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Sample records for atomic layer graphene

  1. Mode Locking of Lasers with Atomic Layer Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    saturable absorption of the atomic layer graphene different forms of passive laser mode lockers were fabricated. These are the fiber pigtailed...ranging from 1m to 2m. The vector solitons operation of a graphene mode locked erbium fiber laser was experimentally investigated. 1...or fiber lasers; d) to use the modern material fabrication techniques to improve the performance of the graphene -based mode lockers. 3

  2. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A.

    2015-01-01

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors. PMID:26311131

  3. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A

    2015-08-27

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  4. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A.

    2015-08-01

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  5. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-18

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene.

  6. Buffer layer engineering on graphene via various oxidation methods for atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2016-12-01

    The integration of a high-k oxide on graphene using atomic layer deposition requires an electrically reliable buffer layer. In this study, Y was selected as the buffer layer due to its highest oxidation ability among the rare-earth elements, and various oxidation methods (atmospheric, and high-pressure O2 and ozone annealing) were applied to the Y metal buffer layer. By optimizing the oxidation conditions of the top-gate insulator, we successfully improved the capacitance of the top gate Y2O3 insulator and demonstrated a large I on/I off ratio for bilayer graphene under an external electric field.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on pristine and functionalized graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinran; Tabakman, Scott M; Dai, Hongjie

    2008-07-02

    We investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal oxide on pristine and functionalized graphene. On pristine graphene, ALD coating can only actively grow on edges and defect sites, where dangling bonds or surface groups react with ALD precursors. This affords a simple method to decorate and probe single defect sites in graphene planes. We used perylene tetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) to functionalize the graphene surface and selectively introduced densely packed surface groups on graphene. Uniform ultrathin ALD coating on PTCA graphene was achieved over a large area. The functionalization method could be used to integrate ultrathin high-kappa dielectrics in future graphene electronics.

  8. Single-atom Catalysis Using Pt/Graphene Achieved through Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuhui; Zhang, Gaixia; Gauquelin, Nicolas; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Jigang; Yang, Songlan; Chen, Weifeng; Meng, Xiangbo; Geng, Dongsheng; Banis, Mohammad N.; Li, Ruying; Ye, Siyu; Knights, Shanna; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Platinum-nanoparticle-based catalysts are widely used in many important chemical processes and automobile industries. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their use efficiency, however, very challenging. Here we report a practical synthesis for isolated single Pt atoms anchored to graphene nanosheet using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. ALD offers the capability of precise control of catalyst size span from single atom, subnanometer cluster to nanoparticle. The single-atom catalysts exhibit significantly improved catalytic activity (up to 10 times) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses reveal that the low-coordination and partially unoccupied densities of states of 5d orbital of Pt atoms are responsible for the excellent performance. This work is anticipated to form the basis for the exploration of a next generation of highly efficient single-atom catalysts for various applications.

  9. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    PubMed

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  10. Inhomogeneous longitudinal distribution of Ni atoms on graphene induced by layer-number-dependent internal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Tashima, K.; Kotsugi, M.; Ohkochi, T.; Suemitsu, M.; Fukidome, H.

    2016-09-01

    The intrinsic transport properties, such as carrier mobility and saturation velocity, of graphene are the highest among materials owing to its linear band dispersion and weak backscattering. However, the reported field-effect mobility of transistors using graphene as a channel is much lower than the intrinsic channel mobility. One of the reasons for this low mobility is the high contact resistance between graphene and metals used for the source and drain electrodes, which results from the interfacial roughness. Even Ni, which is a promising contact metal for many materials because of its high adhesion and lower contact resistance, does not meet the requirement as a contact metal for graphene. Noticing that the interfacial roughness between the a metal and graphene is strongly related to the onset of the contact resistance, we performed transmission electron microscopy and photoemission electron microscopy measurements to evaluate the microscopic lateral and longitudinal distributions of Ni atoms at the Ni/graphene interface formed on epitaxial graphene (EG) on 4H-SiC(0001). Our data revealed that the deposited Ni atoms diffused into the EG layers, but they did not reach the EG/SiC interface, and the diffusion was stronger on bilayered graphene than on monolayered graphene. We thus ascribe the layer-number-dependent internal diffusion of Ni atoms in EG as a cause of the microscopic interfacial roughness between graphene and the metal. Ensuring homogeneous distribution of the number of EG layers should be key to lowering the contact resistance.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on NF3-pre-treated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junige, Marcel; Oddoy, Tim; Yakimova, Rositsa; Darakchieva, Vanya; Wenger, Christian; Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Albert, Matthias; Bartha, Johann W.

    2015-06-01

    Graphene has been considered for a variety of applications including novel nanoelectronic device concepts. However, the deposition of ultra-thin high-k dielectrics on top of graphene has still been challenging due to graphene's lack of dangling bonds. The formation of large islands and leaky films has been observed resulting from a much delayed growth initiation. In order to address this issue, we tested a pre-treatment with NF3 instead of XeF2 on CVD graphene as well as epitaxial graphene monolayers prior to the Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) of Al2O3. All experiments were conducted in vacuo; i. e. the pristine graphene samples were exposed to NF3 in the same reactor immediately before applying 30 (TMA-H2O) ALD cycles and the samples were transferred between the ALD reactor and a surface analysis unit under high vacuum conditions. The ALD growth initiation was observed by in-situ real-time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (irtSE) with a sampling rate above 1 Hz. The total amount of Al2O3 material deposited by the applied 30 ALD cycles was cross-checked by in-vacuo X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The Al2O3 morphology was determined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The presence of graphene and its defect status was examined by in-vacuo XPS and Raman Spectroscopy before and after the coating procedure, respectively.

  12. Atomic-scale friction modulated by potential corrugation in multi-layered graphene materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-03-21

    Friction is an important issue that has to be carefully treated for the fabrication of graphene-based nano-scale devices. So far, the friction mechanism of graphene materials on the atomic scale has not yet been clearly presented. Here, first-principles calculations were employed to unveil the friction behaviors and their atomic-scale mechanism. We found that potential corrugations on sliding surfaces dominate the friction force and the friction anisotropy of graphene materials. Higher friction forces correspond to larger corrugations of potential energy, which are tuned by the number of graphene layers. The friction anisotropy is determined by the regular distributions of potential energy. The sliding along a fold-line path (hollow-atop-hollow) has a relatively small potential energy barrier. Thus, the linear sliding observed in macroscopic friction experiments may probably be attributed to the fold-line sliding mode on the atomic scale. These findings can also be extended to other layer-structure materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and graphene-like BN sheets.

  13. Encapsulation of graphene transistors and vertical device integration by interface engineering with atomic layer deposited oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Aria, Adrianus I.; Van Veldhoven, Zenas A.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Wang, Ruizhi; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Sui, Jinggao; Connolly, Malcolm R.; Hofmann, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple, scalable approach to achieve encapsulated graphene transistors with negligible gate hysteresis, low doping levels and enhanced mobility compared to as-fabricated devices. We engineer the interface between graphene and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 by tailoring the growth parameters to achieve effective device encapsulation whilst enabling the passivation of charge traps in the underlying gate dielectric. We relate the passivation of charge trap states in the vicinity of the graphene to conformal growth of ALD oxide governed by in situ gaseous H2O pretreatments. We demonstrate the long term stability of such encapsulation techniques and the resulting insensitivity towards additional lithography steps to enable vertical device integration of graphene for multi-stacked electronics fabrication.

  14. Selective metal deposition at graphene line defects by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanpyo; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Johnson, Richard W.; Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Liu, Nan; Kim, Myung-Gil; Pang, Changhyun; Ahn, Chiyui; Bent, Stacey F.; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-09-01

    One-dimensional defects in graphene have a strong influence on its physical properties, such as electrical charge transport and mechanical strength. With enhanced chemical reactivity, such defects may also allow us to selectively functionalize the material and systematically tune the properties of graphene. Here we demonstrate the selective deposition of metal at chemical vapour deposited graphene’s line defects, notably grain boundaries, by atomic layer deposition. Atomic layer deposition allows us to deposit Pt predominantly on graphene’s grain boundaries, folds and cracks due to the enhanced chemical reactivity of these line defects, which is directly confirmed by transmission electron microscopy imaging. The selective functionalization of graphene defect sites, together with the nanowire morphology of deposited Pt, yields a superior platform for sensing applications. Using Pt-graphene hybrid structures, we demonstrate high-performance hydrogen gas sensors at room temperature and show its advantages over other evaporative Pt deposition methods, in which Pt decorates the graphene surface non-selectively.

  15. Parameter Space of Atomic Layer Deposition of Ultrathin Oxides on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ultrathin aluminum oxide (AlOx) films was systematically studied on supported chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene. We show that by extending the precursor residence time, using either a multiple-pulse sequence or a soaking period, ultrathin continuous AlOx films can be achieved directly on graphene using standard H2O and trimethylaluminum (TMA) precursors even at a high deposition temperature of 200 °C, without the use of surfactants or other additional graphene surface modifications. To obtain conformal nucleation, a precursor residence time of >2s is needed, which is not prohibitively long but sufficient to account for the slow adsorption kinetics of the graphene surface. In contrast, a shorter residence time results in heterogeneous nucleation that is preferential to defect/selective sites on the graphene. These findings demonstrate that careful control of the ALD parameter space is imperative in governing the nucleation behavior of AlOx on CVD graphene. We consider our results to have model system character for rational two-dimensional (2D)/non-2D material process integration, relevant also to the interfacing and device integration of the many other emerging 2D materials. PMID:27723305

  16. Uniform Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 on Graphene by Reversible Hydrogen Plasma Functionalization

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A novel method to form ultrathin, uniform Al2O3 layers on graphene using reversible hydrogen plasma functionalization followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented. ALD on pristine graphene is known to be a challenge due to the absence of dangling bonds, leading to nonuniform film coverage. We show that hydrogen plasma functionalization of graphene leads to uniform ALD of closed Al2O3 films down to 8 nm in thickness. Hall measurements and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the hydrogen plasma functionalization is reversible upon Al2O3 ALD and subsequent annealing at 400 °C and in this way does not deteriorate the graphene’s charge carrier mobility. This is in contrast with oxygen plasma functionalization, which can lead to a uniform 5 nm thick closed film, but which is not reversible and leads to a reduction of the charge carrier mobility. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations attribute the uniform growth on both H2 and O2 plasma functionalized graphene to the enhanced adsorption of trimethylaluminum (TMA) on these surfaces. A DFT analysis of the possible reaction pathways for TMA precursor adsorption on hydrogenated graphene predicts a binding mechanism that cleans off the hydrogen functionalities from the surface, which explains the observed reversibility of the hydrogen plasma functionalization upon Al2O3 ALD.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of single-layer graphene resonators using atomic finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haw-Long; Hsu, Jung-Chang; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chang, Win-Jin

    2013-09-28

    Atomic finite element simulation is applied to study the natural frequency and sensitivity of a single-layer graphene-based resonator with CCCC, SSSS, CFCF, SFSF, and CFCF boundary conditions using the commercial code ANSYS. The fundamental frequencies of the graphene sheet are compared with the results of the previous finite element study. In addition, the sensitivity of the resonator is compared with the early work based on nonlocal elasticity theory. The results of the comparison are very good in all considered cases. The sensitivities of the resonator with different boundary conditions are obtained, and the order based on the boundary condition is CCCC > SSSS > CFCF > SFSF > CFFF. The highest sensitivity is obtained when the attached mass is located at the center of the resonator. This is useful for the design of a highly sensitive graphene-based mass sensor.

  18. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene [Plus Supplemental Information

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S.; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; ...

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. We report the direct growth of highly crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG). Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence confirms high-quality WSe2 monolayers; while transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that a tunnel barrier exists due to the van der Waals gap, and is supported by density functional theorymore » that predicts a 1.6 eV barrier for transport from WSe2 to graphene.« less

  19. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene [Plus Supplemental Information

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S.; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Wallace, Robert M.; Mayer, Theresa S.; Datta, Suman; Li, Lain-Jong; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. We report the direct growth of highly crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG). Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence confirms high-quality WSe2 monolayers; while transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that a tunnel barrier exists due to the van der Waals gap, and is supported by density functional theory that predicts a 1.6 eV barrier for transport from WSe2 to graphene.

  20. Synthesis of atomic layers of hybridized h-BNC by depositing h-BN on graphene via ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J. H.; Zhang, X. W.; Liu, H.; Yin, Z. G.; Wang, D. G.; Wang, Y.; You, J. B.; Wu, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report the deposition of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on graphene by ion beam sputtering deposition. Both graphene domains and films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition were used as substrates. In the case of graphene domains, it was found that the h-BN domains were preferentially grown on the baked Cu surface instead of graphene due to the highly catalytic activity of Cu. On the other hand, the higher ejection energy of sputtered particles leads to the mixing of boron/nitrogen atoms and carbon atoms. Consequently, the h-BNC films consisting of the hybrid atomic layers of h-BN and graphene domains were formed when the graphene films were used as substrates. This work provides a promising and accessible route for the synthesis of hybridized h-BNC material.

  1. Atomically thin heterostructures based on single-layer tungsten diselenide and graphene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J; Robinson, Jeremy T; Wallace, Robert M; Mayer, Theresa S; Datta, Suman; Li, Lain-Jong; Robinson, Joshua A

    2014-12-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF).

  2. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics on graphene using reversibly physisorbed ozone.

    PubMed

    Jandhyala, Srikar; Mordi, Greg; Lee, Bongki; Lee, Geunsik; Floresca, Carlo; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Ahn, Jinho; Wallace, Robert M; Chabal, Yves J; Kim, Moon J; Colombo, Luigi; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2012-03-27

    Integration of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) requires the ability to grow or deposit high-quality, ultrathin dielectric insulators on graphene to modulate the channel potential. Here, we study a novel and facile approach based on atomic layer deposition through ozone functionalization to deposit high-κ dielectrics (such as Al(2)O(3)) without breaking vacuum. The underlying mechanisms of functionalization have been studied theoretically using ab initio calculations and experimentally using in situ monitoring of transport properties. It is found that ozone molecules are physisorbed on the surface of graphene, which act as nucleation sites for dielectric deposition. The physisorbed ozone molecules eventually react with the metal precursor, trimethylaluminum to form Al(2)O(3). Additionally, we successfully demonstrate the performance of dual-gated GFETs with Al(2)O(3) of sub-5 nm physical thickness as a gate dielectric. Back-gated GFETs with mobilities of ~19,000 cm(2)/(V·s) are also achieved after Al(2)O(3) deposition. These results indicate that ozone functionalization is a promising pathway to achieve scaled gate dielectrics on graphene without leaving a residual nucleation layer.

  3. Highly Stable and Effective Doping of Graphene by Selective Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Kim, Ki-Ju; Lee, Seung-Joon; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Cho, Seong-Yong; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Bum

    2017-01-11

    The sheet resistance of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition is found to be significantly reduced by the selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ru onto defect sites such as wrinkles and grain boundaries. With 200 ALD cycles, the sheet resistance is reduced from ∼500 to <50 Ω/sq, and the p-type carrier density is drastically increased from 10(13) to 10(15) cm(-2). At the same time, the carrier mobility is reduced from ∼670 to less than 100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This doping of graphene proved to be very stable, with the electrical properties remaining unchanged over eight weeks of measurement. Selective deposition of Ru on defect sites also makes it possible to obtain a graphene film that is both highly transparent and electrically conductive (e.g., a sheet resistance of 125 Ω/sq with 92% optical transmittance at 550 nm). Highly doped graphene layers achieved by Ru ALD are therefore expected to provide a viable basis for transparent conducting electrodes.

  4. An alumina stabilized ZnO-graphene anode for lithium ion batteries via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingpeng; Wang, Aiji; Wang, Yinshu; Li, Chun; Shi, Gaoquan

    2014-10-07

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was applied to deposit ZnO on graphene aerogel, and this composite was used as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. This electrode material was further modified by an ultrathin Al2O3 layer via ALD to stabilize its electrochemical stability. These two metal oxides were uniformly immobilized on graphene frameworks, and the Al2O3 coating strongly improved the electrochemical performances of ZnO-graphene aerogel composite anodes. Particularly, the composite with 10 ALD cycles of Al2O3 coating (denoted as ZnO-G-10) exhibited a high initial discharge capacity of 1513 mA h g(-1) and maintained a reversible capacity of 490 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g(-1). Furthermore, the capacity retention rate increased from 70% to 90% in comparison with its uncoated counterpart after 100 cycles. The ZnO-G-10 anode also showed good rate-capability, delivering a discharge capacity of 415 mA h g(-1) at 1000 mA g(-1). The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the formation of an artificial solid electrolyte interphase layer, stabilizing ZnO and the electrolyte by preventing the aggregation of Zn/ZnO nanograins and the side reaction that would cause the degradation of anodes.

  5. Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davami, Keivan; Jiang, Yijie; Cortes, John; Lin, Chen; Shaygan, Mehrdad; Turner, Kevin T.; Bargatin, Igor

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanostructures with mechanical properties that are tuned by conformal deposition of alumina. Vertical graphene (VG) sheets, also called carbon nanowalls (CNWs), were grown on copper foil substrates using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique and conformally coated with different thicknesses of alumina (Al2O3) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of pristine and alumina-coated VG sheets. Results show a significant increase in the effective Young’s modulus of the VG sheets with increasing thickness of deposited alumina. Deposition of only a 5 nm thick alumina layer on the VG sheets nearly triples the effective Young’s modulus of the VG structures. Both energy absorption and strain recovery were lower in VG sheets coated with alumina than in pure VG sheets (for the same peak force). This may be attributed to the increase in bending stiffness of the VG sheets and the creation of connections between the sheets after ALD deposition. These results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of VG sheets can be tuned over a wide range through conformal atomic layer deposition, facilitating the use of VG sheets in applications where specific mechanical properties are needed.

  6. Density Functional Theory Study of Atomic Layer Deposition of Zinc Oxide on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Amgad Ahmed; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2015-07-01

    The dissociation of zinc ions (Zn2+) from vapor-phase zinc acetylacetonate, Zn(C5H7O2)2, or Zn(acac)2 and its adsorption onto graphene oxide via atomic layer deposition (ALD) were studied using a quantum mechanics approach. Density functional theory (DFT) was used to obtain an approximate solution to the Schrödinger equation. The graphene oxide cluster model was used to represent the surface of the graphene film after pre-oxidation. In this study, the geometries of reactants, transition states, and products were optimized using the B3LYB/6-31G** level of theory or higher. Furthermore, the relative energies of the various intermediates and products in the gas-phase radical mechanism were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311 + G(2df,2p) levels of theory. Additionally, a molecular orbital (MO) analysis was performed for the products of the decomposition of the Zn(acac)2 complex to investigate the dissociation of Zn2+ and the subsequent adsorption of H atoms on the C5H7O2 cluster to form acetylacetonate enol. The reaction energies were calculated, and the reaction mechanism was accordingly proposed. A simulation of infrared (IR) properties was performed using the same approach to support the proposed mechanism via a complete explanation of bond forming and breaking during each reaction step.

  7. Density Functional Theory Study of Atomic Layer Deposition of Zinc Oxide on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amgad Ahmed; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2015-12-01

    The dissociation of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) from vapor-phase zinc acetylacetonate, Zn(C5H7O2)2, or Zn(acac)2 and its adsorption onto graphene oxide via atomic layer deposition (ALD) were studied using a quantum mechanics approach. Density functional theory (DFT) was used to obtain an approximate solution to the Schrödinger equation. The graphene oxide cluster model was used to represent the surface of the graphene film after pre-oxidation. In this study, the geometries of reactants, transition states, and products were optimized using the B3LYB/6-31G** level of theory or higher. Furthermore, the relative energies of the various intermediates and products in the gas-phase radical mechanism were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311 + G(2df,2p) levels of theory. Additionally, a molecular orbital (MO) analysis was performed for the products of the decomposition of the Zn(acac)2 complex to investigate the dissociation of Zn(2+) and the subsequent adsorption of H atoms on the C5H7O2 cluster to form acetylacetonate enol. The reaction energies were calculated, and the reaction mechanism was accordingly proposed. A simulation of infrared (IR) properties was performed using the same approach to support the proposed mechanism via a complete explanation of bond forming and breaking during each reaction step.

  8. Controlling Edge Morphology in Graphene Layers Using Electron Irradiation: From Sharp Atomic Edges to Coalesced Layers Forming Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Silva, E.; Botello-Mendez, A.R.; Barnett, Zachary M; Jia, Xiaoting; Dresselhaus, M; Terrones, H.; Terrones, M.; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental reports indicate that Joule heating can atomically sharpen the edges of chemical vapor deposition grown graphitic nanoribbons. The absence or presence of loops between adjacent layers in the annealed materials is the topic of a growing debate that this Letter aims to put to rest. We offer a rationale explaining why loops do form if Joule heating is used alone, and why adjacent nanoribbon layers do not coalesce when Joule heating is applied after high-energy electrons first irradiate the sample. Our work, based on large-scale quantum molecular dynamics and electronic-transport calculations, shows that vacancies on adjacent graphene sheets, created by electron irradiation, inhibit the formation of edge loops.

  9. Grains and grain boundaries in single-layer graphene atomic patchwork quilts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pinshane Y; Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos S; van der Zande, Arend M; Whitney, William S; Levendorf, Mark P; Kevek, Joshua W; Garg, Shivank; Alden, Jonathan S; Hustedt, Caleb J; Zhu, Ye; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul L; Muller, David A

    2011-01-20

    The properties of polycrystalline materials are often dominated by the size of their grains and by the atomic structure of their grain boundaries. These effects should be especially pronounced in two-dimensional materials, where even a line defect can divide and disrupt a crystal. These issues take on practical significance in graphene, which is a hexagonal, two-dimensional crystal of carbon atoms. Single-atom-thick graphene sheets can now be produced by chemical vapour deposition on scales of up to metres, making their polycrystallinity almost unavoidable. Theoretically, graphene grain boundaries are predicted to have distinct electronic, magnetic, chemical and mechanical properties that strongly depend on their atomic arrangement. Yet because of the five-order-of-magnitude size difference between grains and the atoms at grain boundaries, few experiments have fully explored the graphene grain structure. Here we use a combination of old and new transmission electron microscopy techniques to bridge these length scales. Using atomic-resolution imaging, we determine the location and identity of every atom at a grain boundary and find that different grains stitch together predominantly through pentagon-heptagon pairs. Rather than individually imaging the several billion atoms in each grain, we use diffraction-filtered imaging to rapidly map the location, orientation and shape of several hundred grains and boundaries, where only a handful have been previously reported. The resulting images reveal an unexpectedly small and intricate patchwork of grains connected by tilt boundaries. By correlating grain imaging with scanning probe and transport measurements, we show that these grain boundaries severely weaken the mechanical strength of graphene membranes but do not as drastically alter their electrical properties. These techniques open a new window for studies on the structure, properties and control of grains and grain boundaries in graphene and other two

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Oxide on Single-Layer Graphene: An Atomic-Scale Study toward Understanding Nucleation and Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucheng; Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Utke, Ivo; Michler, Johann; Agrawal, Piyush; Rossell, Marta D; Erni, Rolf

    2017-03-14

    Controlled synthesis of a hybrid nanomaterial based on titanium oxide and single-layer graphene (SLG) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) is reported here. The morphology and crystallinity of the oxide layer on SLG can be tuned mainly with the deposition temperature, achieving either a uniform amorphous layer at 60 °C or ∼2 nm individual nanocrystals on the SLG at 200 °C after only 20 ALD cycles. A continuous and uniform amorphous layer formed on the SLG after 180 cycles at 60 °C can be converted to a polycrystalline layer containing domains of anatase TiO2 after a postdeposition annealing at 400 °C under vacuum. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), characterization of the structure and chemistry was performed on an atomic scale and provided insight into understanding the nucleation and growth. AC-TEM imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that rocksalt TiO nanocrystals were occasionally formed at the early stage of nucleation after only 20 ALD cycles. Understanding and controlling nucleation and growth of the hybrid nanomaterial are crucial to achieving novel properties and enhanced performance for a wide range of applications that exploit the synergetic functionalities of the ensemble.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Oxide on Single-Layer Graphene: An Atomic-Scale Study toward Understanding Nucleation and Growth

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of a hybrid nanomaterial based on titanium oxide and single-layer graphene (SLG) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) is reported here. The morphology and crystallinity of the oxide layer on SLG can be tuned mainly with the deposition temperature, achieving either a uniform amorphous layer at 60 °C or ∼2 nm individual nanocrystals on the SLG at 200 °C after only 20 ALD cycles. A continuous and uniform amorphous layer formed on the SLG after 180 cycles at 60 °C can be converted to a polycrystalline layer containing domains of anatase TiO2 after a postdeposition annealing at 400 °C under vacuum. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), characterization of the structure and chemistry was performed on an atomic scale and provided insight into understanding the nucleation and growth. AC-TEM imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that rocksalt TiO nanocrystals were occasionally formed at the early stage of nucleation after only 20 ALD cycles. Understanding and controlling nucleation and growth of the hybrid nanomaterial are crucial to achieving novel properties and enhanced performance for a wide range of applications that exploit the synergetic functionalities of the ensemble. PMID:28356613

  12. A non-destructive n-doping method for graphene with precise control of electronic properties via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu Seok; Kalode, Pranav Y; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Kim, Hongbum; Lee, Lynn; Sung, Myung Mo

    2016-03-07

    Graphene applications require high precision control of the Fermi level and carrier concentration via a nondestructive doping method. Here, we develop an effective n-doping technique using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO thin films on graphene through a reactive molecular layer. This ALD doping method is nondestructive, simple, and precise. The ZnO thin films on graphene are uniform, conformal, of good quality with a low density of pinholes, and finely tunable in thickness with 1 Å resolution. We demonstrate graphene transistor control in terms of the Dirac point, carrier density, and doping state as a function of the ZnO thickness. Moreover, ZnO functions as an effective thin-film barrier against air-borne water and oxygen on the graphene, resulting in extraordinary stability in air for graphene devices. ZnO ALD was also applied to other two-dimensional materials including MoS2 and WSe2, which substantially enhanced electron mobility.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous TiO2 on graphene as an anode for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Chunmei; Xie, Ming; Sun, Xiang; Travis, Jonathan J.; Wang, Gongkai; Sun, Hongtao; Dillon, Anne C.; Lian, Jie; George, Steven M.

    2013-10-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit TiO2 anode material on high surface area graphene (reduced graphene oxide) sheets for Li-ion batteries. An Al2O3 ALD ultrathin layer was used as an adhesion layer for conformal deposition of the TiO2 ALD films at 120 ° C onto the conducting graphene sheets. The TiO2 ALD films on the Al2O3 ALD adhesion layer were nearly amorphous and conformal to the graphene sheets. These nanoscale TiO2 coatings minimized the effect of the low diffusion coefficient of lithium ions in bulk TiO2. The TiO2 ALD films exhibited stable capacities of ˜120 mAh g-1 and ˜100 mAh g-1 at high cycling rates of 1 A g-1 and 2 A g-1, respectively. The TiO2 ALD films also displayed excellent cycling stability with ˜95% of the initial capacity remaining after 500 cycles. These results illustrate that ALD can provide a useful method to deposit electrode materials on high surface area substrates for Li-ion batteries.

  14. Flexible integrated circuits and multifunctional electronics based on single atomic layers of MoS2 and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, Matin; Burke, Robert A.; Proie, Robert M.; Dubey, Madan

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and its analogues, have been investigated by numerous researchers for high performance flexible and conformal electronic systems, because they offer the ultimate level of thickness scaling, atomically smooth surfaces and high crystalline quality. Here, we use layer-by-layer transfer of large area molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to demonstrate electronics on flexible polyimide (PI) substrates. On the same PI substrate, we are able to simultaneously fabricate MoS2 based logic, non-volatile memory cells with graphene floating gates, photo-detectors and MoS2 transistors with tunable source and drain contacts. We are also able to demonstrate that these flexible heterostructure devices have very high electronic performance, comparable to four point measurements taken on SiO2 substrates, with on/off ratios >107 and field effect mobilities as high as 16.4 cm2 V-1 s-1. Additionally, the heterojunctions show high optoelectronic sensitivity and were operated as photodetectors with responsivities over 30 A W-1. Through local gating of the individual graphene/MoS2 contacts, we are able to tune the contact resistance over the range of 322-1210 Ω mm for each contact, by modulating the graphene work function. This leads to devices with tunable and multifunctional performance that can be implemented in a conformable platform.

  15. Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vaupel, Matthias Dutschke, Anke; Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay; Hitzel, Frank

    2013-11-14

    The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2 nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

  16. Atom-scale covalent electrochemical modification of single-layer graphene on SiC substrates by diaryliodonium salts

    DOE PAGES

    Gearba, Raluca I.; Mueller, Kory M.; Veneman, Peter A.; ...

    2015-05-09

    Owing to its high conductivity, graphene holds promise as an electrode for energy devices such as batteries and photovoltaics. However, to this end, the work function and doping levels in graphene need to be precisely tuned. One promising route for modifying graphene’s electronic properties is via controlled covalent electrochemical grafting of molecules. We show that by employing diaryliodonium salts instead of the commonly used diazonium salts, spontaneous functionalization is avoided. This then allows for precise tuning of the grafting density. Moreover, by employing bis(4-nitrophenyl)iodonium(III) tetrafluoroborate (DNP) salt calibration curves, the surface functionalization density (coverage) of glassy carbon was controlled usingmore » cyclic voltammetry in varying salt concentrations. These electro-grafting conditions and calibration curves translated directly over to modifying single layer epitaxial graphene substrates (grown on insulating 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1)). In addition to quantifying the functionalization densities using electrochemical methods, samples with low grafting densities were characterized by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM). We show that the use of buffer-layer free graphene substrates is required for clear observation of the nitrophenyl modifications. Furthermore, atomically-resolved STM images of single site modifications were obtained, showing no preferential grafting at defect sites or SiC step edges as supposed previously in the literature. Most of the grafts exhibit threefold symmetry, but occasional extended modifications (larger than 4 nm) were observed as well.« less

  17. Atom-scale covalent electrochemical modification of single-layer graphene on SiC substrates by diaryliodonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Gearba, Raluca I.; Mueller, Kory M.; Veneman, Peter A.; Holliday, Bradley J.; Chan, Calvin K.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2015-05-09

    Owing to its high conductivity, graphene holds promise as an electrode for energy devices such as batteries and photovoltaics. However, to this end, the work function and doping levels in graphene need to be precisely tuned. One promising route for modifying graphene’s electronic properties is via controlled covalent electrochemical grafting of molecules. We show that by employing diaryliodonium salts instead of the commonly used diazonium salts, spontaneous functionalization is avoided. This then allows for precise tuning of the grafting density. Moreover, by employing bis(4-nitrophenyl)iodonium(III) tetrafluoroborate (DNP) salt calibration curves, the surface functionalization density (coverage) of glassy carbon was controlled using cyclic voltammetry in varying salt concentrations. These electro-grafting conditions and calibration curves translated directly over to modifying single layer epitaxial graphene substrates (grown on insulating 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1)). In addition to quantifying the functionalization densities using electrochemical methods, samples with low grafting densities were characterized by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM). We show that the use of buffer-layer free graphene substrates is required for clear observation of the nitrophenyl modifications. Furthermore, atomically-resolved STM images of single site modifications were obtained, showing no preferential grafting at defect sites or SiC step edges as supposed previously in the literature. Most of the grafts exhibit threefold symmetry, but occasional extended modifications (larger than 4 nm) were observed as well.

  18. Sub-nanometer atomic layer deposition for spintronics in magnetic tunnel junctions based on graphene spin-filtering membranes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Marie-Blandine; Dlubak, Bruno; Weatherup, Robert S; Yang, Heejun; Deranlot, Cyrile; Bouzehouane, Karim; Petroff, Frédéric; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Fert, Albert; Seneor, Pierre

    2014-08-26

    We report on the successful integration of low-cost, conformal, and versatile atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectric in Ni–Al2O3–Co magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) where the Ni is coated with a spin-filtering graphene membrane. The ALD tunnel barriers, as thin as 0.6 nm, are grown layer-by-layer in a simple, low-vacuum, ozone-based process, which yields high-quality electron-transport barriers as revealed by tunneling characterization. Even under these relaxed conditions, including air exposure of the interfaces, a significant tunnel magnetoresistance is measured highlighting the robustness of the process. The spin-filtering effect of graphene is enhanced, leading to an almost fully inversed spin polarization for the Ni electrode of −42%. This unlocks the potential of ALD for spintronics with conformal, layer-by-layer control of tunnel barriers in magnetic tunnel junctions toward low-cost fabrication and down-scaling of tunnel resistances.

  19. Chemistry and physics of a single atomic layer: strategies and challenges for functionalization of graphene and graphene-based materials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Zheng, Yue Bing; Zhao, Feng; Li, Shoujian; Gao, Xingfa; Xu, Bingqian; Weiss, Paul S; Zhao, Yuliang

    2012-01-07

    Graphene has attracted great interest for its superior physical, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties that enable a wide range of applications from electronics to nanoelectromechanical systems. Functionalization is among the significant vectors that drive graphene towards technological applications. While the physical properties of graphene have been at the center of attention, we still lack the knowledge framework for targeted graphene functionalization. In this critical review, we describe some of the important chemical and physical processes for graphene functionalization. We also identify six major challenges in graphene research and give perspectives and practical strategies for both fundamental studies and applications of graphene (315 references).

  20. Bottom-gate coplanar graphene transistors with enhanced graphene adhesion on atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Dong-Wook; Mikael, Solomon; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-03-09

    A graphene transistor with a bottom-gate coplanar structure and an atomic layer deposition (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) gate dielectric is demonstrated. Wetting properties of ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under different deposition conditions are investigated by measuring the surface contact angle. It is observed that the relatively hydrophobic surface is suitable for adhesion between graphene and ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. To achieve hydrophobic surface of ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a methyl group (CH{sub 3})-terminated deposition method has been developed and compared with a hydroxyl group (OH)-terminated deposition. Based on this approach, bottom-gate coplanar graphene field-effect transistors are fabricated and characterized. A post-thermal annealing process improves the performance of the transistors by enhancing the contacts between the source/drain metal and graphene. The fabricated transistor shows an I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratio, maximum transconductance, and field-effect mobility of 4.04, 20.1 μS at V{sub D} = 0.1 V, and 249.5 cm{sup 2}/V·s, respectively.

  1. Oxidation Resistance of Reactive Atoms in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, Matthew F; Duscher, Gerd; Windl, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We have found that reactive elements that are normally oxidized at room temperature are present as individual atoms or clusters on and in graphene. Oxygen is present in these samples but it is only detected in the thicker amorphous carbon layers present in the graphene specimens we have examined. However, we have seen no evidence that oxygen reacts with the impurity atoms and small clusters of these normally reactive elements when they are incorporated in the graphene layers. First principles calculations suggest that the oxidation resistance is due to kinetic effects such as preferential bonding of oxygen to nonincorporated atoms and H passivation. The observed oxidation resistance of reactive atoms in graphene may allow the use of these incorporated metals in catalytic applications. It also opens the possibility of designing and producing electronic, opto-electronic, and magnetic devices based on these normally reactive atoms.

  2. Thickness scaling of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 films and their application to wafer-scale graphene tunnelling transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Gu, Yeahyun; Heo, Jinseong; Yang, Jaehyun; Lee, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Hyun; Lee, Yunseong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Park, Seongjun; Hwang, Sungwoo

    2016-02-01

    The downscaling of the capacitance equivalent oxide thickness (CET) of a gate dielectric film with a high dielectric constant, such as atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO2, is a fundamental challenge in achieving high-performance graphene-based transistors with a low gate leakage current. Here, we assess the application of various surface modification methods on monolayer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapour deposition to obtain a uniform and pinhole-free ALD HfO2 film with a substantially small CET at a wafer scale. The effects of various surface modifications, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone treatment and introduction of sputtered ZnO and e-beam-evaporated Hf seed layers on monolayer graphene, and the subsequent HfO2 film formation under identical ALD process parameters were systematically evaluated. The nucleation layer provided by the Hf seed layer (which transforms to the HfO2 layer during ALD) resulted in the uniform and conformal deposition of the HfO2 film without damaging the graphene, which is suitable for downscaling the CET. After verifying the feasibility of scaling down the HfO2 thickness to achieve a CET of ~1.5 nm from an array of top-gated metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors, we fabricated graphene heterojunction tunnelling transistors with a record-low subthreshold swing value of <60 mV/dec on an 8″ glass wafer.

  3. Thickness scaling of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 films and their application to wafer-scale graphene tunnelling transistors

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Gu, Yeahyun; Heo, Jinseong; Yang, Jaehyun; Lee, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Hyun; Lee, Yunseong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Park, Seongjun; Hwang, Sungwoo

    2016-01-01

    The downscaling of the capacitance equivalent oxide thickness (CET) of a gate dielectric film with a high dielectric constant, such as atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO2, is a fundamental challenge in achieving high-performance graphene-based transistors with a low gate leakage current. Here, we assess the application of various surface modification methods on monolayer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapour deposition to obtain a uniform and pinhole-free ALD HfO2 film with a substantially small CET at a wafer scale. The effects of various surface modifications, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone treatment and introduction of sputtered ZnO and e-beam-evaporated Hf seed layers on monolayer graphene, and the subsequent HfO2 film formation under identical ALD process parameters were systematically evaluated. The nucleation layer provided by the Hf seed layer (which transforms to the HfO2 layer during ALD) resulted in the uniform and conformal deposition of the HfO2 film without damaging the graphene, which is suitable for downscaling the CET. After verifying the feasibility of scaling down the HfO2 thickness to achieve a CET of ~1.5 nm from an array of top-gated metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors, we fabricated graphene heterojunction tunnelling transistors with a record-low subthreshold swing value of <60 mV/dec on an 8″ glass wafer. PMID:26861833

  4. Atomic-Scale Peeling of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Ichikawa, Masaya; Okamoto, Hideki; Itamura, Noriaki; Sasaki, Naruo; Miura, Kouji

    2012-06-01

    We report the atomic-scale peeling of a single-layer graphene on a graphite substrate, in which stick-slip sliding of the single-layer graphene occurs at the atomic scale while maintaining AB-stacking registry with the graphite substrate. The peeling force curve clearly exhibits a transition from surface-contact to line-contact between the graphene and graphite surfaces. The amplitude of the peeling force depends on the lattice orientation of the surface, which is affected by the sliding force at the interface between the graphene and graphite surfaces. This study of peeling at the atomic scale will clarify the relationship among peeling, friction, adhesion, and superlubricity.

  5. Quantitative annular dark-field imaging of single-layer graphene-II: atomic-resolution image contrast.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shunsuke; Koshiya, Shogo; Nagai, Takuro; Kikkawa, Jun; Ishizuka, Kazuo; Kimoto, Koji

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated how accurately atomic-resolution annular dark-field (ADF) images match between experiments and simulations to conduct more reliable crystal structure analyses. Quantitative ADF imaging, in which the ADF intensity at each pixel represents the fraction of the incident probe current, allows us to perform direct comparisons with simulations without the use of fitting parameters. Although the conventional comparison suffers from experimental uncertainties such as an amorphous surface layer and specimen thickness, in this study we eliminated such uncertainties by using a single-layer graphene as a specimen. Furthermore, to reduce image distortion and shot noises in experimental images, multiple acquisitions with drift correction were performed, and the atomic ADF contrast was quantitatively acquired. To reproduce the experimental ADF contrast, we used three distribution functions as the effective source distribution in simulations. The optimum distribution function and its full-width at half-maximum were evaluated by measuring the residuals between the experimental and simulated images. It was found that the experimental images could be explained well by a linear combination of a Gaussian function and a Lorentzian function with a longer tail than the Gaussian function.

  6. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  7. Dual-protection of a graphene-sulfur composite by a compact graphene skin and an atomic layer deposited oxide coating for a lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingpeng; Wang, Aiji; Tian, Fuyang; Song, Hongquan; Wang, Yinshu; Li, Chun; Hong, Jong-Dal; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-03-12

    A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 0.2 C. A high capacity of 846 mA h g(-1) was achieved after charging/discharging for 100 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of over 92%. In the case of using LiNO3 as a shuttle inhibitor, this electrode showed an initial discharge capacity of 796 mA h g(-1) and a capacity retention of 81% after 250 cycles at a current density of 1 C with an average coulombic efficiency higher than 99.7%.

  8. Atomic structure of graphene on SiO2.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Masa; Chen, J H; Cullen, W G; Fuhrer, M S; Williams, E D

    2007-06-01

    We employ scanning probe microscopy to reveal atomic structures and nanoscale morphology of graphene-based electronic devices (i.e., a graphene sheet supported by an insulating silicon dioxide substrate) for the first time. Atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy images reveal the presence of a strong spatially dependent perturbation, which breaks the hexagonal lattice symmetry of the graphitic lattice. Structural corrugations of the graphene sheet partially conform to the underlying silicon oxide substrate. These effects are obscured or modified on graphene devices processed with normal lithographic methods, as they are covered with a layer of photoresist residue. We enable our experiments by a novel cleaning process to produce atomically clean graphene sheets.

  9. Epitaxial Graphene Surface Preparation for Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    j dielectrics such as Al2O3 , HfO2, Ta2O5, and TiO2 , are important for the realization of graphene-based top-gated electronic devices including field... ALD pulse sequencing of NO2-trimethylaluminum (TMA); 16 oxidation of electron beam evaporated metallic Al, Hf, Ti, Ta;17,18 and spin- coating of a... ALD of Al2O3 films in promoting uni- form, high quality oxide deposition. Initial treatments resulted in partial coverage, while the optimized treatment

  10. Molecular memory with atomically smooth graphene contacts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the use of bilayer graphene as an atomically smooth contact for nanoscale devices. A two-terminal bucky-ball (C60) based molecular memory is fabricated with bilayer graphene as a contact on the polycrystalline nickel electrode. Graphene provides an atomically smooth covering over an otherwise rough metal surface. The use of graphene additionally prohibits the electromigration of nickel into the C60 layer. The devices exhibit a low-resistance state in the first sweep cycle and irreversibly switch to a high-resistance state at 0.8 to 1.2 V bias. In the subsequent cycles, the devices retain the high-resistance state, thus making it write-once read-many memory. PMID:24225345

  11. Dual-protection of a graphene-sulfur composite by a compact graphene skin and an atomic layer deposited oxide coating for a lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mingpeng; Wang, Aiji; Tian, Fuyang; Song, Hongquan; Wang, Yinshu; Li, Chun; Hong, Jong-Dal; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-03-01

    A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.2 C. A high capacity of 846 mA h g-1 was achieved after charging/discharging for 100 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of over 92%. In the case of using LiNO3 as a shuttle inhibitor, this electrode showed an initial discharge capacity of 796 mA h g-1 and a capacity retention of 81% after 250 cycles at a current density of 1 C with an average coulombic efficiency higher than 99.7%.A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.2 C. A

  12. Anomalous Insulator-Metal Transition in Boron Nitride-Graphene Hybrid Atomic Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-13

    locally centered atomic or- bital (LCAO) basis set, and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange- correlation functional.36 The occupation of the Kohn-Sham...Stausholm-Møller, M. Strange, G. A. Tritsaris, M. Vanin, M. Walter, B. Hammer , H. Häkkinen, G. K. H. Madsen, R. M. Nieminen, J. K. Nørskov, M. Puska, T. T... Schmidt , and M. Martin, Nat. Mater. 7, 391 (2008). 43V. M. Pudalov, JETP Lett. 66, 175 (1997). 44S. Das Sarma and E. H. Hwang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 164

  13. Interactions of Pb and Te atoms with graphene.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chuncheng; Robertson, Alex W; He, Kuang; Ford, Camden; Watt, Andrew A R; Warner, Jamie H

    2014-05-28

    PbTe nanocrystals were deposited onto the surface of graphene and used as a reservoir of Pb and Te atoms. Electron beam irradiation at 80 kV caused Pb and Te atoms to mobilize and disperse across the surface of graphene. We studied the dynamics of these atoms in real time using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The Pb and Te atoms were found to attach to the surface layer of amorphous carbon that resides upon the graphene, as well as its edge. Pb and Te atoms were not found residing on pristine graphene, but were found to bond to the free edge states along graphene hole edges. Small PbTe nanoclusters tended to only form on the surface of the amorphous carbon regions and not on pristine graphene.

  14. Physisorbed-precursor-assisted atomic layer deposition of reliable ultrathin dielectric films on inert graphene surfaces for low-power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hyo Won; Heo, Jinseong; Lee, Min-Hyun; Song, Hyun Jae; Ku, JiYeon; Lee, Yunseong; Cho, Yeonchoo; Jeon, Woojin; Suh, Hwansoo; Hwang, Sungwoo; Park, Seongjun

    2016-09-01

    Among the most fundamental challenges encountered in the successful incorporation of graphene in silicon-based electronics is the conformal growth of ultrathin dielectric films, especially those with thicknesses lower than 5 nm, on chemically inert graphene surfaces. Here, we present physisorbed-precursor-assisted atomic layer deposition (pALD) as an extremely robust method for fabricating such films. Using atomic-scale characterisation, it is confirmed that conformal and intact ultrathin Al2O3 films can be synthesised on graphene by pALD. The mechanism underlying the pALD process is identified through first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Further, this novel deposition technique is used to fabricate two types of wafer-scale devices. It is found that the incorporation of a 5 nm-thick pALD Al2O3 gate dielectric film improves the performance of metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors to a greater extent than does the incorporation of a conventional ALD Al2O3 film. We also employ a 5 nm-thick pALD HfO2 film as a highly scalable dielectric layer with a capacitance equivalent oxide thickness of 1 nm in graphene-based tunnelling field-effect transistors fabricated on a glass wafer and achieve a subthreshold swing of 30 mV/dec. This significant improvement in switching allows for the low-voltage operation of an inverter within 0.5 V of both the drain and the gate voltages, thus paving the way for low-power electronics.

  15. Atomic covalent functionalization of graphene.

    PubMed

    Johns, James E; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-01-15

    Although graphene's physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp(2) bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene's electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (∼1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Toward this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  16. Interface Electrical Properties of Al2O3 Thin Films on Graphene Obtained by Atomic Layer Deposition with an in Situ Seedlike Layer.

    PubMed

    Fisichella, Gabriele; Schilirò, Emanuela; Di Franco, Salvatore; Fiorenza, Patrick; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Ravesi, Sebastiano; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2017-03-01

    High-quality thin insulating films on graphene (Gr) are essential for field-effect transistors (FETs) and other electronics applications of this material. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the method of choice to deposit high-κ dielectrics with excellent thickness uniformity and conformal coverage. However, to start the growth on the sp(2) Gr surface, a chemical prefunctionalization or the physical deposition of a seed layer are required, which can effect, to some extent, the electrical properties of Gr. In this paper, we report a detailed morphological, structural, and electrical investigation of Al2O3 thin films grown by a two-steps ALD process on a large area Gr membrane residing on an Al2O3-Si substrate. This process consists of the H2O-activated deposition of a Al2O3 seed layer a few nanometers in thickness, performed in situ at 100 °C, followed by ALD thermal growth of Al2O3 at 250 °C. The optimization of the low-temperature seed layer allowed us to obtain a uniform, conformal, and pinhole-free Al2O3 film on Gr by the second ALD step. Nanoscale-resolution mapping of the current through the dielectric by conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) demonstrated an excellent laterally uniformity of the film. Raman spectroscopy measurements indicated that the ALD process does not introduce defects in Gr, whereas it produces a partial compensation of Gr unintentional p-type doping, as confirmed by the increase of Gr sheet resistance (from ∼300 Ω/sq in pristine Gr to ∼1100 Ω/sq after Al2O3 deposition). Analysis of the transfer characteristics of Gr field-effect transistors (GFETs) allowed us to evaluate the relative dielectric permittivity (ε = 7.45) and the breakdown electric field (EBD = 7.4 MV/cm) of the Al2O3 film as well as the transconductance and the holes field-effect mobility (∼1200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). A special focus has been given to the electrical characterization of the Al2O3-Gr interface by the analysis of high frequency capacitance

  17. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-25

    where an atomic layer of an element is deposited , or removed, in a surface limited reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in...the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as underpotential deposition (UPD). 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15, NUMBER OF...reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as

  18. Atomic intercalation to measure adhesion of graphene on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan C.; Jeon, Seokmin; Belianinov, Alexei; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-10-01

    The interest in mechanical properties of two-dimensional materials has emerged in light of new device concepts taking advantage of flexing, adhesion and friction. Here we demonstrate an effective method to measure adhesion of graphene atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, utilizing atomic-scale `blisters' created in the top layer by neon atom intercalates. Detailed analysis of scanning tunnelling microscopy images is used to reconstruct atomic positions and the strain map within the deformed graphene layer, and demonstrate the tip-induced subsurface translation of neon atoms. We invoke an analytical model, originally devised for graphene macroscopic deformations, to determine the graphite adhesion energy of 0.221+/-0.011 J m-2. This value is in excellent agreement with reported macroscopic values and our atomistic simulations. This implies mechanical properties of graphene scale down to a few-nanometre length. The simplicity of our method provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of nanomechanical properties in layered materials.

  19. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of h-BN(0001) Multilayers on Co(0001) and Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of Graphene on h-BN(0001)/Co(0001).

    PubMed

    Driver, M Sky; Beatty, John D; Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Reid, Kimberly; Rath, Ashutosh; Voyles, Paul M; Kelber, Jeffry A

    2016-03-22

    The direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by industrially scalable methods is of broad interest for spintronic and nanoelectronic device applications. Such applications often require atomically precise control of film thickness and azimuthal registry between layers and substrate. We report the formation, by atomic layer epitaxy (ALE), of multilayer h-BN(0001) films (up to 7 monolayers) on Co(0001). The ALE process employs BCl3/NH3 cycles at 600 K substrate temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) data show that this process yields an increase in h-BN average film thickness linearly proportional to the number of BCl3/NH3 cycles, with BN layers in azimuthal registry with each other and with the Co(0001) substrate. LEED diffraction spot profile data indicate an average BN domain size of at least 1900 Å. Optical microscopy data indicate the presence of some domains as large as ∼20 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ambient exposure studies demonstrate macroscopic and microscopic continuity of the h-BN film, with the h-BN film highly conformal to the Co substrate. Photoemission data show that the h-BN(0001) film is p-type, with band bending near the Co/h-BN interface. Growth of graphene by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is observed on the surface of multilayer h-BN(0001) at temperatures of 800 K. LEED data indicate azimuthal graphene alignment with the h-BN and Co(0001) lattices, with domain size similar to BN. The evidence of multilayer BN and graphene azimuthal alignment with the lattice of the Co(0001) substrate demonstrates that this procedure is suitable for scalable production of heterojunctions for spintronic applications.

  20. Proximity effects in cold atom artificial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graß, Tobias; Chhajlany, Ravindra W.; Tarruell, Leticia; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-03-01

    Cold atoms in an optical lattice with brick-wall geometry have been used to mimic graphene, a two-dimensional material with characteristic Dirac excitations. Here we propose to bring such artificial graphene into the proximity of a second atomic layer with a square lattice geometry. For non-interacting fermions, we find that such bilayer system undergoes a phase transition from a graphene-like semi-metal phase, characterized by a band structure with Dirac points, to a gapped band insulator phase. In the presence of attractive interactions between fermions with pseudospin-1/2 degree of freedom, a competition between semi-metal and superfluid behavior is found at the mean-field level. Using the quantum Monte Carlo method, we also investigate the case of strong repulsive interactions. In the Mott phase, each layer exhibits a different amount of long-range magnetic order. Upon coupling both layers, a valence-bond crystal is formed at a critical coupling strength. Finally, we discuss how these bilayer systems could be realized in existing cold atom experiments.

  1. Intercalation of graphene on iridium with samarium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'eva, E. Yu.; Rut'kov, E. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    Intercalation of graphene on Ir (111) with Sm atoms is studied by methods of thermal desorption spectroscopy and thermionic emission. It is shown that adsorption of samarium at T = 300 K on graphene to concentrations of N ≤ 6 × 1014 atoms cm-2 followed by heating of the substrate leads to practically complete escape of adsorbate underneath the graphene layer. At N > 6 × 1014 atoms cm-2 and increasing temperature, a fraction of adsorbate remains on graphene in the form of two-dimensional "gas" and samarium islands and are desorbed in the range of temperatures of 1000-1200 K. Samarium remaining under the graphene is desorbed from the surface in the temperature range 1200-2150 K. Model conceptions for the samarium-graphene-iridium system in a wide temperature range are developed.

  2. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Victor A.; Alaferdov, Andrei V.; Vaz, Alfredo R.; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.

    2015-06-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000 K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in “cold-wall” reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material.

  3. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Victor A.; Alaferdov, Andrei V.; Vaz, Alfredo R.; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000 K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in “cold-wall” reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material. PMID:26100466

  4. Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hight Walker, Angela; PML, NIST Team

    We investigate the Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers in forming gas. Fe thin films are deposited by sputtering onto mechanically exfoliated graphene, few-layer graphene (FLG), and graphite flakes on a Si/SiO2 substrate. When the sample is rapidly annealed in forming gas, particles are produced due to the dewetting of the Fe thin film and those particles catalyze the etching of graphene layers. Monolayer graphene and FLG regions are severely damaged and that the particles catalytically etch channels in graphite. No etching is observed on graphite for the Fe thin film annealed in nitrogen. The critical role of hydrogen indicates that this graphite etching process is catalyzed by Fe particles through the carbon hydrogenation reaction. By comparing with the etched monolayer and FLG observed for the Fe film annealed in nitrogen, our Raman spectroscopy measurements identify that, in forming gas, the catalytic etching of monolayer and FLG is through carbon hydrogenation. During this process, Fe particles are catalytically active in the dissociation of hydrogen into hydrogen atoms and in the production of hydrogenated amorphous carbon through hydrogen spillover.

  5. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    DOEpatents

    Girit, Caglar O.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  6. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  7. Visualizing Atomic-Scale Negative Differential Resistance in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keun Su; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Walter, Andrew L.; Seyller, Thomas; Yeom, Han Woong; Rotenberg, Eli; Bostwick, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the atomic-scale tunneling characteristics of bilayer graphene on silicon carbide using the scanning tunneling microscopy. The high-resolution tunneling spectroscopy reveals an unexpected negative differential resistance (NDR) at the Dirac energy, which spatially varies within the single unit cell of bilayer graphene. The origin of NDR is explained by two near-gap van Hove singularities emerging in the electronic spectrum of bilayer graphene under a transverse electric field, which are strongly localized on two sublattices in different layers. Furthermore, defects near the tunneling contact are found to strongly impact on NDR through the electron interference. Our result provides an atomic-level understanding of quantum tunneling in bilayer graphene, and constitutes a useful step towards graphene-based tunneling devices.

  8. Fabrication of graphene-silicon layered heterostructures by carbon penetration of silicon film.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; Wang, Yeliang; Li, Linfei; Gao, H-J

    2017-02-24

    A new, easy, in situ technique for fabricating a two-dimensional graphene-silicon layered heterostructure has been developed to meet the demand for integration between graphene and silicon-based microelectronic technology. First, carbon atoms are stored in bulk iridium, and then silicon atoms are deposited onto the Ir(111) surface and annealed. With longer annealing times, the carbon atoms penetrate from the bulk iridium to the top of the silicon and eventually coalesce there into graphene islands. Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images, high-pass fast Fourier transform treatment and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that the top graphene layer is intact and continuous, and beneath it is the silicon layer.

  9. Opposite effects of Cu and Pt atoms on graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2017-02-01

    Metal atoms at graphene edges are important because they can modify the structure and properties of graphene; however, there are very few reports on their direct observation. We performed electron microscopy to investigate the stability and dynamics of Cu and Pt atoms at graphene edges. We found that Cu atoms mended graphene edges, while Pt atoms etched them, and these transformations were promoted by electron irradiation. Cu and Pt atoms formed different atomic configurations at graphene edges.

  10. Comment on "Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene" [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, T.; Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-01

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  11. Surfactant-free single-layer graphene in water.

    PubMed

    Bepete, George; Anglaret, Eric; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Huang, Kai; Pénicaud, Alain; Drummond, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Dispersing graphite in water to obtain true (single-layer) graphene in bulk quantity in a liquid has been an unreachable goal for materials scientists in the past decade. Similarly, a diagnostic tool to identify solubilized graphene in situ has been long awaited. Here we show that homogeneous stable dispersions of single-layer graphene (SLG) in water can be obtained by mixing graphenide (negatively charged graphene) solutions in tetrahydrofuran with degassed water and evaporating the organic solvent. In situ Raman spectroscopy of these aqueous dispersions shows all the expected characteristics of SLG. Transmission electron and atomic force microscopies on deposits confirm the single-layer character. The resulting additive-free stable water dispersions contain 400 m(2) l(-1) of developed graphene surface. Films prepared from these dispersions exhibit a conductivity of up to 32 kS m(-1).

  12. Surfactant-free single-layer graphene in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bepete, George; Anglaret, Eric; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Huang, Kai; Pénicaud, Alain; Drummond, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Dispersing graphite in water to obtain true (single-layer) graphene in bulk quantity in a liquid has been an unreachable goal for materials scientists in the past decade. Similarly, a diagnostic tool to identify solubilized graphene in situ has been long awaited. Here we show that homogeneous stable dispersions of single-layer graphene (SLG) in water can be obtained by mixing graphenide (negatively charged graphene) solutions in tetrahydrofuran with degassed water and evaporating the organic solvent. In situ Raman spectroscopy of these aqueous dispersions shows all the expected characteristics of SLG. Transmission electron and atomic force microscopies on deposits confirm the single-layer character. The resulting additive-free stable water dispersions contain 400 m2 l-1 of developed graphene surface. Films prepared from these dispersions exhibit a conductivity of up to 32 kS m-1.

  13. Electronic and Quantum Transport Properties of Atomically Identified Si Point Defects in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Zhou, Wu; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-05-15

    We report high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images displaying a range of inclusions of isolated silicon atoms at the edges and inner zones of graphene layers. Whereas the incorporation of Si atoms to a graphene armchair edge involves no reconstruction of the neighboring carbon atoms, the inclusion of a Si atom to a zigzag graphene edge entails the formation of five-membered carbon rings. In all the observed atomic edge terminations, a Si atom is found bridging two C atoms in a 2-fold coordinated configuration. The atomic-scale observations are underpinned by first-principles calculations of the electronic and quantum transport properties of the structural anomalies. Experimental estimations of Si-doped graphene band gaps realized by means of transport measurements may be affected by a low doping rate of 2-fold coordinated Si atoms at the graphene edges, and 4-fold coordinated at inner zones due to the apparition of mobility gaps.

  14. Amorphous Ultrathin SnO2 Films by Atomic Layer Deposition on Graphene Network as Highly Stable Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Sun, Xiang; George, Steven M; Zhou, Changgong; Lian, Jie; Zhou, Yun

    2015-12-23

    Amorphous SnO2 (a-SnO2) thin films were conformally coated onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (G) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrochemical characteristics of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites were then determined using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge curves. Because the SnO2 ALD films were ultrathin and amorphous, the impact of the large volume expansion of SnO2 upon cycling was greatly reduced. With as few as five formation cycles best reported in the literature, a-SnO2/G nanocomposites reached stable capacities of 800 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 450 mAh g(-1) at 1000 mA g(-1). The capacity from a-SnO2 is higher than the bulk theoretical values. The extra capacity is attributed to additional interfacial charge storage resulting from the high surface area of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites. These results demonstrate that metal oxide ALD on high surface area conducting carbon substrates can be used to fabricate high power and high capacity electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  15. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Schloegl, R.

    2016-10-19

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene graphene and graphene substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite.

  16. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Schloegl, R.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2016-10-01

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene-graphene and graphene-substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite.

  17. Graphene-coated atomic force microscope tips for reliable nanoscale electrical characterization.

    PubMed

    Lanza, M; Bayerl, A; Gao, T; Porti, M; Nafria, M; Jing, G Y; Zhang, Y F; Liu, Z F; Duan, H L

    2013-03-13

    Graphene single-layer films are grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto commercially available conductive tips for atomic force microscopy. Graphene-coated tips are much more resistant to both high currents and frictions than commercially available, metal-varnished, conductive atomic force microscopy tips, leading to much larger lifetimes and more reliable imaging due to a lower tip-sample interaction.

  18. Resolving Atomic Connectivity in Graphene Nanostructure Junctions.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Thomas; Kawai, Shigeki; Söde, Hajo; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Ruffieux, Pascal; Fasel, Roman; Gröning, Oliver

    2015-08-12

    We report on the structural characterization of junctions between atomically well-defined graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by means of low-temperature, noncontact scanning probe microscopy. We show that the combination of simultaneously acquired frequency shift and tunneling current maps with tight binding (TB) simulations allows a comprehensive characterization of the atomic connectivity in the GNR junctions. The proposed approach can be generally applied to the investigation of graphene nanomaterials and their interconnections and is thus expected to become an important tool in the development of graphene-based circuitry.

  19. Atomic intercalation to measure adhesion of graphene on graphite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan C.; Jeon, Seokmin; Belianinov, Alexei; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-01-01

    The interest in mechanical properties of two-dimensional materials has emerged in light of new device concepts taking advantage of flexing, adhesion and friction. Here we demonstrate an effective method to measure adhesion of graphene atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, utilizing atomic-scale ‘blisters' created in the top layer by neon atom intercalates. Detailed analysis of scanning tunnelling microscopy images is used to reconstruct atomic positions and the strain map within the deformed graphene layer, and demonstrate the tip-induced subsurface translation of neon atoms. We invoke an analytical model, originally devised for graphene macroscopic deformations, to determine the graphite adhesion energy of 0.221±0.011 J m−2. This value is in excellent agreement with reported macroscopic values and our atomistic simulations. This implies mechanical properties of graphene scale down to a few-nanometre length. The simplicity of our method provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of nanomechanical properties in layered materials. PMID:27796294

  20. Atomic intercalation to measure adhesion of graphene on graphite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan C; Jeon, Seokmin; Belianinov, Alexei; Kalinin, Sergei V; Baddorf, Arthur P; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-10-31

    The interest in mechanical properties of two-dimensional materials has emerged in light of new device concepts taking advantage of flexing, adhesion and friction. Here we demonstrate an effective method to measure adhesion of graphene atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, utilizing atomic-scale 'blisters' created in the top layer by neon atom intercalates. Detailed analysis of scanning tunnelling microscopy images is used to reconstruct atomic positions and the strain map within the deformed graphene layer, and demonstrate the tip-induced subsurface translation of neon atoms. We invoke an analytical model, originally devised for graphene macroscopic deformations, to determine the graphite adhesion energy of 0.221±0.011 J m(-2). This value is in excellent agreement with reported macroscopic values and our atomistic simulations. This implies mechanical properties of graphene scale down to a few-nanometre length. The simplicity of our method provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of nanomechanical properties in layered materials.

  1. Single-layer behavior and its breakdown in twisted graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina

    2013-03-01

    Stacking order plays a major role in the electronic properties of graphene layers because hopping between carbon atoms in neighboring layers is a key ingredient in their band structure. Twisting the layers away from the equilibrium Bernal stacking, which produces the superstructures known as Moiré patterns in scanning tunneling microscopy, decreases the overlap between atoms in adjacent layers and therefore significantly alters their electronic properties. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, we obtained direct evidence for the electronic structure of twisted graphene layers.[2] The samples were membranes of CVD grown graphene and graphite crystals which contain areas with various twist angles. In topographic images the regions where layers are twisted away from Bernal stacking exhibit Moiré patterns with periods which depend on the twist angle. We find that the density of states on the twisted layers develops two Van Hove singularities that symmetrically flank the Dirac point at an energy that depends on the twist angle. High magnetic field scanning tunneling microscopy and Landau level spectroscopy of twisted graphene layers reveal that for twist angles exceeding ~3 degrees the low energy carriers exhibit Landau level spectra characteristic of massless Dirac fermions. Above 20 degrees the layers effectively decouple and the electronic properties are indistinguishable from those in single-layer graphene, while for smaller angles we observe a slowdown of the carrier velocity which is strongly angle dependent.[3] These results are compared with theoretical predictions. DOE-FG02-99ER45742, NSF DMR 1207108, Alcatel-Lucent

  2. Graphene: Atomically thin protective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Bolotin, Kirill; Tuberquia, Juan; Harl, Robert; Jennings, Kane

    2011-03-01

    We explore the properties of graphene as a cathodic coating to protect copper substrates from oxidation and further corrosion. High-quality and large area graphene films are grown on copper substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Samples were thermally oxidized in an oxygen-rich environment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization of a Graphene/copper and bare copper samples reveals the absence of oxidized copper at the graphene/copper interface indicating that the graphene monolayer protects the underlying copper. We also determine the protective properties of graphene in aqueous media using electrochemical characterization techniques. First, we use Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) to show that graphene coated substrates lower frequencies (1Hz) exhibit impedance values 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to bare Cu substrates. Cyclic voltammetry also shows that a monolayer of graphene significantly reduces the oxygen reduction, thus exhibiting little charge transfer at the solid-liquid interface. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to estimate that the corrosion rate exhibited by Graphene/Cu is ~ 7 times lower than that of bare Cu substrates.

  3. Cleaning graphene with a titanium sacrificial layer

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, C. A. Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Vogel, E. M.; Chakrabarti, B.

    2014-06-02

    Graphene is a promising material for future electronic applications and chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper is a promising method for synthesizing graphene on the wafer scale. The processing of such graphene films into electronic devices introduces a variety of contaminants which can be difficult to remove. An approach to cleaning residues from the graphene channel is presented in which a thin layer of titanium is deposited via thermal e-beam evaporation and immediately removed. This procedure does not damage the graphene as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, greatly enhances the electrical performance of the fabricated graphene field effect transistors, and completely removes the chemical residues from the surface of the graphene channel as evidenced by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Atomic intercalation to measure adhesion of graphene on graphite

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan C.; Jeon, Seokmin; ...

    2016-10-31

    The interest in mechanical properties of layered and 2D materials has reemerged in light of device concepts that take advantage of flexing, adhesion and friction in such systems. Here we provide an effective measurement of the nanoscale elastic adhesion of a graphene sheet atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) based on the analysis of atomic intercalates in graphite. Atomic intercalation is carried out using conventional ion sputtering, creating blisters in the top-most layer of the HOPG surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy coupled with image analysis and density functional theory are used to reconstruct the atomic positions and the strain map withinmore » the deformed graphene sheet, as well as to demonstrate subsurface diffusion of the ions creating such blisters. To estimate the adhesion energy we invoke an analytical model originally devised for macroscopic deformations of graphene. This model yields a value of 0.221 ± 0.011 J/m-2 for the adhesion energy of graphite, which is in surprisingly good agreement with reported experimental and theoretical values. This implies that macroscopic mechanical properties of graphene scale down to at least a few nanometers length. The simplicity of our method, compared to the macroscale characterization, enables analysis of elastic mechanical properties in two-dimensional layered materials and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of mechanical properties on the nanoscale.« less

  5. Atomic intercalation to measure adhesion of graphene on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan C.; Jeon, Seokmin; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-10-31

    The interest in mechanical properties of layered and 2D materials has reemerged in light of device concepts that take advantage of flexing, adhesion and friction in such systems. Here we provide an effective measurement of the nanoscale elastic adhesion of a graphene sheet atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) based on the analysis of atomic intercalates in graphite. Atomic intercalation is carried out using conventional ion sputtering, creating blisters in the top-most layer of the HOPG surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy coupled with image analysis and density functional theory are used to reconstruct the atomic positions and the strain map within the deformed graphene sheet, as well as to demonstrate subsurface diffusion of the ions creating such blisters. To estimate the adhesion energy we invoke an analytical model originally devised for macroscopic deformations of graphene. This model yields a value of 0.221 ± 0.011 J/m-2 for the adhesion energy of graphite, which is in surprisingly good agreement with reported experimental and theoretical values. This implies that macroscopic mechanical properties of graphene scale down to at least a few nanometers length. The simplicity of our method, compared to the macroscale characterization, enables analysis of elastic mechanical properties in two-dimensional layered materials and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of mechanical properties on the nanoscale.

  6. Enhancement of the Stability of Fluorine Atoms on Defective Graphene and at Graphene/Fluorographene Interface.

    PubMed

    Ao, Zhimin; Jiang, Quanguo; Li, Shuang; Liu, Hao; Peeters, Francois M; Li, Sean; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-09-09

    Fluorinated graphene is one of the most important derivatives of graphene and has been found to have great potential in optoelectronic and photonic nanodevices. However, the stability of F atoms on fluorinated graphene under different conditions, which is essential to maintain the desired properties of fluorinated graphene, is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the diffusion of F atoms on pristine graphene, graphene with defects, and at graphene/fluorographene interfaces by using density functional theory calculations. We find that an isolated F atom diffuses easily on graphene, but those F atoms can be localized by inducing vacancies or absorbates in graphene and by creating graphene/fluorographene interfaces, which would strengthen the binding energy of F atoms on graphene and increase the diffusion energy barrier of F atoms remarkably.

  7. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniël; Calogero, Gaetano; Koster, Rik S.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; van Huis, Marijn A.; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Δ f (z ) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111). The results are corroborated by density functional theory calculations employing a van der Waals functional.

  8. Surface potentials and layer charge distributions in few-layer graphene films.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sujit S; Strachan, Douglas R; Mele, E J; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2009-01-01

    Graphene-derived nanomaterials are emerging as ideal candidates for postsilicon electronics. Elucidating the electronic interaction between an insulating substrate and few-layer graphene (FLG) films is crucial for device applications. Here, we report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) measurements revealing that the FLG surface potential increases with film thickness, approaching a "bulk" value for samples with five or more graphene layers. This behavior is in sharp contrast with that expected for conventional conducting or semiconducting films, and derives from unique aspects of charge screening by graphene's relativistic low energy carriers. EFM measurements resolve previously unseen electronic perturbations extended along crystallographic directions of structurally disordered FLGs, likely resulting from long-range atomic defects. These results have important implications for graphene nanoelectronics and provide a powerful framework by which key properties can be further investigated.

  9. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Qingxiao; Cheng, Yingchun; Li, Kun; Yao, Yingbang; Zhang, Qiang; Dong, Cezhou; Wang, Peng; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Yang, Wei; Zhang, X X

    2012-01-11

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density by doping. We demonstrate that a two-step process is an efficient way to dope graphene: create vacancies by high-energy atom/ion bombardment and fill these vacancies with desired dopants. Different elements (Pt, Co, and In) have been successfully doped in the single-atom form. The high binding energy of the metal-vacancy complex ensures its stability and is consistent with in situ observation by an aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscope.

  10. Anomalous Coulomb drag in bilayer graphene double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomeng; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kim, Philip

    Bilayer graphene double-layer structure consists of two layers of bilayer graphene separated by atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). With a perfect Fermi surface nesting and strong electron-electron interaction (ECoulomb > Ekinetic), such systems offer exciting platforms to study interaction driven phenomena, such as Coulomb drag and exciton condensation. We fabricate ultra-clean encapsulated bilayer graphene double layers with dry pick-up method. Room temperature drag measurement on our devices shows the sign of drag agree with the typical Fermi liquid behavior. However, at lower temperatures, the sign of drag reversed, indicating a new drag mechanism emerges and dominates. We measure this with different geometry, temperature, bias and gating to investigate the origin of such effect and discuss the implication of the drag sign changes.

  11. On the nature of the stacking interaction between two graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizhou; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Tao; Wang, Yi-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The interlayer interaction energy and its components of the bilayer graphene were obtained by extrapolation of the interlayer interaction energies and their components of the dimers formed by graphene with benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, tetracene, perylene, pentacene and hexacene. The resulting interaction energy of the bilayer graphene is -1.82 kcal/mol (or -79 meV) per carbon atom. The dispersion energy represents 70% of the total attractive energy between two graphene layers. In contrast, the electrostatic component is responsible for 25% of the total attractive interaction and the induction term contributes 5% to the stability of two graphene layers.

  12. Near-field scanning microwave microscopy of few-layer graphene.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Gonzales, Edward; Kalichava, Irakli; Gin, Aaron V.; Wickey, Lee; Del Barga, Christopher; Talanov, Vladimir V.; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2010-08-01

    Near-field microwave microscopy can be used as an alternative to atomic-force microscopy or Raman microscopy in determination of graphene thickness. We evaluated the values of AC impedance for few layer graphene. The impedance of mono and few-layer graphene at 4GHz was found predominantly active. Near-field microwave microscopy allows simultaneous imaging of location, geometry, thickness, and distribution of electrical properties of graphene without device fabrication. Our results may be useful for design of future graphene-based microwave devices.

  13. Imaging and dynamics of light atoms and molecules on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jannik C.; Girit, C. O.; Crommie, M. F.; Zettl, A.

    2008-07-01

    Observing the individual building blocks of matter is one of the primary goals of microscopy. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope revolutionized experimental surface science in that atomic-scale features on a solid-state surface could finally be readily imaged. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy has limited applicability due to restrictions in, for example, sample conductivity, cleanliness, and data acquisition rate. An older microscopy technique, that of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has benefited tremendously in recent years from subtle instrumentation advances, and individual heavy (high-atomic-number) atoms can now be detected by TEM even when embedded within a semiconductor material. But detecting an individual low-atomic-number atom, for example carbon or even hydrogen, is still extremely challenging, if not impossible, via conventional TEM owing to the very low contrast of light elements. Here we demonstrate a means to observe, by conventional TEM, even the smallest atoms and molecules: on a clean single-layer graphene membrane, adsorbates such as atomic hydrogen and carbon can be seen as if they were suspended in free space. We directly image such individual adatoms, along with carbon chains and vacancies, and investigate their dynamics in real time. These techniques open a way to reveal dynamics of more complex chemical reactions or identify the atomic-scale structure of unknown adsorbates. In addition, the study of atomic-scale defects in graphene may provide insights for nanoelectronic applications of this interesting material.

  14. Imaging and dynamics of light atoms and molecules on graphene.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jannik C; Girit, C O; Crommie, M F; Zettl, A

    2008-07-17

    Observing the individual building blocks of matter is one of the primary goals of microscopy. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope revolutionized experimental surface science in that atomic-scale features on a solid-state surface could finally be readily imaged. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy has limited applicability due to restrictions in, for example, sample conductivity, cleanliness, and data acquisition rate. An older microscopy technique, that of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has benefited tremendously in recent years from subtle instrumentation advances, and individual heavy (high-atomic-number) atoms can now be detected by TEM even when embedded within a semiconductor material. But detecting an individual low-atomic-number atom, for example carbon or even hydrogen, is still extremely challenging, if not impossible, via conventional TEM owing to the very low contrast of light elements. Here we demonstrate a means to observe, by conventional TEM, even the smallest atoms and molecules: on a clean single-layer graphene membrane, adsorbates such as atomic hydrogen and carbon can be seen as if they were suspended in free space. We directly image such individual adatoms, along with carbon chains and vacancies, and investigate their dynamics in real time. These techniques open a way to reveal dynamics of more complex chemical reactions or identify the atomic-scale structure of unknown adsorbates. In addition, the study of atomic-scale defects in graphene may provide insights for nanoelectronic applications of this interesting material.

  15. Atomically thin epitaxial template for organic crystal growth using graphene with controlled surface wettability.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Ngan; Jo, Sae Byeok; Lee, Seong Kyu; Sin, Dong Hun; Kang, Boseok; Kim, Hyun Ho; Lee, Hansol; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-04-08

    A two-dimensional epitaxial growth template for organic semiconductors was developed using a new method for transferring clean graphene sheets onto a substrate with controlled surface wettability. The introduction of a sacrificial graphene layer between a patterned polymeric supporting layer and a monolayer graphene sheet enabled the crack-free and residue-free transfer of free-standing monolayer graphene onto arbitrary substrates. The clean graphene template clearly induced the quasi-epitaxial growth of crystalline organic semiconductors with lying-down molecular orientation while maintaining the "wetting transparency", which allowed the transmission of the interaction between organic molecules and the underlying substrate. Consequently, the growth mode and corresponding morphology of the organic semiconductors on graphene templates exhibited distinctive dependence on the substrate hydrophobicity with clear transition from lateral to vertical growth mode on hydrophilic substrates, which originated from the high surface energy of the exposed crystallographic planes of the organic semiconductors on graphene. The optical properties of the pentacene layer, especially the diffusion of the exciton, also showed a strong dependency on the corresponding morphological evolution. Furthermore, the effect of pentacene-substrate interaction was systematically investigated by gradually increasing the number of graphene layers. These results suggested that the combination of a clean graphene surface and a suitable underlying substrate could serve as an atomically thin growth template to engineer the interaction between organic molecules and aromatic graphene network, thereby paving the way for effectively and conveniently tuning the semiconductor layer morphologies in devices prepared using graphene.

  16. Surface-confined single-layer covalent organic framework on single-layer graphene grown on copper foil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lirong; Zhou, Xin; Tian, Wei Quan; Gao, Teng; Zhang, Yan Feng; Lei, Shengbin; Liu, Zhong Fan

    2014-09-01

    The integration of 2D covalent organic frameworks (COFs) with atomic thickness with graphene will lead to intriguing two-dimensional materials. A surface-confined covalently bonded Schiff base network was prepared on single-layer graphene grown on copper foil and the dynamic reaction process was investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy. DFT simulations provide an understanding of the electronic structures and the interactions between the surface COF and graphene. Strong coupling between the surface COF and graphene was confirmed by the dispersive bands of the surface COF after interaction with graphene, and also by the experimental observation of tunneling condition dependent contrast of the surface COF.

  17. Selective growth of Pb islands on graphene/SiC buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. T.; Miao, Y. P.; Ma, D. Y.; Hu, T. W.; Ma, F. E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Chu, Paul K.; Xu, K. W. E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-02-14

    Graphene is fabricated by thermal decomposition of silicon carbide (SiC) and Pb islands are deposited by Pb flux in molecular beam epitaxy chamber. It is found that graphene domains and SiC buffer layer coexist. Selective growth of Pb islands on SiC buffer layer rather than on graphene domains is observed. It can be ascribed to the higher adsorption energy of Pb atoms on the 6√(3) reconstruction of SiC. However, once Pb islands nucleate on graphene domains, they will grow very large owing to the lower diffusion barrier of Pb atoms on graphene. The results are consistent with first-principle calculations. Since Pb atoms on graphene are nearly free-standing, Pb islands grow in even-number mode.

  18. van der Waals screening by single-layer graphene and molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Stanislav; Dev, Pratibha; Friedman, Adam L; Stine, Rory; Robinson, Jeremy T; Reinecke, Thomas L; Sheehan, Paul E

    2014-12-23

    A sharp tip of atomic force microscope is employed to probe van der Waals forces of a silicon oxide substrate with adhered graphene. Experimental results obtained in the range of distances from 3 to 20 nm indicate that single-, double-, and triple-layer graphenes screen the van der Waals forces of the substrate. Fluorination of graphene, which makes it electrically insulating, lifts the screening in the single-layer graphene. The van der Waals force from graphene determined per layer decreases with the number of layers. In addition, increased hole doping of graphene increases the force. Finally, we also demonstrate screening of the van der Waals forces of the silicon oxide substrate by single- and double-layer molybdenum disulfide.

  19. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P.; Yang, H.; Blume, R.; Schloegl, R.

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  20. Fabrication of graphene flakes composed of multi-layer graphene sheets using a thermal plasma jet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhan; Heo, Soo Bong; Hoi Gu, Geun; Suh, Jung Sang

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a method to fabricate graphene flakes composed of high quality multi-layer graphene sheets using a thermal plasma jet system. A carbon atomic beam was generated by injecting ethanol into Ar plasma continuously; the beam then flowed through a carbon tube attached to the anode. Graphene was made by epitaxial growth where a carbon atomic beam, having the proper energy, collided with a graphite plate. The graphene fabricated was very pure and showed a relatively good crystalline structure. We have demonstrated that the number of layers of graphene sheets could be controlled by controlling the rate of ethanol injection. Our process is a continuous process with a relatively high yield (~8%).

  1. Effects of heat treatment on Raman spectra of two-layer 12C/13C graphene.

    PubMed

    Kalbac, Martin; Frank, Otakar; Kavan, Ladislav

    2012-10-22

    The Raman spectra of two-layered graphene on a silicon substrate were studied in the temperature range from 298 to 1073 K in an inert atmosphere. Isotopic engineering was used to fabricate two-layer graphene specimens containing (13)C atoms in the top layer and (12)C atoms in the bottom layer, which allowed the behavior of each particular layer to be distinguished as a function of temperature. It is demonstrated that the top layer exhibits much lower Raman temperature coefficients than the bottom one for both the G and the G' modes. We suggest that the changes in the Raman spectra of graphene observed during thermal cycling are predominantly caused by a superposition of two effects, namely, the mechanical stress in graphene exerted by the substrate and the intrinsic changes in the graphene lattice caused by the temperature itself. The top graphene layer is proposed to be more relaxed than the bottom graphene layer and thus reflects almost exclusively the temperature variations as a freestanding graphene layer would.

  2. Graphene on Ni(111): Electronic Corrugation and Dynamics from Helium Atom Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using helium atom scattering, we have studied the structure and dynamics of a graphene layer prepared in situ on a Ni(111) surface. Graphene/Ni(111) exhibits a helium reflectivity of ∼20% for a thermal helium atom beam and a particularly small surface electron density corrugation ((0.06 ± 0.02) Å peak to peak height). The Debye–Waller attenuation of the elastic diffraction peaks of graphene/Ni(111) and Ni(111) was measured at surface temperatures between 150 and 740 K. A surface Debye temperature of θD = (784 ± 14) K is determined for the graphene/Ni(111) system and θD = (388 ± 7) K for Ni(111), suggesting that the interlayer interaction between graphene and the Ni substrate is intermediary between those for strongly interacting systems like graphene/Ru(0001) and weakly interacting systems like graphene/Pt(111). In addition we present measurements of low frequency surface phonon modes on graphene/Ni(111) where the phonon modes of the Ni(111) substrate can be clearly observed. The similarity of these findings with the graphene/Ru(0001) system indicates that the bonding of graphene to a metal substrate alters the dynamic properties of the graphene surface strongly and is responsible for the high helium reflectivity of these systems. PMID:26617683

  3. Graphene on Ni(111): Electronic Corrugation and Dynamics from Helium Atom Scattering.

    PubMed

    Tamtögl, Anton; Bahn, Emanuel; Zhu, Jianding; Fouquet, Peter; Ellis, John; Allison, William

    2015-11-19

    Using helium atom scattering, we have studied the structure and dynamics of a graphene layer prepared in situ on a Ni(111) surface. Graphene/Ni(111) exhibits a helium reflectivity of ∼20% for a thermal helium atom beam and a particularly small surface electron density corrugation ((0.06 ± 0.02) Å peak to peak height). The Debye-Waller attenuation of the elastic diffraction peaks of graphene/Ni(111) and Ni(111) was measured at surface temperatures between 150 and 740 K. A surface Debye temperature of θD = (784 ± 14) K is determined for the graphene/Ni(111) system and θD = (388 ± 7) K for Ni(111), suggesting that the interlayer interaction between graphene and the Ni substrate is intermediary between those for strongly interacting systems like graphene/Ru(0001) and weakly interacting systems like graphene/Pt(111). In addition we present measurements of low frequency surface phonon modes on graphene/Ni(111) where the phonon modes of the Ni(111) substrate can be clearly observed. The similarity of these findings with the graphene/Ru(0001) system indicates that the bonding of graphene to a metal substrate alters the dynamic properties of the graphene surface strongly and is responsible for the high helium reflectivity of these systems.

  4. Effect of water layer at the SiO2/graphene interface on pentacene morphology.

    PubMed

    Chhikara, Manisha; Pavlica, Egon; Matković, Aleksandar; Gajić, Radoš; Bratina, Gvido

    2014-10-07

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to examine early stages of pentacene growth on exfoliated single-layer graphene transferred to SiO2 substrates. We have observed 2D growth with mean height of 1.5 ± 0.2 nm on as-transferred graphene. Three-dimensional islands of pentacene with an average height of 11 ± 2 nm were observed on graphene that was annealed at 350 °C prior to pentacene growth. Compellingly similar 3D morphology has been observed on graphene transferred onto SiO2 that was treated with hexamethyldisilazane prior to the transfer of graphene. On multilayer graphene we have observed 2D growth, regardless of the treatment of SiO2. We interpret this behavior of pentacene molecules in terms of the influence of the dipolar field that emerges from the water monolayer at the graphene/SiO2 interface on the surface energy of graphene.

  5. Green synthesis of well-dispersed single-layer graphene colloids via an electrolytic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yilong; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Shang

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has lots of attractive properties. However, most of its optimal properties are only associated with individual sheets. Producing a colloidal form of graphene can effectively avoid graphene aggregation and thus maintain its original performance. In this paper, an electrolytic method was utilized to prepare graphene colloids. Initially, graphene oxide (GO) was produced from graphite by a pressurized oxidation method. The high concentration of H+ or OH‑ was found to facilitate the aggregation of GO. Then, GO was reduced by nascent hydrogen, which was generated by reducing hydrogen ions on an iron cathode in the electrolytic method. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermogravimetric analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses indicated that the nascent hydrogen can effectively reduce GO to graphene. Atomic force microscopy analysis and dispersibility evaluation of graphene colloids proved that the novel electrolytic method can prepare well-dispersed single-layer graphene colloids.

  6. Hidden Kekule Order of Ghost Atoms on Monolayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward; Rosenthal, Ethan; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Ogawa, Yui; Shen, Kyle; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2015-03-01

    Various charge and spin ordered phases have been predicted to exist in graphene when the lattice symmetry is broken on the atomic scale. One such phase is the Kekule distortion, whereby the C-C bond symmetry is broken and the graphene unit cell is tripled. It has been proposed that when certain adatoms are placed on monolayer graphene, strong interactions can exist between them mediated by the graphene lattice. The graphene-adatom interaction can induce Kekule order in the graphene itself, and move the adatoms to produce a hidden Kekule ordering. In this talk I will discuss evidence from scanning tunneling microscopy, electron diffraction and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy that shows the existence of this unique ordering in epitaxial graphene on copper. Interestingly, we find in this case that the Kekule order is induced by a dilute number of ``ghost atoms'' - unidentified atomic features - in the otherwise perfect copper lattice underneath monolayer graphene.

  7. Atomic Scale Study on Growth and Heteroepitaxy of ZnO Monolayer on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin semiconducting oxide on graphene carries a unique combination of wide band gap, high charge carrier mobility, and optical transparency, which can be widely applied for optoelectronics. However, study on the epitaxial formation and properties of oxide monolayer on graphene remains unexplored due to hydrophobic graphene surface and limits of conventional bulk deposition technique. Here, we report atomic scale study of heteroepitaxial growth and relationship of a single-atom-thick ZnO layer on graphene using atomic layer deposition. We demonstrate atom-by-atom growth of zinc and oxygen at the preferential zigzag edge of a ZnO monolayer on graphene through in situ observation. We experimentally determine that the thinnest ZnO monolayer has a wide band gap (up to 4.0 eV), due to quantum confinement and graphene-like structure, and high optical transparency. This study can lead to a new class of atomically thin two-dimensional heterostructures of semiconducting oxides formed by highly controlled epitaxial growth. PMID:28002942

  8. Raman Fingerprints of Atomically Precise Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzhbitskiy, Ivan A.; Corato, Marzio De; Ruini, Alice; Molinari, Elisa; Narita, Akimitsu; Hu, Yunbin; Schwab, Matthias G.; Bruna, Matteo; Yoon, Duhee; Milana, Silvia; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Prezzi, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Bottom-up approaches allow the production of ultra-narrow and atomically precise graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), with electronic and optical properties controlled by the specific atomic structure. Combining Raman spectroscopy and ab-initio simulations, we show that GNR width, edge geometry and functional groups all influence their Raman spectra. The low-energy spectral region below 1000 cm-1 is particularly sensitive to edge morphology and functionalization, while the D peak dispersion can be used to uniquely fingerprint the presence of GNRs, and differentiates them from other sp2 carbon nanostructures.

  9. Two-dimensional atomic crystals beyond graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures have been the center of intense research and development for more than two decades now. Of these materials, graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) layered material system, has had a significant impact on science and technology over the past decade after monolayers of this material were experimentally isolated in 2004. The recent emergence of other classes of 2D graphene-like layered materials has added yet more exciting dimensions for research in exploring the diverse properties and applications arising from these 2D material systems. For example, hexagonal-BN, a layered material closest in structure to graphene, is an insulator, while NbSe2, a transition metal di-chalcogenide, is metallic and monolayers of other transition metal di-chalcogenides such as MoS2 are direct band-gap semiconductors. The rich spectrum of properties that 2D layered material systems offer can potentially be engineered ondemand, and creates exciting prospects for using such materials in applications ranging from electronics, sensing, photonics, energy harvesting and flexible electronics over the coming years.

  10. Graphene/ferroelectrics/graphene hybrid structure: Asymmetric doping of graphene layers

    SciTech Connect

    Duong, Dinh Loc; Lee, Si Young; Kim, Seong Kyu; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-06-15

    We report graphene/ferroelectric/graphene hybrid structure to demonstrate an asymmetrical doping in two graphene layers, one side with electrons and another side with holes. Two ferroelectrics, a poly(vinylidenefluoride) (PVDF) and a hydrofluorinated graphene, were used to demonstrate the concept with density functional calculations, revealing the Fermi level shift of 0.35 and 0.75 eV, respectively. This concept was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy using graphene/poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE))/graphene hybrid, which can easily form β-phase close to our simulation model. G-band peak position was downshifted for electron doping and upshifted for hole doping. This hybrid structure opens an opportunity to study bilayer graphene system with a controllable thickness for a wide range of high carrier concentration.

  11. Antibacterial activity of graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybowska-Sarapuk, Ł.; Kotela, A.; Krzemiński, J.; Janczak, D.; Wróblewska, M.; Marchel, H.; Łegorz, P.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial biofilm is a direct cause of complications in management of various medical conditions. There is an ongoing search for a feasible method to prevent its growth, as an alternative to antibiotics, which are ineffective. The aim of the study was to prepare and evaluate a detailed algorithm for production of graphene coatings, using economically efficient methods of printed electronics (such as ink-jet printing or spray coating), and assess their antibacterial properties. Based on the preliminary results of our work we suggest that graphene coating may inhibit the formation of microbial biofilms. Further research is needed to verify antibacterial properties of graphene coatings and its future applications in prevention of biofilm-related infections, e.g. by coating surgical instruments, catheters or tracheostomy tubes. In addition, we propose a series of hypotheses to be evaluated in further work.

  12. Atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitskii, Alexander

    There is a considerable interest in graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), few-nm-wide strips of graphene with high aspect ratios, because of their intriguing physical properties. For example, GNRs with zigzag edges are predicted to exhibit low-dimensional magnetism, while GNRs with armchair edges can possess large energy band gaps, making them promising materials for future electronics and photovoltaics. The ability to control structural parameters of GNRs, such as their width, edge structure and termination, with atomic precision is the key for practical realization of these intriguing nanoscale properties. Physical properties of GNRs can also be modified by their doping with heteroatoms, such nitrogen, resulting in nitrogen-doped GNRs or N-GNRs. In this talk I will discuss several types of N-GNRs with different doping levels that have been synthesized and systematically studied by spectroscopic, microscopic and transport methods. Incorporation of nitrogen atoms in graphene lattice is shown to be an effective route to affect GNRs' band gap, doping level as well as aggregation behavior. The support from NSF CHE-1455330 is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Enhanced intervalley scattering in artificially stacked double-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.; Kelekçi, Özgür; Iqbal, M. W.; Jin, Xiaozhan; Hwang, Chanyong; Eom, Jonghwa

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated artificially stacked double-layer graphene by sequentially transferring graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The double-layer graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements. A weak localization effect was observed for different charge carrier densities and temperatures. The obtained intervalley scattering rate was unusually high compared to normal Bernal-stacked bilayer or single-layer graphene. The sharp point defects, local deformation, or bending of graphene plane required for intervalley scattering from one Dirac cone to another seemed to be enhanced by the artificially stacked graphene layers.

  14. Graphene and graphene-like layered transition metal dichalcogenides in energy conversion and storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Feng, Hongbin; Li, Jinghong

    2014-06-12

    Being confronted with the energy crisis and environmental problems, the exploration of clean and renewable energy materials as well as their devices are urgently demanded. Two-dimensional (2D) atomically-thick materials, graphene and grpahene-like layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have showed vast potential as novel energy materials due to their unique physicochemical properties. In this Review, we outline the typical application of graphene and grpahene-like TMDs in energy conversion and storage fields, and hope to promote the development of 2D TMDs in this field through the analysis and comparisons with the relatively natural graphene. First, a brief introduction of electronic structures and basic properties of graphene and TMDs are presented. Then, we summarize the exciting progress of these materials made in both energy conversion and storage field including solar cells, electrocatalysis, supercapacitors and lithium ions batteries. Finally, the prospects and further developments in these exciting fields of graphene and graphene-like TMDs materials are also suggested.

  15. Enhancement of absorption in vertically-oriented graphene sheets growing on a thin copper layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozouvan, Tamara; Poperenko, Leonid; Kravets, Vasyl; Shaykevich, Igor

    2017-02-01

    The optical properties and surface structure of graphene films grown on thin copper Cu (1 μm) layer using chemical vapour deposition method were investigated via spectroscopic ellipsometry and nanoscopic measurements. Angle variable ellipsometry measurements were performed to analyze the features of dispersion of the complex refractive index and optical conductivity. It was observed significant enhancement of the absorption band in the vertically-oriented graphene sheets layer with respect to the bulk graphite due to interaction between excited localized surface plasmon at surface of thin Cu layer and graphene's electrons. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements with atomic spatial resolution revealed vertical crystal lattice structure of the deposited graphene layer. The obtained results provide direct evidence of the strong influence of the growing condition and morphology of nanostructure on electronic and optical behaviours of graphene film.

  16. Gamma ray-assisted irradiation of few-layer graphene films: a Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleut, D. N.; Marković, Z. M.; Holclajtner Antunović, I. D.; Dramićanin, M. D.; Kepić, D. P.; Todorović Marković, B. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper represents results of a Raman spectroscopy study of gamma-irradiated few-layer graphene thin films at three different doses: 25, 50 and 110 kGy. Graphene thin films were deposited by the vacuum filtration method and then transferred onto glass substrate. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis have shown that the average in-plane crystallite size La of graphene thin films varies slightly when an irradiation dose is applied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that gamma irradiation of graphene thin films resulted in slight p-doping of the graphene thin film surface. It was found that during gamma irradiation at a dose of 110 kGy, the graphene sheets merged. As a result, the number of incorporated defects in the graphene structure was reduced (the ID/IG ratio decreased with the increase in the applied dose).

  17. Spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity in few-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, Joseph C., Jr.

    Carbon is an extremely versatile element due to the ability of its electronic structure to allow strong bonds with many elements including other carbon atoms. This allows for the formation of many types of large and complex architectures, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, at the nanoscale. One of the most fascinating allotropes of carbon is graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice with carbon in sp2 hybridization, which building block for layered graphite and other nanocarbons.[1] Because of its unique structure, graphene displays several interesting properties including high thermal[2-4] and electrical mobility and conductivity[1,5]. The initial studies on graphene were performed on mechanically exfoliated samples, which were limited to few microns in size. In the recent years, large areas of single- and few-layer graphene (˜few cm x cm) are being produced by chemical vapor deposition technique for practical applications. However, chemical vapor deposition grown graphene is highly polycrystalline with interfaces such as edges, grain boundaries, dislocations, and point defects. This inevitable presence of defects in graphene influences its electrical and thermal transport. While many studies have previously focused on the influence of defects on electrical mobility and conductivity, there is little information on the influence of defects on the thermal properties of graphene. This study specifically investigates the effect of both intrinsic and extrinsic defects on the in-plane thermal properties of graphene using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The in-plane thermal conductivity of few-layered graphene (FLG) was measured using Raman spectroscopy, following the work of Balandin et al. [4]The thermal conductivity was estimated from a shift of the characteristic G-band of graphene as a function of the excitation laser power. The graphene samples were synthesized on nickel substrates using chemical vapor deposition, and transferred to copper TEM grids and

  18. Few layer graphene based superlattices as efficient thermal insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuxiang; Chalopin, Yann; Volz, Sebastian

    2013-09-01

    While graphene and few layer graphene (FLG) are considered as having the highest thermal conductivity in their in-plane directions, our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations however show that those systems are also characterized by a superior thermal contact resistance, which could be largely tuned with the layer number when in contact with a silica substrate. Taking advantages of such a resistive interface, MD simulations show that SiO2/FLG superlattices have a thermal conductivity as low as 0.30 W/m K, exhibiting a promising prospect in nano-scale thermal insulation. These findings pave the way for an improved thermal management of nanoscale systems such as thermal barrier coatings and phase change memory materials with atomic-scale super-insulators.

  19. Layer resolved capacitive probing of graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibrov, Alexander; Parmentier, François; Li, Jia; Wang, Lei; Hunt, Benjamin; Dean, Cory; Hone, James; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Young, Andrea

    Compared to single layer graphene, graphene bilayers have an additional ``which-layer'' degree of freedom that can be controlled by an external electric field in a dual-gated device geometry. We describe capacitance measurements capable of directly probing this degree of freedom. By performing top gate, bottom gate, and penetration field capacitance measurements, we directly extract layer polarization of both Bernal and twisted bilayers. We will present measurements of hBN encapsulated bilayers at both zero and high magnetic field, focusing on the physics of the highly degenerate zero-energy Landau level in the high magnetic field limit where spin, valley, and layer degeneracy are all lifted by electronic interactions.

  20. Symmetry breaking in few layer graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Aaron; Ohta, Taisuke; McChesney, Jessica L.; Emtsev, Konstantin V.; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticle dynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axis screening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of the spectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiC using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this paper we review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extracting such parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments against the possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  1. Symmetry Breaking in Few Layer Graphene Films

    SciTech Connect

    Bostwick, A.; Ohta, T.; McChesney, J.L.; Emtsev, K.; Seyller,Th.; Horn, K.; Rotenberg, E.

    2007-05-25

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticledynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axisscreening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of thespectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiCusing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this articlewe review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extractingsuch parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments againstthe possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  2. Atomically thin semiconducting layers and nanomembranes: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, Mircea; Dragoman, Daniela; Tiginyanu, Ion

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews the main physical properties of atomically thin semiconductors and the electronic devices based on them. We start with graphene, describing its physical properties and growth methods, followed by a discussion of its electronic device applications. Then, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are analyzed as a prototype of atomically thin semiconductors, their physical properties, growth methods, and electronic devices are discussed in detail. Finally, non-layered semiconducting membranes with thicknesses ranging from a few nanometers to about 50 nm, and considered as counterparts of atomically thin semiconductors, are analyzed, and their applications presented.

  3. Large-area, freestanding, single-layer graphene-gold: a hybrid plasmonic nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R Swathi; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Payne, Scott; Bradley, Michael; Borondics, Ferenc

    2014-06-24

    Graphene-based plasmonic devices have recently drawn great attention. However, practical limitations in fabrication and device architectures prevent studies from being carried out on the intrinsic properties of graphene and their change by plasmonic structures. The influence of a quasi-infinite object (i.e., the substrate) on graphene, being a single sheet of carbon atoms, and the plasmonic device is overwhelming. To address this and put the intrinsic properties of the graphene-plasmonic nanostructures in focus, we fabricate large-area, freestanding, single-layer graphene-gold (LFG-Au) sandwich structures and Au nanoparticle decorated graphene (formed via thermal treatment) hybrid plasmonic nanostructures. We observed two distinct plasmonic enhancement routes of graphene unique to each structure via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The localized electronic structure variation in the LFG due to graphene-Au interaction at the nanoscale is mapped using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. The measurements show an optical density of ∼0.007, which is the smallest experimentally determined for single-layer graphene thus far. Our results on freestanding graphene-Au plasmonic structures provide great insight for the rational design and future fabrication of graphene plasmonic hybrid nanostructures.

  4. Graphene coated with controllable N-doped carbon layer by molecular layer deposition as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Shichao; Qin, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, graphene is coated with nitrogen-doped carbon layer, which is produced by a carbonization process of aromatic polyimide (PI) films deposited on the surfaces of graphene by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The utilization of MLD not only allows uniform coating of PI layers on the surfaces of pristine graphene without any surface treatment, but also enables homogenous dispersion of doped nitrogen atoms in the carbonized products. The as-prepared N-doped carbon layer coated graphene (NC-G) exhibited remarkable capacitance performance as electrode materials for supercapacitor, showing a high specific capacitance of 290.2 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, meanwhile maintaining good rate performance and stable cycle capability. The NC-G synthesized by this way represents an alternative promising candidate as electrode material for supercapacitors.

  5. Effective elastic mechanical properties of single layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, F; Adhikari, S; Srikantha Phani, A

    2009-02-11

    The elastic moduli of single layer graphene sheet (SLGS) have been a subject of intensive research in recent years. Calculations of these effective properties range from molecular dynamic simulations to use of structural mechanical models. On the basis of mathematical models and calculation methods, several different results have been obtained and these are available in the literature. Existing mechanical models employ Euler-Bernoulli beams rigidly jointed to the lattice atoms. In this paper we propose truss-type analytical models and an approach based on cellular material mechanics theory to describe the in-plane linear elastic properties of the single layer graphene sheets. In the cellular material model, the C-C bonds are represented by equivalent mechanical beams having full stretching, hinging, bending and deep shear beam deformation mechanisms. Closed form expressions for Young's modulus, the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio for the graphene sheets are derived in terms of the equivalent mechanical C-C bond properties. The models presented provide not only quantitative information about the mechanical properties of SLGS, but also insight into the equivalent mechanical deformation mechanisms when the SLGS undergoes small strain uniaxial and pure shear loading. The analytical and numerical results from finite element simulations show good agreement with existing numerical values in the open literature. A peculiar marked auxetic behaviour for the C-C bonds is identified for single graphene sheets under pure shear loading.

  6. Reversible loss of Bernal stacking during the deformation of few-layer graphene in nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Young, Robert J; Kinloch, Ian A; Haigh, Sarah J; Warner, Jamie H; Hinks, Jonathan A; Xu, Ziwei; Li, Li; Ding, Feng; Riaz, Ibtsam; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S

    2013-08-27

    The deformation of nanocomposites containing graphene flakes with different numbers of layers has been investigated with the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that there is a shift of the 2D band to lower wavenumber and that the rate of band shift per unit strain tends to decrease as the number of graphene layers increases. It has been demonstrated that band broadening takes place during tensile deformation for mono- and bilayer graphene but that band narrowing occurs when the number of graphene layers is more than two. It is also found that the characteristic asymmetric shape of the 2D Raman band for the graphene with three or more layers changes to a symmetrical shape above about 0.4% strain and that it reverts to an asymmetric shape on unloading. This change in Raman band shape and width has been interpreted as being due to a reversible loss of Bernal stacking in the few-layer graphene during deformation. It has been shown that the elastic strain energy released from the unloading of the inner graphene layers in the few-layer material (~0.2 meV/atom) is similar to the accepted value of the stacking fault energies of graphite and few layer graphene. It is further shown that this loss of Bernal stacking can be accommodated by the formation of arrays of partial dislocations and stacking faults on the basal plane. The effect of the reversible loss of Bernal stacking upon the electronic structure of few-layer graphene and the possibility of using it to modify the electronic structure of few-layer graphene are discussed.

  7. Reversible Loss of Bernal Stacking during the Deformation of Few-Layer Graphene in Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The deformation of nanocomposites containing graphene flakes with different numbers of layers has been investigated with the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that there is a shift of the 2D band to lower wavenumber and that the rate of band shift per unit strain tends to decrease as the number of graphene layers increases. It has been demonstrated that band broadening takes place during tensile deformation for mono- and bilayer graphene but that band narrowing occurs when the number of graphene layers is more than two. It is also found that the characteristic asymmetric shape of the 2D Raman band for the graphene with three or more layers changes to a symmetrical shape above about 0.4% strain and that it reverts to an asymmetric shape on unloading. This change in Raman band shape and width has been interpreted as being due to a reversible loss of Bernal stacking in the few-layer graphene during deformation. It has been shown that the elastic strain energy released from the unloading of the inner graphene layers in the few-layer material (∼0.2 meV/atom) is similar to the accepted value of the stacking fault energies of graphite and few layer graphene. It is further shown that this loss of Bernal stacking can be accommodated by the formation of arrays of partial dislocations and stacking faults on the basal plane. The effect of the reversible loss of Bernal stacking upon the electronic structure of few-layer graphene and the possibility of using it to modify the electronic structure of few-layer graphene are discussed. PMID:23899378

  8. Aqueous proton transfer across single-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Achtyl, Jennifer L.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Lijun; Cai, Yu; Raju, Muralikrishna; Zhang, Weiwei; Sacci, Robert L.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Wesolowski, David J.; Dai, Sheng; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Neurock, Matthew; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer across single-layer graphene proceeds with large computed energy barriers and is therefore thought to be unfavourable at room temperature unless nanoscale holes or dopants are introduced, or a potential bias is applied. Here we subject single-layer graphene supported on fused silica to cycles of high and low pH, and show that protons transfer reversibly from the aqueous phase through the graphene to the other side where they undergo acid–base chemistry with the silica hydroxyl groups. After ruling out diffusion through macroscopic pinholes, the protons are found to transfer through rare, naturally occurring atomic defects. Computer simulations reveal low energy barriers of 0.61–0.75 eV for aqueous proton transfer across hydroxyl-terminated atomic defects that participate in a Grotthuss-type relay, while pyrylium-like ether terminations shut down proton exchange. Unfavourable energy barriers to helium and hydrogen transfer indicate the process is selective for aqueous protons. PMID:25781149

  9. Aqueous proton transfer across single-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Achtyl, Jennifer L.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Lijun; Cai, Yu; Raju, Muralikrishna; Zhang, Weiwei; Sacci, Robert L.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Wesolowski, David J.; Dai, Sheng; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Neurock, Matthew; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-03-17

    Proton transfer across single-layer graphene proceeds with large computed energy barriers and is thought to be unfavourable at room temperature unless nanoscale holes or dopants are introduced, or a potential bias is applied. Here we subject single-layer graphene supported on fused ​silica to cycles of high and low pH, and show that protons transfer reversibly from the aqueous phase through the graphene to the other side where they undergo acid–base chemistry with the silica hydroxyl groups. After ruling out diffusion through macroscopic pinholes, the protons are found to transfer through rare, naturally occurring atomic defects. Computer simulations reveal low energy barriers of 0.61–0.75 eV for aqueous proton transfer across hydroxyl-terminated atomic defects that participate in a Grotthuss-type relay, while ​pyrylium-like ether terminations shut down proton exchange. In conclusion, unfavourable energy barriers to helium and ​hydrogen transfer indicate the process is selective for aqueous protons.

  10. Aqueous proton transfer across single-layer graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Achtyl, Jennifer L.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Lijun; ...

    2015-03-17

    Proton transfer across single-layer graphene proceeds with large computed energy barriers and is thought to be unfavourable at room temperature unless nanoscale holes or dopants are introduced, or a potential bias is applied. Here we subject single-layer graphene supported on fused ​silica to cycles of high and low pH, and show that protons transfer reversibly from the aqueous phase through the graphene to the other side where they undergo acid–base chemistry with the silica hydroxyl groups. After ruling out diffusion through macroscopic pinholes, the protons are found to transfer through rare, naturally occurring atomic defects. Computer simulations reveal low energymore » barriers of 0.61–0.75 eV for aqueous proton transfer across hydroxyl-terminated atomic defects that participate in a Grotthuss-type relay, while ​pyrylium-like ether terminations shut down proton exchange. In conclusion, unfavourable energy barriers to helium and ​hydrogen transfer indicate the process is selective for aqueous protons.« less

  11. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; ...

    2016-10-19

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene graphene and graphene substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy andmore » density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite.« less

  12. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  13. Graphene growth at the interface between Ni catalyst layer and SiO2/Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Song, Kwan-Woo; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2011-07-01

    Graphene was synthesized deliberately at the interface between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate as well as on top surface of Ni film using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which is suitable for large-scale and low-cost synthesis of graphene. The carbon atom injected at the top surface of Ni film can penetrate and reach to the Ni/SiO2 interface for the formation of graphene. Once we have the graphene in between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate, the substrate spontaneously provides insulating SiO2 layer and we may easily get graphene/SiO2/Si structure simply by discarding Ni film. This growth of graphene at the interface can exclude graphene transfer step for electronic application. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy show that graphene was successfully synthesized at the back of Ni film and the coverage of graphene varies with temperature and time of synthesis. The coverage of graphene at the interface depends on the amount of carbon atoms diffused into the back of Ni film.

  14. Synthesis of layer-tunable graphene: A combined kinetic implantation and thermal ejection approach

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Su; ...

    2015-05-04

    Layer-tunable graphene has attracted broad interest for its potentials in nanoelectronics applications. However, synthesis of layer-tunable graphene by using traditional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method still remains a great challenge due to the complex experimental parameters and the carbon precipitation process. Herein, by performing ion implantation into a Ni/Cu bilayer substrate, the number of graphene layers, especially single or double layer, can be controlled precisely by adjusting the carbon ion implant fluence. The growth mechanism of the layer-tunable graphene is revealed by monitoring the growth process is observed that the entire implanted carbon atoms can be expelled towards the substratemore » surface and thus graphene with designed layer number can be obtained. Such a growth mechanism is further confirmed by theoretical calculations. The proposed approach for the synthesis of layer-tunable graphene offers more flexibility in the experimental conditions. Being a core technology in microelectronics processing, ion implantation can be readily implemented in production lines and is expected to expedite the application of graphene to nanoelectronics.« less

  15. Synthesis of layer-tunable graphene: A combined kinetic implantation and thermal ejection approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Yongqiang; Chu, Paul K.; Gao, Heng; Ren, Wei; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Peihong; Wang, Xi; Di, Zengfeng

    2015-05-04

    Layer-tunable graphene has attracted broad interest for its potentials in nanoelectronics applications. However, synthesis of layer-tunable graphene by using traditional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method still remains a great challenge due to the complex experimental parameters and the carbon precipitation process. Herein, by performing ion implantation into a Ni/Cu bilayer substrate, the number of graphene layers, especially single or double layer, can be controlled precisely by adjusting the carbon ion implant fluence. The growth mechanism of the layer-tunable graphene is revealed by monitoring the growth process is observed that the entire implanted carbon atoms can be expelled towards the substrate surface and thus graphene with designed layer number can be obtained. Such a growth mechanism is further confirmed by theoretical calculations. The proposed approach for the synthesis of layer-tunable graphene offers more flexibility in the experimental conditions. Being a core technology in microelectronics processing, ion implantation can be readily implemented in production lines and is expected to expedite the application of graphene to nanoelectronics.

  16. Resistance and rupture analysis of single- and few-layer graphene nanosheets impacted by various projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghzadeh, Sadegh; Liu, Ling

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a quasi-classical model for the collision of various nanoparticles with single- and few-layer graphene nanosheets was introduced as a multi-scale approach that couples non-equilibrium molecular dynamics with the Finite Element Method. As a resistance criterion, it was observed that the coefficient of restitution and the induced stresses depend on the impact velocity of projectile. These parameters were evaluated computationally, and it was revealed that certain resulting behaviors differ from behaviors at the macro scale. By obtaining an out-of-plane yield stress limit of 1.0 TPa for graphene, the stress analysis of single- and multi-layer graphene sheets revealed that the limit projectile velocity needed for the yielding of graphene sheets increases with the increase in the number of layers. For aluminum nanoparticles, this increase is almost linear, and for other metals, it slightly deviates from the linear trend. It was also observed that the graphene sheets have a different rupture form when impacted by gaseous molecules than by metal particles. Considering the very high momentum of gas molecules and their shock-like behavior during high-speed collisions with a graphene sheet, pores with a size of one carbon atom can be created in graphene sheets. Since a single-layer graphene sheet can withstand a projectile which is 3.64 times larger than a projectile impacting a 20-layer graphene sheet, spaced graphene sheets seem to be more effective in absorbing the impact energy of projectiles than conventional few-layer graphene sheets.

  17. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki; Kalita, Golap

    2014-09-29

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  18. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  19. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Kottaisamy, M.

    2014-02-15

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  20. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Graphene Double Layer Formed by a Double Transfer of Graphene Single Layers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Bae, Gi Yoon; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate formation of double layer graphene by means of a double transfer using two single graphene layers grown by a chemical vapor deposition method. It is observed that shiftiness and broadness in the double-resonance of Raman scattering are much weaker than those of bilayer graphene formed naturally. Transport characteristics examined from transmission line measurements and field effect transistors show the similar behavior with those of single layer graphene. It indicates that interlayer separation, in electrical view, is large enough to avoid correlation between layers for the double layer structure. It is also observed from a transistor with the double layer graphene that molecules adsorpted on two inner graphene surfaces in the double layered structure are isolated and conserved from ambient environment.

  1. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  2. Layer-to-layer compression and enhanced optical properties of few-layer graphene nanosheet induced by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhen; Tan, Yang; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2016-08-01

    We report on the first experimental study of the layer-to-layer compression and enhanced optical properties of few-layer graphene nanosheet by applying ion irradiation. The deformation of graphene layers is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. It is observed that after the irradiation of energetic ion beams, the space between separate graphene layers is reduced due to layer-to-layer compression, resulting in tighter contact of the graphene sheet with the surface of the substrate. This processing enables enhanced interaction of the graphene with the evanescent-field wave near the surface, which induces reinforced polarization-dependent light absorption of the graphene. Utilizing the ion-bombarded graphene nanosheets as saturable absorbers, we have realized efficient Q-switched waveguide lasing with enhanced performance through the interaction of the graphene and evanescent field.

  3. ssDNA binding reveals the atomic structure of graphene.

    PubMed

    Husale, By Sudhir; Sahoo, Sangeeta; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Traversi, Floriano; Annibale, Paolo; Kis, Andras

    2010-12-07

    We used AFM to investigate the interaction of polyelectrolytes such as ssDNA and dsDNA molecules with graphene as a substrate. Graphene is an appropriate substrate due to its planarity, relatively large surfaces that are detectable via an optical microscope, and straightforward identification of the number of layers. We observe that in the absence of the screening ions deposited ssDNA will bind only to the graphene and not to the SiO(2) substrate, confirming that the binding energy is mainly due to the π-π stacking interaction. Furthermore, deposited ssDNA will map the graphene underlying structure. We also quantify the π-π stacking interaction by correlating the amount of deposited DNA with the graphene layer thickness. Our findings agree with reported electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) measurements. Finally, we inspected the suitability of using a graphene as a substrate for DNA origami-based nanostructures.

  4. Characterization of graphene oxide nanofilms obtained by the SAW atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachova, O. V.; Balashov, S. M.; Kubota, L. T.; Timm, R. A.; Nascimento, P. H.; Pavani Filho, A.; Moshkalev, S.

    2015-03-01

    Due to its ability to absorb water molecules, graphene oxide (GO) is considered a promising material for sensitive coatings in fast surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors. In this work, we characterize GO films obtained by the SAW atomization technique. It is shown that the atomized submicroliter droplets of aqueous suspension of GO can be deposited onto the surface of Si, LiNbO3 or quartz substrates forming discrete or continuous films of nanometer thickness. The deposited films were examined using AFM and electron microscopy. We discuss the dependence of thickness and structure of the obtained GO films on the parameters of deposition: the number of atomized droplets, a volume of the initial droplet, a distance between the atomizer and the sample, etc. To evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the obtained GO films, we used them as sensitive coatings of the SAW humidity sensors. We found that the adsorption characteristics of the GO films are determined by fast adsorption on the surface of GO sheets and slow adsorption, attributed to limited penetration of water molecules between the sheets, and depend on the number of deposited layers.

  5. Ultrafast Nanofiltration through Large-Area Single-Layered Graphene Membranes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanzhe; Hu, Yongyou; Koehler, Stephan; Cai, Liheng; Wen, Junjie; Tan, Xiaojun; Xu, Weiwei L; Sheng, Qian; Hou, Xu; Xue, Jianming; Yu, Miao; Weitz, David

    2017-03-22

    Perforated single-layered graphene has demonstrated selectivity and flux that is orders of magnitude greater than state-of-the-art polymer membranes. However, only individual graphene sheets with sizes up to tens of micrometers have been successfully fabricated for pressurized permeation studies. Scaling-up and reinforcement of these atomic membranes with minimum cracks and pinholes remains a major hurdle for practical applications. We develop a large-area in situ, phase-inversion casting technique to create 63 cm(2) high-quality single-layered perforated graphene membranes for ultrafast nanofiltration that can operate at pressures up to 50 bar. This result demonstrates the feasibility of our technique for creating robust large-area, high quality, single-layered graphene and its potential use as a pressurized nanofiltration membrane.

  6. Dynamics of single Fe atoms in graphene vacancies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alex W; Montanari, Barbara; He, Kuang; Kim, Judy; Allen, Christopher S; Wu, Yimin A; Olivier, Jaco; Neethling, Jan; Harrison, Nicholas; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2013-04-10

    Focused electron beam irradiation has been used to create mono and divacancies in graphene within a defined area, which then act as trap sites for mobile Fe atoms initially resident on the graphene surface. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy at 80 kV has been used to study the real time dynamics of Fe atoms filling the vacancy sites in graphene with atomic resolution. We find that the incorporation of a dopant atom results in pronounced displacements of the surrounding carbon atoms of up to 0.5 Å, which is in good agreement with density functional theory calculations. Once incorporated into the graphene lattice, Fe atoms can transition to adjacent lattice positions and reversibly switch their bonding between four and three nearest neighbors. The C atoms adjacent to the Fe atoms are found to be more susceptible to Stone-Wales type bond rotations with these bond rotations associated with changes in the dopant bonding configuration. These results demonstrate the use of controlled electron beam irradiation to incorporate dopants into the graphene lattice with nanoscale spatial control.

  7. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  8. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  9. Controllable synthesis of graphene sheets with different numbers of layers and effect of the number of graphene layers on the specific capacity of anode material in lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Wang, Hui; Wang, Gang; Wan, Lijuan; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jintao; Bai, Jinbo

    2011-05-15

    High quality graphene sheets are synthesized through efficient oxidation process followed by rapid thermal expansion and reduction by H{sub 2}. The number of graphene layers is controlled by tuning the oxidation degree of GOs. The higher the oxidation degree of GOs is getting, the fewer the numbers of graphene layers can be obtained. The material is characterized by elemental analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies. The obtained graphene sheets with single, triple and quintuplicate layers as anode materials exhibit a high reversible capacity of 1175, 1007, and 842 mA h g{sup -1}, respectively, which show that the graphene sheets with fewer layers have higher reversible capacity. -- Graphical abstract: The typical TEM images of the graphene sheets derived from GO3(a), GO2(b) and GO1(c). Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} With the oxidation degree of GO increasing, the numbers of graphene layers decreased. {yields} With the numbers of graphene layers decreasing, the reversible capacity improved. {yields} Graphene sheets with single-layer exhibit the best electrochemical performances.

  10. Detection of interlayer interaction in few-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zefei; Han, Yu; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Zhu, Wei; He, Mingquan; Xu, Shuigang; Chen, Xiaolong; Lu, Huanhuan; Ye, Weiguang; Han, Tianyi; Wu, Yingying; Long, Gen; Shen, Junying; Huang, Rui; Wang, Lin; He, Yuheng; Cai, Yuan; Lortz, Rolf; Su, Dangsheng; Wang, Ning

    2015-08-01

    Bernal-stacked few-layer graphene has been investigated by analyzing its Landau-level spectra through quantum capacitance measurements. We find that surface relaxation, which is insignificant in trilayer graphene, starts to manifest in Bernal-stacked tetralayer graphene. In trilayer graphene, the interlayer interaction parameters are generally similar to those of graphite. However, in tetralayer graphene, the hopping parameters of the two bulk layers are quite different from those of the two outer layers. This represents direct evidence of the surface relaxation phenomenon. Traditionally, the van der Waals interaction between the carbon layers is thought to be insignificant. However, we suggest that the interlayer interaction is an important factor in explaining the observed results, and the symmetry-breaking effects in graphene sublattice are not negligible.

  11. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Schloegl, R.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2016-01-01

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene–graphene and graphene–substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite. PMID:27759024

  12. Dielectric function for doped graphene layer with barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Ramos, Manuel; Garces Garcia, Eric; Magana, Fernado; Vazquez Fonseca, Gerardo Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study is to calculate the dielectric function for a system formed with a graphene layer doped with barium titanate. Density functional theory, within the local density approximation, plane-waves and pseudopotentials scheme as implemented in Quantum Espresso suite of programs was used. We considered 128 carbon atoms with a barium titanate cluster of 11 molecules as unit cell with periodic conditions. The geometry optimization is achieved. Optimization of structural configuration is performed by relaxation of all atomic positions to minimize their total energies. Band structure, density of states and linear optical response (the imaginary part of dielectric tensor) were calculated. We thank Dirección General de Asuntos del Personal Académico de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, partial financial support by Grant IN-106514 and we also thank Miztli Super-Computing center the technical assistance.

  13. Deformation of graphene on an oxidizing nickel surface: the role of graphene layer number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lijin; Shaina, P. R.; Gupta, Aparna; Das Gupta, Nandita; Jaiswal, Manu

    2016-11-01

    Few-layer graphene grown on nickel substrates by chemical vapour deposition is typically characterised by thickness inhomogeneity. In this work, we investigate the thickness-dependent changes induced in graphene during the surface oxidation of the underlying metal. Temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to monitor the lattice strain and defect formation induced in graphene, as well as the oxidation of Ni surface. Significant lattice strain is induced in thin layers of graphene (1-2 layers) during the oxidation process, for T > 400 °C. This is followed by the formation of boundary-type defects, and graphene loses structural integrity. In contrast, lattice strain induced in thicker graphene (up to 7 layers) during the metal surface oxidation is quite subdued. These thicker layers de-pin and remain structurally intact even after the underneath metal surface has oxidized.

  14. Tunable hybrid surface waves supported by a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorsh, I. V.; Shadrivov, I. V.; Belov, P. A.; Kivshar, Yu. S.

    2013-05-01

    We study electromagnetic waves localized near the surface of a semi-infinite dielectric medium covered by a graphene layer in the presence of a strong external magnetic field. We demonstrate that a novel type of hybrid TE-TM polarized surface plasmons can propagate along the graphene layer. We analyze the effect of the Hall conductivity on the polarization properties of these hybrid surface waves and suggest a possibility to tune the graphene plasmons by the external magnetic field.

  15. Single layer graphene protective gas barrier for copper photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangze; Moody, Nathan A.; Jensen, Kevin L.; Pavlenko, Vitaly; Narvaez Villarrubia, Claudia W.; Mohite, Aditya D.; Gupta, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    Photocathodes can benefit from a thin protection layer and attain long-term stability. Graphene is potentially a good candidate for such application. We report direct growth of single-layer graphene on single crystal Cu(110) photocathodes using chemical vapor deposition and the effective protection of copper photocathodes with graphene against degradation under atmospheric conditions. Due to the interaction and charge transfer between graphene and copper, the graphene-protected cathodes have 0.25 eV lower work function and 17% higher quantum efficiency at 250 nm compared with bare Cu cathodes. The graphene coating can protect copper photocathodes from degradation for more than 20 min in an exposure to 200 Torr of air. The validation of graphene-photocathode compatibility opens a new route to the lifetime-extension for photocathodes.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of charge carrier anisotropic motion in twisted few-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kandyba, Viktor; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Barinov, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, a layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice, captures enormous interest as probably the most promising component of future electronics thanks to its mechanical robustness, flexibility, and unique charge carrier quasiparticles propagating like massless high energy Dirac fermions. If several graphene layers form a stack, the interaction between them is, on the one hand, weak, allowing realization of various registries between the layers and, on the other hand, strong enough for a wide range tuning of the electronic properties. Here we grow few layer graphene with various number of layers and twist configurations and address the electronic properties of individual atomic layers in single microscopic domains using angle-resolved photoelectron spectromicroscopy. The dependence of the interlayer coupling on the twist angle is analyzed and, in the domains with tri-layers and more, if different rotations are present, the electrons in weaker coupled adjacent layers are shown to have different properties manifested by coexisting van Hove singularities, moiré superlattices with corresponding superlattice Dirac points, and charge carrier group velocity renormalizations. Moreover, pronounced anisotropy in the charge carrier motion, opening a possibility to transform strongly coupled graphene bilayers into quasi one-dimensional conductors, is observed. PMID:26548567

  17. Nanomechanical cleavage of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Najmaei, Sina; Bando, Yoshio; Kimoto, Koji; Koskinen, Pekka; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Yakobson, Boris I; Sorokin, Pavel B; Lou, Jun; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-04-03

    The discovery of two-dimensional materials became possible due to the mechanical cleavage technique. Despite its simplicity, the as-cleaved materials demonstrated surprising macro-continuity, high crystalline quality and extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties that triggered global research interest. Here such cleavage processes and associated mechanical behaviours are investigated by a direct in situ transmission electron microscopy probing technique, using atomically thin molybdenum disulphide layers as a model material. Our technique demonstrates layer number selective cleavage, from a monolayer to double layer and up to 23 atomic layers. In situ observations combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal unique layer-dependent bending behaviours, from spontaneous rippling (<5 atomic layers) to homogeneous curving (~ 10 layers) and finally to kinking (20 or more layers), depending on the competition of strain energy and interfacial energy.

  18. Nanomechanical cleavage of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Kvashnin, Dmitry G.; Najmaei, Sina; Bando, Yoshio; Kimoto, Koji; Koskinen, Pekka; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Sorokin, Pavel B.; Lou, Jun; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of two-dimensional materials became possible due to the mechanical cleavage technique. Despite its simplicity, the as-cleaved materials demonstrated surprising macro-continuity, high crystalline quality and extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties that triggered global research interest. Here such cleavage processes and associated mechanical behaviours are investigated by a direct in situ transmission electron microscopy probing technique, using atomically thin molybdenum disulphide layers as a model material. Our technique demonstrates layer number selective cleavage, from a monolayer to double layer and up to 23 atomic layers. In situ observations combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal unique layer-dependent bending behaviours, from spontaneous rippling (<5 atomic layers) to homogeneous curving (~ 10 layers) and finally to kinking (20 or more layers), depending on the competition of strain energy and interfacial energy.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of few-layer graphene prepared by C2-C6 cluster ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. S.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, Z. D.; Huang, Z. H.; Liu, C. S.; Fu, D. J.; Liu, J. R.

    2013-07-01

    Few-layer graphene has been prepared on 300 nm-thick Ni films by C2-C6 cluster ion implantation at 20 keV/cluster. Raman spectroscopy reveals significant influence of the number of atoms in the cluster, the implantation dose, and thermal treatment on the structure of the graphene layers. In particular, the graphene samples exhibit a sharp G peak at 1584 cm-1 and 2D peaks at 2711-2717 cm-1. The IG/I2D ratios higher than 1.70 and IG/ID ratio as high as 1.95 confirm that graphene sheets with low density of defects have been synthesized with much improved quality by ion implantation with larger clusters of C4-C6.

  20. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionally high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.

  1. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    DOE PAGES

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; ...

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionallymore » high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.« less

  2. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  3. Dynamical screening of the van der Waals interaction between graphene layers.

    PubMed

    Dappe, Y J; Bolcatto, P G; Ortega, J; Flores, F

    2012-10-24

    The interaction between graphene layers is analyzed combining local orbital DFT and second order perturbation theory. For this purpose we use the linear combination of atomic orbitals-orbital occupancy (LCAO-OO) formalism, that allows us to separate the interaction energy as the sum of a weak chemical interaction between graphene layers plus the van der Waals interaction (Dappe et al 2006 Phys. Rev. B 74 205434). In this work, the weak chemical interaction is calculated by means of corrected-LDA calculations using an atomic-like sp(3)d(5) basis set. The van der Waals interaction is calculated by means of second order perturbation theory using an atom-atom interaction approximation and the atomic-like-orbital occupancies. We also analyze the effect of dynamical screening in the van der Waals interaction using a simple model. We find that this dynamical screening reduces by 40% the van der Waals interaction. Taking this effect into account, we obtain a graphene-graphene interaction energy of 70 ± 5 meV/atom in reasonable agreement with the experimental evidence.

  4. Large changes of graphene conductance as a function of lattice orientation between stacked layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Qi, Yabing; Kwon, Sangku; Salmeron, Miquel; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-01-01

    Using the conductive tip of an atomic force microscope as an electrode, we found that the electrical conductance of graphite terraces separated by steps can vary by large factors of up to 100, depending on the relative lattice orientation of the surface and subsurface layers. This effect can be attributed to interlayer interactions that, when stacked commensurately in a Bernal sequence (ABAB…), cause the band gap to open. Misaligned layers, on the other hand, behave like graphene. Angular misorientations of a few degrees were found to cause large increases in the conductance of the top layer, with the maximum occurring around 30°. These results suggest new applications for graphene multilayers by stacking layers at various angles to control the resistance of the connected graphene ribbons in devices.

  5. One-atom-thick 2D copper oxide clusters on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kano, Emi; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Sakai, Seiji; Chernozatonskii, Leonid A; Sorokin, Pavel B; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2017-03-17

    The successful isolation and remarkable properties of graphene have recently triggered investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials from layered compounds; however, one-atom-thick 2D materials without bulk layered counterparts are scarcely reported. Here we report the structure and properties of novel 2D copper oxide studied by experimental and theoretical methods. Electron microscopy observations reveal that copper oxide can form monoatomic layers with an unusual square lattice on graphene. Density functional theory calculations suggest that oxygen atoms at the centre of the square lattice stabilizes the 2D Cu structure, and that the 2D copper oxide sheets have unusual electronic and magnetic properties different from 3D bulk copper oxide.

  6. High temperature and current density induced degradation of multi-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.; Mag-isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo

    2015-10-19

    We present evidence of moderate current density, when accompanied with high temperature, promoting migration of foreign atoms on the surface of multi-layer graphene. Our in situ transmission electron microscope experiments show migration of silicon atoms at temperatures above 800 °C and current density around 4.2 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Originating from the micro-machined silicon structures that clamp the freestanding specimen, the atoms are observed to react with the carbon atoms in the multi-layer graphene to produce silicon carbide at temperatures of 900–1000 °C. In the absence of electrical current, there is no migration of silicon and only pyrolysis of polymeric residue is observed.

  7. Atomic-Scale Interfacial Magnetism in Fe/Graphene Heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W. Q.; Wang, W. Y.; Wang, J. J.; Wang, F. Q.; Lu, C.; Jin, F.; Zhang, A.; Zhang, Q. M.; Laan, G. van der; Xu, Y. B.; Li, Q. X.; Zhang, R.

    2015-01-01

    Successful spin injection into graphene makes it a competitive contender in the race to become a key material for quantum computation, or the spin-operation-based data processing and sensing. Engineering ferromagnetic metal (FM)/graphene heterojunctions is one of the most promising avenues to realise it, however, their interface magnetism remains an open question up to this day. In any proposed FM/graphene spintronic devices, the best opportunity for spin transport could only be achieved where no magnetic dead layer exists at the FM/graphene interface. Here we present a comprehensive study of the epitaxial Fe/graphene interface by means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experiment has been performed using a specially designed FM1/FM2/graphene structure that to a large extent restores the realistic case of the proposed graphene-based transistors. We have quantitatively observed a reduced but still sizable magnetic moments of the epitaxial Fe ML on graphene, which is well resembled by simulations and can be attributed to the strong hybridization between the Fe 3dz2 and the C 2pz orbitals and the sp-orbital-like behavior of the Fe 3d electrons due to the presence of graphene. PMID:26145155

  8. Controlling Interfacial Reactions and Intermetallic Compound Growth at the Interface of a Lead-free Solder Joint with Layer-by-Layer Transferred Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yong-Ho; Lee, Jong-Dae; Yoon, Taeshik; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2016-03-02

    The immoderate growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed at the interface of a solder metal and the substrate during soldering can degrade the mechanical properties and reliability of a solder joint in electronic packaging. Therefore, it is critical to control IMC growth at the solder joints between the solder and the substrate. In this study, we investigated the control of interfacial reactions and IMC growth by the layer-by-layer transfer of graphene during the reflow process at the interface between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (in wt %) lead-free solder and Cu. As the number of graphene layers transferred onto the surface of the Cu substrate increased, the thickness of the total IMC (Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn) layer decreased. After 10 repetitions of the reflow process for 50 s above 217 °C, the melting temperature of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu, with a peak temperature of 250 °C, the increase in thickness of the total IMC layer at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was decreased by more than 20% compared to that at the interface of bare Cu without graphene. Furthermore, the average diameter of the Cu6Sn5 scallops at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was smaller than that at the interface without graphene. Despite 10 repetitions of the reflow process, the growth of Cu3Sn at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was suppressed by more than 20% compared with that at the interface without graphene. The multiple layers of graphene at the interface between the solder metal and the Cu substrate hindered the diffusion of Cu atoms from the Cu substrate and suppressed the reactions between Cu and Sn in the solder. Thus, the multiple layers of graphene transferred at the interface between dissimilar metals can control the interfacial reaction and IMC growth occurring at the joining interface.

  9. Nanoscale imaging of freestanding nitrogen doped single layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R S; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Bradley, Michael P; Borondics, Ferenc

    2015-02-14

    Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale.

  10. Strong piezoelectricity in single-layer graphene deposited on SiO2 grating substrates.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Zelenovskiy, Pavel; Romanyuk, Konstantin; Luchkin, Sergey; Kopelevich, Yakov; Kholkin, Andrei

    2015-06-25

    Electromechanical response of materials is a key property for various applications ranging from actuators to sophisticated nanoelectromechanical systems. Here electromechanical properties of the single-layer graphene transferred onto SiO2 calibration grating substrates is studied via piezoresponse force microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The correlation of mechanical strains in graphene layer with the substrate morphology is established via Raman mapping. Apparent vertical piezoresponse from the single-layer graphene supported by underlying SiO2 structure is observed by piezoresponse force microscopy. The calculated vertical piezocoefficient is about 1.4 nm V(-1), that is, much higher than that of the conventional piezoelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate and comparable to that of relaxor single crystals. The observed piezoresponse and achieved strain in graphene are associated with the chemical interaction of graphene's carbon atoms with the oxygen from underlying SiO2. The results provide a basis for future applications of graphene layers for sensing, actuating and energy harvesting.

  11. Characterization of Graphene and Transition Metal Dichalcogenide at the Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Lin, Yung-Chang; Warner, Jamie H.; Teng, Po-Yuan; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Chiu, Po-Wen; Iijima, Sumio; Suenga, Kazu

    2015-12-01

    Edge structures and atomic defects are of fundamental importance since they can significantly affect the physical and chemical properties of low-dimensional materials, such as nanoribbons, and therefore merit thorough investigations at the atomic level. Recent developments of direct imaging and analytical techniques using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) have provided direct access to information on the local atomic structure and the chemical composition at the atomic scale. In this review, we report on the discrimination of single atoms including dopant atoms on a monolayered transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanoribbon and a single nitrogen adatom on graphene by time-resolved annular dark-field (ADF) imaging and spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We also show that in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy can be used to monitor the structural transformation between semiconducting (2H) and metallic (1T) phases in monolayer MoS2, and can enable direct observation of in-plane graphene growth at a step edge of a bi-layer graphene and domain boundary formation during growth with atomic-resolution.

  12. Atomic oxidation of large area epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Velez-Fort, E.; Ouerghi, A.; Silly, M. G.; Sirtti, F.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Shukla, A.

    2014-03-03

    Structural and electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC were studied before and after an atomic oxidation process. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy indicates that oxygen penetrates into the substrate and decouples a part of the interface layer. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates the increase of defects due to the presence of oxygen. Interestingly, we observed on the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra a splitting of the π* peak into two distinct resonances centered at 284.7 and 285.2 eV. This double structure smears out after the oxidation process and permits to probe the interface architecture between graphene and the substrate.

  13. Energetics of atomic scale structure changes in graphene.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Stephen T; Lebedeva, Irina V; Popov, Andrey M; Bichoutskaia, Elena

    2015-05-21

    The presence of defects in graphene has an essential influence on its physical and chemical properties. The formation, behaviour and healing of defects are determined by energetic characteristics of atomic scale structure changes. In this article, we review recent studies devoted to atomic scale reactions during thermally activated and irradiation-induced processes in graphene. The formation energies of vacancies, adatoms and topological defects are discussed. Defect formation, healing and migration are quantified in terms of activation energies (barriers) for thermally activated processes and by threshold energies for processes occurring under electron irradiation. The energetics of defects in the graphene interior and at the edge is analysed. The effects of applied strain and a close proximity of the edge on the energetics of atomic scale reactions are overviewed. Particular attention is given to problems where further studies are required.

  14. Graphene-based multilayers constructed from layer-by-layer self-assembly techniques.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Liu, Xiaomian; Cong, Hailin; Yuan, Hua; Wang, Dong; Li, Zejing

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of graphene-based multilayers fabricated from layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique. Graphene multilayer films, due to their excellent performances and specific applications, have attracted widespread attention during recent decades. In this paper, the preparation and property of self-assembled graphene multilayer films are introduced. The application of different graphene multilayer films in transparent conducting films (TCFs), field effect transistors (FETs), lithium ion batteries (LIBs), supercapacitors, and solar cells are summarized and discussed. The perspectives for the future developments of self-assembled graphene multilayer films are proposed.

  15. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, David; Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  16. Electronic interaction between nitrogen atoms in doped graphene.

    PubMed

    Tison, Yann; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Joucken, Frédéric; Sharma, Dimpy; Henrard, Luc; Amara, Hakim; Ghedjatti, Ahmed; Ducastelle, François

    2015-01-27

    Many potential applications of graphene require either the possibility of tuning its electronic structure or the addition of reactive sites on its chemically inert basal plane. Among the various strategies proposed to reach these objectives, nitrogen doping, i.e., the incorporation of nitrogen atoms in the carbon lattice, leads in most cases to a globally n-doped material and to the presence of various types of point defects. In this context, the interactions between chemical dopants in graphene have important consequences on the electronic properties of the systems and cannot be neglected when interpreting spectroscopic data or setting up devices. In this report, the structural and electronic properties of complex doping sites in nitrogen-doped graphene have been investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, supported by density functional theory and tight-binding calculations. In particular, based on combined experimental and simulation works, we have systematically studied the electronic fingerprints of complex doping configurations made of pairs of substitutional nitrogen atoms. Localized bonding states are observed between the Dirac point and the Fermi level in contrast with the unoccupied state associated with single substitutional N atoms. For pyridinic nitrogen sites (i.e., the combination of N atoms with vacancies), a resonant state is observed close to the Dirac energy. This insight into the modifications of electronic structure induced by nitrogen doping in graphene provides us with a fair understanding of complex doping configurations in graphene, as it appears in real samples.

  17. Driving Forces of Conformational Changes in Single-Layer Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The extensive oxygen-group functionality of single-layer graphene oxide proffers useful anchor sites for chemical functionalization in the controlled formation of graphene architecture and composites. However, the physicochemical environment of graphene oxide and its single-atom thickness facilitate its ability to undergo conformational changes due to responses to its environment, whether pH, salinity, or temperature. Here, we report experimental and molecular simulations confirming the conformational changes of single-layer graphene oxide sheets from the wet or dry state. MD, PM6, and ab initio simulations of dry SLG and dry and wetted SLGO and electron microscopy imaging show marked differences in the properties of the materials that can explain variations in previously observed results for the pH dependent behavior of SLGO and electrical conductivity of chemically modified graphene-polymer composites. Understanding the physicochemical responses of graphene and graphene oxide architecture and performing selected chemistry will ultimately facilitate greater tunability of their performance. PMID:22494387

  18. Atomic intercalation - a practical method to determine the nanoscale adhesion energy of graphene on HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan; Jeon, Seokmin; Belianinov, Alexei; Kalinin, Sergei; Baddorf, Arthur; Maksymovych, Petro

    A detailed analysis of atomic intercalates in graphite provides a direct estimate of the nanoscale elastic adhesion of a graphene sheet atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Atomic intercalation is carried out using conventional ion sputtering, creating ``blisters'' in the top-most layer of the HOPG surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy coupled with image analysis and density functional theory is used to reconstruct the atomic positions and the strain map within the deformed graphene sheet. To estimate the adhesion energy we invoke an analytical model originally devised for macroscopic deformations of graphene. This model yields a value of is 0.221 +/- 0.011 J/m2 for the adhesion energy of graphite, which is in surprisingly good agreement with reported experimental and theoretical values. This implies that mechanical properties of graphene scale at least to lengths of a few nanometers. The simplicity of our method enables analysis of elastic mechanical properties in many two-dimensional layered materials and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of mechanical properties on the nanoscale. Acknowledgements: Experiments were conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  19. SrO(001) on graphene: a universal buffer layer for integration of complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Adam; Wen, Hua; Pinchuk, Igor; Zhu, Tiancong; Kawakami, Roland

    2015-03-01

    We report the successful growth of high-quality crystalline SrO on highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and single layer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy. The epitaxial SrO layers have (001) orientation as confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy measurements show rms surface roughness of optimal films to be 1.2 Å. Transport measurements of exfoliated graphene after SrO deposition show a strong dependence between the Dirac point and Sr oxidation. To show the utility of SrO as a buffer layer for complex oxide integration, we grew perovskite crystal SrTiO3 on SrO, and it was also confirmed to have (001) orientation from x-ray diffraction. This materials advancement opens the door to integration of many other complex oxides to explore novel correlated electron physics in graphene.

  20. Atomic-Scale Sliding Friction on Graphene in Water.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Pimentel, Carlos; Pedraz, Patricia; Luo, Feng; Serena, Pedro A; Pina, Carlos M; Gnecco, Enrico; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-04-26

    The sliding of a sharp nanotip on graphene completely immersed in water is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) and atomic force microscopy. MD simulations predict that the atomic-scale stick-slip is almost identical to that found in ultrahigh vacuum. Furthermore, they show that water plays a purely stochastic role in sliding (solid-to-solid) friction. These observations are substantiated by friction measurements on graphene grown on Cu and Ni, where, oppositely of the operation in air, lattice resolution is readily achieved. Our results promote friction force microscopy in water as a robust alternative to ultra-high-vacuum measurements.

  1. Surface stress of graphene layers supported on soft substrate

    PubMed Central

    Du, Feng; Huang, Jianyong; Duan, Huiling; Xiong, Chunyang; Wang, Jianxiang

    2016-01-01

    We obtain the surface stress of a single layer and multilayers of graphene supported on silicone substrates by measuring the deformation of the graphene-covered substrates induced by the surface tension of liquid droplets together with the Neumann’s triangle concept. We find that the surface stress of the graphene-covered substrate is significant larger than that of the bare substrate, and it increases with increasing graphene layers, and finally reaches a constant value of about 120 mN/m on three and more layers of graphene. This work demonstrates that the apparent surface stress of graphene-substrate systems can be tuned by the substrate and the graphene layers. The surface stress and the tuning effect of the substrate on it may have applications in design and characterization of graphene-based ultra-sensitive sensors and other devices. Moreover, the method may also be used to measure the surface stress of other ultrathin films supported on soft substrates. PMID:27166087

  2. Surface Chemistry in Electrochemical Atomic Layer Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    example, where a thin film of a material is formed an atomic layer at a time. That is, surface limited reactions are used to deposit individual atomic...The present studies were designed to investigate these surface limited reactions. To determine what the structures of the deposits were, and how that structure influenced subsequent deposition .

  3. Atomic Structures of Silicene Layers Grown on Ag(111): Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy Observations

    PubMed Central

    Resta, Andrea; Leoni, Thomas; Barth, Clemens; Ranguis, Alain; Becker, Conrad; Bruhn, Thomas; Vogt, Patrick; Le Lay, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Silicene, the considered equivalent of graphene for silicon, has been recently synthesized on Ag(111) surfaces. Following the tremendous success of graphene, silicene might further widen the horizon of two-dimensional materials with new allotropes artificially created. Due to stronger spin-orbit coupling, lower group symmetry and different chemistry compared to graphene, silicene presents many new interesting features. Here, we focus on very important aspects of silicene layers on Ag(111): First, we present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM) observations of the major structures of single layer and bi-layer silicene in epitaxy with Ag(111). For the (3 × 3) reconstructed first silicene layer nc-AFM represents the same lateral arrangement of silicene atoms as STM and therefore provides a timely experimental confirmation of the current picture of the atomic silicene structure. Furthermore, both nc-AFM and STM give a unifying interpretation of the second layer (√3 × √3)R ± 30° structure. Finally, we give support to the conjectured possible existence of less stable, ~2% stressed, (√7 × √7)R ± 19.1° rotated silicene domains in the first layer. PMID:23928998

  4. Atomic structures of silicene layers grown on Ag(111): scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy observations.

    PubMed

    Resta, Andrea; Leoni, Thomas; Barth, Clemens; Ranguis, Alain; Becker, Conrad; Bruhn, Thomas; Vogt, Patrick; Le Lay, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Silicene, the considered equivalent of graphene for silicon, has been recently synthesized on Ag(111) surfaces. Following the tremendous success of graphene, silicene might further widen the horizon of two-dimensional materials with new allotropes artificially created. Due to stronger spin-orbit coupling, lower group symmetry and different chemistry compared to graphene, silicene presents many new interesting features. Here, we focus on very important aspects of silicene layers on Ag(111): First, we present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM) observations of the major structures of single layer and bi-layer silicene in epitaxy with Ag(111). For the (3 × 3) reconstructed first silicene layer nc-AFM represents the same lateral arrangement of silicene atoms as STM and therefore provides a timely experimental confirmation of the current picture of the atomic silicene structure. Furthermore, both nc-AFM and STM give a unifying interpretation of the second layer (√3 × √3)R ± 30° structure. Finally, we give support to the conjectured possible existence of less stable, ~2% stressed, (√7 × √7)R ± 19.1° rotated silicene domains in the first layer.

  5. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    Since ancient times, pure carbon materials have been familiar in human society—not only diamonds in jewellery and graphite in pencils, but also charcoal and coal which have been used for centuries as fuel for living and industry. Carbon fibers are stronger, tougher and lighter than steel and increase material efficiency because of their lower weight. Today, carbon fibers and related composite materials are used to make the frames of bicycles, cars and even airplane parts. The two-dimensional allotrope, now called graphene, is just a single layer of carbon atoms, locked together in a strongly bonded honeycomb lattice. In plane, graphene is stiffer than diamond, but out-of-plane it is soft, like rubber. It is virtually invisible, may conduct electricity (heat) better than copper and weighs next to nothing. Carbon compounds with two carbon atoms as a base, such as graphene, graphite or diamond, have isoelectronic sister compounds made of boron-nitrogen pairs: hexagonal and cubic boron nitride, with almost the same lattice constant. Although the two 2D sisters, graphene and h-BN, have the same number of valence electrons, their electronic properties are very different: freestanding h-BN is an insulator, while charge carriers in graphene are highly mobile. The past ten years have seen a great expansion in studies of single-layer and few-layer graphene. This activity has been concerned with the π electron transport in graphene, in electric and magnetic fields. More than 30 years ago, however, single-layer graphene and h-BN on solid surfaces were widely investigated. It was noted that they drastically changed the chemical reactivity of surfaces, and they were known to 'poison' heterogeneous catalysts, to passivate surfaces, to prevent oxidation of surfaces and to act as surfactants. Also, it was realized that the controlled growth of h-BN and graphene on substrates yields the formation of mismatch driven superstructures with peculiar template functionality on the

  6. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  7. Tuning surface plasmons in graphene ribbons with liquid crystal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Viktor Yu.; Bunning, Timothy J.; Evans, Dean R.

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmons in graphene possess stronger mode confinement and lower propagation loss. One way to excite the surface plasmons is placing a periodic array of graphene nano-ribbons on top of a dielectric substrate. However once the system is fabricated it is not possible to change its optical properties. Liquid crystals (LC) are a uniaxial medium with an optical axis easily controlled by external stimuli. We suggest tuning the surface plasmons in an array of graphene ribbons by placing a LC slab on top of the ribbons. A voltage applied to the LC layer shifts the graphene ribbons plasmonic notch and changes its depth.

  8. Kinetic and chemical stability of graphene oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si; Bongiorno, Angelo; Bongiorno's lab Team

    2014-03-01

    Chemical functionalization of graphene holds great promise to open new applications of graphene in technology. Here we combine density functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo calculations to study both the stability and structure of graphene layers functionalized with epoxide and hydroxyl species. Our calculations show that sparse functionalizations of graphene are unstable in air at room temperature. However, oxygen groups diffuse and are prone to form dense agglomerates. To investigate these phenomena, we use DFT calculations to first map the interaction of functionalities on graphene, and then to device a simple energy scheme to both compute the Gibbs free energy of formation of arbitrary functionalizations of graphene and predict the structure resulting from diffusion and agglomeration processes. We find that the stability of graphene oxide increases for increasing both the O:C ratio and ageing time. The structure of the aged layers consists of a non-homogeneous phase of highly oxidized regions surrounded by areas of pristine graphene. Within the oxidized domains, formation of energetically stable motifs reduces the likelihood of occurrence of decomposition reactions, thereby enhancing the kinetic stability of the oxidized layer.

  9. Reduction of graphene oxide to graphene, A study of changes in the atomic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, A.; Wagner, A.; Mattevi, C.; Chov, A.; Liao, K.; Macosko, C.; Chhowalla, M.; Mkhoyan, K. A.

    2012-02-01

    An economic method for large scale production of graphene is based on exfoliation of graphite into 1-atom thick sheets by oxidation, creating graphene oxide (GO) and subsequent reduction of GO into graphene. Reduced GO sheets approach the highly desired properties of graphene, such as electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, to various degrees, but not completely. To understand why, we must understand the nanostructure of the sheets. Different methods of reduction result in products that are similar to graphene, but these products retain some oxidized areas or contain regions with sp^3 bonded carbon. The concentration and distribution of these defects on the reduced GO sheet affect the properties of the 2D material. Here, we have characterized the atomic structure of GO and reduced GO via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Spectroscopic data taken during thermal reduction of GO shows changes in the fine structure of carbon K-edge as the carbon changes from an oxidized form to elemental amorphous carbon to graphite like form, clearly delineating the process of reduction of GO to graphene. Products of several other reduction methods are also characterized revealing information on electronic environment surrounding carbon atoms, distribution of crystalline areas, and oxygen removal from GO.

  10. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  11. Adsorption by design: Tuning atom-graphene van der Waals interactions via mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Nathan S.; Del Maestro, Adrian; Wexler, Carlos; Kotov, Valeri N.

    2016-05-01

    We aim to understand how the van der Waals force between neutral adatoms and a graphene layer is modified by uniaxial strain and electron correlation effects. A detailed analysis is presented for three atoms (He, H, and Na) and graphene strain ranging from weak to moderately strong. We show that the van der Waals potential can be significantly enhanced by strain, and present applications of our results to the problem of elastic scattering of atoms from graphene. In particular, we find that quantum reflection can be significantly suppressed by strain, meaning that dissipative inelastic effects near the surface become of increased importance. Furthermore, we introduce a method to independently estimate the Lennard-Jones parameters used in an effective model of He interacting with graphene, and determine how they depend on strain. At short distances, we find that strain tends to reduce the interaction strength by pushing the location of the adsorption potential minima to higher distances above the deformed graphene sheet. This opens up the exciting possibility of mechanically engineering an adsorption potential, with implications for the formation and observation of anisotropic low-dimensional superfluid phases.

  12. Spin-induced band modifications of graphene through intercalation of magnetic iron atoms.

    PubMed

    Sung, S J; Yang, J W; Lee, P R; Kim, J G; Ryu, M T; Park, H M; Lee, G; Hwang, C C; Kim, Kwang S; Kim, J S; Chung, J W

    2014-04-07

    Intercalation of magnetic iron atoms through graphene formed on the SiC(0001) surface is found to induce significant changes in the electronic properties of graphene due mainly to the Fe-induced asymmetries in charge as well as spin distribution. From our synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy data together with ab initio calculations, we observe that the Fe-induced charge asymmetry results in the formation of a quasi-free-standing bilayer graphene while the spin asymmetry drives multiple spin-split bands. We find that Fe adatoms are best intercalated upon annealing at 600 °C, exhibiting split linear π-bands, characteristic of a bilayer graphene, but much diffused. Subsequent changes in the C 1s, Si 2p, and Fe 3p core levels are consistently described in terms of Fe-intercalation. Our calculations together with a spin-dependent tight binding model ascribe the diffuse nature of the π-bands to the multiple spin-split bands originated from the spin-injected carbon atoms residing only in the lower graphene layer.

  13. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  14. Atomically Sharp Interface in an h-BN-epitaxial graphene van der Waals Heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Sediri, Haikel; Pierucci, Debora; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Henck, Hugo; Patriarche, Gilles; Dappe, Yannick J.; Yuan, Sheng; Toury, Bérangère; Belkhou, Rachid; Silly, Mathieu G.; Sirotti, Fausto; Boutchich, Mohamed; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2015-01-01

    Stacking various two-dimensional atomic crystals is a feasible approach to creating unique multilayered van der Waals heterostructures with tailored properties. Herein for the first time, we present a controlled preparation of large-area h-BN/graphene heterostructures via a simple chemical deposition of h-BN layers on epitaxial graphene/SiC(0001). Van der Waals forces, which are responsible for the cohesion of the multilayer system, give rise to an abrupt interface without interdiffusion between graphene and h-BN, as shown by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) and direct observation using scanning and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM/HRTEM). The electronic properties of graphene, such as the Dirac cone, remain intact and no significant charge transfer i.e. doping, is observed. These results are supported by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. We demonstrate that the h-BN capped graphene allows the fabrication of vdW heterostructures without altering the electronic properties of graphene. PMID:26585245

  15. The effects of oxygen on controlling the number of carbon layers in the chemical vapor deposition of graphene on a nickel substrate.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wei-Dong; Yang, Qingdan; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2013-05-10

    While oxygen is typically considered undesirable during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on metal substrates, we demonstrate that suitable amounts of oxygen in the CVD system can in fact improve the uniformity and thickness control of the graphene film. The role of oxygen on the CVD of graphene on a nickel substrate using a propylene precursor was investigated with various surface analytical techniques. It was found that the number of carbon layers in the deposited graphene sample decreases as the concentration of oxygen increases. In particular, single-layer graphene can be easily obtained with an oxygen/propylene ratio of 1/9. In the presence of oxygen, a thin layer of nickel oxide will form on the substrate. The oxide layer decreases the concentration of carbon atoms dissolved in the nickel substrate and results in graphene samples with a decreasing number of carbon layers.

  16. Extremely large magnetoresistance in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gopinadhan, Kalon; Shin, Young Jun; Jalil, Rashid; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Geim, Andre K.; Neto, Antonio H. Castro; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding magnetoresistance, the change in electrical resistance under an external magnetic field, at the atomic level is of great interest both fundamentally and technologically. Graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore magnetoresistance at its nascent stage of structural formation. Here we report an extremely large local magnetoresistance of∼2,000% at 400 K and a non-local magnetoresistance of >90,000% in an applied magnetic field of 9 T at 300 K in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures. The local magnetoresistance is understood to arise from large differential transport parameters, such as the carrier mobility, across various layers of few-layer graphene upon a normal magnetic field, whereas the non-local magnetoresistance is due to the magnetic field induced Ettingshausen–Nernst effect. Non-local magnetoresistance suggests the possibility of a graphene-based gate tunable thermal switch. In addition, our results demonstrate that graphene heterostructures may be promising for magnetic field sensing applications. PMID:26388149

  17. Confining Cation Injection to Enhance CBRAM Performance by Nanopore Graphene Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaolong; Liu, Sen; Niu, Jiebin; Liao, Lei; Liu, Qi; Xiao, Xiangheng; Lv, Hangbing; Long, Shibing; Banerjee, Writam; Li, Wenqing; Si, Shuyao; Liu, Ming

    2017-02-24

    Conductive-bridge random access memory (CBRAM) is considered a strong contender of the next-generation nonvolatile memory technology. Resistive switching (RS) behavior in CBRAM is decided by the formation/dissolution of nanoscale conductive filament (CF) inside RS layer based on the cation injection from active electrode and their electrochemical reactions. Remarkably, RS is actually a localized behavior, however, cation injects from the whole area of active electrode into RS layer supplying excessive cation beyond the requirement of CF formation, leading to deterioration of device uniformity and reliability. Here, an effective method is proposed to localize cation injection into RS layer through the nanohole of inserted ion barrier between active electrode and RS layer. Taking an impermeable monolayer graphene as ion barrier, conductive atomic force microscopy results directly confirm that CF formation is confined through the nanohole of graphene due to the localized cation injection. Compared with the typical Cu/HfO2 /Pt CBRAM device, the novel Cu/nanohole-graphene/HfO2 /Pt device shows improvement of uniformity, endurance, and retention characteristics, because the cation injection is limited by the nanohole graphene. Scaling the nanohole of ion barrier down to several nanometers, the single-CF-based CBRAM device with high performance is expected to achieve by confining the cation injection at the atomic scale.

  18. Layer-by-Layer Insight into Electrostatic Charge Distribution of Few-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokni, Hossein; Lu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In few-layer graphene (FLG) systems on a dielectric substrate such as SiO2, the addition of each extra layer of graphene can drastically alter their electronic and structural properties. Here, we map the charge distribution among the individual layers of finite-size FLG systems using a novel spatial discrete model that describes both electrostatic interlayer screening and fringe field effects. Our results reveal that the charge density in the region very close to the edges is screened out an order of magnitude more weakly than that across the central region of the layers. Our discrete model suggests that the interlayer charge screening length in 1–8 layer thick graphene systems depends mostly on the overall gate/molecular doping level rather than on temperature, in particular at an induced charge density >5 × 1012 cm‑2, and can reliably be determined to be larger than half the interlayer spacing but shorter than the bilayer thickness. Our model can be used for designing FLG-based devices, and offers a simple rule regarding the charge distribution in FLG: approximately 70%, 20%, 6% and 3% (99% overall) of the total induced charge density reside within the four innermost layers, implying that the gate-induced electric field is not definitely felt by >4th layer.

  19. Layer-by-Layer Insight into Electrostatic Charge Distribution of Few-Layer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Rokni, Hossein; Lu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    In few-layer graphene (FLG) systems on a dielectric substrate such as SiO2, the addition of each extra layer of graphene can drastically alter their electronic and structural properties. Here, we map the charge distribution among the individual layers of finite-size FLG systems using a novel spatial discrete model that describes both electrostatic interlayer screening and fringe field effects. Our results reveal that the charge density in the region very close to the edges is screened out an order of magnitude more weakly than that across the central region of the layers. Our discrete model suggests that the interlayer charge screening length in 1–8 layer thick graphene systems depends mostly on the overall gate/molecular doping level rather than on temperature, in particular at an induced charge density >5 × 1012 cm−2, and can reliably be determined to be larger than half the interlayer spacing but shorter than the bilayer thickness. Our model can be used for designing FLG-based devices, and offers a simple rule regarding the charge distribution in FLG: approximately 70%, 20%, 6% and 3% (99% overall) of the total induced charge density reside within the four innermost layers, implying that the gate-induced electric field is not definitely felt by >4th layer. PMID:28220816

  20. Addressing Raman features of individual layers in isotopically labeled Bernal stacked bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Sara D.; Weis, Johan Ek; Frank, Otakar; Fridrichová, Michaela; Kalbac, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In this report important Raman modes for the evaluation of strain in graphene (the 2D and 2D‧) are analyzed. The isotope labeling is used to disentangle contribution of individual graphene layers of graphene bilayer to the studied Raman modes. It is shown that for Bernal-stacked bilayers, the 2D and the 2D‧ Raman modes have three distinct components that can be assigned to processes originating solely from the top graphene layer, bottom graphene layer, and from a combination of processes originating both from the top and bottom layers. The reported results thus enable addressing the properties of individual graphene layers in graphene bilayer by Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Formation of Compound Semiconductors by Electrochemical Atomic Layer Epitaxy (ECALE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-26

    by using Underpotential Deposition (UPD). UPD is a phenomena where an atomic layer of an element deposits at a potential prior to that needed to...atomic layers of the constituent elements. Atomic layers are formed in ECALE by using Underpotential Deposition (UPD). UPD is a phenomena where an atomic...atomic layers of the constituent elements which make up a compound. Deposition is limited to an atomic layer by the use of underpotential deposition (UPD

  2. Adsorption of beryllium atoms and clusters both on graphene and in a bilayer of graphite investigated by DFT.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Yves; Fernandez, Nicolas; Allouche, Alain; Linsmeier, Christian

    2013-01-09

    We herein investigate the interaction of beryllium with a graphene sheet and in a bilayer of graphite by means of periodic DFT calculations. In all cases, we find the beryllium atoms to be more weakly bonded on graphene than in the bilayer. Be(2) forms both magnetic and non-magnetic structures on graphene depending on the geometrical configuration of adsorption. We find that the stability of the Be/bilayer system increases with the size of the beryllium clusters inserted into the bilayer of graphite. We also find a charge transfer from beryllium to the graphite layers. All these results are analysed in terms of electronic structure.

  3. Coulomb Drag and Magnetotransport in Graphene Double Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutuc, Emanuel

    2013-03-01

    Graphene double layers, a set of two closely spaced graphene monolayers seperated by an ultra-thin dielectric, represent an interesting electron system to explore correlated electron states. We discuss the fabrication of such samples using a layer-by-layer transfer approach, the electron transport in individual layers at zero and in a high magnetic field, and Coulomb drag measurements. Coulomb drag, probed by flowing a drive current in one layer, and measuring the voltage drop in the opposite layer provides a direct measurement of the electron-electron scattering between the two layers, and can be used to probe the electron system ground state. Coulomb drag in graphene, measured as a function of both layer densities and temperature reveals two distinct regimes: (i) diffusive drag at elevated temperatures, above 50 K, and (ii) mesoscopic fluctuations-dominated drag at low temperatures. A second topic discussed here is a technique that allows a direct measurement of the Fermi energy in an electron system with an accuracy independent of the sample size, using a graphene double layer heterostructure. The underlying principle of the technique is that an interlayer bias applied to bring the top layer to the charge neutrality point is equal to the Fermi energy of the bottom layer, which in effect renders the top graphene layer a resistively detected Kelvin probe. We illustrate this method by measuring the Fermi velocity, Landau level spacing, and Landau level broadening in monolayer graphene. Work done in collaboration with S. Kim, I. Jo, J. Nah, D. Dillen, K. Lee, B. Fallahazad, Z. Yao, and S. K. Banerjee. We thank ONR, NRI, and NSF for support.

  4. Nondestructive and in situ determination of graphene layers using optical fiber Fabry-Perot interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Peng, Xiaobin; Liu, Qianwen; Gan, Xin; Lv, Ruitao; Fan, Shangchun

    2017-02-01

    Thickness measurement plays an important role for characterizing optomechanical behaviors of graphene. From the view of graphene-based Fabry-Perot (F-P) sensors, a simple, nondestructive and in situ method of determining the thickness of nanothick graphene membranes was demonstrated by using optical fiber F-P interference. Few-layer/multilayer graphene sheets were suspendedly adhered onto the endface of a ferrule with a 125 µm inner diameter by van der Waals interactions to construct micro F-P cavities. Along with the Fresnel’s law and complex index of refraction of the membrane working as a light reflector of an F-P interferometer, the optical reflectivity of graphene was modeled to investigate the effects of light wavelength and temperature. Then the average thickness of graphene membranes were extracted by F-P interference demodulation, and yielded a very strong cross-correlation coefficient of 99.95% with the experimental results observed by Raman spectrum and atomic force microscope. The method could be further extended for determining the number of layers of other 2D materials.

  5. Visualizing Klein tunneling in graphene at the atomic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward B.; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Shen, Kyle M.; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene has attracted much attention from both the solid-state and high-energy scientific communities because its elementary excitations mimic relativistic chiral fermions. This has allowed graphene to act as a table-top testbed for verifying certain longstanding theoretical predictions dating back to the very first formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics. One such prediction is Klein tunneling, the ability of chiral electrons to transmit perfectly through arbitrarily high potential barriers. Previous transport and point-spectroscopic studies confirmed Klein behavior of graphene electrons but lacked real-space resolution. Here we use scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements to present the first real-space atomic images of Klein tunneling in graphene. In these CVD-grown samples, quasi-circular regions of the copper substrate underneath graphene act as potential barriers that can scatter and transmit electrons. At certain energies, the relativistic chiral fermions that Klein scatter from these barriers are shown to fulfill resonance conditions such that the transmitted electrons become trapped and form standing waves. These resonant modes are visualized with detailed spectroscopic images with atomic resolution that agree well with theoretical calculations. The trapping time is shown to depend critically on both the angular momenta quantum number of the resonant state and the radius of the trapping potential.

  6. Synthesis of Extended Atomically Perfect Zigzag Graphene - Boron Nitride Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Drost, Robert; Kezilebieke, Shawulienu; M. Ervasti, Mikko; Hämäläinen, Sampsa K.; Schulz, Fabian; Harju, Ari; Liljeroth, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The combination of several materials into heterostructures is a powerful method for controlling material properties. The integration of graphene (G) with hexagonal boron nitride (BN) in particular has been heralded as a way to engineer the graphene band structure and implement spin- and valleytronics in 2D materials. Despite recent efforts, fabrication methods for well-defined G-BN structures on a large scale are still lacking. We report on a new method for producing atomically well-defined G-BN structures on an unprecedented length scale by exploiting the interaction of G and BN edges with a Ni(111) surface as well as each other. PMID:26584674

  7. In-situ Fabrication and Electronic Characterization of Junction-confined Single Layer Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhengqing John; Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio; Hong, Sung Ju; Drndic, Marija; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2013-03-01

    We report electronic measurements on high quality single layer junction-confined graphene nanoribbons fabricated in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this work, a process is demonstrated for the fabrication and confirmation of pristine single layer graphene nanoribbons using high vacuum current annealing and precision nano-sculpting, both conducted within the vacuum chamber of a TEM. Briefly, CVD-grown graphene is patterned into a freely-suspended nanoribbon connected to large area contacts. The sample is then mounted on a TEM holder with electrical feedthroughs to allow for simultaneous imaging and in-situ electrical transport measurements within the TEM. A focused electron beam is used to progressively narrow the ribbon, providing a platform to controllably sculpt and define the device geometry while characterizing its electrical properties. In-situ electrical measurements and TEM imaging with sub-nm resolution revealed the dependence of the nanoribbon resistance as a function of width in the range 17 - 280 nm. Monolayer graphene were found to sustain current densities in excess of 5 x 109 A/cm2, orders of magnitude higher than copper while the conductance varied approximately as w0.75, where w is the ribbon width in nanometers. These results demonstrates graphene's potential as a next generation, high performance interconnects material with the ability to reach single-digit technology nodes at the level of a single atomic layer. Funding for this work was provided by SRC contract # 2011-IN-2229.

  8. Wrinkled single-layer graphenes fabricated by silicon nanopillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zibo; Wu, Yutong; Nan, Jingjie; Tang, Xiaoduo; Zhang, Junhu; Yang, Bai

    2016-11-01

    The degree of crumpling affects the optoelectronic properties of graphene, which are very important for the performance of graphene-based devices and materials. In this article, we report an approach to tune the formation of wrinkles on single-layer graphene (SLG) by silicon nanopillar (SNP) arrays. By using gold nanoparticles as an etching mask, SNP arrays with different heights could be prepared by tuning the duration of etching. The formation of wrinkles on these SNP arrays was studied systematically. We found that thermal treatment could lead to a wrapping behavior of graphene around SNP arrays, which was accompanied by the emergence of many more wrinkles. Controllable wettability, conductivity and transmittance were demonstrated. This ability to tune wrinkles using SNP arrays can be employed to engineer the fabrication of graphene-related devices and other optoelectronic applications.

  9. The Effect of Growth Parameters on the Intrinsic Properties of Large-Area Single Layer Graphene Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Murari; Chisholm, Matthew F; Eres, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the parameter space for single layer graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition on Cu. The temperature is the most widely recognized parameter in single layer graphene growth. We show that the methane-to-hydrogen ratio and the growth pressure also are critical parameters that affect the structural perfection and the cleanliness of graphene. The optimal conditions for suppressing double and multilayer graphene growth occur near 1000 C, 1:20 methane-to-hydrogen ratio, and a total pressure in the range from 0.5 to 1 Torr. Raman mapping of a 40x30 m2 area shows single layer domains with 5-10 m linear dimensions. Atomic resolution imaging of suspended graphene by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that the cleanest single layer graphene consists of areas of 10-15 nm linear dimensions and smaller patches of residual contamination that was undetected by other characterization methods.

  10. Calculation of the superconducting transition temperature of a graphene layer doped with titanium and palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gerardo; Magana, Fernando; Salas-Torres, Osiris

    We explore the structural interactions between graphene and transition metals such as palladium (Pd) and titanium (Ti) and the possibility of inducing superconductivity in a graphene sheet in two cases, one by doping its surface with palladium atoms sit on the center of the hexagons of the graphene layer and other by covering the graphene layer with two layers of titanium metal atoms. The results here were obtained from first-principles density functional theory in the local density approximation. The Quantum-Espresso package was used with norm conserving pseudopotentials. All of the structures considered were relaxed to their minimum energy configuration. Phonon frequencies were calculated using the linear-response technique on several phonon wave-vector mesh. The electron-phonon coupling parameter was calculated with several electron momentum k-mesh. The superconducting critical temperature was estimated using the Allen-Dynes formula with μ* = 0.1 - 0.15. We note that palladium and titanium are good candidate materials to show a metal-to-superconductor transition. We thank Dirección General de Asuntos del Personal Académico de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, partial financial support by Grant IN-106514 and we also thank Miztli Super-Computing center the technical assistance.

  11. Atomic-scale studies of nanometer-sized graphene on semiconducting surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, Justin; Ritter, Kyle; He, Kevin; Lyding, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    We have performed atomic level studies of graphene on semiconducting surfaces using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM) [1]. By mechanically exfoliating graphite and using an in-situ dry contact transfer technique [2], we observe predominantly single and double layers of atomically clean graphene with lateral dimensions of 2-20 nm. Room temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of the 2-10 nm monolayer pieces display a size-dependent energy gap ranging from 0.1-1 eV, while monolayers with lateral dimensions of 20 nm exhibit a finite density of states at the Fermi level. [1] K.A. Ritter and J.W. Lyding, Nanotechnology, in press (http://arxiv.org/pdf/0711.0050). [2] P.M. Albrecht and J.W. Lyding, APL 83, 5029 (2003).

  12. Layer-by-layer graphene/TCNQ stacked films as conducting anodes for organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lin, Cheng-Te; Huang, Jen-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Wei; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong

    2012-06-26

    Large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising candidate for transparent conducting electrode applications in flexible optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes or organic solar cells. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the polymer photovoltaic devices using a pristine CVD graphene anode is still not appealing due to its much lower conductivity than that of conventional indium tin oxide. We report a layer-by-layer molecular doping process on graphene for forming sandwiched graphene/tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ)/graphene stacked films for polymer solar cell anodes, where the TCNQ molecules (as p-dopants) were securely embedded between two graphene layers. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells based on these multilayered graphene/TCNQ anodes are fabricated and characterized. The P3HT/PCBM device with an anode structure composed of two TCNQ layers sandwiched by three CVD graphene layers shows optimum PCE (∼2.58%), which makes the proposed anode film quite attractive for next-generation flexible devices demanding high conductivity and transparency.

  13. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  14. Number of graphene layers exhibiting an influence on oxidation of DNA bases: analytical parameters.

    PubMed

    Goh, Madeline Shuhua; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-20

    This article investigates the analytical performance of double-, few- and multi-layer graphene upon oxidation of adenine and guanine. We observed that the sensitivity of differential pulse voltammetric response of guanine and adenine is significantly higher at few-layer graphene surface than single-layer graphene. We use glassy carbon electrode as substrate coated with graphenes. Our findings shall have profound influence on construction of graphene based genosensors.

  15. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Marcus, Charles M.; Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing

    2014-02-07

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

  16. Vacancy Interlayer Migration in Multi-layered Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lili; Gao, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiuyun; Yan, Tianying; Ding, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Graphene has innumerous applications due to its exceptional properties. Various defects that may be introduced into the graphene lattice during synthesis and/or post-treatments are known have significantly impact on these properties. So engineering graphene by introducing or annealing of defects is an important technology to achieve desired properties for various applications. Therefore a comprehensive understanding on the behavior of defects in graphene is critically important. Here, interlayer migration of the vacancies in multi-layered graphene (MLG) was investigated by density functional tight-binding molecular dynamic simulations and first principle calculations. Our study reveals that, although the direct vacancy migration between neighboring graphene layers (NGLs) is prohibited by a very high barrier up to ~ 7 eV, the interaction between vacancies or vacancy and holes in NGLs can greatly reduce the barrier to ~ 3 eV and expedites the migration process. Our study reveals a new mechanism of the defect self-healing in MLG and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and it can be used to engineer desired graphene materials.

  17. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-12-17

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g. the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. The nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transport involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.

  18. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T.; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Qiao, Rui

    2014-11-13

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g., the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. Lastly, the nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transport involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.

  19. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T.; Yang, Bao; ...

    2014-11-13

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g., the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. Lastly, the nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transportmore » involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.« less

  20. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  1. Imaging Stacking Order in Few-Layer Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    C Lui; Z Li; Z Chen; P Klimov; L Brus; T Heinz

    2011-12-31

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) has been predicted to exist in various crystallographic stacking sequences, which can strongly influence the material's electronic properties. We demonstrate an accurate and efficient method to characterize stacking order in FLG using the distinctive features of the Raman 2D-mode. Raman imaging allows us to visualize directly the spatial distribution of Bernal (ABA) and rhombohedral (ABC) stacking in tri- and tetralayer graphene. We find that 15% of exfoliated graphene tri- and tetralayers is composed of micrometer-sized domains of rhombohedral stacking, rather than of usual Bernal stacking. These domains are stable and remain unchanged for temperatures exceeding 800 C.

  2. Selective nano-patterning of graphene using a heated atomic force microscope tip

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young-Soo; Wu, Xuan; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we introduce a selective thermochemical nano-patterning method of graphene on insulating substrates. A tiny heater formed at the end of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is optimized by a finite element method. The cantilever device is fabricated using conventional micromachining processes. After preliminary tests of the cantilever device, nano-patterning experiments are conducted with various conducting and insulating samples. The results indicate that faster scanning speed and higher contact force are desirable to reduce the sizes of nano-patterns. With the experimental condition of 1 μm/s and 24 mW, the heated AFM tip generates a graphene oxide layer of 3.6 nm height and 363 nm width, on a 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layer, with a tip contact force of 100 nN.

  3. Electronic Structure and Morphology of Graphene Layers on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke

    2008-03-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery and the unique electronic properties of graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. The unique linear dispersion relation of charge carriers near the Fermi level (``Dirac Fermions'') lead to exciting transport properties, such as an unusual quantum Hall effect, and have aroused scientific and technological interests. On the way towards graphene-based electronics, a knowledge of the electronic band structure and the morphology of epitaxial graphene films on silicon carbide substrates is imperative. We have studied the evolution of the occupied band structure and the morphology of graphene layers on silicon carbide by systematically increasing the layer thickness. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we examine this unique 2D system in its development from single layer to multilayers, by characteristic changes in the π band, the highest occupied state, and the dispersion relation in the out-of-plane electron wave vector in particular. The evolution of the film morphology is evaluated by the combination of low-energy electron microscopy and ARPES. By exploiting the sensitivity of graphene's electronic states to the charge carrier concentration, changes in the on-site Coulomb potential leading to a change of π and π* bands can be examined using ARPES. We demonstrate that, in a graphene bilayer, the gap between π and π* bands can be controlled by selectively adjusting relative carrier concentrations, which suggests a possible application of the graphene bilayer for switching functions in electronic devices. This work was done in collaboration with A. Bostwick, J. L. McChesney, and E. Rotenberg at Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, K. Horn at Fritz-Haber-Institut, K. V. Emtsev and Th. Seyller at Lehrstuhl für Technische Physik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, and F. El Gabaly and A. K. Schmid at National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley

  4. Direct observation of electrically induced Pauli paramagnetism in single-layer graphene using ESR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Sakurai, Yuki; Kawahara, Kenji; Ago, Hiroki; Takenobu, Taishi; Marumoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has been actively investigated as an electronic material owing to many excellent physical properties, such as high charge mobility and quantum Hall effect, due to the characteristics of a linear band structure and an ideal two-dimensional electron system. However, the correlations between the transport characteristics and the spin states of charge carriers or atomic vacancies in graphene have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we show the spin states of single-layer graphene to clarify the correlations using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy as a function of accumulated charge density using transistor structures. Two different electrically induced ESR signals were observed. One is originated from a Fermi-degenerate two-dimensional electron system, demonstrating the first observation of electrically induced Pauli paramagnetism from a microscopic viewpoint, showing a clear contrast to no ESR observation of Pauli paramagnetism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to a one-dimensional electron system. The other is originated from the electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments due to atomic vacancies in graphene, showing a universal phenomenon for carbon materials including CNTs. The degenerate electron system with the ambipolar spin vanishments would contribute to high charge mobility due to the decrease in spin scatterings in graphene. PMID:27731338

  5. Infrared dynamics of cold atoms on hot graphene membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sanghita; Kotov, Valeri N.; Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2016-06-01

    We study the infrared dynamics of low-energy atoms interacting with a sample of suspended graphene at finite temperature. The dynamics exhibits severe infrared divergences order by order in perturbation theory as a result of the singular nature of low-energy flexural phonon emission. Our model can be viewed as a two-channel generalization of the independent boson model with asymmetric atom-phonon coupling. This allows us to take advantage of the exact nonperturbative solution of the independent boson model in the stronger channel while treating the weaker one perturbatively. In the low-energy limit, the exact solution can be viewed as a resummation (exponentiation) of the most divergent diagrams in the perturbative expansion. As a result of this procedure, we obtain the atom's Green function which we use to calculate the atom damping rate, a quantity equal to the quantum sticking rate. A characteristic feature of our results is that the Green's function retains a weak, infrared cutoff dependence that reflects the reduced dimensionality of the problem. As a consequence, we predict a measurable dependence of the sticking rate on graphene sample size. We provide detailed predictions for the sticking rate of atomic hydrogen as a function of temperature and sample size. The resummation yields an enhanced sticking rate relative to the conventional Fermi golden rule result (equivalent to the one-loop atom self-energy), as higher-order processes increase damping at finite temperature.

  6. Compression behavior of single-layer graphenes.

    PubMed

    Frank, Otakar; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Parthenios, John; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Riaz, Ibtsam; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Galiotis, Costas

    2010-06-22

    Central to most applications involving monolayer graphenes is its mechanical response under various stress states. To date most of the work reported is of theoretical nature and refers to tension and compression loading of model graphenes. Most of the experimental work is indeed limited to the bending of single flakes in air and the stretching of flakes up to typically approximately 1% using plastic substrates. Recently we have shown that by employing a cantilever beam we can subject single graphenes to various degrees of axial compression. Here we extend this work much further by measuring in detail both stress uptake and compression buckling strain in single flakes of different geometries. In all cases the mechanical response is monitored by simultaneous Raman measurements through the shift of either the G or 2D phonons of graphene. Despite the infinitely small thickness of the monolayers, the results show that graphenes embedded in plastic beams exhibit remarkable compression buckling strains. For large length (l)-to-width (w) ratios (> or =0.2) the buckling strain is of the order of -0.5% to -0.6%. However, for l/w < 0.2 no failure is observed for strains even higher than -1%. Calculations based on classical Euler analysis show that the buckling strain enhancement provided by the polymer lateral support is more than 6 orders of magnitude compared to that of suspended graphene in air.

  7. Layer Number Dependence of Li(+) Intercalation on Few-Layer Graphene and Electrochemical Imaging of Its Solid-Electrolyte Interphase Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jingshu; Burgess, Mark; Zhang, Jiarui; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-04-26

    A fundamental question facing electrodes made out of few layers of graphene (FLG) is if they display chemical properties that are different to their bulk graphite counterpart. Here, we show evidence that suggests that lithium ion intercalation on FLG, as measured via stationary voltammetry, shows a strong dependence on the number of layers of graphene that compose the electrode. Despite its extreme thinness and turbostratic structure, Li ion intercalation into FLG still proceeds through a staging process, albeit with different signatures than bulk graphite or multilayer graphene. Single-layer graphene does not show any evidence of ion intercalation, while FLG with four graphene layers displays limited staging peaks, which broaden and increase in number as the layer number increases to six. Despite these mechanistic differences on ion intercalation, the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) was observed on all electrodes. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in the feedback mode was used to demonstrate changes in the surface conductivity of FLG during SEI evolution. Observation of ion intercalation on large area FLG was conditioned to the fabrication of "ionic channels" on the electrode. SECM measurements using a recently developed Li-ion sensitive imaging technique evidenced the role of these channels in enabling Li-ion intercalation through localized flux measurements. This work highlights the impact of nanostructure and microstructure on macroscopic electrochemical behavior and provides guidance to the mechanistic control of ion intercalation using graphene, an atomically thin interface where surface and bulk reactivity converge.

  8. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  9. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W.; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H.; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  11. Synthesis, properties, and dispersion of few-layer graphene fluoride.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Ekaterina D; Makotchenko, Viktor G; Kibis, Lidiya S; Boronin, Andrei I; Pazhetnov, Egor M; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2013-09-01

    We have fluorinated few-layer graphene (FLG) by using a low-temperature fluorination route with gaseous ClF3. The treatment process resulted in a new graphene derivative with a finite approximate composition of C2F. TEM studies showed that the product consisted of thin transparent sheets with no more than 10 fluorographene layers stacked together. Spectroscopic methods revealed a predominantly covalent nature of the C-F bonds in the as-synthesized product and we found no evidence for the existence of so-called "semi-ionic" C-F bonds, as observed in bulk C(x)F. In contrast to the case of graphite and typical (thick) expanded graphites, fluorination of FLG did not lead to the intercalation of ClF3 molecules, owing to the lack of a 3D layered structure. The approximate "critical" number of graphene layers that were necessary to form a phase of intercalated compound was estimated to be more than 12, thus providing a "chemical proof" of the difference between the properties of few-layered graphenes and bulk graphites. Fluorographene C2F was successfully delaminated into thinner layers in organic solvents, which is an important property for its integration into electronic devices, nanohybrids, etc.

  12. Fabrication of graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer films by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yuze; Luo, Jing Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-10-15

    A novel graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer film was fabricated by electrostatic interactions induced layer-by-layer self-assembly technique, using water dispersible and negatively charged chemically converted graphene (CCG) and positively charged polyaniline (PANI) as building blocks. CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide, which remained carboxyl group on its surface. The remaining carboxyl groups not only retain the dispersibility of CCG, but also allow the growth of the multilayer films via electrostatic interactions between graphene and PANI. The structure and morphology of the obtained CCG/PANI multilayer film are characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Ultraviolet–visible absorption spectrum (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical properties of the resulting film are studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), which showed that the resulting CCG/PANI multilayer film kept electroactivity in neutral solution and showed outstanding cyclic stability up to 100 cycles. Furthermore, the composite film exhibited good electrocatalytic ability toward ascorbic acid (AA) with a linear response from 1×10{sup −4} to 1.2×10{sup −3} M with the detect limit of 5×10{sup −6} M. This study provides a facile and effective strategy to fabricate graphene/PANI nanocomposite film with good electrochemical property, which may find potential applications in electronic devices such as electrochemical sensor. - Graphical abstract: A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. - Highlights: • A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. • The water dispersible and negatively charged graphene (CCG) was used as building block. • CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide with carboxyl group on its surface. • CCG/PANI film kept

  13. Heat Conduction across Monolayer and Few-Layer Graphenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    film. We note that even though the metal films were deposited in vacuum , water vapor that adsorbs on the substrate during the air exposure after the... developed approach based on Raman spectroscopy16 to count the number of layers n of the graphene flakes. In this approach, n is determined from the ratio...Au/Ti, we coated a monolayer graphene (1- LG) sample with a semitransparent layer of Au (8 nm)/Ti (2 nm) and compared the Raman spectrum of the sample

  14. Terahertz modulators based on multiple non-Bernal graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzakis, Ioannis; Li, Zhen; Benderskii, Alexander; Cronin, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    We investigate a THz modulator based on a stack of disoriented the non-Bernal stacks graphene layers (GLs) grown by chemical vapor deposition method (CVD) on SiO2 substrate. The non-Bernal stacking GLs results in the electron decoupling of the GLs, higher interband absorption and exhibit the same energy spectrum of the charge carriers to that in individual GLs. The detection efficiency in room temperature is high due low probability of the high energy of the optical phonons (~ 0.2 eV) absorption. Using terahertz time- domain spectroscopy, we show that the multi graphene layers exhibit fairly high responsivity due to high quantum efficiency.

  15. High quality reduced graphene oxide through repairing with multi-layered graphene ball nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Yang, MinHo; Cho, Kyeong Min; Jun, Young-Si; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple and up-scalable method to produce highly repaired graphene oxide with a large surface area, by introducing spherical multi-layered graphene balls with empty interiors. These graphene balls are prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Ni particles on the surface of the graphene oxides (GO). Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy results reveal that defects in the GO surfaces are well repaired during the CVD process, with the help of nickel nanoparticles attached to the functional groups of the GO surface, further resulting in a high electrical conductivity of 18,620 S/m. In addition, the graphene balls on the GO surface effectively prevent restacking of the GO layers, thus providing a large surface area of 527 m2/g. Two electrode supercapacitor cells using this highly conductive graphene material demonstrate ideal electrical double layer capacitive behavior, due to the effective use of the outstanding electric conductivity and the large surface area. PMID:24248235

  16. Efficient Nitrogen Doping of Single-Layer Graphene Accompanied by Negligible Defect Generation for Integration into Hybrid Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Sarau, George; Heilmann, Martin; Bashouti, Muhammad; Latzel, Michael; Tessarek, Christian; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-03-22

    While doping enables application-specific tailoring of graphene properties, it can also produce high defect densities that degrade the beneficial features. In this work, we report efficient nitrogen doping of ∼11 atom % without virtually inducing new structural defects in the initial, large-area, low defect, and transferred single-layer graphene. To shed light on this remarkable high-doping-low-disorder relationship, a unique experimental strategy consisting of analyzing the changes in doping, strain, and defect density after each important step during the doping procedure was employed. Complementary micro-Raman mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical microscopy revealed that effective cleaning of the graphene surface assists efficient nitrogen incorporation accompanied by mild compressive strain resulting in negligible defect formation in the doped graphene lattice. These original results are achieved by separating the growth of graphene from its doping. Moreover, the high doping level occurred simultaneously with the epitaxial growth of n-GaN micro- and nanorods on top of graphene, leading to the flow of higher currents through the graphene/n-GaN rod interface. Our approach can be extended toward integrating graphene into other technologically relevant hybrid semiconductor heterostructures and obtaining an ohmic contact at their interfaces by adjusting the doping level in graphene.

  17. Tribological characteristics of few-layer graphene over Ni grain and interface boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Awaja, Firas; Paolicelli, Guido; Bartali, Ruben; Iacob, Erica; Valeri, Sergio; Ryu, Seunghwa; Signetti, Stefano; Speranza, Giorgio; Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2016-03-01

    The tribological properties of metal-supported few-layered graphene depend strongly on the grain topology of the metal substrate. Inhomogeneous distribution of graphene layers at such regions led to variable landscapes with distinguishable roughness. This discrepancy in morphology significantly affects the frictional and wetting characteristics of the FLG system. We discretely measured friction characteristics of FLG covering grains and interfacial grain boundaries of polycrystalline Ni metal substrate via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The friction coefficient of FLG covered at interfacial grain boundaries is found to be lower than that on grains in vacuum (at 10-5 Torr pressure) and similar results were obtained in air condition. Sliding history with AFM cantilever, static and dynamic pull-in and pull-off adhesion forces were addressed in the course of friction measurements to explain the role of the out-of-plane deformation of graphene layer(s). Finite element simulations showed good agreement with experiments and led to a rationalization of the observations. Thus, with interfacial grain boundaries the FLG tribology can be effectively tuned.The tribological properties of metal-supported few-layered graphene depend strongly on the grain topology of the metal substrate. Inhomogeneous distribution of graphene layers at such regions led to variable landscapes with distinguishable roughness. This discrepancy in morphology significantly affects the frictional and wetting characteristics of the FLG system. We discretely measured friction characteristics of FLG covering grains and interfacial grain boundaries of polycrystalline Ni metal substrate via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The friction coefficient of FLG covered at interfacial grain boundaries is found to be lower than that on grains in vacuum (at 10-5 Torr pressure) and similar results were obtained in air condition. Sliding history with AFM cantilever, static and dynamic pull-in and pull

  18. Graphene-layered steps and their fields visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Tae; Yurtsever, Aycan; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced image contrast has been seen at graphene-layered steps a few nanometers in height by means of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) using synchronous femtosecond pulses of light and electrons. The observed steps are formed by the edges of graphene strips lying on the surface of a graphene substrate, where the strips are hundreds of nanometers in width and many micrometers in length. PINEM measurements reflect the interaction of imaging electrons and induced (near) electric fields at the steps, and this leads to a much higher contrast than that achieved in bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging of the same strips. Theory and numerical simulations support the experimental PINEM findings and elucidate the nature of the electric field at the steps formed by the graphene layers. These results extend the range of applications of the experimental PINEM methodology, which has previously been demonstrated for spherical, cylindrical, and triangular nanostructures, to shapes of high aspect ratio (rectangular strips), as well as into the regime of atomic layer thicknesses. PMID:23690572

  19. Local, global, and nonlinear screening in twisted double-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chih-Pin; Rodriguez-Vega, Martin; Li, Guohong; Luican-Mayer, Adina; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Rossi, Enrico; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2016-01-01

    One-atom-thick crystalline layers and their vertical heterostructures carry the promise of designer electronic materials that are unattainable by standard growth techniques. To realize their potential it is necessary to isolate them from environmental disturbances, in particular those introduced by the substrate. However, finding and characterizing suitable substrates, and minimizing the random potential fluctuations they introduce, has been a persistent challenge in this emerging field. Here we show that Landau-level (LL) spectroscopy offers the unique capability to quantify both the reduction of the quasiparticles’ lifetime and the long-range inhomogeneity due to random potential fluctuations. Harnessing this technique together with direct scanning tunneling microscopy and numerical simulations we demonstrate that the insertion of a graphene buffer layer with a large twist angle is a very effective method to shield a 2D system from substrate interference that has the additional desirable property of preserving the electronic structure of the system under study. We further show that owing to its remarkable nonlinear screening capability a single graphene buffer layer provides better shielding than either increasing the distance to the substrate or doubling the carrier density and reduces the amplitude of the potential fluctuations in graphene to values even lower than the ones in AB-stacked bilayer graphene. PMID:27302949

  20. Adsorption of two sodium atoms on graphene -- A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Rani, Babita; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-08-28

    We perform a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of two sodium atoms on graphene using the SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, magnetic moment and charge transfer of the Na{sub n}-graphene (n=1, 2) system are calculated. Three initial horizontal orientations of the pair of sodium atoms on graphene are studied. Our calculations reveal that sodium atoms bind weakly to the graphene surface which is in agreement with previous results. We also notice a charge transfer of 0.288e from a sodium adatom to the graphene sheet altering its magnetic moment (−0.318 µ{sub B}) that is reduced from the gas phase value of the isolated atom (1 µ{sub B}). The calculated adsorption energies suggest that clustering of Na atoms on graphene is energetically favorable.

  1. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  2. Toward Two-Dimensional All-Carbon Heterostructures via Ion Beam Patterning of Single-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kotakoski, Jani; Brand, Christian; Lilach, Yigal; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Mangler, Clemens; Arndt, Markus; Meyer, Jannik C

    2015-09-09

    Graphene has many claims to fame: it is the thinnest possible membrane, it has unique electronic and excellent mechanical properties, and it provides the perfect model structure for studying materials science at the atomic level. However, for many practical studies and applications the ordered hexagon arrangement of carbon atoms in graphene is not directly suitable. Here, we show that the atoms can be locally either removed or rearranged into a random pattern of polygons using a focused ion beam (FIB). The atomic structure of the disordered regions is confirmed with atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images. These structural modifications can be made on macroscopic scales with a spatial resolution determined only by the size of the ion beam. With just one processing step, three types of structures can be defined within a graphene layer: chemically inert graphene, chemically active amorphous 2D carbon, and empty areas. This, along with the changes in properties, gives promise that FIB patterning of graphene will open the way for creating all-carbon heterostructures to be used in fields ranging from nanoelectronics and chemical sensing to composite materials.

  3. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L.G.; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts. PMID:26487368

  4. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-07

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  5. Direct Writing of Graphene-based Nanoelectronics via Atomic Force Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-07

    GO) is simply a sheet of graphene that has oxygen -rich functional groups attached on one side. Oxidizing graphene changes the current carrying...ABSTRACT This project employs direct writing with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to fabricate simple graphene-based electronic components like resistors...and transistors at nanometer-length scales. The goal is to explore their electrical properties for graphene-based electronics . Conducting

  6. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-04-28

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  7. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2014-09-16

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  8. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-22

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  9. Short-range ordering of ion-implanted nitrogen atoms in SiC-graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Willke, P.; Druga, T.; Wenderoth, M.; Amani, J. A.; Weikert, S.; Hofsäss, H.; Thakur, S.; Maiti, K.

    2014-09-15

    We perform a structural analysis of nitrogen-doped graphene on SiC(0001) prepared by ultra low-energy ion bombardment. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we show that nitrogen atoms are incorporated almost exclusively as graphitic substitution in the graphene honeycomb lattice. With an irradiation energy of 25 eV and a fluence of approximately 5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, we achieve a nitrogen content of around 1%. By quantitatively comparing the position of the N-atoms in the topography measurements with simulated random distributions, we find statistically significant short-range correlations. Consequently, we are able to show that the dopants arrange preferably at lattice sites given by the 6 × 6-reconstruction of the underlying substrate. This selective incorporation is most likely triggered by adsorbate layers present during the ion bombardment. This study identifies low-energy ion irradiation as a promising method for controlled doping in epitaxial graphene.

  10. Tunable electronic properties of graphene through controlling bonding configurations of doped nitrogen atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Na; Zhang, Huanxi; Liu, Jingjing; Fu, Yong Qing; Guo, Bin; Wang, Zhenlong; Lei, Shengbin; Hu, PingAn

    2016-01-01

    Single–layer and mono–component doped graphene is a crucial platform for a better understanding of the relationship between its intrinsic electronic properties and atomic bonding configurations. Large–scale doped graphene films dominated with graphitic nitrogen (GG) or pyrrolic nitrogen (PG) were synthesized on Cu foils via a free radical reaction at growth temperatures of 230–300 °C and 400–600 °C, respectively. The bonding configurations of N atoms in the graphene lattices were controlled through reaction temperature, and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscope. The GG exhibited a strong n–type doping behavior, whereas the PG showed a weak n–type doping behavior. Electron mobilities of the GG and PG were in the range of 80.1–340 cm2 V−1·s−1 and 59.3–160.6 cm2 V−1·s−1, respectively. The enhanced doping effect caused by graphitic nitrogen in the GG produced an asymmetry electron–hole transport characteristic, indicating that the long–range scattering (ionized impurities) plays an important role in determining the carrier transport behavior. Analysis of temperature dependent conductance showed that the carrier transport mechanism in the GG was thermal excitation, whereas that in the PG, was a combination of thermal excitation and variable range hopping. PMID:27325386

  11. Tunable electronic properties of graphene through controlling bonding configurations of doped nitrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Na; Zhang, Huanxi; Liu, Jingjing; Fu, Yong Qing; Guo, Bin; Wang, Zhenlong; Lei, Shengbin; Hu, Pingan

    2016-06-01

    Single–layer and mono–component doped graphene is a crucial platform for a better understanding of the relationship between its intrinsic electronic properties and atomic bonding configurations. Large–scale doped graphene films dominated with graphitic nitrogen (GG) or pyrrolic nitrogen (PG) were synthesized on Cu foils via a free radical reaction at growth temperatures of 230–300 °C and 400–600 °C, respectively. The bonding configurations of N atoms in the graphene lattices were controlled through reaction temperature, and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscope. The GG exhibited a strong n–type doping behavior, whereas the PG showed a weak n–type doping behavior. Electron mobilities of the GG and PG were in the range of 80.1–340 cm2 V‑1·s‑1 and 59.3–160.6 cm2 V‑1·s‑1, respectively. The enhanced doping effect caused by graphitic nitrogen in the GG produced an asymmetry electron–hole transport characteristic, indicating that the long–range scattering (ionized impurities) plays an important role in determining the carrier transport behavior. Analysis of temperature dependent conductance showed that the carrier transport mechanism in the GG was thermal excitation, whereas that in the PG, was a combination of thermal excitation and variable range hopping.

  12. Novel Infrared Dynamics of Cold Atoms on Hot Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sanghita; Kotov, Valeri; Clougherty, Dennis

    The low-energy dynamics of cold atoms interacting with macroscopic graphene membranes exhibits severe infrared divergences when treated perturbatively. These infrared problems are even more pronounced at finite temperature due to the (infinitely) many flexural phonons excited in graphene. We have devised a technique to take account (resummation) of such processes in the spirit of the well-known exact solution of the independent boson model. Remarkably, there is also similarity to the infrared problems and their treatment (via the Bloch-Nordsieck scheme) in finite temperature ``hot'' quantum electrodynamics and chromodynamics due to the long-range, unscreened nature of gauge interactions. The method takes into account correctly the strong damping provided by the many emitted phonons at finite temperature. In our case, the inverse membrane size plays the role of an effective low-energy scale, and, unlike the above mentioned field theories, there remains an unusual, highly nontrivial dependence on that scale due to the 2D nature of the problem. We present detailed results for the sticking (atomic damping rate) rate of cold atomic hydrogen as a function of the membrane temperature and size. We find that the rate is very strongly dependent on both quantities.

  13. Facile synthesis of few-layer graphene with a controllable thickness using rapid thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jae Hwan; Kwak, Jinsung; Kwon, Tae-Yang; Park, Soon-Dong; Go, Heungseok; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Kibog; Kang, Seoktae; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2012-03-01

    Few-layer graphene films with a controllable thickness were grown on a nickel surface by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) under vacuum. The instability of nickel films in air facilitates the spontaneous formation of ultrathin (<2-3 nm) carbon- and oxygen-containing compounds on a nickel surface; thus, the high-temperature annealing of the nickel samples without the introduction of intentional carbon-containing precursors results in the formation of graphene films. From annealing temperature and ambient studies during RTA, it was found that the evaporation of oxygen atoms from the surface is the dominant factor affecting the formation of graphene films. The thickness of the graphene layers is strongly dependent on the RTA temperature and time, and the resulting films have a limited thickness (<2 nm), even for an extended RTA time. The transferred films have a low sheet resistance of ~0.9 ± 0.4 kΩ/sq, with ~94% ± 2% optical transparency, making them useful for applications as flexible transparent conductors.

  14. Energetics of a Li Atom adsorbed on B/N doped graphene with monovacancy

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Babita; Jindal, V.K.; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-08-15

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption properties and diffusion of Li atom across B/N-pyridinic graphene. Regardless of the dopant type, B atoms of B-pyridinic graphene lose electron density. On the other hand, N atoms (p-type dopants) have tendency to gain electron density in N-pyridinic graphene. Higher chemical reactivity and electronic conductivity of B/N-pyridinic graphene are responsible for stronger binding of Li with the substrates as compared to pristine graphene. The binding energy of Li with B/N-pyridinic graphene exceeds the cohesive energy of bulk Li, making it energetically unfavourable for Li to form clusters on these substrates. Li atom gets better adsorbed on N-pyridinic graphene due to an additional p-p hybridization of the orbitals while Li on B-pyridinic prefers the ionic bonding. Also, significant distortion of N-pyridinic graphene upon Li adsorption is a consequence of the change in bonding mechanism between Li atom and the substrate. Our results show that bonding character and hence binding energies between Li and graphene can be tuned with the help of B/N doping of monovacancy defects. Further, the sites for most stable adsorption are different for the two types of doped and defective graphene, leading to greater Li uptake capacity of B-pyridinic graphene near the defect. In addition, B-pyridinic graphene offering lower diffusion barrier, ensures better Li kinetics. Thus, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for LIBs as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. - Graphical abstract: Adsorption and diffusion of Li atom across the B/N doped monovacancy graphene is studied using ab-initio DFT calculations. Our results show that bonding mechanism and binding of Li with graphene can be tuned with the help of N/B doping of defects. Also, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for lithium ion batteries as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Density

  15. Nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers.

    PubMed

    Chern, Ruey-Lin; Han, Dezhuan

    2014-02-24

    Based on the effective medium model, nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers with the period much less than the wavelength are investigated. Strong nonlocal effects are found in a broad frequency range for TM polarization, where the effective permittivity tensor exhibits the Lorentzian resonance. The resonance frequency varies with the wave vector and coincides well with the polaritonic mode. Nonlocal features are manifest on the emergence of additional wave and the occurrence of negative refraction. By examining the characters of the eigenmode, the nonlocal optical properties are attributed to the excitation of plasmons on the graphene surfaces.

  16. Adsorption of Mn atom on pristine and defected graphene: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Anithaa, V S; Shankar, R; Vijayakumar, S

    2017-04-01

    The functionalization of graphene with transition metals is of great interest due to its wide range of applications, such as hydrogen storage, spintronics, information storage, etc. Due to its magnetic property adsorption of Mn atom on graphene has a high consequence on the electronic properties of graphene. The increase in size of the graphene sheet with hydrogen termination has a high impact on the transformation of electronic properties of the graphene sheet. Hence in this work, we investigate the size as well as change in structural and electronic properties of pristine/defective graphene sheets on adsorption of Mn atom using density functional theory methods. From the results obtained a higher adsorption energy value of 3.04 eV is found for Mn adatom on the defected graphene sheet than the pristine, 1.85 eV. It is subject to the coverage effect which decreases on increasing number of carbon atoms. Moreover, a decrease in energy gap is observed in pristine and defected graphene sheets with a high number of carbon atoms. The density of states illustrates the significant effect for hydrogen termination in the conduction band of the Mn adsorbed graphene sheet with low carbon atoms. Graphical Abstract Mn adatom on graphene at different sites.

  17. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Proslier, Th.; Ha, Y.; Zasadzinski, J.; Ciovati, G.; Kneissel, P.; Reece, C.; Rimmer, R.; Gurevich, A.; Cooley, L.; Wu, G.; Pellin, M.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: (1) results from ALD coated cavities and coupons, (2) new evidence from point contact tunneling (PCT) showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, (3) a study of high pressure rinsing damage on niobium samples.

  19. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th; Zasadzinski, J

    2009-05-01

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

  20. Electrochemical double-layer capacitors based on functionalized graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Michael Allan

    Graphene is a promising electrode material for electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) used for energy storage due to its high electrical conductivity and theoretical specific surface area. However, the intrinsic capacitance of graphene is known to be low and governed by the electronic side of the interface. Furthermore, graphene tends to aggregate and stack together when processed into thick electrode films. This significantly lowers the ion-accessible specific surface area (SSA). Maximizing both the SSA and the intrinsic capacitance are the main problems addressed in this thesis in an effort to improve the specific capacitance and energy density of EDLCs. In contrast to pristine graphene, functionalized graphene produced by the thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide contains residual functional groups and lattice defects. To study how these properties affect the double-layer capacitance, a model electrode system capable of measuring the intrinsic electrochemical properties of functionalized graphene was developed. To prevent artifacts and uncertainties related to measurements on porous electrodes, the functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) were assembled as densely tiled monolayers using a Langmuir-Blodgett technique. In this way, charging can be studied in a well-defined 2D geometry. The possibility of measuring and isolating the intrinsic electrochemical properties of FGS monolayers was first demonstrated by comparing capacitance and redox probe measurements carried out on coatings deposited on passivated gold and single crystal graphite substrates. This monolayer system was then used to follow the double-layer capacitance of the FGS/electrolyte interface as the structure and chemistry of graphene was varied by thermal treatments ranging from 300 °C to 2100 °C. Elemental analysis and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the resulting chemical and structural transformation upon heat treatment. It was demonstrated that intrinsically defective

  1. High-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy study of the ordering transition of an amorphous carbon layer into graphene on ruthenium(0001).

    PubMed

    Günther, Sebastian; Dänhardt, Sebastian; Ehrensperger, Martin; Zeller, Patrick; Schmitt, Stefan; Wintterlin, Joost

    2013-01-22

    The ordering transition of an amorphous carbon layer into graphene was investigated by high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. A disordered C layer was prepared on a Ru(0001) surface by chemical vapor deposition of ethylene molecules at ~660 K. The carbon layer grows in the form of dendritic islands that have almost the same density as graphene. Upon annealing of the fully covered surface, residual hydrogen desorbs and a coherent but still disordered carbon layer forms, with almost the same carbon coverage as in graphene. The ordering of this layer into graphene at 920 to 950 K was monitored as a function of time. A unique mechanism was observed that involves small topographic holes in the carbon layer. The holes are mobile, and on the trajectories of the holes the disordered carbon layer is transformed into graphene. The transport of C atoms across the holes or along the hole edges provides a low-energy pathway for the ordering transition. This mechanism is prohibited in a dense graphene layer, which offers an explanation for the difficulty of removing defects from graphene synthesized by chemical methods.

  2. Intrinsic Negative Poisson's Ratio for Single-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Chang, Tienchong; Guo, Xingming; Park, Harold S

    2016-08-10

    Negative Poisson's ratio (NPR) materials have drawn significant interest because the enhanced toughness, shear resistance, and vibration absorption that typically are seen in auxetic materials may enable a range of novel applications. In this work, we report that single-layer graphene exhibits an intrinsic NPR, which is robust and independent of its size and temperature. The NPR arises due to the interplay between two intrinsic deformation pathways (one with positive Poisson's ratio, the other with NPR), which correspond to the bond stretching and angle bending interactions in graphene. We propose an energy-based deformation pathway criteria, which predicts that the pathway with NPR has lower energy and thus becomes the dominant deformation mode when graphene is stretched by a strain above 6%, resulting in the NPR phenomenon.

  3. Oxidation and disorder in few-layered graphene induced by the electron-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiwei; Wang Rui; Qian Xiaoming; Chen Lei; Li Jialu; Song Xiaoyan; Liu Liangsen; Chen Guangwei

    2011-05-02

    Structural changes caused by an electron beam with the high irradiation energy of 5 MeV were investigated in few-layered graphene. Both the original and the irradiated few-layered graphene were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that a typical diffraction peak of graphene oxide emerged and this may be attributed to a partial oxidation in few-layered graphene which was induced by the irradiation. In addition, the graphitic structure of few-layered graphene was found to be disordered according to the increased intensity ratio of D to G band.

  4. Effect of the intra-layer potential distributions and spatial currents on the performance of graphene SymFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Mehdi; Sensale-Rodriguez, Berardi

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional (2-D) model for a graphene symmetric field effect transistor (SymFET), which considers (a) the intra-graphene layer potential distributions and (b) the internal current flows through the device, is presented and discussed. The local voltages along the graphene electrodes as well as the current-voltage characteristics of the device are numerically calculated based on a single-particle tunneling model. Our numerical results show that: (i) when the tunneling current is small, due to either a large tunneling thickness (≥ 2 atomic layers of BN) or a small coherence length, the voltage distributions along the graphene electrodes have almost zero variations upon including these distributed effects, (ii) when the tunnel current is large, due to either a small tunneling thickness (∼ 1 atomic layer of BN) or due to a large coherence length, the local voltage distributions along the graphene electrodes become appreciable and the device behavior deviates from that predicted by a 1-D approximation. These effects, which are not captured in one-dimensional SymFET models, can provide a better understanding about the electron dynamics in the device and might indicate potential novel applications for this proposed device.

  5. Electronic structure of epitaxial graphene layers on SiC: effects of the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Varchon, F.; Feng, R.; Hass, J.; Li, X.; Nguyen, B. Ngoc; Naud, C.; Mallet, P.; Veuillen, J.-Y.; Berger, C.; Conrad, E.H.; Magaud, L.

    2008-10-17

    A strong substrate-graphite bond is found in the first all-carbon layer by density functional theory calculations and x-ray diffraction for few graphene layers grown epitaxially on SiC. This first layer is devoid of graphene electronic properties and acts as a buffer layer. The graphene nature of the film is recovered by the second carbon layer grown on both the (0001) and (0001{sup -}) 4H-SiC surfaces. We also present evidence of a charge transfer that depends on the interface geometry. Hence the graphene is doped and a gap opens at the Dirac point after three Bernal stacked carbon layers are formed.

  6. Investigation on optical properties of BSA protein on single-layer graphene using terahertz spectroscopy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengxin; Du, Pengju; Sun, Yiwen

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is sensitive to probe several aspects of biological systems. In THz frequency, electrically controllable Drude-like intraband absorption makes graphene a promising platform for building graphene-based optoelectronic devices such as THz biosensor. In this work, BSA protein thin films were spin-coated and incubated on single-layer graphene. IR lasers with different power were used as the pump light to stimulate the sandwich-like sample respectively. The graphene monolayer complex conductivity was calculated using the transmission method. The novel optical properties of single-layer graphene and BSA protein on graphene in the THz range will be discussed in this paper.

  7. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U. Joseph, Eric A.; Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G.; Lock, Evgeniya H.

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  8. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  9. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-07

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  10. Cross-sectional imaging of individual layers and buried interfaces of graphene-based heterostructures and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, S. J.; Gholinia, A.; Jalil, R.; Romani, S.; Britnell, L.; Elias, D. C.; Novoselov, K. S.; Ponomarenko, L. A.; Geim, A. K.; Gorbachev, R.

    2012-09-01

    By stacking various two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals on top of each other, it is possible to create multilayer heterostructures and devices with designed electronic properties. However, various adsorbates become trapped between layers during their assembly, and this not only affects the resulting quality but also prevents the formation of a true artificial layered crystal upheld by van der Waals interaction, creating instead a laminate glued together by contamination. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has shown that graphene and boron nitride monolayers, the two best characterized 2D crystals, are densely covered with hydrocarbons (even after thermal annealing in high vacuum) and exhibit only small clean patches suitable for atomic resolution imaging. This observation seems detrimental for any realistic prospect of creating van der Waals materials and heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces. Here we employ cross sectional TEM to take a side view of several graphene-boron nitride heterostructures. We find that the trapped hydrocarbons segregate into isolated pockets, leaving the interfaces atomically clean. Moreover, we observe a clear correlation between interface roughness and the electronic quality of encapsulated graphene. This work proves the concept of heterostructures assembled with atomic layer precision and provides their first TEM images.

  11. Atomic-scale scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of nanometer-sized graphene on the Si(111)-7x7 surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, Justin; Lyding, Joseph

    2009-03-01

    We have used ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy to perform atomic-level studies of graphene on the Si(111)-7x7 surface. We used a dry contact transfer technique (DCT) developed by Albrecht and Lyding [1] to deposit mechanically exfoliated graphene in-situ [2] onto atomically clean Si(111)-7x7 surfaces. The DCT method deposits single, double, and thicker layers of atomically clean graphene. We observe varying degrees of transparency of the graphene monolayers and bilayers on the Si(111)-7x7 surface, where the substrate atomic structure is clearly seen through the graphene. We believe that the electronic structure of a graphene monolayer on the Si(111)-7x7 surface leads to the transparency of monolayers and bilayers, similar to the findings of Rutter, et al [3]. Room-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements of the graphene monolayers and bilayers on the Si(111)-7x7 surface show predominantly metallic behavior. [1] P.M. Albrecht and J.W. Lyding, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 5029 (2003) [2] K.A. Ritter and J.W. Lyding, Nanotechnology 19, 015704 (2008) [3] G.M. Rutter, et al, Phys. Rev. B 76, 235416 (2007)

  12. Corrugated graphene layers for sea water desalination using capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, Madhavi; Liu, Bo; Hu, Zhongqiao; Chen, Zhong; Law, Adrian Wing-Keung; Zhou, Kun

    2017-03-14

    The effect of the electric field and surface morphology of corrugated graphene (GE) layers on their capacitive deionization process is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Deionization performances are evaluated in terms of water flow rate and ion adsorption and explained by analysing the water density distribution, radial distribution function and distribution of the ions inside the GE layers. The simulation results reveal that corrugation of GE layers reduces the water flow rate but largely enhances ion adsorption in comparison to the flat GE layers. Such enhancement is mainly due to the adsorption of ions on the GE layers due to the anchoring effect in the regions with wide interlayer distances. Moreover, it reveals that the entrance configuration of the GE layers also has a significant effect on the performance of deionization. Overall, the results from this study will be helpful in designing effective electrode configurations for capacitive deionization.

  13. Stacking-dependent transport properties in few-layers graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Matheus Paes; Padilha, José Eduardo; Pontes, Renato Borges; Fazzio, Adalberto; Silva, Antônio José Roque da

    2017-01-01

    By performing ab initio electronic structure and transport calculations, we investigated the effects of the stacking order (Bernal (AB) and rhombohedral (ABC)) as well as the number of layers, in the electronic structure and charge transport of few-layers graphene (FLG). We observed that for the ABC stack the transport properties are derived from surface states close to the Fermi level connected to dispersive states with an exponential penetration towards the inner layers, whereas for the AB stacking the transport is distributed over all layers. We present a simple model for the resistances as a function of the number of layers which contemplates the different contribution of the surface and inner layers for the transport. However, even if the stackings AB and ABC present completely different electronic and transport properties, both present the same cohesive energies, showing the absence of a thermodynamical preference for a given kind of stacking.

  14. Touch stimulated pulse generation in biomimetic single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul, Onejae; Chun, Hyunsuk; Choi, Eunseok; Choi, Jungbong; Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Dongpyo; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-02-01

    Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac point in the graphene energy band, which generates a sharp peak in the measured resistance. We found that by changing the gate potential it was possible to modulate the threshold pressure and using a series of graphene channels, a train of pulses were generated during a transient pressurizing stimulus demonstrating biomimetic behaviour.Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac

  15. Self-organized arrays of graphene and few-layer graphene quantum dots in fluorographene matrix: Charge transient spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, Irina V.; Nebogatikova, Nadezhda A.; Prinz, Victor Ya.

    2014-05-12

    Arrays of graphene or few-layer graphene quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a partially fluorinated graphene matrix were created by chemical functionalization of layers. Charge transient spectroscopy employed for investigation of obtained QD systems (size 20–70 nm) has allowed us to examine the QD energy spectra and the time of carrier emission (or charge relaxation) from QDs as a function of film thickness. It was found that the characteristic time of carrier emission from QDs decreased markedly (by about four orders of magnitude) on increasing the QD thickness from one graphene monolayer to 3 nm. Daylight-assisted measurements also demonstrate a strong decrease of the carrier emission time.

  16. Fabrication and applications of multi-layer graphene stack on transparent polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewska, Aleksandra; Pasternak, Iwona; Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Przewloka, Aleksandra; Ciuk, Tymoteusz; Sobieski, Jan; Grzonka, Justyna; Abramski, Krzysztof M.; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate the preparation method of a multi-layer stack with a pre-defined number of graphene layers, which was obtained using chemical vapor deposition graphene deposited on a copper substrate and subsequently transferred onto a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. The prepared multi-layer stack can also be transferred onto an arbitrary substrate and in the end, the polymer can be removed, which in consequence significantly increases the range of possible graphene applications. The multi-layer character was confirmed by optical transmittance measurements and Raman spectroscopy, whereas the microstructure of the multi-layer graphene stack was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The electrical properties in the function of the number of graphene layers were assessed with standard Hall Effect measurements. Finally, we showed the practical application of the multi-layer graphene stack as a saturable absorber of a mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser.

  17. Role of barrier layer on dielectric function of graphene double layer system at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Digish K.; Ambavale, Sagar K.; Prajapati, Ketan; Sharma, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    We have theoretically investigated the static dielectric function of graphene double layer system (GDLS) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. GDLS has been suspended on a substrate and barrier layer of three different materials; h-BN, Al2O3 and HfO2 has been introduced between two graphene sheets of GDLS. We have reported dependence of the overall dielectric function of GDLS on interlayer distance and the effect of the dielectric environment at finite temperatures. Results show close relation between changing environment and behavior of dielectric constant of GDLS.

  18. Low-energy phase change memory with graphene confined layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengqiu; Ma, Jun; Ge, Xiaoming; Rao, Feng; Ding, Keyuan; Lv, Shilong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2016-06-01

    How to reduce the Reset operation energy is the key scientific and technological problem in the field of phase change memory (PCM). Here, we show in the Ge2Sb2Te5 based PCM cell, inserting an additional graphene monolayer in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer can remarkably decrease both the Reset current and energy. Because of the small out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of such monolayer graphene, the Set resistance and the heat dissipation towards top TiN electrode of the modified PCM cell are significantly increased and decreased, respectively. The mushroom-typed larger active phase transition volume thus can be confined inside the underlying thinner GST layer, resulting in the lower power consumption.

  19. Buckling instability of circular double-layered graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Shi, Jin-Xing; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2012-04-04

    In this paper, we study the buckling properties of circular double-layered graphene sheets (DLGSs), using plate theory. The two graphene layers are modeled as two individual sheets whose interactions are determined by the Lennard-Jones potential of the carbon-carbon bond. An analytical solution of coupled governing equations is proposed for predicting the buckling properties of circular DLGSs. Using the present theoretical approach, the influences of boundary conditions, plate sizes, and buckling-mode shapes on the buckling behaviors are investigated in detail. The buckling stability is significantly affected by the buckling-mode shapes. As a result of van der Waals interactions, the buckling stress of circular DLGSs is much larger for the anti-phase mode than for the in-phase mode.

  20. Graphene growth by transfer-free chemical vapour deposition on a cobalt layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macháč, Petr; Hejna, Ondřej; Slepička, Petr

    2017-01-01

    The contribution deals with the preparation of graphene films by a transfer-free chemical vapour deposition process utilizing a thin cobalt layer. This method allows growing graphene directly on a dielectric substrate. The process was carried out in a cold-wall reactor with methane as carbon precursor. We managed to prepare bilayer graphene. The best results were obtained for a structure with a cobalt layer with a thickness of 50 nm. The quality of prepared graphene films and of the number of graphene layers were estimated using Raman spectroscopy. with a minimal dots diameter of 180 nm and spacing of 1000 nm were successfully developed.

  1. Graphene-like single-layered covalent organic frameworks: synthesis strategies and application prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan-He; Guan, Cui-Zhong; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2014-10-29

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, such as graphene and transition metal chalcogenides, show many interesting dimension-related materials properties. Inspired by the development of 2D inorganic nanomaterials, single-layered covalent organic frameworks (sCOFs), featuring atom-thick sheets and crystalline extended organic structures with covalently bonded building blocks, have attracted great attention in recent years. With their unique graphene-like topological structure and the merit of structural diversity, sCOFs promise to possess novel and designable properties. However, the synthesis of sCOFs with well-defined structures remains a great challenge. Herein, the recent development of the bottom-up synthesis methods of 2D sCOFs, such as thermodynamic equilibrium control methods, growth-kinetics control methods, and surface-assisted covalent polymerization methods, are reviewed. Finally, some of the critical properties and application prospects of these materials are outlined.

  2. Layered quantum Hall insulators with ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, A.; Szirmai, G.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-11-15

    We consider a generalization of the two-dimensional (2D) quantum Hall insulator to a noncompact, non-Abelian gauge group, the Heisenberg-Weyl group. We show that this kind of insulator is actually a layered three-dimensional (3D) insulator with nontrivial topology. We further show that nontrivial combinations of quantized transverse conductivities can be engineered with the help of a staggered potential. We investigate the robustness and topological nature of this conductivity and connect it to the surface modes of the system. We also propose a simple experimental realization with ultracold atoms in 3D confined to a 2D square lattice with the third dimension being mapped to a gauge coordinate.

  3. Nanoengineering Heterogeneous Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Joseph A; Yang, Nuoya; Bent, Stacey F

    2017-02-27

    A new generation of catalysts is needed to meet society's energy and resource requirements. Current catalyst synthesis does not fully achieve optimum control of composition, size, and structure. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an emerging technique that allows synthesizing of highly controlled catalysts in the forms of films, nanoparticles, and single sites. The addition of ALD coatings can also be used to introduce promoters and improve the stability of traditional catalysts. Evolving research shows promise for applying ALD to understand catalytically active sites and create next-generation catalysts using advanced 3D nanostructures. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Volume 8 is June 7, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  4. Atom-by-atom observation of grain boundary migration in graphene.

    PubMed

    Kurasch, Simon; Kotakoski, Jani; Lehtinen, Ossi; Skákalová, Viera; Smet, Jurgen; Krill, Carl E; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-13

    Grain boundary (GB) migration in polycrystalline solids is a materials science manifestation of survival of the fittest, with adjacent grains competing to add atoms to their outer surfaces at each other's expense. This process is thermodynamically favored when it lowers the total GB area in the sample, thereby reducing the excess free energy contributed by the boundaries. In this picture, a curved boundary is expected to migrate toward its center of curvature with a velocity proportional to the local radius of boundary curvature (R). Investigating the underlying mechanism of boundary migration in a 3D material, however, has been reserved for computer simulation or analytical theory, as capturing the dynamics of individual atoms in the core region of a GB is well beyond the spatial and temporal resolution limits of current characterization techniques. Here, we similarly overcome the conventional experimental limits by investigating a 2D material, polycrystalline graphene, in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, exploiting the energy of the imaging electrons to stimulate individual bond rotations in the GB core region. The resulting morphological changes are followed in situ, atom-by-atom, revealing configurational fluctuations that take on a time-averaged preferential direction only in the presence of significant boundary curvature, as confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations. Remarkably, in the extreme case of a small graphene grain enclosed within a larger one, we follow its shrinkage to the point of complete disappearance.

  5. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2014-11-04

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp(2) carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations.

  6. A platform for large-scale graphene electronics--CVD growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Seong-Yong; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kahng, Se-Jong; Choi, Jae-Young; Ruoff, Rodney S; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2013-05-21

    Direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film can suggest a large-scale and high-quality graphene/h-BN film hybrid structure with a defect-free interface. This sequentially grown graphene/h-BN film shows better electronic properties than that of graphene/SiO2 or graphene transferred on h-BN film, and suggests a new promising template for graphene device fabrication.

  7. Examination of humidity effects on measured thickness and interfacial phenomena of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide via amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jinkins, K.; Farina, L.; Wu, Y.; Camacho, J.

    2015-12-14

    The properties of Few-Layer Graphene (FLG) change with the number of layers and Amplitude Modulation (AM) Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of FLG. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AM-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. The loss tangent values of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO{sub 2}. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO{sub 2} substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AM-AFM.

  8. Optical properties of few layered graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap Choudhary, Raghvendra; Shukla, Shobha; Vaibhav, Kumar; Bhagwan Pawar, Pranav; Saxena, Sumit

    2015-09-01

    Quantum dots provide a unique opportunity to study the confinement effects of electronic wave function on the properties of materials. We have investigated the optical properties of graphene quantum dots synthesized using ultra-fast light-matter interactions followed by one step reduction process. Atomic-scale morphological information suggests the presence of both zigzag and armchair edges in these quantum dots. Optical characterizations were performed using absorption, photoluminescence, and infrared spectroscopy. A shift in the emission spectrum and disappearance of n → π* transition in the absorption spectrum on reduction of the ablated samples confirmed the formation of graphene quantum dots. First principles calculations are in good agreement with the experimentally reported infrared data.

  9. High resolution transmission electron microscope Imaging and first-principles simulations of atomic-scale features in graphene membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-thin membranes such as graphene[1] are of great importance for basic science and technology applications. Graphene sets the ultimate limit of thinness, demonstrating that a free-standing single atomic layer not only exists but can be extremely stable and strong [2--4]. However, both theory [5, 6] and experiments [3, 7] suggest that the existence of graphene relies on intrinsic ripples that suppress the long-wavelength thermal fluctuations which otherwise spontaneously destroy long range order in a two dimensional system. Here we show direct imaging of the atomic features in graphene including the ripples resolved using monochromatic aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compare the images observed in TEM with simulated images based on an accurate first-principles total potential. We show that these atomic scale features can be mapped through accurate first-principles simulations into high resolution TEM contrast. [1] Geim, A. K. & Novoselov, K. S. Nat. Mater. 6, 183-191, (2007). [2] Novoselov, K. S.et al. Science 306, 666-669, (2004). [3] Meyer, J. C. et al. Nature 446, 60-63, (2007). [4] Lee, C., Wei, X. D., Kysar, J. W. & Hone, J. Science 321, 385-388, (2008). [5] Nelson, D. R. & Peliti, L. J Phys-Paris 48, 1085-1092, (1987). [6] Fasolino, A., Los, J. H. & Katsnelson, M. I. Nat. Mater. 6, 858-861, (2007). [7] Meyer, J. C. et al. Solid State Commun. 143, 101-109, (2007).

  10. Negative Poisson's Ratio in Single-Layer Graphene Ribbons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S

    2016-04-13

    The Poisson's ratio characterizes the resultant strain in the lateral direction for a material under longitudinal deformation. Though negative Poisson's ratios (NPR) are theoretically possible within continuum elasticity, they are most frequently observed in engineered materials and structures, as they are not intrinsic to many materials. In this work, we report NPR in single-layer graphene ribbons, which results from the compressive edge stress induced warping of the edges. The effect is robust, as the NPR is observed for graphene ribbons with widths smaller than about 10 nm, and for tensile strains smaller than about 0.5% with NPR values reaching as large as -1.51. The NPR is explained analytically using an inclined plate model, which is able to predict the Poisson's ratio for graphene sheets of arbitrary size. The inclined plate model demonstrates that the NPR is governed by the interplay between the width (a bulk property), and the warping amplitude of the edge (an edge property), which eventually yields a phase diagram determining the sign of the Poisson's ratio as a function of the graphene geometry.

  11. Ultrathin-layer chromatography nanostructures modified by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Jim, S R; Foroughi-Abari, A; Krause, K M; Li, P; Kupsta, M; Taschuk, M T; Cadien, K C; Brett, M J

    2013-07-19

    Stationary phase morphology and surface chemistry dictate the properties of ultrathin-layer chromatography (UTLC) media and interactions with analytes in sample mixtures. In this paper, we combined two powerful thin film deposition techniques to create composite chromatography nanomaterials. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) produces high surface area columnar microstructures with aligned macropores well-suited for UTLC. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables precise fabrication of conformal, nanometer-scale coatings that can tune surfaces of these UTLC films. We coated ∼5μm thick GLAD SiO2 UTLC media with <10nm thick ALD metal oxides (Al2O3, ZrO2, and ZnO) to decouple surface chemistry from the underlying GLAD scaffold microstructure. The effects of ALD coatings on GLAD UTLC media were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gas adsorption porosimetry, and lipophilic dye separations. The results collectively show that the most significant changes occur over the first few nanometers of ALD coating. They further demonstrate independent control of film microstructure and surface characteristics. ALD coatings can enhance complex GLAD microstructures to engineer new composite nanomaterials potentially useful in analytical chromatography.

  12. Nanolaminates with Novel Properties Fabricated Using Atomic Layer Deposition Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    ALD can be deposited on the A120 3 ALD layer to form a conducting layer . Subsequently, an...additional A120 3 ALD layer can be deposited on the W ALD layer to form an additional insulating layer . This A120 3/W/ A120 3 layer on the carbon nanotube...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This AFOSR grant worked on the development, understanding and applications of atomic layer deposition ( ALD ) for nanolaminates. ALD

  13. Synthesis of Graphene Layers from Metal-Carbon Melts: Nucleation and Growth Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Shaahin

    A new method for growth of large-area graphene, which can lead to a scalable low-cost high-throughput production technology, was demonstrated. The method is based on growing of graphene films on the surface of metal-carbon melts and involves dissolving carbon in a molten metal at a specified temperature and then allowing the dissolved carbon to nucleate and grow on top of the melt at a lower temperature. The synthesized graphene layers were subjected to detailed microscopic and Raman spectroscopic characterizations. The deconvolution of the Raman 2D band was used to accurately determine the number of atomic planes in the resulting graphene layers and access their quality. The results indicated that the technology can provide bulk graphite films, few-layer graphene as well as high-quality single layer graphene on metals. It was also shown that upon cooling of supersaturated metal-carbon melts; graphite would also grow inside the melt either with flake or sphere morphology, depending on the solidification rate and degree of supersaturation. At small solidification rates, graphite crystals are normally bounded by faceted low index basal and prismatic planes which grow by lateral movement of ledges produced by 2D-nucleation or dislocations. At higher growth rates, however, both interfaces become kinetically rough, and growth becomes limited by diffusion of carbon to the growing interface. The roughening transition from faceted to non-faceted was found to depend on the driving force and nature of growing plane. Due to high number of C-C dangling bonds in prismatic face, its roughening transition occurs at smaller driving forces. At intermediate rates, the prismatic interfaces become rough and grow faster while the basal plane is still faceted, leading to formation of flake graphite. At higher growth rates, both interfaces grow with a relatively similar rate leading to initiation of graphite sphere formation, which later grows by a multi-stage growth mechanism. An

  14. Atomically controlled substitutional boron-doping of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Saito, Shohei; Osumi, Shinichiro; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro; Foster, Adam S.; Spijker, Peter; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-08-01

    Boron is a unique element in terms of electron deficiency and Lewis acidity. Incorporation of boron atoms into an aromatic carbon framework offers a wide variety of functionality. However, the intrinsic instability of organoboron compounds against moisture and oxygen has delayed the development. Here, we present boron-doped graphene nanoribbons (B-GNRs) of widths of N=7, 14 and 21 by on-surface chemical reactions with an employed organoboron precursor. The location of the boron dopant is well defined in the centre of the B-GNR, corresponding to 4.8 atom%, as programmed. The chemical reactivity of B-GNRs is probed by the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO), which is most effectively trapped by the boron sites, demonstrating the Lewis acid character. Structural properties and the chemical nature of the NO-reacted B-GNR are determined by a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy, high-resolution atomic force microscopy with a CO tip, and density functional and classical computations.

  15. Vapour phase growth and grain boundary structure of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Najmaei, Sina; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Wu; Zou, Xiaolong; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; Yakobson, Boris I; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Single-layered molybdenum disulphide with a direct bandgap is a promising two-dimensional material that goes beyond graphene for the next generation of nanoelectronics. Here, we report the controlled vapour phase synthesis of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for the nucleation, growth, and grain boundary formation in its crystalline monolayers. Furthermore, a nucleation-controlled strategy is established to systematically promote the formation of large-area, single- and few-layered films. Using high-resolution electron microscopy imaging, the atomic structure and morphology of the grains and their boundaries in the polycrystalline molybdenum disulphide atomic layers are examined, and the primary mechanisms for grain boundary formation are evaluated. Grain boundaries consisting of 5- and 7- member rings are directly observed with atomic resolution, and their energy landscape is investigated via first-principles calculations. The uniformity in thickness, large grain sizes, and excellent electrical performance signify the high quality and scalable synthesis of the molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

  16. Substrate-Independent Growth of Atomically Precise Chiral Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contributing to the need for new graphene nanoribbon (GNR) structures that can be synthesized with atomic precision, we have designed a reactant that renders chiral (3,1)-GNRs after a multistep reaction including Ullmann coupling and cyclodehydrogenation. The nanoribbon synthesis has been successfully proven on different coinage metals, and the formation process, together with the fingerprints associated with each reaction step, has been studied by combining scanning tunneling microscopy, core-level spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. In addition to the GNR’s chiral edge structure, the substantial GNR lengths achieved and the low processing temperature required to complete the reaction grant this reactant extremely interesting properties for potential applications. PMID:27548516

  17. Electronic structure of few-layer epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Sutter, P; Hybertsen, M S; Sadowski, J T; Sutter, E

    2009-07-01

    The electronic structure of epitaxial monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer graphene on Ru(0001) was determined by selected-area angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (micro-ARPES). Micro-ARPES band maps provide evidence for a strong electronic coupling between monolayer graphene and the adjacent metal, which causes the complete disruption of the graphene pi-bands near the Fermi energy. However, the perturbation by the metal decreases rapidly with the addition of further graphene sheets, and already an epitaxial graphene bilayer on Ru recovers the characteristic Dirac cones of isolated monolayer graphene. A graphene trilayer on Ru behaves like free-standing bilayer graphene. Density-functional theory based calculations show that this decoupling is due to the efficient passivation of metal d-states by the interfacial graphene layer.

  18. Nucleation of graphene layers on magnetic oxides: Co3O4(111) and Cr2O3(0001) from theory and experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Beatty, John; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Yuan; ...

    2016-12-14

    We report directly grown strongly adherent graphene on Co3O4(111) by carbon molecular beam epitaxy (C MBE) at 850 K and density functional theory (DFT) findings that the first graphene layer is reconstructed to fit the Co3O4 surface, while subsequent layers retain normal graphene structure. This adherence to the Co3O4 structure results from partial bonding of half the carbons to top oxygens of the substrate. This structure is validated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction studies, showing layer-by-layer graphene growth with ~0.08 electrons/carbon atom transferred to the oxide from the first graphene layer, in agreement with DFT. In contrast,more » for Cr2O3 DFT finds no strong bonding to the surface and C MBE on Cr2O3(0001) yields only graphite formation at 700 K, with C desorption above 800 K. As a result, strong graphene-to-oxide charge transfer aids nucleation of graphene on incommensurate oxide substrates and may have implications for spintronics.« less

  19. Atomically Precise Bottom-up Fabrication of Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinming

    2011-03-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) -- narrow stripes of graphene -- are predicted to exhibit remarkable properties making them suitable for future electronic applications. Contrary to their two-dimensional (2D) parent material graphene, which exhibits semimetallic behavior, GNRs with widths smaller than 10 nm are predicted to be semiconductors due to quantum confinement and edge effects. Despite significant advances in GNR fabrication using chemical, sonochemical and lithographic methods as well as recent reports on the successful unzipping of carbon nanotubes into GNRs, the production of sub-10 nm GNRs with chemical precision remains a major challenge. In this talk, we will present a simple GNR fabrication method that allows for the production of atomically precise GNRs of different topologies and widths. Our bottom-up approach consists in the surface-assisted coupling of suitably designed molecular precursors into linear polyphenylenes and their subsequent cyclodehydrogenation, and results in GNRs whose topology, width and edge periphery are defined by the precursor monomers. By means of STM and Raman characterization, we demonstrate that this fabrication process allows for the atomically precise fabrication of complex GNR topologies. Furthermore, we have developed a reliable procedure to transfer GNRs fabricated on metal surfaces onto other substrates. It will for example be shown that millimeter sized sheets of crosslinked GNRs can be transferred onto silicon wafers, making them available for further processing, e.g. by lithography, prototype device fabrication and characterization. Coauthors: Pascal Ruffieux, Rached Jaafar, Marco Bieri, Thomas Braun, and Stephan Blankenburg, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland; Matthias Muoth, ETH Zurich, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland; Ari P. Seitsonen, University of Zurich, Physical Chemistry Institute, 8057

  20. Graphene-Dielectric Integration for Graphene Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lei; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2010-01-01

    Graphene is emerging as an interesting electronic material for future electronics due to its exceptionally high carrier mobility and single-atomic thickness. Graphene-dielectric integration is of critical importance for the development of graphene transistors and a new generation of graphene based electronics. Deposition of dielectric materials onto graphene is of significant challenge due to the intrinsic material incompatibility between pristine graphene and dielectric oxide materials. Here we review various strategies being researched for graphene-dielectric integration. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) can be used to directly deposit dielectric materials on graphene, but often introduces significant defects into the monolayer of carbon lattice; Atomic layer deposition (ALD) process has also been explored to to deposit high-κ dielectrics on graphene, which however requires functionalization of graphene surface with reactive groups, inevitably leading to a significant degradation in carrier mobilities; Using naturally oxidized thin aluminum or polymer as buffer layer for dielectric deposition can mitigate the damages to graphene lattice and improve the carrier mobility of the resulted top-gated transistors; Lastly, a physical assembly approach has recently been explored to integrate dielectric nanostructures with graphene without introducing any appreciable defects, and enabled top-gated graphene transistors with the highest carrier mobility reported to date. We will conclude with a brief summary and perspective on future opportunities. PMID:21278913

  1. Tailoring nanoporous materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien; Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Ludwig, Karl F; Martens, Johan A

    2011-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. The self-limiting nature of the chemical reactions ensures precise film thickness control and excellent step coverage, even on 3D structures with large aspect ratios. At present, ALD is mainly used in the microelectronics industry, e.g. for growing gate oxides. The excellent conformality that can be achieved with ALD also renders it a promising candidate for coating porous structures, e.g. for functionalization of large surface area substrates for catalysis, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, filtration devices, sensors, membranes etc. This tutorial review focuses on the application of ALD for catalyst design. Examples are discussed where ALD of TiO(2) is used for tailoring the interior surface of nanoporous films with pore sizes of 4-6 nm, resulting in photocatalytic activity. In still narrower pores, the ability to deposit chemical elements can be exploited to generate catalytic sites. In zeolites, ALD of aluminium species enables the generation of acid catalytic activity.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of oxides for microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongtao

    Atomic layer deposition of high-kappa oxides has gained interest due to the wide applications in microelectronics. For gate dielectric application, amorphous oxides are preferred for the structural uniformity at nanometer scale. LaxM2-xO 3 (M = Sc, Lu or Y) films were deposited by ALD with metal amidinate precursors and H2O. Both LaScO3 and LaLuO3 films are amorphous and free of interfacial layers. Besides the structural benefits, both oxides have high dielectric constants (˜23 for LaScO 3 and 28 +/- 1 for LaLuO3), low leakage current density, and very few bulk traps, and are scalable to EOT < 1 nm. La1.23Y 0.77O3 films have polycrystalline structures with moderately high kappa ˜ 17 and low leakage current. The Poole-Frenkel mechanism is verified in the ternary oxide films by studying temperature dependence of the leakage current. For La1.1Al0.9O3/Si, the thermal stability was evaluated by studying the interface structure evolution under different annealing conditions. It concludes that an interfacial layer forms at the temperature above 600°C and the oxygen source resides in the film. For DRAM application, ALD deposition of rutile phase TiO2 is developed for its 70. The substrate, SnO2 and RuO2/Ru, works as both bottom electrodes and templates for rutile TiO2 nucleation. The growth rate is ˜ 0.3 A/cycle and is regardless of phases and crystallinity. The crystallinity strongly depends on the substrates. High quality ruthenium thin films were deposited by ALD with bis( N,N'-di-tert-butylacetamidinato) ruthenium(II) dicarbonyl and O2. The film crystallinity, density, and resistivity strongly depend on the O2 exposure. As EO ≈ Emax, the films have the lowest resistivity, highest density and best crystallinity (˜10 muO·cm, ˜12.3 g/cm3 and grain size comparable to film thickness). When EO > Emax, films peel off from the substrate due to the recombinative desorption of O2. The impurities are mainly O (0.27+/-0.03at.%) and C (0.30+/-0.05at.%). The C is mostly

  3. Regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Sun, Zhenhua; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Han; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Zhongchang; Fujita, Takeshi; Ding, Feng; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng; Wu, Hongkai; Chen, Mingwei; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-07-23

    Defects play significant roles in properties of graphene and related device performances. Most studies of defects in graphene focus on their influences on electronic or luminescent optical properties, while controlling infrared optoelectronic performance of graphene by defect engineering remains a challenge. In the meantime, pristine graphene has very low infrared photoresponses of ~0.01 A/W due to fast photocarrier dynamics. Here we report regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control for the first time. The infrared optoelectronic transport and photocurrent generation are significantly influenced and well controlled by oxygenous defects and structures in reduced graphene oxide. Moreover, remarkable infrared photoresponses are observed in photoconductor devices based on reduced graphene oxide with an external responsivity of ~0.7 A/W, at least over one order of magnitude higher than that from pristine graphene. External quantum efficiencies of infrared devices reach ultrahigh values of ~97%, which to our knowledge is one of the best efficiencies for infrared photoresponses from nonhybrid, pure graphene or graphene-based derivatives. The flexible infrared photoconductor devices demonstrate no photoresponse degradation even after 1000 bending tests. The results open up new routes to control optoelectronic behaviors of graphene for high-performance devices.

  4. Atomic Layer Etching Mechanism of MoS2 for Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Seok; Kim, Ki Hyun; Nam, Yeonsig; Jeon, Jaeho; Yim, Soonmin; Singh, Eric; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Sung Joo; Jung, Yeon Sik; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Dong Woo

    2017-04-05

    Among the layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) that can form stable two-dimensional crystal structures, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been intensively investigated because of its unique properties in various electronic and optoelectronic applications with different band gap energies from 1.29 to 1.9 eV as the number of layers decreases. To control the MoS2 layers, atomic layer etching (ALE) (which is a cyclic etching consisting of a radical-adsorption step such as Cl adsorption and a reacted-compound-desorption step via a low-energy Ar(+)-ion exposure) can be a highly effective technique to avoid inducing damage and contamination that occur during the reactive steps. Whereas graphene is composed of one-atom-thick layers, MoS2 is composed of three-atom-thick S(top)-Mo(mid)-S(bottom) layers; therefore, the ALE mechanisms of the two structures are significantly different. In this study, for MoS2 ALE, the Cl radical is used as the adsorption species and a low-energy Ar(+) ion is used as the desorption species. A MoS2 ALE mechanism (by which the S(top), Mo(mid), and S(bottom) atoms are sequentially removed from the MoS2 crystal structure due to the trapped Cl atoms between the S(top) layer and the Mo(mid) layer) is reported according to the results of an experiment and a simulation. In addition, the ALE technique shows that a monolayer MoS2 field effect transistor (FET) fabricated after one cycle of ALE is undamaged and exhibits electrical characteristics similar to those of a pristine monolayer MoS2 FET. This technique is also applicable to all layered TMD materials, such as tungsten disulfide (WS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), and tungsten diselenide (WSe2).

  5. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (˜0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  6. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  7. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  8. The effect of h-BN buffer layers in bilayer graphene on Co (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Can; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Tao; Guo, Qing; Sheng, Kuang; Yin, You

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of the interface of Co/graphene is essential for applications of graphene-based devices, as well as in the process of graphene synthesis. In this paper, the Co/graphene interface, including five structures of bilayer graphene (BLG) on Co (111) surface with bilayer or monolayer BN buffer sheets, is investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The corresponding atomic and electronic structures and Mulliken charge populations are also analyzed. The bilayer BN sheets are found to be the thinnest insulator for the backside Co metal gate, which shields BLG from Co substrate pining, decreases the charges influenced by the substrate, and improves BLG transport mobility.

  9. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) Polymer as Amphibious Buffer Layer for Graphene Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Jianjun; Huo, Shuai; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuecan; Chen, Tangshen; Wu, Wei; Xu, Jingxia

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the scattering and trapping effects, the interfaces of dielectric/graphene or substrate/graphene can tailor the performance of field-effect transistor (FET). In this letter, the polymer of benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as an amphibious buffer layer and located at between the layers of substrate and graphene and between the layers of dielectric and graphene. Interestingly, with the help of nonpolar and hydrophobic BCB buffer layer, the large-scale top-gated, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene transistors was prepared on Si/SiO2 substrate, its cutoff frequency (fT) and the maximum cutoff frequency (fmax) of the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) can be reached at 12 GHz and 11 GHz, respectively.

  10. Knudsen effusion through polymer-coated three-layer porous graphene membranes.

    PubMed

    Boutilier, Michael S H; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-05-05

    Graphene membranes have the potential to exceed the permeance and selectivity limits of conventional gas separation membranes. Realizing this potential in practical systems relies on overcoming numerous scalability challenges, such as isolating or sealing permeable defects in macroscopic areas of graphene that can compromise performance and developing methods to create high densities of selective pores over large areas. This study focuses on a centimeter-scale membrane design, where leakage is reduced by substrate selection, permeable polymer film coating, and stacking of three independent layers of graphene, while (selective) pores are created by high density ion bombardment. The three-layer graphene provides high resistance to gas flow, which decreases with ion bombardment and results in selectivity consistent with Knudsen effusion. The results suggest that the permeable pores created in three layer graphene were larger than those required for molecular sieving and that designs based on single layer graphene may lend themselves more easily to molecular sieving of gases.

  11. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  12. Modified morphology of graphene sheets by Argon-atom bombardment: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Kai-Wang; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Liu, Wen-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    By a molecular dynamics method, we simulated the process of Argon-atom bombardment on a graphene sheet with 2720 carbon atoms. The results show that, the damage of the bombardment on the graphene sheet depends not only on the incident energy but also on the particle flux density of Argon atoms. To compare and analyze the effect of the incident energy and the particle flux density in the Argon-atom bombardment, we defined the impact factor on graphene sheet by calculating the broken-hole area. The results indicate that, there is an exponential accumulated-damage for the impact of both the incident energy and the particle flux density and there is a critical incident energy ranging from 20-30 eV/atom in Argon-atom bombardment. Different configurations, such as sieve-like and circle-like graphene can be formed by controlling of different particle flux density as the incident energy is more than the critical value. Our results supply a feasible method on fabrication of porous graphene-based materials for gas-storages and molecular sieves, and it also helps to understand the damage mechanism of graphene-based electronic devices under high particle radiation.

  13. Monolayer and/or few-layer graphene on metal or metal-coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Peter Werner; Sutter, Eli Anguelova

    2015-04-14

    Disclosed is monolayer and/or few-layer graphene on metal or metal-coated substrates. Embodiments include graphene mirrors. In an example, a mirror includes a substrate that has a surface exhibiting a curvature operable to focus an incident beam onto a focal plane. A graphene layer conformally adheres to the substrate, and is operable to protect the substrate surface from degradation due to the incident beam and an ambient environment.

  14. Long Spin Diffusion Length in Few-Layer Graphene Flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W.; Phillips, L. C.; Barbone, M.; Hämäläinen, S. J.; Lombardo, A.; Ghidini, M.; Moya, X.; Maccherozzi, F.; van Dijken, S.; Dhesi, S. S.; Ferrari, A. C.; Mathur, N. D.

    2016-09-01

    We report a spin valve with a few-layer graphene flake bridging highly spin-polarized La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 electrodes, whose surfaces are kept clean during lithographic definition. Sharp magnetic switching is verified using photoemission electron microscopy with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism contrast. A naturally occurring high interfacial resistance ˜12 M Ω facilitates spin injection, and a large resistive switching (0.8 M Ω at 10 K) implies a 70 - 130 μ m spin diffusion length that exceeds previous values obtained with sharp-switching electrodes.

  15. A Direct Transfer of Layer-Area Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    A direct transfer of layer-area graphene William Regan,1,2 Nasim Alem,1,2,3 Benjamín Alemán,1,2,3 Baisong Geng,1,4 Çağlar Girit,1,2 Lorenzo Maserati... Meyer , Ç. Ö. Girit, M. F. Crommie, and A. Zettl, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 123110 2008. 10J. C. Meyer , Ç. Ö. Girit, M. F. Crommie, and A. Zettl, Nature...London 454, 319 2008. 11M. D. Fischbein and M. Drndić, Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 113107 2008. 12J. C. Meyer , A. K. Geim, M. I. Katsnelson, K. S

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of SrO buffer layers on graphite and graphene for the integration of complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Wen, Hua; Ohta, Taisuke; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Zhu, Tiancong; Beechem, Thomas; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful growth of high-quality SrO films on highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and single-layer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy. The SrO layers have (001) orientation as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while atomic force microscopy measurements show continuous pinhole-free films having rms surface roughness of <1.5 Å. Transport measurements of exfoliated graphene after SrO deposition show a strong dependence between the Dirac point and Sr oxidation. Subsequently, the SrO is leveraged as a buffer layer for more complex oxide integration via the demonstration of (001) oriented SrTiO3 grown atop a SrO/HOPG stack.

  17. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of SrO buffer layers on graphite and graphene for the integration of complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Wen, Hua; Ohta, Taisuke; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Zhu, Tiancong; Beechem, Thomas; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-04-27

    Here, we report the successful growth of high-quality SrO films on highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and single-layer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy. The SrO layers have (001) orientation as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while atomic force microscopy measurements show continuous pinhole-free films having rms surface roughness of <1.5 Å. Moreover, transport measurements of exfoliated graphene, after SrO deposition, show a strong dependence between the Dirac point and Sr oxidation. As a result, the SrO is leveraged as a buffer layer for more complex oxide integration via the demonstration of (001) oriented SrTiO3 grown atop a SrO/HOPG stack.

  18. Study of nanotribological properties of multilayer graphene by calibrated atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yitian; Wang, Zhuoqiong; Li, Cong

    2014-08-01

    The nanotribological properties of multilayer graphene oxide (MGO), multilayer reduced graphene oxide (MRGO), and mechanically exfoliated multilayer graphene (MEMG) deposited on SiO2 substrate were comparatively investigated via calibrated atomic force microscopy in ambient conditions. Friction as a function of the applied normal load and sliding velocity was studied. Results show that all three types of multilayer graphene films exhibit good adhesion and friction reduction properties. MEMG exhibits the lowest friction and adhesive force because of its perfect planar lattice. A logarithmic increase in friction was observed at low sliding velocities for all measured graphene films. Friction decreases on MGO and bare SiO2 substrate, whereas it remains approximately constant on MEMG and MRGO, when the sliding velocity exceeds their critical velocities. The possible mechanisms for the experimental results were discussed. Our studies provide a good opportunity to use different types of multilayer graphene films for promising lubricant applications in nanodevices.

  19. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2015-12-01

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results.To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are

  20. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, Joseba; Politakos, Nikolaos; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Rojas, Elena; Marradi, Marco; Ledezma, Raquel; Arizmendi, Layza; Rodríguez, J Alberto; Ziolo, Ronald F; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO)-polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS). Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  1. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates

    PubMed Central

    Irigoyen, Joseba; Politakos, Nikolaos; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Rojas, Elena; Marradi, Marco; Ledezma, Raquel; Arizmendi, Layza; Rodríguez, J Alberto; Ziolo, Ronald F

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO)–polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS). Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies. PMID:26734521

  2. Development of the layer-by-layer biosensor using graphene films: application for cholesterol determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Nguyen, Hai; Chuc Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Van Tu; Doan Le, Huu; Quynh Nguyen, Van; Thanh Tam Ngo, Thi; Phuc Do, Quan; Nghia Nguyen, Xuan; Phan, Ngoc Minh; Tran, Dai Lam

    2013-03-01

    The preparation and characterization of graphene films for cholesterol determination are described. The graphene films were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Methane gas (CH4) and copper tape were used as carbon source and catalyst in the graphene growth process, respectively. The intergrated array was fabricated by using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology in which Fe3O4-doped polyaniline (PANi) film was electropolymerized on Pt/Gr electrodes. The properties of the Pt/Gr/PANi/Fe3O4 films were investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized onto the working electrode with glutaraldehyde agent. The cholesterol electrochemical biosensor shows high sensitivity (74 μA mM-1 cm-2) and fast response time (<5 s). A linear calibration plot was obtained in the wide cholesterol concentration range from 2 to 20 mM and correlation coefficient square (R2) of 0.9986. This new layer-by-layer biosensor based on graphene films promises many practical applications.

  3. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Cimen, Furkan; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-07-21

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V{sub t} shift (4 V) at low operating voltage (6/−6 V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10{sup 4} cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V{sub t} shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V{sub t} shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E ≥ 5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  4. Growth of homogeneous single-layer graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Da; Lu, Zitong; Guo, Qinglei; Ye, Lin; Wei, Xing; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Su

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the commonly used chemical vapor deposition growth that leads to multilayer graphene formation by carbon segregation from the Ni bulk, we designed a Ni-Ge binary system to directly grow graphene film on Ni-Ge binary substrate, via chemical vapor deposition with methane and hydrogen gas as precursors. Our system fully overcomes the fundamental limitations of Ni and yields homogenous single layer graphene over large areas. The chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Ni-Ge binary substrate shows that self limiting monolayer graphene growth can be obtained on these substrate.

  5. Precise Control of the Number of Layers of Graphene by Picosecond Laser Thinning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhe; Ye, Xiaohui; Han, Jinpeng; Chen, Qiao; Fan, Peixun; Zhang, Hongjun; Xie, Dan; Zhu, Hongwei; Zhong, Minlin

    2015-01-01

    The properties of graphene can vary as a function of the number of layers (NOL). Controlling the NOL in large area graphene is still challenging. In this work, we demonstrate a picosecond (ps) laser thinning removal of graphene layers from multi-layered graphene to obtain desired NOL when appropriate pulse threshold energy is adopted. The thinning process is conducted in atmosphere without any coating and it is applicable for graphene films on arbitrary substrates. This method provides many advantages such as one-step process, non-contact operation, substrate and environment-friendly, and patternable, which will enable its potential applications in the manufacturing of graphene-based electronic devices. PMID:26111758

  6. Atomic-layer deposition of cadmium chalcogenides on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhovskii, Yu. K.

    2014-09-01

    The results of studies of the synthesis of ultrafine layers of cadmium selenide and telluride by atomic-layer deposition on the silicon surface of different orientations were summarized. The main tendencies of the chemisorption of the components and conditions of layer growth during the formation of nanostructures of these compounds were determined.

  7. Synthesis and Characterizations of Two-Dimensional Atomic Layers and Their Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Hsien

    2015-03-01

    Monolayers of van der Waals (vdw) materials, including graphene, h-BN, and MoS2, have been highlighted regarding both scientific and industrial aspects due to novel physical phenomenon inherited from the reduced dimensionality. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) atomic layers, being considered as the thinnest semiconductor, exhibit great potential for advanced nano-devices. Monolayer in the class of offered a burgeoning field in fundamental physics, energy harvesting, electronics and optoelectronics. Recently, atomically thin heterostructures of TMD monolayer with various geometrical and energy band alignments are expected to be the key materials for next generation flexible optoelectronics. The individual TMD monolayers can be adjoined vertically or laterally to construct diverse heterostructures which are difficult to reach with the laborious pick up-and-transfer method of the exfoliated flakes. The ability to produce copious amounts of high quality layered heterostructures on diverse surfaces is highly desirable but it has remained a challenging issue. Here, we have achieved a direct synthesis of various heterostructures of monolayer TMDs. The synthesis was performed using ambient-pressure CVD with aromatic molecules as seeding promoters. We discuss possible growth behaviors, and we examine the symmetry and the interface of these heterostructures using optical analysis and atomic-resolution scanning TEM. Our method offers a controllable synthesis of to obtain high-quality heterostructures of TMD atomic layers with diverse interface geometry.

  8. An analysis of electrochemical energy storage using electrodes fabricated from atomically thin 2D structures of MoS2, graphene and MoS2/graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffstutler, Jacob D.

    The behavior of 2D materials has become of great interest in the wake of development of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and the discovery of monolayer graphene by Geim and Novoselov. This study aims to analyze the response variance of 2D electrode materials for EDLCs prepared through the liquid-phase exfoliation method when subjected to differing conditions. Once exfoliated, samples are tested with a series of structural characterization methods, including tunneling electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A new ionic liquid for EDLC use, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate is compared in performance to 6M potassium hydroxide aqueous electrolyte. Devices composed of liquid-phase exfoliated graphene / MoS2 composites are analyzed by concentration for ideal performance. Device performance under cold extreme temperatures for the ionic fluid is presented as well. A brief overview of by-layer analysis of graphene electrode materials is presented as-is. All samples were tested with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, with good capacitive results. The evolution of electrochemical behavior through the altered parameters is tracked as well.

  9. Layer-selective half-metallicity in bilayer graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Gi Wan; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2015-05-01

    Half-metallicity recently predicted in the zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) and the hydrogenated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) enables fully spin-polarized electric currents, providing a basis for carbon-based spintronics. In both carbon systems, the half-metallicity arises from the edge-localized electron states under an electric field, lowering the critical electric field Dc for the half-metallicity being an issue in recent works on ZGNRs. A properly chosen direction of the electric field alone has been predicted to significantly reduce Dc in the hydrogenated CNTs, which in this work turned out to be the case in narrow bilayer ZGNRs (biZGNRs). Here, our simple model based on the electrostatic potential difference between the edges predicts that for wide biZGNRs of width greater than ~2.0 nm (10 zigzag carbon chains), only one layer of the biZGNRs becomes half-metallic leaving the other layer insulating as confirmed by our density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The electric field-induced switching of the spin-polarized current path is believed to open a new route to graphene-based spintronics applications.

  10. Prediction of structural and mechanical properties of atom-decorated porous graphene via density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Reza; Ajori, Shahram; Malakpour, Sina

    2016-04-01

    The considerable demand for novel materials with specific properties has motivated the researchers to synthesize supramolecular nanostructures through different methods. Porous graphene is the first two-dimensional hydrocarbon synthesized quite recently. This investigation is aimed at studying the mechanical properties of atom-decorated (functionalized) porous graphene by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculation within both local density approximations (LDA) and generalized gradient approximations (GGA). The atoms are selected from period 3 of periodic table as well as Li and O atom from period 2. The results reveal that metallic atoms and noble gases are adsorbed physically on porous graphene and nonmetallic ones form chemical bonds with carbon atom in porous graphene structure. Also, it is shown that, in general, atom decoration reduces the values of mechanical properties such as Young's, bulk and shear moduli as well as Poisson's ratio, and this reduction is more considerable in the case of nonmetallic atoms (chemical adsorption), especially oxygen atoms, as compared to metallic atoms and noble gases (physical adsorption).

  11. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on atomically-thin graphene chemical patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mikael, Solomon; Suh, Hyo Seon; Liu, Chi-Chun; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong; Arnold, Michael S.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-08-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a scalable method to fabricate well-ordered patterns over the wafer scale with feature sizes below the resolution of conventional lithography. Typically, lithographically-defined prepatterns with varying chemical contrast are used to rationally guide the assembly of block copolymers. The directed self-assembly to obtain accurate registration and alignment is largely influenced by the assembly kinetics. Furthermore, a considerably broad processing window is favored for industrial manufacturing. Using an atomically-thin layer of graphene on germanium, after two simple processing steps, we create a novel chemical pattern to direct the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). Faster assembly kinetics are observed on graphene/germanium chemical patterns than on conventional chemical patterns based on polymer mats and brushes. This new chemical pattern allows for assembly on a wide range of guiding periods and along designed 90° bending structures. We also achieve density multiplication by a factor of 10, greatly enhancing the pattern resolution. The rapid assembly kinetics, minimal topography, and broad processing window demonstrate the advantages of inorganic chemical patterns composed of hard surfaces.

  12. Quantized edge modes in atomic-scale point contacts in graphene.

    PubMed

    Kinikar, Amogh; Phanindra Sai, T; Bhattacharyya, Semonti; Agarwala, Adhip; Biswas, Tathagata; Sarker, Sanjoy K; Krishnamurthy, H R; Jain, Manish; Shenoy, Vijay B; Ghosh, Arindam

    2017-04-03

    The zigzag edges of single- or few-layer graphene are perfect one-dimensional conductors owing to a set of gapless states that are topologically protected against backscattering. Direct experimental evidence of these states has been limited so far to their local thermodynamic and magnetic properties, determined by the competing effects of edge topology and electron-electron interaction. However, experimental signatures of edge-bound electrical conduction have remained elusive, primarily due to the lack of graphitic nanostructures with low structural and/or chemical edge disorder. Here, we report the experimental detection of edge-mode electrical transport in suspended atomic-scale constrictions of single and multilayer graphene created during nanomechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The edge-mode transport leads to the observed quantization of conductance close to multiples of G0 = 2e(2)/h. At the same time, conductance plateaux at G0/2 and a split zero-bias anomaly in non-equilibrium transport suggest conduction via spin-polarized states in the presence of an electron-electron interaction.

  13. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on atomically-thin graphene chemical patterns

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mikael, Solomon; Suh, Hyo Seon; Liu, Chi-Chun; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong; Arnold, Michael S.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a scalable method to fabricate well-ordered patterns over the wafer scale with feature sizes below the resolution of conventional lithography. Typically, lithographically-defined prepatterns with varying chemical contrast are used to rationally guide the assembly of block copolymers. The directed self-assembly to obtain accurate registration and alignment is largely influenced by the assembly kinetics. Furthermore, a considerably broad processing window is favored for industrial manufacturing. Using an atomically-thin layer of graphene on germanium, after two simple processing steps, we create a novel chemical pattern to direct the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). Faster assembly kinetics are observed on graphene/germanium chemical patterns than on conventional chemical patterns based on polymer mats and brushes. This new chemical pattern allows for assembly on a wide range of guiding periods and along designed 90° bending structures. We also achieve density multiplication by a factor of 10, greatly enhancing the pattern resolution. The rapid assembly kinetics, minimal topography, and broad processing window demonstrate the advantages of inorganic chemical patterns composed of hard surfaces. PMID:27528258

  14. Mechanical properties of graphene cantilever from atomic force microscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Rasuli, R; Iraji Zad, A; Ahadian, M M

    2010-05-07

    We have studied the mechanical properties of a few-layer graphene cantilever (FLGC) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical properties of the suspended FLGC over an open hole have been derived from the AFM data. Force displacement curves using the Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov (DMT) and the massless cantilever beam models yield a Young modulus of E(c) approximately 37, E(a) approximately 0.7 TPa and a Hamakar constant of approximately 3 x 10( - 18) J. The threshold force to shear the FLGC was determined from a breaking force and modeling. In addition, we studied a graphene nanoribbon (GNR), which is a system similar to the FLGC; using density functional theory (DFT). The in-plane Young's modulus for the GNRs were calculated from the DFT outcomes approximately 0.82 TPa and the results were compared with the experiment. We found that the Young's modulus and the threshold shearing force are dependent on the direction of applied force and the values are different for zigzag edge and armchair edge GNRs.

  15. Slidable atomic layers in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yu; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2017-04-01

    We report the preparation and manipulation of slidable atomic layers in clean, incommensurate van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures. Monolayer and multilayer WS2 grains are grown on graphite and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) via chemical vapor deposition, and these grains can slide smoothly on graphite and hBN surfaces by manipulation with a tip. Furthermore, this sliding process allows the suspension, tearing, stacking, and connection of the atomic layers. These results demonstrate a novel approach for developing a wide variety of atomic-layer heterostructures with tunable interlayer coupling and an ideal system for studying the superlubricity of incommensurate, highly clean vdW contacts.

  16. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  17. Measuring graphene adhesion using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhu, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the mechanism of graphene adhesion and can readily extend to the adhesion measurement for other 2D nanomaterials.Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the

  18. Kapitza Resistance between Few-Layer Graphene and Water: Liquid Layering Effects.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Dmitry; Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens H; Giapis, Konstantinos P; Angelikopoulos, Panagiotis; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2015-09-09

    The Kapitza resistance (RK) between few-layer graphene (FLG) and water was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The RK was found to depend on the number of the layers in the FLG though, surprisingly, not on the water block thickness. This distinct size dependence is attributed to the large difference in the phonon mean free path between the FLG and water. Remarkably, RK is strongly dependent on the layering of water adjacent to the FLG, exhibiting an inverse proportionality relationship to the peak density of the first water layer, which is consistent with better acoustic phonon matching between FLG and water. These findings suggest novel ways to engineer the thermal transport properties of solid-liquid interfaces by controlling and regulating the liquid layering at the interface.

  19. A hybrid Mg-Al layered double hydroxide/graphene nanostructure obtained via hydrothermal synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Cao, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Jun; Hu, Guo-Hua; Dang, Zhi-Min

    2014-06-01

    A hybrid Mg-Al layered double hydroxide/graphene (LDH-GR) material nanostructure has been fabricated by employing the hydrothermal treatment at 140 °C for 10 h. Graphene oxide is simultaneously reduced to graphene during the hydrothermal treatment. The LDH and LDH-GR have high degree of crystallinity and assembled layer structure, which is attributed to electrostatic interaction mechanism. The obtained hybrid nanostructure materials can be used as flame retardant or conductor of electricity and heat due to the combination of different properties arising from graphene and LDH.

  20. Low-frequency phonons of few-layer graphene within a tight-binding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Valentin N.; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Few-layer graphene is a layered carbon material with covalent bonding in the layers and weak van der Waals interactions between the layers. The interlayer energy is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the intralayer one, which hinders the description of the static and dynamic properties within electron band structure models. We overcome this difficulty by introducing two sets of matrix elements—one set for the covalent bonds in the graphene layers and another one for the van der Waals interactions between adjacent graphene layers in a tight-binding model of the band structure. Both sets of matrix elements are derived from an ab initio study on carbon dimers. The matrix elements are applied in the calculation of the phonon dispersion of graphite and few-layer graphene with AB and ABC layer stacking. The results for few-layer graphene with AB stacking agree well with the available experimental data, which justifies the application of the matrix elements to other layered carbon structures with van der Waals interactions such as few-layer graphene nanoribbons, multiwall carbon nanotubes, and carbon onions.

  1. Electrical Double Layer Capacitance in a Graphene-embedded Al2O3 Gate Dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Ki Min, Bok; Kim, Seong K.; Jun Kim, Seong; Ho Kim, Sung; Kang, Min-A; Park, Chong-Yun; Song, Wooseok; Myung, Sung; Lim, Jongsun; An, Ki-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Graphene heterostructures are of considerable interest as a new class of electronic devices with exceptional performance in a broad range of applications has been realized. Here, we propose a graphene-embedded Al2O3 gate dielectric with a relatively high dielectric constant of 15.5, which is about 2 times that of Al2O3, having a low leakage current with insertion of tri-layer graphene. In this system, the enhanced capacitance of the hybrid structure can be understood by the formation of a space charge layer at the graphene/Al2O3 interface. The electrical properties of the interface can be further explained by the electrical double layer (EDL) model dominated by the diffuse layer. PMID:26530817

  2. Electrical Double Layer Capacitance in a Graphene-embedded Al2O3 Gate Dielectric.

    PubMed

    Ki Min, Bok; Kim, Seong K; Jun Kim, Seong; Ho Kim, Sung; Kang, Min-A; Park, Chong-Yun; Song, Wooseok; Myung, Sung; Lim, Jongsun; An, Ki-Seok

    2015-11-04

    Graphene heterostructures are of considerable interest as a new class of electronic devices with exceptional performance in a broad range of applications has been realized. Here, we propose a graphene-embedded Al2O3 gate dielectric with a relatively high dielectric constant of 15.5, which is about 2 times that of Al2O3, having a low leakage current with insertion of tri-layer graphene. In this system, the enhanced capacitance of the hybrid structure can be understood by the formation of a space charge layer at the graphene/Al2O3 interface. The electrical properties of the interface can be further explained by the electrical double layer (EDL) model dominated by the diffuse layer.

  3. Enhanced ultra-low-frequency interlayer shear modes in folded graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting

    2014-08-01

    Few-layer graphene has attracted tremendous attention owing to its exceptional electronic properties inherited from single-layer graphene and new features led by introducing extra freedoms such as interlayer stacking sequences or rotations. Effectively probing interlayer shear modes are critical for unravelling mechanical and electrical properties of few-layer graphene and further developing its practical potential. Unfortunately, shear modes are extremely weak and almost fully blocked by a Rayleigh rejecter in Raman measurements. This greatly hinders investigations of shear modes in few-layer graphene. Here, we demonstrate enhancing of shear modes by properly folding few-layer graphene. As a direct benefit of the strong signal, enhancement mechanism, vibrational symmetry, anharmonicity and electron-phonon coupling of the shear modes are uncovered through studies of Raman mapping, polarization- and temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy. This work complements Raman studies of graphene layers, and paves an efficient way to exploit low-frequency shear modes of few-layer graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials.

  4. Semiconducting properties of bilayer graphene modulated by an electric field for next-generation atomic-film electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, K.; Li, S.-L.; Miyazaki, H.; Aparecido-Ferreira, A.; Nakaharai, S.

    2014-03-01

    A practical wide bandgap was induced in bilayer graphene using a perpendicular electric field. A self-assembled gate insulator was used to apply a large electric field. The wide bandgap allows the operation of fundamental logic gates composed of bilayer graphene transistors. The results reviewed here indicate the potential for graphene electronics to be realized as emerging transistors with an atomically thin semiconductor.

  5. Graphene-like two-dimensional layered nanomaterials: applications in biosensors and nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guohai; Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Zhu, Junjie; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology provides promising opportunities for various important applications. The recent discovery of atomically-thick two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials can offer manifold perspectives to construct versatile devices with high-performance to satisfy multiple requirements. Many studies directed at graphene have stimulated renewed interest on graphene-like 2D layered nanomaterials (GLNs). GLNs including boron nitride nanosheets, graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2 and WS2) have attracted significant interest in numerous research fields from physics and chemistry to biology and engineering, which has led to numerous interdisciplinary advances in nano science. Benefiting from the unique physical and chemical properties (e.g. strong mechanical strength, high surface area, unparalleled thermal conductivity, remarkable biocompatibility and ease of functionalization), these 2D layered nanomaterials have shown great potential in biochemistry and biomedicine. This review summarizes recent advances of GLNs in applications of biosensors and nanomedicine, including electrochemical biosensors, optical biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and cancer therapy. Current challenges and future perspectives in these rapidly developing areas are also outlined. It is expected that they will have great practical foundation in biomedical applications with future efforts.

  6. Graphene as a transparent conducting and surface field layer in planar Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mehta, Bodh R; Bhatnagar, Mehar; S, Ravi; Mahapatra, Silika; Salkalachen, Saji; Jhawar, Pratha

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation-based study on the application of graphene as a transparent conducting layer on a planar and untextured crystalline p-n silicon solar cell. A high-quality monolayer graphene with 97% transparency and 350 Ω/□ sheet resistance grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method was transferred onto planar Si cells. An increase in efficiency from 5.38% to 7.85% was observed upon deposition of graphene onto Si cells, which further increases to 8.94% upon SiO2 deposition onto the graphene/Si structure. A large increase in photon conversion efficiency as a result of graphene deposition shows that the electronic interaction and the presence of an electric field at the graphene/Si interface together play an important role in this improvement and additionally lead to a reduction in series resistance due to the conducting nature of graphene.

  7. Nanoprocessing of layered crystalline materials by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Shojiro; Wang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    By taking advantage of the mechanical anisotropy of crystalline materials, processing at a single-layer level can be realized for layered crystalline materials with periodically weak bonds. Mica (muscovite), graphite, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and boron nitride have layered structures, and there is little interaction between the cleavage planes existing in the basal planes of these materials. Moreover, it is easy to image the atoms on the basal plane, where the processed shape can be observed on the atomic level. This study reviews research evaluating the nanometer-scale wear and friction as well as the nanometer-scale mechanical processing of muscovite using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It also summarizes recent AFM results obtained by our research group regarding the atomic-scale mechanical processing of layered materials including mica, graphite, MoS2, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  8. Plasma assisted fabrication of multi-layer graphene/nickel hybrid film as enhanced micro-supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Q.; Li, W. L.; Zhao, W. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Xing, Y. P.; Li, X.; Xue, T.; Qi, W.; Zhang, K. L.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhao, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    A facile synthesis strategy has been developed for fabricating multi-layer graphene/nickel hybrid film as micro-supercapacitor electrodes by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The as-presented method is advantageous for rapid graphene growth at relatively low temperature of 650 °C. In addition, after pre-treating for the as-deposited nickel film by using argon plasma bombardment, the surface-to-volume ratio of graphene film on the treated nickel substrate is effectively increased by the increasing of surface roughness. This is demonstrated by the characterization results from transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy. Moreover, the electrochemical performance of the resultant graphene/nickel hybrid film as micro-supercapacitor working electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements. It was found that the increase of the surface-to-volume ratio of graphene/nickel hybrid film improved the specific capacitance of 10 times as the working electrode of micro-supercapacitor. Finally, by using comb columnar shadow mask pattern, the micro-supercapacitor full cell device was fabricated. The electrochemical performance measurements of the micro-supercapacitor devices indicate that the method presented in this study provides an effective way to fabricate micro-supercapacitor device with enhanced energy storage property.

  9. Ionic liquid-assisted exfoliation and dispersion: stripping graphene and its two-dimensional layered inorganic counterparts of their inhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravula, Sudhir; Baker, Sheila N.; Kamath, Ganesh; Baker, Gary A.

    2015-02-01

    Research on graphene--monolayers of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice--is proceeding at a relentless pace as scientists of both experimental and theoretical bents seek to explore and exploit its superlative attributes, including giant intrinsic charge mobility, record-setting thermal conductivity, and high fracture strength and Young's modulus. Of course, fully exploiting the remarkable properties of graphene requires reliable, large-scale production methods which are non-oxidative and introduce minimal defects, criteria not fully satisfied by current approaches. A major advance in this direction is ionic liquid-assisted exfoliation and dispersion of graphite, leading to the isolation of few- and single-layered graphene sheets with yields two orders of magnitude higher than the earlier liquid-assisted exfoliation approaches using surface energy-matched solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). In this Minireview, we discuss the emerging use of ionic liquids for the practical exfoliation, dispersion, and modification of graphene nanosheets. These developments lay the foundation for strategies seeking to overcome the many challenges faced by current liquid-phase exfoliation approaches. Early computational and experimental results clearly indicate that these same approaches can readily be extended to inorganic graphene analogues (e.g., BN, MoX2 (X = S, Se, Te), WS2, TaSe2, NbSe2, NiTe2, and Bi2Te3) as well.

  10. Spin and valley resolved Landau level crossing in tri-layer ABA stacked graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Biswajit; Gupta, Vishakha; Borah, Abhinandan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deshmukh, Mandar

    We present quantum Hall measurements on a high quality encapsulated tri-layer graphene device. Low temperature field effect mobility of this device is around 500,000 cm2/Vs and we see SdH oscillations at a magnetic field as low as 0.3 T. Quantum Hall measurements confirm that the chosen tri layer graphene is Bernal (ABA) stacked. Due to the presence of both mass-less monolayer like Dirac fermions and massive bi-layer like Dirac fermions in Bernal stacked tri-layer graphene, there are Landau level crossings between monolayer and bi-layer bands in quantum Hall regime. Although most of the Landau Level crossings are predominantly present on the electron sides, we also observe signatures of the crossings on the hole side. This behaviour is consistent with the asymmetry of electron and hole in ABA tri-layer graphene. We observe a series of crossings of the spin and valley resolved Landau Levels.

  11. Robust adhesion of flower-like few-layer graphene nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shibing; Li, Lin; Sun, Wangning; Xia, Xiaoxiang; Han, Dong; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured surface possessing ultrahigh adhesion like ``gecko foot'' or ``rose petal'' can offer more opportunities for bionic application. We grow flower-like few-layer graphene on silicon nanocone arrays to form graphene nanoclusters, showing robust adhesion. Their contact angle (CA) is 164° with a hysteresis CA of 155° and adhesive force for a 5 μL water droplet is about 254 μN that is far larger than present reported results. We bring experimental evidences that this great adhesion depends on large-area plentiful edges of graphene nanosheets tuned by conical nanostructure and intrinsic wetting features of graphene. Such new hierarchical few-layer graphene nanostructure provides a feasible strategy to understand the ultra-adhesive mechanism of the ``gecko effect'' or ``rose effect'' and enhance the wettability of graphene for many practical applications.

  12. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Que, Yande D.; Tao, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yeliang L.; Wu, Lijun J.; Zhu, Yimei M.; Kim, Kisslinger; Weinl, Michael; Schreck, Matthias; Shen, Chengmin M.; Du, Shixuan X.; Liu, Yunqi Q.; Gao, H. -J.; Huang, Li; Xu, Wenyan Y.

    2015-01-20

    Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal crystals, such as Ru,⁽¹⁻³⁾ Ir,⁽⁴⁻⁶⁾ and Ni,⁽⁷⁾ provides large-area, uniform graphene layers with controllable defect density, which is crucial for practical applications in future devices. To decrease the high cost of single-crystalline metal bulks, single-crystalline metal films are strongly suggested as the substrates for epitaxial growth large-scale high-quality graphene.⁽⁸⁻¹⁰⁾ Moreover, in order to weaken the interactions of graphene with its metal host, which may result in a suppression of the intrinsic properties of graphene,⁽¹¹ ¹²⁾ the method of element intercalation of semiconductors at the interface between an epitaxial graphene layer and a transition metal substrate has been successfully realized.⁽¹³⁻¹⁶⁾

  13. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Que, Yande D.; Tao, Jing; Zhang, Yong; ...

    2015-01-20

    Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal crystals, such as Ru,⁽¹⁻³⁾ Ir,⁽⁴⁻⁶⁾ and Ni,⁽⁷⁾ provides large-area, uniform graphene layers with controllable defect density, which is crucial for practical applications in future devices. To decrease the high cost of single-crystalline metal bulks, single-crystalline metal films are strongly suggested as the substrates for epitaxial growth large-scale high-quality graphene.⁽⁸⁻¹⁰⁾ Moreover, in order to weaken the interactions of graphene with its metal host, which may result in a suppression of the intrinsic properties of graphene,⁽¹¹ ¹²⁾ the method of element intercalation of semiconductors at the interface between an epitaxial graphene layer and a transitionmore » metal substrate has been successfully realized.⁽¹³⁻¹⁶⁾« less

  14. Determination of the geometric corrugation of graphene on SiC(0001) by grazing incidence fast atom diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zugarramurdi, A.; Debiossac, M.; Lunca-Popa, P.; Mayne, A. J.; Borisov, A. G.; Mu, Z.; Roncin, P.; Khemliche, H.; Momeni, A.

    2015-03-09

    We present a grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD) study of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). This system shows a Moiré-like 13 × 13 superlattice above the reconstructed carbon buffer layer. The averaging property of GIFAD results in electronic and geometric corrugations that are well decoupled; the graphene honeycomb corrugation is only observed with the incident beam parallel to the zigzag direction while the geometric corrugation arising from the superlattice is revealed along the armchair direction. Full-quantum calculations of the diffraction patterns show the very high GIFAD sensitivity to the amplitude of the surface corrugation. The best agreement between the calculated and measured diffraction intensities yields a corrugation height of 0.27 ± 0.03 Å.

  15. Cutting forces related with lattice orientations of graphene using an atomic force microscopy based nanorobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yang; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Ma, Laipeng; Dong, Zaili; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C.

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between cutting forces and lattice orientations of monolayer graphene is investigated by using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanorobot. In the beginning, the atomic resolution image of the graphene lattice is obtained by using an AFM. Then, graphene cutting experiments are performed with sample rotation method, which gets rid of the tip effect completely. The experimental results show that the cutting force along the armchair orientation is larger than the force along the zigzag orientation, and the cutting forces are almost identical every 60°, which corresponds well with the 60° symmetry in graphene honeycomb lattice structure. By using Poisson analysis method, the single cutting force along zigzag orientation is 3.9 nN, and the force along armchair is 20.5 nN. This work lays the experimental foundation to build a close-loop fabrication strategy with real-time force as a feedback sensor to control the cutting direction.

  16. Atomically precise edge chlorination of nanographenes and its application in graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yuan-Zhi; Yang, Bo; Parvez, Khaled; Narita, Akimitsu; Osella, Silvio; Beljonne, David; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Chemical functionalization is one of the most powerful and widely used strategies to control the properties of nanomaterials, particularly in the field of graphene. However, the ill-defined structure of the present functionalized graphene inhibits atomically precise structural characterization and structure-correlated property modulation. Here we present a general edge chlorination protocol for atomically precise functionalization of nanographenes at different scales from 1.2 to 3.4 nm and its application in graphene nanoribbons. The well-defined edge chlorination is unambiguously confirmed by X-ray single-crystal analysis, which also discloses the characteristic non-planar molecular shape and detailed bond lengths of chlorinated nanographenes. Chlorinated nanographenes and graphene nanoribbons manifest enhanced solution processability associated with decreases in the optical band gap and frontier molecular orbital energy levels, exemplifying the structure-correlated property modulation by precise edge chlorination. PMID:24212200

  17. Determining charge state of graphene vacancy by noncontact atomic force microscopy and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Weinert, M; Li, L

    2015-01-21

    Graphene vacancies are engineered for novel functionalities, however, the charge state of these defects, the key parameter that is vital to charge transfer during chemical reactions and carrier scattering, is generally unknown. Here, we carried out atomic resolution imaging of graphene vacancy defects created by Ar plasma using noncontact atomic force microscopy, and made the first determination of their charge state by local contact potential difference measurements. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we show that graphene vacancies are typically positively charged, with size-dependent charge states that are not necessarily integer-valued. These findings provide new insights into carrier scattering by vacancy defects in graphene, as well as its functionalization for chemical sensing and catalysis, and underline the tunability of these functions by controlling the size of vacancy defect.

  18. Quantum-confined electronic states in atomically well-defined graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Sampsa K; Sun, Zhixiang; Boneschanscher, Mark P; Uppstu, Andreas; Ijäs, Mari; Harju, Ari; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Liljeroth, Peter

    2011-12-02

    Despite the enormous interest in the properties of graphene and the potential of graphene nanostructures in electronic applications, the study of quantum-confined states in atomically well-defined graphene nanostructures remains an experimental challenge. Here, we study graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with well-defined edges in the zigzag direction, grown by chemical vapor deposition on an Ir(111) substrate by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We measure the atomic structure and local density of states of individual GQDs as a function of their size and shape in the range from a couple of nanometers up to ca. 20 nm. The results can be quantitatively modeled by a relativistic wave equation and atomistic tight-binding calculations. The observed states are analogous to the solutions of the textbook "particle-in-a-box" problem applied to relativistic massless fermions.

  19. Strain engineering of Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate through molecular dynamics simulations that the Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene (FLG) can be controlled by applying mechanical strain. For unstrained FLG, the Kapitza resistance decreases with the increase of thickness and reaches an asymptotic value of 6 × 10(-10) m(2)K/W at a thickness about 16 nm. Uniaxial cross-plane strain is found to increase the Kapitza resistance in FLG monotonically, when the applied strain varies from compressive to tensile. Moreover, uniaxial strain couples the in-plane and out-of-plane strain/stress when the surface of FLG is buckled. We find that with a compressive cross-plane stress of 2 GPa, the Kapitza resistance is reduced by about 50%. On the other hand it is almost tripled with a tensile cross-plane stress of 1 GPa. Remarkably, compressive in-plane strain can either increase or reduce the Kapitza resistance, depending on the specific way it is applied. Our study suggests that graphene can be exploited for both heat dissipation and insulation through strain engineering.

  20. Unraveling the 3D Atomic Structure of a Suspended Graphene/hBN van der Waals Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Argentero, Giacomo; Mittelberger, Andreas; Reza Ahmadpour Monazam, Mohammad; Cao, Yang; Pennycook, Timothy J; Mangler, Clemens; Kramberger, Christian; Kotakoski, Jani; Geim, A K; Meyer, Jannik C

    2017-03-08

    In this work we demonstrate that a free-standing van der Waals heterostructure, usually regarded as a flat object, can exhibit an intrinsic buckled atomic structure resulting from the interaction between two layers with a small lattice mismatch. We studied a freely suspended membrane of well-aligned graphene on a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) monolayer by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). We developed a detection method in the STEM that is capable of recording the direction of the scattered electron beam and that is extremely sensitive to the local stacking of atoms. A comparison between experimental data and simulated models shows that the heterostructure effectively bends in the out-of-plane direction, producing an undulated structure having a periodicity that matches the moiré wavelength. We attribute this rippling to the interlayer interaction and also show how this affects the intralayer strain in each layer.

  1. Unraveling the 3D Atomic Structure of a Suspended Graphene/hBN van der Waals Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argentero, Giacomo; Mittelberger, Andreas; Reza Ahmadpour Monazam, Mohammad; Cao, Yang; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Mangler, Clemens; Kramberger, Christian; Kotakoski, Jani; Geim, A. K.; Meyer, Jannik C.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we demonstrate that a free-standing van der Waals heterostructure, usually regarded as a flat object, can exhibit an intrinsic buckled atomic structure resulting from the interaction between two layers with a small lattice mismatch. We studied a freely suspended membrane of well aligned graphene on a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) monolayer by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). We developed a detection method in the STEM that is capable of recording the direction of the scattered electron beam and that is extremely sensitive to the local stacking of atoms. Comparison between experimental data and simulated models shows that the heterostructure effectively bends in the out-of-plane direction, producing an undulated structure having a periodicity that matches the moir\\'e wavelength. We attribute this rippling to the interlayer interaction and also show how this affects the intralayer strain in each layer.

  2. Unraveling the 3D Atomic Structure of a Suspended Graphene/hBN van der Waals Heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that a free-standing van der Waals heterostructure, usually regarded as a flat object, can exhibit an intrinsic buckled atomic structure resulting from the interaction between two layers with a small lattice mismatch. We studied a freely suspended membrane of well-aligned graphene on a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) monolayer by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). We developed a detection method in the STEM that is capable of recording the direction of the scattered electron beam and that is extremely sensitive to the local stacking of atoms. A comparison between experimental data and simulated models shows that the heterostructure effectively bends in the out-of-plane direction, producing an undulated structure having a periodicity that matches the moiré wavelength. We attribute this rippling to the interlayer interaction and also show how this affects the intralayer strain in each layer. PMID:28140602

  3. Symmetry breaking in graphene layers on SiC-substrate—an ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. K.; Agrawal, S.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive detailed ab-initio study of the electronic structure of 1-7 graphene layers on the polar SiC (0 0 0 1) substrate systems has been performed for the first time. We observe a symmetry-breaking in all the graphene-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrate systems leading to an opening of band gap in contrast to the existence of zero band gap seen in the isolated graphene layer. The planar lattice parameter in graphene-SiC system decreases with the number of graphene layers from 3.051 Å to 2.948 Å showing an overall decrease of 3.5% and it approaches toward the bulk graphite. The electronic structure of the graphene layer-SiC system depends crucially on the planar lattice parameter and both the band gap and the location of the Dirac point are affected drastically. The band gap and the depth of the Dirac point below the Fermi level decrease with the number of graphene layers in conformity with the recent ARPES experiments of Zhou et al. The present results in some graphene-SiC systems are seen to be different from the earlier theoretical results reported in the literature.

  4. Programmable hydrogenation of graphene for novel nanocages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liuyang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Wang, Xianqiao

    2013-11-01

    Folded graphene has exhibited novel electrical and mechanical properties unmatched by pristine graphene, which implies that morphology of graphene adds the dimensionality of design space to tailor its properties. However, how to overcome the energy barrier of the folding process to fold the graphene with the specific morphology remains unexplored. Here we propose a programmable chemical functionalization by doping a pristine graphene sheet in a certain pattern with hydrogen atoms to precisely control its folding morphology. Molecular dynamics simulation has been performed to create a cross-shaped cubic graphene nanocage encapsulating a biomolecule by warping the top graphene layer downward and the bottom graphene layer upward to mimic the drug delivery vehicle. Such a paradigm, programmable enabled graphene nanocage, opens up a new avenue to control the 3D architecture of folded graphene and therefore provides a feasible way to exploit and fabricate the graphene-based unconventional nanomaterials and nanodevices for drug delivery.

  5. Size-controlled InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs with an ITO/graphene transparent layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jae-Phil; Seong, Won-Seok; Min, Jung-Hong; Kong, Duk-Jo; Seo, Dong-Ju; Kim, Hyung-jun; Lee, Dong-Seon

    2016-11-01

    We introduce ITO on graphene as a current-spreading layer for separated InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs for the purpose of passivation-free and high light-extraction efficiency. Transferred graphene on InGaN/GaN nanorods effectively blocks the diffusion of ITO atoms to nanorods, facilitating the production of transparent ITO/graphene contact on parallel-nanorod LEDs, without filling the air gaps, like a bridge structure. The ITO/graphene layer sufficiently spreads current in a lateral direction, resulting in uniform and reliable light emission observed from the whole area of the top surface. Using KOH treatment, we reduce series resistance and reverse leakage current in nanorod LEDs by recovering the plasma-damaged region. We also control the size of the nanorods by varying the KOH treatment time and observe strain relaxation via blueshift in electroluminescence. As a result, bridge-structured LEDs with 8 min of KOH treatment show 15 times higher light-emitting efficiency than with 2 min of KOH treatment.

  6. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Monir; Zakaria, Azmi; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdul Wahab, Zaidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  7. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Monir; Zakaria, Azmi; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdul Wahab, Zaidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene. PMID:27064575

  8. Relaxation Properties of Single Layer Graphene on SiO2 Substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Li, Shuai; Min, Jiaojiao; Shen, Cuili

    2015-04-01

    The relaxation properties of single layer graphene sheet on the SiO2 substrate are investigated through molecular dynamics simulation technique in this article. The graphene sheet models with different aspect ratios on SiO2 substrate are established and sufficiently relaxed at different thermodynamic temperatures. Subsequently, the morphology, equilibrium position and undulation of graphene on SiO2 substrate are discussed. It is observed that after sufficient relaxation processes, all the graphene sheets are adsorbed on SiO2 substrates and have some certain degree of undulations both on the edge and in the inner surface rather than perfect planar structures. Further observation from the simulation results shows that with different initial distances between the graphene sheet and SiO2 substrate, the graphene sheet would eventually stabilize to an identical equilibrium level at the same temperature. In addition, the final average distance between the graphene sheet and the substrate is a constant of 3.44 A at 0.01 K, in close proximity to the value of parameter r in Lennard-Jones potential function, and the higher the temperature is, the larger the final distance becomes. The results also indicate that for the same size of the graphene sheet, the increasing of temperature significantly aggravates the undulation of graphene sheet. With the increase of aspect ratios, the undulation of the graphene sheet is also aggravated, even the graphene sheet would crimp to a certain extent.

  9. Few-layers graphene oxide for NO2 gas sensor on plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Muhammad M.; Isa, Siti S. Mat; Jamlos, M. F.; Murad, S. A. Z.; Isa, M. Mohamad; Kasjoo, S. R.; Ahmad, N.; Nor, N. I. M.; Khalid, N.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum filtration method was used in order to fabricate a homogeneous and uniform thin film of multi-layer graphene oxide on plastic substrate. This self-regulating technique allows the number of graphene oxide layer to be controlled thus controlling the film thickness by simply varying either the concentration of the graphene oxide in the suspension or the filtration volume. Measurement of the sheet resistance as a function of graphene oxide concentration in solution shows the percolation behavior of multi-layer films. The device was then exposed in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) environment at room temperature and 200 °C, under atmospheric pressure. Results demonstrate that the graphene oxide film shows good sensitivity and excellent recovery time using plastic substrate.

  10. Raman Scattering from few-layer Graphene Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Joshi, P.; Srinivas, T.; Eklund, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Few layer-graphene sheet (nGL's) films, where n is the number of graphene layers, are new two-dimensional sp^2 carbon systems that have been shown to produce exciting Fractional Quantum Hall phenomena. We report here on the first Raman scattering (RS) results of nGLs. nGLs with lateral dimensions of ˜1-3 μm were prepared by chemical delamination of graphite flake or HOPG and then transferred from solution onto substrates (mica, pyrex,In/pyrex and Au/pyrex). RS spectra have been collected on nGL's with n=1, 2, 3 and compared with the graphite. Graphite exhibits two E2g interlayer modes at 42 cm-1 and 1582 cm-1. The Raman spectra of (n=1-3) nGLs were found to exhibit peaks at 1350 cm-1 and 1620 cm-1, i.e., near frequencies associated with high phonon density of states. The high frequency E2g band is found to split into two bands when the nGL is supported on metallic substrates (In,Au). In both these cases, we observe bands at 1583 cm-1, ˜1592 cm-1 rather than one band at 1581 cm-1 when the nGL is on insulating pyrex. The splitting of the interlayer band when on metallic substrates is identified with charge transfer between the nGL and the substrate. The phonon density of states scattering observed does not appear to be due to disorder in the basal plane.

  11. Design of graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Rieke, Peter C.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    A series of cathodes using Pt supported onto graphene sheets with different contents of carbon black in the catalyst layer were prepared and characterized. Carbon black was added as a spacer between two-dimensional graphene sheets in the catalyst layer to study its effect on the performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Electrochemical properties and surface morphology of the cathodes with and without carbon black were characterized using cyclic voltammetry, ac-impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical polarization technique, and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that carbon black effectively modifies the array of graphene supports, resulting in more Pt nanoparticles available for electrochemical reaction and better mass transport in the catalyst layer.

  12. Contribution of dielectric screening to the total capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Cheng; Jiang, De-en

    2016-02-17

    We apply joint density functional theory (JDFT), which treats the electrode/electrolyte interface self-consistently, to an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) based on few-layer graphene electrodes. The JDFT approach allows us to quantify a third contribution to the total capacitance beyond quantum capacitance (CQ) and EDL capacitance (CEDL). This contribution arises from the dielectric screening of the electric field by the surface of the few-layer graphene electrode, and we therefore term it the dielectric capacitance (CDielec). We find that CDielec becomes significant in affecting the total capacitance when the number of graphene layers in the electrode is more than three. In conclusion, our investigation sheds new light on the significance of the electrode dielectric screening on the capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes.

  13. Contribution of dielectric screening to the total capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Zhan, Cheng; Jiang, De-en

    2016-02-17

    We apply joint density functional theory (JDFT), which treats the electrode/electrolyte interface self-consistently, to an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) based on few-layer graphene electrodes. The JDFT approach allows us to quantify a third contribution to the total capacitance beyond quantum capacitance (CQ) and EDL capacitance (CEDL). This contribution arises from the dielectric screening of the electric field by the surface of the few-layer graphene electrode, and we therefore term it the dielectric capacitance (CDielec). We find that CDielec becomes significant in affecting the total capacitance when the number of graphene layers in the electrode is more than three. In conclusion,more » our investigation sheds new light on the significance of the electrode dielectric screening on the capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes.« less

  14. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Epitaxy of InAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Clinton B.; Happek, Uwe; Flowers, Billy H., Jr.; Vaidyanathan, Raman; Wade, Travis L.; Stickney, John L.

    1999-11-01

    We report on the electrosynthesis of InAs semiconductor films at room temperature using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy. With this novel technique a semiconductor film can be formed layer by layer, via electrodeposition. An automated thin-layer electrochemical flow cell system is used to deposit InAs. A layer of In is first deposited on a gold cathode from a solution containing ions of In. Using the proper potential, only an atomic layer of material is formed. The solution is then exchanged for one containing As ions, and the second atomic layer (at a different, ion-specific potential) is deposited. These two steps establish a cycle producing a monolayer of the compound. The cycle can be repeated to produce semiconductor films consisting of thousands of layers. The quality of the obtained films is analyzed using x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy probing the bandgap of the material. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation and the University of Georgia Research Foundation.

  15. Low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy of AlN ultrathin films by layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Lee, Wei-Hao; Kao, Wei-Chung; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Lin, Ray-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2017-01-01

    Low-temperature epitaxial growth of AlN ultrathin films was realized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) together with the layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing (ALA), instead of a high growth temperature which is needed in conventional epitaxial growth techniques. By applying the ALA with the Ar plasma treatment in each ALD cycle, the AlN thin film was converted dramatically from the amorphous phase to a single-crystalline epitaxial layer, at a low deposition temperature of 300 °C. The energy transferred from plasma not only provides the crystallization energy but also enhances the migration of adatoms and the removal of ligands, which significantly improve the crystallinity of the epitaxial layer. The X-ray diffraction reveals that the full width at half-maximum of the AlN (0002) rocking curve is only 144 arcsec in the AlN ultrathin epilayer with a thickness of only a few tens of nm. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy also indicates the high-quality single-crystal hexagonal phase of the AlN epitaxial layer on the sapphire substrate. The result opens a window for further extension of the ALD applications from amorphous thin films to the high-quality low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy, which can be exploited in a variety of fields and applications in the near future. PMID:28045075

  16. Low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy of AlN ultrathin films by layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Lee, Wei-Hao; Kao, Wei-Chung; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Lin, Ray-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2017-01-01

    Low-temperature epitaxial growth of AlN ultrathin films was realized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) together with the layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing (ALA), instead of a high growth temperature which is needed in conventional epitaxial growth techniques. By applying the ALA with the Ar plasma treatment in each ALD cycle, the AlN thin film was converted dramatically from the amorphous phase to a single-crystalline epitaxial layer, at a low deposition temperature of 300 °C. The energy transferred from plasma not only provides the crystallization energy but also enhances the migration of adatoms and the removal of ligands, which significantly improve the crystallinity of the epitaxial layer. The X-ray diffraction reveals that the full width at half-maximum of the AlN (0002) rocking curve is only 144 arcsec in the AlN ultrathin epilayer with a thickness of only a few tens of nm. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy also indicates the high-quality single-crystal hexagonal phase of the AlN epitaxial layer on the sapphire substrate. The result opens a window for further extension of the ALD applications from amorphous thin films to the high-quality low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy, which can be exploited in a variety of fields and applications in the near future.

  17. Control of layer stacking in CVD graphene under quasi-static condition.

    PubMed

    Subhedar, Kiran M; Sharma, Indu; Dhakate, Sanjay R

    2015-09-14

    The type of layer stacking in bilayer graphene has a significant influence on its electronic properties because of the contrast nature of layer coupling. Herein, different geometries of the reaction site for the growth of bilayer graphene by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and their effects on the nature of layer stacking are investigated. Micro-Raman mapping and curve fitting analysis confirmed the type of layer stacking for the CVD grown bilayer graphene. The samples grown with sandwiched structure such as quartz/Cu foil/quartz along with a spacer, between the two quartz plates to create a sealed space, resulted in Bernal or AB stacked bilayer graphene while the sample sandwiched without a spacer produced the twisted bilayer graphene. The contrast difference in the layer stacking is a consequence of the difference in the growth mechanism associated with different geometries of the reaction site. The diffusion dominated process under quasi-static control is responsible for the growth of twisted bilayer graphene in sandwiched geometry while surface controlled growth with ample and continual supply of carbon in sandwiched geometry along with a spacer, leads to AB stacked bilayer graphene. Through this new approach, an efficient technique is presented to control the nature of layer stacking.

  18. Large area single and bilayer graphene with controlled orientation for each layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Pasupathy, Abhay; Shen, Kyle; Park, Jiwoong; Cornell Collaboration; Cornell-Columbia Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The creation and exploration of artificial graphene structures has recently become the focus of great interest. In particular, controlling the interlayer twist angles in multilayer graphene stacks allows modulation of the overall band structure. However, producing such a structure remains difficult due to the random distribution of twist angles in as-grown samples. Here we report a novel way for creating large area graphene stacks with a pre-determined twist angle. We first grow single layer graphene whose orientation is aligned over a few cm length scale on copper foil. The overall angle alignment of the graphene is confirmed using low energy electron microscopy (LEED) and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Since the graphene is well aligned over a few centimeters, we can create large area graphene stacks with known twist angle by transferring these graphene layers while controlling the orientation of each layer during transfer. We confirm that the layers are coupled by probing the resulting band structure using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and examining their interlayer optical resonance features using spatially resolved hyperspectral (DUV-Vis-NIR wavelengths). This new method is scalable, and controllable and thus paves the way to explore and exploit the novel properties of two-dimensional crystals in artificial stacks with controlled interlayer structures. Second affiliation: Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science.

  19. Unstacked double-layer templated graphene for high-rate lithium-sulphur batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Tian, Gui-Li; Nie, Jing-Qi; Peng, Hong-Jie; Wei, Fei

    2014-03-03

    Preventing the stacking of graphene is essential to exploiting its full potential in energy-storage applications. The introduction of spacers into graphene layers always results in a change in the intrinsic properties of graphene and/or induces complexity at the interfaces. Here we show the synthesis of an intrinsically unstacked double-layer templated graphene via template-directed chemical vapour deposition. The as-obtained graphene is composed of two unstacked graphene layers separated by a large amount of mesosized protuberances and can be used for high-power lithium-sulphur batteries with excellent high-rate performance. Even after 1,000 cycles, high reversible capacities of ca. 530 mA h g(-1) and 380 mA h g(-1) are retained at 5 C and 10 C, respectively. This type of double-layer graphene is expected to be an important platform that will enable the investigation of stabilized three-dimensional topological porous systems and demonstrate the potential of unstacked graphene materials for advanced energy storage, environmental protection, nanocomposite and healthcare applications.

  20. Unstacked double-layer templated graphene for high-rate lithium-sulphur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Tian, Gui-Li; Nie, Jing-Qi; Peng, Hong-Jie; Wei, Fei

    2014-03-01

    Preventing the stacking of graphene is essential to exploiting its full potential in energy-storage applications. The introduction of spacers into graphene layers always results in a change in the intrinsic properties of graphene and/or induces complexity at the interfaces. Here we show the synthesis of an intrinsically unstacked double-layer templated graphene via template-directed chemical vapour deposition. The as-obtained graphene is composed of two unstacked graphene layers separated by a large amount of mesosized protuberances and can be used for high-power lithium-sulphur batteries with excellent high-rate performance. Even after 1,000 cycles, high reversible capacities of ca. 530 mA h g-1 and 380 mA h g-1 are retained at 5 C and 10 C, respectively. This type of double-layer graphene is expected to be an important platform that will enable the investigation of stabilized three-dimensional topological porous systems and demonstrate the potential of unstacked graphene materials for advanced energy storage, environmental protection, nanocomposite and healthcare applications.

  1. Systematic study on the sensitivity enhancement in graphene plasmonic sensors based on layer-by-layer self-assembled graphene oxide multilayers and their reduced analogues.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyungwha; Rani, Adila; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Yonghwi; Yang, Heejin; Kim, Sang Ouk; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Dong Ha

    2015-01-14

    The use of graphene in conventional plasmonic devices was suggested by several theoretic research studies. However, the existing theoretic studies are not consistent with one another and the experimental studies are still at the initial stage. To reveal the role of graphenes on the plasmonic sensors, we deposited graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films on Au films and their refractive index (RI) sensitivity was compared for the first time in SPR-based sensors. The deposition of GO bilayers with number of deposition L from 1 to 5 was carried out by alternative dipping of Au substrate in positively- and negatively charged GO solutions. The fabrication of layer-by-layer self-assembly of the graphene films was monitored in terms of the SPR angle shift. GO-deposited Au film was treated with hydrazine to reduce the GO. For the rGO-Au sample, 1 bilayer sample showed a higher RI sensitivity than bare Au film, whereas increasing the rGO film from 2 to 5 layers reduced the RI sensitivity. In the case of GO-deposited Au film, the 3 bilayer sample showed the highest sensitivity. The biomolecular sensing was also performed for the graphene multilayer systems using BSA and anti-BSA antibody.

  2. Energetics, diffusion, and magnetic properties of cobalt atom in a monolayer graphene: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Raji, Abdulrafiu T.; Lombardi, Enrico B.

    2015-09-21

    We use ab initio methods to study the binding, diffusion, and magnetic properties of cobalt atom embedded in graphene vacancies. We investigate the diffusion of Co-monovacancy (Co-MV) and Co-divacancy (Co-DV) defect complexes, and determine the minimum energy path (MEP), as well as the activation energy barrier of migration. We obtained similar activation energy barriers, of ∼5.8 eV, for Co-MV and Co-DV diffusion, respectively. Our calculations also suggest that, at electron–irradiation energy of 200 keV as used in a related experiment, the maximum energy transfer to the Co atom, of approximately 9.0 eV is sufficiently high to break metal-carbon bonding. The incident electron energy is also high enough to displace graphene's carbon atoms from their lattice positions. The breaking of metal-carbon bonding and the displacement of graphene atoms may act to facilitate the migration of Co. We conclude therefore that the detrapping and diffusion of cobalt as observed experimentally is likely to be radiation-induced, similar to what has been observed for Au and Fe in electron-irradiated graphene. Furthermore, we show that Co migration in graphene is such that its magnetic moment varies along the diffusion path. The magnetic moment of Co is consistently higher in Co-DV diffusion when compared to that of Co-MV diffusion.

  3. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets film: layer-by-layer electrochemical preparation, characterization and rifampicin sensory application.

    PubMed

    Rastgar, Shokoufeh; Shahrokhian, Saeed

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical deposition, as a well-controlled synthesis procedure, has been used for subsequently layer-by-layer preparation of nickel hydroxide nanoparticle-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (Ni(OH)2-RGO) on a graphene oxide (GO) film pre-cast on a glassy carbon electrode surface. The surface morphology and nature of the nano-hybrid film (Ni(OH)2-RGO) was thoroughly characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. The modified electrode appeared as an effective electro-catalytic model for analysis of rifampicin (RIF) by using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The prepared modified electrode exhibited a distinctly higher activity for electro-oxidation of RIF than either GO, RGO nanosheets or Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles. Enhancement of peak currents is ascribed to the fast heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics that arise from the synergistic coupling between the excellent properties of RGO nanosheets (such as high density of edge plane sites, subtle electronic characteristics and attractive π-π interaction) and unique properties of metal nanoparticles. Under the optimized analysis conditions, the modified electrode showed two oxidation processes for rifampicin at potentials about 0.08 V (peak I) and 0.69 V (peak II) in buffer solution of pH 7.0 with a wide linear dynamic range of 0.006-10.0 µmol L(-1) and 0.04-10 µmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 4.16 nmol L(-1) and 2.34 nmol L(-1) considering peaks I and II as an analytical signal, respectively. The results proved the efficacy of the fabricated modified electrode for simple, low cost and highly sensitive medicine sensor well suited for the accurate determinations of trace amounts of rifampicin in the pharmaceutical and clinical preparations.

  4. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  5. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; ...

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in themore » total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. In conclusion, these multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.« less

  6. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. In conclusion, these multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  7. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-01

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  8. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments. PMID:26902901

  9. Colloidal properties and stability of aqueous suspensions of few-layer graphene: Importance of graphene concentration.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu; Yang, Guoqing; Lu, Kun; Petersen, Elijah J; Mao, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the colloidal stability of graphene is essential for predicting its transport and ecological risks in aquatic environments. We investigated the agglomeration of (14)C-labeled few-layer graphene (FLG) at concentrations spanning nearly four orders of magnitude (2 μg/L to 10 mg/L) using dynamic light scattering and sedimentation measurements. FLG agglomerates formed rapidly in deionized water at concentrations >3 mg/L. From 1 mg/L to 3 mg/L, salt-induced agglomeration was decreased with dilution of FLG suspensions; the critical coagulation concentration of the more concentrated suspension (3 mg/L) was significantly lower than the dilute suspension (1 mg/L) in the presence of NaCl (1.6 mmol/L and 10 mmol/L, respectively). In contrast, FLG underwent slow agglomeration and settling at concentrations ≤0.1 mg/L in NaCl solutions and ambient waters with low ionic strength (<10 mmol/L). FLG nanoparticles with smaller lateral sizes (25 nm-75 nm) were shown to agglomerate more slowly than larger FLG, and these small FLG particles exhibited greater bioaccumulation in zebrafish embryo and stronger chorion penetration ability than larger FLG particles. These findings suggest that FLG at more environmentally relevant concentration is relatively stable and may have implications for exposure of small FLG to ecological receptors.

  10. Compositional characterization of atomic layer deposited alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Anu; Thomas, Subin; Kumar, K. Rajeev

    2014-01-28

    As the microelectronic industry demands feature size in the order of few and sub nanometer regime, the film composition and other film properties become critical issues and ALD has emerged as the choice of industry. Aluminum oxide is a material with wide applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and protective and ion barrier layers. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an excellent dielectric because of its large band gap (8.7eV), large band offsets with silicon. We have deposited thin layers of alumina on silicon wafer (p-type) for gate dielectric applications by ALD technique and compositional characterizations of the deposited thin films were done using EDS, XPS and FTIR spectra.

  11. Atomic-Layer Engineering of Oxide Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic I.; Bollinger, A.T.; Eckstein, J.N.; Dubuis, G.; Pavuna, D.

    2012-03-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy technique has enabled synthesis of atomically smooth thin films, multilayers, and superlattices of cuprates and other complex oxides. Such heterostructures show high temperature superconductivity and enable novel experiments that probe the basic physics of this phenomenon. For example, it was established that high temperature superconductivity and anti-ferromagnetic phases separate on Angstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with high temperature superconductivity over an anomalously large length scale (the 'Giant Proximity Effect'). We review some recent experiments on such films and superlattices, including X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, angle-resolved time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy, transport measurements, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, resonant X-ray scattering, low-energy muon spin resonance, and ultrafast photo-induced reflection high energy electron diffraction. The results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations, a discovery of interface high temperature superconductivity that occurs in a single CuO{sub 2} plane, evidence for local pairs, and establishing tight limits on the temperature range of superconducting fluctuations.

  12. Investigating change of properties in gallium ion irradiation patterned single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan; Dong, Jinyao; Bai, Bing; Xie, Guoxin

    2016-10-01

    Besides its excellent physical properties, graphene promises to play a significant role in electronics with superior properties, which requires patterning of graphene for device integration. Here, we presented the changes in properties of single-layer graphene before and after patterning using gallium ion beam. Combined with Raman spectra of graphene, the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) image confirmed that a metal-insulator transition occurred after large doses of gallium ion irradiation. The changes in work function and Raman spectra of graphene indicated that the defect density increased as increasing the dose and a structural transition occurred during gallium ion irradiation. The patterning width of graphene presented an increasing trend due to the scattering influence of the impurities and the substrate.

  13. Grain size control for CVD-grown single crystal mono- and bi-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-03-01

    By suppressing the nucleation density during Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) growth, we demonstrate that the large-size single crystal monolayer and bilayer graphene can be synthesized by this method. For single layer, single crystals with diameter up to 5.9 mm, have been successfully obtained by adjusting degree of oxidation during surface treatment step and hydrogen annealing duration during growth, thereby allow us to control nucleation density and consequently to control graphene grains sizes. For bilayer growth, our main strategy is to maximize the duration that is controlled by the absorption-diffusion mechanism. With this method, sub-millimeter size single crystal bilayer graphene is also obtained. Electron transport measurement on those produced graphene has shown carrier mobility that is comparable with that of mechanical exfoliated graphene, indicating the high quality of our graphene sample. This project is supported by the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong SAR (Project Number 623512 and DAG12EG05).

  14. Observation of Localized Vibrational Modes of Graphene Nanodomes by Inelastic Atom Scattering.

    PubMed

    Maccariello, D; Al Taleb, A; Calleja, F; Vázquez de Parga, A L; Perna, P; Camarero, J; Gnecco, E; Farías, D; Miranda, R

    2016-01-13

    Inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS) is suitable to determine low-energy (few meV) vibrations spatially localized on structures in the nanometer range. This is illustrated for the nanodomes that appear often on graphene (Gr) epitaxially grown on single crystal metal surfaces. The nature of the inelastic losses observed in Gr/Ru(0001) and Gr/Cu/Ru(0001) has been clarified by intercalation of Cu below the Gr monolayer, which decouples the Gr layer from the Ru substrate and changes substantially the out-of-plane, flexural phonon dispersion of epitaxial Gr, while maintaining the nanodomes and their localized vibrations. He diffraction proves that the Cu-intercalated Gr layer is well ordered structurally, while scanning tunneling microscopy reveals the persistence of the (slightly modified) periodic array of Gr nanodomes. A simple model explains the order of magnitude of the energy losses associated with the Gr nanodomes and their size dependence. The dispersionless, low-energy phonon branches may radically alter the transport of heat in intercalated Gr.

  15. Formation of single layer graphene on nickel under far-from-equilibrium high flux conditions.

    PubMed

    Neyts, Erik C; van Duin, Adri C T; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2013-08-21

    We investigate the theoretical possibility of single layer graphene formation on a nickel surface at different substrate temperatures under far-from-equilibrium high precursor flux conditions, employing state-of-the-art hybrid reactive molecular dynamics/uniform acceptance force bias Monte Carlo simulations. It is predicted that under these conditions, the formation of a single layer graphene-like film may proceed through a combined deposition-segregation mechanism on a nickel substrate, rather than by pure surface segregation as is typically observed for metals with high carbon solubility. At 900 K and above, nearly continuous graphene layers are obtained. These simulations suggest that single layer graphene deposition is theoretically possible on Ni under high flux conditions.

  16. Formation of a Buffer Layer for Graphene on C-Face SiC{0001}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guowei; Srivastava, N.; Feenstra, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Graphene films prepared by heating the SiC surface (the C-face of the {0001} surface) in a Si-rich environment have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and low-energy electron microscopy. Upon graphitization, an interface with symmetry is observed by in situ LEED. After oxidation, the interface displays symmetry. Electron reflectivity measurements indicate that these interface structures arise from a graphene-like "buffer layer" that forms between the graphene and the SiC, similar to that observed on Si-face SiC. From a dynamical LEED structure calculation for the oxidized C-face surface, it is found to consist of a graphene layer sitting on top of a silicate (Si2O3) layer, with the silicate layer having the well-known structure as previously studied on bare SiC surfaces. Based on this result, the structure of the interface prior to oxidation is discussed.

  17. AA stacking, tribological and electronic properties of double-layer graphene with krypton spacer.

    PubMed

    Popov, Andrey M; Lebedeva, Irina V; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Lozovik, Yurii E; Potapkin, Boris V; Poklonski, Nikolai A; Siahlo, Andrei I; Vyrko, Sergey A

    2013-10-21

    Structural, energetic, and tribological characteristics of double-layer graphene with commensurate and incommensurate krypton spacers of nearly monolayer coverage are studied within the van der Waals-corrected density functional theory. It is shown that when the spacer is in the commensurate phase, the graphene layers have the AA stacking. For this phase, the barriers to relative in-plane translational and rotational motion and the shear mode frequency of the graphene layers are calculated. For the incommensurate phase, both of the barriers are found to be negligibly small. A considerable change of tunneling conductance between the graphene layers separated by the commensurate krypton spacer at their relative subangstrom displacement is revealed by the use of the Bardeen method. The possibility of nanoelectromechanical systems based on the studied tribological and electronic properties of the considered heterostructures is discussed.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  19. Low temperature synthesis and field emission characteristics of single to few layered graphene grown using PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Khan, Sunny; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-04-01

    In this work, high-quality graphene has successfully been synthesized on copper (Cu) coated Silicon (Si) substrate at very large-area by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This method is low cost and highly effective for synthesizing graphene relatively at low temperature of 600 °C. Electron microscopy images have shown that surface morphology of the grown samples is quite uniform consisting of single layered graphene (SLG) to few layered graphene (FLG). Raman spectra reveal that graphene has been grown with high-quality having negligible defects and the observation of G and G' peaks is also an indicative of stokes phonon energy shift caused due to laser excitation. Scanning probe microscopy image also depicts the synthesis of single to few layered graphene. The field emission characteristics of as-grown graphene samples were studied in a planar diode configuration at room temperature. The graphene samples were observed to be a good field emitter having low turn-on field, higher field amplification factor and long term emission current stability.

  20. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. The correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.

  1. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; ...

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzagmore » directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. Lastly, the correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.« less

  2. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-01-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. The correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene. PMID:25434431

  3. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. Lastly, the correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.

  4. DFT simulations of inter-graphene-layer coupling with rotationally misaligned hBN tunnel barriers in graphene/hBN/graphene tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsaraj, Amithraj; Register, Leonard F.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-10-01

    Van der Waal's heterostructures allow for novel devices such as two-dimensional-to-two-dimensional tunnel devices, exemplified by interlayer tunnel FETs. These devices employ channel/tunnel-barrier/channel geometries. However, during layer-by-layer exfoliation of these multi-layer materials, rotational misalignment is the norm and may substantially affect device characteristics. In this work, by using density functional theory methods, we consider a reduction in tunneling due to weakened coupling across the rotationally misaligned interface between the channel layers and the tunnel barrier. As a prototypical system, we simulate the effects of rotational misalignment of the tunnel barrier layer between aligned channel layers in a graphene/hBN/graphene system. We find that the rotational misalignment between the channel layers and the tunnel barrier in this van der Waal's heterostructure can significantly reduce coupling between the channels by reducing, specifically, coupling across the interface between the channels and the tunnel barrier. This weakened coupling in graphene/hBN/graphene with hBN misalignment may be relevant to all such van der Waal's heterostructures.

  5. Single-layer graphene based SPR biochips for tuberculosis bacillus detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Huang, Teng-Yi; Kuo, Chun-Chuan; Lee, Wei-Che; Hsieh, Min-Hua; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2012-06-01

    This paper is intended to demonstrate a facile and effective method to construct single layer graphene films onto the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at Au electrodes based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biochips integrated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for tuberculosis bacillus (TB) detection. It is a novel Au-SAM-graphene nanocomposites and taking advantages of the striking properties of both graphene and Au film, fundamental understanding in hybrid material manipulation and new electrochemical properties can be obtained. The sensitivity of TB detection in the LAMP-based assay for the amplification of the Insertion Sequence 6110 (IS6110) samples was determined by a single-layer graphene/Au thin film and compared with that of a conventional Au/Cr-based SPR chips. The results show that a graphene/Au SPR offers a potentially powerful assay, with a highly sensitive analysis, that may be applicable as an important tool for bio-marker detection.

  6. Field electron emission of layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets with atom-thick sharp edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huihui; Li, Yuan; Li, Qi; Li, Borui; Song, Zengcai; Huang, Wenxiao; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun; Carroll, David; Fang, Guojia

    2014-06-01

    Field electron emission properties of solution processed few-layer Bi2Se3 nanosheets are studied for the first time, which exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.3 V μm-1, a high field enhancement factor of up to 6860 and good field emission stability. This performance is better than that of the as reported layered MoS2f sheets and is comparable to that of single layer graphene films. The efficient field emission behaviours are found to be not only attributed to their lower work function but also related to their numerous sharp edges or protrusion decorated structure based on our simulation results. Besides, the contribution of possible two-dimensional electron gas surface states of atom-thick layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets is discussed in this paper. We anticipate that these solution processed layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets have great potential as robust high-performance vertical structure electron emitters for future light weight and highly flexible vacuum micro/nano-electronic device applications.Field electron emission properties of solution processed few-layer Bi2Se3 nanosheets are studied for the first time, which exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.3 V μm-1, a high field enhancement factor of up to 6860 and good field emission stability. This performance is better than that of the as reported layered MoS2f sheets and is comparable to that of single layer graphene films. The efficient field emission behaviours are found to be not only attributed to their lower work function but also related to their numerous sharp edges or protrusion decorated structure based on our simulation results. Besides, the contribution of possible two-dimensional electron gas surface states of atom-thick layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets is discussed in this paper. We anticipate that these solution processed layered Bi2Se3 nanosheets have great potential as robust high-performance vertical structure electron emitters for future light weight and highly flexible vacuum micro/nano-electronic device applications

  7. Graphene Substrate for van der Waals Epitaxy of Layer-Structured Bismuth Antimony Telluride Thermoelectric Film.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Ohta, Hiromichi; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Sung Wng

    2017-02-01

    Graphene as a substrate for the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D layered materials is utilized for the epitaxial growth of a layer-structured thermoelectric film. Van der Waals epitaxial Bi0.5 Sb1.5 Te3 film on graphene synthesized via a simple and scalable fabrication method exhibits good crystallinity and high thermoelectric transport properties comparable to single crystals.

  8. Graphene as a spacer to layer-by-layer assemble electrochemically functionalized nanostructures for molecular bioelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Jingfang; Cheng, Hanjun; Yu, Ping; Ye, Jianshan; Mao, Lanqun

    2011-09-06

    This study demonstrates the capability of graphene as a spacer to form electrochemically functionalized multilayered nanostructures onto electrodes in a controllable manner through layer-by-layer (LBL) chemistry. Methylene green (MG) and positively charged methylimidazolium-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as examples of electroactive species and electrochemically useful components for the assembly, respectively. By using graphene as the spacer, the multilayered nanostructures of graphene/MG and graphene/MWNT could be readily formed onto electrodes with the LBL method on the basis of the electrostatic and/or π-π interaction(s) between graphene and the electrochemically useful components. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to characterize the assembly processes, and the results revealed that nanostructure assembly was uniform and effective with graphene as the spacer. Electrochemical studies demonstrate that the assembled nanostructures possess excellent electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of NADH and could thus be used as electronic transducers for bioelectronic devices. This potential was further demonstrated by using an alcohol dehydrogenase-based electrochemical biosensor and glucose dehydrogenase-based glucose/O(2) biofuel cell as typical examples. This study offers a simple route to the controllable formation of graphene-based electrochemically functionalized nanostructures that can be used for the development of molecular bioelectronic devices such as biosensors and biofuel cells.

  9. Atomically-resolved edge states on surface-nanotemplated graphene explored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Merino, Pablo; Santos, Hernán; Pinardi, Anna L; Chico, Leonor; Martin-Gago, José A

    2017-03-17

    Graphene edges present localized electronic states strongly depending on their shape, size and border configuration. Chiral- or zigzag-ended graphene nanostructures develop spatially and spectrally localized edge states around the Fermi level; however, atomic scale investigations of such graphene terminations and their related electronic states are very challenging and many of their properties remain unexplored. Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study on graphene stripes showing strong metallic edge states at room temperature. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate the use of vicinal Pt(111) as a template for the growth of graphene stripes and characterize their electronic structure. We find the formation of a sublattice localized electronic state confined on the free-standing edges of the graphene ribbons at energies close to the Fermi level. These experimental results are reproduced and understood with tight-binding and ab initio calculations. Our results provide a new way of synthesizing wide graphene stripes with zigzag edge termination and open new prospects in the study of valley and spin phenomena at their interfaces.

  10. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4-37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2-7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8-28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  11. Coating of nanoporous membranes: atomic layer deposition versus sputtering.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, K; Airaksinen, V M; Franssila, S

    2009-06-01

    Nanoporous anodic alumina membranes and silicon samples with plasma etched nanopores have been coated with zinc oxide or gold layer using atomic layer deposition (ALD) or sputtering, respectively. In the case of ALD process, the precursor pulses were extended, compared with planar substrate coating. Thick (60 microm) anodic alumina membranes have been conformally coated with zinc oxide ALD layer. Metal sputtering technique was used just for opposite purpose--to minimize the penetration of gold into the pores during gold-coating of the top and bottom surfaces of the membrane. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been used to investigate the layer thickness, uniformity and conformality inside the nanopores.

  12. Work function of few layer graphene covered nickel thin films measured with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, B.; Gysin, U.; Marot, L. Glatzel, Th.; Steiner, R.; Meyer, E.

    2016-01-25

    Few layer graphene and graphite are simultaneously grown on a ∼100 nm thick polycrystalline nickel film. The work function of few layer graphene/Ni is found to be 4.15 eV with a variation of 50 meV by local measurements with Kelvin probe force microscopy. This value is lower than the work function of free standing graphene due to peculiar electronic structure resulting from metal 3d-carbon 2p(π) hybridization.

  13. Atomic layer engineering of perovskite oxides for chemically sharp heterointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M; Seo, Sung Seok A; Luo, Zhenlin; Zhou, Hua; Fister, Timothy T; Eastman, Jeffrey A; Fuoss, Paul H; Fong, Dillon D; Tischler, Jonathan Z; Eres, Gyula; Chisholm, Matthew F; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2012-12-18

    Atomic layer engineering enables fabrication of a chemically sharp oxide heterointerface. The interface formation and strain evolution during the initial growth of LaAlO(3) /SrTiO(3) heterostructures by pulsed laser deposition are investigated in search of a means for controlling the atomic-sharpness of the interface. This study shows that inserting a monolayer of LaAlO(3) grown at high oxygen pressure dramatically enhances interface abruptness.

  14. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition with Thermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates ranging from glass, polymers, aerogels, and metals to high aspect ratio geometries. This talk will focus on the utilization of ALD for engineering applications.

  15. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of copper nanofilms on ruthenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebregziabiher, Daniel K.; Kim, Youn-Geun; Thambidurai, Chandru; Ivanova, Valentina; Haumesser, Paul-Henri; Stickney, John L.

    2010-04-01

    As ULSI scales to smaller and smaller dimensions, it has become necessary to form layers of materials only a few nm thick. In addition, trenches are now being incorporated in ULSI formation which require conformal coating and will not be amenable to CMP. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is being developed to address such issues. ALD is the formation of materials layer by layer using self-limiting reactions. This article describes the formation of Cu seed layers (for the Cu damascene process) on a Ru barrier layer. The deposit was formed by the electrochemical analog of ALD, using electrochemical self-limiting reactions which are referred to as underpotential deposition (UPD). Monolayer restricted galvanic displacement was used to form atomic layers of Cu. First Pb UPD was deposited, forming a sacrificial layer, and then a Cu +2 solution was flushed into the cell and Pb was exchanged for Cu. A linear dependence was shown for Cu growth over 8 ALD cycles, and STM showed a conformal deposition, as expected for an ALD process. Relative Cu coverages were determined using Auger electron spectroscopy, while absolute Cu coverages were obtained from coulometry during oxidative stripping of the deposits. Use of a Cl - containing electrolyte results in Cu deposits covered with an atomic layer of Cl atoms, which have been shown to protect the surfaced from oxidation during various stages of the deposition process. The 10 nm thick Ru substrates were formed on Si(1 0 0) wafers, and were partially oxidized upon receipt. Electrochemical reduction, prior to Cu deposition, removed the oxygen and some traces of carbon, the result of transport. Ion bombardment proved to clean all oxygen and carbon traces from the surface.

  16. Atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of graphene nanosheets derived from graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S; Solís-Fernández, P; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2009-05-19

    Graphene nanosheets produced in the form of stable aqueous dispersions by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and deposited onto graphite substrates have been investigated by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (AFM/STM). The chemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets were hardly distinguishable from their unreduced counterparts in the topographic AFM images. However, they could be readily discriminated through phase imaging in the attractive regime of tapping-mode AFM, probably because of differences in hydrophilicity arising from their distinct oxygen contents. The chemically reduced nanosheets displayed a smoothly undulated, globular morphology on the nanometer scale, with typical vertical variations in the subnanometer range and lateral feature sizes of approximately 5-10 nm. Such morphology was attributed to be the result of significant structural disorder in the carbon skeleton, which originates during the strong oxidation that leads to graphene oxide and remains after chemical reduction. Direct evidence of structural disorder was provided by atomic-scale STM imaging, which revealed an absence of long-range periodicity in the graphene nanosheets. Only structured domains a few nanometers large were observed instead. Likewise, the nanosheet edges appeared atomically rough and ill-defined, though smooth on the nanometer scale. The unreduced graphene oxide nanosheets could only be imaged by STM at very low tunneling currents (approximately 1 pA), being visualized in some cases with inverted contrast relative to the graphite substrate, a result that was attributed to their extremely low conductivity. Complementary characterization of the unreduced and chemically reduced nanosheets was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis as well as UV-visible absorption and X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. In particular, the somewhat puzzling Raman results were interpreted to be the result of an amorphous character of the graphene oxide material.

  17. Light non-metallic atom (B, N, O and F)-doped graphene: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Cao, C; Jiang, J Z

    2010-12-17

    First-principles calculations are performed to study the geometry, electronic structure and magnetic properties of light non-metallic atom-doped graphene (B, N, O and F). The planar structure and the quasi-linear energy dispersion near the Dirac point remain through doping with B and N atoms, by which p-type doping and n-type doping graphene are respectively induced. A bandgap of about 0.5 eV is generated through O doping, and geometrically the O atom is also in the graphene plane. No magnetic moment is detected in B- , N- and O-doped graphene. For F doping, the F atom bonds with one of the carbon atoms close to the vacancy, with the other two carbon atoms undergoing a Jahn-Teller distortion. A weak polarized magnetic moment of 0.71 µ(B) is detected through F doping.

  18. Iridium wire grid polarizer fabricated using atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Käsebier, Thomas; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-10-25

    In this work, an effective multistep process toward fabrication of an iridium wire grid polarizer for UV applications involving a frequency doubling process based on ultrafast electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition is presented. The choice of iridium as grating material is based on its good optical properties and a superior oxidation resistance. Furthermore, atomic layer deposition of iridium allows a precise adjustment of the structural parameters of the grating much better than other deposition techniques like sputtering for example. At the target wavelength of 250 nm, a transmission of about 45% and an extinction ratio of 87 are achieved.

  19. The Mechanical Robustness of Atomic-Layer- and Molecular-Layer-Deposited Coatings on Polymer Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical robustness of atomic-layer- and molecular-layer-deposited coatings on polymer substrates David C. Miller,1,2,a Ross R. Foster,1,2...00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The mechanical robustness of atomic-layer- and molecular-layer-deposited coatings on polymer ...fracture related to the sharp grip teeth, polymer strips “Flex-o-Pane,” Warp Brothers, Inc. were attached over the grip ends outside of the gage region

  20. Enhancement of capillary electrochromatographic separation performance by conductive polymer in a layer-by-layer fabricated graphene stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Wenpeng; Bao, Tao; Chen, Zilin

    2014-04-25

    In this work, we fabricated a novel graphene-based capillary column for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) by a layer-by-layer strategy. To immobilize graphene onto the inner surface of silica capillary, a bio-inspired method was first used to functionalize the capillary surface with a layer of polydopamine (PDA). Graphene oxide (GO) was then introduced and can covalently react with polydopamine, realizing immobilization of graphene as a result. To enhance the modification efficiency of polydopamine, a conductive polymer, polyaniline (PANI) was introduced to be a sub-layer; polydopamine was then introduced following with GO, to generate a multilayer GO-PDA-PANI@capillary. Interestingly, separation efficiency of the graphene-based capillary was enhanced significantly by using conductive PANI as a sub-layer. The morphology of different layers modified on the capillary column was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electroosmotic flow (EOF) characteristics of capillaries modified with different layers were also investigated by varying the pH value of mobile phase. GO-PDA-PANI@capillary showed good separation efficiency towards alkylbenzenes by OT-CEC mode, with theoretic plate numbers up to 133,918 for benzene. The separation was found to follow a reversed-phase chromatographic retention mechanism. Repeatability of the GO-PDA-PANI@capillary was studied, with relative standard deviations for intra-day and inter-day runs less than 2.89%, and column-to-column runs less than 6.17%. The separation performance of GO-PDA-PANI@capillary was also compared with that of the reported graphene modified capillary.

  1. Evenly transferred single-layered graphene membrane assisted by strong substrate adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongjae; Kim, Hoijoon; Seol, Daehee; Park, Taejin; Leem, Mirine; Ha, Hyunwoo; An, Hyesung; You Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Park, Seongjun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Kim, Yunseok

    2017-04-01

    We explored the transfer of a single-layered graphene membrane assisted by substrate adhesion. A relatively larger adhesion force was measured on the SiO2 substrate compared with its van der Waals contribution, which is expected to result from the additional contribution of the chemical bonding force. Density functional theory calculations verified that the strong adhesion force was indeed accompanied by chemical bonding. The transfer of single-layered graphene and subsequent deposition of the dielectric layer were best performed on the SiO2 substrate exhibiting a larger adhesion force. This study suggests the selection and/or modification of the underlying substrate for proper transfer of graphene as well as other 2D materials similar to graphene.

  2. Evenly transferred single-layered graphene membrane assisted by strong substrate adhesion.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Kim, Hoijoon; Seol, Daehee; Park, Taejin; Leem, Mirine; Ha, Hyunwoo; An, Hyesung; You Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Park, Seongjun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Kim, Yunseok

    2017-04-07

    We explored the transfer of a single-layered graphene membrane assisted by substrate adhesion. A relatively larger adhesion force was measured on the SiO2 substrate compared with its van der Waals contribution, which is expected to result from the additional contribution of the chemical bonding force. Density functional theory calculations verified that the strong adhesion force was indeed accompanied by chemical bonding. The transfer of single-layered graphene and subsequent deposition of the dielectric layer were best performed on the SiO2 substrate exhibiting a larger adhesion force. This study suggests the selection and/or modification of the underlying substrate for proper transfer of graphene as well as other 2D materials similar to graphene.

  3. Propagation characteristics of surface plasmon polariton modes in graphene layer with nonlinear magnetic cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagyaraj, C.; Ajith, R.; Vincent, Mathew

    2017-03-01

    We study the dispersion characteristics of surface plasmon polariton modes guided through a graphene monolayer bounded with a nonlinear magnetic cladding and linear substrate. Nonlinear cladding with permeability μ ={μ }{{l}}+{μ }{{nl}}| {\\boldsymbol{H}}{| }2 provides an extra hand for controlling guided mode behavior externally. The presence of graphene layer enhances nonlinearity in the waveguide configuration thereby changing position of the self-focused peak of field components in the nonlinear medium. Also the propagation length of the fundamental mode strongly depends on the chemical potential of graphene layer. An appreciable increase in propagation length with increase in input power is observed. Phase constant and propagation length of the fundamental mode are calculated as a function of input mode power and graphene layer chemical potential over midinfrared frequencies.

  4. Graphene layer growth on silicon substrates with nickel film by pulse arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, K.; Banno, K.; Aryal, H. R.; Egawa, T.

    2012-10-15

    Carbon layer has been grown on a Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si(111) substrate under high vacuum pressure by pulse arc plasma deposition. From the results of Raman spectroscopy for the sample, it is found that graphene was formed by ex-situ annealing of sample grown at room temperature. Furthermore, for the sample grown at high temperature, graphene formation was shown and optimum temperature was around 1000 Degree-Sign C. Transmission electron microscopy observation of the sample suggests that the graphene was grown from step site caused by grain of Ni film. The results show that the pulse arc plasma technique has the possibility for acquiring homogenous graphene layer with controlled layer thickness.

  5. Deformation sensor based on polymer-supported discontinuous graphene multi-layer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Carotenuto, G.; Schiavo, L.; Romeo, V.; Nicolais, L.

    2014-05-15

    Graphene can be conveniently used in the modification of polymer surfaces. Graphene macromolecules are perfectly transparent to the visible light and electrically conductive, consequently these two properties can be simultaneously provided to polymeric substrates by surface coating with thin graphene layers. In addition, such coating process provides the substrates of: water-repellence, higher surface hardness, low-friction, self-lubrication, gas-barrier properties, and many other functionalities. Polyolefins have a non-polar nature and therefore graphene strongly sticks on their surface. Nano-crystalline graphite can be used as graphene precursor in some chemical processes (e.g., graphite oxide synthesis by the Hummer method), in addition it can be directly applied to the surface of a polyolefin substrate (e.g., polyethylene) to cover it by a thin graphene multilayer. In particular, the nano-crystalline graphite perfectly exfoliate under the application of a combination of shear and friction forces and the produced graphene single-layers perfectly spread and adhere on the polyethylene substrate surface. Such polymeric materials can be used as ITO (indium-tin oxide) substitute and in the fabrication of different electronic devices. Here the fabrication of transparent resistive deformation sensors based on low-density polyethylene films coated by graphene multilayers is described. Such devices are very sensible and show a high reversible and reproducible behavior.

  6. A further comparison of graphene and thin metal layers for plasmonics.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyong; Gao, Pingqi; Shi, Wangzhou

    2016-05-21

    Which one is much more suitable for plasmonic materials, graphene or metal? To address this problem well, the plasmonic properties of thin metal sheets at different thicknesses have been investigated and compared with a graphene layer. As demonstration examples, the propagation properties of insulator-metal-insulator and metamaterials (MMs) structures are also shown. The results manifest that the plasmonic properties of the graphene layer are comparable to that of thin metal sheets with the thickness of tens of nanometers. For the graphene MMs structure, by using the periodic stack structure in the active region, the resonant transmission strength significantly improves. At the optimum period number, 3-5 periods of graphene/SiO2, the graphene MMs structure manifests good frequency and amplitude tunable properties simultaneously, and the resonant strength is also strong with large values of the Q-factor. Therefore, graphene is a good tunable plasmonic material. The results are very helpful to develop novel graphene plasmonic devices, such as modulators, antenna and filters.

  7. A further comparison of graphene and thin metal layers for plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoyong; Gao, Pingqi; Shi, Wangzhou

    2016-05-01

    Which one is much more suitable for plasmonic materials, graphene or metal? To address this problem well, the plasmonic properties of thin metal sheets at different thicknesses have been investigated and compared with a graphene layer. As demonstration examples, the propagation properties of insulator-metal-insulator and metamaterials (MMs) structures are also shown. The results manifest that the plasmonic properties of the graphene layer are comparable to that of thin metal sheets with the thickness of tens of nanometers. For the graphene MMs structure, by using the periodic stack structure in the active region, the resonant transmission strength significantly improves. At the optimum period number, 3-5 periods of graphene/SiO2, the graphene MMs structure manifests good frequency and amplitude tunable properties simultaneously, and the resonant strength is also strong with large values of the Q-factor. Therefore, graphene is a good tunable plasmonic material. The results are very helpful to develop novel graphene plasmonic devices, such as modulators, antenna and filters.

  8. Deformation sensor based on polymer-supported discontinuous graphene multi-layer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, G.; Schiavo, L.; Romeo, V.; Nicolais, L.

    2014-05-01

    Graphene can be conveniently used in the modification of polymer surfaces. Graphene macromolecules are perfectly transparent to the visible light and electrically conductive, consequently these two properties can be simultaneously provided to polymeric substrates by surface coating with thin graphene layers. In addition, such coating process provides the substrates of: water-repellence, higher surface hardness, low-friction, self-lubrication, gas-barrier properties, and many other functionalities. Polyolefins have a non-polar nature and therefore graphene strongly sticks on their surface. Nano-crystalline graphite can be used as graphene precursor in some chemical processes (e.g., graphite oxide synthesis by the Hummer method), in addition it can be directly applied to the surface of a polyolefin substrate (e.g., polyethylene) to cover it by a thin graphene multilayer. In particular, the nano-crystalline graphite perfectly exfoliate under the application of a combination of shear and friction forces and the produced graphene single-layers perfectly spread and adhere on the polyethylene substrate surface. Such polymeric materials can be used as ITO (indium-tin oxide) substitute and in the fabrication of different electronic devices. Here the fabrication of transparent resistive deformation sensors based on low-density polyethylene films coated by graphene multilayers is described. Such devices are very sensible and show a high reversible and reproducible behavior.

  9. Local conductance mapping of water-intercalated graphene on mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jin Heui; Lee, Hyunsoo; Kwon, Sangku; Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Song, Hee Chan; Choi, Joong Il Jake; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-12-01

    We report that the conductance of graphene is influenced by intercalated water layers using current sensing atomic force microscopy (AFM). We obtained a confined water layer between chemical vapor deposition graphene and mica by transferring graphene onto mica in a liquid water bath. Atomic force microscopy topographic images confirm high coverage by a single water layer, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) verifies a clean surface without contamination by measuring the honeycomb lattice structure of the graphene. We show that the surface conductance is perturbed by the presence of a water layer between the graphene and mica, which is not found in the STM topographic image. We found that the graphene on the edge and at pinholes of the water layer exhibits lower conductance, compared with that of graphene on the water terrace. We attribute the perturbation of conductance to structural defects from the water film and a variation of interaction between the edge of the water and graphene.

  10. On-Surface Synthesis and Characterization of 9-Atom Wide Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    DOE PAGES

    Talirz, Leopold; Söde, Hajo; Dumslaff, Tim; ...

    2017-01-27

    The bottom-up approach to synthesize graphene nanoribbons strives not only to introduce a band gap into the electronic structure of graphene but also to accurately tune its value by designing both the width and edge structure of the ribbons with atomic precision. Within this paper, we report the synthesis of an armchair graphene nanoribbon with a width of nine carbon atoms on Au(111) through surface-assisted aryl–aryl coupling and subsequent cyclodehydrogenation of a properly chosen molecular precursor. By combining high-resolution atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the atomic structure of the fabricated ribbons is exactlymore » as designed. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and Fourier-transformed scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveal an electronic band gap of 1.4 eV and effective masses of ≈0.1 me for both electrons and holes, constituting a substantial improvement over previous efforts toward the development of transistor applications. We use ab initio calculations to gain insight into the dependence of the Raman spectra on excitation wavelength as well as to rationalize the symmetry-dependent contribution of the ribbons’ electronic states to the tunneling current. Lastly, we propose a simple rule for the visibility of frontier electronic bands of armchair graphene nanoribbons in scanning tunneling spectroscopy.« less

  11. Single-layer CVD-grown graphene decorated with metal nanoparticles as a promising biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Gutés, Albert; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2012-03-15

    A new approach to the development of a single-layer graphene sensor decorated with metal nanoparticles is presented. Chemical vapor deposition is used to grow single layer graphene on copper. Decoration of the single-layer graphene is achieved by electroless deposition of Au nanoparticles using the copper substrate as a source of electrons. Transfer of the decorated single-layer graphene on glassy carbon electrodes offers a sensitive platform for biosensor development. As a proof of concept, 10 units of glucose oxidase were deposited on the surface in a Nafion matrix to stabilize the enzyme as well as to prevent interference from ascorbic acid and uric acid. Amperometric linear response calibration in the μmoll(-1) is obtained. The presented methodology enables highly sensitive platforms for biosensor development, providing a scalable roll-to-roll production with a much more reproducible scheme when compared to the graphene biosensors reported previously based on drop-cast of multi-layer graphene suspensions.

  12. Vertically aligned GaAs nanowires on graphite and few-layer graphene: generic model and epitaxial growth.

    PubMed

    Munshi, A Mazid; Dheeraj, Dasa L; Fauske, Vidar T; Kim, Dong-Chul; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Weman, Helge

    2012-09-12

    By utilizing the reduced contact area of nanowires, we show that epitaxial growth of a broad range of semiconductors on graphene can in principle be achieved. A generic atomic model is presented which describes the epitaxial growth configurations applicable to all conventional semiconductor materials. The model is experimentally verified by demonstrating the growth of vertically aligned GaAs nanowires on graphite and few-layer graphene by the self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid technique using molecular beam epitaxy. A two-temperature growth strategy was used to increase the nanowire density. Due to the self-catalyzed growth technique used, the nanowires were found to have a regular hexagonal cross-sectional shape, and are uniform in length and diameter. Electron microscopy studies reveal an epitaxial relationship of the grown nanowires with the underlying graphitic substrates. Two relative orientations of the nanowire side-facets were observed, which is well explained by the proposed atomic model. A prototype of a single GaAs nanowire photodetector demonstrates a high-quality material. With GaAs being a model system, as well as a very useful material for various optoelectronic applications, we anticipate this particular GaAs nanowire/graphene hybrid to be promising for flexible and low-cost solar cells.

  13. High-yield synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes through electrochemical expansion of graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junzhong; Manga, Kiran Kumar; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-06-15

    High-yield production of few-layer graphene flakes from graphite is important for the scalable synthesis and industrial application of graphene. However, high-yield exfoliation of graphite to form graphene sheets without using any oxidation process or super-strong acid is challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution route inspired by the lithium rechargeable battery for the high-yield (>70%) exfoliation of graphite into highly conductive few-layer graphene flakes (average thickness <5 layers). A negative graphite electrode can be electrochemically charged and expanded in an electrolyte of Li salts and organic solvents under high current density and exfoliated efficiently into few-layer graphene sheets with the aid of sonication. The dispersible graphene can be ink-brushed to form highly conformal coatings of conductive films (15 ohm/square at a graphene loading of <1 mg/cm(2)) on commercial paper.

  14. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifeng Hu, Haiyan

    2014-06-21

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  15. Modifying atomic-scale friction between two graphene sheets: A molecular-force-field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yufeng; Guo, Wanlin; Chen, Changfeng

    2007-10-01

    Recently discovered ultralow friction (superlubricity) between incommensurate graphitic layers has raised great interest in understanding the interlayer interaction between graphene sheets under various physical conditions. In this work, we have studied the effects of interlayer distance change and in-sheet defects in modifying the interlayer friction in graphene sheets by extensive molecular-force-field statics calculations. The interlayer friction between graphene sheets with commensurate or incommensurate interlayer stacking increases with decreasing interlayer distance, but in the case of incommensurate stacking, ultralow friction can exist in a significantly expanded range of interlayer distance. The ultralow interlayer friction in the incommensurate stacking sheets is insensitive to the in-sheet defect of vacancy at a certain orientation. These results provide knowledge for possibly controlling friction between graphene sheets and offer insight into their applications.

  16. Seamless lamination of a concave-convex architecture with single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Taekyung; Baik, Jaeyoon; Seo, Keumyoung; Moon, Youngkwon; Park, Noejung; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Kyu Kwak, Sang; Ju, Sanghyun; Real Ahn, Joung

    2015-10-01

    Graphene has been used as an electrode and channel material in electronic devices because of its superior physical properties. Recently, electronic devices have changed from a planar to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) geometry to overcome the limitations of planar devices. The evolution of electronic devices requires that graphene be adaptable to a 3D substrate. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposited single-layer graphene can be transferred onto a silicon dioxide substrate with a 3D geometry, such as a concave-convex architecture. A variety of silicon dioxide concave-convex architectures were uniformly and seamlessly laminated with graphene using a thermal treatment. The planar graphene was stretched to cover the concave-convex architecture, and the resulting strain on the curved graphene was spatially resolved by confocal Raman spectroscopy; molecular dynamic simulations were also conducted and supported the observations. Changes in electrical resistivity caused by the spatially varying strain induced as the graphene-silicon dioxide laminate varies dimensionally from 2D to 3D were measured by using a four-point probe. The resistivity measurements suggest that the electrical resistivity can be systematically controlled by the 3D geometry of the graphene-silicon dioxide laminate. This 3D graphene-insulator laminate will broaden the range of graphene applications beyond planar structures to 3D materials.Graphene has been used as an electrode and channel material in electronic devices because of its superior physical properties. Recently, electronic devices have changed from a planar to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) geometry to overcome the limitations of planar devices. The evolution of electronic devices requires that graphene be adaptable to a 3D substrate. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposited single-layer graphene can be transferred onto a silicon dioxide substrate with a 3D geometry, such as a concave-convex architecture. A

  17. Efficient organic photovoltaic cells on a single layer graphene transparent conductive electrode using MoOx as an interfacial layer.

    PubMed

    Du, J H; Jin, H; Zhang, Z K; Zhang, D D; Jia, S; Ma, L P; Ren, W C; Cheng, H M; Burn, P L

    2017-01-07

    The large surface roughness, low work function and high cost of transparent electrodes using multilayer graphene films can limit their application in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we develop single layer graphene (SLG) films as transparent anodes for OPV cells that contain light-absorbing layers comprised of the evaporable molecular organic semiconductor materials, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/fullerene (C60), as well as a molybdenum oxide (MoOx) interfacial layer. In addition to an increase in the optical transmittance, the SLG anodes had a significant decrease in surface roughness compared to two and four layer graphene (TLG and FLG) anodes fabricated by multiple transfer and stacking of SLGs. Importantly, the introduction of a MoOx interfacial layer not only reduced the energy barrier between the graphene anode and the active layer, but also decreased the resistance of the SLG by nearly ten times. The OPV cells with the structure of polyethylene terephthalate/SLG/MoOx/CuI/ZnPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al were flexible, and had a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.84%, which was only 17.6% lower than the devices with an equivalent structure but prepared on commercial indium tin oxide anodes. Furthermore, the devices with the SLG anode were 50% and 86.7% higher in efficiency than the cells with the TLG and FLG anodes. These results show the potential of SLG electrodes for flexible and wearable OPV cells as well as other organic optoelectronic devices.

  18. Vibration atomic layer deposition for conformal nanoparticle coating

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Suk Won; Woo Kim, Jun; Jong Choi, Hyung; Hyung Shim, Joon

    2014-01-15

    A vibration atomic layer deposition reactor was developed for fabricating a conformal thin-film coating on nanosize particles. In this study, atomic layer deposition of 10–15-nm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was conducted on a high-surface-area acetylene black powder with particle diameters of 200–250 nm. Intense vibration during the deposition resulted in the effective separation of particles, overcoming the interparticle agglomeration force and enabling effective diffusion of the precursor into the powder chunk; this phenomenon led to the formation of a conformal film coating on the nanopowder particles. It was also confirmed that the atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films initially grew on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder particles as discrete islands, presumably because chemisorption of the precursor and water occurred only on a few sites on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder surface. Relatively sluggish growth of the films during the initial atomic layer deposition cycles was identified from composition analysis.

  19. Cost-Effective Systems for Atomic Layer Deposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubitz, Michael; Medina, Phillip A., IV; Antic, Aleks; Rosin, Joseph T.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the design and testing of two different home-built atomic layer deposition (ALD) systems for the growth of thin films with sub-monolayer control over film thickness. The first reactor is a horizontally aligned hot-walled reactor with a vacuum purging system. The second reactor is a vertically aligned cold-walled reactor with a…

  20. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Ibrahim Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas; Mahvash, Farzaneh; Nannini, Matthieu; Siaj, Mohamed

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55 mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  1. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba-Son; Lin, Jen-Fin

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750 °C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750 °C. At 800 °C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  2. Enhancement of light extraction efficiency of vertical LED with patterned graphene as current spreading layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sumitra; Sai Nandini, Annam Deepthi; Pal, Suchandan; Dhanavantri, Chenna

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report an optimised pattern of surface textured graphene current spreading layer (CSL) for the enhancement of light extraction efficiency (LEE) in InGaN/GaN vertical light emitting diodes (V-LEDs). It is found that by texturing graphene surface LEE improves drastically. This improvement is attributed to better current spreading of graphene and increased random and multiple scattering of light through textured surfaces. Simulation results illustrate that V-LEDs with surface textured (hexagonal pattern) ITO as CSL shows threefold improvement in light extraction efficiency compared to V-LEDs with no surface texturing on ITO CSL. Further, LEE of V-LEDs having patterned graphene CSL is compared with that for indium tin oxide (ITO) CSL. V-LEDs with optimised hexagonal patterning on graphene CSL shows 13.42% enhancement of LEE compared to that of LED with hexagonal patterning on ITO surface.

  3. Shape-alterable and -recoverable graphene/polyurethane bi-layered composite film for supercapacitor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Zhixin; Yan, Xingbin; Xue, Qunji

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a graphene/shape-memory polyurethane (PU) composite film, used for a supercapacitor electrode, is fabricated by a simple bonding method. In the composite, formerly prepared graphene paper is closely bonded on the surface of the PU slice, forming a bi-layered composite film. Based on the good flexibility of graphene paper and the outstanding shape holding capacity of PU phase, the resulting composite film can be changed into various shapes. Also, the composite film shows excellent shape recovery ability. The graphene/PU composite film used as the electrode maintains a satisfactory electrochemical capacitance of graphene material and there is no decay in the specific capacitance after long-cycle testing, making it attractive for novel supercapacitors with special shapes and shape-memory ability.

  4. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-κ oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselev, Alexander; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Marks, Tobin J.; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Hersam, Mark C.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2013-12-01

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al2O3 and HfO2 films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100 nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al2O3/HfO2 stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  5. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-κ oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tselev, Alexander Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2013-12-09

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100 nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  6. Nucleation of graphene layers on magnetic oxides: Co3O4(111) and Cr2O3(0001) from theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, John; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Yuan; Driver, M. Sky; Goddard, III, William A.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2016-12-14

    We report directly grown strongly adherent graphene on Co3O4(111) by carbon molecular beam epitaxy (C MBE) at 850 K and density functional theory (DFT) findings that the first graphene layer is reconstructed to fit the Co3O4 surface, while subsequent layers retain normal graphene structure. This adherence to the Co3O4 structure results from partial bonding of half the carbons to top oxygens of the substrate. This structure is validated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction studies, showing layer-by-layer graphene growth with ~0.08 electrons/carbon atom transferred to the oxide from the first graphene layer, in agreement with DFT. In contrast, for Cr2O3 DFT finds no strong bonding to the surface and C MBE on Cr2O3(0001) yields only graphite formation at 700 K, with C desorption above 800 K. As a result, strong graphene-to-oxide charge transfer aids nucleation of graphene on incommensurate oxide substrates and may have implications for spintronics.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin platinum films on tungsten atomic layer deposition adhesion layers: Application to high surface area substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Clancey, Joel W.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Kukreja, Ratandeep S.; Kongkanand, Anusorn; George, Steven M.

    2015-01-15

    Platinum (Pt) atomic layer deposition (ALD) usually yields Pt nanoparticles during initial film growth. In contrast, deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt films is needed for many important applications, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. A continuous and high radius of curvature Pt film is more stable and has a higher area-specific activity than the Pt nanoparticles commonly used in PEM fuel cells. However, the Pt film must be ultrathin and have a large surface area to be cost effective. In this paper, a review of earlier Pt ALD studies on flat substrates is presented that demonstrates that tungsten, with a higher surface energy than platinum, can serve as an adhesion layer to achieve Pt ALD films that are continuous at ultrathin thicknesses of ∼1.5 nm. This work utilized MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the Pt ALD reactants. The deposition of continuous and ultrathin Pt ALD films using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and H{sub 2} plasma as the reactants is then studied on two high surface area substrate materials: TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed uniform and continuous Pt films with thicknesses of ∼4 nm on the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. TEM with electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis revealed W ALD and Pt ALD films with thicknesses of ∼3 nm that were continuous and conformal on the high aspect ratio NSTF substrates. These results demonstrate that cost effective use of Pt ALD on high surface area substrates is possible for PEM fuel cells.

  8. Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of single Iron atom at graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Hao, Yanjun; Xu, Xiaohong

    2017-02-01

    A systemic theoretical study of one iron atom on graphene ribbon edges (Fe/GR) has been carried out by using density functional theory. Thermodynamic stabilities, electronic and magnetic properties of Fe/GR with different edge types and adsorption locations were investigated. According to the Clar's aromatic sextet rule, the formation energies and density of states of Fe atom are found to rely tightly on the ribbon's periodic length. Moreover, Fe atoms on reconstructed zz edges are also stable with low formation energies and semiconducting properties. Finally, the magnetic properties are found sensitive with the structural details, especially the local bond environment. The present theoretical results constitute a useful picture for the deep comprehending on the interface details of the lateral Fe/graphene heterostructures.

  9. First-principles study on bottom-up fabrication process of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of a polyanthracene formation in the bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons on Au(111) using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. We show that the structure of precursor molecules plays a decisive role in the C-C coupling reaction. The reaction energy of the dimerization of anthracene dimers is a larger negative value than that of the dimerization of anthracene monomers, suggesting that the precursor molecule used in experiments has a favorable structure for graphene nanoribbon fabrication.

  10. Controlling dynamical thermal transport of biased bilayer graphene by impurity atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, Hamed; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    We address the dynamical thermal conductivity of biased bilayer graphene doped with acceptor impurity atoms for AA-stacking in the context of tight binding model Hamiltonian. The effect of scattering by dilute charged impurities is discussed in terms of the self-consistent Born approximation. Green's function approach has been exploited to find the behavior of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene within the linear response theory. We have found the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity for different values of concentration and scattering strength of dopant impurity. Also the dependence of thermal conductivity on the impurity concentration and bias voltage has been investigated in details.

  11. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  12. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi Darma, Yudi

    2014-03-24

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of porous, mixed phase, wrinkled, few layer graphene like nanocarbon from charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, B.

    2015-12-01

    A technique to synthesis wrinkled graphene like nano carbon (GNC) from charcoal is reported in the current study. The charcoal produced by thermal decomposition and is intercalated by Hummers method. It is separated by centrifugation and sonication to get few layer graphene sheets. The structural and chemical changes of the nanostructure is elucidated by Raman spectroscopy, TEM, SEM-EDS and XPS. Raman spectra revealed the existence of highly graphitized amorphous carbon, which is confirmed by the appearance of five peaks in the deconvoluted first order Raman spectra. The SEM analysis reveals the formation of large area graphene sheets with nano-porous structure in it. The TEM/SAED analysis exhibits the presence of short range few layer graphene.

  14. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting.

  15. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  16. Basics of quantum field theory of electromagnetic interaction processes in single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-09-01

    The content of this work is the study of electromagnetic interaction in single-layer graphene by means of the perturbation theory. The interaction of electromagnetic field with Dirac fermions in single-layer graphene has a peculiarity: Dirac fermions in graphene interact not only with the electromagnetic wave propagating within the graphene sheet, but also with electromagnetic field propagating from a location outside the graphene sheet and illuminating this sheet. The interaction Hamiltonian of the system comprising electromagnetic field and Dirac fermions fields contains the limits at graphene plane of electromagnetic field vector and scalar potentials which can be shortly called boundary electromagnetic field. The study of S-matrix requires knowing the limits at graphene plane of 2-point Green functions of electromagnetic field which also can be shortly called boundary 2-point Green functions of electromagnetic field. As the first example of the application of perturbation theory, the second order terms in the perturbative expansions of boundary 2-point Green functions of electromagnetic field as well as of 2-point Green functions of Dirac fermion fields are explicitly derived. Further extension of the application of perturbation theory is also discussed.

  17. Atomic-Layer-Confined Doping for Atomic-Level Insights into Visible-Light Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Lei, Fengcai; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Yongfu; Liang, Liang; Liu, Katong; Xu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Qun; Pan, Bicai; Luo, Yi; Xie, Yi

    2015-08-03

    A model of doping confined in atomic layers is proposed for atomic-level insights into the effect of doping on photocatalysis. Co doping confined in three atomic layers of In2S3 was implemented with a lamellar hybrid intermediate strategy. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of Co ions brings about several new energy levels and increased density of states at the conduction band minimum, leading to sharply increased visible-light absorption and three times higher carrier concentration. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the electron transfer time of about 1.6 ps from the valence band to newly formed localized states is due to Co doping. The 25-fold increase in average recovery lifetime is believed to be responsible for the increased of electron-hole separation. The synthesized Co-doped In2S3 (three atomic layers) yield a photocurrent of 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.5 V vs. RHE, nearly 10 and 17 times higher than that of the perfect In2S3 (three atomic layers) and the bulk counterpart, respectively.

  18. Van Der Waals heterogeneous layer-layer carbon nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on graphene and graphane sheets.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kun; Zhao, Rui-Sheng; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zheng, Hong; Nagase, Shigeru; Zhao, Sheng-Dun; Liu, Yan-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang

    2017-04-15

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings, such as π···π stacking, CH···π are very essential for supramolecular carbon nanostructures. Graphite is a typical homogenous carbon matter based on π···π stacking of graphene sheets. Even in systems not involving aromatic groups, the stability of diamondoid dimer and layer-layer graphane dimer originates from C - H···H - C noncovalent interaction. In this article, the structures and properties of novel heterogeneous layer-layer carbon-nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on [n]-graphane and [n]-graphene and their derivatives are theoretically investigated for n = 16-54 using dispersion corrected density functional theory B3LYP-D3 method. Energy decomposition analysis shows that dispersion interaction is the most important for the stabilization of both double- and multi-layer-layer [n]-graphane@graphene. Binding energy between graphane and graphene sheets shows that there is a distinct additive nature of CH···π interaction. For comparison and simplicity, the concept of H-H bond energy equivalent number of carbon atoms (noted as NHEQ), is used to describe the strength of these noncovalent interactions. The NHEQ of the graphene dimers, graphane dimers, and double-layered graphane@graphene are 103, 143, and 110, indicating that the strength of C-H···π interaction is close to that of π···π and much stronger than that of C-H···H-C in large size systems. Additionally, frontier molecular orbital, electron density difference and visualized noncovalent interaction regions are discussed for deeply understanding the nature of the C-H···π stacking interaction in construction of heterogeneous layer-layer graphane@graphene structures. We hope that the present study would be helpful for creations of new functional supramolecular materials based on graphane and graphene carbon nano-structures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Bio-inspired two-dimensional nanofluidic generators based on a layered graphene hydrogel membrane.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Chi; Wu, Yanzhe; Jiang, Yanan; Gao, Jun; Li, Dan; Jiang, Lei

    2013-11-13

    An electrogenetic layered graphene hydrogel membrane (GHM) possesses ultra-large interlayer spacing of about 10 nm, forming charged 2D nanocapillaries between graphene sheets that selectively permeate counter-ions and exclude co-ions. When an electrolyte flow goes through the GHM, it functions as an integrated 2D nanofluidic generator converting hydraulic motion into electricity. The maximum streaming conductance density approaches 16.8 μA cm(-2) bar(-1) .

  20. Stable aqueous dispersions of functionalized multi-layer graphene by pulsed underwater plasma exfoliation of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Plath, Asmus; Beckert, Fabian; Tölle, Folke J.; Sturm, Heinz; Mülhaupt, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    A process was developed for graphite particle exfoliation in water to stably dispersed multi-layer graphene. It uses electrohydraulic shockwaves and the functionalizing effect of solution plasma discharges in water. The discharges were excited by 100 ns high voltage pulsing of graphite particle chains that bridge an electrode gap. The underwater discharges allow simultaneous exfoliation and chemical functionalization of graphite particles to partially oxidized multi-layer graphene. Exfoliation is caused by shockwaves that result from rapid evaporation of carbon and water to plasma-excited gas species. Depending on discharge energy and locus of ignition, the shockwaves cause stirring, erosion, exfoliation and/or expansion of graphite flakes. The process was optimized to produce long-term stable aqueous dispersions of multi-layer graphene from graphite in a single process step without requiring addition of intercalants, surfactants, binders or special solvents. A setup was developed that allows continuous production of aqueous dispersions of flake size-selected multi-layer graphenes. Due to the well-preserved sp2-carbon structure, thin films made from the dispersed graphene exhibited high electrical conductivity. Underwater plasma discharge processing exhibits high innovation potential for morphological and chemical modifications of carbonaceous materials and surfaces, especially for the generation of stable dispersions of two-dimensional, layered materials.

  1. Cellular uptake and distribution of graphene oxide coated with layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiye; Lu, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhongjun; Nie, Guangjun; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-01

    We report a facile approach for the fabrication of a new class of graphene oxide (GO)-based nanoassemblies by layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The single-layer thickness and intrinsic negatively charged carboxyl groups of GO nanosheets provide a natural platform for LbL assembly of polyelectrolyte nanofilms by electrostatic forces at mild and aqueous conditions. The general applicability of our approach is demonstrated by the preparation of GO nanoassemblies with sizes of 100-200 nm using various charged polyelectrolytes, including synthetic polymers, polypeptides, and DNA oligonucleotides. Systemic assessment of cytotoxicity and acute stress response show that no discernable signs of cytotoxicity are associated with exposure of GO and its nanoassemblies [GO/PLL (poly ( l-lysine)), GO/PLL/PSS (poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate)), GO/PLL-PEG (PEGlayted PLL), GO/PLL/PLGA-PEG (PEGlayted poly ( l-glutamic acid))] up to 1 μg/mL. Studies on cellular uptake and subcellular localization show that a representative nanoassembly, GO/PLL-PEG, can effectively cross cell membranes and localize mainly in lysosomal compartments, without induction of noticeable harmful effects as confirmed by detection of mitochondrial depolarization and lysosomal pH.

  2. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-11-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  3. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-12-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  4. Applications of atomic layer deposition in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenbin; Li, Xianglin; Karuturi, Siva Krishna; Fam, Derrick Wenhui; Fan, Hongjin; Shrestha, Santosh; Wong, Lydia Helena; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2015-02-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a unique tool for the growth of thin films with excellent conformity and thickness control down to atomic levels. The application of ALD in energy research has received increasing attention in recent years. In this review, the versatility of ALD in solar cells will be discussed. This is specifically focused on the fabrication of nanostructured photoelectrodes, surface passivation, surface sensitization, and band-structure engineering of solar cell materials. Challenges and future directions of ALD in the applications of solar cells are also discussed.

  5. Nature of the surface states at the single-layer graphene/Cu(111) and graphene/polycrystalline-Cu interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliara, S.; Tognolini, S.; Bignardi, L.; Galimberti, G.; Achilli, S.; Trioni, M. I.; van Dorp, W. F.; Ocelík, V.; Rudolf, P.; Parmigiani, F.

    2015-05-01

    Single-layer graphene supported on a metal surface has shown remarkable properties relevant for novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the nature of the electronic states derived from unoccupied surface states and quantum well states, lying in the real-space gap between the graphene and the solid surface, has not been explored and exploited yet. Herein, we use ultraviolet nonlinear angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to unveil the coexistence at the graphene/Cu(111) interface of a highest occupied Shockley surface state (HOSS) and the two lowest unoccupied surface states (LUSS). The experimental results and electronic structure calculations, based on one-dimensional model potential, indicate that the two unoccupied states originate from the hybridization of an n =1 image potential state with a quantum well state. The hybridized nature of these unoccupied states is benchmarked by a similar experiment done on single-layer graphene grown on copper polycrystalline foil where only the image state survives being the quantum well state at this interface inhibited.

  6. One-Minute Room-Temperature Transfer-Free Production of Mono- and Few-Layer Polycrystalline Graphene on Various Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shenglin; Zeng, Yike; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui; Yu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Graphene deposited on various substrates has attracted the attention of the scientific and technical communities for use in a wide range of applications. Graphene on substrates is commonly produced by two types of methods, namely, methods that require a transfer step and transfer-free methods. Compared with methods that require a transfer step, transfer-free methods have a simpler procedure and a lower cost. Thus, transfer-free methods have considerable potential to meet the industrial and commercial demands of production methods. However, some limitations of the current transfer-free methods must be overcome, such as the high temperatures encountered during production, the relatively long manufacturing times, incompatibilities for both rigid and flexible substrates, and an inability to extend the process to other two-dimensional (2-D) atomic crystals. In this work, a room-temperature rubbing method is developed for the rapid transfer-free production of defect-free polycrystalline graphene on rigid and flexible substrates. Starting with inexpensive commercially obtained graphite powder, mono- and few-layer graphene can be fabricated directly on various substrates, with an average production time of less than one minute (from raw graphite to graphene on the substrate). Importantly, this method can be extended to other 2-D atomic crystals. PMID:26763292

  7. Ultrathin two-dimensional atomic crystals as stable interfacial layer for improvement of lithium metal anode.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Gao, Teng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Yao, Hongbin; Wang, Haotian; Lu, Zhenda; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Zheng; Liu, Zhongfan; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2014-10-08

    Stable cycling of lithium metal anode is challenging due to the dendritic lithium formation and high chemical reactivity of lithium with electrolyte and nearly all the materials. Here, we demonstrate a promising novel electrode design by growing two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystal layers including hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene directly on Cu metal current collectors. Lithium ions were able to penetrate through the point and line defects of the 2D layers during the electrochemical deposition, leading to sandwiched lithium metal between ultrathin 2D layers and Cu. The 2D layers afford an excellent interfacial protection of Li metal due to their remarkable chemical stability as well as mechanical strength and flexibility, resulting from the strong intralayer bonds and ultrathin thickness. Smooth Li metal deposition without dendritic and mossy Li formation was realized. We showed stable cycling over 50 cycles with Coulombic efficiency ∼97% in organic carbonate electrolyte with current density and areal capacity up to the practical value of 2.0 mA/cm(2)and 5.0 mAh/cm(2), respectively, which is a significant improvement over the unprotected electrodes in the same electrolyte.

  8. Ab-initio investigation of the influence of chemical compounds on graphene layer properties in fabricated IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, L.; Wozny, J.; Szczecinska, N.; Lisik, Z.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the influence of H2O, NaOH and propanol on properties of graphene layer placed on SiO2 has been investigated. These chemical particles are present during technological steps required for a device fabrication and may lead to significant changes of graphene properties. The investigation has been done by means of ab-initio simulation based on the DFT method. A MedeA-VASP package was used to investigate behavior of graphene layer in the vicinity of chemical compounds. Presented studies show that properties of graphene are significantly modified when particles of H2O and NaOH are captured in-between graphene layer and SiO2. Special attention should be paid to NaOH which, according to simulations, decays and modifies the properties of graphene layer.

  9. Formation and photovoltaic performance of few-layered graphene-decorated TiO2 nanocrystals used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueli; Cheng, Yuqing; Shu, Wei; Peng, Zhuoyin; Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Zakharova, Galina S

    2014-06-21

    Few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are successfully in situ synthesized at a low temperature of 400 °C using C28H16Br2 as the precursor. Raman mapping images show that the TiO2 nanocrystals are very uniformly dispersed in the composite films, and the in situ coating during the thermal decomposition process will favor the formation of a good interface combination between the few-layered graphene and the TiO2 nanocrystals. The few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are used as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the conversion efficiency of 8.25% is obtained under full sun irradiation (AM 1.5), which increases by 65% compared with that of the pure TiO2 nanocrystal DSSCs (5.01%). It is found that the good interface combination between few-layered graphene and TiO2 nanocrystals may improve the electric conductivity and lifetime of photoinduced electrons in DSSCs. Moreover, some carbon atoms are doped into the crystal structure of the TiO2 nanocrystals during the thermal decomposition process, which will enhance the light absorption by narrowing the band gap and favor the improvement of the photovoltaic efficiency.

  10. Cobalt intercalation at the graphene/iridium(111) interface: Influence of rotational domains, wrinkles, and atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Vlaic, S.; Kimouche, A.; Coraux, J.; Rougemaille, N.; Santos, B.; Locatelli, A.

    2014-03-10

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we study Co intercalation under graphene grown on Ir(111). Depending on the rotational domain of graphene on which it is deposited, Co is found intercalated at different locations. While intercalated Co is observed preferentially at the substrate step edges below certain rotational domains, it is mostly found close to wrinkles below other domains. These results indicate that curved regions (near substrate atomic steps and wrinkles) of the graphene sheet facilitate Co intercalation and suggest that the strength of the graphene/Ir interaction determines which pathway is energetically more favorable.

  11. Characterization of CZTSSe photovoltaic device with an atomic layer-deposited passivation layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei Cao, Yanyan; Caspar, Jonathan V.; Guo, Qijie; Johnson, Lynda K.; Mclean, Robert S.; Malajovich, Irina; Choudhury, Kaushik Roy

    2014-07-28

    We describe a CZTSSe (Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S{sub 1−x},Se{sub x}){sub 4}) photovoltaic (PV) device with an ALD (atomic layer deposition) coated buffer dielectric layer for CZTSSe surface passivation. An ALD buffer layer, such as TiO{sub 2}, can be applied in order to reduce the interface recombination and improve the device's open-circuit voltage. Detailed characterization data including current-voltage, admittance spectroscopy, and capacitance profiling are presented in order to compare the performance of PV devices with and without the ALD layer.

  12. Adsorption of metal atoms at a buckled graphene grain boundary using model potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Helgee, Edit E.; Isacsson, Andreas

    2016-01-15

    Two model potentials have been evaluated with regard to their ability to model adsorption of single metal atoms on a buckled graphene grain boundary. One of the potentials is a Lennard-Jones potential parametrized for gold and carbon, while the other is a bond-order potential parametrized for the interaction between carbon and platinum. Metals are expected to adsorb more strongly to grain boundaries than to pristine graphene due to their enhanced adsorption at point defects resembling those that constitute the grain boundary. Of the two potentials considered here, only the bond-order potential reproduces this behavior and predicts the energy of the adsorbate to be about 0.8 eV lower at the grain boundary than on pristine graphene. The Lennard-Jones potential predicts no significant difference in energy between adsorbates at the boundary and on pristine graphene. These results indicate that the Lennard-Jones potential is not suitable for studies of metal adsorption on defects in graphene, and that bond-order potentials are preferable.

  13. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  14. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  15. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  16. Growing vertical ZnO nanorod arrays within graphite: efficient isolation of large size and high quality single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; E, Yifeng; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2013-07-18

    We report a unique strategy for efficiently exfoliating large size and high quality single-layer graphene directly from graphite into DMF dispersions by growing ZnO nanorod arrays between the graphene layers in graphite.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons exfoliated onto H:Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radocea, Adrian; Mehdi Pour, Mohammad; Vo, Timothy; Shekhirev, Mikhail; Sinitskii, Alexander; Lyding, Joseph

    Atomically precise graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are promising materials for next generation transistors due to their well-controlled bandgaps and the high thermal conductivity of graphene. The solution synthesis of graphene nanoribbons offers a pathway towards scalable manufacturing. While scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can access size scales required for characterization, solvent residue increases experimental difficulty and precludes band-gap determination via scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Our work addresses this challenge through a dry contact transfer method that cleanly transfers solution-synthesized GNRs onto H:Si(100) under UHV using a fiberglass applicator. The semiconducting silicon surface avoids problems with image charge screening enabling intrinsic bandgap measurements. We characterize the nanoribbons using STM and STS. For chevron GNRs, we find a 1.6 eV bandgap, in agreement with computational modeling, and map the electronic structure spatially with detailed spectra lines and current imaging tunneling spectroscopy. Mapping the electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons is an important step towards taking advantage of the ability to form atomically precise nanoribbons and finely tune their properties.

  18. An important atomic process in the CVD growth of graphene: Sinking and up-floating of carbon atom on copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingfeng; Li, Meicheng; Gu, TianSheng; Bai, Fan; Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya; Yu, Yangxin

    2013-11-01

    By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the early stages of the growth of graphene on copper (1 1 1) surface are investigated. At the very first time of graphene growth, the carbon atom sinks into subsurface. As more carbon atoms are adsorbed nearby the site, the sunken carbon atom will spontaneously form a dimer with one of the newly adsorbed carbon atoms, and the formed dimer will up-float on the top of the surface. We emphasize the role of the co-operative relaxation of the co-adsorbed carbon atoms in facilitating the sinking and up-floating of carbon atoms. In detail: when two carbon atoms are co-adsorbed, their co-operative relaxation will result in different carbon-copper interactions for the co-adsorbed carbon atoms. This difference facilitates the sinking of a single carbon atom into the subsurface. As a third carbon atom is co-adsorbed nearby, it draws the sunken carbon atom on top of the surface, forming a dimer. Co-operative relaxations of the surface involving all adsorbed carbon atoms and their copper neighbors facilitate these sinking and up-floating processes. This investigation is helpful for the deeper understanding of graphene synthesis and the choosing of optimal carbon sources or process.

  19. Ultrahigh-Gain Photodetectors Based on Atomically Thin Graphene-MoS2 Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjing; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Huang, Jing-Kai; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Tsai, Meng-Lin; Chang, Yung-Huang; Liang, Chi-Te; Chen, Yu-Ze; Chueh, Yu-Lun; He, Jr-Hau; Chou, Mei-Yin; Li, Lain-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Due to its high carrier mobility, broadband absorption, and fast response time, the semi-metallic graphene is attractive for optoelectronics. Another two-dimensional semiconducting material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is also known as light- sensitive. Here we show that a large-area and continuous MoS2 monolayer is achievable using a CVD method and graphene is transferable onto MoS2. We demonstrate that a photodetector based on the graphene/MoS2 heterostructure is able to provide a high photogain greater than 108. Our experiments show that the electron-hole pairs are produced in the MoS2 layer after light absorption and subsequently separated across the layers. Contradictory to the expectation based on the conventional built-in electric field model for metal-semiconductor contacts, photoelectrons are injected into the graphene layer rather than trapped in MoS2 due to the presence of a perpendicular effective electric field caused by the combination of the built-in electric field, the applied electrostatic field, and charged impurities or adsorbates, resulting in a tuneable photoresponsivity. PMID:24451916

  20. microstructures by inversion of macroporous silicon using atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, A.; Knez, M.; Müller, F.; Gösele, U.

    2008-07-01

    An approach is presented which is capable of fabricating arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional microstructures. Two methods—namely, macroporous silicon and atomic layer deposition—are combined to realize structures in the micrometer and submicrometer range. Using TiO2 as an example, the fabrication of single hollow objects as well as complex network structures is shown. The scalability and the wide range of applicable materials are the key points of this method for future applications.

  1. Few layered graphene Sheet decorated by ZnO Nanoparticles for anti-bacterial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykkam, Satish; Narsingam, Sowmya; Ahmadipour, Mohsen; Dayakar, T.; Venkateswara Rao, K.; Shilpa Chakra, Ch.; Kalakotla, Shanker

    2015-07-01

    A widely soluble few layered graphene (FLG) sheets decorated by ZnO nano particles were prepared through hydrothermal method using ethylene glycol as a solvent and a reducing agent. The obtained FLG/ZnO composite material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The anti-bacterial properties of ZnO nano particles decorated few layered graphenes were tested against Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi by using well diffusion method. The results confirmed that FLG/ZnO has significant antibacterial activity more against S. typhi than E. coli. The obtained results from the current research work conclusively states that the ZnO nano particles which were decorated by few layered graphene possess a significant anti-bacterial activity.

  2. Electron dynamics of the buffer layer and bilayer graphene on SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Alex J.; Caplins, Benjamin W.; Suich, David E.; Harris, Charles B.; Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2014-06-09

    Angle- and time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TPPE) was used to investigate electronic states in the buffer layer of 4H-SiC(0001). An image potential state (IPS) series was observed on this strongly surface-bound buffer layer, and dispersion measurements indicated free-electron-like behavior for all states in this series. These results were compared with TPPE taken on bilayer graphene, which also show the existence of a free-electron-like IPS series. Lifetimes for the n = 2, and n = 3 states were obtained from time-resolved TPPE; slightly increased lifetimes were observed in the bilayer graphene sample for the n = 2 the n = 3 states. Despite the large band gap of graphene at the center of the Brillouin zone, the lifetime results demonstrate that the graphene layers do not behave as a simple tunneling barrier, suggesting that the buffer layer and graphene overlayers play a direct role in the decay of IPS electrons.

  3. Graphene-copper composite with micro-layered grains and ultrahigh strength.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Ziyue; Cui, Ye; Wei, Bing; Xu, Shichong; Sheng, Jie; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Yunpeng; Fei, Weidong

    2017-02-07

    Graphene with ultrahigh intrinsic strength and excellent thermal physical properties has the potential to be used as the reinforcement of many kinds of composites. Here, we show that very high tensile strength can be obtained in the copper matrix composite reinforced by reduced graphene oxide (RGO) when micro-layered structure is achieved. RGO-Cu powder with micro-layered structure is fabricated from the reduction of the micro-layered graphene oxide (GO) and Cu(OH)2 composite sheets, and RGO-Cu composites are sintered by spark plasma sintering process. The tensile strength of the 5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 608 MPa, which is more than three times higher than that of the Cu matrix. The apparent strengthening efficiency of RGO in the 2.5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 110, even higher than that of carbon nanotube, multilayer graphene, carbon nano fiber and RGO in the copper matrix composites produced by conventional MLM method. The excellent tensile and compressive strengths, high hardness and good electrical conductivity are obtained simultaneously in the RGO-Cu composites. The results shown in the present study provide an effective method to design graphene based composites with layered structure and high performance.

  4. Graphene-copper composite with micro-layered grains and ultrahigh strength

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Ziyue; Cui, Ye; Wei, Bing; Xu, Shichong; Sheng, Jie; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Yunpeng; Fei, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Graphene with ultrahigh intrinsic strength and excellent thermal physical properties has the potential to be used as the reinforcement of many kinds of composites. Here, we show that very high tensile strength can be obtained in the copper matrix composite reinforced by reduced graphene oxide (RGO) when micro-layered structure is achieved. RGO-Cu powder with micro-layered structure is fabricated from the reduction of the micro-layered graphene oxide (GO) and Cu(OH)2 composite sheets, and RGO-Cu composites are sintered by spark plasma sintering process. The tensile strength of the 5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 608 MPa, which is more than three times higher than that of the Cu matrix. The apparent strengthening efficiency of RGO in the 2.5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 110, even higher than that of carbon nanotube, multilayer graphene, carbon nano fiber and RGO in the copper matrix composites produced by conventional MLM method. The excellent tensile and compressive strengths, high hardness and good electrical conductivity are obtained simultaneously in the RGO-Cu composites. The results shown in the present study provide an effective method to design graphene based composites with layered structure and high performance. PMID:28169306

  5. Graphene-copper composite with micro-layered grains and ultrahigh strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Ziyue; Cui, Ye; Wei, Bing; Xu, Shichong; Sheng, Jie; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Yunpeng; Fei, Weidong

    2017-02-01

    Graphene with ultrahigh intrinsic strength and excellent thermal physical properties has the potential to be used as the reinforcement of many kinds of composites. Here, we show that very high tensile strength can be obtained in the copper matrix composite reinforced by reduced graphene oxide (RGO) when micro-layered structure is achieved. RGO-Cu powder with micro-layered structure is fabricated from the reduction of the micro-layered graphene oxide (GO) and Cu(OH)2 composite sheets, and RGO-Cu composites are sintered by spark plasma sintering process. The tensile strength of the 5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 608 MPa, which is more than three times higher than that of the Cu matrix. The apparent strengthening efficiency of RGO in the 2.5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 110, even higher than that of carbon nanotube, multilayer graphene, carbon nano fiber and RGO in the copper matrix composites produced by conventional MLM method. The excellent tensile and compressive strengths, high hardness and good electrical conductivity are obtained simultaneously in the RGO-Cu composites. The results shown in the present study provide an effective method to design graphene based composites with layered structure and high performance.

  6. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarik, Keren J. Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A.

    2015-03-15

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices.

  7. Towards wafer-size graphene layers by atmospheric pressure graphitization of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, Konstantin V.; Bostwick, Aaron; Horn, Karsten; Jobst, Johannes; Kellogg, Gary L.; Ley, Lothar; McChesney, Jessica L.; Ohta, Taisuke; Reshanov, Sergey A.; Röhrl, Jonas; Rotenberg, Eli; Schmid, Andreas K.; Waldmann, Daniel; Weber, Heiko B.; Seyller, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Graphene, a single monolayer of graphite, has recently attracted considerable interest owing to its novel magneto-transport properties, high carrier mobility and ballistic transport up to room temperature. It has the potential for technological applications as a successor of silicon in the post Moore's law era, as a single-molecule gas sensor, in spintronics, in quantum computing or as a terahertz oscillator. For such applications, uniform ordered growth of graphene on an insulating substrate is necessary. The growth of graphene on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces by high-temperature annealing in vacuum was previously proposed to open a route for large-scale production of graphene-based devices. However, vacuum decomposition of SiC yields graphene layers with small grains (30-200nm refs 14-16). Here, we show that the ex situ graphitization of Si-terminated SiC(0001) in an argon atmosphere of about 1bar produces monolayer graphene films with much larger domain sizes than previously attainable. Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements confirm the improved quality of the films thus obtained. High electronic mobilities were found, which reach μ=2,000cm2V-1s-1 at T=27K. The new growth process introduced here establishes a method for the synthesis of graphene films on a technologically viable basis.

  8. Observing Atomic Collapse Resonances in Artificial Nuclei on Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    from the vacuum, but these results remain ambiguous due to the enormously large Zc ~ 170 that is required (6, 7). Hopes to realize atomic collapse...threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual “atomic collapse” state which exhibits an electron wave function component that falls...matching the quasi-bound state resonance energy between the simulation and experi- ment. The resulting simulated dI/dV spectra from the Dirac equation are

  9. Band gap engineering for single-layer graphene by using slow Li(+) ions.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Mintae; Lee, Paengro; Kim, Jingul; Park, Heemin; Chung, Jinwook

    2016-08-05

    In order to utilize the superb electronic properties of graphene in future electronic nano-devices, a dependable means of controlling the transport properties of its Dirac electrons has to be devised by forming a tunable band gap. We report on the ion-induced modification of the electronic properties of single-layer graphene (SLG) grown on a SiC(0001) substrate by doping low-energy (5 eV) Li(+) ions. We find the opening of a sizable and tunable band gap up to 0.85 eV, which depends on the Li(+) ion dose as well as the following thermal treatment, and is the largest band gap in the π-band of SLG by any means reported so far. Our Li 1s core-level data together with the valence band suggest that Li(+) ions do not intercalate below the topmost graphene layer, but cause a significant charge asymmetry between the carbon sublattices of SLG to drive the opening of the band gap. We thus provide a route to producing a tunable graphene band gap by doping Li(+) ions, which may play a pivotal role in the utilization of graphene in future graphene-based electronic nano-devices.

  10. Hybridization of conductive few-layer graphene with well-dispersed Pd nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Wen; Cottingham, Steven; Jiao, Jun

    2013-06-01

    To improve the activity of Pd nanocrystals (NCs) and maximize the applicability, we used a very simple, low-cost and environmentally benign method to hybridize conductive few-layer graphene with Pd NCs. The TEM results indicated that the monodispersed Pd NCs were well distributed on the graphene surface. The particle size and loading density can be easily tailored by varying reaction times. The XRD and Raman spectrum clearly demonstrated that the pristine exfoliated few-layer graphene are well-crystallized with very low defects, and still preserved the high crystalline structure after the chemical deposition of Pd NCs. Furthermore, this effective process does not require the use of surfactants during the entire reaction, resulting in a clean interface between Pd NCs and graphene substrate, with improved electron transmission. This work presents not only a promising methodology for the mass production of Pd@graphene hybrids, but also opening up the opportunity to develop graphene-Pd based devices for applications in catalysts, sensors and hydrogen storage.

  11. Fabrication of graphene-nanoflake/poly(4-vinylphenol) polymer nanocomposite thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization and its application as flexible resistive switching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyung Hyun; Ali, Junaid; Na, Kyoung-Hoan

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes synthesis of graphene/poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) nanocomposite and deposition of thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) for fabrication flexible resistive switching device. EHDA technique proved its viability for thin film deposition after surface morphology analyses by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and non-destructive 3D Nano-profilometry, as the deposited films were, devoid of abnormalities. The commercially available graphene micro-flakes were exfoliated and broken down to ultra-small (20 nm-200 nm) nano-flakes by ultra-sonication in presence of N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP). These graphene nanoflakes with PVP nanocomposite, were successfully deposited as thin films (thickness ~140±7 nm, Ra=2.59 nm) on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Transmittance data revealed that thin films are up to ~87% transparent in visible and NIR region. Resistive switching behaviour of graphene/PVP nanocomposite thin film was studied by using the nanocomposite as active layer in Ag/active layer/ITO sandwich structure. The resistive switching devices thus fabricated, showed characteristic OFF to ON (high resistance to low resistance) transition at low voltages, when operated between ±3 V, characterized at 10 nA compliance currents. The devices fabricated by this approach exhibited a stable room temperature, low power current-voltage hysteresis and well over 1 h retentivity, and ROFF/RON≈35:1. The device showed stable flexibility up to a minimum bending diameter of 1.8 cm.

  12. Self-forming oriented layer slip and macroscale super-low friction of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hui; Ji, Li; Li, Hongxuan; Wang, Jinqing; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-02-01

    Graphite lubrication is not effective in vacuum, and the failure mechanism is still under debate. Here, we show that graphene as two-dimensional (2D) "graphite paper" can overcome this shortcoming of graphite. Graphene exhibits stable super-low friction in a vacuum environment at the engineering scale because it can self-form a highly ordered lamellar structure on the sliding interface during the friction process owing to its unique 2D nano-effects. Experimental observation of the layer-slip phenomenon on the low-energy-state outside layers provides direct evidence to understand the lubrication mechanism of graphitic materials.

  13. Magneto-transport properties of a random distribution of few-layer graphene patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovella, Fabrice; Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Mitioglu, Anatolie; Conédéra, Véronique; Pierre, Mathieu; Raquet, Bertrand; Goiran, Michel; Vergnes, Hugues; Caussat, Brigitte; Plochocka, Paulina; Escoffier, Walter

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we address the electronic properties of conducting films constituted of an array of randomly distributed few layer graphene patches and investigate on their most salient galvanometric features in the moderate and extreme disordered limit. We demonstrate that, in annealed devices, the ambipolar behaviour and the onset of Landau level quantization in high magnetic field constitute robust hallmarks of few-layer graphene films. In the strong disorder limit, however, the magneto-transport properties are best described by a variable-range hopping behaviour. A large negative magneto-conductance is observed at the charge neutrality point, in consistency with localized transport regime.

  14. Tensile mechanical properties of nano-layered copper/graphene composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yezeng; Huang, Feng; Li, Hui; Sui, Yanwei; Wei, Fuxiang; Meng, Qingkun; Yang, Weiming; Qi, Jiqiu

    2017-03-01

    The solidification of two-dimensional liquid copper confined to graphene layers has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The results clearly show that the liquid copper undergoes an obvious transition to a crystal film with the decrease of temperature, accompanied by dramatic change in potential energy and radial distribution function. Moreover, five different simulation models are used to investigate the effects of the number of graphene layers on the mechanical properties of the composites. It is found that the strength and plasticity of the composites have been improved significantly.

  15. An iron-based green approach to 1-h production of single-layer graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Li; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Wei, Yangyang; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Zheng; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chao

    2015-01-01

    As a reliable and scalable precursor of graphene, graphene oxide (GO) is of great importance. However, the environmentally hazardous heavy metals and poisonous gases, explosion risk and long reaction times involved in the current synthesis methods of GO increase the production costs and hinder its real applications. Here we report an iron-based green strategy for the production of single-layer GO in 1 h. Using the strong oxidant K2FeO4, our approach not only avoids the introduction of polluting heavy metals and toxic gases in preparation and products but also enables the recycling of sulphuric acid, eliminating pollution. Our dried GO powder is highly soluble in water, in which it forms liquid crystals capable of being processed into macroscopic graphene fibres, films and aerogels. This green, safe, highly efficient and ultralow-cost approach paves the way to large-scale commercial applications of graphene.

  16. An iron-based green approach to 1-h production of single-layer graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Wei, Yangyang; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Zheng; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chao

    2015-01-01

    As a reliable and scalable precursor of graphene, graphene oxide (GO) is of great importance. However, the environmentally hazardous heavy metals and poisonous gases, explosion risk and long reaction times involved in the current synthesis methods of GO increase the production costs and hinder its real applications. Here we report an iron-based green strategy for the production of single-layer GO in 1 h. Using the strong oxidant K2FeO4, our approach not only avoids the introduction of polluting heavy metals and toxic gases in preparation and products but also enables the recycling of sulphuric acid, eliminating pollution. Our dried GO powder is highly soluble in water, in which it forms liquid crystals capable of being processed into macroscopic graphene fibres, films and aerogels. This green, safe, highly efficient and ultralow-cost approach paves the way to large-scale commercial applications of graphene. PMID:25607686

  17. An iron-based green approach to 1-h production of single-layer graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Wei, Yangyang; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Zheng; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chao

    2015-01-21

    As a reliable and scalable precursor of graphene, graphene oxide (GO) is of great importance. However, the environmentally hazardous heavy metals and poisonous gases, explosion risk and long reaction times involved in the current synthesis methods of GO increase the production costs and hinder its real applications. Here we report an iron-based green strategy for the production of single-layer GO in 1 h. Using the strong oxidant K2FeO4, our approach not only avoids the introduction of polluting heavy metals and toxic gases in preparation and products but also enables the recycling of sulphuric acid, eliminating pollution. Our dried GO powder is highly soluble in water, in which it forms liquid crystals capable of being processed into macroscopic graphene fibres, films and aerogels. This green, safe, highly efficient and ultralow-cost approach paves the way to large-scale commercial applications of graphene.

  18. Friction and conductance imaging of sp2- and sp3-hybridized subdomains on single-layer graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Son, Narae; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Tae Gun; Bang, Gyeong Sook; Kim, Jong Yun; Shim, Gi Woong; Goddeti, Kalyan C.; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Namdong; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Kim, Wondong; Kim, Sehun; Choi, Sung-Yool; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the subdomain structures of single-layer graphene oxide (GO) by characterizing local friction and conductance using conductive atomic force microscopy. Friction and conductance mapping showed that a single-layer GO flake has subdomains several tens to a few hundreds of nanometers in lateral size. The GO subdomains exhibited low friction (high conductance) in the sp2-rich phase and high friction (low conductance) in the sp3-rich phase. Current-voltage spectroscopy revealed that the local current flow in single-layer GO depends on the quantity of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, and epoxy bridges within the 2-dimensional carbon layer. The presence of subdomains with different sp2/sp3 carbon ratios on a GO flake was also confirmed by chemical mapping using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. These results suggest that spatial mapping of the friction and conductance can be used to rapidly identify the composition of heterogeneous single-layer GO at nanometer scale, which is essential for understanding charge transport in nanoelectronic devices.We investigated the subdomain structures of single-layer graphene oxide (GO) by characterizing local friction and conductance using conductive atomic force microscopy. Friction and conductance mapping showed that a single-layer GO flake has subdomains several tens to a few hundreds of nanometers in lateral size. The GO subdomains exhibited low friction (high conductance) in the sp2-rich phase and high friction (low conductance) in the sp3-rich phase. Current-voltage spectroscopy revealed that the local current flow in single-layer GO depends on the quantity of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, and epoxy bridges within the 2-dimensional carbon layer. The presence of subdomains with different sp2/sp3 carbon ratios on a GO flake was also confirmed by chemical mapping using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. These results suggest that spatial mapping of the friction and conductance can be used to rapidly identify

  19. Graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy on the carbon-face of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, E.; Godey, S.; Ferrer, F. J.; Vignaud, D.; Wallart, X.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C.; Bournel, F.; Gallet, J.-J.

    2010-12-13

    Graphene layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the (0001) C-face of SiC and have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and UV photoelectron spectroscopy. Contrary to the graphitization process, the step-terrace structure of SiC is fully preserved during the MBE growth. LEED patterns show multiple orientation domains which are characteristic of graphene on SiC (0001), indicating non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. Well-defined Dirac cones, typical of single-layer graphene, have been observed in the valence band for few graphene layers by synchrotron spectroscopy, confirming the electronic decoupling of graphene layers.

  20. Electrical DNA sequencing by graphene edges functionalized with H or N atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Rodrigo G.; Scheicheir, Ralph H.

    2014-03-01

    The current technology of DNA sequencing needs to be revolutionized in order to be sufficiently cost-efficient for widespread application in healthcare and genomic research. One of the most promising proposals is to use a solid-state nanodevice based on graphene due to its atomically thin edges which would readily enable single-nucleobase resolution in transverse conductance measurements. We used ab initio calculations based on Density Functional Theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function method to study how the capability of a graphene nanogap to electrically sense the four nucleobases (Adenine, Cytosine, Guanine and Thymine) is affected by different passivation (H or N) of the graphene edges. We will show how, for the same nucleobase, the zero bias conductance can be increased by five orders of magnitude when N atoms are chosen for functionalization over H atoms. Other aspects investigated by us concern the translational process of nucleobases through the nanogap and the corresponding spatial resolution due to diminishing transmittance as the nucleobase moves out of the gap.