving the (unmodeled) ECR plasma determines the current for a given electrode structure and voltage. Initial transverse velocity was not a sensitive parameter. Electrode radial fields and beam space charge forces generate most of the transverse velocities observed as the beam exits from the electrodes. ''Tails'' which were present in the measured harp data could be explained by an H/sub 2//sup +/ component in the beam. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  8. ATOMIC BEAM POLARIZATION MEASUREMENT OF THE RHIC POLARIZED H-JET TARGET.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; NASS,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; RITTER,J.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The RHIC polarized H-Jet measures the polarization of the RHIC proton beam via elastic scattering off a nuclear polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The atomic beam is produced by a dissociator, a beam forming system and sextupole magnets. Nuclear polarization is achieved by exchanging occupation numbers of hyperfine states using high frequency transitions. The polarization was measured using a modified form of a Breit-Rabi polarimeter including focusing magnets and another set of high frequency transitions. The sampling of a large part of the beam and low noise electronics made it possible to measure the polarization to a high degree of accuracy in a very short time period (1 min). Using this system, we measured no depolarization of the atomic beam due to the RF fields of the bunched proton beam. Time-of-Flight measurements were done using a fast chopper and a QMA at the position of the RHIC interaction point to determine the areal density of the atomic beam seen by the RHIC beam.

  9. Novel oxygen atom source for material degradation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, R. H.; Caledonia, G. E.

    1988-01-01

    Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a high flux pulsed source of energetic (8 km/s) atomic oxygen to bombard specimens in experiments on the aging and degradation of materials in a low earth orbit environment. The proof-of-concept of the PSI approach was demonstrated in a Phase 1 effort. In Phase 2 a large O-atom testing device (FAST-2) has been developed and characterized. Quantitative erosion testing of materials, components, and even small assemblies (such as solar cell arrays) can be performed with this source to determine which materials and/or components are most vulnerable to atomic oxygen degradation. The source is conservatively rated to irradiate a 100 sq cm area sample at greater than 10(exp 17) atoms/s, at a 10 Hz pulse rate. Samples can be exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence equivalent to the on-orbit ram direction exposure levels incident on Shuttle surfaces at 250 km during a week-long mission in a few hours.

  10. Status of the hydrogen and deuterium atomic beam polarized target for NEPTUN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandikov, N. I.; Ershov, V. P.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Kulikov, M. V.; Pilipenko, Yu. K.; Shutov, V. B.

    1995-09-01

    NEPTUN-NEPTUN-A is a polarized experiment at Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK, IHEP) with two internal targets. Status of the atomic beam polarized target that is being developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna is presented.

  11. Final design of the beam source for the MITICA injector.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, D; Agostinetti, P; Dalla Palma, M; De Muri, M; Chitarin, G; Gambetta, G; Marconato, N; Pasqualotto, R; Pavei, M; Pilan, N; Rizzolo, A; Serianni, G; Toigo, V; Trevisan, L; Visentin, M; Zaccaria, P; Zaupa, M; Boilson, D; Graceffa, J; Hemsworth, R S; Choi, C H; Marti, M; Roux, K; Singh, M J; Masiello, A; Froeschle, M; Heinemann, B; Nocentini, R; Riedl, R; Tobari, H; de Esch, H P L; Muvvala, V N

    2016-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement experiment is the prototype and the test bed of the ITER heating and current drive neutral beam injectors, currently in the final design phase, in view of the installation in Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated facility in Padova, Italy. The beam source is the key component of the system, as its goal is the generation of the 1 MeV accelerated beam of deuterium or hydrogen negative ions. This paper presents the highlights of the latest developments for the finalization of the MITICA beam source design, together with a description of the most recent analyses and R&D activities carried out in support of the design.

  12. Quasi-Bessel beams from asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources.

    PubMed

    Müller, Angelina; Wapler, Matthias C; Schwarz, Ulrich T; Reisacher, Markus; Holc, Katarzyna; Ambacher, Oliver; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2016-07-25

    We study the spatial intensity distribution and the self-reconstruction of quasi-Bessel beams produced from refractive axicon lenses with edge emitting laser diodes as asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources. Comparing these to a symmetric mono-mode fiber source, we find that the asymmetry results in a transition of a quasi-Bessel beam into a bow-tie shaped pattern and eventually to a line shaped profile at a larger distance along the optical axis. Furthermore, we analytically estimate and discuss the effects of astigmatism, substrate modes and non-perfect axicons. We find a good agreement between experiment, simulation and analytic considerations. Results include the derivation of a maximal axicon angle related to astigmatism of the illuminating beam, impact of laser diode beam profile imperfections like substrate modes and a longitudinal oscillation of the core intensity and radius caused by a rounded axicon tip. PMID:27464190

  13. Final design of the beam source for the MITICA injector.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, D; Agostinetti, P; Dalla Palma, M; De Muri, M; Chitarin, G; Gambetta, G; Marconato, N; Pasqualotto, R; Pavei, M; Pilan, N; Rizzolo, A; Serianni, G; Toigo, V; Trevisan, L; Visentin, M; Zaccaria, P; Zaupa, M; Boilson, D; Graceffa, J; Hemsworth, R S; Choi, C H; Marti, M; Roux, K; Singh, M J; Masiello, A; Froeschle, M; Heinemann, B; Nocentini, R; Riedl, R; Tobari, H; de Esch, H P L; Muvvala, V N

    2016-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement experiment is the prototype and the test bed of the ITER heating and current drive neutral beam injectors, currently in the final design phase, in view of the installation in Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated facility in Padova, Italy. The beam source is the key component of the system, as its goal is the generation of the 1 MeV accelerated beam of deuterium or hydrogen negative ions. This paper presents the highlights of the latest developments for the finalization of the MITICA beam source design, together with a description of the most recent analyses and R&D activities carried out in support of the design. PMID:26932037

  14. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  15. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  16. Beam Extraction from Laser Driven Multi-Charged Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O A; Logan, B G

    2001-03-19

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. They discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1-MV beam of Xe{sup 16+} ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. The design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from the initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. They conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 amperes.

  17. Hyperfine structure measurement of 87Rb atoms injected into superfluid helium as highly energetic ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kei; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Wakui, Takashi; Mitsuya, Yousuke; Hayasaka, Miki; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Odashima, Hitoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Orochi Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new nuclear laser spectroscopy technique that is called OROCHI (Optical RI-atoms Observation in Condensed Helium as Ioncatcher). In OROCHI, highly energetic ion beam is injected into superfluid helium (He II) and is trapped as atoms. Hyperfine structure (HFS) and Zeeman splitting of trapped atoms is measured using laser-microwave (MW)/radiofrequency (RF) double resonance method. We deduce nuclear moments and spin values from the measured splittings, respectively So far, we measured Zeeman splitting of 84-87Rb atoms To evaluate the validity of the OROCHI method, it is necessary to investigate the following two points not only for Zeeman but also for HFS splitings. (i) What is the accuracy in frequency in our measurement? (ii) How high beam intensity is necessary to observe resonance spectra? For this purpose we conducted online experiment using 87Rb beam and measured the HFS splitting of injected 87Rb atoms in He II.

  18. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  19. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zschornack, G.; König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  20. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  1. Pulsed rotating supersonic source for merged molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, L.; Hickey, M. S.; Krasovitskiy, V.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Herschbach, D. R.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source, evolved from an ancestral device [M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001)]. The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, cryocooling, and a shutter gate eliminated the main handicap of the original device in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1-0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ˜1012 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ˜1015 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, Cl2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when using two merged beams. By closely matching the beam speeds, very low relative collision energies can be attained without making either beam very slow.

  2. Pulsed rotating supersonic source for merged molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Les; Hickey, Mark; Krasovitskiy, Vitaliy; Rathnayaka, Daya; Lyuksyutov, Igor; Herschbach, Dudley

    2012-10-01

    We continue the characterization of a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source. The original device was described by M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001). The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, and a shutter gate eliminate the main handicap of the original device in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1--0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ˜10^12 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ˜10^15 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when using two merged beams. By closely matching the beam speeds, very low relative collision energies can be attained without making either beam very slow.

  3. Random sources for beams with azimuthally varying polarization properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-07-11

    We develop analytical model for statistically stationary sources that radiate beam-like far fields with polarization properties separately controllable in both radial and azimuthal variables. In particular, we demonstrate that for a suitable choice of source parameters a vortex-like far-field distribution of the degree of polarization (DOP) can be obtained. Furthermore, we report the experimental generation of such sources using an optical setup with Mach-Zehnder interferometer having two independent spatial light modulators in its branches. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions. The new class of sources may find uses in imaging, communication and sensing applications based on source polarization diversity. PMID:27410819

  4. Compact Gamma-Beam Source for Nuclear Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    A compact gamma-beam source dedicated to the development of the nuclear security technologies by use of the nuclear resonance fluorescence is described. Besides, such source is a very promising tool for novel technologies of the express cargoes inspection to prevent nuclear terrorism. Gamma-beam with the quanta energies from 0.3MeV to 7.2MeV is generated in the Compton scattering of the "green" laser photons on the electron beam with energies from 90MeV to 430MeV. The characteristic property of the proposed gammabeam source is a narrow spectrum (less than 1%) at high average gamma-yield (of 1013γ/s) due to special operation mode.

  5. High-flux source of low-energy neutral beams using reflection of ions from metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, John W.; Motley, Robert W.; Langer, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Reflection of low-energy ions from surfaces can be applied as a method of producing high-flux beams of low-energy neutral particles, and is an important effect in several areas of plasma technology, such as in the edge region of fusion devices. We have developed a beam source based on acceleration and reflection of ions from a magnetically confined coaxial RF plasma source. The beam provides a large enough flux to allow the energy distribution of the reflected neutrals to be measured despite the inefficiency of detection, by means of an electrostatic cylindrical mirror analyzer coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Energy distributions have been measured for oxygen, nitrogen, and inert gas ions incident with from 15 to 70 eV reflected from amorphous metal surfaces of several compositions. For ions of lighter atomic mass than the reflecting metal, reflected beams have peaked energy distributions; beams with the peak at 4-32 eV have been measured. The energy and mass dependences of the energy distributions as well as measurements of absolute flux, and angular distribution and divergence are reported. Applications of the neutral beams produced are described.

  6. A virtual source model for Kilo-voltage cone beam CT: Source characteristics and model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Spezi, E.; Volken, W.; Frei, D.; Fix, M. K.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to study the source characteristics of a clinical kilo-voltage cone beam CT unit and to develop and validate a virtual source model that could be used for treatment planning purposes. Methods: We used a previously commissioned full Monte Carlo model and new bespoke software to study the source characteristics of a clinical kilo-voltage cone beam CT (CBCT) unit. We identified the main particle sources, their spatial, energy and angular distribution for all the image acquisition presets currently used in our clinical practice. This includes a combination of two energies (100 and 120 kVp), two filters (neutral and bowtie), and eight different x-ray beam apertures. We subsequently built a virtual source model which we validated against full Monte Carlo calculations. Results: We found that the radiation output of the clinical kilo-voltage cone beam CT unit investigated in this study could be reproduced with a virtual model comprising of two sources (target and filtration cone) or three sources (target, filtration cone and bowtie filter) when additional filtration was used. With this model, we accounted for more than 97% of the photons exiting the unit. Each source in our model was characterised by a origin distribution in both X and Y directions, a fluence map, a single energy spectrum for unfiltered beams and a two dimensional energy spectrum for bowtie filtered beams. The percentage dose difference between full Monte Carlo and virtual source model based dose distributions was well within the statistical uncertainty associated with the calculations ( {+-} 2%, one standard deviation) in all cases studied. Conclusions: The virtual source that we developed is accurate in calculating the dose delivered from a commercial kilo-voltage cone beam CT unit operating with routine clinical image acquisition settings. Our data have also shown that target, filtration cone, and bowtie filter sources needed to be all included in the model

  7. Versatile cold atom source for multi-species experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Paris-Mandoki, A.; Jones, M. D.; Nute, J.; Warriar, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Wu, J.

    2014-11-15

    We present a dual-species oven and Zeeman slower setup capable of producing slow, high-flux atomic beams for loading magneto-optical traps. Our compact and versatile system is based on electronic switching between different magnetic field profiles and is applicable to a wide range of multi-species experiments. We give details of the vacuum setup, coils, and simple electronic circuitry. In addition, we demonstrate the performance of our system by optimized, sequential loading of magneto-optical traps of lithium-6 and cesium-133.

  8. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  9. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam ChargeNeutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson,Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-10-01

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K{sup +} ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments.

  10. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  11. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Development of a plasma generator for a long pulse ion source for neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Hanada, M.; Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; Kim, B. R.; Seo, C. S.; Jin, J. T.; Lee, K. W.; In, S. R.; Oh, B. H.; Kim, J.; Bae, Y. S.

    2011-06-15

    A plasma generator for a long pulse H{sup +}/D{sup +} ion source has been developed. The plasma generator was designed to produce 65 A H{sup +}/D{sup +} beams at an energy of 120 keV from an ion extraction area of 12 cm in width and 45 cm in length. Configuration of the plasma generator is a multi-cusp bucket type with SmCo permanent magnets. Dimension of a plasma chamber is 25 cm in width, 59 cm in length, and 32.5 cm in depth. The plasma generator was designed and fabricated at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Source plasma generation and beam extraction tests for hydrogen coupling with an accelerator of the KSTAR ion source have been performed at the KSTAR neutral beam test stand under the agreement of Japan-Korea collaborative experiment. Spatial uniformity of the source plasma at the extraction region was measured using Langmuir probes and {+-}7% of the deviation from an averaged ion saturation current density was obtained. A long pulse test of the plasma generation up to 200 s with an arc discharge power of 70 kW has been successfully demonstrated. The arc discharge power satisfies the requirement of the beam production for the KSTAR NBI. A 70 keV, 41 A, 5 s hydrogen ion beam has been extracted with a high arc efficiency of 0.9 -1.1 A/kW at a beam extraction experiment. A deuteron yield of 77% was measured even at a low beam current density of 73 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Development of a plasma generator for a long pulse ion source for neutral beam injectors.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Tobari, H; Kashiwagi, M; Inoue, T; Hanada, M; Jeong, S H; Chang, D H; Kim, T S; Kim, B R; Seo, C S; Jin, J T; Lee, K W; In, S R; Oh, B H; Kim, J; Bae, Y S

    2011-06-01

    A plasma generator for a long pulse H(+)/D(+) ion source has been developed. The plasma generator was designed to produce 65 A H(+)/D(+) beams at an energy of 120 keV from an ion extraction area of 12 cm in width and 45 cm in length. Configuration of the plasma generator is a multi-cusp bucket type with SmCo permanent magnets. Dimension of a plasma chamber is 25 cm in width, 59 cm in length, and 32.5 cm in depth. The plasma generator was designed and fabricated at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Source plasma generation and beam extraction tests for hydrogen coupling with an accelerator of the KSTAR ion source have been performed at the KSTAR neutral beam test stand under the agreement of Japan-Korea collaborative experiment. Spatial uniformity of the source plasma at the extraction region was measured using Langmuir probes and ±7% of the deviation from an averaged ion saturation current density was obtained. A long pulse test of the plasma generation up to 200 s with an arc discharge power of 70 kW has been successfully demonstrated. The arc discharge power satisfies the requirement of the beam production for the KSTAR NBI. A 70 keV, 41 A, 5 s hydrogen ion beam has been extracted with a high arc efficiency of 0.9 -1.1 A/kW at a beam extraction experiment. A deuteron yield of 77% was measured even at a low beam current density of 73 mA/cm(2).

  15. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to form metal vapors for neutral beam studies, an electron-beam heater and a power supply have been designed. The source, which measures about 30 x 50 x 70 mm, consists of a filament, accelerating plate (defined by pole pieces), and a supported target. The electrons from the filament are focused by the field penetration through a 2 mm slit in the high-voltage cage. They are then accelerated to about 5 kV to a ground plate. The electrons then follow a path in the magnetic field and strike the sample to be heated on its front surface. The assembly is attached to a water-cooled base plate. The electron beam source has produced beams of Ta and C particles with densities of about 10 to the 8th power/cu cm.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of a cesium atom beam in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiang Zhu, Hongwei; Ma, Yinguang; Li, Detian; Liu, Zhidong; Wang, Ji

    2015-03-07

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of the deflection of a beam of {sup 133}Cs atoms in a two wire magnetic field. Our results reveal the relationship between transmission rate of the atoms and incident parameters. Incident angle and position of the beam with maximum transmission are obtained from the simulations. The effect of the deflection field on the spatial distribution (beam profile) of {sup 133}Cs is derived. The method will help with the design of magnetic deflection experiments and to extract the magnetic properties from such experiments.

  17. Performance characteristics of a circular multicusp neutral beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiki, T.; Sasaki, A.; Sano, F.; Uo, K.

    1981-10-01

    The performance of the Heliotron-E neutral beam system, composed of intense cylindrical magnetic multipole bucket sources and beam line facilities, has been investigated. The investigation of the influence of the filament shape on the arc discharge stability shows that a wide-hairpin shaped filament results in more stable arc discharge without increasing the arc voltage than does a narrow-hairpin filament. An electrolytic polishing process has been tested for surface treatment of the Molybdenum grid and found to be very effective in reducing the number of conditioning shots. Beam extraction experiments show that a single bucket source can deliver the total beam current of 35 A at the accelerating voltage of 30 kV with the corresponding power transmission efficiency of more than 85% at the focal point of the grid curvature, the minimum beam divergence is less than 1.15° and the proton yield of the source is above 85%. Measurements of the equivalent gas line density in the neutralizer cell suggest the existence of the gas flow process different from a standard vacuum model.

  18. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  19. Emittance Analysis of the DIII-D Neutral Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, N. A.; Crowley, B.

    2014-10-01

    In a high powered neutral beam system ions are extracted from a low temperature plasma, through apertures in the arc chamber, by application of a potential to an external electrode. It has been determined that to increase the beam energy of the DIII-D neutral beam system beyond 95 keV the accelerator must be reconfigured to avoid excessive electrical breakdown in the grid gaps. Deciding exactly what modifications are to be made requires modeling and experimental effort. A basic problem is to find a geometry with which the extracted beam is intense, low divergence, free of aberrations, and does not strike the focusing electrodes. We present the results of modeling proposed reconfigurations to the accelerator geometry and source conditions. The quality of the beam produced from the various accelerator configurations is quantified through metrics such as the beam emittance and the average divergence per beamlet. By comparing the beam quality and power delivered for each proposed reconfiguration an optimal design is selected and recommended. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US DOE under DE-FG02-94ER54235, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  20. Requirements and limitations on beam quality in synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.

    1989-07-01

    The requirements and limitations of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facilities are reviewed. These machines are designed to emit radiation of very high intensity, extreme brightness, very short pulses, and laserlike coherence. These performance goals put severe requirements on the quality of the electron or positron beams. Phenomena affecting the injection process and the beam lifetime are discussed. Gas desorption by synchrotron radiation, collective effects (coupled bunch oscillations) and ion trapping (for an electron beam) play an important role. Low emittance lattices are more sensitive to quadrupole movements and at the same time, in order not to lose the benefits of high brilliance, require tighter tolerances on the allowed movement of the photon beam source. 22 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  2. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  3. A large-acceptance beam-deceleration module for retrofitting into ion-source beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, H.; Meyer, F. W.

    2013-03-01

    We describe a large-acceptance deceleration module capable of decelerating large-emittance full-intensity ion beams typical of ECR ion sources to very low energies with high efficiency. The deceleration module is designed to permit convenient retrofitting into an existing beam line to replace, e.g., the first Faraday cup after magnetic analysis of the beam extracted from the ion source. For starting energies of 10 keV, and incident ion currents as large as 300 μA, deceleration efficiencies have been measured to be greater than 80% for final energies as low as 70 eV. The decelerated beam intensity can be monitored either by insertion of a beam catcher floating at the final deceleration voltage or from the current to the exit grid itself, with suitable correction applied for the grid transparency factor. The behavior of the deceleration optics was modeled using SIMION, incorporating the effects of intra-beam space charge repulsion. We describe a recent application of this deceleration module to study near-surface He bubble and blister formation of a W target heated to 1250 K and irradiated with a 98 eV He ion beam with a flux of ˜1016 cm-2 s-1.

  4. Quantum demolition measurement of photon statistics by atomic beam deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkommer, A. M.; Akulin, V. M.; Schleich, W. P.

    1992-12-01

    We consider the deflection of a resonant two-level atom by a quantized electromagnetic field using the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian. We show that a joint measurement of the atomic momentum and an appropriate field variable allows us to reconstruct the original photon statistics even for this demolition Hamiltonian. We demonstrate that the momentum distribution of atoms scattered at the nodes of the standing wave also follows the original photon statistics of the field. In this sense a recent experiment on the optical Stern-Gerlach effect [T. Sleator et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1996 (1992)] measures the intensity fluctuations of the standing wave.

  5. Pure single photons from a trapped atom source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, D. B.; Slodička, L.; Araneda, G.; Lachman, L.; Filip, R.; Hennrich, M.; Blatt, R.

    2016-09-01

    Single atoms or atom-like emitters are the purest source of single photons, they are intrinsically incapable of multi-photon emission. To demonstrate this degree of photon number-state purity we have realized a single-photon source using a single ion trapped at the common focus of high numerical aperture lenses. Our trapped-ion source produces single-photon pulses with {g}2(0)=(1.9+/- 0.2)× {10}-3 without any background subtraction. After subtracting detector dark counts the residual {g}2(0) is less than 3 × 10‑4 (95% confidence interval). The multi-photon component of the source light field is low enough that we measure violation of a quantum non-Gaussian state witness, by this characterization the source output is indistinguishable from ideal attenuated single photons. In combination with efforts to enhance collection efficiency from single emitters, our results suggest that single trapped ions are not only ideal stationary qubits for quantum information processing, but promising sources of light for scalable optical quantum networks.

  6. Mid-IR laser source using hollow waveguide beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ian F.; Thorne, Daniel H.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Hollow waveguide technology is a route to efficient beam combining of multiple laser sources in a compact footprint. It is a technology appropriate for combining free-space or fibre-coupled beams generated by semiconductor, fibre or solidstate laser sources. This paper will present results of a breadboard mid-IR system comprising four laser sources combined using a hollow waveguide optical circuit. In this approach the individual dichroic beam combiner components are held in precision alignment slots in the hollow waveguide circuit and the different input wavelengths are guided between the components to a common output port. The hollow waveguide circuit is formed in the surface of a Macor (machinable glass-ceramic) substrate using precision CNC machining techniques. The hollow waveguides have fundamentally different propagation characteristics to solid core waveguides leading to transmission characteristics close to those of the atmosphere while still providing useful light guidance properties. The transmission efficiency and power handling of the hollow waveguide circuit can be designed to be very high across a broad waveband range. Three of the sources are quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), a semiconductor laser technology providing direct generation of midwave IR output. The combined beams provide 4.2 W of near diffraction-limited output co-boresighted to better than 20 µrad. High coupling efficiency into the waveguides is demonstrated, with negligible waveguide transmission losses. The overall transmission of the hollow waveguide beam combining optical circuit, weighted by the laser power at each wavelength, is 93%. This loss is dominated by the performance of the dichroic optics used to combine the beams.

  7. Negative hydrogen ion source for TOKAMAK neutral beam injector (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Y.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kashiwagi, M.; Kitagawa, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Morishita, T.; Hanada, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2000-02-01

    Intense negative ion source producing multimegawatt hydrogen/deuterium negative ion beams has been developed for the neutral beam injector (NBI) in TOKAMAK thermonuclear fusion machines. Negative ions are produced in a cesium seeded multi-cusp plasma generator via volume and surface processes, and accelerated with a multistage electrostatic accelerator. The negative ion source for JT-60U has produced 18.5 A/360 keV (6.7 MW) H- and 14.3 A/380 keV (5.4 MW) D- ion beams at average current densities of 11 mA/cm2 (H-) and 8.5 mA/cm2 (D-). A high energy negative ion source has been developed for the next generation TOKAMAK such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The source has demonstrated to accelerate negative ions up to 1 MeV, the energy required for ITER. Higher negative ion current density of more than 20 mA/cm2 was obtained in the ITER concept sources. It was confirmed that the consumption rate of cesium is small enough to operate the source for a half year in ITER-NBI without maintenance.

  8. A miniaturized, high flux BEC source for precision atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Waldemar; Rudolph, Jan; Popp, Manuel; Rasel, Ernst; Quantus Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Atom chips have proven to be excellent sources for the fast production of ultra-cold gases due to their outstanding performance in evaporative cooling. However, the total number of atoms has previously been limited by the small volume of their magnetic traps. To overcome this restriction, we have developed a novel loading scheme that allows us to produce Bose-Einstein condensates of a few 105 87Rb atoms every two seconds. The apparatus is designed to be operated in microgravity at the drop tower in Bremen, where even higher numbers of atoms can be achieved in the absence of any gravitational sag. Using the drop tower's catapult mode, our setup will perform atom interferometry during nine seconds in free fall. Thus, the fast loading scheme allows for interferometer sequences of up to seven seconds - interrogation times which are inaccessible for ground based devices. The QUANTUS project is supported by the German Space Agency DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) under grant number DLR 50WM1131. Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Universitaet Bremen, HU Berlin, Universitaet Hamburg, Universitaet Ulm, TU Darmstadt, MPQ-Garching.

  9. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  10. Ion source test stand for radioactive beams (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, J. A.; Decrock, P.; Portillo, M.; Mullen, T. P.; Geraci, A. A.; Barlow, T. A.; Greene, J. P.; Gomes, I.; Batson, C. H.; Saremba, S. E.

    1998-02-01

    A test stand for development of ion sources for radioactive beams is currently being commissioned at Argonne. It is located at the Physics Division's Dynamitron accelerator which will be used as a neutron generator with a flux of up to 1011 neutrons per second created by reactions of 4 MeV deuterons on various targets with beam currents of up to 100 μA. The primary targets will be located adjacent to heated secondary targets inside an on-line ion source. With this neutron-generator facility it will be possible to produce radioactive beams of various isotopes, such as 6He, 24Na, and neutron-rich fission fragments. For example, with a secondary target of uranium carbide containing 25 g of natural or depleted uranium the yields of individual isotopes in the target will be about 107/s for isotopes such as 132Sn, 140Xe, and 142Cs, near the peak of the fission distribution. The ion sources to be evaluated will be located within a shielded cave with walls consisting of 30 cm of steel plus 60 cm of concrete to attenuate the prompt neutron radiation by a factor of about 104. Secondary beams of radioactive fission fragments with intensities on the order of 106/s per isotope will be extracted in the 1+ charge state at energies of 20 keV and mass separated with a Danfysik mass separator. Light isotopes, such as 6He and 24Na, can be produced via (n,α) and (n,p) reactions on appropriate target materials. Commissioning began with measurements of fission yields from primary targets of C, Be, BeO, and BN. A surface ionization source which is a variation of the one used in the TRISTAN on-line mass seperator facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been installed and tested with stable Rb and Cs beams. The isotope separator was also commissioned with these beams. The development program will include emittance measurements and source optimization, initially with stable beams, and target-delay-time and release-efficiency measurements for various target/secondary-beam systems.

  11. Rotating matter-wave beam splitters and consequences for atom gyrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, Charles

    2007-09-15

    The effect of a rotation on a matter-wave-laser beam splitter is studied and modeled. This modeling is shown to give important nontrivial corrections to the Sagnac phase shift of matter-wave gyrometers when the duration of the laser action cannot be neglected with respect to the propagation time between beam splitters. This result is illustrated on a Mach-Zehnder atom gyrometer (rate gyroscope) with running laser beam splitters. A quasiclassical description of the interferometer arms inside the beam splitters is proposed to interpret the corrected Sagnac phase shift in terms of an effective interferometer area.

  12. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy. Progress report, July 20, 1987--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, H.C.

    1989-06-01

    With the HIRAB (High Resolution Atomic Beam) building, the photodetachment experiments at LAMPF was able to continue. The 1988 runs provided data to complement that of 1986 on effects of electric fields on photodetachment cross section of H{sup -} and interaction of thin foils with relativistic H{sup -} ions. The first multiphoton detachment of H{sup -} was observed. In each of these experiments, a high-powered laser beam was allowed to intersect the relativistic ion beam; the photon energy in the barycentric system is Doppler shifted, and the laser may thus effectively be tuned (through up to a decade) by changing the angle of intersection of the 2 beams.

  13. Atomic oxygen patterning from a biomedical needle-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Seán; Turner, Miles M.

    2013-09-28

    A “plasma needle” is a cold plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure. Such sources interact strongly with living cells, but experimental studies on bacterial samples show that this interaction has a surprising pattern resulting in circular or annular killing structures. This paper presents numerical simulations showing that this pattern occurs because biologically active reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are produced dominantly where effluent from the plasma needle interacts with ambient air. A novel solution strategy is utilised coupling plasma produced neutral (uncharged) reactive species to the gas dynamics solving for steady state profiles at the treated biological surface. Numerical results are compared with experimental reports corroborating evidence for atomic oxygen as a key bactericidal species. Surface losses are considered for interaction of plasma produced reactants with reactive solid and liquid interfaces. Atomic oxygen surface reactions on a reactive solid surface with adsorption probabilities above 0.1 are shown to be limited by the flux of atomic oxygen from the plasma. Interaction of the source with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface.

  14. Atomic oxygen patterning from a biomedical needle-plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Seán; Turner, Miles M.

    2013-09-01

    A "plasma needle" is a cold plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure. Such sources interact strongly with living cells, but experimental studies on bacterial samples show that this interaction has a surprising pattern resulting in circular or annular killing structures. This paper presents numerical simulations showing that this pattern occurs because biologically active reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are produced dominantly where effluent from the plasma needle interacts with ambient air. A novel solution strategy is utilised coupling plasma produced neutral (uncharged) reactive species to the gas dynamics solving for steady state profiles at the treated biological surface. Numerical results are compared with experimental reports corroborating evidence for atomic oxygen as a key bactericidal species. Surface losses are considered for interaction of plasma produced reactants with reactive solid and liquid interfaces. Atomic oxygen surface reactions on a reactive solid surface with adsorption probabilities above 0.1 are shown to be limited by the flux of atomic oxygen from the plasma. Interaction of the source with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface.

  15. Sources of Atomic and Nuclear Data for Biomedical Purposes.

    PubMed

    Holt, P D

    1979-01-01

    Users of nuclear and atomic data for biomedical purposes often have difficulty in identifying the most up-to-date and appropriate sources of such data. The biomedical Subcommittee of the UK Nuclear Data Committee have prepared a list of recommended data sources available at the beginning of 1978 on radioactive decay schemes; neutron cross-sections and data for neutron activation analysis; excitation functions for the production of radionuclides by charged particles; W-values for neutron and electron dosimetry; X- and gamma-ray cross-sections; stopping powers and ranges for charged particles; and dose deposition by electrons and beta particles. PMID:432260

  16. Steady state gas efficiency of ion sources for neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.; Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; Owren, H.M.; Willis, J.E.

    1981-09-01

    Gas present in the acceleration grids of a neutral beam line is one cause of divergent beam power. A measure of this problem is the gas efficiency (nuclear) of the ion source, epsilon/sub g/ = I/sub b//I/sub g/, where I/sub b/ denotes the extracted current of beam nuclei, and I/sub g/ the total current of nuclei to the source as gas. For a short pulse beam, less than or equal to 0.1 sec, gas transients make epsilon/sub g/ difficult to observe. Using the fraction size Berkeley LPA (nominally 120 keV, 10A), the gas efficiency of a positive ion, hydrogen neutral beam has been studied with pulses from 0.5 to 28 sec at 80 keV, 5.7 A, and 0.5 sec at 120 keV, 10A. The observed gas efficiency, 20% to 40%, is shown to agree with a simple steady state model. The model indicates that gas efficiency is determined by the degree of arc ionization.

  17. Intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto–optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia-Qiang, Huang; Xue-Shu, Yan; Chen-Fei, Wu; Jian-Wei, Zhang; Li-Jun, Wang

    2016-06-01

    We report our studies on an intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional (2D) magneto–optical trap (MOT) with independent axial cooling and pushing. The new-designed source, proposed as 2D-HP MOT, uses hollow laser beams for axial cooling and a thin pushing laser beam to extract a cold atomic beam. With the independent pushing beam, the atomic flux can be substantially optimized. The total atomic flux maximum obtained in the 2D-HP MOT is 4.02 × 1010 atoms/s, increased by 60 percent compared to the traditional 2D+ MOT in our experiment. Moreover, with the pushing power 10 μW and detuning 0Γ, the 2D-HP MOT can generate a rather intense atomic beam with the concomitant light shift suppressed by a factor of 20. The axial velocity distribution of the cold cesium beams centers at 6.8 m/s with an FMHW of about 2.8 m/s. The dependences of the atomic flux on the pushing power and detuning are studied in detail. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304177).

  18. Intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia-Qiang, Huang; Xue-Shu, Yan; Chen-Fei, Wu; Jian-Wei, Zhang; Li-Jun, Wang

    2016-06-01

    We report our studies on an intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical trap (MOT) with independent axial cooling and pushing. The new-designed source, proposed as 2D-HP MOT, uses hollow laser beams for axial cooling and a thin pushing laser beam to extract a cold atomic beam. With the independent pushing beam, the atomic flux can be substantially optimized. The total atomic flux maximum obtained in the 2D-HP MOT is 4.02 × 1010 atoms/s, increased by 60 percent compared to the traditional 2D+ MOT in our experiment. Moreover, with the pushing power 10 μW and detuning 0Γ, the 2D-HP MOT can generate a rather intense atomic beam with the concomitant light shift suppressed by a factor of 20. The axial velocity distribution of the cold cesium beams centers at 6.8 m/s with an FMHW of about 2.8 m/s. The dependences of the atomic flux on the pushing power and detuning are studied in detail. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304177).

  19. Ion Beam Plasma Interactions in the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Kesterson, A.; Kamar, O.; Lin, Y.; Munoz, J.; Wang, X.

    2008-11-01

    A 100 KeV NEC duoplasmatron is used to produce an energetic ion beam (10 KeV < E < 100 KeV). The beam is sent through plasmas produced by the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. The beam current and beam size are measured by a device combining Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) and Faraday Cup (FC) features. ASTRAL produces bright intense He/Ne/Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field < 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. Depending on the ion beam energy and the ratio of beam density over plasma density different wave instabilities will be generated within the plasmas. A real-time spectrum analyzer will be used to identify the wave instabilities and their evolution in the plasma. We will present early experimental results together with some preliminary theoretical simulation using 2D and 3D hybrid simulation codes. In these codes, ions are treated as fully kinetic particles while electrons are treated as a fluid. Both species are moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field.

  20. A non-diaphragm type small shock tube for application to a molecular beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-07-01

    A non-diaphragm type small shock tube was developed for application to a molecular beam source, which can generate beams in the energy range from 1 to several electron volts and beams containing dissociated species such as atomic oxygen. Since repetitive high-frequency operation is indispensable for rapid signal acquisition in beam scattering experiments, the dimensions of the shock tube were miniaturized to reduce the evacuation time between shots. The designed shock tube is 2-4 mm in diameter and can operate at 0.5 Hz. Moreover, a high shock Mach number at the tube end is required for high-energy molecular beam generation. To reduce the shock attenuation caused by the wall boundary layer, which becomes significant in small-diameter tubes, we developed a high-speed response valve employing the current-loop mechanism. The response time of this mechanism is about 100 μs, which is shorter than the rupture time of conventional diaphragms. We show that the current-loop valve generates shock waves with shorter formation distances (about 200-300 mm) than those of conventional shock tubes. In addition, the converging geometry efficiently accelerates shock wave in the small-diameter tubes. The optimal geometry of the shock tube yields shock Mach number around 7, which indicates that the translation energy of molecular beams can exceed 1 eV even in the presence of the real gas effect.

  1. LEVIS ion source and beam characterization on PBFA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, T.J.; Tisone, G.C.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Johnson, D.J.; Pointon, T.D.

    1993-12-31

    We report on the continuing development of the LEVIS (Laser Evaporation Ion Source) lithium active ion source for the 15-cm radial focussing ion diode on PBFA-11. We found previously that DC-heating of the anode surface to 150{degrees}C maximum for 5 hours resulted in a pure lithium beam. This paper discusses the characterization of LEVIS source uniformity by Faraday cup arrays and multiple lines of sight for visible light spectroscopy. These diagnostics give some evidence of nonuniformity in both A-K gap electric fields and ion current density. Despite this, however, the measured focal spot size appears smaller than with a passive LiF source operated in the same magnetic field topology. Experiments using a curved anode for vertical beam focussing show reduced ion beam turn-on delay by 5 ns by altering the magnetic field topology as well as anode curvature. Another 3--5 ns reduction was achieved by switching from a passive LiF to the active LEVIS source.

  2. High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using electron beam ion traps and advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bernitt, Sven; Eberle, Sita; Hell, Natalie; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kelley, Rich; Leutenegger, Maurice; Porter, F. Scott; Rudolph, Jan; Steinbrugge, Rene; Traebert, Elmar; Crespo-Lopez-Urritia, Jose R.

    2015-08-01

    We have used the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap coupled with a NASA/GSFC microcalorimeter spectrometer instrument to systematically address problems found in the analysis of high resolution X-ray spectra from celestial sources, and to benchmark atomic physics codes employed by high resolution spectral modeling packages. Our results include laboratory measurements of transition energies, absolute and relative electron impact excitation cross sections, charge exchange cross sections, and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths. More recently, we have coupled to the Max-Plank Institute for Nuclear Physics-Heidelberg's FLASH-EBIT electron beam ion trap to third and fourth generation advanced light sources to measure photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections, as well as, natural line widths of X-ray transitions in highly charged iron ions. Selected results will be presented.

  3. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  4. Atomic physics measurements in an electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Osterheld, A.; Schneider, M.B.

    1989-03-01

    An electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged ions (q less than or equal to 70/+/) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of transition energies and electron excitation cross sections for x-ray line emission are summarized. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-drivenNeutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt,B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-02-15

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable ofproducing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm2 and with atomicfraction>90 percent was designed and tested with an electrostaticlow energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source wasincorporatedinto the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source(ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQaccelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gastarget. In this design a 40 mA D+ beam is produced from a 6 mm diameteraperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into theRFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used tocreate ~; 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HVbreakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize thefield in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguideto the plasma is done by an autotuner. We observed significantimprovement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride linerinside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared withPBGUNS simulations.

  6. Charge steering of laser plasma accelerated fast ions in a liquid spray — creation of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schnürer, M.; Abicht, F.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-11-15

    The scenario of “electron capture and loss” has been recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with up to MeV kinetic energy [S. Ter-Avetisyan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 051501 (2011)]. Validation of these processes and of their generic nature is here provided in experiments where the ion source and the interaction medium have been spatially separated. Fast positive ions accelerated from a laser plasma source are sent through a cold spray where their charge is changed. Such formed neutral atom or negative ion has nearly the same momentum as the original positive ion. Experiments are released for protons, carbon, and oxygen ions and corresponding beams of negative ions and neutral atoms have been obtained. The electron capture and loss phenomenon is confirmed to be the origin of the negative ion and neutral atom beams. The equilibrium ratios of different charge components and cross sections have been measured. Our method is general and allows the creation of beams of neutral atoms and negative ions for different species which inherit the characteristics of the positive ion source.

  7. Measurement of ion beam from laser ion source for RHIC EBIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue,T.; Tamura, J.; Okamura, M.

    2008-06-23

    Laser ion source (LIS) is a candidate of the primary ion source for the RHIC EBIS. LIS will provide intense charge state 1+ ions to the EBIS for further ionization. We measured plasma properties of a variety of atomic species from C to Au using the second harmonics of Nd:YAG laser (532 nm wave length, up to 0.5 J/6 ns). Since properties of laser produced plasma is different from different species, laser power density for singly charged ion production should be verified experimentally for each atomic species. After plasma analysis experiments, Au ions was extracted from plasma and emittance of the ion beam was measured using a pepper pot type emittance monitor.

  8. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  9. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2012-04-01

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  10. Compact, high power electron beam based terahertz sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.; Lewellen, J. W.; Milton, S. V.; Gopalsami, N.; Schneider, J. F.; Skubal, L.; Li, Y. L.; Virgo, M.; Gallerano, G. P.; Doria, A.; Giovenale, E.; Messina, G.; Spasovsky, I. P.; Office of The Director-Applied Science and Technology; Univ. of Maryland; ENEA

    2007-08-01

    Although terahertz (THz) radiation was first observed about 100 years ago, this portion of the electromagnetic spectrum at the boundary between the microwaves and the infrared has been, for a long time, rather poorly explored. This situation changed with the rapid development of coherent THz sources such as solid-state oscillators, quantum cascade lasers, optically pumped solid-state devices, and novel coherent radiator devices. These in turn have stimulated a wide variety of applications from material science to telecommunications, from biology to biomedicine. Recently, there have been two related compact coherent radiation devices invented able to produce up to megawatts of peak THz power by inducing a ballistic bunching effect on the electron beam, forcing the beam to radiate coherently. An introduction to the two systems and the corresponding output photon beam characteristics will be provided.

  11. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  12. Simultaneous ion beam profile scan using a single laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Long, C.; Huang, C.; Dickson, R.; Aleksandrov, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the world’s first experiment of a simultaneous profile scan of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam using a laser wire system. The system was developed and brought to operational level of application at the superconducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex. The laser wire profile scanner is based on a photodetachment process and therefore can be conducted on a 1-MW neutron production H- beam in a nonintrusive manner. The new simultaneous profile scanning system allows one to simultaneously measure profiles of the H- beam at nine different locations of the linac with high speed and accuracy, and therefore provides a unique tool for accelerator tuning and physics study. This paper describes the design, optical system and software platform developments, and measurement results of the simultaneous profile scanning system.

  13. Probing the energy flow in Bessel light beams using atomic photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhykov, A.; Seipt, D.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-09-01

    The growing interest in twisted light beams also requires a better understanding of their complex internal structure. Particular attention is currently being given to the energy circulation in these beams as usually described by the Poynting vector field. In the present study we propose to use the photoionization of alkali-metal atoms as a probe process to measure (and visualize) the energy flow in twisted light fields. Such measurements are possible since the angular distribution of photoelectrons, emitted from a small atomic target, appears sensitive to and is determined by the local direction of the Poynting vector. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method, detailed calculations were performed for the ionization of sodium atoms by nondiffractive Bessel beams.

  14. Dynamics of Finite Energy Airy Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum in Multilevel Atomic Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenkun; Wang, Shun; Hu, Weifei; Gu, Yuzong

    2016-10-01

    We numerically investigate the dynamics of inward circular finite-energy Airy beams carrying different orbital angular momentum (OAM) numbers in a close-Λ three-level atomic vapor with the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window. We report that due to the EIT induced by the microwave field, the transverse intensity distribution properties of Airy beam can be feasibly manipulated and modulated through adjusting OAM numbers l and the frequency detuning, as well as the propagation distance, in the multi-level atomic systems. What's more, the rotation of the beam also can be observed with different positions in atomic ensembles. The investigation may provide a useful tool for studying particle manipulation, signal processing and propagation in graded-index (GRIN) fibers.

  15. Ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources and the subsequent low energy beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winklehner, Daniel

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are capable of delivering high currents of Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) to heavy ion accelerators (e.g.: to the future FRIB). The use of a sextupole magnet for confinement of the plasma inside the source imposes a unique triangular structure on the beam. This, together with the multitude of ion species that are extracted at the same time and the high axial magnetic field at the plasma aperture, resulting from additional confining solenoids, make the simulation and design of ECRIS extraction systems particularly challenging. The first objective of this thesis was to refine and test a semi-empirical simulation model of the formation and extraction of HCIs from ECR ion sources as well as their transport through the subsequent Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system. To this end, a set of utility functions was written to simplify performing the simulations. In the LEBT system, another interesting, yet so far unanswered, question arises: The influence of space-charge effects on the beam and the level of space-charge compensation in the ECRIS beam line. This interesting topic quickly became the second main objective of the thesis. A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was built and systematic measurements of the neutralization level in ECRIS LEBT systems were done for the first time as part of this thesis (this intensity and pressure regime was previously not well explored). The measured neutralization levels for typical ECRIS beams were found to be between 0% and 50% and agreed reasonably well with a simple formula developed by Gabovich et al. for highly neutralized proton and H- beams after it was re-derived and extended in this thesis for low neutralization and multiple species. Preliminary tests of the refined and integrated simulation model for the ECR ion sources VENUS and SuSI and their respective low energy beam transport systems include comparisons of measured beam currents, cross sections and emittances with the

  16. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  17. The development of the radio frequency driven negative ion source for neutral beam injectors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, W.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Wuenderlich, D.

    2012-02-15

    Large and powerful negative hydrogen ion sources are required for the neutral beam injection (NBI) systems of future fusion devices. Simplicity and maintenance-free operation favors RF sources, which are developed intensively at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP) since many years. The negative hydrogen ions are generated by caesium-enhanced surface conversion of atoms and positive ions on the plasma grid surface. With a small scale prototype the required high ion current density and the low fraction of co-extracted electrons at low pressure as well as stable pulses up to 1 h could be demonstrated. The modular design allows extension to large source dimensions. This has led to the decision to choose RF sources for the NBI of the international fusion reactor, ITER. As an intermediate step towards the full size ITER source at IPP, the development will be continued with a half-size source on the new ELISE testbed. This will enable to gain experience for the first time with negative hydrogen ion beams from RF sources of these dimensions.

  18. Arc modulator for the TFTR neutral-beam ion source--

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, F.P.; Dewan, S.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Power-conditioning systems are being increasingly used to provide specialized protection capabilities. This paper discusses the protection of the tokomak fusion reactor neutral-beam ion source, located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The system design is based on thee operational protection requirements. The protection requirements include provisions for ion-source current pulse matching, ion-source fault current extinction, and metallic fault current extinction. A power circuit configuration satisfying these requirements is illustrated and briefly described. Simplified analytical expressions relating the protection requirements to the circuit parameters are developed. The circuit configuration is implemented using SCR's. Testing and operational verification of the circuit implementation has been conducted. The side effects observed include ion-source current overshoot and the existence of a negative ion source current. Modifications to counteract these side effects are briefly described.

  19. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line. PMID:24593466

  20. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  1. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  2. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Hiroshi Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Yoshida, H. P.; Imai, K.; and others

    2014-02-15

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a {sup 18}O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  3. Hybrid silicon free-space source with integrated beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doylend, J. K.; Heck, M. J. R.; Bovington, J. T.; Peters, J. D.; Davenport, M. L.; Coldren, L. A.; Bowers, J. E.

    2013-02-01

    Free-space beam steering using optical phase arrays are desirable as a means of implementing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and free-space communication links without the need for moving parts, thus alleviating vulnerabilities due to vibrations and inertial forces. Implementing such an approach in silicon photonic integrated circuits is particularly desirable in order to take advantage of established CMOS processing techniques while reducing both device size and packaging complexity. In this work we demonstrate a free-space diode laser together with beam steering implemented on-chip in a silicon photonic circuit. A waveguide phased array, surface gratings, a hybrid III-V/silicon laser and an array of hybrid III/V silicon amplifiers were fabricated on-chip in order to achieve a fully integrated steerable free-space optical source with no external optical inputs, thus eliminating the need for fiber coupling altogether. The chip was fabricated using a modified version of the hybrid silicon process developed at UCSB, with modifications in order to incorporate diodes within the waveguide layer as well as within the III-V gain layer. Beam steering across a 12° field of view with +/-0.3° accuracy and 1.8°x0.6° beam width was achieved, with background peaks suppressed 7 dB relative to the main lobe within the field of view for arbitrarily chosen beam directions.

  4. A new beam source for free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.C.; Wang, Z.J.; Zhu, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    A high power, high current density and high voltage electron beam was generated with the pseudospark discharge (PS), this is a new beam source for free electron lasers. The design and construction of the pseudospark discharge was described, the device has low cost and is easy to fabricate. The experiments are presented, the configuration parameters of the modified pulse line accelerator (PLA) are as follows. The PS hollow cavity has a 3 cm diameter and 4.1 cm long. The discharge chamber consists of planar cathode with hollow cavity, sets of intermediate electrodes and insulators with a common channel, and a planar anode. The electrodes are made of brass and the insulators are made of Plexiglas. The diameter of the channel is 3.2 mm. The anode-cathode gap distance is varied in 10-100 mm. The electron beams have voltage of 200 KeV, current of 2 KA and beam diameter of 1mm. The beam penetrated a 0.3 mm hole on a copper foil of 0.05 mm thick at the distance of 5 cm from the anode and penetrated a 0.6 mm hole on an acid-sensitive film at the distance of 15 cm. A compact free electron laser with a table size is discussed.

  5. Long-pulse ion source for neutral-beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Ryan, P. M.; Schechter, D. E.; Stirling, W. L.; Haselton, H. H.

    1982-04-01

    A rectangular ion source is being developed for producing 120-keV/25-A hydrogen ion beams for pulse durations up to 10 s. It consists of a plasma generator with a rectangular arc chamber (25×35 cm cross section) and an ion accelerator with rectangular grids (10×25 cm hole pattern). The plasma generator is a modified duoPIGatron type. It has been operated at 120 V, 1100 A, and 10 s arc durations to produce a dense and uniform plasma sufficient for supplying a 25-A ion beam current. The electron emitter used is either a LaB6 hollow cathode or a LM (molybdenum doped with La2O3) indirectly heated cathode. The ion accelerator having four (or three) rectangular grids with multiple circular apertures has been utilized to form high-energy ion beams above (or below) 80 keV. With substantial improvements in water cooling and mechanical stability, this ion accelerator has been operated reliably to deliver long-pulse ion beams with energies in excess of 100 keV and pulse lengths of many seconds. The results of measurements made on the power transmission efficiency (70%-80%), power density profile at the target (±0.5% HWHM near the focal plane), and grid loadings (≲1% for each grid) are elaborated. The important characteristics associated with this long-pulse ion source are also presented and discussed.

  6. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Ahmed, M. M.; Abdelhamid, M. M.; Ashour, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition.

  7. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source.

    PubMed

    Abdel Reheem, A M; Ahmed, M M; Abdelhamid, M M; Ashour, A H

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition. PMID:27587108

  8. Deuterium removal from radiation damage in tungsten by isotopic exchange with hydrogen atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; Efimov, V. S.; Gasparyan, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    The tungsten samples were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create radiation-induced defects and then exposed to the deuterium atomic beam. The deuterium removal was studied by isotopic exchange with atomic hydrogen beam. Modification of the deuterium depth profile in self-ion irradiated tungsten under isotopic exchange up to a depth of 6 μm was measured in- situ by nuclear reaction analysis. The total deuterium retention after isotopic exchange was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It is shown that the efficiency of the deuterium removal increases with increasing of the hydrogen incident flux, incident energy and temperature of the tungsten sample.

  9. Plasma diagnosis as a tool for the determination of the parameters of electron beam evaporation and sources of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Jaya; Dileep Kumar, V.; Yadav, S. P.; Barnwal, Tripti A.; Dikshit, Biswaranjan

    2016-07-01

    The atomic vapor generated by electron beam heating is partially ionized due to atom-atom collisions (Saha ionization) and electron impact ionization, which depend upon the source temperature and area of evaporation as compared to the area of electron beam bombardment on the target. When electron beam evaporation is carried out by inserting the target inside an insulating liner to reduce conductive heat loss, it is expected that the area of evaporation becomes significantly more than the area of electron beam bombardment on the target, resulting in reduced electron impact ionization. To assess this effect and to quantify the parameters of evaporation, such as temperature and area of evaporation, we have carried out experiments using zirconium, tin and aluminum as a target. By measuring the ion content using a Langmuir probe, in addition to measuring the atomic vapor flux at a specific height, and by combining the experimental data with theoretical expressions, we have established a method for simultaneously inferring the source temperature, evaporation area and ion fraction. This assumes significance because the temperature cannot be reliably measured by an optical pyrometer due to the wavelength dependent source emissivity and reflectivity of thin film mirrors. In addition, it also cannot be inferred from only the atomic flux data at a certain height as the area of evaporation is unknown (it can be much more than the area of electron bombardment, especially when the target is placed in a liner). Finally, the reason for the lower observed electron temperatures of the plasma for all the three cases is found to be the energy loss due to electron impact excitation of the atomic vapor during its expansion from the source.

  10. Charged-particle beam diagnostics for the advanced photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e -, e +) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest X-ray sources in the 10-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV injector synchrotron (IS), 7-GeV storage ring (SR), and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  11. GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitors for spallation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Claps, G.; Caniello, R.; Cazzaniga, C.; Grosso, G.; Murtas, F.; Tardocchi, M.; Vassallo, E.; Gorini, G.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Nowak, G.; Stoermer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of new large area and high flux thermal neutron detectors for future neutron spallation sources, like the European Spallation Source (ESS) is motivated by the problem of 3He shortage. In the framework of the development of ESS, GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) is one of the detector technologies that are being explored as thermal neutron sensors. A first prototype of GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitor (bGEM) has been built during 2012. The bGEM is a triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with an aluminum cathode coated by 1 μm thick B4C layer used to convert thermal neutrons to charged particles through the 10B(n,7Li)α nuclear reaction. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a bGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beamline. Beam profiles (FWHMx=31 mm and FWHMy=36 mm), bGEM thermal neutron counting efficiency (≈1%), detector stability (3.45%) and the time-of-flight spectrum of the beam were successfully measured. This prototype represents the first step towards the development of thermal neutrons detectors with efficiency larger than 50% as alternatives to 3He-based gaseous detectors.

  12. RF ion source development for neutral beam application

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Kippenhan, D.; Vella, M.C.

    1983-11-01

    At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a 24 x 24 cm/sup 2/ RF source has been tested with beam acceleration. Recently, we have been investigating the characteristics of plasmas generated with different kinds of antenna coatings. The antenna coil was installed inside a cylindrical multicusp source (20-cm diam by 24-cm long) and was driven by a 500 W amplifier. A tiny light bulb filament was used to start a background plasma. The RF was then switched on and a steady-state hydrogen plasma of moderate density (n approx. = 10/sup 11//cm/sup 3/) could be sustained even with the filament turned off.

  13. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ˜5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  14. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-27

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15V before neutralization to 0.3 V,more » implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established similar to –5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-mu s surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of mu s after the high voltage pulse is applied. Lastly, it is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.« less

  15. Biprism electron interferometry with a single atom tip source.

    PubMed

    Schütz, G; Rembold, A; Pooch, A; Meier, S; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A; Günther, A; Chang, W T; Hwang, I S; Stibor, A

    2014-06-01

    Experiments with electron or ion matter waves require a coherent, monochromatic and long-term stable source with high brightness. These requirements are best fulfilled by single atom tip (SAT) field emitters. The performance of an iridium covered W(111) SAT is demonstrated and analyzed for electrons in a biprism interferometer. Furthermore we characterize the emission of the SAT in a separate field electron and field ion microscope and compare it with other emitter types. A new method is presented to fabricate the electrostatic charged biprism wire that separates and combines the matter wave. In contrast to other biprism interferometers the source and the biprism size are well defined within a few nanometers. The setup has direct applications in ion interferometry and Aharonov-Bohm physics. PMID:24704604

  16. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  17. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Neri, L; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Torrisi, G; Cheymol, B; Ponton, A; Galatà, A; Patti, G; Gozzo, A; Lega, L; Ciavola, G

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  18. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, L. Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  19. Two photons on an atomic beam splitter: Nonlinear scattering and induced correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulet, Alexandre; Le, Huy Nguyen; Scarani, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    Optical emitters strongly coupled to photons propagating in one-dimensional waveguides are a promising platform for optical quantum information processing. Here, we present a theoretical study of the scattering of two indistinguishable photons on a single two-level atom in a Hong-Ou-Mandel setup. By computing the dynamics, we can describe the system at any time of the scattering event. This allows us to highlight the one-to-one correspondence between the saturation of the atom and the effective interaction induced between the photons. Furthermore, we discuss the integrability of the atomic beam splitter and provide an intuitive picture for the correlations observed between the outgoing photons.

  20. Gaussification of quantum states of traveling light beams in atomic memory

    SciTech Connect

    Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2010-08-15

    We propose and investigate a protocol for Gaussification of quantum states of traveling light beams in an atomic quantum memory that couples to light via quantum nondemolition (QND) interaction. The protocol relies on a periodic switching between two different QND couplings and the total coupling strength scales only logarithmically with number of Gaussified light modes. The present scheme can be used to prepare entangled states of two distant atomic ensembles and to purify and Gaussify noisy non-Gaussian entangled states of light while simultaneously storing the purified state in atomic memories.

  1. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  2. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  3. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.; Johnson, H. T.; Freund, J. B.

    2015-05-15

    Focused ion beams provide a means of nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, which is used for applications such as forming nanometer-scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. We investigate such a configuration with Ga{sup +} bombardment of a Si thin-film target using molecular dynamics simulation. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A flow model with Marangoni forcing, based upon the temperature gradient and geometry from the atomistic simulation, indeed reproduces the flow and thus could be used to anticipate such flows and their influence in applications.

  4. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for

  5. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection. PMID:26932000

  6. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  7. Report of the Snowmass T4 working group on particle sources: Positron sources, anti-proton sources and secondary beams

    SciTech Connect

    N. Mokhov et al.

    2002-12-05

    This report documents the activities of the Snowmass 2001 T4 Particle Sources Working Group. T4 was charged with examining the most challenging aspects of positron sources for linear colliders and antiproton sources for proton-antiproton colliders, and the secondary beams of interest to the physics community that will be available from the next generation of high-energy particle accelerators. The leading issues, limiting technologies, and most important R and D efforts of positron production, antiproton production, and secondary beams are discussed in this paper. A listing of T4 Presentations is included.

  8. Beam position feedback system for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.

    1993-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The systems consist of 20 VME crates distributed around the ring, each running multiple digital signal processors (DSP) running at 4kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. The particle and X-ray beam position data is shared by the distributed processors through networked reflective memory. A theory of closed orbit correction using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix and simulation of its application to the APS storage ring will be discussed. This technique combines the global and local feedback systems and resolves the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error. Maximum correction efficiency is achieved by feeding back the global orbit data to the local feedback systems. The effect of the eddy current induced in the relatively thick (1/2 inch) vacuum chamber by the AC corrector magnet field for local feedback systems is compensated by digital filters. Results of experiments conducted on the X-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source and the SPEAR at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory will also be presented.

  9. A high-performance electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi,J.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; McCafferty, D.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Syndstrup, L.

    2009-06-08

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, a high current Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has been developed as part of a new preinjector that is under construction to replace the Tandem Van de Graaffs as the heavy ion preinjector for the RHIC and NASA experimental programs. This preinjector will produce milliampere-level currents of essentially any ion species, with q/A {ge} 1/6, in short pulses, for injection into the Booster synchrotron. In order to produce the required intensities, this EBIS uses a 10A electron gun, and an electron collector designed to handle 300 kW of pulsed electron beam power. The EBIS trap region is 1.5 m long, inside a 5T, 2m long, 8-inch bore superconducting solenoid. The source is designed to switch ion species on a pulse-to-pulse basis, at a 5 Hz repetition rate. Singly-charged ions of the appropriate species, produced external to the EBIS, are injected into the trap and confined until the desired charge state is reached via stepwise ionization by the electron beam. Ions are then extracted and matched into an RFQ, followed by a short IH Linac, for acceleration to 2 MeV/A, prior to injection into the Booster synchrotron. An overview of the preinjector is presented, along with experimental results from the prototype EBIS, where all essential requirements have already been demonstrated. Design features and status of construction of the final high intensity EBIS is also be presented.

  10. A subnanosecond pulsed ion source for micrometer focused ion beams.

    PubMed

    Höhr, C; Fischer, D; Moshammer, R; Dorn, A; Ullrich, J

    2008-05-01

    A new, compact design of an ion source delivers nanosecond pulsed ion beams with low emittance, which can be focused to micrometer size. By using a high-power, 25 fs laser pulse focused into a gas region of 10(-6) mbar, ions at very low temperatures are produced in the small laser focal volume of 5 mum diameter by 20 mum length through multiphoton ionization. These ions are created in a cold environment, not in a hot plasma, and, since the ionization process itself does not significantly heat them, have as a result essentially room temperature. The generated ion pulse, up to several thousand ions per pulse, is extracted from the source volume with ion optical elements that have been carefully designed by simulation calculations. Externally triggered, its subnanosecond duration and even smaller time jitter allow it to be superimposed with other pulsed particle or laser beams. It therefore can be combined with any type of collision experiment where the size and the time structure of the projectile beam crucially affect the achievable experimental resolution.

  11. Nanofabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2003-03-01

    Nanostructuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condensermonochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing freestanding nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented.

  12. Single-Slit Diffraction Pattern of a Thermal Atomic Potassium Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, John A.; Bills, Francis A.

    1969-01-01

    The diffraction of a full thermal atomic potassium beam by a single slit was observed. Four experimental diffraction patterns were compared with that predicted by de Brogtie's hypothesis and simple scalar Fresnel diffraction theory. Possible reasons for the differences were discussed. (LC)

  13. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Mark-II Ultra-Cold Jet Target.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppov, V. G.; Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Murray, J. R.; Neumann, J. J.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Kleppner, D.; Davidenko, A. M.; Grishin, V. N.

    2000-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Mark-II). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. Recently, the Jet produced a measured electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam of about 10^15 H s-1 into a 0.3 cm^2 area at the detector. This intensity corresponds to the free jet density of about 10^11 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. So far, the intensity is limited by the high insulation vacuum pressure due to the evaporation of the separation cell's helium film. The beam's angular and radial distributions were measured. A test of a new superfluid-^4He-coated parabolic mirror, attached to the separation cell, appeared to increase the beam intensity by a factor of about 3, as expected.

  14. Plasma diagnosis as a tool for the determination of the parameters of electron beam evaporation and sources of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Jaya; Dileep Kumar, V.; Yadav, S. P.; Barnwal, Tripti A.; Dikshit, Biswaranjan

    2016-07-01

    The atomic vapor generated by electron beam heating is partially ionized due to atom–atom collisions (Saha ionization) and electron impact ionization, which depend upon the source temperature and area of evaporation as compared to the area of electron beam bombardment on the target. When electron beam evaporation is carried out by inserting the target inside an insulating liner to reduce conductive heat loss, it is expected that the area of evaporation becomes significantly more than the area of electron beam bombardment on the target, resulting in reduced electron impact ionization. To assess this effect and to quantify the parameters of evaporation, such as temperature and area of evaporation, we have carried out experiments using zirconium, tin and aluminum as a target. By measuring the ion content using a Langmuir probe, in addition to measuring the atomic vapor flux at a specific height, and by combining the experimental data with theoretical expressions, we have established a method for simultaneously inferring the source temperature, evaporation area and ion fraction. This assumes significance because the temperature cannot be reliably measured by an optical pyrometer due to the wavelength dependent source emissivity and reflectivity of thin film mirrors. In addition, it also cannot be inferred from only the atomic flux data at a certain height as the area of evaporation is unknown (it can be much more than the area of electron bombardment, especially when the target is placed in a liner). Finally, the reason for the lower observed electron temperatures of the plasma for all the three cases is found to be the energy loss due to electron impact excitation of the atomic vapor during its expansion from the source.

  15. Coherent and dynamic beam splitting based on light storage in cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Lee, Jong-Chan; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a coherent and dynamic beam splitter based on light storage in cold atoms. An input weak laser pulse is first stored in a cold atom ensemble via electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). A set of counter-propagating control fields, applied at a later time, retrieves the stored pulse into two output spatial modes. The high visibility interference between the two output pulses clearly demonstrates that the beam splitting process is coherent. Furthermore, by manipulating the control lasers, it is possible to dynamically control the storage time, the power splitting ratio, the relative phase, and the optical frequencies of the output pulses. With further improvements, the active beam splitter demonstrated in this work might have applications in photonic photonic quantum information and in all-optical information processing.

  16. Coherent and dynamic beam splitting based on light storage in cold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Lee, Jong-Chan; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a coherent and dynamic beam splitter based on light storage in cold atoms. An input weak laser pulse is first stored in a cold atom ensemble via electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). A set of counter-propagating control fields, applied at a later time, retrieves the stored pulse into two output spatial modes. The high visibility interference between the two output pulses clearly demonstrates that the beam splitting process is coherent. Furthermore, by manipulating the control lasers, it is possible to dynamically control the storage time, the power splitting ratio, the relative phase, and the optical frequencies of the output pulses. With further improvements, the active beam splitter demonstrated in this work might have applications in photonic photonic quantum information and in all-optical information processing. PMID:27677457

  17. 'Crystal Collimator' Measurement of CESR particle-beam Source Size

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K.D.; Bazarov, Ivan; White, Jeffrey; Revesz, Peter

    2004-05-12

    We have measured electron and positron beam source size at CHESS when the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) is run dedicated for the production of synchrotron radiation. Horizontal source size at several beamlines is expected to shrink by a factor of two but synchrotron (visible) light measurements only provide the vertical size. Therefore a 'crystal collimator' using two Bragg reflection in dispersive (+,+) orientation has been built to image the horizontal (vertical) source by passing x-rays parallel to within 5 microradians to an imaging screen and camera. With the 'crystal collimator' we observe rms sizes of 1.2 mm horizontal by 0.28 mm vertical, in good agreement with the 1.27 mm size calculated from lattice functions, and 0.26 mm observed using a synchrotron light interferometer.

  18. Source Regions of Energetic Neutral Atoms From Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C. P.; Roelof, E. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2002-12-01

    We have discovered that two discrete source regions dominate the emission fluxes of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from Jupiter's space environment in the 10's of keV energy range. The source regions are: 1) a ring or torus of emission just beyond the orbit of Europa, and 2) Jupiter's exosphere which glows in ENAs as a result of the near-precipitation of energetic ions onto Jupiter's atmosphere. To identify these sources we: i) deconvolved the instrument response from the ENA images obtained by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Camera during the Cassini flyby of Jupiter in January of 2001 (Krimigis et al., 2002), and ii) combined the images with in situ data obtained from the Galileo Energetic Particle Detector (EPD). The trans-Europa ENA emission source requires neutral densities greater than 10 / cc, and perhaps 10's per cc depending on the exact distribution of the ENA emissions. Thus, we hereby confirm the inference of Lagg et al. (2001), developed using Galileo EPD energetic-ion angle distributions, of the presence of a much denser population of neutral gas in the vicinity of Europa than has been predicted on the basis of the volcanic sources at Io. The Jupiter exospheric ENA source strength offers the most direct measure yet obtained of the flux of energetic ions precipitating over all onto Jupiter's atmosphere. Krimigis et al., A nebula of gasses from Io surrounding Jupiter, Nature, 415, 994, 2002. Lagg, A., N. Krupp, J. Woch, and D. J. Williams, Evidence for an extended neutral torus at Europa, Unpublished Manuscript, 2001.

  19. Nonlinear effects in optical pumping of a cold and slow atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfido, N.; Bezuglov, N. N.; Bruvelis, M.; Shayeganrad, G.; Birindelli, S.; Tantussi, F.; Guerri, I.; Viteau, M.; Fioretti, A.; Ciampini, D.; Allegrini, M.; Comparat, D.; Arimondo, E.; Ekers, A.; Fuso, F.

    2015-10-01

    By photoionizing hyperfine (HF) levels of the Cs state 6 2P3 /2 in a slow and cold atom beam, we find how their population depends on the excitation laser power. The long time (around 180 μ s ) spent by the slow atoms inside the resonant laser beam is large enough to enable exploration of a unique atom-light interaction regime heavily affected by time-dependent optical pumping. We demonstrate that, under such conditions, the onset of nonlinear effects in the population dynamics and optical pumping occurs at excitation laser intensities much smaller than the conventional respective saturation values. The evolution of population within the HF structure is calculated by numerical integration of the multilevel optical Bloch equations. The agreement between numerical results and experiment outcomes is excellent. All main features in the experimental findings are explained by the occurrence of "dark" and "bright" resonances leading to power-dependent branching coefficients.

  20. Preparation and Analysis of Atom Probe Tips by Xenon Focused Ion Beam Milling.

    PubMed

    Estivill, Robert; Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2016-06-01

    The damage and ion distribution induced in Si by an inductively coupled plasma Xe focused ion beam was investigated by atom probe tomography. By using predefined patterns it was possible to prepare the atom probe tips with a sub 50 nm end radius in the ion beam microscope. The atom probe reconstruction shows good agreement with simulated implantation profiles and interplanar distances extracted from spatial distribution maps. The elemental profiles of O and C indicate co-implantation during the milling process. The presence of small disc-shaped Xe clusters are also found in the three-dimensional reconstruction. These are attributed to the presence of Xe nanocrystals or bubbles that open during the evaporation process. The expected accumulated dose points to a loss of >95% of the Xe during analysis, which escapes undetected. PMID:27056544

  1. Preparation and Analysis of Atom Probe Tips by Xenon Focused Ion Beam Milling.

    PubMed

    Estivill, Robert; Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2016-06-01

    The damage and ion distribution induced in Si by an inductively coupled plasma Xe focused ion beam was investigated by atom probe tomography. By using predefined patterns it was possible to prepare the atom probe tips with a sub 50 nm end radius in the ion beam microscope. The atom probe reconstruction shows good agreement with simulated implantation profiles and interplanar distances extracted from spatial distribution maps. The elemental profiles of O and C indicate co-implantation during the milling process. The presence of small disc-shaped Xe clusters are also found in the three-dimensional reconstruction. These are attributed to the presence of Xe nanocrystals or bubbles that open during the evaporation process. The expected accumulated dose points to a loss of >95% of the Xe during analysis, which escapes undetected.

  2. Ion Flux Measurements in Electron Beam Produced Plasmas in Atomic and Molecular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, S. G.; Leonhardt, D.; Blackwell, D. D.; Murphy, D. P.; Fernsler, R. F.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, mass- and time-resolved measurements of ion fluxes sampled from pulsed, electron beam-generated plasmas will be discussed. Previous works have shown that energetic electron beams are efficient at producing high-density plasmas (10^10-10^12 cm-3) with low electron temperatures (Te < 1.0 eV) over the volume of the beam. Outside the beam, the plasma density and electron temperature vary due, in part, to ion-neutral and electron-ion interactions. In molecular gases, electron-ion recombination plays a significant role while in atomic gases, ion-neutral interactions are important. These interactions also determine the temporal variations in the electron temperature and plasma density when the electron beam is pulsed. Temporally resolved ion flux and energy distributions at a grounded electrode surface located adjacent to pulsed plasmas in pure Ar, N_2, O_2, and their mixtures are discussed. Measurements are presented as a function of operating pressure, mixture ratio, and electron beam-electrode separation. The differences in the results for atomic and molecular gases will also be discussed and related to their respective gas-phase kinetics.

  3. Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2012-06-25

    Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

  4. Betatron Radiation from a Beam Driven Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.; /SLAC

    2012-08-13

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 x 10{sup 10} electrons, 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} spot, 20-100 {micro}m length, 20 GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 x 35 cm{sup 2} phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  5. Betatron radiation from a beam driven plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.

    2012-12-01

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 × 1010 electrons, 20 × 20μm2 spot, 20 - 100μm length, 20GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of ˜ 1 × 1017 cm-3 will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 × 35cm2 phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  6. Betatron radiation from a beam driven plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.

    2012-12-21

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons, 20 Multiplication-Sign 20{mu}m{sup 2} spot, 20 - 100{mu}m length, 20GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of {approx} 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 Multiplication-Sign 35cm{sup 2} phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  7. Consistency of atomic data for the interpretation of beam emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delabie, E.; Brix, M.; Giroud, C.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Marchuk, O.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Ralchenko, Yu; Surrey, E.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Zastrow, K. D.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2010-12-01

    Several collisional-radiative (CR) models (Anderson et al 2000 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 42 781-806, Hutchinson 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 71-82, Marchuk et al 2008 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 10F532) have been developed to calculate the attenuation and the population of excited states of hydrogen or deuterium beams injected into tokamak plasmas. The datasets generated by these CR models are needed for the modelling of beam ion deposition and (excited) beam densities in current experiments, and the reliability of these data will be crucial to obtain helium ash densities on ITER combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy. Good agreement between the different CR models for the neutral beam (NB) is found, if corrections to the fundamental cross sections are taken into account. First the Hα and Hβ beam emission spectra from JET are compared with the expected intensities. Second, the line ratios within the Stark multiplet are compared with the predictions of a sublevel resolved model. The measured intensity of the full multiplet is ≈30% lower than expected on the basis of beam attenuation codes and the updated beam emission rates, but apart from the atomic data this could also be due to the characterization of the NB path and line of sight integration and the absolute calibration of the optics. The modelled n = 3 to n = 4 population agrees very well with the ratio of the measured Hα to Hβ beam emission intensities. Good agreement is found as well between the NB power fractions measured with beam emission in plasma and on the JET Neutral Beam Test Bed. The Stark line ratios and σ/π intensity ratio deviate from a statistical distribution, in agreement with the CR model in parabolic states from Marchuk et al (2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 011002).

  8. Electron-beam-pumped VCSEL light source for projection display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, Michael D.; Kozlovsky, Vladimir I.

    2005-04-01

    An electron beam pumped vertical cavity laser, or an "eVCSEL", has been developed as a low-cost light source for LCOS and DLP based consumer television. 1000 lumens directed towards the spatial light modulator requires a total power of 144 watts for lasers in the three primary colors. This power surplus allows for high screen brightness for rear projection televisions of diagonals greater than 50 inches and eliminates the need for high gain screens with the benefit of larger viewing angles. Because of the high saturation of laser light, a color gamut approaching that of the human visual system is possible, creating superior image reproduction.

  9. Critical beam dynamical issues in neutron spallation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, M.; Bongardt, K.; Letchford, A. P.

    1996-06-01

    The accelerator part of proposed neutron spallation sources consists of a high intensity linac and compressor ring or rapid cycling synchrotron. The most critical part of such a high current machine is to keep activation caused by particle loss along the linac or at ring injection down to an acceptable limit. Sources of particle loss along the linac can be beam mismatch, resonances of any kind, temperature transfer within a bunch and/or nonlinear internal or external forces. In addition machine errors like misalignments, tolerances, and rf errors have to be considered. All these sources cause emittance growth. The common way of setting up the beam dynamics of high intensity linacs is governed by avoiding these sources and testing it by Monte-Carlo simulations. To get information on the possible loss mechanism, the only way is to increase the particle number of the Monte-Carlo simulations and to study phase space distributions in detail. Monte-Carlo simulations with 50000 particles for the 1.334 GeV coupled cavity linac of the European Spallation Source (ESS) are presented. It is shown that it is possible to design a non-space charge dominated linac for 200 mA bunch current with almost constant emittances. A detailed study of the phase space distribution along the linac shows a small number of halo particles nearby the bunch core. This halo is acceptable for ring injection. Some information related to particle loss in the linac and in the compressor ring afterwards is extracted and comments for positioning scrapers are made.

  10. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  11. Atom number in magneto-optic traps with millimeter scale laser beams.

    PubMed

    Hoth, Gregory W; Donley, Elizabeth A; Kitching, John

    2013-03-01

    We measure the number of atoms N trapped in a conventional vapor-cell magneto-optic trap (MOT) using beams that have a diameter d in the range 1-5 mm. We show that the N is proportional to d(3.6) scaling law observed for larger MOTs is a robust approximation for optimized MOTs with beam diameters as small as 3 mm. For smaller beams, the description of the scaling depends on how d is defined. The most consistent picture of the scaling is obtained when d is defined as the diameter where the intensity profile of the trapping beams decreases to the saturation intensity. Using this definition, N scales as d(6) for d<2.3 mm but, at larger d, N still scales as d(3.6).

  12. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  13. Comment on ''Generation of cold low divergent atomic beam of indium by laser ablation'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113302 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, A.; Booth, A.; Lee, S.; Amonson, M.; Bergeson, S. D.

    2009-04-15

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a subthermal atomic beam.

  14. Performance of positive ion based high power ion source of EAST neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Jiang, Caichao; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhimin

    2016-02-01

    The positive ion based source with a hot cathode based arc chamber and a tetrode accelerator was employed for a neutral beam injector on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Four ion sources were developed and each ion source has produced 4 MW @ 80 keV hydrogen beam on the test bed. 100 s long pulse operation with modulated beam has also been tested on the test bed. The accelerator was upgraded from circular shaped to diamond shaped in the latest two ion sources. In the latest campaign of EAST experiment, four ion sources injected more than 4 MW deuterium beam with beam energy of 60 keV into EAST.

  15. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source.

    PubMed

    Pitters, Jason L; Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A

    2012-04-21

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  16. Precise measurement of the scalar polarizability of ^115In in an indium atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Anders; Ranjit, Gambhir; Schine, Nathan; Majumder, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, we have pursued a series of precise atomic structure measurements in Group III elements thallium and indium in order to test recent ab initio theory calculations in these three-valance-electron systems. We are currently completing a precision measurement of the indium scalar polarizability within the 410 nm 5P1/2->6S1/2 transition using a GaN semiconductor laser interacting transversely with a collimated indium atomic beam in the presence of precisely calibrated high voltage electric field. We use 100 MHz laser frequency modulation and RF lock-in detection to obtain a high-resolution absorption signal despite indium beam optical depths of < 10-3. An in-vacuum chopper wheel modulates the atomic beam and provides further noise and background reduction. Our current level of precision produces 1% statistical measurement of the Stark Shift in less than one hour of data collection. Our preliminary results for the scalar polarizability within this transition agree with a previous result,ootnotetextT.R. Fowler and J. Yellin, Phys. Rev. A 1, 1006 (1970) and we expect an eventual tenfold improvement in accuracy, providing a challenge to ongoing atomic theory calculations. Current results will be presented.

  17. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  18. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sonato, P.

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  19. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  20. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J.; Leung, K.N.

    1997-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  1. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  2. Production of charged (singly and multiply) phosphorous beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Maunoury, L.; Kantas, S.; Leroy, R.; Pacquet, J.Y.

    2006-03-15

    Within the framework of biological application linked to ion irradiation, the fabrication of radioactive stents by ion implantation provides a significant improvement of the recovery of arteries after a treatment of stenosed coronary arteries [P. Fehsenfeld et al., Semin Interv Cardiol. 3, 157 (1998); E. Huttel et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 825 (2002); M.-A. Golombeck et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 206, 495 (2003)]. For this appliance, the suitable radioactive ion is {sup 32}P. Obviously, in order to have a minimum loss of these radioactive ions through the ionization process, it is imperative to have high ionization efficiency. In this article, the production of such singly and multiply charged phosphorous beams is investigated using two different electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: MONO1000/1001 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)] and SUPERSHyPIE [J. Y. Pacquet et al., EP Patent No. 97 401294 (pending); R. Leroy et al., 14th International Workshop on ECR Ion Sources, May 1999 (unpublished)]. Spectra and above all efficiencies [J. Y. Pacquet et al., GANIL R 02 07; GANIL R 03 08] (31% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms and compound with MONO1000/1001 and 43% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms with SUPERSHyPIE) of these beams will be presented as well as the intensities (227 e{mu}A for P{sup +} with MONO1000/1001 and 145 e{mu}A for P{sup 7+} with SUPERSHyPIE) of such beams.

  3. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Savchenkov, A V; Vishnyakova, G A; Golovizin, A A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2013-04-30

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 Degree-Sign C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  4. Design and construction of a sample preparation chamber for atomic beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, C.

    1992-05-01

    A new type of atomic beam scattering spectrometer was built to advance the usefulness of the atomic beam scattering technique as a surface dynamics probe. The facility was not only built to investigate the typical alkali halide samples such as NaCl, NaF, and LiF, but also to investigate metallic surfaces. Metal samples are more complicated to study, due to their reactive surfaces and the sample preparation process. A surface analysis chamber was constructed as an attachment to the scattering facility to treat samples under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and then transfer these samples into the scattering facility. This surface analysis chamber is referred to as the sample preparation chamber and is the basis for this thesis.

  5. Utilization of novel atom sources in studies of semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolan, John Thaddeus

    Nanometer-scale characterization of semiconductor surfaces is very important for precise control of the ultrafine structures necessary for the realization of devices using quantum confinement. The performance of these heterojunction devices is strongly dependent on interface quality. In the case of III-V semiconductors, the major problem is the presence of the native oxide layer and surface carbon contamination. This carbon is strongly bonded to the III-V surface even after ion-etching and high temperature annealing and induces a free-carrier depletion region at the substrate-epilayer interface. Furthermore, native oxides on GaAs and InP surfaces are detrimental to the formation of stable interfaces and can result in defective epitaxial growth, inducing undesirable electrical characteristics to the device so they must be removed without damaging the near-surface region. A surface characterization study using ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been performed on GaAs(001) and InP(111) substrates before and after cleaning by ion sputtering/annealing cycles and room temperature exposure to the flux produced by a novel atomic hydrogen source based on electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) to determine any treatment-induced alterations. In order to realize high performance III-V circuits, the preparation of a good quality passivating oxide interface is necessary. Device quality oxide-(III-V) interface fabrication will certainly depend on the composition of the oxide interface and any possible damage induced by the oxidation process. In the case of GaAs, thermal oxides and formation of thick oxides (which actually is diffusion-controlled and possibly close to thermal equilibrium) usually results in non-stoichiometric films of Gasb2Osb3 and Assb2Osb3 as well as a pile-up of elemental As at the GaAs-oxide interface. This structure is predicted by the Ga-O-As phase diagram, but it provides poor electrical isolation and surface

  6. Apker Award Talk: Atomic Beam Measurement of the Indium 6p1 / 2 Scalar Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenbraun, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first measurement of the scalar polarizability of the indium 6p1 / 2 -excited state using two-step laser spectroscopy in an atomic beam. This is one in a series of precise atomic structure measurements by the Majumder lab at Williams College, which serve as stringent tests of abinitio calculation methods for three-valence-electron systems. We stabilize a laser to the indium 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 410 nm transition and scan a second laser across the 6s1 / 2 --> 6p1 / 2 1343 nm transition. The two laser beams are overlapped and interact transversely with a collimated atomic beam of indium. Two-tone FM spectroscopy allows us to observe the small (< 1 part in 103) IR absorption, and characteristic sideband features in the RF-demodulated lineshape provide built-in frequency calibration. Application of DC electric fields up to 20 kV/cm give rise to Stark shifts of order 100 MHz. Because our group has previously measured the difference in polarizabilities within the 410 nm transition, we can determine the 6p1 / 2 polarizability with no loss of precision. Preliminary results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical calculations and can be used to infer accurate values for the indium 6 p - 5 d matrix elements.

  7. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Michigan Ultra-Cold Jet Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageya, T.; Blinov, B. B.; Denbow, J. M.; Kandes, M. C.; Krisch, A. D.; Kulkarni, D. A.; Lehman, M. A.; Luppov, V. G.; Morozov, V. S.; Murray, J. R.; Peters, C. C.; Raymond, R. S.; Ross, M. R.; Yonehara, K.; Borisov, N. S.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Kleppner, D.; Grishin, V. N.; Mysnik, A. L.

    2001-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Michigan Jet Target). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. The Jet produced, at the detector, a spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam with a measured intensity of about 1.7 10^15 H s-1 and a FWHM area of less than 0.13 cm^2. This intensity corresponds to a free jet density of about 1.3 10^12 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. When the transition RF unit is installed, we expect a proton polarization higher than 90%.

  8. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    DOEpatents

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  9. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Bruhns, H; de Ruette, N; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; Savin, D W; Stützel, J; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of ∼7.4% for H(-) at a beam energy of 10 keV and ∼3.7% for C(-) at 28 keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975 nm and 808 nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2 kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table. PMID:26628128

  10. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Brown, I. G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-04-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar+ ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 × 1015 ions/cm2, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work.

  11. Applications of beam-foil spectroscopy to atomic collisions in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1976-01-01

    Some selected papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Beam-Foil Spectroscopy, whose results are of particular pertinence to ionic collision phenomena in solids, are reviewed. The topics discussed include solid target effects and means of surmounting them in the measurement of excited projectile ion lifetimes for low-energy heavy element ions; the electron emission accompanying the passage of heavy particles through solid targets; the collision broadening of X rays emitted from 100 keV ions moving in solids; residual K-shell excitation in chlorine ions penetrating carbon; comparison between 40 MeV Si on gaseous SiH4 targets at 300 mtorr and 40 MeV Si on Al; and the emergent surface interaction in beam-foil spectroscopy. A distinct overlap of interests between the sciences of beam-foil spectroscopy and atomic collisions in solids is pointed out.

  12. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. P.; Grussie, F.; Bruhns, H.; de Ruette, N.; Koenning, T. P.; Miller, K. A.; Savin, D. W.; Stützel, J.; Urbain, X.; Kreckel, H.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of ˜7.4% for H- at a beam energy of 10 keV and ˜3.7% for C- at 28 keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975 nm and 808 nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2 kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  13. Beam Diagnostics On The HELEN Laser System At Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, R. L.; Norman, C. J.; Danson, C. N.

    1982-11-01

    The HELEN laser system at the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, is a two beam Nd-glass laser used for the study of laser plasma phenomena relevant to weapons physics, and is capable of generating 100 J pulses of 1TW peak power in each arm. This paper presents an overview of the system with particular reference to recent developments in beam diagnostics. The diagnostics discussed fall into two categories of equal importance. Firstly, the measurement of beam parameters required for the complete analysis of experimental target data, namely laser pulse energy, pulse width, pre-pulse ratio and far-field intensity distribution; and secondly, measurement of parameters used to ensure optimum system performance such as near-field intensity distribution, amplifier gains and passive component transmission.

  14. Brightness limitations in multi-kiloampere electron beam sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.; Boyd, J.K.; Paul, A.C.; Prono, D.S.

    1984-08-24

    Heuristic relationships such as the Lawson-Penner criterion, used to scale Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier gain and efficiency over orders of magnitude in beam current and brightness, have no fundamental basis. The brightness of a given source is set by practical design choices such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. The design of low emittance, high current electron guns has received considerable attention at Livermore over the past few years. The measured brightnesses of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) guns are less than predicted with the EBQ gun design code; this discrepancy is due to plasma effects from the present cold, plasma cathode in the code. The EBQ code is well suited to exploring the current limits of gridless relativistic Pierce columns with moderate current density (<50 A/cm/sup 2/) at the cathode. As EBQ uses a steady-state calculation it is not amenable for study of transient phenomena at the beam head. For this purpose, a Darwin approximation code, DPC, has been written. The main component in our experimental cathode development effort is a readily modified electron gun that will allow us to test many candidate cathode materials, types and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MV/cm. 6 references, 6 figures.

  15. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G. Zolotukhin, D. B.; Klimov, A. S.; Savkin, K. P.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  16. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Savkin, K. P.; Klimov, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  17. Physics data base for the Beam Plasma Neutron Source (BPNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coensgen, F. H.; Casper, T. A.; Correll, D. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Molvik, A. W.

    1990-10-01

    A 14-MeV deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron source for accelerated end-of-life testing of fusion reactor materials has been designed on the basis of a linear two-component collisional plasma system. An intense flux (up to 5 x 10(exp 18)/sq m sec) of 14 MeV neutrons is produced in a fully ionized high-density (n sub e approx. = 3 x 10(exp 21) per cu m) tritium target by transverse injection of 60 MW of neutral beam power. Power deposited in the target is removed by thermal electron conduction to large end chambers, where it is deposited in gaseous plasma collectors. We show in this paper that the major physics issues have now been experimentally demonstrated. These include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and stability, microstability, startup, fueling, Spitzer electron thermal conductivity, and power deposition in a gaseous plasma collector. However, an integrated system was not demonstrated.

  18. High-precision Stark shift measurements in excited states of indium using an atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, P. K.; Carter, A. L.; Augenbraun, B. L.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; Vilas, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    A recent precision measurement in our group of the indium scalar polarizability within the 410 nm 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 transition showed excellent agreement with ab initio atomic theory. We are now completing a measurement of the polarizability within the 6s1 / 2 --> 6p1 / 2 excited-state transition. In our experiment, two external cavity semiconductor diode lasers interact transversely with a collimated indium atomic beam. We tune the 410 nm laser to the 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 transition, keeping the laser locked to the exact Stark-shifted resonance frequency. We overlap a 1343 nm infrared laser to reach the 6p1 / 2 state. The very small infrared absorption in our atomic beam is detected using two-tone FM spectroscopy. Monitoring the two-step excitation signal in a field-free supplemental vapor cell provides frequency reference and calibration. Precisely calibrated electric fields of 5 - 15 kV/cm produce Stark shifts of order 100 MHz for this excited state. Experimental details, latest results, and comparison to theory will be discussed. In the near future, The same infrared laser will be tuned to 1291 nm to study the scalar and tensor polarizability of the 6p3 / 2 excited state providing a distinct test of atomic theory. Work supported by NSF Grant # 1404206.

  19. Experimentally validated pencil beam scanning source model in TOPAS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2014-11-21

    The presence of a low-dose envelope, or 'halo', in the fluence profile of a proton spot can increase the output of a pencil beam scanning field by over 10%. This study evaluated whether the Monte Carlo simulation code, TOPAS 1.0-beta 8, based on Geant4.9.6 with its default physics list, can predict the spot halo at depth in phantom by incorporating a halo model within the proton source distribution. Proton sources were modelled using three 2D Gaussian functions, and optimized until simulated spot profiles matched measurements at the phantom surface out to a radius of 100 mm. Simulations were subsequently compared with profiles measured using EBT3 film in Solidwater® phantoms at various depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams. Simulations predict measured profiles within a 1 mm distance to agreement for 2D profiles extending to the 0.1% isodose, and within 1 mm/1% Gamma criteria over the integrated curve of spot profile as a function of radius. For isodose lines beyond 0.1% of the central spot dose, the simulated primary spot sigma is smaller than the measurement by up to 15%, and can differ by over 1 mm. The choice of particle interaction algorithm and phantom material were found to cause ~1 mm range uncertainty, a maximal 5% (0.3 mm) difference in spot sigma, and maximal 1 mm and ~2 mm distance to agreement in isodoses above and below the 0.1% level, respectively. Based on these observations, therefore, the selection of physics model and the application of Solidwater® as water replacement material in simulation and measurement should be used with caution.

  20. Experimentally validated pencil beam scanning source model in TOPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; Ainsley, Christopher G.; McDonough, James E.

    2014-11-01

    The presence of a low-dose envelope, or ‘halo’, in the fluence profile of a proton spot can increase the output of a pencil beam scanning field by over 10%. This study evaluated whether the Monte Carlo simulation code, TOPAS 1.0-beta 8, based on Geant4.9.6 with its default physics list, can predict the spot halo at depth in phantom by incorporating a halo model within the proton source distribution. Proton sources were modelled using three 2D Gaussian functions, and optimized until simulated spot profiles matched measurements at the phantom surface out to a radius of 100 mm. Simulations were subsequently compared with profiles measured using EBT3 film in Solidwater® phantoms at various depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams. Simulations predict measured profiles within a 1 mm distance to agreement for 2D profiles extending to the 0.1% isodose, and within 1 mm/1% Gamma criteria over the integrated curve of spot profile as a function of radius. For isodose lines beyond 0.1% of the central spot dose, the simulated primary spot sigma is smaller than the measurement by up to 15%, and can differ by over 1 mm. The choice of particle interaction algorithm and phantom material were found to cause ~1 mm range uncertainty, a maximal 5% (0.3 mm) difference in spot sigma, and maximal 1 mm and ~2 mm distance to agreement in isodoses above and below the 0.1% level, respectively. Based on these observations, therefore, the selection of physics model and the application of Solidwater® as water replacement material in simulation and measurement should be used with caution.

  1. Experimentally validated pencil beam scanning source model in TOPAS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2014-11-21

    The presence of a low-dose envelope, or 'halo', in the fluence profile of a proton spot can increase the output of a pencil beam scanning field by over 10%. This study evaluated whether the Monte Carlo simulation code, TOPAS 1.0-beta 8, based on Geant4.9.6 with its default physics list, can predict the spot halo at depth in phantom by incorporating a halo model within the proton source distribution. Proton sources were modelled using three 2D Gaussian functions, and optimized until simulated spot profiles matched measurements at the phantom surface out to a radius of 100 mm. Simulations were subsequently compared with profiles measured using EBT3 film in Solidwater® phantoms at various depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams. Simulations predict measured profiles within a 1 mm distance to agreement for 2D profiles extending to the 0.1% isodose, and within 1 mm/1% Gamma criteria over the integrated curve of spot profile as a function of radius. For isodose lines beyond 0.1% of the central spot dose, the simulated primary spot sigma is smaller than the measurement by up to 15%, and can differ by over 1 mm. The choice of particle interaction algorithm and phantom material were found to cause ~1 mm range uncertainty, a maximal 5% (0.3 mm) difference in spot sigma, and maximal 1 mm and ~2 mm distance to agreement in isodoses above and below the 0.1% level, respectively. Based on these observations, therefore, the selection of physics model and the application of Solidwater® as water replacement material in simulation and measurement should be used with caution. PMID:25349982

  2. Fluctuation of an ion beam extracted from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N. Okajima, Y.; Wada, M.

    2014-02-15

    Argon ion beam fluctuation from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source is observed. The ion beam was measured by an 8 measurement elements beam profile monitor. The amplitude of the beam current fluctuation stayed in the same level from 100 Hz to 1 kHz of the filament heating frequency. The beam current fluctuation frequency measured by the beam profile monitor was equal to the frequency of the AC filament operation. The fluctuation amplitudes of the beam current by AC operation were less than 7% and were in the same level of the DC operation.

  3. Experimental optimization of beam quality extracted from a duoplasmatron proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Y. K.; Draganic, I. N.; Fortgang, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    The LANSCE accelerator facility operates with two independent ion injectors for H⁺ and H⁻ particle beams. The H⁺ ion beam is formed using a duoplasmatron source followed by a 750 keV Cockroft-Walton accelerating column. Formation of an optimal plasma meniscus is an important feature for minimizing beam emittance, and maximizing beam brightness. A series of experiments were performed to find the optimal combination of extraction voltage and extracted current for the H⁺ beam. Measurements yielded the best ratio of beam perveance to Child–Langmuir perveance of 0.52 for maximizing beam brightness.

  4. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H⁻ ion source.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H(-) beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10(21) m(-3), whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  5. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H⁻ ion source.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H(-) beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10(21) m(-3), whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon. PMID:26932004

  6. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H- beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 1021 m-3, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  7. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  8. Three-dimensional cooling of a single atom by a pair of counter-propagating tightly focused beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Tiancai

    2015-09-01

    A light beam tightly focused by a high numerical-aperture lens system contains longitudinal components with polarization parallel to the propagation axis. By numerically analyzing the polarization distribution around the focal region in one pair of confocally aligned counter-propagating tightly focused light beams with orthogonal linear polarizations, we found that there exists a three-dimensional polarization gradient pattern similar to that used in cooling neutral atoms. This can be used to three-dimensionally cool atoms trapped in a far-off-resonant trap with only one pair of counter-propagating beams in one dimension. This new cooling scheme can be used to individually cool single atoms in an addressable two-dimensional single-atom array for quantum information processing and be applied to perform readouts of qubit encoded in these atoms without losing them. PMID:26368455

  9. Noncontact atomization of droplets using an aerial ultrasonic source with two vibrating plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Arisa; Yanagimoto, Miduki; Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2015-07-01

    For use in mass spectrometry, we investigated the noncontact atomization of droplets using a rectangular transverse vibrating plate ultrasonic source. To determine the atomization properties of the ultrasonic source, we examined the sound pressure distribution of the standing wave acoustic field formed and observed the behavior of the atomized particles in the acoustic field. We determined the relationship between sound pressure and the conditions and location where atomization occurs with the variations in droplet surface tension and viscosity using three different compounds: water, ethanol, and glycerin. Furthermore, we clarifies the distribution of particle diameters in atomized water.

  10. Point source atom interferometry with a cloud of finite size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, Gregory W.; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth A.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a two axis gyroscope by the use of light pulse atom interferometry with an expanding cloud of atoms in the regime where the cloud has expanded by 1.1-5 times its initial size during the interrogation. Rotations are measured by analyzing spatial fringe patterns in the atom population obtained by imaging the final cloud. The fringes arise from a correlation between an atom's initial velocity and its final position. This correlation is naturally created by the expansion of the cloud, but it also depends on the initial atomic distribution. We show that the frequency and contrast of these spatial fringes depend on the details of the initial distribution and develop an analytical model to explain this dependence. We also discuss several challenges that must be overcome to realize a high-performance gyroscope with this technique.

  11. Development of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source for Spatial Beam Profile Measurement of a High Intensity Positive Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Wada, Motoi; Nishida, Tomoaki; Demura, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Daichi; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nishiura, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu; Kisaki, Masashi; Sasao, Mamiko

    2011-09-26

    We have been developing a negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -} ion) source for a spatial beam profile monitor of a high intensity positive ion beam as a new diagnostic tool. In case of a high intensity continuous-wave (CW) deuteron (D{sup +}) beam for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), it is difficult to measure the beam qualities in the severe high radiation environment during about one-year cyclic operation period. Conventional techniques are next to unusable for diagnostics in the operation period of about eleven months and for maintenance in the one-month shutdown period. Therefore, we have proposed an active beam probe system by using a negative ion beam and started an experimental study for the proof-of-principle (PoP) of the new spatial beam profile monitoring tool. In this paper, we present the status of development of the H{sup -} ion source as a probe beam source for the PoP experiment.

  12. Distribution of Fe atom density in a dc magnetron sputtering plasma source measured by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibagaki, K.; Nafarizal, N.; Sasaki, K.; Toyoda, H.; Iwata, S.; Kato, T.; Tsunashima, S.; Sugai, H.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetron sputtering discharge is widely used as an efficient method for thin film fabrication. In order to achieve the optimized fabrication, understanding of the kinetics in plasmas is essential. In the present work, we measured the density distribution of sputtered Fe atoms using laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A dc magnetron plasma source with a Fe target was used. An area of 20 × 2 mm in front of the target was irradiated by a tunable laser beam having a planar shape. The picture of laser-induced fluorescence on the laser beam was taken using an ICCD camera. In this way, we obtained the two-dimensional image of the Fe atom density. As a result, it has been found that the Fe atom density observed at a distance of several centimeters from the target is higher than that adjacent to the target, when the Ar gas pressure was relatively high. It is suggested from this result that some gas-phase production processes of Fe atoms are available in the plasma. This work has been performed under the 21st Century COE Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  13. Light sources generating self-splitting beams and their propagation in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhangrong

    2014-06-01

    A class of random sources producing far fields self-splitting intensity profiles with variable spacing between the x and y directions is introduced. The beam conditions for ensuring the sources to generate a beam are derived. Based on the derived analytical expression, the evolution behavior of the beams produced by these families of sources in free space and turbulence atmospheric are explored and comparatively analyzed. By changing the modulation parameters n and m, the degree of coherence of Gaussian Schell-model source in the x and y directions are modulated respectively, and then the number of splitting beams and the spacing between splitting beams can be adjusted. It is illustrated that the self-splitting intensity profile is stable when beams propagate in free space, but they eventually transformed into a Gaussian profiles when it passes at sufficiently large distances from its source through the turbulent atmosphere.

  14. Automatic approaching method for atomic force microscope using a Gaussian laser beam.

    PubMed

    Han, Cheolsu; Lee, Haiwon; Chung, Chung Choo

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a criterion for a fast automatic approach method in conventional atomic force microscope is introduced. There are currently two approach methods: automatic and semiautomatic methods. However, neither of them provides a high approach speed to enable the avoidance of possible damage to tips or samples. Industrial atomic force microscope requires a high approach speed and good repeatability for inspecting a large volume. Recently, a rapid automatic engagement method was reported to improve the approach speed. However, there was no information on how to determine the safe distance. This lack of information increases the chance for damage to occur in calibrating optimal approach speed. In this paper, we show that the proposed criterion can be used for decision making in determining mode transitions from fast motion to slow motion. The criterion is calculated based on the average intensity of a Gaussian laser beam. The tip-sample distance where the average intensity becomes the maximum value is used for the criterion. We explain the effects of the beam spot size and the window size on the average intensity. From experimental results with an optical head used in a commercial atomic force microscope, we observed that the mean and standard deviation (of the distance at which intensity is the maximum for the 25 experiments) are 194.0 and 15.0 microm, respectively, for a rectangular cantilever (or 224.8 and 12.6 microm for a triangular cantilever). Numerical simulation and experimental results are in good agreement.

  15. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Takagi, Shu

    2008-12-31

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on graphene through controlled ion beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Oh, Il-Kwon; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Hyungjun; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2016-05-01

    The polymer residue generated during the graphene transfer process to the substrate tends to cause problems (e.g., a decrease in electron mobility, unwanted doping, and non-uniform deposition of the dielectric material). In this study, by using a controllable low-energy Ar+ ion beam, we cleaned the polymer residue without damaging the graphene network. HfO2 grown by atomic layer deposition on graphene cleaned using an Ar+ ion beam showed a dense uniform structure, whereas that grown on the transferred graphene (before Ar+ ion cleaning) showed a non-uniform structure. A graphene-HfO2-metal capacitor fabricated by growing 20-nm thick HfO2 on graphene exhibited a very low leakage current (<10-11 A/cm2) for Ar+ ion-cleaned graphene, whereas a similar capacitor grown using the transferred graphene showed high leakage current.

  17. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  18. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Liu, H.; Tian, X.; Xu, P.; Wang, Y.; Ren, J.; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2014-02-15

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of {sup 88}Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10) kHz.

  19. Coherent Reflection of He Atom Beams from Rough Surfaces at Grazing Incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Schewe, H. Christian; Meijer, Gerard; Schoellkopf, Wieland

    2010-09-24

    We report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component k{sub z} of the incident wave vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of k{sub z} only. This behavior is explained by quantum reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of k{sub z} the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also depend on the parallel component k{sub x} of the wave vector. The material specific k{sub x} dependence for this classic reflection at the repulsive branch of the potential is discussed in terms of an averaging out of the surface roughness under grazing incidence conditions.

  20. Use of an Atmospheric Atomic Oxygen Beam for Restoration of Defaced Paintings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Karla, Margaret; Norris, Mary Jo; Real, William A.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    An atmospheric atomic oxygen beam has been found to be effective in removing organic materials through oxidation that are typical of graffiti or other contaminant defacements which may occur to the surfaces of paintings. The technique, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is portable and was successfully used at the Carnegie Museum of Art to remove a lipstick smudge from the surface of porous paint on the Andy Warhol painting "Bathtub." This process was also evaluated for suitability to remove felt tip and ball point ink graffiti from paper, gesso on canvas and cotton canvas.

  1. Noise Effects on Entangled Coherent State Generated via Atom-Field Interaction and Beam Splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarbashi, G.; Mirzaei, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a controllable method for producing two and three-mode entangled coherent states (ECS's) using atom-field interaction in cavity QED and beam splitter. The generated states play central roles in linear optics, quantum computation and teleportation. We especially focus on qubit, qutrit and qufit like ECS's and investigate their entanglement by concurrence measure. Moreover, we illustrate decoherence properties of ECS's due to noisy channels, using negativity measure. At the end the effect of noise on monogamy inequality is discussed.

  2. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Collimation and compression of atomic beams under conditions of coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosachev, D. V.; Matisov, B. G.; Rozhdestvenskiĭ, Yu V.

    1992-07-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the collimation and compression of atomic beams under two-frequency cooling conditions. It was possible to reach cooled atom temperatures right down to TR = \\hslash2k2/2MkB approx 10-6 K, determined by the recoil energy of the atom. The dependences of the temperature on the frequency difference between the light waves were investigated, for velocities near zero, and these were found to be in qualitative agreement with those observed experimentally. An expression for the beam diameter after compression by diverging waves was derived. Estimates of these effects are given for cases of practical importance.

  3. Simulation and beam line experiments for the superconducting ECRion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Damon S.; Leitner, Daniela; Grote, David P.; Lyneis, ClaudeM.

    2007-09-10

    The particle-in-cell code Warp has been enhanced toincorporate both two- and three-dimensional sheath extraction modelsgiving Warp the capability of simulating entire ion beam transportsystems including the extraction of beams from plasma sources. In thisarticle we describe a method of producing initial ion distributions forplasma extraction simulations in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ionsources based on experimentally measured sputtering on the source biaseddisc. Using this initialization method, we present preliminary resultsfor extraction and transport simulations of an oxygen beam and comparethem with experimental beam imaging on a quartz viewing plate for thesuperconducting ECR ion source VENUS.

  4. Loading a fountain clock with an enhanced low-velocity intense source of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, G.; Gerginov, V.; Weyers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a cesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 77, 3331 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3331], which we modify by adding a dark-state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of 4 ×108 atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of 8.6 m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieve a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms Nat=2.9 ×106 in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability σy(1 s ) =2.7 ×10-14 is demonstrated.

  5. Investigations of the emittance and brightness of ion beams from an electron beam ion source of the Dresden EBIS type

    SciTech Connect

    Silze, Alexandra; Ritter, Erik; Zschornack, Guenter; Schwan, Andreas; Ullmann, Falk

    2010-02-15

    We have characterized ion beams extracted from the Dresden EBIS-A, a compact room-temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS) with a permanent magnet system for electron beam compression, using a pepper-pot emittance meter. The EBIS-A is the precursor to the Dresden EBIS-SC in which the permanent magnets have been replaced by superconducting solenoids for the use of the source in high-ion-current applications such as heavy-ion cancer therapy. Beam emittance and brightness values were calculated from data sets acquired for a variety of source parameters, in leaky as well as pulsed ion extraction mode. With box shaped pulses of C{sup 4+} ions at an energy of 39 keV root mean square emittances of 1-4 mm mrad and a brightness of 10 nA mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} were achieved. The results meet the expectations for high quality ion beams generated by an electron beam ion source.

  6. Investigations of the emittance and brightness of ion beams from an electron beam ion source of the Dresden EBIS type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silze, Alexandra; Ritter, Erik; Zschornack, Günter; Schwan, Andreas; Ullmann, Falk

    2010-02-01

    We have characterized ion beams extracted from the Dresden EBIS-A, a compact room-temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS) with a permanent magnet system for electron beam compression, using a pepper-pot emittance meter. The EBIS-A is the precursor to the Dresden EBIS-SC in which the permanent magnets have been replaced by superconducting solenoids for the use of the source in high-ion-current applications such as heavy-ion cancer therapy. Beam emittance and brightness values were calculated from data sets acquired for a variety of source parameters, in leaky as well as pulsed ion extraction mode. With box shaped pulses of C4+ ions at an energy of 39 keV root mean square emittances of 1-4 mm mrad and a brightness of 10 nA mm-2 mrad-2 were achieved. The results meet the expectations for high quality ion beams generated by an electron beam ion source.

  7. Efficient intensity-gradient cooling of atoms in a weak standing-wave hollow-beam trap

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhengling; Yin Jianping

    2006-07-15

    We propose a trap scheme for cold alkali-metal atoms with an efficient intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling in a weak standing-wave hollow-beam gravito-optical trap, which is composed of the interference of two well collimated, counterpropagating doughnut hollow beams with an intensity difference and a plug beam. We calculate the intensity distribution of the weak standing-wave hollow-beam field and its intensity gradient one, and find that such an optical dipole trap with an extremely high intensity gradient is desirable to realize an efficient intensity-gradient cooling for alkali-metal atoms in the trap. We also calculate the optical potentials, instantaneous dipole forces and spontaneous emission rates for a three-level dressed atom and study the dynamic process of intensity-gradient cooling of {sup 87}Rb atoms in the weak standing-wave hollow-beam trap by Monte Carlo simulations. Our study shows that the minimum optical potential at each node in our dipole trap is high enough to trap almost all cold atoms with a temperature of 120 {mu}K released from a standard magneto-optical trap, and an ultracold {sup 87}Rb atomic sample with a temperature of {approx}0.73 {mu}K can be obtained in the trap. Starting from this stage, an all-optical Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) could be realized by using the optical-potential evaporative cooling.

  8. Commissioning and initial operation of a radioactive beam ion source at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombsky, M.; Bishop, D.; Bricault, P.; Dale, D.; Hurst, A.; Jayamanna, K.; Keitel, R.; Olivo, M.; Schmor, P.; Stanford, G.

    2000-02-01

    In November of 1998, the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF started delivering on-line isotope separated radioactive beams to experiments. A surface ionization source developed for ISAC has been used to commission the mass separator and beam transport systems and is providing radioactive beams to the first generation of ISAC experiments. The ion source is integral with the radioactive beam production target and is designed to be simple, radiation hard, inexpensive, and easily exchanged by remote-handling techniques. The ion source and its extraction column are suspended at the bottom of ˜2 m of steel shielding incorporated in the target module. The module is suspended in a vacuum tank with primary and secondary vacuum systems. All services for the target/ion source and beam extraction system are ducted through the module shielding. The first sets of beam transport elements and beam diagnostic devices are similarly suspended in vacuum at the bottom of two additional shielded modules. Ion beam characteristics can be routinely monitored during on-line operation by a system of Faraday cups, wire scanners, "harp" monitors, and a novel emittance measurement apparatus that can measure beam emittance in both horizontal and vertical planes. The diagnostics devices are capable of resolving beam signals down to the 10 pA range.

  9. Surface Properties of SiC Layer Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) with Helicon Sputtering Molecular Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuta, Akira; Moronuki, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Yuji

    Although there have been some attempts to produce a monocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) flat surface, the surface properties, such as surface roughness, have not satisfied the required specifications. In this study, we apply a helicon sputtering device to molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to improve those properties. The helicon sputtering device was used as a molecular beam source for generating a Si molecular beam, where the electric field caused by the helicon coil supplied energy to the sputtered Si molecules. The amount of energy was controlled by the electric power applied to the coil. High-purity acetylene gas was used as the carbon (C) molecular beam source. The substrate was a monocrystalline (111) Si wafer. With the increase of the electric power, that is, the supply of high energy to molecules, the roughness of the surface was improved. A uniform mirror surface of monocrystalline SiC was produced over the entire substrate with a roughness of 1nm (Ra) order.

  10. Experimental results of a dual-beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. H. Cui, B. Q.; Ma, R. G.; Ma, Y. J.; Tang, B.; Huang, Q. H.; Jiang, W. S.; Zheng, Y. N.

    2014-02-15

    A dual beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter aimed to produce 200 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} beams simultaneously has been developed. Not suitable to use the analyzing magnet, the purity of beam extracted from the source becomes important to the performance of implanter. The performance of ion source was measured. The results of experiments show that the materials of inlet tube of ion source, the time of arc ionization in ion source, and the amount of gas flow have significant influence on the purity of beam. The measures by using copper as inlet tube material, long time of arc ionization, and increasing the inlet of gas flow could effectively reduce the impurity of beam. And the method using the gas mass flow controller to adjust the proportion of H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} is feasible.

  11. A beam transport system for an intense He{sup -} beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Kikuchi, M.; Nagamura, T.; Sugawara, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Kobuchi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Shinto, K.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.

    2008-02-15

    We have been developing a test stand for fast He{sup 0} beam production. One of the major issues is how to transport effectively the He{sup +} and He{sup -} beams from which the He{sup 0} beam is produced. The beam should be focused in two transverse focal points, the center of the charge exchange cell and the electrostatic accelerator. We studied the beam transport system and effect of space charge neutralization in the test stand by experiments and calculation.

  12. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  13. A thermal beam of metastable krypton atoms produced by optical excitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Hu, S.-M.; Bailey, K.; Davis, A. M.; Dunford, R. W.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Science and Technology of China

    2007-02-08

    A room-temperature beam of krypton atoms in the metastable 5s[3/2]{sub 2} level is demonstrated via an optical excitation method. A Kr-discharge lamp is used to produce vacuum ultraviolet photons at 124 nm for the first-step excitation from the ground level 4p{sup 6} {sup 1}S{sub 0} to the 5s[3/2]{sub 1} level. An 819 nm Ti:sapphire laser is used for the second-step excitation from 5s[3/2]{sub 1} to 5s[3/2]{sub 2} followed by a spontaneous decay to the 5s[3/2]{sub 2} metastable level. A metastable atomic beam with an angular flux density of 3 x 10{sup 14} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} is achieved at the total gas flow rate of 0.01 cm{sup 3}/s at STP (or 3 x 10{sup 17} at./s). The dependences of the flux on the gas flow rate, laser power, and lamp parameters are investigated.

  14. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain

  15. The development of the radio frequency driven negative ion source for neutral beam injectors (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, W.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.

    2012-02-01

    Large and powerful negative hydrogen ion sources are required for the neutral beam injection (NBI) systems of future fusion devices. Simplicity and maintenance-free operation favors RF sources, which are developed intensively at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) since many years. The negative hydrogen ions are generated by caesium-enhanced surface conversion of atoms and positive ions on the plasma grid surface. With a small scale prototype the required high ion current density and the low fraction of co-extracted electrons at low pressure as well as stable pulses up to 1 h could be demonstrated. The modular design allows extension to large source dimensions. This has led to the decision to choose RF sources for the NBI of the international fusion reactor, ITER. As an intermediate step towards the full size ITER source at IPP, the development will be continued with a half-size source on the new ELISE testbed. This will enable to gain experience for the first time with negative hydrogen ion beams from RF sources of these dimensions.

  16. Multiple-Beam Detection of Fast Transient Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been designed for using multiple independent stations to discriminate fast transient radio sources from local anomalies, such as antenna noise or radio frequency interference (RFI). This can improve the sensitivity of incoherent detection for geographically separated stations such as the very long baseline array (VLBA), the future square kilometer array (SKA), or any other coincident observations by multiple separated receivers. The transients are short, broadband pulses of radio energy, often just a few milliseconds long, emitted by a variety of exotic astronomical phenomena. They generally represent rare, high-energy events making them of great scientific value. For RFI-robust adaptive detection of transients, using multiple stations, a family of algorithms has been developed. The technique exploits the fact that the separated stations constitute statistically independent samples of the target. This can be used to adaptively ignore RFI events for superior sensitivity. If the antenna signals are independent and identically distributed (IID), then RFI events are simply outlier data points that can be removed through robust estimation such as a trimmed or Winsorized estimator. The alternative "trimmed" estimator is considered, which excises the strongest n signals from the list of short-beamed intensities. Because local RFI is independent at each antenna, this interference is unlikely to occur at many antennas on the same step. Trimming the strongest signals provides robustness to RFI that can theoretically outperform even the detection performance of the same number of antennas at a single site. This algorithm requires sorting the signals at each time step and dispersion measure, an operation that is computationally tractable for existing array sizes. An alternative uses the various stations to form an ensemble estimate of the conditional density function (CDF) evaluated at each time step. Both methods outperform standard detection strategies on a test

  17. RAMPING UP THE SNS BEAM CURRENT WITH THE LBNL BASELINE H- SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Newland, Denny J; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two years the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has ramped up the repetition rate, pulse length, and the beam current to reach 540 kW, which has challenged many subsystems including the H- source designed and built by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This paper discusses the major modifications of the H- source implemented to consistently and routinely output the beam current required by the SNS beam power ramp up plan. At this time, 32 mA LINAC beam current are routinely produced, which meets the requirement for 690 kW planned for end of 2008. In June 2008, a 14-day production run used 37 mA, which is close to the 38 mA required for 1.44 MW. A medium energy beam transport (MEBT) beam current of 46 mA was demonstrated on September 2, 2008.

  18. White beam slits and pink beam slits for the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Maser, J.; Powers, T.; Schmidt, O.; Rossi, E.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a clean cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam. The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.

  19. White Beam Slits and Pink Beam Slits for the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Powers, T.; Schmidt, O.; Rossi, E.; Maser, J.

    2007-01-19

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a clean cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam.The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits' accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.

  20. Design of a neutrino source based on beta beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildner, E.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Stora, T.; Mendonca, T. Melo; Vlachoudis, V.; Bouquerel, E.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophime, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Chancé, A.; Payet, J.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Mezzetto, M.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Hass, M.; Berkovits, D.; Stahl, A.; Schaumann, M.; Wehner, J.

    2014-07-01

    "Beta beams" produce collimated pure electron (anti)neutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and having them decay in a racetrack shaped storage ring of 7 km circumference, the decay ring. EUROnu beta beams are based on CERN infrastructures and existing machines. Using existing machines may be an advantage for the cost evaluation, but will also constrain the physics performance. The isotope pair of choice for the beta beam is He6 and Ne18. However, before the EUROnu studies one of the required isotopes, Ne18, could not be produced in rates that satisfy the needs for physics of the beta beam. Therefore, studies of alternative beta emitters, Li8 and B8, with properties interesting for a beta beam have been proposed and have been studied within EUROnu. These alternative isotopes could be produced by using a small storage ring, in which the beam traverses a target, creating the Li8 and B8 isotopes. This production ring, the injection linac and the target system have been evaluated. Measurements of the cross section of the reactions to produce the beta beam isotopes show interesting results. A device to collect the produced isotopes from the target has been developed and tested. However, the yields of Li8 and B8, using the production ring for production of Li8 and B8, is not yet, according to simulations, giving the rates of isotopes that would be needed. Therefore, a new method of producing the Ne18 isotope has been developed and tested giving good production rates. A 60 GHz ECRIS prototype, the first in the world, was developed and tested for ion production with contributions from EUROnu. The decay ring lattices for the Li8 and B8 have been developed and the lattice for He6 and Ne18 has been optimized to ensure the high intensity ion beam stability.

  1. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H-beam formation and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Roderich

    2009-01-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as d. c. discharge- and rf-driven multicusp sources. Penning-type and ECR-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber-. and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed. ionization mechanism, beam formation and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  2. Development of a lithium liquid metal ion source for MeV ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Maskrey, J.T.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium liquid metal ion sources are an attractive complement to the existing gaseous ion sources that are extensively used for ion beam analysis. This is due in part to the high brightness of the liquid metal ion source and in part to the availability of a lithium ion beam. High brightness is of particular importance to MeV ion microprobes which are now approaching current density limitations on targets determined by the ion source. The availability of a lithium beam provides increased capabilities for hydrogen profiling and high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. This paper describes the design and performance of a lithium liquid metal ion source suitable for use on a 5MV Laddertron accelerator. Operational experience with the source and some of its uses for ion beam analysis are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Jolly, S.; Pozimski, J.; Savage, P.; Woods, M.

    2008-02-15

    The ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  4. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H(-) Penning surface plasma ion source.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Gabor, C; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T; Jolly, S; Pozimski, J; Savage, P; Woods, M

    2008-02-01

    The ISIS H(-) Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  5. Preliminary result of rapid solenoid for controlling heavy-ion beam parameters of laser ion source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Okamura, M.; Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.

    2015-03-13

    To realize a heavy ion inertial fusion driver, we have studied a possibility of laser ion source (LIS). A LIS can provide high current high brightness heavy ion beams, however it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters. To overcome the issue, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The rapid ramping magnetic field could enhance limited time slice of the current and simultaneously the beam emittance changed accordingly. This approach may also useful to realize an ion source for HIF power plant.

  6. Error Sources for Gravitational Wave Sensors using Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2011-04-01

    Proposals were made in 2008 for using two atom interferometers with laser links between them as gravitational wave sensors (S. Dimopoulos et al., PRD 78, 122002 (2008)). However, the importance of fluctuations in the laser wavefront aberrations over periods of seconds to minutes was overlooked in these proposals. For the AGIS-Sat 3 proposal, the total path length would be 10,000 km, and the laser wavefront aberration fluctuations would have to be attenuated to a level of 2 × 10-9 wavelengths in order to achieve the quoted gravitational wave sensitivity. For the AGIS-Sat 2 proposal, the requirement would be a factor 10 less severe. In addition, the atom cloud temperature fluctuations from cloud to cloud would have to be less than 0.2 pK and 2 pK for the two proposed missions. More recently, a proposal for a gravitational wave mission called AGIS-LEO at 1000 km altitude in Earth orbit has been made (J. M. Hogan et al., arXiv:1009.2702v1, 14 Sept. 2010). For this mission, the atom interferometer separation would be 30 km, and the wavefront aberration jitter would need to be reduced to 2 × 10-8 wavelengths. Some steps toward mitigation of the wavefront aberration jitter problem are mentioned, including possible use of an extra initial laser propagation path and a mode-scrubbing cavity. However, the requirements on such filtering systems appear to be severe.

  7. Terahertz radiation source based on self-wake beam bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey; Jing Chunguang; Schoessow, Paul; Kanareykin, Alexei; Jiang Bo; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zholents, Alexander; Gai Wei

    2012-12-21

    A table top device for producing high power T-ray beams is described. A rectangular electron beam that can be produced out of a photoinjector via stacking of the laser pulse, and running off-crest of the photoinjector rf is sent through a dielectric loaded waveguide. Due to the beam's self-wake its energy becomes modulated. In the chicane beamline following the dielectric energy-bunching section this energy modulation is converted to a density modulation-a bunch train. The density modulated beam can be sent through a power extraction section, like a dielectric loaded accelerating structure, or simply can intercept a foil target, producing THz radiation of various bandwidths and power levels.

  8. Ion sources for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1993-12-31

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the 25-MV tandem accelerator for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams to energies appropriate for research in nuclear physics; negative ion beams are, therefore, required for injection into the tandem accelerator. Because charge exchange is an efficient means for converting initially positive ion beams to negative ion beams, both positive and negative ion sources are viable options for use at the facility; the choice of the type of ion source will depend on the overall efficiency for generating the radioactive species of interest. A high-temperature version of the CERN-ISOLDE positive ion source has been selected and a modified version of the source designed and fabricated for initial use at the HRIBF because of its low emittance, relatively high ionization efficiencies and species versatility, and because it has been engineered for remote installation, removal and servicing as required for safe handling in a high-radiation-level ISOL facility. Prototype plasma-sputter negative ion sources and negative surface-ionization sources are also under design consideration for generating negative radioactive ion beams from high-electron-affinity elements. The design features of these sources and expected efficiencies and beam qualities (emittances) will be described in this report.

  9. Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Spence, D.; Lykke, K.

    1998-08-04

    A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H{sup +}, D{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sup +}, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}, among others, with the most effective being water (H{sub 2}O) and deuterated water (D{sub 2}O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H{sup +}) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D{sup +}). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 2}{sup +}, D{sub 3}{sup +}, into the desired ion species, H{sup +} and D{sup +}, respectively. 4 figs.

  10. Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Spence, David; Lykke, Keith

    1998-01-01

    A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H.sup.+, D.sup.+, O.sup.+, N.sup.+, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H.sub.2 O, D.sub.2 O, O.sub.2, and SF.sub.6, among others, with the most effective being water (H.sub.2 O) and deuterated water (D.sub.2 O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H.sup.+) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D.sup.+). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H.sub.2.sup.+,H.sub.3.sup.+ and D.sub.2.sup.+, D.sub.3.sup.+, into the desired ion species, H.sup.+ and D.sup.+, respectively.

  11. Numerical simulation of a triode source of intense radial converging electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeyev, V.; Engelko, V.; Ovsyannikov, A.; Ovsyannikov, D.; Ponomarev, V.; Fetzer, R.; Mueller, G.

    2016-10-01

    The results of numerical simulations of a triode source of an intense radial converging electron beam are presented. The role of the initial transverse velocity of electrons, defocusing effect of the controlling grid, the beam self-magnetic field, backscattering of electrons, and ion flow from the target is analyzed. It was found that the ion flow from the target essentially increases the value of the electron current. The influence of the beam self-magnetic field on electron trajectories leads to the fact that there is a critical value of the cathode-grid voltage dividing the mode of the source operation into stable and unstable. The influence of initial transverse electron energies on the beam focusing is essentially higher than the influence of the controlling grid. Backscattering of the beam electrons from the target surface increases the target ion current so that the source operation may become unstable and the distribution of the beam power density on the target becomes nonuniform with a maximum in the center. Electrons passing by the target drift along the source axis. This leads to diminishing the power density at the center of the target and to the exit of peripheral electrons from the source. Conditions for achieving required electron beam parameters (the electron kinetic energy—120 keV, the beam energy density on the target ˜40 J/cm2 on a maximum possible length of the target surface) were determined.

  12. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  13. 120-kV testing of a 10 x 40-cm prototype of the U. S. common long pulse neutral beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.D.; Owren, H.M.; Paterson, J.A.; Pincosy, P.A.; Pyle, R.; Wells, R.P.; Vella, M.C.

    1986-11-01

    The 10 x 40-cm long pulse neutral beam source developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been selected as the prototype for the design of the U. S. common long pulse source to be used on tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR), Doublet-III, and mirror fusion test facility (MFTF-B). The long pulse source consists of a magnetic line cusp bucket with an actively cooled backplate electron dump and a four-grid accelerator using slot apertures and water-cooled molybdenum rails. Deuterium testing of the long pulse source at 120 kV and 53 A and with a 2-s pulse length has been completed on the neutral beam engineering test facility, including an 8-h 100-shot test to demonstrate the durability and reliability of the source. Maximum 2-s beam parameters obtained (not simultaneously) are 125 kV, 58 A (deuterium), and 7.1 MW. Beam pulse length has been extended to 5 s at 120 kV. Atomic species fractions in excess of 80% have been obtained, with a beam divergence (full energy, 1/e half-angle) of approximately 0.8 x 0.4/sup 0/. Calorimetric measurements on the accelerator grids and backplate electron dump indicate heat loads consistent with predictions and within the design limits of the source. This testing has verified the design of the source and its ability to exceed the basic performance requirements.

  14. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shornikov, A.; Wenander, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  15. Stray light reduction in optical computed tomography using a convergent cone-beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin; Dekker, Kurtis; Battista, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    The planar diffuser light source for a cone-beam optical CT scanner was replaced with a filtered LED and large Fresnel lens. The source was focused on a camera and convergent cone-beam images were acquired. Images are sensitive to mismatches in the refractive index of vessels, samples and matching liquid. For PETE jars and water solutions, a loss of approximately 30% of the projections was demonstrated. Teflon PFA cylinders provided better refractive index matching and more accurate reconstructions. The convergent cone-beam source dramatically increased imaging efficiency by a factor of 1000 and reduced stray light levels by confining illumination to image forming rays.

  16. Spatially resolved measurements of electron cyclotron resonance ion source beam profile characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-03-15

    Simulations predict that the concentric rings and the triangular structures in the profiles of strongly focused ion beams that are found in different experiments should be dominated by ion species with the same or at least similar m/q-ratio. To verify these theoretical predictions we have tuned our ECR ion source to deliver a beam consisting of multiple ion species whose particular m/q-depending focusing ranges from weakly focused to overfocused. We then recorded spatially resolved charge-state distributions of the beam profile at characteristic positions in the plane perpendicular to the beam line. The results validate theoretical predictions and are summarized in this paper. To achieve the required beam profile characteristics we moved the extraction along the beam line to achieve stronger focusing than by only changing the extraction voltage. To fit the regions of interest of the beam profile into the transmission area of the sector magnet, we steered the beam by moving the extraction in the plane perpendicular to the beam axis. The results of both investigations, beam focusing and beam steering by using a 3D-movable extraction, are also reported in this paper. A brief overview of the new beam monitor extensively used during these measurements, the Faraday cup array, is also given.

  17. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Zschornack, G.; Ullmann, F.; Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L.

    2012-02-15

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au{sup 60+}. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

  18. Ion Beam Control and Transistor Characteristics for 45 nm Source-Drain Extension Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, K.; Nishikawa, M.; Mori, T.; Kase, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kurata, H.; Satoh, S.

    2008-11-03

    The beam trajectory and divergence angle is systematically examined with ion source parts degradation and focusing condition. We clarified that the variation and drive current of NMOSFET transistor characteristics are related the beam angle conditions, using our advanced logic transistor of 45 nm low stand-by power and high performance device technology. We can propose the practical condition to become insensitive to ion beam angle degradation and some gain of drive current of MOSFET is achieved.

  19. LONGITUDINAL MISMATCH IN SCL AS A SOURCE OF BEAM HALO.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.

    2003-06-19

    An advantage of a proton Super-conducting Linac (SCL) is that RF cavities can be operated independently, allowing easier beam transport: and acceleration. But cavities are to be separated by drifts long enough to avoid they couple to each other. Moreover, cavities are placed in cryostats that include inactive insertions for cold-warm transitions; and interspersed are warm insertions for magnets and other devices. The SCL is then an alternating sequence of accelerating elements and drifts. No periodicity is present, and the longitudinal motion is not adiabatic. This has the consequence that the beam bunch ellipse will tumble, dilute and create a halo in the momentum plane because of inherent nonlinearities. When this is coupled to longitudinal space-charge forces, it may cause beam loss with latent activation of the accelerator components.

  20. Beam position monitor design for a third generation light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhichu; Leng, Yongbin; Ye, Kairong; Zhao, Guobi; Yuan, Renxian

    2014-11-01

    The measurement of the beam orbit plays a very important role in particle accelerators. The button-type beam position monitor (BPM) was designed for the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility to reduce the impedances and to guarantee a high resolution of the measurement. Position resolution, beam impedance, higher-order mode, and impedance matching have been studied during the design based on the physical parameters of the storage ring at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Meanwhile, an analytic formula of the BPM broadband impedance was derived based on a resistor-capacitor equivalent circuit. Thus, the impedance of the BPM could be analyzed quantitatively by simply measuring the capacitance of the electrode. This formula had been verified by comparing the results of the calculations of the formula and the simulations in MAFIA.

  1. LINEAR ELECTROSTATIC INSTABILITY OF THE ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Litwin, C.; Vella, M.C.; Sessler, A.

    1981-12-01

    Linear plasma fluid theory is used to study the stability of a cold electron beam in Brillouin equilibrium which passes through a stationary cold ion background, with particular interest in stability for parameters relevant to EBIS devices. Dispersion is studied both analytically and numerically. For {ell}=0, the usual infinite medium two stream instability condition is shown to correspond to a requirement that beam perveance exceed a minimum value, P>33 {micro}pervs; hence, this mode is stable for EBIS (P {approx} l{micro}perv). The Brillouin equilibrium rotation is shown to cause an electron-ion rotating stream instability, which is convectively unstable. The {ell}=1 mode is also found to be unstable. Higher modes numbers, {ell}>1, are unstable, but have reduced growth. Instability is only weakly affected by finite beam radius and boundary conditions.

  2. Ramping Up the SNS Beam Power with the LBNL Baseline H- source

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Newland, Denny J; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    LBNL designed and built the Frontend for the Spallation Neutron Source, including its H- source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). This paper discusses the performance of the H- source and LEBT during the commissioning of the accelerator, as well as their performance while ramping up the SNS beam power to 540 kW. Detailed discussions of major shortcomings and their mitigations are presented to illustrate the effort needed to take even a well-designed R&D ion source into operation. With these modifications, at 4% duty factor the LBNL H- source meets the essential requirements that were set at the beginning of the project.

  3. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  4. Synthesis of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films on nickel foils by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhaie, S.; Wofford, J. M.; Schumann, T.; Jahn, U.; Ramsteiner, M.; Hanke, M.; Lopes, J. M. J. Riechert, H.

    2015-05-25

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered two-dimensional material with properties that make it promising as a dielectric in various applications. We report the growth of h-BN films on Ni foils from elemental B and N using molecular beam epitaxy. The presence of crystalline h-BN over the entire substrate is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy is used to examine the morphology and continuity of the synthesized films. A scanning electron microscopy study of films obtained using shorter depositions offers insight into the nucleation and growth behavior of h-BN on the Ni substrate. The morphology of h-BN was found to evolve from dendritic, star-shaped islands to larger, smooth triangular ones with increasing growth temperature.

  5. Crossed-beam DC slice imaging of fluorine atom reactions with linear alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Joalland, Baptiste; Suits, Arthur G.

    2015-05-14

    We report the reaction dynamics of F atom with selected alkanes studied by crossed beam scattering with DC slice ion imaging. The target alkanes are propane, n-butane, and n-pentane. The product alkyl radicals are probed by 157 nm single photon ionization following reaction at a collision energy of ∼10 kcal mol{sup −1}. The analyzed data are compared with the corresponding theoretical studies. Reduced translational energy distributions for each system show similar trends with little of the reaction exoergicity appearing in translation. However, the pentane reaction shows a somewhat smaller fraction of available energy in translation than the other two, suggesting greater energy channeled into pentyl internal degrees of freedom. The center-of-mass angular distributions all show backscattering as well as sharp forward scattering that decreases in relative intensity with the size of the molecule. Possible reasons for these trends are discussed.

  6. Isotope shift in erbium I by laser-atomic-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, H.; Matsuki, S.

    1987-04-01

    High-resolution laser spectroscopy has been performed on an atomic beam of natural erbium isotopes. The isotope shift in the 582.7 nm transitions [4f126s2( 3H6)-->4f12( 3H6)66( 3P01)J=7] for the pairs of 162,164,166,167,168,170Er I was obtained with an accuracy of about 4 MHz. Relative changes of mean-square nuclear charge radii δ for these isotopes were thus deduced. The isotope shift in 167Er, obtained from the well-resolved hyperfine components, shows similar even-odd staggering effect in δ found in the nearby elements.

  7. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  8. An electrostatic glass actuator for ultrahigh vacuum: A rotating light trap for continuous beams of laser-cooled atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fuezesi, F.; Jornod, A.; Thomann, P.; Plimmer, M. D.; Dudle, G.; Moser, R.; Sache, L.; Bleuler, H.

    2007-10-15

    This article describes the design, characterization, and performance of an electrostatic glass actuator adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum environment (10{sup -8} mbar). The three-phase rotary motor is used to drive a turbine that acts as a velocity-selective light trap for a slow continuous beam of laser-cooled atoms. This simple, compact, and nonmagnetic device should find applications in the realm of time and frequency metrology, as well as in other areas of atomic, molecular physics and elsewhere.

  9. An electrostatic glass actuator for ultrahigh vacuum: A rotating light trap for continuous beams of laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füzesi, F.; Jornod, A.; Thomann, P.; Plimmer, M. D.; Dudle, G.; Moser, R.; Sache, L.; Bleuler, H.

    2007-10-01

    This article describes the design, characterization, and performance of an electrostatic glass actuator adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum environment (10-8mbar). The three-phase rotary motor is used to drive a turbine that acts as a velocity-selective light trap for a slow continuous beam of laser-cooled atoms. This simple, compact, and nonmagnetic device should find applications in the realm of time and frequency metrology, as well as in other areas of atomic, molecular physics and elsewhere.

  10. Collisional and Radiative Processes in Adiabatic Deceleration, Deflection, and Off-Axis Trapping of a Rydberg Atom Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, Ch.; Hogan, S. D.; Schmutz, H.; Agner, J. A.; Merkt, F.

    2011-02-18

    A supersonic beam of Rydberg hydrogen atoms has been adiabatically deflected by 90 deg., decelerated to zero velocity in less than 25 {mu}s, and loaded into an electric trap. The deflection has allowed the suppression of collisions with atoms in the trailing part of the gas pulse. The processes leading to trap losses, i.e., fluorescence to the ground state, and transitions and ionization induced by blackbody radiation have been monitored over several milliseconds and quantitatively analyzed.

  11. 200-mm-diameter neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma etcher and silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Nukaga, Osamu; Ueki, Shinji; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Inamoto, Yoshimasa; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-09-15

    The authors developed a neutral beam source consisting of a 200-mm-diameter inductively coupled plasma etcher and a graphite neutralization aperture plate based on the design of a neutral beam source that Samukawa et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 40, L779 (2001)] developed. They measured flux and energy of neutral particles, ions, and photons using a silicon wafer with a thermocouple and a Faraday cup and calculated the neutralization efficiency. An Ar neutral beam flux of more than 1 mA/cm{sup 2} in equivalent current density and a neutralization efficiency of more than 99% were obtained. The spatial uniformity of the neutral beam flux was within {+-}6% within a 100 mm diameter. Silicon etching using a F{sub 2}-based neutral beam was done at an etch rate of about 47 nm/min, while Cl{sub 2}-based neutral beam realized completely no undercut. The uniformity of etch rate was less than {+-}5% within the area. The etch rate increased by applying bias power to the neutralization aperture plate, which shows that accelerated neutral beam was successfully obtained. These results indicate that the neutral beam source is scalable, making it possible to obtain a large-diameter and uniform neutral beam, which is inevitable for application to mass production.

  12. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments. PMID:27587180

  13. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  14. Interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons with mirror and mixer

    DOEpatents

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-06-01

    53 Systems and methods are described for an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device optically coupled to a source of coherent energy, the multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device i) including a mirror and a mixer and ii) converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a tunable phase adjuster optically coupled to the condenser device, the tunable phase adjuster changing a phase of at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam to generate a first interferometeric multi-color entangled photon beam; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the condenser device, the beam splitter combining the first interferometeric multi-color entangled photon beam with a second interferometric multi-color entangled photon beam.

  15. Visualization of Trajectories of Electron Beams Emitted by an IonSource with Closed Electron Drift

    SciTech Connect

    Institue of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; Brown, Ian G.; Bordenjuk, Ian V.; Panchenko, Oleg A.; Sologub, Sergei V.; Brown, Ian G.

    2007-10-01

    Trajectories of electron beams emitted by an ion source with an anode layer and Hall electron closed drift orbits were visualized using light emission from a working gas excited by electrons. Gas discharge of magnetron type, arising in the beam drift region under the influence of an electric field of a target bias potential, was visualized.

  16. 77 FR 12226 - Sadex Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of... use of electron beam and x- ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed...

  17. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  18. Summary II - Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T. T. C.

    2007-08-10

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

  19. Sources of Nuclear Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Arthur L., Jr.

    A brief outline of the historical landmarks in nuclear physics leading to the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes introduces this illustrated booklet. The distribution of known sources of uranium ores is mapped and some details about the geology of each geographical area given. Methods of prospective, mining, milling, refining, and fuel…

  20. Integrated MEMS mass sensor and atom source for a ``Fab on a Chip''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Bishop, David

    2014-03-01

    ``Fab on a Chip'' is a new concept suggesting that the semiconductor fabrication facility can be integrated into a single silicon chip for nano-manufacturing. Such a chip contains various MEMS devices which can work together, operating in a similar way as a conventional fab does, to fabricate nano-structures. Here we present two crucial ``Fab on a chip'' components: the MEMS mass sensor and atomic evaporation source. The mass sensor is essentially a parallel plate capacitor with one suspended plate. When incident atoms deposit on the suspended plate, the mass change of the plate can be measured by detecting the resonant frequency shift. Using the mass sensor, a mass resolution of 3 fg is achieved. The MEMS evaporation source consists of a polysilicon plate suspended by two electrical leads with constrictions. By resistively heating the plate, this device works as a tunable atom flux source. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one can build a multi-element atom evaporator. The mass sensor and atom source are integrated so that the mass sensor is used to monitor and characterize the atomic flux. A material source and a sensor to monitor the fabrication are two integral components for our ``Fab on a Chip.''

  1. The thermophysics of electron beam evaporative sources: Annual report, 21 April 1986-20 April 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    This report presents work accomplished in preparing equipment for study of evaporative electron beam sources. Faraday cups and x-ray imaging equipment were developed. Due to other commitments, the future of this work is uncertain. (JDH)

  2. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    PubMed

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  3. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    PubMed

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented. PMID:26931949

  4. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomae, R.; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  5. Gate-Tunable Atomically Thin Lateral MoS2 Schottky Junction Patterned by Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Y; Nakamura, T; Ishii, A; Ohata, C; Hasegawa, M; Katsumoto, S; Cusati, T; Fortunelli, A; Iannaccone, G; Fiori, G; Roche, S; Haruyama, J

    2016-06-01

    Among atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is attracting considerable attention because of its direct bandgap in the 2H-semiconducting phase. On the other hand, a 1T-metallic phase has been revealed, bringing complementary application. Recently, thanks to top-down fabrication using electron beam (EB) irradiation techniques, in-plane 1T-metal/2H-semiconductor lateral (Schottky) MoS2 junctions were demonstrated, opening a path toward the co-integration of active and passive two-dimensional devices. Here, we report the first transport measurements evidencing the formation of a MoS2 Schottky barrier (SB) junction with barrier height of 0.13-0.18 eV created at the interface between EB-irradiated (1T)/nonirradiated (2H) regions. Our experimental findings, supported by state-of-the-art simulation, reveal unique device fingerprint of SB-based field-effect transistors made from atom-thin 1T layers. PMID:27152475

  6. Gate-Tunable Atomically Thin Lateral MoS2 Schottky Junction Patterned by Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Y; Nakamura, T; Ishii, A; Ohata, C; Hasegawa, M; Katsumoto, S; Cusati, T; Fortunelli, A; Iannaccone, G; Fiori, G; Roche, S; Haruyama, J

    2016-06-01

    Among atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is attracting considerable attention because of its direct bandgap in the 2H-semiconducting phase. On the other hand, a 1T-metallic phase has been revealed, bringing complementary application. Recently, thanks to top-down fabrication using electron beam (EB) irradiation techniques, in-plane 1T-metal/2H-semiconductor lateral (Schottky) MoS2 junctions were demonstrated, opening a path toward the co-integration of active and passive two-dimensional devices. Here, we report the first transport measurements evidencing the formation of a MoS2 Schottky barrier (SB) junction with barrier height of 0.13-0.18 eV created at the interface between EB-irradiated (1T)/nonirradiated (2H) regions. Our experimental findings, supported by state-of-the-art simulation, reveal unique device fingerprint of SB-based field-effect transistors made from atom-thin 1T layers.

  7. Light and/or atomic beams to detect ultraweak gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicolò; Di Virgilio, Angela; Ortolan, Antonello; Porzio, Alberto; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2014-06-01

    We shall review the opportunities lent by ring lasers and atomic beams interferometry in order to reveal gravitomagnetic effects on Earth. Both techniques are based on the asymmetric propagation of waves in the gravitational field of a rotating mass; actually the times of flight for co- or counter-rotating closed paths turn out to be different. After discussing properties and limitations of the two approaches we shall describe the proposed GINGER experiment which is being developed for the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy. The experimental apparatus will consist of a three-dimensional array of square rings, 6m × 6m, that is planned to reach a sensitivity in the order of 1prad/√Hertz or better. This sensitivity would be one order of magnitude better than the best existing ring, which is the G-ring in Wettzell, Bavaria, and would allow for the terrestrial detection of the Lense-Thirring effect and possibly of deviations from General Relativity. The possibility of using either the ring laser approach or atomic interferometry in a space mission will also be considered. The technology problems are under experimental study using both the German G-ring and the smaller G-Pisa ring, located at the Gran Sasso.

  8. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  9. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  10. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A; Sing Babu, P; Srivastava, S; Pandit, V S

    2015-11-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results. PMID:26628123

  11. Practical constraints on sources for pulsed beam lithographies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, J.Y.; Picraux, S.T.; Light, R.W.; Hsing, W.W.

    1988-03-01

    Many of the sources currently being considered for advanced microlithography are pulsed, rather than continuous. These sources are characterized not merely by brightness and lifetime, but more generally by shot-to-shot stability, lifetime, single-pulse fluence, and repetition rate. These four characteristics are constrained by practical considerations, and, within limits, can be traded off against each other. We describe these tradeoffs and optimal source operating regimes for lithographies based on broad- and narrow-band excimer laser sources and on pulsed x-ray sources. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Performance of the H- Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Hardek, Thomas W; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F; Stockli, Martin P

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H- ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R&D activities are also briefly described.

  13. Performance of the H{sup -} Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Hardek, T.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.

    2011-09-26

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H{sup -} ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R and D activities are also briefly described.

  14. Sparse cortical source localization using spatio-temporal atoms.

    PubMed

    Korats, Gundars; Ranta, Radu; Le Cam, Steven; Louis-Dorr, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of sparse localization of cortical sources from scalp EEG recordings. Localization algorithms use propagation model under spatial and/or temporal constraints, but their performance highly depends on the data signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this work we propose a dictionary based sparse localization method which uses a data driven spatio-temporal dictionary to reconstruct the measurements using Single Best Replacement (SBR) and Continuation Single Best Replacement (CSBR) algorithms. We tested and compared our methods with the well-known MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC algorithms on simulated realistic data. Tests were carried out for different noise levels. The results show that our method has a strong advantage over MUSIC-type methods in case of synchronized sources. PMID:26737185

  15. Atomic clouds as distributed sources for the io plasma torus.

    PubMed

    Brown, R A; Ip, W H

    1981-09-25

    Several recent developments have implications for the neutral particle environment of Jupiter. Very hot sulfur ions have been detected in the Io torus with gyrospeeds comparable to the corotation speed, a phenomenon that would result from a neutral sulfur cloud. Current evidence supports the hypothesis that extensive neutral clouds of oxygen and sulfur exist in the Jupiter magnetosphere and that they are important sources of ions and energy for the Io torus.

  16. Ramping up the Spallation Neutron Source beam power with the H{sup -} source using 0 mg Cs/day

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, M. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the ramp up of the beam power for the Spallation Neutron Source by ramping up the pulse length, the repetition rate, and the beam current emerging from the H{sup -} source. Starting out with low repetition rates ({<=}10 Hz) and short pulse lengths ({<=}0.2 ms), the H{sup -} source and low-energy beam transport delivered from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory exceeded the requirements with almost perfect availability. This paper discusses the modifications that were required to exceed 0.2 ms pulse length and 0.2% duty factor with acceptable availability and performance. Currently, the source is supporting neutron production at 1 MW with 38 mA linac beam current at 60 Hz and 0.9 ms pulse length. The pulse length will be increased to {approx}1.1 ms to meet the requirements for neutron production with a power between 1 and 1.4 MW. A medium-energy beam transport (MEBT) beam current of 46 mA with a 5.4% duty factor has been demonstrated for 32 h. A 56 mA MEBT beam current with a 4.1% duty factor has been demonstrated for 20 min at the conclusion of a 12-day production run. This is close to the 59 mA needed for 3 MW neutron productions. Also notable is the Cs{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cesium system, which dispenses {approx}10 mg of Cs during the startup of the ion source, sufficient for producing the required 38 mA for 4 weeks without significant degradation.

  17. Optimization of a charge-state analyzer for electron cyclotron resonance ion source beams.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, S; Beijers, J P M; Kremers, H R; Mironov, V; Mulder, J; Brandenburg, S

    2012-07-01

    A detailed experimental and simulation study of the extraction of a 24 keV He(+) beam from an ECR ion source and the subsequent beam transport through an analyzing magnet is presented. We find that such a slow ion beam is very sensitive to space-charge forces, but also that the neutralization of the beam's space charge by secondary electrons is virtually complete for beam currents up to at least 0.5 mA. The beam emittance directly behind the extraction system is 65 π mm mrad and is determined by the fact that the ion beam is extracted in the strong magnetic fringe field of the ion source. The relatively large emittance of the beam and its non-paraxiality lead, in combination with a relatively small magnet gap, to significant beam losses and a five-fold increase of the effective beam emittance during its transport through the analyzing magnet. The calculated beam profile and phase-space distributions in the image plane of the analyzing magnet agree well with measurements. The kinematic and magnet aberrations have been studied using the calculated second-order transfer map of the analyzing magnet, with which we can reproduce the phase-space distributions of the ion beam behind the analyzing magnet. Using the transfer map and trajectory calculations we have worked out an aberration compensation scheme based on the addition of compensating hexapole components to the main dipole field by modifying the shape of the poles. The simulations predict that by compensating the kinematic and geometric aberrations in this way and enlarging the pole gap the overall beam transport efficiency can be increased from 16% to 45%. PMID:22852683

  18. Optimization of a charge-state analyzer for electron cyclotron resonance ion source beams

    SciTech Connect

    Saminathan, S.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Kremers, H. R.; Mironov, V.; Mulder, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2012-07-15

    A detailed experimental and simulation study of the extraction of a 24 keV He{sup +} beam from an ECR ion source and the subsequent beam transport through an analyzing magnet is presented. We find that such a slow ion beam is very sensitive to space-charge forces, but also that the neutralization of the beam's space charge by secondary electrons is virtually complete for beam currents up to at least 0.5 mA. The beam emittance directly behind the extraction system is 65 {pi} mm mrad and is determined by the fact that the ion beam is extracted in the strong magnetic fringe field of the ion source. The relatively large emittance of the beam and its non-paraxiality lead, in combination with a relatively small magnet gap, to significant beam losses and a five-fold increase of the effective beam emittance during its transport through the analyzing magnet. The calculated beam profile and phase-space distributions in the image plane of the analyzing magnet agree well with measurements. The kinematic and magnet aberrations have been studied using the calculated second-order transfer map of the analyzing magnet, with which we can reproduce the phase-space distributions of the ion beam behind the analyzing magnet. Using the transfer map and trajectory calculations we have worked out an aberration compensation scheme based on the addition of compensating hexapole components to the main dipole field by modifying the shape of the poles. The simulations predict that by compensating the kinematic and geometric aberrations in this way and enlarging the pole gap the overall beam transport efficiency can be increased from 16% to 45%.

  19. Optimization of a charge-state analyzer for electron cyclotron resonance ion source beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saminathan, S.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Kremers, H. R.; Mironov, V.; Mulder, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2012-07-01

    A detailed experimental and simulation study of the extraction of a 24 keV He+ beam from an ECR ion source and the subsequent beam transport through an analyzing magnet is presented. We find that such a slow ion beam is very sensitive to space-charge forces, but also that the neutralization of the beam's space charge by secondary electrons is virtually complete for beam currents up to at least 0.5 mA. The beam emittance directly behind the extraction system is 65 π mm mrad and is determined by the fact that the ion beam is extracted in the strong magnetic fringe field of the ion source. The relatively large emittance of the beam and its non-paraxiality lead, in combination with a relatively small magnet gap, to significant beam losses and a five-fold increase of the effective beam emittance during its transport through the analyzing magnet. The calculated beam profile and phase-space distributions in the image plane of the analyzing magnet agree well with measurements. The kinematic and magnet aberrations have been studied using the calculated second-order transfer map of the analyzing magnet, with which we can reproduce the phase-space distributions of the ion beam behind the analyzing magnet. Using the transfer map and trajectory calculations we have worked out an aberration compensation scheme based on the addition of compensating hexapole components to the main dipole field by modifying the shape of the poles. The simulations predict that by compensating the kinematic and geometric aberrations in this way and enlarging the pole gap the overall beam transport efficiency can be increased from 16% to 45%.

  20. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  1. In situ study of erosion and deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films by exposure to a hydrogen atom beam

    SciTech Connect

    Markelj, Sabina; Pelicon, Primoz; Cadez, Iztok; Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Jacob, Wolfgang

    2012-07-15

    This paper reports on the first dual-beam experiment employing a hydrogen atom beam for sample exposure and an ion beam for analysis, enabling in situ and real-time studies of hydrogen atom interaction with materials. The erosion of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) layer by deuterium atoms at 580 K sample temperature was studied and the uptake of deuterium during the erosion process was measured in real time. The deuterium areal density increased at the beginning to 7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}, but then stabilized at a constant value of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}. Formation of a polymer-like deposit on an a-C:H layer held at room temperature and subjected to the deuterium atom beam was observed and also studied in situ. For both erosion and deposition studies an a-{sup 13}C:H layer on top of an Si substrate was used as a sample, making the experiments isotopically fully specified and thereby differentiating the deposited from the original layer and the interacting D atoms from H atoms present in the layer and in the residual vacuum. From the deposition study it was shown that carbon in the deposited layer originates from carbon-carrying species in the background vacuum that interact with hydrogen atoms. The areal density of the carbon at the surface was determined from the energy shift of the Si edge in the Rutherford backscattering spectrum. The cross section for {sup 7}Li on D at 4.3 MeV Li ion energy and at a recoil angle of 30 Degree-Sign was also determined to be (236 {+-} 16) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}/sr. This is a factor of 3 {+-} 0.2 times higher than the Rutherford elastic cross section.

  2. An ion source module for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, B. Huang, Q.; Tang, B.; Ma, R.; Chen, L.; Ma, Y.

    2014-02-15

    An ion source module is developed for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility. The ion source module is designed to meet the requirements of remote handling. The connection and disconnection of the electricity, cooling and vacuum between the module and peripheral units can be executed without on-site manual work. The primary test of the target ion source has been carried out and a Li{sup +} beam has been extracted. Details of the ion source module and its primary test results are described.

  3. Two-stage crossed beam cooling with ⁶Li and ¹³³Cs atoms in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian; Yao, Hepeng; Wang, Lu; Li, Chen; Yang, Shifeng; Chen, Xuzong; Ma, Zhaoyuan

    2015-05-01

    Applying the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method developed for ultracold Bose-Fermi mixture gases research, we study the sympathetic cooling process of 6Li and 133Cs atoms in a crossed optical dipole trap. The obstacles to producing 6Li Fermi degenerate gas via direct sympathetic cooling with 133Cs are also analyzed, by which we find that the side-effect of the gravity is one of the main obstacles. Based on the dynamic nature of 6Li and 133Cs atoms, we suggest a two-stage cooling process with two pairs of crossed beams in microgravity environment. According to our simulations, the temperature of 6Li atoms can be cooled to T = 29.5 pK and T/TF = 0.59 with several thousand atoms, which propose a novel way to get ultracold fermion atoms with quantum degeneracy near pico-Kelvin.

  4. Two-stage crossed beam cooling with ⁶Li and ¹³³Cs atoms in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian; Yao, Hepeng; Wang, Lu; Li, Chen; Yang, Shifeng; Chen, Xuzong; Ma, Zhaoyuan

    2015-05-01

    Applying the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method developed for ultracold Bose-Fermi mixture gases research, we study the sympathetic cooling process of 6Li and 133Cs atoms in a crossed optical dipole trap. The obstacles to producing 6Li Fermi degenerate gas via direct sympathetic cooling with 133Cs are also analyzed, by which we find that the side-effect of the gravity is one of the main obstacles. Based on the dynamic nature of 6Li and 133Cs atoms, we suggest a two-stage cooling process with two pairs of crossed beams in microgravity environment. According to our simulations, the temperature of 6Li atoms can be cooled to T = 29.5 pK and T/TF = 0.59 with several thousand atoms, which propose a novel way to get ultracold fermion atoms with quantum degeneracy near pico-Kelvin. PMID:25969232

  5. Development of ion source with a washer gun for pulsed neutral beam injection.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kajiya, H; Takahashi, T; Imanaka, H; Takase, Y; Ono, Y; Sato, K N

    2008-06-01

    A new type of economical neutral beam source has been developed by using a single washer gun, pulsed operation, and a simple electrode system. We replaced the conventional hot filaments for arc-discharge-type plasma formation with a single stainless-steel washer gun, eliminating the entire dc power supply for the filaments and the cooling system for the electrodes. Our initial experiments revealed successful beam extraction up to 10 kV and 8.6 A, based on spatial profile measurements of density and temperature in the plasma source. The system also shows the potential to control the beam profile by controlling the plasma parameters in the ion accumulation chamber.

  6. Injector Beam Dynamics for a High-Repetition Rate 4th-Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, C. F.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Filippetto, D.; Penn, G.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.

    2013-05-20

    We report on the beam dynamics studies and optimization methods for a high repetition rate (1 MHz) photoinjector based on a VHF normal conducting electron source. The simultaneous goals of beamcompression and reservation of 6-dimensional beam brightness have to be achieved in the injector, in order to accommodate a linac driven FEL light source. For this, a parallel, multiobjective optimization algorithm is used. We discuss the relative merits of different injector design points, as well as the constraints imposed on the beam dynamics by technical considerations such as the high repetition rate.

  7. Proton beam production by a laser ion source with hydride target.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Stifler, C; Palm, K; Steski, D; Ikeda, S; Kumaki, M; Kanesue, T

    2016-02-01

    We studied proton beam production from a laser ion source using hydrogen rich target materials. In general, gas based species are not suitable for laser ion sources since formation of a dense laser target is difficult. In order to achieve reliable operation, we tested hydride targets using a sub nanosecond Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, which may help suppress target material consumption. We detected enough yields of protons from a titanium hydride target without degradation of beam current during the experiment. The combination of a sub nanosecond laser and compressed hydride target may provide stable proton beam. PMID:26931967

  8. Characterization of proton beam emission from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. K.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.

    2013-04-01

    We report here characterization of the ions produced in the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) at RRCAT, which operates at 2.45 GHz and is aimed to produce a 50 keV, 30 mA proton beam. The plasma in the source was created using microwave power in the range of 150-1200 W. An efficient, single hole, three-electrode ion extraction system was employed to extract the ion beam from the ECRIS, and the extracted ion beam was characterized using a Thomson Parabola Ion Spectrograph, which provides complete information of all the differently charged species present in the plasma. The extracted ion beam current measured up to 8 mA beam current for 25 keV accelerating field and followed the Child-Langmuir law.

  9. Simulation of ultrasonic surface waves with multi-Gaussian and point source beam models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xinyu; Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Li, Xiongbing; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    In the past decade, multi-Gaussian beam models have been developed to solve many complicated bulk wave propagation problems. However, to date those models have not been extended to simulate the generation of Rayleigh waves. Here we will combine Gaussian beams with an explicit high frequency expression for the Rayleigh wave Green function to produce a three-dimensional multi-Gaussian beam model for the fields radiated from an angle beam transducer mounted on a solid wedge. Simulation results obtained with this model are compared to those of a point source model. It is shown that the multi-Gaussian surface wave beam model agrees well with the point source model while being computationally much more efficient.

  10. Propagation characteristics of Bessel beams generated by continuous, incoherent light sources.

    PubMed

    Altıngöz, Ceren; Yalızay, Berna; Akturk, Selcuk

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the propagation behavior of Bessel beams generated by incoherent, continuous light sources. We perform experiments with narrowband and broadband light emitting diodes, and, for comparison, with a laser diode. We observe that the formation of Bessel beams is affected minimally by temporal coherence, while spatial coherence determines the longitudinal evolution of the beam profile. With spatially incoherent beams, the fringe contrast is comparable to the coherent case at the beginning of the Bessel zone, while it completely fades away by propagation, turning into a cylindrical light pipe. Our results show that beam shaping methods can be extended to cases of limited spatial coherence, paving the way for potential new uses and applications of such sources.

  11. Propagation characteristics of Bessel beams generated by continuous, incoherent light sources.

    PubMed

    Altıngöz, Ceren; Yalızay, Berna; Akturk, Selcuk

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the propagation behavior of Bessel beams generated by incoherent, continuous light sources. We perform experiments with narrowband and broadband light emitting diodes, and, for comparison, with a laser diode. We observe that the formation of Bessel beams is affected minimally by temporal coherence, while spatial coherence determines the longitudinal evolution of the beam profile. With spatially incoherent beams, the fringe contrast is comparable to the coherent case at the beginning of the Bessel zone, while it completely fades away by propagation, turning into a cylindrical light pipe. Our results show that beam shaping methods can be extended to cases of limited spatial coherence, paving the way for potential new uses and applications of such sources. PMID:26367302

  12. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    PubMed Central

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  13. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  14. A simple velocity-tunable pulsed atomic source of slow metastable argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Loize, T.; Aljunid, S. A.; Correia, F.; Fabre, N.; Perales, F.; Tualle, J. M.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.; Dutier, G.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed beam of metastable argon atoms having a low tunable velocity (10 to 150 m s-1) is produced with a very substantial brightness (9  ×  108Ar* s-1 sr-1). The present original experimental configuration leads to a variable velocity dispersion that can be smaller than the standard Brownian one. This behaviour, analysed using Monte Carlo simulations, exhibits momentum stretching (heating) or narrowing (cooling) entirely due to a subtle combination of Doppler and Zeeman effects.

  15. A free jet (supersonic), molecular beam source with automatized, 50 nm precision nozzle-skimmer positioning.

    PubMed

    Eder, S D; Samelin, B; Bracco, G; Ansperger, K; Holst, B

    2013-09-01

    Low energy (thermal) free jet (supersonic) molecular beams are used in a range of applications from surface science and surface deposition to quantum coherence and gas kinetics experiments. A free jet molecular beam is created by a gas expansion from a high pressure reservoir through a small aperture (nozzle). The nozzle typically has a diameter of 2-20 μm. The central part of the beam is selected using a skimmer, typically up to 500 μm in diameter. Recent years have seen the introduction of highly spatially confined beam sources based on micrometer skimmers and micrometer or even sub-micrometer nozzles. Such sources have been applied, for example, in the investigation of superfluidity and in neutral helium microscopy. However, up till now no source design allowing the precise positioning of the micro-skimmer relative to the nozzle has been available. This is an important issue because the relative position of skimmer and nozzle can influence the beam properties considerably. Here we present the design and implementation of a new molecular beam source, which allows an automatized, 50 nm precision positioning of the skimmer relative to the nozzle. The source is liquid nitrogen cooled and the temperature can be controlled between 110 K and 350 K with a temperature fluctuation of less than ±0.1 K over several hours. Beam intensity measurements using a 5 μm nozzle and a skimmer 5 μm in diameter are presented for stagnation pressures po in the range 3-180 bars. A 2D beam profile scan, using a 9.5 μm skimmer and a 5 μm nozzle is presented as a further documentation of the versatility of the new design and as an illustration of the influence of the relative skimmer-nozzle position on the beam properties.

  16. Metal negative ion beam extraction from a radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, S.; Yamada, N.; Kasuya, T.; Romero, C. F. P.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A metal ion source of magnetron magnetic field geometry has been designed and operated with a Cu hollow target. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz is directly supplied to the hollow target to maintain plasma discharge and induce self-bias to the target for sputtering. The extraction of positive and negative Cu ion beams have been tested. The ion beam current ratio of Cu{sup +} to Ar{sup +} has reached up to 140% when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. Cu{sup −} ion beam was observed at 50 W RF discharge power and at a higher Ar gas pressure in the ion source. Improvement of poor RF power matching and suppression of electron current is indispensable for a stable Cu{sup −} ion beam production from the source.

  17. Negative hydrogen ion beam extracted from a Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N.; Wada, M.

    2011-09-26

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup -}) ion beam was produced without cesium seeding by a Bernas-type ion source with a coaxial hot cathode. The amount of H{sup -} ion beam current extracted from an original Bernas-type ion source using a hairpin shape filament as a hot cathode was 1 {mu}A with the 0.4 A arc current, while that 300 eV beam energy. In the other hand, H{sup -} ion beam current using the Bernas-type ion source with a coaxial hot cathode reached 4 {mu}A under the same condition. Production efficiency was enhanced by the focused plasma produced by a coaxial hot cathode.

  18. Electrical shielding box measurement of the negative hydrogen beam from Penning ion gauge ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Long, J. D.; He, X. Z.; Zhang, K. Z.; Zhang, L. W.; Wang, X.

    2012-06-15

    The cold-cathode Penning ion gauge (PIG) type ion source has been used for generation of negative hydrogen (H{sup -}) ions as the internal ion source of a compact cyclotron. A novel method called electrical shielding box dc beam measurement is described in this paper, and the beam intensity was measured under dc extraction inside an electrical shielding box. The results of the trajectory simulation and dc H{sup -} beam extraction measurement were presented. The effect of gas flow rate, magnetic field strength, arc current, and extraction voltage were also discussed. In conclusion, the dc H{sup -} beam current of about 4 mA from the PIG ion source with the puller voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.31 A was extrapolated from the measurement at low extraction dc voltages.

  19. Development of low temperature atomic force microscopy with an optical beam deflection system capable of simultaneously detecting the lateral and vertical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Eiji; Wen, Huanfei; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a very important tool for imaging and investigating the complex force interactions on sample surfaces with high spatial resolution. In the AFM, two types of detection systems of the tip-sample interaction forces have been used: an optical detection system and an electrical detection system. In optical detection systems, such as optical beam deflection system or optical fiber interferometer system, both the lateral and the vertical tip-sample forces can be measured simultaneously. In electrical detection systems, such as qPlus or Kolibri sensors, either the lateral or vertical forces can be measured. Simultaneous measurement of the lateral and vertical interaction forces effectively allows investigation of force interactions because the force is a vector with magnitude and direction. In this study, we developed a low-temperature, frequency-modulation AFM using an optical beam deflection system to simultaneously measure the vertical and lateral forces. In this system, the heat sources, such as a laser diode and a current-to-voltage converter, for measuring the photocurrent of the four-segmented photodiode are located outside the observation chamber to avoid a temperature increase of the AFM unit. The focused optical beam is three-dimensionally adjustable on the back side of the cantilever. We demonstrate low-noise displacement measurement of the cantilever and successful atomic resolution imaging using the vertical and lateral forces at low temperatures.

  20. Damage effects of {ion}/{atom} beam milling on MNOS (Al/Si 3N 4/SiO 2/Si) capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Belson, J.; Wilson, I. H.

    1984-02-01

    Low energy argon ion and atom beams produced by saddle field sources have been used to study changes in CVD Si 3N 4/SiO 2/Si structures after bombardment of the bare nitride at a particle energy of 2.9 keV. Interface state densities Nst and flatband voltages VFB were extracted from high frequency (1.3 MHz) and quasi-static C- V curves. Bombardment was found to induce an increase in Nst and positive and negative charge storage associated with the nitride (or the nitride/oxide interface). The effect was more pronounced under ion bombardment. On the supposition that displacement damage is similar for ion and atom bombardments the differences in charge storage are interpreted in terms of enhanced trapping under the field associated with ion bombardment.

  1. Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics Talk: Low energy spread Ion source for focused ion beam systems-Search for the holy grail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Bill

    2011-03-01

    In this talk I will cover my personal experiences as a serial entrepreneur and founder of a succession of focused ion beam companies (1). Ion Beam Technology, which developed a 200kv (FIB) direct ion implanter (2). Micrion, where the FIB found a market in circuit edit and mask repair, which eventually merged with FEI corporation. and (3). ALIS Corporation which develop the Orion system, the first commercially successful sub-nanometer helium ion microscope, that was ultimately acquired by Carl Zeiss corporation. I will share this adventure beginning with my experiences in the early days of ion beam implantation and e-beam lithography which lead up to the final breakthrough understanding of the mechanisms that govern the successful creation and operation of a single atom ion source.

  2. AtomicJ: an open source software for analysis of force curves.

    PubMed

    Hermanowicz, Paweł; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-06-01

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh. PMID:24985823

  3. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanowicz, Paweł; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-06-01

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  4. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanowicz, Paweł Gabryś, Halina; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava

    2014-06-15

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  5. High-resolution photographic material of Institute of Atomic Energy for holography in intersecting beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, R. V.; Barinova, E. S.; Myatezh, O. V.; Zaborov, A. N.; Romash, E. V.; Chernyi, D. I.

    1991-02-01

    The properties o a new silver halide photographic material for holography in intersecting beams are presented. The energy sensitivi-. ty is io-4 J/crn2 the diffraction efficiency is 20 the resolv-. ing power is 4500 5000 line/mm. The high sensitivity of the photo-. graphic material allows it to be used for holography of living objects. At the Institute of Atomic Energy much attention is paid. to devel-'' opment of a wide choice of photographic materials for pulsed holo-'' graphy1 " 7 Table 1 presents the properties of the basic photographic materials of the IAE for holography in the visible and infrared ranges. Table 1 Name of photographic material Max. sens spectra of itivity nm Sensitivity J/c. m2 Resolution line/mm Diffract. efficiency IAE-''530 IAE-. 630 IAE-. 630(2) L4. E69o 530 630 630 690 -io5 5. 1O6 -io6 io6 3000 30OO 2000 -2O0O 2O 30 IAE-''840 1AE-1060 840 860 910 1060 2OO0 1o Recently a number of problems have been raised which could be solved by means of pulsed holography with recording according to the scheme in intersecting beams given photographic materials displaying a greater (by at least two orders of magnitude) sensitivity than those produced by the Soviet industry for these purposes. Among such prob lems are those in the field of in-''vivo studies. At present in a nwn-'' ber of medical institutions researches are being carried out into the possibility of

  6. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Barbisan, M.

    2012-04-15

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H{sup -} or D{sup -} particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H{sup -} (D{sup -}) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H{sub {alpha}} (D{sub {alpha}}) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  7. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER.

    PubMed

    Zaniol, B; Pasqualotto, R; Barbisan, M

    2012-04-01

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H(-) or D(-) particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H(-) (D(-)) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H(α) (D(α)) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  8. A Molecular Beam Source for Electron Spectroscopy of Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marburger, Simon P.; Kugeler, Oliver; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2004-05-12

    We describe the construction and testing of a supersonic jet apparatus to carry out electron spectroscopy on Van-der-Waals clusters using Synchrotron Radiation as an excitation source. The cluster source works with a conical nozzle that can be cooled with LHe as well as with LN2. The system has been optimized for mechanical and thermal stability, for low residual magnetic fields and is of a compact design.

  9. Survey, alignment, and beam stability at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes survey and alignment at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerators from 1993 to 1997. The ALS is a third generation light source requiring magnet alignment to within 150 microns. To accomplish this, a network of monuments was established and maintained. Monthly elevation surveys show the movement of the floor over time. Inclinometers have recently been employed to give real time information about magnet, vacuum tank and magnet girder motion in the ALS storage ring.

  10. Study of a microwave power source for a two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.L.

    1994-08-15

    A theoretical and experimental study of a microwave power source suitable for driving a linear e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider is reported. The power source is based on the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept, is driven by a 5-MeV, 1-kA induction accelerator electron beam, and operates at X-band frequencies. The development of a computer code to simulate the transverse beam dynamics of an intense relativistic electron beam transiting a system of microwave resonant structures is presented. This code is time dependent with self-consistent beam-cavity interactions and uses realistic beam parameters. Simulations performed with this code are compared with analytical theory and experiments. The concept of spacing resonant structures at distances equal to the betatron wavelength of the focusing system to suppress the growth of transverse instabilities is discussed. Simulations include energy spread over the beam to demonstrate the effect of Landau damping and establish the sensitivity of the betatron wavelength spacing scheme to errors in the focusing system. The design of the Reacceleration Experiment is described in detail and includes essentially all the issues related to a full scale RK-TBA microwave source. A total combined power from three output structures in excess of 170 MW with an amplitude stability of {+-}4% over a 25 ns pulse was achieved. The results of the experiment are compared to simulations used during the design phase to validate the various codes and methods used. The primary issue for the RK-TBA concept is identified as transverse beam instability associated with the excitation of higher order modes in the resonant structures used for extracting microwave power from the modulated beam. This work represents the first successful experimental demonstration of repeated cycles of microwave energy extraction from and reacceleration of a modulated beam.

  11. High-intensity and high-brightness source of moderated positrons using a brilliant γ beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Schreckenbach, K.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, large efforts are conducted toward the development of highly brilliant γ beams via Compton back scattering of photons from a high-brilliance electron beam, either on the basis of a normal-conducting electron linac or a (super-conducting) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Particularly, ERLs provide an extremely brilliant electron beam, thus enabling the generation of highest-quality γ beams. A 2.5 MeV γ beam with an envisaged intensity of 1015 photons s-1, as ultimately envisaged for an ERL-based γ-beam facility, narrow band width (10-3), and extremely low emittance (10-4 mm2 mrad2) offers the possibility to produce a high-intensity bright polarized positron beam. Pair production in a face-on irradiated W converter foil (200 μm thick, 10 mm long) would lead to the emission of 2×1013 (fast) positrons per second, which is four orders of magnitude higher compared to strong radioactive 22Na sources conventionally used in the laboratory. Using a stack of converter foils and subsequent positron moderation, a high-intensity low-energy beam of moderated positrons can be produced. Two different source setups are presented: a high-brightness positron beam with a diameter as low as 0.2 mm, and a high-intensity beam of 3×1011 moderated positrons per second. Hence, profiting from an improved moderation efficiency, the envisaged positron intensity would exceed that of present high-intensity positron sources by a factor of 100.

  12. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm-1. For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm-1. With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  13. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci 252Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 106 ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for 23Na8+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 13.7% for 85Rb19+ with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of 143Ba27+ accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  14. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-15

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi {sup 252}Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10{sup 6} ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for {sup 23}Na{sup 8+}, 15.6% for {sup 84}Kr{sup 17+}, and 13.7% for {sup 85}Rb{sup 19+} with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+} and 14.7% for {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+} accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  15. Recent developments and upgrades in ion source technology and ion beam systems at HVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podaru, Nicolae C.; Mous, Dirk J. W.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss various ion sources used in particle accelerator systems dedicated to ion beam analysis techniques. Key performance and characteristics of some ion sources are discussed: emittance, brightness, gas consumption, sample consumption efficiency, lifetime, etc. For negative ion sources, we focus on the performance of volume H- ion sources (e.g. HVE model 358), the duoplasmatron negative ion source and the magnetically filtered multicusp volume sources (e.g. HVE model SO-120). The duoplasmatron ion source has been recently upgraded with a Ta filament to deliver up to 150 μA H- ion beams and in conjunction with the Na charge exchange canal up to 20 μA of He-. The available brightness from the duoplasmatron increased from 2 to 6 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1. The ion source has been incorporated in a stand-alone light ion injector, well suited to deliver 20-30 keV negative ion beams of H-, He-, C-, NHx- and O- to accelerate for most ion beam analysis techniques.

  16. Source localization of auditory evoked responses from a human brain with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Xia, H.; Ben-Amar Baranga, A.; Hoffman, D.; Romalis, M. V.

    2007-03-01

    We report first measurements of auditory evoked fields (AEF) in a human brain with an atomic magnetometer system and discuss the techniques for magnetic source localization using this system. Until recent development of spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) atomic magnetometers with a sensitivity of 0.5fT/Hz^1/2, only SQUID magnetometers had sufficient sensitivity to measure a magnetoencephalograph (MEG). With simple multi-channel operation and no cryogenic maintenance, the atomic magnetometer provides a promising alternative for brain activity measurements. A clear N100m feature in AEF was observed after averaging over 600 stimuli. Currently the intrinsic magnetic noise level is 3.5 fT/Hz^1/2 at 10 Hz. Optical detection of magnetic fields allows flexibility in magnetic mapping while in the same time imposing certain geometrical constraints. To investigate the magnetic source localization capabilities of the atomic MEG system we performed extensive numerical simulations and measurements with a brain phantom consisting of an artificial current source in a saline-filled sphere. We will discuss the results of numerical analysis and experimental implementation of magnetic source localization with atomic magnetometer.

  17. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  18. Optimization of the beam extraction systems for the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D. A.; Lettry, J.; Scrivens, R.; Steyaert, D.; Midttun, Ø.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.

    2015-04-08

    The development of the Linac 4 and its integration into CERN’s acceleration complex is part of the foreseen luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The goal is to inject a 160 MeV H{sup −} beam into the CERN PS Booster (PSB) in order to increase the beam brightness by a factor of 2 compared to the 50 MeV proton linac, Linac 2, that is currently in operation. The requirements for the ion source are a 45 keV H{sup −} beam of 80 mA intensity, 2 Hz repetition rate and 0.5 ms pulse length within a normalized rms-emittance of 0.25 mm· mrad. The previously installed beam extraction system has been designed for an H{sup −} ion beam intensity of 20 mA produced by an RF-volume source with an electron to H{sup −} ratio of up to 50. For the required intensity upgrades of the Linac4 ion source, a new beam extraction system is being produced and tested; it is optimized for a cesiated surface RF-source with a nominal beam current of 40 mA and an electron to H{sup −} ratio of 4. The simulations, based on the IBSIMU code, are presented. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a peak beam current of more than 100 mA was demonstrated with a magnetron H{sup −} source at an energy of 35 keV and a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A new extraction system is required to operate at an energy of 45 keV; simulation of a two stage extraction system dedicated to the magnetron is presented.

  19. Expansion Discharge Source for Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael; Pearson, Jessica; Riccardo, Craig; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular ions are important in several fields of research, and spectroscopy acts as a key tool in the study of these ions. However, problems such as low ion abundance, ion-neutral confusion, and spectral congestion due to high internal temperatures can hinder effective spectroscopic studies. To circumvent these problems, we are developing a technique called Sensitive, Cooled, Resolved, Ion BEam Spectroscopy (SCRIBES). This ion beam spectrometer will feature a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source to produce cold molecular ions, electrostatic ion optics to focus the ions into an ion beam and bend the beam away from co-produced neutral molecules, an overlap region for cavity enhanced spectroscopy, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. When completed, SCRIBES will be an effective tool for the study of large, fluxional, and complex molecular ions that are difficult to study with other means. The ion beam spectrometer has been successfully implemented with a hot ion source. This talk will focus on the work of integrating a supersonic expansion discharge source into the instrument. To better understand how the source would work in the whole ion beam instrument, characterization studies are being performed with spectroscopy of HN_2^+ in a section of the system to ascertain the rotational temperature of the ion expansion. Attempts are also underway to measure the ion current from a beam formed from the expansion. Once the source in this environment is properly understood, we will reintegrate it to the rest of the ion beam system, completing SCRIBES. A. A. Mills, B. M. Siller, M. W. Porambo, M. Perera, H. Kreckel and B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys., 135, 224201, (2011). K. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kauffman and B. J. McCall Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103, (2010).

  20. Review of work related to ion sources and targets for radioactive beams at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A group including many ANL Physics Division staff and ATLAS outside users has discussed the possibilities for research with radioactive ion beams and prepared a working paper entitled {open_quotes}Concept for an Advanced Exotic Beam Facility Based on ATLAS.{close_quotes} Several subgroups have been working on issues related to ion sources and targets which could be used in the production and ionization of radionuclides with high power primary beams. Present activities include: (a) setting up an ion source test stand to measure emittances and energy spreads of ISOL-type ion sources, (b) experiments to evaluate methods of containing liquid uranium for production targets, (c) experimental evaluation of geometries for the generation of secondary neutron beams for production of radionuclides, (d) setting up an ISOL-type ion source at a neutron generator facility to measure fission fragment release times and efficiencies, and (e) computer simulations of an electron-beam charge-state amplifier to increase the charge states of 1{sup +} secondary beams to 2,3 or 4{sup +}. The present status of these projects and future plans are reported below.

  1. Characterization of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of electron cyclotron resonance source

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S. K.; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P. R.; Kotaiah, S.

    2007-05-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source at 50 keV, 30 mA proton current has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. Its plasma study has been done. Plasma chamber was excited with 350 W of microwave power at 2450 MHz, along with nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Microwave power was fed to the plasma chamber through waveguide. Plasma density and electron temperature were studied under various operating conditions, such as magnetic field, gas pressure, and transversal distance. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current-voltage variation. The nitrogen plasma density calculated was approximately 4.5x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and electron temperatures of 3-10 eV (cold) and 45-85 eV (hot) were obtained. The total ion beam current of 2.5 mA was extracted, with two-electrode extraction geometry, at 15 keV beam energy. The optimization of the source is under progress to extract 30 mA proton beam current at 50 keV beam energy, using three-electrode extraction geometry. This source will be used as an injector to continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 100 MeV proton linac. The required root-mean-square normalized beam emittance is less than 0.2{pi} mm mrad. This article presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of ECR proton source.

  2. Characterization of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of electron cyclotron resonance source.

    PubMed

    Jain, S K; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P R; Kotaiah, S

    2007-05-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source at 50 keV, 30 mA proton current has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. Its plasma study has been done. Plasma chamber was excited with 350 W of microwave power at 2450 MHz, along with nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Microwave power was fed to the plasma chamber through waveguide. Plasma density and electron temperature were studied under various operating conditions, such as magnetic field, gas pressure, and transversal distance. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current-voltage variation. The nitrogen plasma density calculated was approximately 4.5 x 10(11) cm(-3), and electron temperatures of 3-10 eV (cold) and 45-85 eV (hot) were obtained. The total ion beam current of 2.5 mA was extracted, with two-electrode extraction geometry, at 15 keV beam energy. The optimization of the source is under progress to extract 30 mA proton beam current at 50 keV beam energy, using three-electrode extraction geometry. This source will be used as an injector to continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 100 MeV proton linac. The required root-mean-square normalized beam emittance is less than 0.2pi mm mrad. This article presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of ECR proton source.

  3. MONO1001: A source for singly charged ions applied to the production of multicharged fullerene beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Andersen, J. U.; Cederquist, H.; Huber, B. A.; Hvelplund, P.; Leroy, R.; Manil, B.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Pedersen, U. V.; Rangamma, J.; Tomita, S.

    2004-05-01

    The present article reports on a recent study of the production of multiply charged fullerene beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). As collision studies in fundamental physics are demanding intense beams of multiply charged ions of small molecules, clusters, and particularly of fullerenes, we have further developed the ion source ECRIS MONO1000 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)], originally devoted to produce singly charged ions, towards the production of multiply charged fullerene beams. In this article, the test measurements performed at the Electrostatic Ion Storage Ring Århus rf power (ELISA) facility will be described. Typical mass spectra (from pure C60 and C70 powder) will be shown and the influence of several source parameters (rf power, support gas, gas pressure,…) will be discussed specifying the conditions necessary for an optimum ion source operation.

  4. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  5. Formation and atomic configuration of binary metallic glasses studied by ion beam mixing and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-06-15

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Ag-Nb system with overall composition ranging from 25 to 90 at. % of Nb by ion beam mixing. Interestingly, the diffraction analysis shows that the formed Nb-rich metallic glass features are two distinct atomic configurations. In atomistic modeling, an n-body Ag-Nb potential is derived, under the assistance of ab initio calculation, and then applied in molecular dynamics simulations. An atomic configuration is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, and as well as an icosahedral ordering observed in the Ag-Nb metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems. Simulations confirm that the two dominate local atomic packing units are formed through a structural phase transition from the Nb-based bcc and fcc solid solutions, respectively, suggesting a concept of structural heredity that the crystalline structure of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the resultant metallic glasses.

  6. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J

    2014-08-01

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished. PMID:25161320

  7. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-08-01

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  8. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  9. Dynamic grazing incidence fast atom diffraction during molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, P. Eddrief, M.; Etgens, V. H.; Khemliche, H. Debiossac, M.; Mulier, M.; Lalmi, B.; Roncin, P.; Momeni, A.

    2014-07-14

    A Grazing Incidence Fast Atom Diffraction (GIFAD) system has been mounted on a commercial molecular beam epitaxy chamber and used to monitor GaAs growth in real-time. In contrast to the conventionally used Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction, all the GIFAD diffraction orders oscillate in phase, with the change in intensity related to diffuse scattering at step edges. We show that the scattered intensity integrated over the Laue circle is a robust method to monitor the periodic change in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth, with oscillation phase and amplitude independent of incidence angle and crystal orientation. When there is a change in surface reconstruction at the start of growth, GIFAD intensity oscillations show that there is a corresponding delay in the onset of layer-by-layer growth. In addition, changes in the relative intensity of different diffraction orders have been observed during growth showing that GIFAD has the potential to provide insight into the preferential adatom attachment sites on the surface reconstruction during growth.

  10. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Tinschert, K.; Maimone, F.

    2012-02-15

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  11. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Spädtke, P; Lang, R; Mäder, J; Maimone, F; Rossbach, J; Tinschert, K

    2012-02-01

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  12. Meniscus and beam halo formation in a tandem-type negative ion source with surface production

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2012-06-04

    A meniscus of plasma-beam boundary in H{sup -} ion sources largely affects the extracted H{sup -} ion beam optics. Although it is hypothesized that the shape of the meniscus is one of the main reasons for the beam halo observed in experiments, a physical mechanism of the beam halo formation is not yet fully understood. In this letter, it is first shown by the 2D particle in cell simulation that the H{sup -} ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus cause a beam halo since the surface produced H{sup -} ions penetrate into the bulk plasma, and, thus, the resultant meniscus has a relatively large curvature.

  13. Multiaperture ion beam extraction from gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance source of multicharged ions.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, A; Dorf, M; Zorin, V; Bokhanov, A; Izotov, I; Razin, S; Skalyga, V; Rossbach, J; Spädtke, P; Balabaev, A

    2008-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source with quasi-gas-dynamic regime of plasma confinement (ReGIS), constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia, provides opportunities for extracting intense and high-brightness multicharged ion beams. Despite the short plasma lifetime in a magnetic trap of a ReGIS, the degree of multiple ionization may be significantly enhanced by the increase in power and frequency of the applied microwave radiation. The present work is focused on studying the intense beam quality of this source by the pepper-pot method. A single beamlet emittance measured by the pepper-pot method was found to be approximately 70 pi mm mrad, and the total extracted beam current obtained at 14 kV extraction voltage was approximately 25 mA. The results of the numerical simulations of ion beam extraction are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Multiaperture ion beam extraction from gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance source of multicharged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorov, A.; Dorf, M.; Zorin, V.; Bokhanov, A.; Izotov, I.; Razin, S.; Skalyga, V.; Rossbach, J.; Spaedtke, P.; Balabaev, A.

    2008-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source with quasi-gas-dynamic regime of plasma confinement (ReGIS), constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia, provides opportunities for extracting intense and high-brightness multicharged ion beams. Despite the short plasma lifetime in a magnetic trap of a ReGIS, the degree of multiple ionization may be significantly enhanced by the increase in power and frequency of the applied microwave radiation. The present work is focused on studying the intense beam quality of this source by the pepper-pot method. A single beamlet emittance measured by the pepper-pot method was found to be {approx}70 {pi} mm mrad, and the total extracted beam current obtained at 14 kV extraction voltage was {approx}25 mA. The results of the numerical simulations of ion beam extraction are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Improvement of beam emittance of the CEA high intensity proton source SILHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, R.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.

    1999-06-01

    The emittance of the intense proton beam extracted by the source SILHI at Commisariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA)-Saclay is a key parameter for the design of the IPHI Project RFQ. This parameter has a relevant role even for the design of an intense proton source for the TRASCO project of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The tests performed in the framework of CEA-INFN collaboration have been mainly devoted to a 75 mA beam emittance investigation injecting different gases in the beam line. The results show that the rms normalized emittance decreases up to a factor 3 while the beam losses induced by recombination are contained within 5%. Normalized emittance in r-r' plane of about 0.1 π min mrad have been obtained using Ar and Kr.

  16. Improved electron ionization ion source for the detection of supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirav, Aviv; Fialkov, Alexander; Gordin, Alexander

    2002-08-01

    An improved electron ionization (EI) ion source is described, based on the modification of a Brink-type EI ion source through the addition of a second cage with a fine mesh outside the ion chamber. The added outer cage shields the inner ion cage (ionization zone) against the penetration of the filament and electron repeller potentials, and thus results in the provision of ions with narrower ion energy distribution, hence improved ion-beam quality. The closer to zero electrical field inside the ion cage enables improved filtration (rejection) of ions that are produced from vacuum background compounds, based on difference in ion energies of beam and background species. The improved background ion filtration and ion-beam quality resulted in 2.6 times higher mass spectrometric ion signal, combined with 6.4 times better signal to noise ratio, in comparison with the same ion source having a single cage. The dual cage ion source further provides a smaller or no reduction of the electron emission current upon lowering the electron energy for achieving softer EI and/or electron attachment ionization. It also improves the long-term mass spectral and signal reproducibility and enables fast, automated change of the electron energy. Consequently, the dual cage EI ion source is especially effective for use with gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with SMB, ion guns with SMB, and any other experimental systems with SMB or nonthermal molecular beams.

  17. Ramping up the SNS Beam Power with the H- Source using 0 mg Cs/Day

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the ramp up of the beam power for the Spallation Neutron Source by ramping up the pulse length, the repetition rate, and the beam current emerging from the H- source. Starting out with low rep rates (<10 Hz) and short pulse lengths (<<0.3 ms) the H- source and LEBT delivered from LBNL exceeded the requirements with almost perfect availability. This paper discusses the modifications that were required to exceed 0.2 ms pulse length and 0.2% duty factor with acceptable availability and performance. Currently the source is supporting neutron production at 1 MW with 38 mA LINAC beam current at 60 Hz and 0.9 ms pulse length. The pulse length will be increased to ~1.1 ms to meet the requirements for neutron production with a power between 1 and 1.4 MW. A MEBT beam current of 46 mA with a 5.4% duty factor has been demonstrated for 32 hours. A 56mA MEBT beam current with a 4.1% duty factor has been demonstrated for 20 minutes at the conclusion of a 12 day production run. This is close to the 59 mA needed for 3 MW neutron productions. Also notable is the Cs2CrO4 cesium system, which dispenses ~10 mg of Cs during the startup of the ion source, sufficient for producing the required 38 mA for 4 weeks without significant degradation.

  18. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKU.

    PubMed

    Ren, H T; Peng, S X; Lu, P N; Yan, S; Zhou, Q F; Zhao, J; Yuan, Z X; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O(+), H(+), and D(+) to N(+), Ar(+), and He(+). Up to now, about 120 mA of H(+), 83 mA of D(+), 50 mA of O(+), 63 mA of N(+), 70 mA of Ar(+), and 65 mA of He(+) extracted at 50 kV through a φ 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 π mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H(+) or He(+) beam extracted from this ion source and H∕He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H∕He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He(+) beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He(+) beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He(+) beam. PMID:22380337

  19. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKU

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H. T.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Yan, S.; Zhou, Q. F.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2012-02-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O{sup +}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +} to N{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, and He{sup +}. Up to now, about 120 mA of H{sup +}, 83 mA of D{sup +}, 50 mA of O{sup +}, 63 mA of N{sup +}, 70 mA of Ar{sup +}, and 65 mA of He{sup +} extracted at 50 kV through a {phi} 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H{sup +} or He{sup +} beam extracted from this ion source and H/He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H/He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He{sup +} beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He{sup +} beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He{sup +} beam.

  20. A study of mixed group-V nitrides grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using a nitrogen radical beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, W.G.; Tu, C.W.; Mathes, D.; Hull, R.

    1997-12-31

    The authors report a study of N incorporation in GaAs and InP by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using a N radical beam source. For GaNAs grown at high temperatures, phase separation was observed, as evidenced from the formation of cubic GaN aside from GaNAs. By lowering the growth temperature, however, GaNAs alloys with N as high as 14.8% have been obtained without showing any phase separation. For InNP, no phase separation was observed in the temperature range studied (310--420 C). Contrary to GaNAs, incorporating N in InP is very difficult, with only less than 1% N being achieved. Optical absorption measurement reveals strong red shift of bandgap energy with direct-bandgap absorption. However, no semimetallic region seems to exist for GaNAs and a composition, dependent bowing parameter has been observed.