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Sample records for atomic structure ii

  1. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts. PMID:27650485

  2. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-09-21

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts.

  3. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts. PMID:27650485

  4. Atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anke; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Rosso, Kevin M; Frierdich, Andrew J; Scherer, Michelle M

    2015-03-01

    Due to their stability toward reductive dissolution, Fe-bearing clay minerals are viewed as a renewable source of Fe redox activity in diverse environments. Recent findings of interfacial electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals and electron conduction in octahedral sheets of nontronite, however, raise the question whether Fe interaction with clay minerals is more dynamic than previously thought. Here, we use an enriched isotope tracer approach to simultaneously trace Fe atom movement from the aqueous phase to the solid ((57)Fe) and from the solid into the aqueous phase ((56)Fe). Over 6 months, we observed a significant decrease in aqueous (57)Fe isotope fraction, with a fast initial decrease which slowed after 3 days and stabilized after about 50 days. For the aqueous (56)Fe isotope fraction, we observed a similar but opposite trend, indicating that Fe atom movement had occurred in both directions: from the aqueous phase into the solid and from the solid into aqueous phase. We calculated that 5-20% of structural Fe in clay minerals NAu-1, NAu-2, and SWa-1 exchanged with aqueous Fe(II), which significantly exceeds the Fe atom layer exposed directly to solution. Calculations based on electron-hopping rates in nontronite suggest that the bulk conduction mechanism previously demonstrated for hematite1 and suggested as an explanation for the significant Fe atom exchange observed in goethite2 may be a plausible mechanism for Fe atom exchange in Fe-bearing clay minerals. Our finding of 5-20% Fe atom exchange in clay minerals indicates that we need to rethink how Fe mobility affects the macroscopic properties of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and its role in Fe biogeochemical cycling, as well as its use in a variety of engineered applications, such as landfill liners and nuclear repositories.

  5. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin. PMID:25066915

  6. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin.

  7. Electron in a homogeneous crystal of point atoms with internal structure. II

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasov, P.B.; Pavlov, B.S.

    1988-07-01

    A spectral analysis is made of a Schroedinger operator with zero-range potential of the type of one- or two-dimensional lattice in the presence of internal structure. The relationship between the resonances of an isolated atom and the spectral properties of the crystal is established.

  8. Structure of human chromosomes studied by atomic force microscopy. Part II. Relationship between structure and cytogenetic bands.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Javier

    2003-03-01

    In the first part of this work, human chromosomes were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air and in aqueous solution. The analysis of the images suggests that the last level of organization consists of a radial arrangement of chromatin loops which are anchored to a fiber which is folded giving a pattern of bands which differs in volume. Here the pattern of bands observed by AFM is compared to the cytogenetic map at the 850-band level. Thus thicker and thinner bands are identified as G and R bands, respectively. Finally a model is proposed which links genome sequence, cytogenetics, and chromosome structure. PMID:12648565

  9. Structure of human chromosomes studied by atomic force microscopy. Part II. Relationship between structure and cytogenetic bands.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Javier

    2003-03-01

    In the first part of this work, human chromosomes were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air and in aqueous solution. The analysis of the images suggests that the last level of organization consists of a radial arrangement of chromatin loops which are anchored to a fiber which is folded giving a pattern of bands which differs in volume. Here the pattern of bands observed by AFM is compared to the cytogenetic map at the 850-band level. Thus thicker and thinner bands are identified as G and R bands, respectively. Finally a model is proposed which links genome sequence, cytogenetics, and chromosome structure.

  10. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  11. Iron Atom Exchange between Hematite and Aqueous Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Frierdich, Andrew J; Helgeson, Maria; Liu, Chengshuai; Wang, Chongmin; Rosso, Kevin M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2015-07-21

    Aqueous Fe(II) has been shown to exchange with structural Fe(III) in goethite without any significant phase transformation. It remains unclear, however, whether aqueous Fe(II) undergoes similar exchange reactions with structural Fe(III) in hematite, a ubiquitous iron oxide mineral. Here, we use an enriched (57)Fe tracer to show that aqueous Fe(II) exchanges with structural Fe(III) in hematite at room temperature, and that the amount of exchange is influenced by particle size, pH, and Fe(II) concentration. Reaction of 80 nm-hematite (27 m(2) g(-1)) with aqueous Fe(II) at pH 7.0 for 30 days results in ∼5% of its structural Fe(III) atoms exchanging with Fe(II) in solution, which equates to about one surface iron layer. Smaller, 50 nm-hematite particles (54 m(2) g(-1)) undergo about 25% exchange (∼3× surface iron) with aqueous Fe(II), demonstrating that structural Fe(III) in hematite is accessible to the fluid in the presence of Fe(II). The extent of exchange in hematite increases with pH up to 7.5 and then begins to decrease as the pH progresses to 8.0, likely due to surface site saturation by sorbed Fe(II). Similarly, when we vary the initial amount of added Fe(II), we observe decreasing amounts of exchange when aqueous Fe(II) is increased beyond surface saturation. This work shows that Fe(II) can catalyze iron atom exchange between bulk hematite and aqueous Fe(II), despite hematite being the most thermodynamically stable iron oxide.

  12. Atomic far-IR fine-structure line mapping of L1630, M17, and W3: Comparison of (O I) and (C II) distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, J. E.; Jaffe, Dan T.; Zhou, Shudong

    1995-01-01

    We mapped the distribution of atomic far-IR line emission from (O I) and (C II) over parsec scales in the Galactic star-forming regions L1630, M17, and W3 using the MPE Far-Infrared Fabry-Perot Imaging spectrometer (FIFI) on board the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The lines mapped include (O I) 63 microns, (O I) 146 microns, and (C II) 158 microns. Comparison of the intensities and ratios of these lines with models of photodissociation regions (e.g., Tielens & Hollenbach 1985, ApJ, 344, 770) allows us to derive temperatures and densities of the primarily neutral atomic gas layers lying on the surfaces of UV-illuminated molecular gas. In general, the (C II) line arises ubiquitously throughout the molecular clouds while the (O I) lines are mainly confined to warm, dense gas (T is greater than 100 K, n is greater than 10(exp 4)/cu cm) near the sites of O and B stars. The distribution of (C II) in the star-forming clouds implies that the (C II) emission arises on the surfaces of molecular clumps throughout the clouds, rather than only at the boundary layer between molecular gas and H II regions.

  13. Atomic structures of 13-atom clusters by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Wei, Ching-Ming

    2007-03-01

    The 13-atom cluster structures of the alkaline metals, alkaline earth metals, boron group, 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals in the periodic table, and Pb are investigated by density functional theory with three kinds of exchange correlation approximation: i) LDA (Local Density Approximation), ii) GGA (Generalized Gradient Approximation) [1], and iii) PBE (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) [2]. The results mainly focus on five 3-D structures: icosahedral, cuboctahedral, hexagonal-closed packed, body-center cubic, decahedral, and the other two layer structures: buckled biplanar (bbp) and garrison-cap biplanar (gbp) structures. Limited by accuracy of exchange correlation approximation, two interesting results are found. The ground states of Ca13, Sr13, Ba13, Sc13, Y13, La13, Ti13, Zr13, and Hf13 are icosahedral structures. The clusters of Ir13, Pt13, Cu13, Ag13, and Au13 are more favorable for layer structures (i.e. bbp and gbp) than the other five 3-D structures. [1] J. P. Perdew et al., Phys. Rev. B 46, 6671 (1992). [2] J. P. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996).

  14. Synthesis, characterization, substitution, and atom-transfer reactions of ([eta][sup 2]-alkyne)(tetratolylporphyrinato)titanium(II). X-ray structure of trans-bis(4-picoline)(tetratolylporphyrinato)titanium(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L.K.; Hays, J.A.; Young, V.G. Jr.; Day, C.L. ); Caron, C.; D'Souza, F.; Kadish, K.M. )

    1993-09-29

    A general preparative method for (tetratolylporphyrinato)titanium(II) [eta][sup 2]-acetylene complexes, (TTP)Ti([eta][sup 2]-RC[triple bond]CR[prime]), (R = R[prime] = CH[sub 3], CH[sub 2]CH[sub 3], C[sub 6]H[sub 5]; R = CH[sub 3], R[prime] = CH[sub 2]CH[sub 3]) is described. Displacement of 2-butyne from (TTP)Ti([eta][sup 2]-MeC[triple bond]CMe) with terminal acetylenes allows the preparation of (TTP)Ti([eta][sup 2]-HC[triple bond]CH) and (TTP)Ti([eta][sup 2]-PhC[triple bond]CH). The [pi] complexes undergo simple substitution reaction with pyridine (py) and 4-picoline (pic) to afford the bis(ligand) complexes trans-(TTP)Ti(py)[sub 2] and trans-(TTP)Ti(pic)[sub 2]. The structure of the bis(picoline) complex, C[sub 66]H[sub 56]N[sub 4]Ti, was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (triclinic, P[bar 1]). Crystallographic symmetry requires that the Ti atom resides in the center of the 24 atom porphyrin plane. The Ti-N[sup pic] distance is 2.223(3) [angstrom], and the average Ti-N[sub pyrrole] distance is 2.047(8) [angstrom]. The two picoline ligands are coplanar, and the dihedral angle formed by the plane of the picoline rings and the Ti-N[sub 1] vector is 43[degrees]. When ([eta][sup 2]-PhC[triple bond]CPh)Ti(TTP) is treated with di-p-tolyldiazomethane, a diazo adduct (TTP)Ti=NN=C(C[sub 6]H[sub 4]CH[sub 3])[sub 2] is formed. Atom transfer occurs when ([eta][sup 2]-PhC[triple bond]CPh)Ti(TTP) is treated with X=PPh[sub 3] (X = S, Se), resulting in a two-electron oxidized product, (TTP)Ti=X, PPh[sub 3], and free PhC[triple bond]CPh. Treatment of (TTP)Ti([eta][sup 2]-PhC[triple bond]CPh) with elemental sulfur or selenium produces the perchalcogenido complexes (TTP)Ti(S[sub 2]) and (TTP)Ti(Se[sub 2]).

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Computational Atomic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Douglass E.

    1998-02-01

    The primary purpose of `Computational Atomic Structure' is to give a potential user of the Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) Atomic Structure Package an outline of the physics and computational methods in the package, guidance on how to use the package, and information on how to interpret and use the computational results. The book is successful in all three aspects. In addition, the book provides a good overview and review of the physics of atomic structure that would be useful to the plasma physicist interested in refreshing his knowledge of atomic structure and quantum mechanics. While most of the subjects are covered in greater detail in other sources, the book is reasonably self-contained, and, in most cases, the reader can understand the basic material without recourse to other sources. The MCHF package is the standard package for computing atomic structure and wavefunctions for single or multielectron ions and atoms. It is available from a number of ftp sites. When the code was originally written in FORTRAN 77, it could only be run on large mainframes. With the advances in computer technology, the suite of codes can now be compiled and run on present day workstations and personal computers and is thus available for use by any physicist, even those with extremely modest computing resources. Sample calculations in interactive mode are included in the book to illustrate the input needed for the code, what types of results and information the code can produce, and whether the user has installed the code correctly. The user can also specify the calculational level, from simple Hartree-Fock to multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock. The MCHF method begins by finding approximate wavefunctions for the bound states of an atomic system. This involves minimizing the energy of the bound state using a variational technique. Once the wavefunctions have been determined, other atomic properties, such as the transition rates, can be determined. The book begins with an

  16. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    PubMed

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  17. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  18. Atomic structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I at pH 8.0 reveals the large disulfide-rich region in domain II to be sensitive to a pH change

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a recombinant thaumatin at pH 8.0 determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantial fluctuations of a loop in domain II was found in the structure at pH 8.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-factors for Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in mobility might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although the sweetness remains when thaumatin is heated at 80 Degree-Sign C for 4 h under acid conditions, it rapidly declines when heating at a pH above 6.5. To clarify the structural difference at high pH, the atomic structure of a recombinant thaumatin I at pH 8.0 was determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Comparison to the crystal structure of thaumatin at pH 7.3 and 7.0 revealed the root-mean square deviation value of a C{alpha} atom to be substantially greater in the large disulfide-rich region of domain II, especially residues 154-164, suggesting that a loop region in domain II to be affected by solvent conditions. Furthermore, B-factors of Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change, suggesting that a striking increase in the mobility of these lysine residues, which could facilitate a reaction with a free sulfhydryl residue produced via the {beta}-elimination of disulfide bonds by heating at a pH above 7.0. The increase in mobility of lysine residues as well as a loop region in domain II might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation of thaumatin above pH 7.0.

  19. Agricultural Structures, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Burhoe, Steve

    This guide to a curriculum unit in agricultural structures is designed to expand the curriculum materials available in vocational agriculture in Missouri. It and Agricultural Structures I (see note) provide reference materials to systematize the curriculum. The six units cover working with concrete (19 lessons, 2 laboratory exercises), drawing and…

  20. Relativistic Configuration Interaction calculations of the atomic properties of selected transition metal positive ions; Ni II, V II and W II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalmoneam, Marwa Hefny

    Relativistic Configuration Interaction (RCI) method has been used to investigate atomic properties of the singly ionized transition metals including Nickel (Ni II), Vanadium (V II), and Tungsten (W II). The methodology of RCI computations was also improved. Specifically, the method to shift the energy diagonal matrix of the reference configurations was modified which facilitated including the effects of many electronic configurations that used to be difficult to be included in the energy matrix and speeded-up the final calculations of the bound and continuum energy spectrum. RCI results were obtained for three different cases: i. Atomic moments and polarizabilities of Ni II; ii. Hyperfine structure constants of V II; iii. Lifetime, Lande g-values, and Oscillator strength of W II. Four atomic quantities of Ni II were calculated; scalar dipole polarizability, off-diagonal electric dipole polarizability, non-adiabatic scalar dipole polarizability, and quadrupole polarizability of Ni II. These quantities appear as effective parameters in an effective potential model. These quantities are computed for the first time. The two hyperfine structure (HFS) constants ; magnetic dipole interaction constant, A, and the electric quadrupole interaction constant, B, have been calculated for the V II 3d4, 3d3 4s, and 3d 2 4s2 J=1 to 5 even parity states . Analysis of the results shows the sum of HFS A of nearby energy levels to be conserved. The Lande g-value and the vector composition percentages for all the wavefunctions of those configurations have also been calculated. RCI results are in good agreement with most of the available experimental data. Lifetimes of 175 decay branches in W II have been calculated. Also, Lande g-values have been calculated for all measured W II odd parity levels J=1/2-11/2. The RCI oscillator strengths and branching fraction values of the lowest 10 energy levels for each odd parity J are presented. The calculated results are only in semi

  1. Electrochemical Potential Derived from Atomic Cluster Structures.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinglian; Xiao, Debao; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Based on the atomic cluster structures and free electron approximation model, it is revealed that the electrochemical potential (ECP) for the system of interest is proportional to the reciprocal of atomic cluster radius squared, i.e., φ = k·(1/r(2)). Applied to elemental crystals, the correlation between atomic cluster radii and the ECP that we have predicted agrees well with the previously reported results. In addition, some other physicochemical properties associated with the ECP have also been found relevant to the atomic cluster radii of materials. Thus, the atomic cluster radii can be perceived as an effective characteristic parameter to measure the ECP and related properties of materials. Our results provide a better understanding of ECP directly from the atomic structures perspective. PMID:26801811

  2. Electrochemical Potential Derived from Atomic Cluster Structures.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinglian; Xiao, Debao; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Based on the atomic cluster structures and free electron approximation model, it is revealed that the electrochemical potential (ECP) for the system of interest is proportional to the reciprocal of atomic cluster radius squared, i.e., φ = k·(1/r(2)). Applied to elemental crystals, the correlation between atomic cluster radii and the ECP that we have predicted agrees well with the previously reported results. In addition, some other physicochemical properties associated with the ECP have also been found relevant to the atomic cluster radii of materials. Thus, the atomic cluster radii can be perceived as an effective characteristic parameter to measure the ECP and related properties of materials. Our results provide a better understanding of ECP directly from the atomic structures perspective.

  3. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Raymond, John C.; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR) and important as diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by te{raymond1979} with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of the IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive their fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of the IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-IR lines, e.g., fethreefive/fetwofive, fefive/fetwofive, and fefive/feoneseven, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist, the uncertainty in atomic rates appears to be the major source of discrepancy.

  4. Some Experiments in Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.

    1974-01-01

    The role of spectral color slides in laboratory situations is discussed, then experiments for secondary school students concerning color and wave length, evidence of quantization, and the ionization energy of the hydrogen atom are outlined. Teaching guidelines for creating a set of spectrograms and photographic specifications are provided. (DT)

  5. Introduction to Atomic Structure: Demonstrations and Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciparick, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates a variety of electrical phenomena to help explain atomic structure. Topics include: establishing electrical properties, electrochemistry, and electrostatic charges. Recommends demonstration equipment needed and an explanation of each. (MVL)

  6. About the atomic structures of icosahedral quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Gratias, Denis

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a survey of the crystallographic methods that have been developed these last twenty five years to decipher the atomic structures of the icosahedral stable quasicrystals since their discovery in 1982 by D. Shechtman. After a brief recall of the notion of quasiperiodicity and the natural description of Z-modules in 3-dim as projection of regular lattices in N>3-dim spaces, we give the basic geometrical ingredients useful to describe icosahedral quasicrystals as irrational 3-dim cuts of ordinary crystals in 6-dim space. Atoms are described by atomic surfaces (ASs) that are bounded volumes in the internal (or perpendicular) 3-dim space and the intersections of which with the physical space are the actual atomic positions. The main part of the paper is devoted to finding the major properties of quasicrystalline icosahedral structures. As experimentally demonstrated, they can be described with a surprisingly few high symmetry ASs located at high symmetry special points in 6-dim space. The atomic structures are best described by aggregations and intersections of high symmetry compact interpenetrating atomic clusters. We show here that the experimentally relevant clusters are derived from one generic cluster made of two concentric triacontahedra scaled by τ and an external icosidodecahedron. Depending on which ones of the orbits of this cluster are eventually occupied by atoms, the actual atomic clusters are of type Bergman, Mackay, Tsai and others….

  7. Direct atomic structure determination by the inspection of structural phase.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Philip N H; Moodie, Alexander F; Etheridge, Joanne

    2013-08-27

    A century has passed since Bragg solved the first atomic structure using diffraction. As with this first structure, all atomic structures to date have been deduced from the measurement of many diffracted intensities using iterative and statistical methods. We show that centrosymmetric atomic structures can be determined without the need to measure or even record a diffracted intensity. Instead, atomic structures can be determined directly and quickly from the observation of crystallographic phases in electron diffraction patterns. Furthermore, only a few phases are required to achieve high resolution. This represents a paradigm shift in structure determination methods, which we demonstrate with the moderately complex α-Al2O3. We show that the observation of just nine phases enables the location of all atoms with a resolution of better than 0.1 Å. This level of certainty previously required the measurement of thousands of diffracted intensities.

  8. Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum Powder: Part II. Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2009-12-01

    The optimal processing parameters that are required to atomize amorphous Al were established on the basis of numerical simulations in part I of this study. In this part II, the characterization of cooling rate experienced by gas-atomized, Al-based amorphous powders was studied via experiments. An experimental investigation was implemented to validate the numerical predictions reported in part I of this study. The cooling rate experienced by the powders, for example, was experimentally determined on the basis of dendrite arm spacing correlations, and the results were compared with the numerical predictions. The experimental studies were completed using commercial Al 2024 as a baseline material and Al90Gd7Ni2Fe1 metallic glass (MG). The results showed that the cooling rate of droplets increases with decreasing particle size, with an increasing proportion of helium in the atomization gas and with increasing melt superheat. The experimental results reported in this article suggest good agreement between experiments and numerical simulations.

  9. Structure of hexaaquanickel(II) bromate.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, A C; Gallucci, J C; Gerkin, R E

    1991-09-15

    [Ni(H2O)6](BrO3)2, Mr = 422.60, cubic, Pa3, a = 10.2987 (6) A, V = 1092.3 (2) A3, Z = 4, F(000) = 824, Dx = 2.57 g cm-3, lambda(Mo K alpha) = 0.71073 A, mu = 90.79 cm-1, T = 296 K, R = 0.024 for 360 unique reflections having I greater than sigma I. The single type of nickel ion is coordinated by six water-molecule O atoms, each at an observed distance of 2.061 (2) A, in an almost regular octahedral array. The single type of bromate ion has an observed Br--O bond length of 1.655 (2) A and O--Br--O bond angle 104.25 (9) degrees. Both the nickel-oxygen complex and the bromate ion were found to manifest rigid-body behavior. The Ni--O distance corrected for rigid-body motion is 2.065 A, while the corrected Br--O bond length is 1.663 A. Location and refinement of the two inequivalent H atoms permitted a detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonding, which occurs principally between the oxygen octahedron and the bromate groups. This structure is isomorphic to the structures of hexaaquanickel(II) chlorate and hexaaquacobalt(II) bromate which have been reported recently from this laboratory. PMID:1786165

  10. Atomic Data and Spectral Model for Fe II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Manuel A.; Fivet, Vanessa; Ballance, Connor; Quinet, Pascal; Ferland, Gary; Mendoza, Claudio; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2015-08-01

    We present extensive calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact collision strengths for Fe ii. The data sets involve 52 levels from the 3d7, 3d64s, and 3{d}54{s}2 configurations. Computations of A-values are carried out with a combination of state-of-the-art multiconfiguration approaches, namely the relativistic Hartree–Fock, Thomas–Fermi–Dirac potential, and Dirac–Fock methods, while the R-matrix plus intermediate coupling frame transformation, Breit–Pauli R-matrix, and Dirac R-matrix packages are used to obtain collision strengths. We examine the advantages and shortcomings of each of these methods, and estimate rate uncertainties from the resulting data dispersion. We proceed to construct excitation balance spectral models, and compare the predictions from each data set with observed spectra from various astronomical objects. We are thus able to establish benchmarks in the spectral modeling of [Fe ii] emission in the IR and optical regions as well as in the UV Fe ii absorption spectra. Finally, we provide diagnostic line ratios and line emissivities for emission spectroscopy as well as column densities for absorption spectroscopy. All atomic data and models are available online and through the AtomPy atomic data curation environment.

  11. Structures and Properties of the Products of the Reaction of Lanthanide Atoms with H 2 O: Dominance of the +II Oxidation State

    DOE PAGES

    Mikulas, Tanya C.; Chen, Mingyang; Fang, Zongtang; Peterson, Kirk A.; Andrews, Lester; Dixon, David A.

    2016-01-07

    We studied, lanthanides and H2O reactions using density functional theory with the B3LYP functional. H2O forms an initial Lewis acid-base complex with the lanthanides exothermically with interaction energies from -2 to -20 kcal/mol. For most of the Ln, formation of HLnOH is more exothermic than formation of H2LnO, HLnO + H, and LnOH + H. Moreover, the reactions to produce HLnOH are exothermic from -25 to -75 kcal/mol. The formation of LnO + H2 for La and Ce is slightly more exothermic than formation of HLnOH and is less or equally exothermic for the rest of the lanthanides. The Lnmore » in HLnOH and LnOH are in the formal +II and +I oxidation states, respectively. The Ln in H2LnO is mostly in the +III formal oxidation state with either Ln-O-/Ln-H- or Ln-(H2)-/Ln= O2- bonding interactions. A few of the H2LnO have the Ln in the +IV or mixed +III/+IV formal oxidation states with Ln=O2-/Ln-H- bonding interactions. The Ln in HLnO are generally in the +III oxidation state with the exception of Yb in the +II state. The orbital populations calculated within the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis are consistent with the oxidation states and reaction energies. The more exothermic reactions to produce HLnOH are always associated with more backbonding from the O(H) and H characterized by more population in the 6s and 5d in Ln and the formation of a stronger Ln-O(H) bond. Overall, the calculations are consistent with the experiments in terms of reaction energies and vibrational frequencies.« less

  12. Structures and Properties of the Products of the Reaction of Lanthanide Atoms with H2O: Dominance of the +II Oxidation State.

    PubMed

    Mikulas, Tanya C; Chen, Mingyang; Fang, Zongtang; Peterson, Kirk A; Andrews, Lester; Dixon, David A

    2016-02-11

    The reactions of lanthanides with H2O have been studied using density functional theory with the B3LYP functional. H2O forms an initial Lewis acid-base complex with the lanthanides exothermically with interaction energies from -2 to -20 kcal/mol. For most of the Ln, formation of HLnOH is more exothermic than formation of H2LnO, HLnO + H, and LnOH + H. The reactions to produce HLnOH are exothermic from -25 to -75 kcal/mol. The formation of LnO + H2 for La and Ce is slightly more exothermic than formation of HLnOH and is less or equally exothermic for the rest of the lanthanides. The Ln in HLnOH and LnOH are in the formal +II and +I oxidation states, respectively. The Ln in H2LnO is mostly in the +III formal oxidation state with either Ln-O(-)/Ln-H(-) or Ln-(H2)(-)/Ln=O(2-) bonding interactions. A few of the H2LnO have the Ln in the +IV or mixed +III/+IV formal oxidation states with Ln=O(2-)/Ln-H(-) bonding interactions. The Ln in HLnO are generally in the +III oxidation state with the exception of Yb in the +II state. The orbital populations calculated within the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis are consistent with the oxidation states and reaction energies. The more exothermic reactions to produce HLnOH are always associated with more backbonding from the O(H) and H characterized by more population in the 6s and 5d in Ln and the formation of a stronger Ln-O(H) bond. Overall, the calculations are consistent with the experiments in terms of reaction energies and vibrational frequencies.

  13. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  14. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  15. Atomic Structure of Graphene Subnanometer Pores.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Chen, Qu; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-12-22

    The atomic structure of subnanometer pores in graphene, of interest due to graphene's potential as a desalination and gas filtration membrane, is demonstrated by atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. High temperatures of 500 °C and over are used to prevent self-healing of the pores, permitting the successful imaging of open pore geometries consisting of between -4 to -13 atoms, all exhibiting subnanometer diameters. Picometer resolution bond length measurements are used to confirm reconstruction of five-membered ring projections that often decorate the pore perimeter, knowledge which is used to explore the viability of completely self-passivated subnanometer pore structures; bonding configurations where the pore would not require external passivation by, for example, hydrogen to be chemically inert.

  16. Structural materials: understanding atomic scale microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, E A; Miller, Michael K; Blavette, D; Ringer, S. P.; Sudbrack, C; Smith, G.D.W.

    2009-01-01

    With the ability to locate and identify atoms in three dimensions, atom-probe tomography (APT) has revolutionized our understanding of structure-property relationships in materials used for structural applications. The atomic-scale details of clusters, second phases, and microstructural defects that control alloy properties have been investigated, providing an unprecedented level of detail on the origins of aging behavior, strength, creep, fracture toughness, corrosion, and irradiation resistance. Moreover, atomic-scale microscopy combined with atomistic simulation and theoretical modeling of material behavior can guide new alloy design. In this article, selected examples highlight how APT has led to a deeper understanding of materials structures and therefore properties, starting with the phase transformations controlling the aging and strengthening behavior of complex Al-, Fe-, and Ni-based alloys systems. The chemistry of interfaces and structural defects that play a crucial role in high-temperature strengthening, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also discussed, with particular reference to Zr- and Al-alloys and FeAl intermetallics.

  17. Noncontiguous atom matching structural similarity function.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana L; Falcao, Andre O

    2013-10-28

    Measuring similarity between molecules is a fundamental problem in cheminformatics. Given that similar molecules tend to have similar physical, chemical, and biological properties, the notion of molecular similarity plays an important role in the exploration of molecular data sets, query-retrieval in molecular databases, and in structure-property/activity modeling. Various methods to define structural similarity between molecules are available in the literature, but so far none has been used with consistent and reliable results for all situations. We propose a new similarity method based on atom alignment for the analysis of structural similarity between molecules. This method is based on the comparison of the bonding profiles of atoms on comparable molecules, including features that are seldom found in other structural or graph matching approaches like chirality or double bond stereoisomerism. The similarity measure is then defined on the annotated molecular graph, based on an iterative directed graph similarity procedure and optimal atom alignment between atoms using a pairwise matching algorithm. With the proposed approach the similarities detected are more intuitively understood because similar atoms in the molecules are explicitly shown. This noncontiguous atom matching structural similarity method (NAMS) was tested and compared with one of the most widely used similarity methods (fingerprint-based similarity) using three difficult data sets with different characteristics. Despite having a higher computational cost, the method performed well being able to distinguish either different or very similar hydrocarbons that were indistinguishable using a fingerprint-based approach. NAMS also verified the similarity principle using a data set of structurally similar steroids with differences in the binding affinity to the corticosteroid binding globulin receptor by showing that pairs of steroids with a high degree of similarity (>80%) tend to have smaller differences

  18. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  19. Atomic Structure of Ultrathin Gold Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Cui, Fan; Sun, Jianwei; Yang, Peidong

    2016-05-11

    Understanding of the atomic structure and stability of nanowires (NWs) is critical for their applications in nanotechnology, especially when the diameter of NWs reduces to ultrathin scale (1-2 nm). Here, using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AC-HRTEM), we report a detailed atomic structure study of the ultrathin Au NWs, which are synthesized using a silane-mediated approach. The NWs contain large amounts of generalized stacking fault defects. These defects evolve upon sustained electron exposure, and simultaneously the NWs undergo necking and breaking. Quantitative strain analysis reveals the key role of strain in the breakdown process. Besides, ligand-like morphology is observed at the surface of the NWs, indicating the possibility of using AC-HRTEM for surface ligand imaging. Moreover, the coalescence dynamic of ultrathin Au NWs is demonstrated by in situ observations. This work provides a comprehensive understanding of the structure of ultrathin metal NWs at atomic-scale and could have important implications for their applications.

  20. Atomic Structure of Ultrathin Gold Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Cui, Fan; Sun, Jianwei; Yang, Peidong

    2016-05-11

    Understanding of the atomic structure and stability of nanowires (NWs) is critical for their applications in nanotechnology, especially when the diameter of NWs reduces to ultrathin scale (1-2 nm). Here, using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AC-HRTEM), we report a detailed atomic structure study of the ultrathin Au NWs, which are synthesized using a silane-mediated approach. The NWs contain large amounts of generalized stacking fault defects. These defects evolve upon sustained electron exposure, and simultaneously the NWs undergo necking and breaking. Quantitative strain analysis reveals the key role of strain in the breakdown process. Besides, ligand-like morphology is observed at the surface of the NWs, indicating the possibility of using AC-HRTEM for surface ligand imaging. Moreover, the coalescence dynamic of ultrathin Au NWs is demonstrated by in situ observations. This work provides a comprehensive understanding of the structure of ultrathin metal NWs at atomic-scale and could have important implications for their applications. PMID:27071038

  1. Measurement of isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in Zr II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, S. D.; Holt, R. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have applied fast-ion-beam laser-fluorescence spectroscopy to measure the isotope shifts (IS) of 51 optical transitions in the wavelength range 420.6-461.4 nm and the hyperfine structures (hfs) of 11 even parity and 30 odd parity levels in Zr II. The IS and many of the hfs measurements are the first for these transitions and levels. These atomic data are very important for astrophysical studies of chemical abundances, allowing correction for saturation and the effects of blended lines. They also provide important constraints on stellar diffusion modeling and provide a benchmark for theoretical atomic structure calculations.

  2. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  3. Hyperfine structure measurement of 87Rb atoms injected into superfluid helium as highly energetic ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kei; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Wakui, Takashi; Mitsuya, Yousuke; Hayasaka, Miki; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Odashima, Hitoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Orochi Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new nuclear laser spectroscopy technique that is called OROCHI (Optical RI-atoms Observation in Condensed Helium as Ioncatcher). In OROCHI, highly energetic ion beam is injected into superfluid helium (He II) and is trapped as atoms. Hyperfine structure (HFS) and Zeeman splitting of trapped atoms is measured using laser-microwave (MW)/radiofrequency (RF) double resonance method. We deduce nuclear moments and spin values from the measured splittings, respectively So far, we measured Zeeman splitting of 84-87Rb atoms To evaluate the validity of the OROCHI method, it is necessary to investigate the following two points not only for Zeeman but also for HFS splitings. (i) What is the accuracy in frequency in our measurement? (ii) How high beam intensity is necessary to observe resonance spectra? For this purpose we conducted online experiment using 87Rb beam and measured the HFS splitting of injected 87Rb atoms in He II.

  4. GRASP: General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, I. P.; McKenzie, B. J.; Norrington, P. H.; Mayers, D. F.; Pyper, N. C.

    2016-09-01

    GRASP (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) calculates atomic structure, including energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes; it is a fully relativistic code based on the jj coupling scheme.

  5. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-07-22

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms.

  6. Structure and stability of semiconductor tip apexes for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pou, P; Ghasemi, S A; Jelinek, P; Lenosky, T; Goedecker, S; Perez, R

    2009-07-01

    The short range force between the tip and the surface atoms, that is responsible for atomic-scale contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM), is mainly controlled by the tip apex. Thus, the ability to image, manipulate and chemically identify single atoms in semiconductor surfaces is ultimately determined by the apex structure and its composition. Here we present a detailed and systematic study of the most common structures that can be expected at the apex of the Si tips used in experiments. We tackle the determination of the structure and stability of Si tips with three different approaches: (i) first principles simulations of small tip apexes; (ii) simulated annealing of a Si cluster; and (iii) a minima hopping study of large Si tips. We have probed the tip apexes by making atomic contacts between the tips and then compared force-distance curves with the experimental short range forces obtained with dynamic force spectroscopy. The main conclusion is that although there are multiple stable solutions for the atomically sharp tip apexes, they can be grouped into a few types with characteristic atomic structures and properties. We also show that the structure of the last atomic layers in a tip apex can be both crystalline and amorphous. We corroborate that the atomically sharp tips are thermodynamically stable and that the tip-surface interaction helps to produce the atomic protrusion needed to get atomic resolution.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of rutile and TiO2-II from TiCl4 and O3 on sapphire: Influence of substrate orientation on thin film structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möldre, Kristel; Aarik, Lauri; Mändar, Hugo; Niilisk, Ahti; Rammula, Raul; Tarre, Aivar; Aarik, Jaan

    2015-10-01

    Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 from TiCl4 and ozone on single crystal α-Al2O3 substrates was investigated and the possibility to control the phase composition by the substrate orientation was demonstrated. Epitaxial growth of rutile and high-pressure TiO2-II on α-Al2O3(0 0 0 1) and rutile on α-Al2O3(0 1 1¯ 2) were obtained at 400-600 °C. On α-Al2O3(0 0 0 1), the epitaxial relationships were determined to be [0 1 0]R // [2 1¯ 1¯ 0]S and [0 0 1]R // [0 1 1¯ 0]S for rutile and sapphire, and [0 0 1]II // [2 1¯ 1¯ 0]S and [0 1¯ 0]II // [0 1 1¯ 0]S for TiO2-II and sapphire. The TiO2-II concentration up to 50% was obtained in the films deposited at 425-500 °C. On α-Al2O3(0 1 1¯ 2), the epitaxial relationship of rutile was [0 1 0]R // [2 1¯ 1¯ 0]S and [0 0 1]R // [0 1 1¯ 0]S. The densities of epitaxial films reached 4.2-4.3 g/cm3 on substrates with both orientations but the epitaxial quality was markedly higher on α-Al2O3(0 0 0 1).

  8. Crystal structures of copper(II) nitrate, copper(II) chloride, and copper(II) perchlorate complexes with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Bairac, N. N.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Bocelli, G.; Pahontu, E.; Gulea, A. P.

    2009-05-15

    Compounds dinitrato(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper (I), dichloro(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone) copper hemihydrate (II), and bis(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper(2+) perchlorate hydrate (III) are synthesized and their crystal structures are determined. In compounds I-III, the neutral 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone molecule (L) is tridentately attached to the copper atom via the N,N,O set of donor atoms. In compounds I and II, the Cu: L ratio is equal to 1: 1, whereas, in III, it is 1: 2. In complex I, the coordination sphere of the copper atom includes two nitrate ions with different structural functions in addition to the L ligand. The structure is built as a one-dimensional polymer in which the NO{sub 3} bidentate group fulfills a bridging function. The coordination polyhedron of the copper(2+) atom can be considered a distorted tetragonal bipyramid (4 + 1 + 1). Compound II has an ionic structure in which the main element is the [CuLCl{sub 2} . Cu(H{sub 2}O)LCl]{sup +} dimer. In the dimer, the copper atoms are linked via one of the {mu}{sub 2}-bridging chlorine atoms. The coordination polyhedra of the central atoms of the Cu(H{sub 2})LCl and CuLCl{sub 2} complex fragments are tetragonal bipyramid and tetragonal pyramid, respectively. In compound III, the copper atom is octahedrally surrounded by two L ligands in the mer configuration.

  9. Crystal structures of copper(II) nitrate, copper(II) chloride, and copper(II) perchlorate complexes with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Bairac, N. N.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Bocelli, G.; Pahontu, E.; Gulea, A. P.

    2009-05-01

    Compounds dinitrato(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper ( I), dichloro(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone) copper hemihydrate ( II), and bis(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper(2+) perchlorate hydrate ( III) are synthesized and their crystal structures are determined. In compounds I- III, the neutral 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone molecule ( L) is tridentately attached to the copper atom via the N,N,O set of donor atoms. In compounds I and II, the Cu: L ratio is equal to 1: 1, whereas, in III, it is 1: 2. In complex I, the coordination sphere of the copper atom includes two nitrate ions with different structural functions in addition to the L ligand. The structure is built as a one-dimensional polymer in which the NO3 bidentate group fulfills a bridging function. The coordination polyhedron of the copper(2+) atom can be considered a distorted tetragonal bipyramid (4 + 1 + 1). Compound II has an ionic structure in which the main element is the [Cu LCl2 · Cu(H2O) LCl]+ dimer. In the dimer, the copper atoms are linked via one of the μ2-bridging chlorine atoms. The coordination polyhedra of the central atoms of the Cu(H2) LCl and Cu LCl2 complex fragments are tetragonal bipyramid and tetragonal pyramid, respectively. In compound III, the copper atom is octahedrally surrounded by two L ligands in the mer configuration.

  10. Weakly Antiferromagentic Coupling Via Superexchange Interaction Between Mn(II)-Mn(II) Atoms: A QM/MM Study of the Active Site of Human Cytosolic X-Propyl Aminopeptidase P

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sangwook; Sim, Sooyeon

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dinuclear manganese, Mn(II)-Mn(II), active site of human cytosolic X-propyl aminopeptidase (XPNPEP1) employing the QM/MM method. The optimized structure supports two manganese atoms at the active site and excludes the possibility of a single Mn(II) atom or other combination of divalent metal ions: Ca(II), Fe(II), Mg(II). A broken symmetry solution verifies an antiferromagnetically coupled state between the Mn(II)-Mn(II) pair, which is the ground state. From the energy difference between the high spin state (HS) and the broken symmetry state (BS), we estimate the exchange coupling constant, J, to be 5.15 cm-1. Also, we observe multiple bridges (p orbitals) from solvent and two carboxylate linking to the Mn(II)-Mn(II), which leads to the weakly antiferromagnetic interaction of d5-d5 electrons through superexchange coupling. PMID:23145216

  11. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, D.N. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Merkle, K.L. )

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l brace}222{r brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert bar}O{vert bar}Mg{hor ellipsis} and not Cu{vert bar}Mg{vert bar}O{hor ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l brace}111{r brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  12. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Lock, Nina; Jensen, Kirsten M Ø; Christensen, Mogens; Bøjesen, Espen D; Emerich, Hermann; Vaughan, Gavin; Billinge, Simon J L; Iversen, Bo B

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structure is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries.

  13. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Lock, Nina; Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; Christensen, Mogens; Bøjesen, Espen D.; Emerich, Hermann; Vaughan, Gavin; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Iversen, Bo B.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structure is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries. PMID:25075335

  14. Structurally uniform and atomically precise carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Yasutomo; Ito, Hideto; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Nanometre-sized carbon materials consisting of benzene units oriented in unique geometric patterns, hereafter named nanocarbons, conduct electricity, absorb and emit light, and exhibit interesting magnetic properties. Spherical fullerene C60, cylindrical carbon nanotubes and sheet-like graphene are representative forms of nanocarbons, and theoretical simulations have predicted several exotic 3D nanocarbon structures. At present, synthetic routes to nanocarbons mainly lead to mixtures of molecules with a range of different structures and properties, which cannot be easily separated or refined into pure forms. Some researchers believe that it is impossible to synthesize these materials in a precise manner. Obtaining ‘pure’ nanocarbons is a great challenge in the field of nanocarbon science, and the construction of structurally uniform nanocarbons, ideally as single molecules, is crucial for the development of functional materials in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and biomedical applications. This Review highlights the organic chemistry approach — more specifically, bottom-up construction with atomic precision — that is currently the most promising strategy towards this end.

  15. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  16. Palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes with tridentate iminophosphine ligands; synthesis and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Ní Dhubhghaill, Orla M; Lennon, Joanne; Drew, Michael G B

    2005-10-01

    The previously synthesised Schiff-base ligands 2-(2-Ph(2)PC(6)H(4)N[double bond, length as m-dash]CH)-R'-C(6)H(3)OH (R'= 3-OCH(3), HL(1); 5-OCH(3), HL(2); 5-Br, HL(3); 5-Cl, HL(4)) were prepared by a faster, more efficient route involving a microwave assisted co-condensation of 2-(diphenylphosphino)aniline with the appropriate substituted salicylaldehyde. HL(1-4) react directly with M(II)Cl(2)(M = Pd, Pt) or Pt(II)I(2)(cod) affording neutral square-planar complexes of general formula [M(II)Cl(eta(3)-L(1-4))](M = Pd, Pt, 1-8) and [Pt(II)I(eta(3)-L(1-4))](M = Pd, Pt, 9-12). Reaction of complexes 1-4 with the triarylphosphines PR(3)(R = Ph, p-tolyl) gave the novel ionic complexes [Pd(II)(PR(3))(eta(3)-L(1-4))]ClO(4)(13-20). Substituted platinum complexes of the type [Pt(II)(PR(3))(eta(3)-L(1-4))]ClO(4)(R = P(CH(2)CH(2)CN)(3)21-24) and [Pt(II)(P(p-tolyl)(3))(eta(3)-L(3,4))]ClO(4)( 25 and 26 ) were synthesised from the appropriate [Pt(II)Cl(eta(3)-L(1-4))] complex (5-8) and PR(3). The complexes are characterised by microanalytical and spectroscopic techniques. The crystal structures of 3, 6, 10, 15, 20 and 26 were determined and revealed the metal to be in a square-planar four-coordinate environment containing a planar tridentate ligand with an O,N,P donor set together with one further atom which is trans to the central nitrogen atom. PMID:16172647

  17. Synthesis and crystal structure of thiosemicarbazide complexes of nickel(II) and copper(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadikov, G. G.; Antsyshkina, A. S.; Koksharova, T. V.; Sergienko, V. S.; Kurando, S. V.; Gritsenko, I. S.

    2012-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazide complexes of nickel(II) [Ni( TSC)2](H Sal)2 ( I) and copper(II) [Cu( TSC)2](H Sal)2 ( Ia) ( TSC is thiosemicarbazide and H Sal is a salycilate anion), as well as complexes [Ni( TSC)2](SO4) · 2H2O ( II) and [Ni( TSC)3]Cl2 · H2O ( III), are synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Monoclinic crystals I and Ia are isostructural; space group P21/ n, Z = 2. Crystals II are monoclinic, space group P21/ m, Z = 2. Crystals III are orthorhombic, space group Pbca, Z = 8. In I and Ia, two planar salycilate anions sandwich a planar centrosymmetric [Ni( TSC)2]2+ cation to form a supermolecule. The cation and anions are additionally bound by hydrogen bonds. Other hydrogen bonds connect supermolecules into planar layers. In structure II, centrosymmetric [Ni( TSC)2]2+ cations are connected by π-stacking interactions into supramolecular ensembles of a specific type. The ensembles, water molecules, and (SO4)2- anions are bound in the crystal via hydrogen bonds. In the [Ni( TSC)3]2+ cation of structure III, ligands coordinate the Ni atom by the bidentate chelate pattern with the formation of five-membered metallocycles. These metallocycles have an envelope conformation unlike those in I and II, which are planar. In III (unlike in analogous complexes), a meridional isomer of the coordination octahedron of the Ni atom is formed. Together with Cl1- and Cl2- anions, cations form supermolecules, which are packed into planar layers with a square-cellular structure. The layers are linked by hydrogen bonds formed by crystallization water molecules that are located between the layers.

  18. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  19. Structural study of Fe (II) adsorption on hematite (1102)

    SciTech Connect

    Tanwar, K.S.; Petitto, S.C.; Ghose, S.K.; Eng, P.J.; Trainor, T.P.

    2008-07-15

    The structure of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(1{bar 1}02) reacted with Fe(II) under anoxic conditions was studied using crystal truncation rod (CTR) diffraction. The CTR results show the crystalline termination of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(1{bar 1}02) is modified due to adsorption of Fe(II) at crystallographic lattice sites. In addition, the binding sites for adsorbed Fe are similar for all studied conditions: reaction for 2 h at pH 5.0, for 34 d at pH 5.0, and for 5.5 h at pH 7.0. The occupancy of adsorbed Fe increases with both reaction time and pH, which is consistent with typical cation adsorption behavior on iron (hydr)oxide surfaces. The metal-oxygen bond lengths of the (ordered) surface Fe atoms are characteristic of Fe(III), which provides indirect evidence for oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II) and is consistent with recent studies indicating that Fe(III)-hydroxides are effective oxidants for dissolved ferrous iron. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that no crystalline surface reaction products formed during the course of Fe(II) reaction. Overall, the structural characterization of the Fe(II) adsorption reaction results in an enhanced understanding of how reduced iron affects the structure, stability and reactivity of hematite.

  20. Big Atoms for Small Children: Building Atomic Models from Common Materials to Better Visualize and Conceptualize Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipolla, Laura; Ferrari, Lia A.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on approach to introduce the chemical elements and the atomic structure to elementary/middle school students is described. The proposed classroom activity presents Bohr models of atoms using common and inexpensive materials, such as nested plastic balls, colored modeling clay, and small-sized pasta (or small plastic beads).

  1. Role Playing: The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggleston, Noel C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how a role playing exercise can be used to teach students in a college level history course about the use of the atomic bomb in World War II. Information is presented on general use of role playing in history courses, objectives, questions to consider about use of the atomic bomb, and course evaluation. For journal availability, see so…

  2. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  3. The Last Act: The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Air And Space Museum.

    This text was to have been the script for the National Air and Space Museum's exhibition of the Enola Gay, focusing on the end of World War II and the decision of the United States to use of the atomic bomb. The Enola Gay was a B-29 aircraft that carried the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, on August 6, 1945. The atomic bomb brought a…

  4. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  5. A Variational Monte Carlo Approach to Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    The practicality and usefulness of variational Monte Carlo calculations to atomic structure are demonstrated. It is found to succeed in quantitatively illustrating electron shielding, effective nuclear charge, l-dependence of the orbital energies, and singlet-tripetenergy splitting and ionization energy trends in atomic structure theory.

  6. Probing Atomic Dynamics and Structures Using Optical Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Pattern formation is a widely studied phenomenon that can provide fundamental insights into nonlinear systems. Emergent patterns in cold atoms are of particular interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because one can relate optical patterns to spatial structures in the atoms. In our experimental system, we study multimode optical patterns generated from a sample of cold, thermal atoms. We observe this nonlinear optical phenomenon at record low input powers due to the highly nonlinear nature of the spatial bunching of atoms in an optical lattice. We present a detailed study of the dynamics of these bunched atoms during optical pattern formation. We show how small changes in the atomic density distribution affect the symmetry of the generated patterns as well as the nature of the nonlinearity that describes the light-atom interaction. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  7. Crystal structures of copper(II) chloride, copper(II) bromide, and copper(II) nitrate complexes with pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Jeanneau, E.; Bairac, N. N.; Bocelli, G.; Poirier, D.; Roy, J.; Gulea, A. P.

    2008-09-15

    The crystal structures of chloro-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper dimethyl sulfoxide solvate (I), bromo-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper (II), and (2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper(II) nitrate dimethyl sulfoxide solvate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. In the crystals, complexes I and II form centrosymmetric dimers in which the thiosemicarbazone sulfur atom serves as a bridge and occupies the fifth coordination site of the copper atom of the neighboring complex related to the initial complex through the center of symmetry. In both cases, the coordination polyhedron of the complexing ion is a distorted tetragonal bipyramid. Complex III in the crystal structure forms polymer chains in which the copper atom of one complex forms the coordination bond with the thicarbamide nitrogen atom of the neighboring complex. In this structure, the coordination polyhedron of the central atom is an elongated tetragonal bipyramid. It is established that complexes I-III at a concentration of 10{sup -5} mol/l selectively inhibit the growth of 60 to 90 percent of the cancer tumor cells of the human myeloid leukemia (HL-60).

  8. Atomic displacements in ferroelectric trigonal and orthorhombic boracite structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowty, Eric; Clark, J.R.

    1972-01-01

    New crystal-structure refinements of Pca21 boracite, Mg3ClB7O13, and R??{lunate}c ericaite, Fe2.4Mg0.6ClB7O13, show that some boron and oxygen atoms are involved in the 'ferro' transitions as well as the metal and halogen atoms. The atomic displacements associated with the polarity changes are as large as 0.6A??. ?? 1972.

  9. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E. |

    1996-09-01

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Atomic Structure of Au 329 (SR) 84 Faradaurate Plasmonic Nanomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Jan; Cullen, David A.; Dass, Amala

    2015-05-21

    To design novel nanomaterials, it is important to precisely control the composition, determine the atomic structure, and manipulate the structure to tune the materials property. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the material whose composition is Au329(SR)84 precisely, therefore referred to as a nanomolecule. The size homogeneity was shown by electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and mass spectrometry. We proposed its atomic structure to contain the Au260 core using experiments and modeling of a total-scattering-based atomic-pair distribution functional analysis. HAADF- STEM images shows fcc-like 2.0 ± 0.1 nm diameter nanomolecules.

  11. Atomic Structure of Au329(SR)84 Faradaurate Plasmonic Nanomolecules

    DOE PAGES

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Jan; Cullen, David; Dass, Amala

    2015-04-03

    To design novel nanomaterials, it is important to precisely control the composition, determine the atomic structure, and manipulate the structure to tune the materials property. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the material whose composition is Au329(SR)84 precisely, therefore referred to as a nanomolecule. The size homogeneity was shown by electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and mass spectrometry. We proposed its atomic structure to contain the Au260 core using experiments and modeling of a total-scattering-based atomic-pair distribution functional analysis. HAADF-STEM images shows fcc-like 2.0 ± 0.1 nm diameter nanomolecules.

  12. Structures of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Bimetallic nanoclusters, such as gold-platinum nanoclusters, are nanomaterials promising wide range of applications. We perform a numerical study of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters, Au{sub n}Pt{sub 38−n} (0 ≤ n ≤ 38), to elucidate the geometrical structures of these clusters. The lowest-energy structures of these bimetallic nanoclusters at the semi-empirical level are obtained via a global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering multi-canonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), in which empirical Gupta many-body potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the constituent atoms. The structures of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters are predicted to be core-shell segregated nanoclusters. Gold atoms are observed to preferentially occupy the surface of the clusters, while platinum atoms tend to occupy the core due to the slightly smaller atomic radius of platinum as compared to gold’s. The evolution of the geometrical structure of 38-atom Au-Pt clusters displays striking similarity with that of 38-atom Au-Cu nanoalloy clusters as reported in the literature.

  13. Presentation of Atomic Structure in Turkish General Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Costu, Bayram

    2009-01-01

    Research in science education has recognized the importance of teaching atomic structure within a history and philosophy of science perspective. The objective of this study is to evaluate general chemistry textbooks published in Turkey based on the eight criteria developed in previous research. Criteria used referred to the atomic models of…

  14. Graphene mechanics: II. Atomic stress distribution during indentation until rupture.

    PubMed

    Costescu, Bogdan I; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-06-28

    Previous Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments found single layers of defect-free graphene to rupture at unexpectedly high loads in the micronewton range. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled an AFM spherical tip pressing on a circular graphene sheet and studied the stress distribution during the indentation process until rupture. We found the graphene rupture force to have no dependency on the sheet size and a very weak dependency on the indenter velocity, allowing a direct comparison to experiment. The deformation showed a non-linear elastic behavior, with a two-dimensional elastic modulus in good agreement with previous experimental and computational studies. In line with theoretical predictions for linearly elastic sheets, rupture forces of non-linearly elastic graphene are proportional to the tip radius. However, as a deviation from the theory, the atomic stress concentrates under the indenter tip more strongly than predicted and causes a high probability of bond breaking only in this area. In turn, stress levels decrease rapidly towards the edge of the sheet, most of which thus only serves the role of mechanical support for the region under the indenter. As a consequence, the high ratio between graphene sheets and sphere radii, hitherto supposed to be necessary for reliable deformation and rupture studies, could be reduced to a factor of only 5-10 without affecting the outcome. Our study suggests time-resolved analysis of forces at the atomic level as a valuable tool to predict and interpret the nano-scale response of stressed materials beyond graphene.

  15. Smart structures for rotorcraft control (SSRC) II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacot, A. Dean; Dadone, Leo

    1998-06-01

    The Smart Structures for Rotor Control (SSRC) is a consortium under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Smart Structures program. Phase I of the program was administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, with Boeing Seattle as the consortium administrator, and MIT, PSU and Boeing Helicopters as the other principal consortium members. Phase II, renamed Smart Materials and Structures Demonstration Consortium (SMSDC), is a combination of the proposed Phase II efforts of SSRC and the Boeing MESA Smart Materials Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) program. This paper summarizes the SSRC efforts, introduces the SMSDC program, and provides a framework for the relationships between specific SSRC technical papers in this conference. The SSRC objectives were to research smart structure methods to achieve reduced rotorcraft vibration, reduce acoustic noise, and increased performance. The SSRC program includes dynamic piezoelectric actuation of flaps on the rotor blades, distributed dynamic piezo actuation of the rotor twist, and quasi-steady rotor twist control using shape memory alloys. The objective of Phase II is then to fly a rotorcraft to demonstrate such a system.

  16. Atomic structure of highly-charged ions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A. Eugene

    2002-05-23

    Atomic properties of multiply charged ions have been investigated using excitation of energetic heavy ion beams. Spectroscopy of excited atomic transitions has been applied from the visible to the extreme ultraviolet wavelength regions to provide accurate atomic structure and transition rate data in selected highly ionized atoms. High-resolution position-sensitive photon detection has been introduced for measurements in the ultraviolet region. The detailed structures of Rydberg states in highly charged beryllium-like ions have been measured as a test of long-range electron-ion interactions. The measurements are supported by multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations and by many-body perturbation theory. The high-angular-momentum Rydberg transitions may be used to establish reference wavelengths and improve the accuracy of ionization energies in highly charged systems. Precision wavelength measurements in highly charged few-electron ions have been performed to test the most accurate relativistic atomic structure calculations for prominent low-lying excited states. Lifetime measurements for allowed and forbidden transitions in highly charged few-electron ions have been made to test theoretical transition matrix elements for simple atomic systems. Precision lifetime measurements in laser-excited alkali atoms have been initiated to establish the accuracy of relativistic atomic many-body theory in many-electron systems.

  17. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  18. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated. PMID:26429029

  19. Crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride and its copper(II) and cobalt(III) chloride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M. Tsapkov, V. I.; Bocelli, G.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Shova, S. G.; Gulea, A. P.

    2006-01-15

    The crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride hydrate hemiethanol solvate (I), salicylideneguanylhydrazinium trichloroaquacuprate(II) (II), and bis(salicylideneguanylhydrazino)cobalt(III) chloride trihydrate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. The structures of compounds I, II, and III are solved by direct methods and refined using the least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms to the final factors R = 0.0597, 0.0212, and 0.0283, respectively. In the structure of compound I, the monoprotonated molecules and chlorine ions linked by hydrogen bonds form layers aligned parallel to the (010) plane. In the structure of compound II, the salicylaldehyde guanylhydrazone cations and polymer chains consisting of trichloroaquacuprate(II) anions are joined by an extended three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds. In the structure of compound III, the [Co(LH){sub 2}]{sup +} cations, chloride ions, and molecules of crystallization water are linked together by a similar network.

  20. The structure of hexaaquanickel(II) chlorate.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, J C; Gerkin, R E

    1990-03-15

    Hexaaquanickel(II) chlorate, [Ni(H2O)6]-(ClO3)2, Mr = 333.69, cubic, Pa3-, a = 10.3159 (5) A, V = 1097.80 (5) A3, Z = 4, F(000) = 680, Dx = 2.02 g cm-3, lambda(Mo K alpha-) = 0.71069 A, T = 296 K, mu = 23.13 cm-1, R = 0.026 for 388 unique reflections having I greater than sigma I. The single type of Ni ion is coordinated by six water-molecule O atoms, each at an observed distance 2.054 (1) A, in an almost regular octahedral array. The single type of chlorate ion has a Cl--O bond length 1.487 (1) A and O--Cl--O bond angle 106.45 (6) degrees. The Ni--O complex, but not the chlorate ion, manifested rigid-body behavior. The Ni--O distance corrected for rigid-body motion is 2.060 A. Location and refinement of the two inequivalent H atoms permitted a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding, which occurs principally between the oxygen octahedra and the chlorate groups. PMID:2354044

  1. Atomic-level analysis of membrane-protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2016-06-01

    Membrane proteins are substantially more challenging than natively soluble proteins as subjects for structural analysis. Thus, membrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in structural databases. Recently, focused consortium efforts and advances in methodology for protein production, crystallographic analysis and cryo-EM analysis have accelerated the pace of atomic-level structure determination of membrane proteins.

  2. Solution structure of pyoverdin GM-II.

    PubMed

    Mohn, G; Koehl, P; Budzikiewicz, H; Lefèvre, J F

    1994-03-15

    The three-dimensional structure in solution of ferri-pyoverdin GM-II isolated from the culture medium of Pseudomonas fluorescens was determined by application of NMR methods to the Ga3+ analogue. Distance geometry calculations were performed with FILMAN using interproton distances and coupling constants as constraints. Further conformational analysis was carried out by energy minimization with MM2 and AMBER. Back-calculation of the NOESY spectra shows that the resulting structures are in agreement with the experimental data. PMID:8130197

  3. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK

  4. Synthesis, structure and fluorescence properties of a novel 3D Sr(II) coordination polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Hui; Xu, Qing; Gu, Zhi-Feng; Gao, Ji-Xing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chang-Shan; Tang, Yun-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Solvothermal reaction of 2,2‧-bipyridine-5,5‧-dicarboxylic acid (H2bpdc) and SrCl2 affords a novel coordination polymer [Sr(Hbpdc)2]n1. X-ray structure determination shows that 1 exhibits a novel three-dimensional network. The unique Sr II cation sits on a two-fold axis and coordinated by four O-atom donors from four Hbptc- ligands and four N-atom donors from two Hbptc- ligands in distorted dodecahedral geometry. In 1 each Sr II cation connects to six different Hbptc- ligands and each Hbptc- ligand bridges three different Sr II cations which results in the formation of a three-dimensional polymeric structure. Corresponding to the free ligand, the fluorescent emission of complex 1 display remarkable "Einstain" shifts, which may be attributed to the coordination interaction of Sr atoms, thus reduce the rigidity of pyridyl rings.

  5. Standard deviations of composition measurements in atom probe analyses-Part II: 3D atom probe.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Grancher, G; Bostel, A; Blavette, D

    2007-09-01

    In a companion paper [F. Danoix, G. Grancher, A. Bostel, D. Blavette, Surf. Interface Anal. this issue (previous paper).], the derivation of variances of the estimates of measured composition, and the underlying hypotheses, have been revisited in the the case of conventional one dimensional (1D) atom probes. In this second paper, we will concentrate on the analytical derivation of the variance when the estimate of composition is obtained from a 3D atom probe. As will be discussed, when the position information is available, compositions can be derived either from constant number of atoms, or from constant volume, blocks. The analytical treatment in the first case is identical to the one developed for conventional 1D instruments, and will not be discussed further in this paper. Conversely, in the second case, the analytical treatment is different, as well as the formula of the variance. In particular, it will be shown that the detection efficiency plays an important role in the determination of the variance.

  6. Electronic structure of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Ruffieux, Pascal; Cai, Jinming; Plumb, Nicholas C; Patthey, Luc; Prezzi, Deborah; Ferretti, Andrea; Molinari, Elisa; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Fasel, Roman

    2012-08-28

    Some of the most intriguing properties of graphene are predicted for specifically designed nanostructures such as nanoribbons. Functionalities far beyond those known from extended graphene systems include electronic band gap variations related to quantum confinement and edge effects, as well as localized spin-polarized edge states for specific edge geometries. The inability to produce graphene nanostructures with the needed precision, however, has so far hampered the verification of the predicted electronic properties. Here, we report on the electronic band gap and dispersion of the occupied electronic bands of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons fabricated via on-surface synthesis. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy data from armchair graphene nanoribbons of width N = 7 supported on Au(111) reveal a band gap of 2.3 eV, an effective mass of 0.21 m(0) at the top of the valence band, and an energy-dependent charge carrier velocity reaching 8.2 × 10(5) m/s in the linear part of the valence band. These results are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions that include image charge corrections accounting for screening by the metal substrate and confirm the importance of electron-electron interactions in graphene nanoribbons.

  7. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  8. Atomic emission line wavelength calculations below 2000 angstroms for Lithium II through Cobalt XXVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    Atomic-emission-line wavelengths are presented which were calculated from wavelengths of previously identified transition sequences using second-degree polynomials fitted to known wave numbers by the least squares method. Wavelengths less than 2000 angstroms are included for ions from Li II to Co XXVI. The computer program written in FORTRAN 4 is also included.

  9. Structure of Photosystems I and II.

    PubMed

    Fromme, Petra; Grotjohann, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the major process that converts solar energy into chemical energy on Earth. Two and a half billion years ago, the ancestors of cyanobacteria were able to use water as electron source for the photosynthetic process, thereby evolving oxygen and changing the atmosphere of our planet Earth. Two large membrane protein complexes, Photosystems I and II, catalyze the primary step in this energy conversion, the light-induced charge separation across the photosynthetic membrane. This chapter describes and compares the structure of two Photosystems and discusses their function in respect to the mechanism of light harvesting, electron transfer and water splitting.

  10. Crystal structure of the coordination polymer [FeIII 2{PtII(CN)4}3

    PubMed Central

    Seredyuk, Maksym; Muñoz, M. Carmen; Real, José A.; Iskenderov, Turganbay S.

    2015-01-01

    The title complex, poly[dodeca-μ-cyanido-diiron(III)triplat­inum(II)], [FeIII 2{PtII(CN)4}3], has a three-dimensional polymeric structure. It is built-up from square-planar [PtII(CN)4]2− anions (point group symmetry 2/m) bridging cationic [FeIIIPtII(CN)4]+ ∞ layers extending in the bc plane. The FeII atoms of the layers are located on inversion centres and exhibit an octa­hedral coordination sphere defined by six N atoms of cyanide ligands, while the PtII atoms are located on twofold rotation axes and are surrounded by four C atoms of the cyanide ligands in a square-planar coordination. The geometrical preferences of the two cations for octa­hedral and square-planar coordination, respectively, lead to a corrugated organisation of the layers. The distance between neighbouring [FeIIIPtII(CN)4]+ ∞ layers corresponds to the length a/2 = 8.0070 (3) Å, and the separation between two neighbouring PtII atoms of the bridging [PtII(CN)4]2− groups corresponds to the length of the c axis [7.5720 (2) Å]. The structure is porous with accessible voids of 390 Å3 per unit cell. PMID:25705468

  11. Single-atom based coherent quantum interference device structure.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Borislav; Rungger, Ivan; Mantega, Mauro; Sanvito, Stefano; Boland, John J

    2015-05-13

    We describe the fabrication, operation principles, and simulation of a coherent single-atom quantum interference device (QID) structure on Si(100) controlled by the properties of single atoms. The energy and spatial distribution of the wave functions associated with the device are visualized by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and the amplitude and phase of the evanescent wave functions that couple into the quantum well states are directly measured, including the action of an electrostatic gate. Density functional theory simulations were employed to simulate the electronic structure of the device structure, which is in excellent agreement with the measurements. Simulations of device transmission demonstrate that our coherent single-atom QID can have ON-OFF ratios in excess of 10(3) with potentially minimal power dissipation.

  12. Single-atom based coherent quantum interference device structure.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Borislav; Rungger, Ivan; Mantega, Mauro; Sanvito, Stefano; Boland, John J

    2015-05-13

    We describe the fabrication, operation principles, and simulation of a coherent single-atom quantum interference device (QID) structure on Si(100) controlled by the properties of single atoms. The energy and spatial distribution of the wave functions associated with the device are visualized by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and the amplitude and phase of the evanescent wave functions that couple into the quantum well states are directly measured, including the action of an electrostatic gate. Density functional theory simulations were employed to simulate the electronic structure of the device structure, which is in excellent agreement with the measurements. Simulations of device transmission demonstrate that our coherent single-atom QID can have ON-OFF ratios in excess of 10(3) with potentially minimal power dissipation. PMID:25826690

  13. Crystal structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin II at 1.27 A

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Tani, Fumito; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} X-ray crystallographic structure of sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. {yields} The overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to that of thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. {yields} The side chain of two critical residues, 67 and 82, for sweetness was modeled in two alternative conformations. {yields} The flexibility and fluctuation of side chains at 67 and 82 seems to be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits a sweet taste sensation at 50 nM. Here the X-ray crystallographic structure of one of its variants, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. Overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. Furthermore, the side chain of residue 67 in thaumatin II is highly disordered. Since residue 67 is one of two residues critical to the sweetness of thaumatin, the present results suggested that the critical positive charges at positions 67 and 82 are disordered and the flexibility and fluctuation of these side chains would be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors.

  14. ISOTROPIC INELASTIC COLLISIONS IN A MULTITERM ATOM WITH HYPERFINE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Belluzzi, Luca; Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2015-10-10

    A correct modeling of the scattering polarization profiles observed in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, the sodium doublet being one of the most important examples, requires taking hyperfine structure (HFS) and quantum interference between different J-levels into account. An atomic model suitable for taking these physical ingredients into account is the so-called multiterm atom with HFS. In this work, we introduce and study the transfer and relaxation rates due to isotropic inelastic collisions with electrons, which enter the statistical equilibrium equations (SEE) for the atomic density matrix of this atomic model. Under the hypothesis that the electron–atom interaction is described by a dipolar operator, we provide useful relations between the rates describing the transfer and relaxation of quantum interference between different levels (whose numerical values are in most cases unknown) and the usual rates for the atomic level populations, for which experimental data and/or approximate theoretical expressions are generally available. For the particular case of a two-term atom with HFS, we present an analytical solution of the SEE for the spherical statistical tensors of the upper term, including both radiative and collisional processes, and we derive the expression of the emission coefficient in the four Stokes parameters. Finally, an illustrative application to the Na i D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} lines is presented.

  15. Neutron powder diffraction studies as a function of temperature of structure II hydrate formed from propane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction data confirm that hydrate samples synthesized with propane crystallize as structure type II hydrate. The structure has been modeled using rigid-body constraints to describe C3H8 molecules located in the eight larger polyhedral cavities of a deuterated host lattice. Data were collected at 12, 40, 100, 130, 160, 190, 220, and 250 K and used to calculate the thermal expansivity from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters. The data collected allowed for full structural refinement of atomic coordinates and the atomic-displacement parameters.

  16. Post-translational processing of preprosomatostatin-II examined using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P C; Nichols, R; Dixon, J E

    1987-09-15

    The products and an intermediate of preprosomatostatin-II processing in the anglerfish islet were purified and subjected to structural analysis. The peptides isolated identify the site of signal cleavage (between Ser-24 and Gln-25). The prohormone is further processed at Arg-97 and, to a lesser extent, at the two adjacent basic amino acid residues Lys-61 and Arg-62. A 28-residue somatostatin is also generated which can be hydroxylated at Lys-23. A proteolytic processing site which would form the 14-residue somatostatin does not appear to be used to a significant degree. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS) was used to demonstrate that the amino-terminal residues of peptides 25-60, and 25-90 are pyroglutamic acid, a modification which precludes Edman degradation of these peptides. Analysis of the peptides and tryptic peptide maps by FABMS allowed confirmation of the sites of prohormone conversion and indicated that terminal basic residues were removed during processing. Three amino acid residues were also found to differ from the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA and were localized to specific regions by FABMS analysis. Residues found to differ from the cDNA (cDNA in parentheses) were: Asp-77 (Thr), Val-78 (Phe), and Gly-90 (Glu). Mass assignments were confirmed by running a single cycle of Edman degradation prior to FABMS. The peptides noted above were also examined by Edman sequence analysis. The sequence of a cDNA clone to preprosomatostatin-II was re-examined in light of the observed differences at the protein level. This study emphasizes the utility of FABMS in prohormone processing studies and in identification of post-translational processing events. PMID:2887572

  17. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    SciTech Connect

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-15

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As, GaAs{sub x}P{sub 1−x}, or CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  18. Study of the interaction of DNA with cisplatin and other Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Onoa, G B; Cervantes, G; Moreno, V; Prieto, M J

    1998-01-01

    Modifications in the structure of a 260 bp DNA (hlyM) fragment from Escherichia coli caused by interaction with Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes were studied. Cisplatin and transplatin [cis- and trans-PtCl2(NH3)2 respectively], Pt2Cl2(Spym)4 (Spym = 2-mercaptopyrimidine anion), Pd-famotidine and Pt-famotidine were incubated with DNA for 24 h at 37 degrees C and then observed with an atomic force microscope. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides the opportunity for nanometer resolution in research on the interaction between nucleic acids and metal complexes. The complexes induced noticeable changes in DNA topography according to their different characteristics and structure. In the case of cisplatin a shortening in DNA strands was observed. Transplatin and Pt2Cl2(Spym)4 caused shortening and compaction, whilst an aggregation of two strands was observed for the Pt-famotidine compound but not for the Pd-famotidine compound or the metal-free famotidine. PMID:9490794

  19. Atomic carbon near the molecular cloud/H II region interface in S 140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernichel, J.; Krause, D.; Roehrig, R.; Stutzki, J.; Winnewisser, G.

    1992-06-01

    We have observed the (CI) 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line of atomic carbon at 492 GHz in the edge-on interface between the molecular cloud L 1204 and the S 140 H II region with the KOSMA telescope on Gornergrat, Switzerland. We find that the (CI)-emission near the interface consists of a narrow velocity component with position and line width similar to that of the ambient molecular cloud material, superimposed on a wider component (FWHM is approximately equal to 15 km/s) exhibiting a line profile similar to that of the higher velocity material visible in CO and carrying most of the CI column density. The velocity integrated (CI) emission peaks near the edge of the cloud facing the exciting star. This finding is in contrast to earlier results by Keene et al. (1985) who missed the wide velocity component in their observations. The relative CI/CO abundance is strongly enhanced in the high velocity material (100 percent) relative to the ambient cloud material (11 percent).

  20. Theoretical atomic physics code development I: CATS: Cowan Atomic Structure Code

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.; Cowan, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    An adaptation of R.D. Cowan's Atomic Structure program, CATS, has been developed as part of the Theoretical Atomic Physics (TAPS) code development effort at Los Alamos. CATS has been designed to be easy to run and to produce data files that can interface with other programs easily. The CATS produced data files currently include wave functions, energy levels, oscillator strengths, plane-wave-Born electron-ion collision strengths, photoionization cross sections, and a variety of other quantities. This paper describes the use of CATS. 10 refs.

  1. Vortex-ring-fractal Structure of Atom and Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Osmera, Pavel

    2010-06-17

    This chapter is an attempt to attain a new and profound model of the nature's structure using a vortex-ring-fractal theory (VRFT). Scientists have been trying to explain some phenomena in Nature that have not been explained so far. The aim of this paper is the vortex-ring-fractal modeling of elements in the Mendeleev's periodic table, which is not in contradiction to the known laws of nature. We would like to find some acceptable structure model of the hydrogen as a vortex-fractal-coil structure of the proton and a vortex-fractal-ring structure of the electron. It is known that planetary model of the hydrogen atom is not right, the classical quantum model is too abstract. Our imagination is that the hydrogen is a levitation system of the proton and the electron. Structures of helium, oxygen, and carbon atoms and a hydrogen molecule are presented too.

  2. Design of magnetic traps for neutral atoms with vortices in type-II superconducting microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Dumke, R.; Fermani, R.; Mueller, T.; Lim, M. J.

    2010-06-15

    We design magnetic traps for atoms based on the average magnetic field of vortices induced in a type-II superconducting thin film. This magnetic field is the critical ingredient of the demonstrated vortex-based atom traps, which operate without transport current. We use Bean's critical-state method to model the vortex field through mesoscopic supercurrents induced in the thin strip. The resulting inhomogeneous magnetic fields are studied in detail and compared to those generated by multiple normally conducting wires with transport currents. Various vortex patterns can be obtained by programing different loading-field and transport-current sequences. These variable magnetic fields are employed to make versatile trapping potentials.

  3. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite

    PubMed Central

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains. PMID:26876049

  4. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite.

    PubMed

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K

    2016-02-15

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains.

  5. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  6. Workshop on foundations of the relativistic theory of atomic structure

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    The conference is an attempt to gather state-of-the-art information to understand the theory of relativistic atomic structure beyond the framework of the original Dirac theory. Abstracts of twenty articles from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  7. Structural Basis of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II and Construction of a Database of Mutant Iduronate 2-Sulfatases

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Seiji; Ohno, Kazuki; Okuyama, Torayuki; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by a deficiency of iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS), and missense mutations comprising about 30% of the mutations responsible for MPS II result in heterogeneous phenotypes ranging from the severe to the attenuated form. To elucidate the basis of MPS II from the structural viewpoint, we built structural models of the wild type and mutant IDS proteins resulting from 131 missense mutations (phenotypes: 67 severe and 64 attenuated), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid substitution on the IDS structure by calculating the accessible surface area, the number of atoms affected and the root-mean-square distance. The results revealed that the amino acid substitutions causing MPS II were widely spread over the enzyme molecule and that the structural changes of the enzyme protein were generally larger in the severe group than in the attenuated one. Coloring of the atoms influenced by different amino acid substitutions at the same residue showed that the structural changes influenced the disease progression. Based on these data, we constructed a database of IDS mutations as to the structures of mutant IDS proteins. PMID:27695081

  8. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  9. Atomic diffusion processes in heteroepitaxial metallic systems using SLKMC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Syed Islamuddin; Karim, Altaf

    We have examined the diffusion of small islands of Cu on Ag(111) surface using a self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (SLKMC-II) method with an improved pattern recognition scheme. Due to strain generated at the interface between metals with different bulk lattice constants, interesting single atom, multi-atom and concerted diffusion processes are automatically revealed in the simulations. Here we will report various processes for small islands in the case of Cu/Ag(111) system. Key processes responsible for island diffusion and their energetics together with trends in effective energy barriers as well as diffusion constants for small islands will also be provided. In addition to 2-D diffusion processes, as an application of SLKMC-II to the 3-dimensional heteroepitaxial systems, we will also report energy barriers of some of the 3-dimensional processes including down the A- and B-steps and exchange processes

  10. Atomic structure of the cross-[beta] spine of islet amyloid polypeptide (amylin)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, J.J.; Sievers, S.A.; Sawaya, M.R.; Cascio, D.; Popov, D.; Riekel, C.; Eisenberg, D.

    2009-03-27

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin) is a 37-residue hormone found as fibrillar deposits in pancreatic extracts of nearly all type II diabetics. Although the cellular toxicity of IAPP has been established, the structure of the fibrillar form found in these deposits is unknown. Here we have crystallized two segments from IAPP, which themselves form amyloid-like fibrils. The atomic structures of these two segments, NNFGAIL and SSTNVG, were determined, and form the basis of a model for the most commonly observed, full-length IAPP polymorph.

  11. Detailed Atomic Structure of Neutral and Near-Neutral Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2011-05-11

    This paper highlights the issues which need to be addressed in undertaking accurate calculations of multi-electron atoms and ions, particularly at or near the neutral end of an isoelectronic sequence. We illustrate the processes through two calculations--of transitions in Cl I and Sn II--and discuss the convergence of our results as well as updating previous work. In particular, in the case of Cl I, we propose new identifications of the levels involved in certain transitions which are important in determining the abundance of chlorine in the inter-stellar medium (ISM), while in singly ionised tin, our calculations suggest a re-evaluation of the the abundance of tin in the ISM. We also confirm recent identification of Sn II lines seen in tokamak plasmas.

  12. Atomic Data for Zn II: Improving Spectral Diagnostics of Chemical Evolution in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielius, Romas; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Som, Debopam; Lykins, Matt L.

    2015-05-01

    Damped Lyα (DLA) and sub-DLA absorbers in quasar spectra provide the most sensitive tools for measuring the element abundances of distant galaxies. The estimation of abundances from absorption lines depends sensitively on the accuracy of the atomic data used. We have started a project to produce new atomic spectroscopic parameters for optical and UV spectral lines using state-of-the-art computer codes employing a very broad configuration interaction (CI) basis. Here we report our results for Zn ii, an ion used widely in studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) as well as DLAs and sub-DLAs. We report new calculations of many energy levels of Zn ii and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations use the CI approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework. We use both nonrelativistic and quasi-relativistic one-electron radial orbitals. We have incorporated the results of these atomic calculations into the plasma simulation code Cloudy and applied them to a lab plasma and examples of a DLA and a sub-DLA. Our values of the Zn ii λ λ 2026, 2062 oscillator strengths are higher than previous values by 0.10 dex. The Cloudy calculations for representative absorbers with the revised Zn atomic data imply ionization corrections lower than calculated earlier by 0.05 dex. The new results imply that Zn metallicities should be lower by 0.1 dex for DLAs and by 0.13-0.15 dex for sub-DLAs than in past studies. Our results can be applied to other studies of Zn ii in the Galactic and extragalactic ISM.

  13. The shells of atomic structure in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S. P.; Feng, S. D.; Qiao, J. W.; Dong, B. S.; Qin, J. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We proposed a scheme to describe the spatial correlation between two atoms in metallic glasses. Pair distribution function in a model iron was fully decomposed into several shells and can be presented as the spread of nearest neighbor correlation via distance. Moreover, angle distribution function can also be decomposed into groups. We demonstrate that there is close correlation between pair distribution function and angle distribution function for metallic glasses. We think that our results are very helpful understanding the atomic structure of metallic glasses.

  14. The structures of the crystalline phase and columnar mesophase of rhodium (II) heptanoate and of its binary mixture with copper (II) heptanoate probed by EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inb-Elhaj, M.; Guillon, D.; Skoulios, A.; Maldivi, P.; Giroud-Godquin, A. M.; Marchon, J.-C.

    1992-12-01

    EXAFS was used to investigate the local structure of the polar spines of rhodium (II) soaps in the columnar liquid crystalline state. It was also used to ascertain the degree of blending of the cores in binary mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps. For the pure rhodium soaps, the columns are shown to result from the stacking of binuclear metal-metal bonded dirhodium tetracarboxylate units bonded to one another by apical ligation of the metal atom of each complex with one of the oxygen atoms of the adjacent molecule. Mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps give a hexagonal columnar mesophase in which pure rhodium and pure copper columns are randomly distributed.

  15. Quantum Chemical Studies on the Prediction of Structures, Charge Distributions and Vibrational Spectra of Some Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) Iodide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakci, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal complexes play an important role in coordination chemistry as well as in the formation of metal-based drugs. In order to obtain accurate results for studying these type of complexes quantum chemical studies are performed and especially density functional theory (DFT) has become a promising choice. This talk represents molecular structures, charge distributions and vibrational analysis of Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) iodide complexes of p-toluidine and m-toluidine by means of DFT. Stable structures of the ligands and the related complexes have been obtained in the gas phase at B3LYP/def2-TZVP level and calculations predict Ni(II) complexes as distorted polymeric octahedral whereas Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes as distorted tetrahedral geometries. Charge distribution analysis have been performed by means of Mulliken, NBO and APT methods and physically most meaningful method for our compounds is explained. Vibrational spectra of the title compounds are computed from the optimized geometries and theoretical frequencies are compared with the previously obtained experimental data. Since coordination occurs via nitrogen atoms of the free ligands, N-H stretching bands of the ligands are shifted towards lower wavenumbers in the complexes whereas NH_2 wagging and twisting vibrations are shifted towards higher wavenumbers.

  16. Atomic structure of [110] tilt grain boundaries in FCC materials

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, K.L.; Thompson, L.J.

    1997-04-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) has been used to study the atomic-scale structure and localized relaxations at grain boundaries (GBs) in Au, Al, and MgO. The [110] tilt GBs play an important role in polycrystalline fcc metals since among all of the possible GB geometries this series of misorientations as a whole contains the lowest energies, including among others the two lowest energy GBs, the (111) and (113) twins. Therefore, studies of the atomic-scale structure of [110] tilt GBs in fcc metals and systematic investigations of their dependence on misorientation and GB plane is of considerable importance to materials science. [110] tilt GBs in ceramic oxides of the fcc structure are also of considerable interest, since in this misorientation range polar GBs exist, i.e. GBs in which crystallographic planes that are made up of complete layers of cations or anions can join to form a GB.

  17. Volcano structure in atomic resolution core-loss images.

    PubMed

    D'Alfonso, A J; Findlay, S D; Oxley, M P; Allen, L J

    2008-06-01

    A feature commonly present in simulations of atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy images in the scanning transmission electron microscope is the volcano or donut structure. In the past this has been understood in terms of a geometrical perspective using a dipole approximation. It is shown that the dipole approximation for core-loss spectroscopy begins to break down as the probe forming aperture semi-angle increases, necessitating the inclusion of higher order terms for a quantitative understanding of volcano formation. Using such simulations we further investigate the mechanisms behind the formation of such structures in the single atom case and extend this to the case of crystals. The cubic SrTiO3 crystal is used as a test case to show the effects of nonlocality, probe channelling and absorption in producing the volcano structure in crystal images.

  18. Atomic Structure of an Amorphous/Crystal Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Naoya; Painter, Gayle S; Becher, Paul F; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors report atomic-resolution images that illustrate the transition from a crystalline Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grain across the interface into an amorphous Lu-Si-Mg-N-O glassy phase. The interface is not atomically abrupt, but is comprised of sub-nanometer-scale ordered regions that resemble a LuN-like structure. These ordered clusters bind to the prismatic surface of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains at specific low energy positions for Lu adsorption as predicted by first-principles calculations. The ordered regions are filamentary in nature, extending for at least two atomic layers into the amorphous pockets at multigrain junctions before disappearing.

  19. Energetics of atomic scale structure changes in graphene.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Stephen T; Lebedeva, Irina V; Popov, Andrey M; Bichoutskaia, Elena

    2015-05-21

    The presence of defects in graphene has an essential influence on its physical and chemical properties. The formation, behaviour and healing of defects are determined by energetic characteristics of atomic scale structure changes. In this article, we review recent studies devoted to atomic scale reactions during thermally activated and irradiation-induced processes in graphene. The formation energies of vacancies, adatoms and topological defects are discussed. Defect formation, healing and migration are quantified in terms of activation energies (barriers) for thermally activated processes and by threshold energies for processes occurring under electron irradiation. The energetics of defects in the graphene interior and at the edge is analysed. The effects of applied strain and a close proximity of the edge on the energetics of atomic scale reactions are overviewed. Particular attention is given to problems where further studies are required.

  20. Structural properties of lithium atom under weakly coupled plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Saha, J. K.; Chandra, R.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2016-04-01

    The Rayleigh-Ritz variational technique with a Hylleraas basis set is being tested for the first time to estimate the structural modifications of a lithium atom embedded in a weakly coupled plasma environment. The Debye-Huckel potential is used to mimic the weakly coupled plasma environment. The wave functions for both the helium-like lithium ion and the lithium atom are expanded in the explicitly correlated Hylleraas type basis set which fully takes care of the electron-electron correlation effect. Due to the continuum lowering under plasma environment, the ionization potential of the system gradually decreases leading to the destabilization of the atom. The excited states destabilize at a lower value of the plasma density. The estimated ionization potential agrees fairly well with the few available theoretical estimates. The variation of one and two particle moments, dielectric susceptibility and magnetic shielding constant, with respect to plasma density is also been discussed in detail.

  1. Microtraps for neutral atoms using superconducting structures in the critical state

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, A.; Brune, M.; Raimond, J.-M.; Nogues, G.; Lupascu, A.; Haroche, S.

    2009-12-15

    Recently demonstrated superconducting atom chips provide a platform for trapping atoms and coupling them to solid-state quantum systems. Controlling these devices requires a full understanding of the supercurrent distribution in the trapping structures. For type-II superconductors, this distribution is hysteretic in the critical state due to the partial penetration of the magnetic field in the thin superconducting film through pinned vortices. We report here an experimental observation of this memory effect. Our results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Bean model of the critical state without adjustable parameters. The memory effect allows to write and store permanent currents in micron-sized superconducting structures and paves the way toward engineered trapping potentials.

  2. Syntheses, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties of copper(II)-tetracyanometallate(II) complexes with nicotinamide and isonicotinamide ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayın, Elvan; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2015-09-01

    Four new one dimensional (1D) cyanide complexes, namely {[Cu(NH3)4(μ-na)][M‧(CN)4]}n and {[Cu(NH3)2(ina)2M‧(μ-CN)2(CN)2]}n (M‧(II) = Pd (1 and 3) or Pt (2 and 4), na:nicotinamide and ina:isonicotinamide) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental, spectral (FT-IR and Raman), and thermal (TG, DTG and DTA) analyses. The crystal structures of complexes 1-3 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. In complexes 1 and 2, na ligand is coordinated to the adjacent Cu(II) ions as a bridging ligand, giving rise to 1D linear cationic chain and the [M‧(CN)4]2- anionic complex acts as a counter ion. Complexes 3 and 4 are also 1D linear chain in which two cyanide ligands bridged neighboring M‧(II) and Cu(II) ions, while ina ligand is coordinated Cu(II) ion through nitrogen atom of pyridine ring. In the complexes, the Cu(II) ions adopt distorted octahedral geometries, while M‧(II) ions are four coordinated with four carbon atoms from cyanide ligands in square-planar geometries. The adjacent chains are further stacked through intermolecular hydrogen bond, Nsbnd Hṡṡṡπ, Csbnd H⋯M‧ and M‧⋯π interactions to form 3D supramolecular networks. Vibration assignments are given for all the observed bands. In addition, thermal stabilities of the compounds are also discussed.

  3. Likelihood of atom-atom contacts in crystal structures of halogenated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Jelsch, Christian; Soudani, Sarra; Ben Nasr, Cherif

    2015-05-01

    The likelihood of occurrence of intermolecular contacts in crystals of halogenated organic compounds has been analysed statistically using tools based on the Hirshfeld surface. Several families of small halogenated molecules (containing organic F, Cl, Br or I atoms) were analysed, based on chemical composition and aromatic or aliphatic character. The behaviour of crystal contacts was also probed for molecules containing O or N. So-called halogen bonding (a halogen making short interactions with O or N, or a π interaction with C) is generally disfavoured, except when H is scarce on the molecular surface. Similarly, halogen⋯halogen contacts are more rare than expected, except for molecules that are poor in H. In general, the H atom is found to be the preferred partner of organic halogen atoms in crystal structures. On the other hand, C⋯C interactions in parallel π-stacking have a high propensity to occur in halogenated aromatic molecules. The behaviour of the four different halogen species (F, Cl, Br, I) is compared in several chemical composition contexts. The analysis tool can be refined by distinguishing several types for a given chemical species, such as H atoms bound to O or C. Such distinction shows, for instance, that C-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O are the preferred interactions in compounds containing both O and Cl.

  4. Stable atomic structure of NiTi austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A; Johnson, Duane D

    2014-08-01

    Nitinol (NiTi), the most widely used shape-memory alloy, exhibits an austenite phase that has yet to be identified. The usually assumed austenitic structure is cubic B2, which has imaginary phonon modes, hence it is unstable. We suggest a stable austenitic structure that “on average” has B2 symmetry (observed by x-ray and neutron diffraction), but it exhibits finite atomic displacements from the ideal B2 sites. The proposed structure has a phonon spectrum that agrees with that from neutron scattering, has diffraction spectra in agreement with x-ray diffraction, and has an energy relative to the ground state that agrees with calorimetry data.

  5. Atomic Structure of Twin Boundaries in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Jones, K. M.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2003-05-01

    Using the combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, first-principles density-functional total energy calculations, and image simulations, we determined the atomic structure of lamellar twin and double-positioning twin boundaries in CdTe. We find that the structure of lamellar twin boundaries has no dangling bonds or wrong bonds; thus, it results in negligible effects on the electronic properties. The structure of double-positioning twin boundaries, however, contain both Cd and Te dangling bonds, and therefore produce energy states in the bandgap that are detrimental to the electronic properties of CdTe.

  6. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-18

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene.

  7. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R.; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene. PMID:26888259

  8. Atom by atom: HRTEM insights into inorganic nanotubes and fullerene-like structures.

    PubMed

    Bar Sadan, Maya; Houben, Lothar; Enyashin, Andrey N; Seifert, Gotthard; Tenne, Reshef

    2008-10-14

    The characterization of nanostructures down to the atomic scale is essential to understand some physical properties. Such a characterization is possible today using direct imaging methods such as aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), when iteratively backed by advanced modeling produced by theoretical structure calculations and image calculations. Aberration-corrected HRTEM is therefore extremely useful for investigating low-dimensional structures, such as inorganic fullerene-like particles and inorganic nanotubes. The atomic arrangement in these nanostructures can lead to new insights into the growth mechanism or physical properties, where imminent commercial applications are unfolding. This article will focus on two structures that are symmetric and reproducible. The first structure that will be dealt with is the smallest stable symmetric closed-cage structure in the inorganic system, a MoS(2) nanooctahedron. It is investigated by means of aberration-corrected microscopy which allowed validating the suggested DFTB-MD model. It will be shown that structures diverging from the energetically most stable structures are present in the laser ablated soot and that the alignment of the different shells is parallel, unlike the bulk material where the alignment is antiparallel. These findings correspond well with the high-energy synthetic route and they provide more insight into the growth mechanism. The second structure studied is WS(2) nanotubes, which have already been shown to have a unique structure with very desirable mechanical properties. The joint HRTEM study combined with modeling reveals new information regarding the chirality of the different shells and provides a better understanding of their growth mechanism.

  9. Zero-Temperature Structures of Atomic Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey; Ceperley, David

    2011-03-01

    Since the first prediction of an atomic metallic phase of hydrogen by Wigner and Huntington over 75 years ago, there have been many theoretical efforts aimed at determining the crystal structures of the zero-temperature phases. We present results from ab initio random structure searching with density functional theory performed to determine the ground state structures from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. We estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (rs = 1.225), which then remains stable to 2.5 TPa (rs = 0.969). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an . . . ABCABC . . . planar structure that is remarkably similar to the ground state of lithium, which compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice beyond 5 TPa (rs < 0.86). Our results provide a complete ab initio description of the atomic metallic crystal structures of hydrogen, resolving one of the most fundamental and long outstanding issues concerning the structures of the elements.

  10. Molecular structures, charge distributions, and vibrational analyses of the tetracoordinate Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine investigated by density functional theory in comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    The Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine have been studied with B3LYP calculations by using def2-TZVP basis set at the metal atoms and using def2-TZVP and 6-311G+(d,p) basis sets at the remaining atoms. Both basis set combinations give analogous results, which validate the use of quickly converging 6-311G+(d,p) basis set in future studies. The molecular structures, atomic charge and spin distributions, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the complexes have been calculated. The Zn, Cd and Hg complexes have been found to have distorted tetrahedral environments around the metal atoms whereas Cu complex has a square planar geometry. The NBO charge analysis have been found more accurate and less misleading compared with the Mulliken scheme. The present vibrational spectra calculations allow accurate assignment of the vibrational bands, which otherwise assigned tentatively in previous experimental-only studies.

  11. Synthesis and structural characterisation of iron(II) and copper(II) diphosphates containing flattened metal oxotetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Keates, Adam C.; Wang, Qianlong; Weller, Mark T.

    2014-02-15

    Single crystal and bulk polycrystalline forms of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=Fe(II), Cu(II)) have been synthesised and their structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the tetragonal system, space group P-42{sub 1}m. Their structures are formed from infinite sheets of linked oxopolyhedra of the stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2−} with potassium cations situated between the layers. The MO{sub 4} tetrahedra share oxygen atoms with [P{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 4−} diphosphate groups and the potassium ions have KO{sub 8} square prismatic geometry. In both compounds the M(II) centre has an unusual strongly flattened, tetrahedral coordination to oxygen, as a result of the Jahn–Teller (JT) effect for the high spin d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing or a second order JT effect for d{sup 9} Cu(II) centres in four fold coordination. The uncommon transition metal ion environments found in these materials are reflected in their optical absorption spectra and magnetism data. - Graphical abstract: The structures of the tetragonal polymorphs of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, M=Cu(II), Fe(II), consist of infinite sheets of stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2−}, formed from linked pyrophosphate groups and MO{sub 4} tetrahedra, separated by potassium ions. In both compounds the unusual tetrahedral coordination of the M(II) centre is strongly flattened as a result of Jahn–Teller (JT) effects for high spin, d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing and second-order JT effects for d{sup 9} Cu(II). Display Omitted - Highlights: • Tetrahedral copper and iron(II) coordinated by oxygen. • New layered phosphate structure. • Jahn–Teller and d{sup 10} distorted coordinations.

  12. New macrocyclic schiff base complexes incorporating a homopiperazine unit: Synthesis of some Co(II), Ni(II),Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes and crystal structure and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keypour, Hassan; Rezaeivala, Majid; Ramezani-Aktij, Ameneh; Bayat, Mehdi; Dilek, Nefise; Ünver, Hüseyin

    2016-07-01

    A new macrocyclic Schiff base ligand, L, was synthesized by condensation reaction of 1,4-bis(2-formylphenyl)homopiperazine and 1,4-diaminobutane in acetonitrile. The Schiff base ligand was characterized by using elemental analyses, FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques. The metal (II) complexes [ML], were synthesized from the reaction of MCl2.nH2O (M: Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) with Schiff base ligand, L and characterized by elemental analyses and FT-IR. X-ray crystal structure of [CoLCl]+ distorted square pyramidal geometry with an N4Cl core, arising from coordination by the four donor nitrogen atoms from the macrocyclic framework and one Cl atom. It crystallizes triclinic space group, P-1 with a = 7.1777(1) Å, b = 11.0357 (2) Å, c = 15.1520(2) Å, V = 1183.14(3), Z = 2, Dc = 1.556 g cm-3, μ (MoKα) = 0.156 mm-1. Also, the bonding situation between the [MCl]+ and Ligand (L) fragments in [MLCl]ClO4 (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II)) complexes were carried out by energy-decomposition analysis (EDA). The results showed that there is an increasing trend in the case of ΔEelstat of the complexes by changing the M from Co(II) to Zn(II).

  13. Designing a heterotrinuclear Cu(II)-Ni(II)-Cu(II) complex from a mononuclear Cu(II) Schiff base precursor with dicyanamide as a coligand: synthesis, crystal structure, thermal and photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Hopa, Cigdem; Cokay, Ismail

    2016-08-01

    Schiff bases are considered `versatile ligands' in coordination chemistry. The design of polynuclear complexes has become of interest due to their facile preparations and varied synthetic, structural and magnetic properties. The reaction of the `ligand complex' [CuL] {H2L is 2,2'-[propane-1,3-diylbis(nitrilomethanylylidene)]diphenol} with Ni(OAc)2·4H2O (OAc is acetate) in the presence of dicyanamide (dca) leads to the formation of bis(dicyanamido-1κN(1))bis(dimethyl sulfoxide)-2κO,3κO-bis{μ-2,2'-[propane-1,3-diylbis(nitrilomethanylylidene)]diphenolato}-1:2κ(6)O,O':O,N,N',O';1:3κ(6)O,O':O,N,N',O'-dicopper(II)nickel(II), [Cu2Ni(C17H16N2O2)2(C2N3)2(C2H6OS)2]. The complex shows strong absorption bands in the frequency region 2155-2269 cm(-1), which clearly proves the presence of terminal bonding dca groups. A single-crystal X-ray study revealed that two [CuL] units coordinate to an Ni(II) atom through the phenolate O atoms, with double phenolate bridges between Cu(II) and Ni(II) atoms. Two terminal dca groups complete the distorted octahedral geometry around the central Ni(II) atom. According to differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA), the title complex is stable up to 423 K and thermal decomposition starts with the release of two coordinated dimethyl sulfoxide molecules. Free H2L exhibits photoluminescence properties originating from intraligand (π-π*) transitions and fluorescence quenching is observed on complexation of H2L with Cu(II).

  14. Designing a heterotrinuclear Cu(II)-Ni(II)-Cu(II) complex from a mononuclear Cu(II) Schiff base precursor with dicyanamide as a coligand: synthesis, crystal structure, thermal and photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Hopa, Cigdem; Cokay, Ismail

    2016-08-01

    Schiff bases are considered `versatile ligands' in coordination chemistry. The design of polynuclear complexes has become of interest due to their facile preparations and varied synthetic, structural and magnetic properties. The reaction of the `ligand complex' [CuL] {H2L is 2,2'-[propane-1,3-diylbis(nitrilomethanylylidene)]diphenol} with Ni(OAc)2·4H2O (OAc is acetate) in the presence of dicyanamide (dca) leads to the formation of bis(dicyanamido-1κN(1))bis(dimethyl sulfoxide)-2κO,3κO-bis{μ-2,2'-[propane-1,3-diylbis(nitrilomethanylylidene)]diphenolato}-1:2κ(6)O,O':O,N,N',O';1:3κ(6)O,O':O,N,N',O'-dicopper(II)nickel(II), [Cu2Ni(C17H16N2O2)2(C2N3)2(C2H6OS)2]. The complex shows strong absorption bands in the frequency region 2155-2269 cm(-1), which clearly proves the presence of terminal bonding dca groups. A single-crystal X-ray study revealed that two [CuL] units coordinate to an Ni(II) atom through the phenolate O atoms, with double phenolate bridges between Cu(II) and Ni(II) atoms. Two terminal dca groups complete the distorted octahedral geometry around the central Ni(II) atom. According to differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA), the title complex is stable up to 423 K and thermal decomposition starts with the release of two coordinated dimethyl sulfoxide molecules. Free H2L exhibits photoluminescence properties originating from intraligand (π-π*) transitions and fluorescence quenching is observed on complexation of H2L with Cu(II). PMID:27487333

  15. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  16. Magnetism and surface structure of atomically controlled ultrathin metal films.

    SciTech Connect

    Shiratsuchi, Yu.; Yamamoto, M.; Bader, S. D.; Materials Science Division; Osaka Univ.

    2007-01-01

    We review the correlation of magnetism and surface structure in ultrathin metal films, including the tailoring of novel magnetic properties using atomic scale control of the nanostructure. We provide an overview of modern fabrication and characterization techniques used to create and explore these fascinating materials, and highlight important phenomena of interest. We also discuss techniques that control and characterize both the magnetic and structural properties on an atomic scale. Recent advances in the development and applications of these techniques allow nanomagnetism to be investigated in an unprecedented manner. A system cannot necessarily retain a two-dimensional structure as it enters the ultrathin region, but it can transform into a three-dimensional, discontinuous structure due to the Volmer-Weber growth mechanism. This structural transformation can give rise to superparamagnetism. During this evolution, competing factors such as interparticle interactions and the effective magnetic anisotropy govern the magnetic state. These magnetic parameters are influenced by the nanostructure of the film. In particular, controlling the magnetic anisotropy is critical for determining the magnetic properties. Surface effects play especially important roles in influencing both the magnitude and direction of the magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin films. By properly altering the surface structure, the strength and direction of the magnetic anisotropy are controlled via spin-orbit and/or dipole interactions.

  17. The crystal structure of samarosporin I at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Renate; Axford, Danny; Evans, Gwyndaf; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2012-11-01

    The atomic resolution structures of samarosporin I have been determined at 100 and 293 K. This is the first crystal structure of a natural 15-residue peptaibol. The amino acid sequence in samarosporin I is identical to emerimicin IV and stilbellin I. Samarosporin is a peptide antibiotic produced by the ascomycetous fungus Samarospora rostrup and belongs to peptaibol subfamily 2. The structures at both temperatures are very similar to each other adopting mainly a 3₁₀-helical and a minor fraction of α-helical conformation. The helices are significantly bent and packed in an antiparallel fashion in the centered monoclinic lattice leaving among them an approximately 10-Å channel extending along the crystallographic twofold axis. Only two ordered water molecules per peptide molecule were located in the channel. Comparisons have been carried out with crystal structures of subfamily 2 16-residue peptaibols antiamoebin and cephaibols. The repercussion of the structural analysis of samarosporin on membrane function is discussed.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and cytotoxic properties of thiosemicarbazide Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathan Kumar, S.; Rajesh, J.; Anitha, K.; Dhahagani, K.; Marappan, M.; Indra Gandhi, N.; Rajagopal, G.

    2015-05-01

    Synthesis of new complexes of Ni(II) (1) and Zn(II) (2) with [1-(2-hydroxy-3,5-diiodobenzylidene)-4-phenylthiosemicarbazide] have been reported. The composition of these two complexes 1 and 2 is discussed on the basis of IR, 1H NMR and UV spectral data along with their X-ray crystallographic data. The crystal structure of these two complexes has revealed that the free ligand (L) is deprotonated twice at the oxygen and sulfur atoms and they are coordinated with the complexes through phenoxide-O, azomethine-N and thiolate-S atoms. The single-crystal X-ray structures of complex (1) exhibits a square planar structure, while complex (2) reveals trigonal bipyramidal distorted square based pyramidal structure. Anticancer activity of ligand and the complexes 1-2 are evaluated in human adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells. The preliminary bioassay indicates that the free ligand and the complexes 1-2 exhibit inhibitory activity against the human adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines.

  19. Synthesis, structural and electrochemical properties of nickel(II) sulfamethazine complex with diethylenetriamine ligand.

    PubMed

    Bulut, İclal; Öztürk, Filiz; Bulut, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    In this study, [Ni(dien)2]⋅smz2⋅(Hsmz: sulfamethazine and dien: diethylenetriamine) complex has been synthesized and its crystal structure has been determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The title complex crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group Pbnb [a=8.556(5), b=16.228(5), c=28.209(5)Å, V=3917(3)Å(3) and Z=4]. The nickel(II) ion has distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The metal atom, which rides on a crystallographic center of symmetry, is coordinated by six nitrogen atoms of two dien ligands to form a discrete [Ni(dien)2](2+) unit, which captures two sulfamethazine ions, each through intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The powder EPR spectrum of Cu(2+) doped Ni(II) complex was recorded at room temperature. The vibrational investigation has been carried out by considering the characteristic bands related to the functional groups of the complex. The electrochemical behavior of Ni(II) ions in the presence and in the absence of smz and dien were studied by square wave and cyclic voltammetry. A well-defined irreversible peak at -1.112V different from those of the Ni(II)-smz (-0.876V) and the Ni(II)-dien complex (-1.064V) was observed in the solution containing Ni(II) ions, which was attributed to the formation of the new mixed ligand complex of Ni(II) with smz and dien.

  20. Direct structure determination by atomic-resolution incoherent STEM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nellist, P.D.; Xin, Y.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Use of a large, annular dark-field (ADF) detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope is shown to give images that can allow direct structure determination, being a convolution between the illuminating probe intensity and an object function localized at the atomic column positions. The ADF image is also shown to resolve crystal spacings more than twice smaller than the phase contrast point resolution limit of the microscope used, with sub-angstrom structural information being retrieved. ADF image of several semiconductor materials are studied.

  1. Determination of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in food and water samples after preconcentration by coprecipitation with Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Tufekci, Mehmet; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Elvan, Hamide; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Duran, Celal

    2013-02-01

    A new, simple, and rapid separation and preconcentration procedure, for determination of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions in environmental real samples, has been developed. The method is based on the combination of coprecipitation of analyte ions by the aid of the Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate-(Mo(VI)-DDTC) precipitate and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The effects of experimental conditions like pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of DDTC and Mo(VI), standing time, centrifugation rate and time, sample volume, etc. and also the influences of some foreign ions were investigated in detail on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions. The preconcentration factors were found to be 150 for Pb(II), Zn(II) and Co(II), and 200 for Cd(II) ions. The detection limits were in the range of 0.1-2.2 μg L(-1) while the relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 5 % for the studied analyte ions. The accuracy of the method was checked by spiked/recovery tests and the analysis of certified reference material (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water). The procedure was successfully applied to seawater and stream water as liquid samples and baby food and dried eggplant as solid samples in order to determine the levels of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions. PMID:22527456

  2. Solid phase extraction of lead (II), copper (II), cadmium (II) and nickel (II) using gallic acid-modified silica gel prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fazhi; Lin, Xucong; Wu, Xiaoping; Xie, Zenghong

    2008-01-15

    The immobilization of gallic acid on the surface of amino group-containing silica gel phases for the formation of a newly chelating matrix (GASG) is described. The newly synthesized extractant, characterized by the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transformation spectroscopy and elemental analysis, was used to preconcentrate Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II). The pH ranges for quantitative sorption and the concentrations of HCl for eluting Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were opimized, respectively. The sorption capacity of the matrix has been found to be 12.63, 6.09, 15.38, 4.62mg/g for Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II), respectively, with the preconcentration factor of approximately 200 ( approximately 100 for Cd(II)). The effects of flow rates, the eluants, the electrolytes and cations on the metal ions extraction, as well as the chelating matrix stability and reusability, were also studied. The extraction behavior of the matrix was conformed with Langmuir's equation. The present preconcentration and determination method was successfully applied to the analysis of synthetic metal mixture solution and river water samples. The 3sigma detection limit and 10sigma quantification limit for Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) were found to be 0.58, 0.86, 0.65, 0.92microg/L and 1.08, 1.23, 0.87, 1.26microg/L, respectively. PMID:18371717

  3. The role of atomic lines in radiation heating of the experimental space vehicle Fire-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S. T.

    2015-10-01

    The results of calculating the convective and radiation heating of the Fire-II experimental space vehicle allowing for atomic lines of atoms and ions using the NERAT-ASTEROID computer platform are presented. This computer platform is intended to solve the complete set of equations of radiation gas dynamics of viscous, heat-conductive, and physically and chemically nonequilibrium gas, as well as radiation transfer. The spectral optical properties of high temperature gases are calculated using ab initio quasi-classical and quantum-mechanical methods. The calculation of the transfer of selective thermal radiation is performed using a line-by-line method using specially generated computational grids over the radiation wavelengths, which make it possible to attain a noticeable economy of computational resources.

  4. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  5. The heavy atom microwave structure of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Vinh; Stahl, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam

    2016-11-01

    The rotational spectra of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran have been observed using a pulsed molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating in the frequency range 2-26.5 GHz. Conformational analysis using quantum chemical calculations yields two stable conformers; both of them possess an envelope structure. The conformational transformation can occur via two different transition states. The Cremer-Pople notation for five-membered rings is chosen for describing the conformations. Only one conformer with equatorial position of the methyl group is assigned in the experimental spectrum. The fits of its parent species, 13C- and 18O-isotopologues result in highly accurate molecular parameters, and enable the determination of a heavy atom rs structure using Kraitchman's equations. This experimentally determined structure is in excellent agreement with the structure calculated by anharmonic frequency calculations.

  6. Structure of a Quantized Vortex in Fermi Atom Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiko; Koyama, Tomio

    2006-09-07

    In atomic Fermi gases, the pairing character changes from BCS-like to BEC-like when one decreases the threshold energy of the Feshbach resonance. With this crossover, the system enters the strong-coupling regime through the population enhancement of diatom molecules, and the vortex structure becomes much different from well-known core structures in BCS superfluid since the superfluid order parameter is given by a sum of BCS pairs and BEC molecular condensates. In this paper, we study the structure of a vortex by numerically solving the generalized Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation derived from the fermion-boson model and clarify how the vortex structure changes with the threshold energy of the Feshbach resonance. We find that the diatom boson condensate enhances the matter density depletion inside the vortex core and the discreteness of localized quasi-particle spectrum.

  7. TlII excitation cross-sections in collisions of slow electrons with thallium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    Excitation of a singly-charged thallium ion in electron collisions with thallium atoms has been studied experimentally. Seventy excitation cross sections have been measured at an exciting electron energy of 30 eV. Ten optical excitation functions (OEFs) have been recorded in the incident electron energy range of 0-200 eV. For seven TlII spectral series, the dependence of excitation cross-sections on the principal quantum numbers of upper levels has been studied. A comparison of findings with data from preceding publications is presented.

  8. Studying Atomic Structures by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Knut W.

    2008-07-01

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  9. Studying atomic structures by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Knut W

    2008-07-25

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy-loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli-electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations. PMID:18653874

  10. Deciphering Adsorption Structure on Insulators at the Atomic Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmer, Konrad; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2014-09-01

    We applied Scanning Probe Microscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) to discover the basics of how adsorbates wet insulating substrates, addressing a key question in geochemistry. To allow experiments on insulating samples we added Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) capability to our existing UHV Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). This was accomplished by integrating and debugging a commercial qPlus AFM upgrade. Examining up-to-40-nm-thick water films grown in vacuum we found that the exact nature of the growth spirals forming around dislocations determines what structure of ice, cubic or hexagonal, is formed at low temperature. DFT revealed that wetting of mica is controlled by how exactly a water layer wraps around (hydrates) the K+ ions that protrude from the mica surface. DFT also sheds light on the experimentally observed extreme sensitivity of the mica surface to preparation conditions: K atoms can easily be rinsed off by water flowing past the mica surface.

  11. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  12. Atomic structure of anthrax protective antigen pore elucidates toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L; Collier, R John; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-05-28

    Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen, lethal factor, and oedema factor, is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in humans and animals. Protective antigen forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes lethal factor and oedema factor into the cytosol of target cells. Protective antigen is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. On the basis of biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a phi (Φ)-clamp composed of phenylalanine (Phe)427 residues of protective antigen catalyses protein translocation via a charge-state-dependent Brownian ratchet. Although atomic structures of protective antigen prepores are available, how protective antigen senses low pH, converts to active pore, and translocates lethal factor and oedema factor are not well defined without an atomic model of its pore. Here, by cryo-electron microscopy with direct electron counting, we determine the protective antigen pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed.

  13. Atomic structure of anthrax PA pore elucidates toxin translocation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Collier, R. John; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF), is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in human and animals. PA forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes LF and EF into the cytosol of target cells1. PA is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. Based on biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a Φ-clamp composed of Phe427 residues of PA catalyzes protein translocation via a charge-state dependent Brownian ratchet2–9. Although atomic structures of PA prepores are available10–14, how PA senses low pH, converts to active pore and translocates LF and EF are not well defined without an atomic model of the PA pore. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) with direct electron counting, we have determined the PA pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low-pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed. PMID:25778700

  14. Atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite: an Fe isotope tracer study.

    PubMed

    Handler, Robert M; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2009-02-15

    The reaction of aqueous Fe(II) with Fe(III) oxides is a complex process, comprising sorption, electron transfer, and in some cases, reductive dissolution and transformation to secondary minerals. To better understand the dynamics of these reactions, we measured the extent and rate of Fe isotope exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite using a 57Fe isotope tracer approach. We observed near-complete exchange of Fe atoms between the aqueous phase and goethite nanorods over a 30-day time period. Despite direct isotopic evidence for extensive mixing between the aqueous and goethite Fe, no phase transformation was observed, nor did the size or shape of the goethite rods change appreciably. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images, however, appear to indicate that some recrystallization of the goethite particles may have occurred. Near-complete exchange of Fe between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite, coupled with negligible change in the goethite mineralogy and morphology, suggests a mechanism of coupled growth (via sorption and electron transfer) and dissolution at separate crystallographic goethite sites. We propose that sorption and dissolution sites are linked via conduction through the bulk crystal, as was recently demonstrated for hematite. Extensive mixing between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite, a relatively stable iron oxide, has significant implications for heavy metal sequestration and release (e.g., arsenic and uranium), as well as reduction of soil and groundwater contaminants.

  15. Synthesis and structural characterization of two half-sandwich nickel(II) complexes with the scorpionate ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.-F. E-mail: s-shuwen@163.com; Zhang, X.; Sun, S.-W.; Sun, H.; Ma, H.-X.

    2015-12-15

    The synthesis and characterization of two new halfsandwich mononuclear nickel(II) complexes with the scorpionate ligands, [k{sup 3}-N, N',N''-Tp{sup t-Bu}, {sup Me}NiI] (1) and [k{sup 3}-N,N',N''-Tp{sup t-Bu}, {sup Me}NiNO{sub 3}] (2), are reported. These complexes have been fully characterized by elemental analyses and infrared spectra. Their molecular structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The nickel(II) ion of complex 1 is in a four-coordinate environment, in which the donor atoms are provided by three nitrogen atoms of a hydrotris(pyrazolyl) borate ligand and one iodide atom, while that of complex 2 is in a five-coordinate environment with three nitrogen atoms from a hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate ligand and two oxygen atoms from a nitrate ion.

  16. Synthesis and structural characterization of two half-sandwich nickel(II) complexes with the scorpionate ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.-F.; Zhang, X.; Sun, S.-W.; Sun, H.; Ma, H.-X.

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis and characterization of two new halfsandwich mononuclear nickel(II) complexes with the scorpionate ligands, [ k 3- N, N', N''- Tp t-Bu, Me NiI] ( 1) and [ k 3- N, N', N''- Tp t-Bu, Me NiNO3] ( 2), are reported. These complexes have been fully characterized by elemental analyses and infrared spectra. Their molecular structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The nickel(II) ion of complex 1 is in a four-coordinate environment, in which the donor atoms are provided by three nitrogen atoms of a hydrotris(pyrazolyl) borate ligand and one iodide atom, while that of complex 2 is in a five-coordinate environment with three nitrogen atoms from a hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate ligand and two oxygen atoms from a nitrate ion.

  17. Tin(II) ketoacidoximates: synthesis, X-ray structures and processing to tin(II) oxide.

    PubMed

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash; Davaasuren, Bambar; Alshankiti, Buthainah Ameen; Rothenberger, Alexander

    2015-12-14

    Tin(II) ketoacidoximates of the type [HON=CRCOO]2Sn (R = Me 1, CH2Ph 2) and (MeON=CMeCOO)3Sn](-) NH4(+)·2H2O 3 were synthesized by reacting pyruvate- and hydroxyl- or methoxylamine RONH2 (R = H, Me) with tin(II) chloride dihydrate SnCl2·2H2O. The single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the geometry at the Sn atom is trigonal bipyramidal in 1, 2 and trigonal pyramidal in 3. Inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in 1-3. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis shows that the decomposition of 1-3 to SnO occurs at ca. 160 °C. The evolved gas analysis during TG indicates complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step for 1 whereas a small organic residue is additionally removed at temperatures >400 °C for 2. Above 140 °C, [HON=C(Me)COO]2Sn (1) decomposes in air to spherical SnO particles of size 10-500 nm. Spin coating of 1 on Si or a glass substrate followed by heating at 200 °C results in a uniform film of SnO. The band gap of the produced SnO film and nanomaterial was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to be in the range of 3.0-3.3 eV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates surface oxidation of the SnO film to SnO2 in ambient atmosphere.

  18. Atomic structure of interface states in silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    George, B M; Behrends, J; Schnegg, A; Schulze, T F; Fehr, M; Korte, L; Rech, B; Lips, K; Rohrmüller, M; Rauls, E; Schmidt, W G; Gerstmann, U

    2013-03-29

    Combining orientation dependent electrically detected magnetic resonance and g tensor calculations based on density functional theory we assign microscopic structures to paramagnetic states involved in spin-dependent recombination at the interface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. We find that (i) the interface exhibits microscopic roughness, (ii) the electronic structure of the interface defects is mainly determined by c-Si, (iii) we identify the microscopic origin of the conduction band tail state in the a-Si:H layer, and (iv) present a detailed recombination mechanism.

  19. Highly stereoselective generation of complex oxy-bicyclic scaffolds via an atom-economic Pd(II)-catalyzed hydroalkynylation, isomerization and Diels-Alder cycloaddition sequence.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruwei; Chen, Ke; Deng, Qiulin; Yang, Jianjun; Zhang, Lixiong

    2014-02-21

    An atom-economic tandem Pd(II)-catalyzed hydroalkynylation, alkyne-allene isomerization, and Diels-Alder cycloaddition is reported. The reaction employs readily available starting substrates, proceeds in a highly ordered fashion, features high regio- and stereoselectivity, and tolerates a wide range of functionality and structural motifs, thus offering an attractive strategy for producing new molecular complexity and diversity from easily available starting materials. A mechanistic study with density functional theoretical calculations was conducted to rationalize the observed stereoselectivity.

  20. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite

    SciTech Connect

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Wu, Tao; Blothe, Marco; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-06-08

    Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through production of organic ligands and acids, and through uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that a lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (Straub, 6 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 107 cells were produced per {micro}mol Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including decrease in unit cell b-dimension toward dioctahedral levels and iron and potassium release. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms may be directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere.

  1. Structural basis for exon recognition by a group II intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Keating, Kevin S.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-11-18

    Free group II introns are infectious retroelements that can bind and insert themselves into RNA and DNA molecules via reverse splicing. Here we report the 3.4-A crystal structure of a complex between an oligonucleotide target substrate and a group IIC intron, as well as the refined free intron structure. The structure of the complex reveals the conformation of motifs involved in exon recognition by group II introns.

  2. Identification of a mechanism of transformation of clathrate hydrate structures I to II or H.

    PubMed

    Yoshioki, Shuzo

    2012-07-01

    Binary mixed-gas hydrates including methane and other guest gases demonstrate a structural transition between the sI and sII phases. Under increasing pressure pure methane hydrate exhibits a phase transition first from sI to sII and then to sH. But the mechanism of the transformation from sI to sII or sH has not yet been identified. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrates suggest there may exist uncommon 15-hedral cages (5¹²6³), linking the sI and sII cages. In addition, xenon hydrate involving 15-hedral cages has been synthesized and named an hsI hydrate. Based on the hsI cages, we propose a mechanism for the transition of sI to sII or sH at atomic level resolution. The sI hydrate is first transformed to hsI, and hsI is further transformed to sII. Upon compression, hsI is transformed to sH owing to depletion of atomic layers. The mechanism of transformation speculated here calls for experimental verification.

  3. Syntheses, characterizations and structures of NO donor Schiff base ligands and nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenol, Cemal; Hayvali, Zeliha; Dal, Hakan; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2011-06-01

    New Schiff base derivatives ( L 1 and L 2) were prepared by the condensation of 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde ( o-vanillin) and 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde ( iso-vanillin) with 5-methylfurfurylamine. Two new complexes [Ni(L 1) 2] and [Cu(L 1) 2] have been synthesized with bidentate NO donor Schiff base ligand ( L 1). The Ni(II) and Cu(II) atoms in each complex are four coordinated in a square planar geometry. Schiff bases ( L 1 and L 2) and complexes [Ni(L 1) 2] and [Cu(L 1) 2] were characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, UV-vis, mass and 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopies. The crystal structures of the ligand ( L 2) and complexes [Ni(L 1) 2] and [Cu(L 1) 2] have also been determined by using X-ray crystallographic technique.

  4. A revised structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II from a neutron fiber diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, P.; Nishiyama, Y.; Chanzy, H.

    1999-11-03

    The crystal and molecular structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II have been revised using new neutron diffraction data extending to 1.2 {angstrom} resolution collected from two highly crystalline fiber samples of mercerized flax. Mercerization was achieved in NaOH/H{sub 2}O for one sample and in NaOD/D{sub 2}O for the other, corresponding to the labile hydroxymethyl moieties being hydrogenated and deuterated, respectively. Fourier difference maps were calculated in which neutron difference amplitudes were combined with phases calculated from two revised X-ray models of cellulose II. The revised phasing models were determined by refinement against the X-ray data set of Kolpak and Blackwell, using the LALS methodology. Both models have two antiparallel chains organized in a P2{sub 1} space group and unit cell parameters: a = 8.01 {angstrom}, b = 9.04 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, and {gamma} = 117.1{degree}. One has equivalent backbone conformations for both chains but different conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties: gt for the origin chain and tg for the center chain. The second model based on the recent crystal structures of cellotetraose, has different conformations for the two chains but nearly equivalent conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties. On the basis of the X-ray data alone, the models could not be differentiated. From the neutron Fourier difference maps, possible labile hydrogen atom positions were identified for each model and refined using LALS. The second model is significantly different from previous proposals based on the crystal structures of cellotetraose, MD simulations of cellulose II, and any potential hydrogen-bonding network in the structure of cellulose II determined in earlier X-ray fiber diffraction studies. The exact localization of the labile hydrogen atoms involved in this bonding, together with their donor and acceptor characteristics, is presented and discussed. This study provides, for the first time

  5. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  6. Refinement of Atomic Structures Against cryo-EM Maps.

    PubMed

    Murshudov, G N

    2016-01-01

    This review describes some of the methods for atomic structure refinement (fitting) against medium/high-resolution single-particle cryo-EM reconstructed maps. Some of the tools developed for macromolecular X-ray crystal structure analysis, especially those encapsulating prior chemical and structural information can be transferred directly for fitting into cryo-EM maps. However, despite the similarities, there are significant differences between data produced by these two techniques; therefore, different likelihood functions linking the data and model must be used in cryo-EM and crystallographic refinement. Although tools described in this review are mostly designed for medium/high-resolution maps, if maps have sufficiently good quality, then these tools can also be used at moderately low resolution, as shown in one example. In addition, the use of several popular crystallographic methods is strongly discouraged in cryo-EM refinement, such as 2Fo-Fc maps, solvent flattening, and feature-enhanced maps (FEMs) for visualization and model (re)building. Two problems in the cryo-EM field are overclaiming resolution and severe map oversharpening. Both of these should be avoided; if data of higher resolution than the signal are used, then overfitting of model parameters into the noise is unavoidable, and if maps are oversharpened, then at least parts of the maps might become very noisy and ultimately uninterpretable. Both of these may result in suboptimal and even misleading atomic models.

  7. Refinement of Atomic Structures Against cryo-EM Maps.

    PubMed

    Murshudov, G N

    2016-01-01

    This review describes some of the methods for atomic structure refinement (fitting) against medium/high-resolution single-particle cryo-EM reconstructed maps. Some of the tools developed for macromolecular X-ray crystal structure analysis, especially those encapsulating prior chemical and structural information can be transferred directly for fitting into cryo-EM maps. However, despite the similarities, there are significant differences between data produced by these two techniques; therefore, different likelihood functions linking the data and model must be used in cryo-EM and crystallographic refinement. Although tools described in this review are mostly designed for medium/high-resolution maps, if maps have sufficiently good quality, then these tools can also be used at moderately low resolution, as shown in one example. In addition, the use of several popular crystallographic methods is strongly discouraged in cryo-EM refinement, such as 2Fo-Fc maps, solvent flattening, and feature-enhanced maps (FEMs) for visualization and model (re)building. Two problems in the cryo-EM field are overclaiming resolution and severe map oversharpening. Both of these should be avoided; if data of higher resolution than the signal are used, then overfitting of model parameters into the noise is unavoidable, and if maps are oversharpened, then at least parts of the maps might become very noisy and ultimately uninterpretable. Both of these may result in suboptimal and even misleading atomic models. PMID:27572731

  8. Understanding the structure of the first atomic contact in gold.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Carlos; Caturla, María José; Palacios, Juan José; Untiedt, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    : We have studied experimentally jump-to-contact (JC) and jump-out-of-contact (JOC) phenomena in gold electrodes. JC can be observed at first contact when two metals approach each other, while JOC occurs in the last contact before breaking. When the indentation depth between the electrodes is limited to a certain value of conductance, a highly reproducible behaviour in the evolution of the conductance can be obtained for hundreds of cycles of formation and rupture. Molecular dynamics simulations of this process show how the two metallic electrodes are shaped into tips of a well-defined crystallographic structure formed through a mechanical annealing mechanism. We report a detailed analysis of the atomic configurations obtained before contact and rupture of these stable structures and obtained their conductance using first-principles quantum transport calculations. These results help us understand the values of conductance obtained experimentally in the JC and JOC phenomena and improve our understanding of atomic-sized contacts and the evolution of their structural characteristics. PMID:23718316

  9. AMO Database in KAERI and Atomic Structure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yongjoo; Park, H. M.; Kwon, D. H.

    2005-05-01

    Atomic spectroscopy studies carried out at the Laboratory for Quantum Optics in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute are introduced together with the AMO (Atomic, Molecular, and Optical) database established based upon those studies.

  10. Atomic structure calculations on the CRAY X-MP

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Atomic structure calculations require both radial and angular integrations, where the latter are often based on Racah algebra. With relatively minor modifications, good performance is obtained on vector machines for radial integrations. Angular integrations, however, present the bottleneck. Some recent improvements in the algorithms for angular integrations are described, as well as some multitasking experiments on the CRAY X-MP and CRAY 2. These show that the workload can easily be distributed evenly among available processors with dynamic scheduling. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Quasicrystal surfaces: structure and growth of atomic overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H. R.; Shimoda, M.; Tsai, A. P.

    2007-05-01

    We review recent developments in surface studies of single-grain quasicrystals under ultra high-vacuum conditions, focusing on two different topics: surface structure and growth of atomic overlayers on surfaces. Quasicrystalline phases are currently used for investigation of the first topic are icosahedral (i) Al-Pd-Mn, i-Al-Cu-Fe, i-Al-Cu-Ru, i-Ag-In-Yb and decagonal (d) Al-Ni-Co, and d-Al-Cu-Co. We report the progress made with all of these phases. The second topic covers the study of single-element overlayer growth by vapor deposition.

  12. Crystal structures of copper(II) and nickel(II) nitrate and chloride complexes with 4-bromo-2-[(2-hydroxyethylimino)-methyl]phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Filippova, I. G.; Bocelli, G.; Gulea, A. P.

    2008-07-15

    The crystal structures of {l_brace}4-bromo-2-[(2-hydroxyethylimino)-methyl]phenolo{r_brace}aquacopper(II) nitrate hemihydrate (I), chloro-{l_brace}4-bromo-2-[(2-hydroxyethylimino)-methyl]phenolo{r_brace}copper hemihydrate (II), and chloro-{l_brace}4-bromo-2-[(2-hydroxyethylimino)-methyl]phenolo{r_brace}aquanickel (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. Crystals of compound I are formed by cationic complexes, nitrate ions, and solvate water molecules. In the cation, the copper atom coordinates the singly deprotonated molecule of tridentate azomethine and the water molecule. The copper complexes are joined into centrosymmetric dimers by the O{sub w}-H...O hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure of compound II is composed of binuclear copper complexes and solvate water molecules. The copper atom coordinates the O,N,O ligand molecule and the chlorine ion, which fulfills a bridging function. The coordination polyhedron of the metal atom is a distorted tetragonal bipyramid in which the vertex is occupied by the chlorine atom of the neighboring complex in the dimer. Compound III is a centrosymmetric dimer complex. The coordination polyhedra of two nickel atoms related via the inversion center are distorted octahedra shared by the edge.

  13. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Mark-II Ultra-Cold Jet Target.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppov, V. G.; Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Murray, J. R.; Neumann, J. J.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Kleppner, D.; Davidenko, A. M.; Grishin, V. N.

    2000-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Mark-II). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. Recently, the Jet produced a measured electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam of about 10^15 H s-1 into a 0.3 cm^2 area at the detector. This intensity corresponds to the free jet density of about 10^11 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. So far, the intensity is limited by the high insulation vacuum pressure due to the evaporation of the separation cell's helium film. The beam's angular and radial distributions were measured. A test of a new superfluid-^4He-coated parabolic mirror, attached to the separation cell, appeared to increase the beam intensity by a factor of about 3, as expected.

  14. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Wu, Tao; Blöthe, Marco; Roden, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through the production of organic ligands and acids and through the uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that the lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture described by Straub et al. (K. L. Straub, M. Benz, B. Schink, and F. Widdel, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:1458–1460, 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay-sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 1.5 × 107 cells were produced per μmol of Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including a decrease in the unit cell b dimension toward dioctahedral levels and Fe and K release. Structural Fe(II) oxidation may involve either direct enzymatic oxidation, followed by solid-state mineral transformation, or indirect oxidation as a result of the formation of aqueous Fe, followed by electron transfer from Fe(II) in the mineral to Fe(III) in solution. Although it is not possible to distinguish between these two mechanisms with available data, the complete absence of aqueous Fe in oxidation experiments favors the former alternative. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms are directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere. PMID:22685132

  15. Synthesis and crystal structure of catena-bis(nicotinamide)aqua({mu}-phthalato)copper(II) hemihydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikov, G. G.; Koksharova, T. V.; Antsyshkina, A. S.; Gritsenko, I. S.; Sergienko, V. S.

    2008-07-15

    The copper(II) phthalate complex with nicotinamide [CuL{sub 2}({mu}-Pht)(H{sub 2}O)] . 0.5H{sub 2}O(I) (where L is nicotinamide and Pht{sup 2-} is an anion of phthalic acid) is synthesized and investigated using IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystals of compound I are monoclinic, a = 13.368(2) A, b = 7.891(3) A, c = 20.480(2) A, {beta} = 108.69(2){sup o}, Z = 4, and space group P2{sub 1}/c. The structural units of crystal I are linear chains formed by bridging phthalate anions and crystallization water molecules. The copper atom is coordinated by two pyridine nitrogen atoms of two nicotinamide ligands (Cu-N, 2.001 and 2.045 A), two oxygen atoms of different phthalate anions (Cu-O, 1.964 and 2.235 A), and the oxygen atom of the H{sub 2} O molecule (Cu-O, 2.014 A). The coordination polyhedron of the copper atom is completed to an elongated (4 + 1 + 1) tetragonal bipyramid by the second (chelating) oxygen atom of the carboxyl group (Cu-O, 2.587 A), which is one of the anions of phthalic acid. The linear polymer molecules are joined into complex macromolecular dimers with the closest internal contacts of the specific type. The macromolecular dimers are the main supramolecular ensembles of the crystal structure.

  16. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  17. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  18. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation. PMID:27355699

  19. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation.

  20. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium(II), lead(II), palladium(II) and silver(I) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Shokrollahi, Ardeshir; Niknam, Khodabakhsh; Niknam, Ebrahim; Najibi, Asma; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-15

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of cadmium(II), lead(II), palladium(II) and silver(I). The analytical procedure involved the formation of understudy metals complex with bis((1H-benzo [d] imidazol-2yl)ethyl) sulfane (BIES), and quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 1molL(-1) HNO(3) was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The concentration of BIES, pH and amount of surfactant (Triton X-114) was optimized. At optimum conditions, the detection limits of (3 sdb/m) of 1.4, 2.8, 1.6 and 1.4 ng mL(-1) for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Pd(2+) and Ag(+) along with preconcentration factors of 30 and enrichment factors of 48, 39, 32 and 42 for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Pd(2+) and Ag(+), respectively, were obtained. The proposed cloud point extraction has been successfully applied for the determination of metal ions in real samples with complicated matrix such as radiology waste, vegetable, blood and urine samples. PMID:19380196

  1. Three-dimensional structure of photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongates in complex with terbutryn

    SciTech Connect

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G. Dontsova, M. V.; Saenger, W.

    2011-11-15

    Photosystem II is a key component of the photosynthetic pathway producing oxygen at the thylakoid membrane of cyanobacteria, green algae, and plants. The three-dimensional structure of photosystem II from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongates in a complex with herbicide terbutryn (a photosynthesis inhibitor) was determined for the first time by X-ray diffraction and refined at 3.2 Angstrom-Sign resolution (R{sub factor} = 26.9%, R{sub free} = 29.9%, rmsd for bond lengths is 0.013 Angstrom-Sign , and rmsd for bond angles is 2.2 Degree-Sign ). The terbutryn molecule was located in the binding pocket of the mobile plastoquinone. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of photosystem II in a complex with terbutryn were deposited in the Protein Data Bank.

  2. 158 micron forbidden C II mapping of NGC 6946 - Probing the atomic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, S. C.; Geis, N.; Genzel, R.; Herrmann, F.; Jackson, J.; Poglitsch, A.; Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    A well-sampled map (23 x 17 kpc) of the strong 158 micron forbidden C II cooling line in the Scd galaxy NGC 6946 at 55 arcsec resolution is presented which was taken with the MPE/UCB Far-infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FIFI) in the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. It is concluded that the line emission in NGC 6946 is present in three spatially distinct components including nucleus, spiral arms, and extended region. An extended emission region is a source of most of the forbidden C II luminosity in NGC 6946. The 1 arcmin nuclear component has a line luminosity of 1.5 x 10 exp 7 solar luminosity and contributes 0.15 percent of the galaxy's total FIR luminosity. An extended component of forbidden C II emission is found to exist past the molecular extent of the galaxy and to be present to at least the full dimensions of the map. This component is attributed to a mixture of neutral and atomic clouds.

  3. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys.

    PubMed

    Middleburgh, S C; King, D M; Lumpkin, G R

    2015-04-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)-making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance.

  4. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  5. Structure of human chromosomes studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Javier

    2003-03-01

    In this work human chromosomes have been treated with RNase and pepsin to remove the layer of cellular material that covers the standard preparations on glass slides. This allows characterization of the topography of chromosomes at nanometer scale in air and in physiological solution by atomic force microscopy. Imaging of the dehydrated structure in air indicates radial arrangement of chromatin loops as the last level of DNA packing. However, imaging in liquid reveals a last level of organization consisting of a hierarchy of bands and coils. Additionally force curves between the tip and the chromosome in liquid are consistent with radial chromatin loops. These results and previous electron microscopy studies are analyzed, and a model is proposed for the chromosome structure in which radial loops and helical coils coexist.

  6. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys

    PubMed Central

    Middleburgh, S. C.; King, D. M.; Lumpkin, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)—making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance. PMID:26064629

  7. On structural patterns in H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, W.A. )

    1989-05-01

    High-resolution photographs of H II regions show that a large number of stars embedded in the nebulosities appear to be surrounded by emply spaces. This phenomenon seems to be quite common but has escaped attention up to now. The effect is not a photographic one, nor does it arise in the half-tone reproduction processes employed in publications, but no satisfactory explanation is apparent. 9 refs.

  8. Hybrid Molecular Structure of the Giant Protease Tripeptidyl Peptidase II

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Crystal K.; Rockel, Beate; Seyit, Gönül; Walian, Peter J.; Schönegge, Anne–Marie; Peters, Jürgen; Zwart, Petrus H.; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Jap, Bing K.

    2010-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is the largest known eukaryotic protease (6MDa). It is believed to act downstream of the 26S proteasome cleaving tripeptides from the N– termini of longer peptides and it is implicated in numerous cellular processes. Here we report the structure of Drosophila TPP II determined by a hybrid approach: The structure of the dimer was solved by x–ray crystallography and docked into the three– dimensional map of the holocomplex obtained by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. The resulting structure reveals the compartmentalization of the active sites inside a system of chambers and suggests the existence of a molecular ruler determining the size of the cleavage products. Furthermore, the structure suggests a model for activation of TPP II involving the relocation of a flexible loop and a repositioning of the active–site serine, coupling it to holocomplex assembly and active site sequestration. PMID:20676100

  9. First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-14

    Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

  10. First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

  11. Synthesis, crystal structure and fluorescence spectrum of a cadmium(II) sulfaquinoxaline complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Hua; Zhao, Ya-Yun; Zhang, Jie; Pan, Jian-Guo; Li, Xing

    2013-11-01

    catena-Poly[[[4-amino-N-(quinoxalin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamidato]aquacadmium(II)]-μ-4-amino-N-(quinoxalin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamidato], [Cd(C14H11N4O2S)2(H2O)], has been synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, fluorescence, IR and thermal analysis. Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals that the complex is a one-dimensional zigzag chain structure, and the Cd(II) cation has a distorted octahedral coordination geometry formed by five N atoms from three different sulfaquinoxaline ligands and one O atom from a water molecule. The fluorescence spectrum reveals that the complex emits strong blue fluorescence and thermal analysis shows that the complex has high thermal stability. PMID:24192183

  12. Structure of the Glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine--copper(II) complex in solution.

    PubMed

    Freedman, J H; Pickart, L; Weinstein, B; Mims, W B; Peisach, J

    1982-09-14

    Optical, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electron spin-echo envelope spectroscopies were used to examine the structure of the Cu(II) complex of glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine (GHL) in solution. At neutral pH, GHL forms a mononuclear 1:1 Cu(II) compound having an EPR spectrum resembling that of Cu(II) equatorially coordinated by two or three nitrogen atoms. Electron spin-echo studies demonstrate that one of these is located in the histidyl imidazole ring. A pH titration of Cu(II)-GHL shows three optical transitions with apparent pKs of 3.6, 9.2 and 11.4 and molecularities, with respect to protons, of 2, 2, and 1, respectively. At the lowest pK, GHL binds Cu(II), forming the species present at physiological pH. At elevated pH, spectroscopic experiments suggest that an alteration of the Cu(II) structure occurs, yet the bound imidazole is retained. These solution studies are consistent with nitrogen coordination of Cu(II) in Cu(II)-GHL, but the solid-state polymeric structure, with oxygen-bridged Cu(II) pairs as previously determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis [Pickart, L., Freedman, J. H., Loker, W. J., Peisach, J., Perkins, C. M., Steinkamp, R. E., & Weinstein, B. (1980) Nature (London) 288, 715-717; C. M. Perkins, N. J. Rose, R. E. Steinkamp, L. H. Jensen, B. Weinstein, and L. Pickart, unpublished results], does not exist in solution. PMID:6291585

  13. In Situ D-periodic Molecular Structure of Type II Collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2010-05-06

    Collagens are essential components of extracellular matrices in multicellular animals. Fibrillar type II collagen is the most prominent component of articular cartilage and other cartilage-like tissues such as notochord. Its in situ macromolecular and packing structures have not been fully characterized, but an understanding of these attributes may help reveal mechanisms of tissue assembly and degradation (as in osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis). In some tissues such as lamprey notochord, the collagen fibrillar organization is naturally crystalline and may be studied by x-ray diffraction. We used diffraction data from native and derivative notochord tissue samples to solve the axial, D-periodic structure of type II collagen via multiple isomorphous replacement. The electron density maps and heavy atom data revealed the conformation of the nonhelical telopeptides and the overall D-periodic structure of collagen type II in native tissues, data that were further supported by structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy. These results help to explain the observed differences in collagen type I and type II fibrillar architecture and indicate the collagen type II cross-link organization, which is crucial for fibrillogenesis. Transmission electron microscopy data show the close relationship between lamprey and mammalian collagen fibrils, even though the respective larger scale tissue architecture differs.

  14. Atomic-level insights into metabolite recognition and specificity of the SAM-II riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Kelley, Jennifer M.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Although S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a metabolic by-product of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), differs from SAM only by a single methyl group and an overall positive charge, SAH binds the SAM-II riboswitch with more than 1000-fold less affinity than SAM. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the molecular basis of such high selectivity in ligand recognition by SAM-II riboswitch. The biosynthesis of SAM exclusively generates the (S,S) stereoisomer, and (S,S)-SAM can spontaneously convert to the (R,S) form. We, therefore, also examined the effects of (R,S)-SAM binding to SAM-II and its potential biological function. We find that the unfavorable loss in entropy in SAM-II binding is greater for (S,S)- and (R,S)-SAM than SAH, which is compensated by stabilizing electrostatic interactions with the riboswitch. The positively charged sulfonium moiety on SAM acts as the crucial anchor point responsible for the formation of key ionic interactions as it fits favorably in the negatively charged binding pocket. In contrast, SAH, with its lone pair of electrons on the sulfur, experiences repulsion in the binding pocket of SAM-II and is enthalpically destabilized. In the presence of SAH, similar to the unbound riboswitch, the pseudoknot structure of SAM-II is not completely formed, thus exposing the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Unlike SAM, this may further facilitate ribosomal assembly and translation initiation. Our analysis of the conformational ensemble sampled by SAM-II in the absence of ligands and when bound to SAM or SAH reveals that ligand binding follows a combination of conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. PMID:22194311

  15. Synthesis, structure, and photoluminescence of ZnII and CdII coordination complexes constructed by structurally related 5,6-substituted pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Wu; Tao, Ying; Hu, Tong-Liang

    2012-08-01

    Aiming at exploring the effect of substituting groups of three structurally related ligands, 5,6-diethyl-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2L1), 5,6-diphenyl-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2L2), and dibenzo[f,h]quinoxaline-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (H2L3), seven new coordination polymers constructed from these three substituted dicarboxylate ligands, {[Zn(L1)(H2O)3]·2H2O}∞ (1), {[Cd2(L2ʹ)4(H2O)]·3H2O}∞ (2), [Zn(L2)(CH3OH)]∞ (3), {[Zn(L2)(H2O)2]·H2O}∞ (4), {[Zn(L2ʹ)]·H2O}∞ (5), [Zn2(L3)(DMF)4]∞(6), [Zn(L3)(2,2ʹ-bipy)(H2O)]∞(7), have been prepared and structurally characterized. 1 is a 1D chain structure in which ZnII ion is six-coordinated with octahedron geometry. 2 is also a 1D chain structure in which there are two crystallographically independent CdII ions in the asymmetric unit and exist transformative L2ʹ ligands in the resulting complex. 3 and 4 both possess 2D layer network with the same (4, 82) topology, while the two complexes take different coordination modes during the forming of the compounds. 5 has a 1D chain structure based on the transformative L2ʹ ligand in which ZnII ion is five-coordinated with bipyramidal geometry. 6 and 7 both have 1D chain structure constructed from L3 ligand. Thereinto, ZnII ion in 6 is five-coordinated by three oxygen atoms from two individual L3 ligands and two oxygen atoms from two DMF molecules. While in 7 there are also five coordination sites occupied by two carboxylate oxygen atoms from two L3 ligands. In addition, the compounds are characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra. The luminescent properties of the compounds are also discussed and exhibit strong fluorescent emissions in the solid state.

  16. Molecular, crystal, and electronic structure of the cobalt(II) complex with 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol

    SciTech Connect

    Linko, R. V.; Sokol, V. I.; Polyanskaya, N. A.; Ryabov, M. A.; Strashnov, P. V.; Davydov, V. V.; Sergienko, V. S.

    2013-05-15

    The reaction of 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol (HL) with cobalt(II) acetate gives the coordination compound [CoL{sub 2}] {center_dot} CHCl{sub 3} (I). The molecular and crystal structure of I is determined by X-ray diffraction. The coordination polyhedron of the Co atom in complex I is an octahedron. The anion L acts as a tridentate chelating ligand and is coordinated to the Co atom through the phenanthrenequinone O1 atom and the benzothiazole N1 atom of the moieties L and the N3 atom of the azo group to form two five-membered metallocycles. The molecular and electronic structures of the compounds HL, L, and CoL{sub 2} are studied at the density functional theory level. The results of the quantum-chemical calculations are in good agreement with the values determined by X-ray diffraction.

  17. Structure and evolution of fossil H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Schwarz, J.

    1971-01-01

    The structure and evolution of a fossil H II region created by a burst of ionizing radiation from a supernova is considered. The cooling time scale for the shell is about 10 to the 6th power years. Superposition of million-year-old fossil H II regions may account for the temperature and ionization of the interstellar medium. Fossil H II regions are unstable to growth of thermal condensations. Highly ionized filamentary structures form and dissipate in about 10,000 years. Partially ionized clouds form and dissipate in about 10 to the 6th power years.

  18. The structure of spider toxin huwentoxin-II with unique disulfide linkage: Evidence for structural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Qin; Lu, Shan-Yun; Gu, Xiao-Cheng; Liang, Song-Ping

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of huwentoxin-II (HWTX-II), an insecticidal peptide purified from the venom of spider Selenocosmia huwena with a unique disulfide bond linkage as I-III, II-V, and IV-VI, has been determined using 2D 1H-NMR. The resulting structure of HWTX-II contains two β-turns (C4-S7 and K24-W27) and a double-stranded antiparallel β-sheet (W27-C29 and C34-K36). Although the C-terminal double-stranded β-sheet cross-linked by two disulfide bonds (II-V and IV-VI in HWTX-II, II-V and III-VI in the ICK molecules) is conserved both in HWTX-II and the ICK molecules, the structure of HWTX-II is unexpected absence of the cystine knot because of its unique disulfide linkage. It suggests that HWTX-II adopts a novel scaffold different from the ICK motif that is adopted by all other spider toxin structures elucidated thus far. Furthermore, the structure of HWTX-II, which conforms to the disulfide-directed β-hairpin (DDH) motif, not only supports the hypothesis that the ICK is a minor elaboration of the more ancestral DDH motif but also suggests that HWTX-II may have evolved from the same structural ancestor. PMID:11790834

  19. Electronic Structure of II-Vi Semiconductors and Their Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Su-Huai

    The II-VI semiconductors ZnXVI, CdXVI, and HgXVI are known to have a metal d band inside the main valence band. Using all-electron self-consistent electronic structure techniques, we study their effects on valence properties. For II-VI semiconductors, we find that p-d repulsion and hybridization (i) lower the band gaps, (ii) alter the sign of the crystal-field splitting, (iii) reduce the spin-orbit splitting, (iv) change the valence band offset between common-anion semiconductors, and (v) increase the equilibrium lattice parameters, p-d repulsion is also shown to be responsible for the anomalously small band gaps in chalcopyrites, and for the negative exchange splitting in MnTe. We also study the electronic structure of ordered and random II-VI substitutional alloys and identify the mechanism for their band gap narrowing. The random {A_{1-x}^{II}B_{x}^{II}C^{VI}} alloys are represented by the "special quasirandom structures." We show how chemical and structural perturbations lead to (i) distinct A-like and B-like features in the density of states and (ii) different C-like features associated with fluctuations in the local environments around the common sublattice.

  20. Entanglement dynamics of three interacting two-level atoms within a common structured environment

    SciTech Connect

    An, Nguyen Ba; Kim, Jaewan; Kim, Kisik

    2011-08-15

    We derive exact time evolution of three two-level atoms coupled to a common environment. The environment is structured and is modeled by a leaky cavity with Lorentzian spectral density. The atoms are initially prepared in a generalized W state and later on experience pairwise dipole-dipole interactions and couplings to the cavity. We study tripartite disentangling and entangling dynamics as well as protecting bipartite entanglement with both atom-atom interactions and atom-cavity couplings taken simultaneously into account.

  1. First principles calculation of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Au-Pd atomic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, Mudra R.; Sharma, A. C.

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of free standing Au-Pd bimetallic atomic chain is studied using ab-initio method. It is found that electronic and magnetic properties of chains depend on position of atoms and number of atoms. Spin polarization factor for different atomic configuration of atomic chain is calculated predicting a half metallic behavior. It suggests a total spin polarised transport in these chains.

  2. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T.; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia–Thornton number–number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr–O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr–O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid. PMID:25520236

  3. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-12-18

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia-Thornton number-number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr-O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr-O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid.

  4. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of multiply charged polynuclear rhenium(I)-ruthenium(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Argazzi, R., Bignozzi, C.A.; Bortolini, O. ); Traldi, P. )

    1993-03-31

    The fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometric behavior of some involatile polynuclear rhenium(I)-ruthenium(II) complexes of general formula [Re(CO)[sub 3](phen)(CN)-[Ru(bpy)[sub 2](CN)]n-Ru(bpy)[sub 2](CN)][sup (n+1)+] (n = 0-2, bpy = 2,2[prime]-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) is presented. Singly, double, and, for n = 2, also triply charged ions were detected, and the fragmentation patterns of these ionic species were determined by studying unimolecular dissociation reactions. The decomposition pathways involve losses of CO and bpy neutral ligands, oxidative addition of coordinated bpy with expulsion of HX (X = CN[sup [minus

  5. Topological Properties of Atomic Lead Film with Honeycomb Structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y H; Zhou, D; Wang, T; Yang, Shengyuan A; Jiang, J Z

    2016-02-25

    Large bandgap is desired for the fundamental research as well as applications of topological insulators. Based on first-principles calculations, here we predict a new family of two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators in functionalized atomic lead films Pb-X (X = H, F, Cl, Br, I and SiH3). All of them have large bandgaps with the largest one above 1 eV, far beyond the recorded gap values and large enough for practical applications even at room temperature. Besides chemical functionalization, external strain can also effectively tune the bandgap while keeping the topological phase. Thus, the topological properties of these materials are quite robust, and as a result there exist 1D topological edge channels against backscattering. We further show that the 2D Pb structure can be encapsulated by SiO2 with very small lattice mismatch and still maintains its topological character. All these features make the 2D atomic Pb films a promising platform for fabricating novel topological electronic devices.

  6. Electronic Structure of Helium Atom in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jayanta K.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2016-03-01

    Bound and resonance states of helium atom have been investigated inside a quantum dot by using explicitly correlated Hylleraas type basis set within the framework of stabilization method. To be specific, precise energy eigenvalues of bound 1sns (1Se) (n = 1-6) states and the resonance parameters i.e. positions and widths of 1Se states due to 2sns (n = 2-5) and 2pnp (n = 2-5) configurations of confined helium below N = 2 ionization threshold of He+ have been estimated. The two-parameter (Depth and Width) finite oscillator potential is used to represent the confining potential due to the quantum dot. It has been explicitly demonstrated that the electronic structural properties become sensitive functions of the dot size. It is observed from the calculations of ionization potential that the stability of an impurity ion within a quantum dot may be manipulated by varying the confinement parameters. A possibility of controlling the autoionization lifetime of doubly excited states of two-electron ions by tuning the width of the quantum cavity is also discussed here. TKM Gratefully Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. 37(3)/14/27/2014-BRNS from the Department of Atomic Energy, BRNS, Government of India. SB Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. PSW-160/14-15(ERO) from University Grants Commission, Government of India

  7. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. M.; Festersen, S.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  8. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; Festersen, S; Magnussen, O M

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation. PMID:27301317

  9. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; Festersen, S; Magnussen, O M

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  10. Defects in p-GaN and their atomic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Tomaszewicz, T.; Zakharov, D.; Jasinski, J.; and O'Keefe, M.

    2004-10-08

    In this paper defects formed in p-doped GaN:Mg grown with Ga polarity will be discussed. The atomic structure of these characteristic defects (Mg-rich hexagonal pyramids and truncated pyramids) in bulk and thin GaN:Mg films grown with Ga polarity was determined at atomic resolution by direct reconstruction of the scattered electron wave in a transmission electron microscope. Small cavities were present inside the defects. The inside walls of the cavities were covered by GaN which grew with reverse polarity compared to the matrix. It was proposed that lateral overgrowth of the cavities restores matrix polarity on the defect base. Exchange of Ga and N sublattices within the defect compared to the matrix lead to a 0.6 {+-} 0.2 {angstrom} displacement between the Ga sublattices of these two areas. A [1{und 1}00]/3 shift with change from AB stacking in the matrix to BC within the entire pyramid is observed

  11. Topological Properties of Atomic Lead Film with Honeycomb Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. H.; Zhou, D.; Wang, T.; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Large bandgap is desired for the fundamental research as well as applications of topological insulators. Based on first-principles calculations, here we predict a new family of two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators in functionalized atomic lead films Pb-X (X = H, F, Cl, Br, I and SiH3). All of them have large bandgaps with the largest one above 1 eV, far beyond the recorded gap values and large enough for practical applications even at room temperature. Besides chemical functionalization, external strain can also effectively tune the bandgap while keeping the topological phase. Thus, the topological properties of these materials are quite robust, and as a result there exist 1D topological edge channels against backscattering. We further show that the 2D Pb structure can be encapsulated by SiO2 with very small lattice mismatch and still maintains its topological character. All these features make the 2D atomic Pb films a promising platform for fabricating novel topological electronic devices. PMID:26912024

  12. Structure and mode of action of cyclic lipopeptide pseudofactin II with divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Janek, Tomasz; Rodrigues, Lígia R; Gudiña, Eduardo J; Czyżnikowska, Żaneta

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of natural lipopeptide pseudofactin II with a series of doubly charged metal cations was examined by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and molecular modelling. The molecular modelling for metal-pseudofactin II provides information on the metal-peptide binding sites. Overall, Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) favor the association with oxygen atoms spanning the peptide backbone, whereas Cu(2+) is coordinated by three nitrogens. Circular dichroism (CD) results confirmed that Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) can disrupt the secondary structure of pseudofactin II at high concentrations, while Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) did not essentially affect the structure of the lipopeptide. Interestingly, our results showed that the addition of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) helped smaller micelles to form larger micellar aggregates. Since pseudofactin II binds metals, we tested whether this phenomena was somehow related to its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Proteus mirabilis. We found that the antimicrobial effect of pseudofactin II was increased by supplementation of culture media with all tested divalent metal ions. Finally, by using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria we showed that the higher antimicrobial activity of metal complexes of pseudofactin II is attributed to the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:27416562

  13. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  14. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-12-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications.

  15. Phase Space Structures Explain Hydrogen Atom Roaming in Formaldehyde Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Mauguière, Frédéric A L; Collins, Peter; Kramer, Zeb C; Carpenter, Barry K; Ezra, Gregory S; Farantos, Stavros C; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    We re-examine the prototypical roaming reaction--hydrogen atom roaming in formaldehyde decomposition--from a phase space perspective. Specifically, we address the question "why do trajectories roam, rather than dissociate through the radical channel?" We describe and compute the phase space structures that define and control all possible reactive events for this reaction, as well as provide a dynamically exact description of the roaming region in phase space. Using these phase space constructs, we show that in the roaming region, there is an unstable periodic orbit whose stable and unstable manifolds define a conduit that both encompasses all roaming trajectories exiting the formaldehyde well and shepherds them toward the H2···CO well.

  16. THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. I. A QUINTESSENTIAL MODEL ATOM OF Mg II AND GENERAL FORMATION PROPERTIES OF THE Mg II h and k LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B.; Uitenbroek, H. E-mail: tiago.pereira@astro.uio.no E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com

    2013-08-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h and k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations will require forward modeling of Mg II h and k line formation from three-dimensional (3D) radiation-MHD models. This paper is the first in a series where we undertake this forward modeling. We discuss the atomic physics pertinent to h and k line formation, present a quintessential model atom that can be used in radiative transfer computations, and discuss the effect of partial redistribution (PRD) and 3D radiative transfer on the emergent line profiles. We conclude that Mg II h and k can be modeled accurately with a four-level plus continuum Mg II model atom. Ideally radiative transfer computations should be done in 3D including PRD effects. In practice this is currently not possible. A reasonable compromise is to use one-dimensional PRD computations to model the line profile up to and including the central emission peaks, and use 3D transfer assuming complete redistribution to model the central depression.

  17. Synthesis, structural elucidation and carbon dioxide adsorption on Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate (II) Prussian blue analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lugo, F.; Polanco, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the course of the last years hexacyanoferrates have been widely studied; even though, the adsorption properties of Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II) (labelled here Zn-HII) have not been thoroughly considered. In addition, soft porous crystals, i.e., adsorbents that display structural flexibility have been, as well, extensively studied, however this property has not been reported for Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II). In this regard, the key questions addressed here were the synthesis and structural characterization of Zn-HII together with the investigation of their low (up to 1 bar) and high pressure (up to 30 bar) adsorption properties, to found if these materials show structural flexibility. Then, to attain the anticipated goals, structural characterizations were made with: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), simultaneously, with the investigation of the adsorption of carbon dioxide. As a result of the research process we concluded that the Zn-HII displayed Fm barm space group framework. Besides, the carbon dioxide adsorption investigation demonstrated the presence of the framework expansion effect together with an extremely high adsorption heat, properties that could be useful for the use of Zn(II) hexacyanoferrate(II) as an excellent adsorbent.

  18. On the atomic structure of cocaine in solution.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew J; Busch, Sebastian; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Callear, Samantha K; Biggin, Philip C; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-01-14

    Cocaine is an amphiphilic drug which has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, a combination of neutron diffraction and computation has been used to investigate the atomic scale structure of cocaine in aqueous solutions. Both the observed conformation and hydration of cocaine appear to contribute to its ability to cross hydrophobic layers afforded by the BBB, as the average conformation yields a structure which might allow cocaine to shield its hydrophilic regions from a lipophilic environment. Specifically, the carbonyl oxygens and amine group on cocaine, on average, form ∼5 bonds with the water molecules in the surrounding solvent, and the top 30% of water molecules within 4 Å of cocaine are localized in the cavity formed by an internal hydrogen bond within the cocaine molecule. This water mediated internal hydrogen bonding suggests a mechanism of interaction between cocaine and the BBB that negates the need for deprotonation prior to interaction with the lipophilic portions of this barrier. This finding also has important implications for understanding how neurologically active molecules are able to interact with both the blood stream and BBB and emphasizes the use of structural measurements in solution in order to understand important biological function.

  19. An atomic structure of the human 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiuliang; Luan, Bai; Wu, Jianping; Shi, Yigong

    2016-09-01

    We report the cryo-EM structure of the human 26S proteasome at an average resolution of 3.5 Å, allowing atomic modeling of 28 subunits in the core particle (CP) and 18 subunits in the regulatory particle (RP). The C-terminal residues of Rpt3 and Rpt5 subunits in the RP can be seen inserted into surface pockets formed between adjacent α subunits in the CP. Each of the six Rpt subunits contains a bound nucleotide, and the central gate of the CP α-ring is closed despite RP association. The six pore 1 loops in the Rpt ring are arranged similarly to a spiral staircase along the axial channel of substrate transport, which is constricted by the pore 2 loops. We also determined the cryo-EM structure of the human proteasome bound to the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 at 4.35-Å resolution. Together, our structures provide a framework for mechanistic understanding of eukaryotic proteasome function.

  20. First Optical Hyperfine Structure Measurement in an Atomic Anion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Canali, C.; Warring, U.; Kellerbauer, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-02-19

    We have investigated the hyperfine structure of the transition between the 5d{sup 7}6s{sup 2} {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{sup e} ground state and the 5d{sup 6}6s{sup 2}6p {sup 6}D{sub J}{sup o} excited state in the negative osmium ion by high-resolution collinear laser spectroscopy. This transition is unique because it is the only known electric-dipole transition in atomic anions and might be amenable to laser cooling. From the observed hyperfine structure in {sup 187}Os{sup -} and {sup 189}Os{sup -} the yet unknown total angular momentum of the bound excited state was found to be J=9/2. The hyperfine structure constants of the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{sup e} ground state and the {sup 6}D{sub 9/2}{sup o} excited state were determined experimentally and compared to multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. Using the knowledge of the ground and excited state angular momenta, the full energy level diagram of {sup 192}Os{sup -} in an external magnetic field was calculated, revealing possible laser cooling transitions.

  1. The grasp2K relativistic atomic structure package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, P.; He, X.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes grasp2K, a general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package. It is a modification and extension of the GRASP92 package by [F.A. Parpia, C. Froese Fischer, I.P. Grant, Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249]. For the sake of continuity, two versions are included. Version 1 retains the GRASP92 formats for wave functions and expansion coefficients, but no longer requires preprocessing and more default options have been introduced. Modifications have eliminated some errors, improved the stability, and simplified interactive use. The transition code has been extended to cases where the initial and final states have different orbital sets. Several utility programs have been added. Whereas Version 1 constructs a single interaction matrix for all the J's and parities, Version 2 treats each J and parity as a separate matrix. This block structure results in a reduction of memory use and considerably shorter eigenvectors. Additional tools have been developed for this format. The CPU intensive parts of Version 2 have been parallelized using MPI. The package includes a "make" facility that relies on environment variables. These make it easier to port the application to different platforms. The present version supports the 32-bit Linux and ibmSP environments where the former is compatible with many Unix systems. Descriptions of the features and the program/data flow of the package will be given in some detail in this report. Program summaryProgram title: grasp2K Catalogue identifier: ADZL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 213 524 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 328 588 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran and C Computer: Intel

  2. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-01

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces.Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all

  3. Optofluidic waveguides: II. Fabrication and structures

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger

    2011-01-01

    We review fabrication methods and common structures for optofluidic waveguides, defined as structures capable of optical confinement and transmission through fluid filled cores. Cited structures include those based on total internal reflection, metallic coatings, and interference based confinement. Configurations include optical fibers and waveguides fabricated on flat substrates (integrated waveguides). Some examples of optofluidic waveguides that are included in this review are Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and two-dimensional photonic crystal arrays, Bragg fibers and waveguides, and Anti Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides (ARROWs). An emphasis is placed on integrated ARROWs fabricated using a thin-film deposition process, which illustrates how optofluidic waveguides can be combined with other microfluidic elements in the creation of lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:21603122

  4. Trapping and manipulation of isolated atoms using nanoscale plasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Chang, D E; Thompson, J D; Park, H; Vuletić, V; Zibrov, A S; Zoller, P; Lukin, M D

    2009-09-18

    We propose and analyze a scheme to interface individual neutral atoms with nanoscale solid-state systems. The interface is enabled by optically trapping the atom via the strong near-field generated by a sharp metallic nanotip. We show that under realistic conditions, a neutral atom can be trapped with position uncertainties of just a few nanometers, and within tens of nanometers of other surfaces. Simultaneously, the guided surface plasmon modes of the nanotip allow the atom to be optically manipulated, or for fluorescence photons to be collected, with very high efficiency. Finally, we analyze the surface forces, heating and decoherence rates acting on the trapped atom.

  5. Imino-phosphine palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes: synthesis, molecular structures and evaluation as antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Motswainyana, William M; Onani, Martin O; Madiehe, Abram M; Saibu, Morounke; Thovhogi, Ntevheleni; Lalancette, Roger A

    2013-12-01

    The imino-phosphine ligands L1 and L2 were prepared via condensation reaction of 2-(diphenylphosphino)benzaldehyde with substituted anilines and obtained in very good yields. An equimolar reaction of L1 and L2 with either PdCl2(cod) or PtCl2(cod) gave new palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes 1-4. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1)H and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. The molecular structures of 2, 3 and 4 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. All the three molecular structures crystallized in monoclinic C2/c space system. The coordination geometry around the palladium and platinum atoms in respective structures exhibited distorted square planar geometry at the metal centers. The complexes were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against human breast (MCF-7) and human colon (HT-29) cancer cells, and they exhibited growth inhibitory activities and selectivity that were superior to the standard compound cisplatin.

  6. Structures of CoII and ZnII complexes of the proton-transfer compound derived from pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid and piperazine.

    PubMed

    Ghadermazi, Mohammad; Gharamaleki, Jafar Attar; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Almasi, Mehdi

    2015-07-01

    The reaction of the proton-transfer compound piperazine-1,4-diium pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate 4.5-hydrate, C4H12N2(2+)·C6H2N2O4(2-)·4.5H2O or (pipzH2)(pyzdc)·4.5H2O (pyzdcH2 is pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid and pipz is piperazine), (I), with Zn(NO3)2·6H2O and CoCl2·6H2O results in the formation of bis(piperazine-1,4-diium) bis(μ-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylato)-κ(3)N(1),O(2):O(3);κ(3)O(3):N(1),O(2)-bis[aqua(pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylato-κ(2)N(1),O(2))zinc(II)] decahydrate, (C4H12N2)2[Zn2(C6H2N2O4)4(H2O)2]·10H2O or (pipzH2)2[Zn(pyzdc)2(H2O)]2·10H2O, (II), and catena-poly[piperazine-1,4-diium [cobalt(II)-bis(μ-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylato)-κ(3)N(1),O(2):O(3);κ(3)O(3):N(1),O(2)] hexahydrate], {(C4H12N2)[Co(C6H2N2O4)2]·6H2O}n or {(pipzH2)[Co(pyzdc)2]·6H2O}n, (III), respectively. In (I), pyzdcH2 is doubly deprotonated on reaction with piperazine as a base. Compound (II) crystallizes as a dimer, whereas compound (III) exists as a one-dimensional coordination polymer. In (II), two pyzdc(2-) groups chelate to each of the two Zn(II) atoms through a ring N atom and an O atom of the 2-carboxylate group. In one ligand, the adjacent 3-carboxylate group bridges to a neighbouring metal atom. A water molecule ligates in the sixth coordination site. The structure of (II) can be described as a commensurate superlattice due to an ordering in the hydrogen-bonded network. In (III), no water is coordinated to the metal atom and the coordination sphere is comprised of two N,O-chelates plus two bridging O atoms. A large number of hydrogen bonds are observed in all three compounds. These interactions, as well as π-π and C=O...π stacking interactions, play important structural roles. PMID:26146390

  7. Triple vortex ring structure in superfluid helium II.

    PubMed

    Kivotides, D; Barenghi, C F; Samuels, D C

    2000-10-27

    Superfluids such as helium II consist of two interpenetrating fluids: the normal fluid and the superfluid. The helium II vortex ring has generally been considered merely as a superfluid object, neglecting any associated motion of the normal fluid. We report a three-dimensional calculation of the coupled motion of the normal-fluid and superfluid components, which shows that the helium II vortex ring consists of a superfluid vortex ring accompanied by two coaxial normal-fluid vortex rings of opposite polarity. The three vortex rings form a coherent, dissipative structure. PMID:11052935

  8. Coordination structure of adsorbed Zn(II) at Water-TiO2 interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    He, G.; Pan, G.; Zhang, M.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2011-01-15

    The local structure of aqueous metal ions on solid surfaces is central to understanding many chemical and biological processes in soil and aquatic environments. Here, the local coordination structure of hydrated Zn(II) at water-TiO{sub 2} interfaces was identified by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A nonintegral coordination number of average {approx}4.5 O atoms around a central Zn atom was obtained by EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations indicated that this coordination structure was consistent with the mixture of 4-coordinated bidentate binuclear (BB) and 5-coordinated bidentate mononuclear (BM) metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) states. The BB complex has 4-coordinated Zn, while the monodentate mononuclear (MM) complex has 6-coordinated Zn, and a 5-coordinated adsorbed Zn was found in the BM adsorption mode. DFT calculated energies showed that the lower-coordinated BB and BM modes were thermodynamically more favorable than the higher-coordinated MM MEA state. The experimentally observed XANES fingerprinting provided additional direct spectral evidence of 4- and 5-coordinated Zn-O modes. The overall spectral and computational evidence indicated that Zn(II) can occur in 4-, 5-, and 6-oxygen coordinated sites in different MEA states due to steric hindrance effects, and the coexistence of different MEA states formed the multiple coordination environments.

  9. Structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liqing Wang, Yujun; Wells, David; Toh, Diana; Harold, Hunt; Zhou, Jing; DiGiammarino, Enrico; Meehan, Edward J.

    2006-09-01

    The crystal structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor has been determined and refined to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors. Osteoclast-stimulating factor (OSF) is an intracellular signaling protein, produced by osteoclasts themselves, that enhances osteoclast formation and bone resorption. It is thought to act via an Src-related signaling pathway and contains SH3 and ankyrin-repeat domains which are involved in protein–protein interactions. As part of a structure-based anti-bone-loss drug-design program, the atomic resolution X-ray structure of the recombinant human OSF SH3 domain (hOSF-SH3) has been determined. The domain, residues 12–72, yielded crystals that diffracted to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The overall structure shows a characteristic SH3 fold consisting of two perpendicular β-sheets that form a β-barrel. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the putative proline-rich peptide-binding site of hOSF-SH3 consists of (i) residues that are highly conserved in the SH3-domain family, including residues Tyr21, Phe23, Trp49, Pro62, Asn64 and Tyr65, and (ii) residues that are less conserved and/or even specific to hOSF, including Thr22, Arg26, Thr27, Glu30, Asp46, Thr47, Asn48 and Leu60, which might be key to designing specific inhibitors for hOSF to fight osteoporosis and related bone-loss diseases. There are a total of 13 well defined water molecules forming hydrogen bonds with the above residues in and around the peptide-binding pocket. Some of those water molecules might be important for drug-design approaches. The hOSF-SH3 structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors.

  10. X-ray and solution structures of Cu(II) GHK and Cu(II) DAHK complexes: influence on their redox properties.

    PubMed

    Hureau, Christelle; Eury, Hélène; Guillot, Régis; Bijani, Christian; Sayen, Stéphanie; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Guillon, Emmanuel; Faller, Peter; Dorlet, Pierre

    2011-08-29

    The Gly-His-Lys (GHK) peptide and the Asp-Ala-His-Lys (DAHK) sequences are naturally occurring high-affinity copper(II) chelators found in the blood plasma and are hence of biological interest. A structural study of the copper complexes of these peptides was conducted in the solid state and in solution by determining their X-ray structures, and by using a large range of spectroscopies, including EPR and HYSCORE (hyperfine sub-level correlation), X-ray absorption and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the structures of [Cu(II)(DAHK)] in the solid state and in solution are similar and confirm the equatorial coordination sphere of NH(2), two amidyl N and one imidazole N. Additionally, a water molecule is bound apically to Cu(II) as revealed by the X-ray structure. As reported previously in the literature, [Cu(II)(GHK)], which exhibits a dimeric structure in the solid state, forms a monomeric complex in solution with three nitrogen ligands: NH(2), amidyl and imidazole. The fourth equatorial site is occupied by a labile oxygen atom from a carboxylate ligand in the solid state. We probe that fourth position and study ternary complexes of [Cu(II)(GHK)] with glycine or histidine. The Cu(II) exchange reaction between different DAHK peptides is very slow, in contrast to [Cu(II)(GHK)], in which the fast exchange was attributed to the presence of a [Cu(II)(GHK)(2)] complex. The redox properties of [Cu(II)(GHK)] and [Cu(II)(DAHK)] were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and by measuring the ascorbate oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen. The measurements indicate that both Cu(II) complexes are inert under moderate redox potentials. In contrast to [Cu(II)(DAHK)], [Cu(II)(GHK)] could be reduced to Cu(I) around -0.62 V (versus AgCl/Ag) with subsequent release of the Cu ion. These complete analyses of structure and redox activity of those complexes gave new insights with biological impact and can serve as models for other more complicated Cu(II

  11. Rotational Spectrum and Carbon Atom Structure of Dihydroartemisinic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Spada, Lorenzo; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinic acid (DHAA, C15H24O2, five chiral centers) is a precursor in proposed low-cost synthetic routes to the antimalarial drug artemisinin. In one reaction process being considered in pharmaceutical production, DHAA is formed from an enantiopure sample of artemisinic acid through hydrogenation of the alkene. This reaction needs to properly set the stereochemistry of the asymmetric carbon for the synthesis to produce artemisinin. A recrystallization process can purify the diastereomer mixture of the hydrogenation reaction if the unwanted epimer is produced in less than 10% abundance. There is a need in the process analytical chemistry to rapidly (less than 1 min) measure the diastereomer excess and current solutions, such a HPLC, lack the needed measurement speed. The rotational spectrum of DHAA has been measured at 300:1 signal-to-noise ratio in a chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating from 2-8 GHz using simple heating of the compound. The 13C isotope analysis provides a carbon atom structure that confirms the diastereomer. This structure is in excellent agreement with quantum chemistry calculations at the B2PLYPD3/ 6-311++G** level of theory. The DHAA spectrum is expected to be fully resolved from the unwanted diastereomer raising the potential for fast diastereomer excess measurement by rotational spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical production process.

  12. Tooth structure studied using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasas, Sandor; Berdal, Ariane; Celio, Marco R.

    1993-06-01

    We used the atomic force microscope (AFM) to observe structure of the tooth, both rat and human. The rigidity and the surface flatness of thin sections of this mineralized tissue, allow us to attain good resolution with the AFM. As enamel contains uniquely large crystals of hydroxyapatite it can be investigated at high resolution. Tooth enamel and thin slices of undecalcified developing tooth germs from 2 - 12 day old rats were observed, embedded in acrylic resin (Lowicryl K4M). In addition, as orthophosphoric acid is widely used clinically to etch tooth enamel before restoring with composites, we studied its action at pH2 on the tooth surface during 1 hour of exposition. Hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen fibers were seen in the tooth slices observed in air, and the classical structure of the enamel was visible. The etched enamel surface under liquid, showed dramatic differences to that imaged in air. Modifications to the surface were also seen during exposure to the acid.

  13. An atomic structure of human γ-secretase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-chen; Yan, Chuangye; Yang, Guanghui; Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Sun, Linfeng; Zhou, Rui; Scheres, Sjors H W; Shi, Yigong

    2015-09-10

    Dysfunction of the intramembrane protease γ-secretase is thought to cause Alzheimer's disease, with most mutations derived from Alzheimer's disease mapping to the catalytic subunit presenilin 1 (PS1). Here we report an atomic structure of human γ-secretase at 3.4 Å resolution, determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Mutations derived from Alzheimer's disease affect residues at two hotspots in PS1, each located at the centre of a distinct four transmembrane segment (TM) bundle. TM2 and, to a lesser extent, TM6 exhibit considerable flexibility, yielding a plastic active site and adaptable surrounding elements. The active site of PS1 is accessible from the convex side of the TM horseshoe, suggesting considerable conformational changes in nicastrin extracellular domain after substrate recruitment. Component protein APH-1 serves as a scaffold, anchoring the lone transmembrane helix from nicastrin and supporting the flexible conformation of PS1. Ordered phospholipids stabilize the complex inside the membrane. Our structure serves as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of γ-secretase function.

  14. A near atomic structure of the active human apoptosome

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tat Cheung; Hong, Chuan; Akey, Ildikó V; Yuan, Shujun; Akey, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    In response to cell death signals, an active apoptosome is assembled from Apaf-1 and procaspase-9 (pc-9). Here we report a near atomic structure of the active human apoptosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The resulting model gives insights into cytochrome c binding, nucleotide exchange and conformational changes that drive assembly. During activation an acentric disk is formed on the central hub of the apoptosome. This disk contains four Apaf-1/pc-9 CARD pairs arranged in a shallow spiral with the fourth pc-9 CARD at lower occupancy. On average, Apaf-1 CARDs recruit 3 to 5 pc-9 molecules to the apoptosome and one catalytic domain may be parked on the hub, when an odd number of zymogens are bound. This suggests a stoichiometry of one or at most, two pc-9 dimers per active apoptosome. Thus, our structure provides a molecular framework to understand the role of the apoptosome in programmed cell death and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17755.001 PMID:27697150

  15. An atomic structure of human γ-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Sun, Linfeng; Zhou, Rui; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Shi, Yigong

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the intramembrane protease γ-secretase is thought to cause Alzheimer’s disease (AD), with most AD-derived mutations mapping to the catalytic subunit presenilin 1 (PS1). Here we report an atomic structure of human γ-secretase at 3.4 Å resolution, determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. AD-derived mutations in PS1 affect residues at two hotspots, each located at the center of a distinct four transmembrane segment (TM) bundle. TM2, and to a lesser extent TM6, exhibit considerable flexibility, yielding a plastic active site and adaptable surrounding elements. The active site of PS1 is accessible from the convex side of the TM horseshoe, suggesting considerable conformational changes in nicastrin extracellular domain (ECD) following substrate recruitment. Aph-1 serves as a scaffold, anchoring the lone TM from nicastrin and supporting the flexible conformation of PS1. Ordered phospholipids stabilize the complex inside the membrane. Our structure serves as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of γ-secretase function. PMID:26280335

  16. An atomic structure of human γ-secretase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiao-Chen; Yan, Chuangye; Yang, Guanghui; Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Sun, Linfeng; Zhou, Rui; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Shi, Yigong

    2015-09-01

    Dysfunction of the intramembrane protease γ-secretase is thought to cause Alzheimer's disease, with most mutations derived from Alzheimer's disease mapping to the catalytic subunit presenilin 1 (PS1). Here we report an atomic structure of human γ-secretase at 3.4 Å resolution, determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Mutations derived from Alzheimer's disease affect residues at two hotspots in PS1, each located at the centre of a distinct four transmembrane segment (TM) bundle. TM2 and, to a lesser extent, TM6 exhibit considerable flexibility, yielding a plastic active site and adaptable surrounding elements. The active site of PS1 is accessible from the convex side of the TM horseshoe, suggesting considerable conformational changes in nicastrin extracellular domain after substrate recruitment. Component protein APH-1 serves as a scaffold, anchoring the lone transmembrane helix from nicastrin and supporting the flexible conformation of PS1. Ordered phospholipids stabilize the complex inside the membrane. Our structure serves as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of γ-secretase function.

  17. Structural Optimization of Zn(II)-Activated MR Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Matosziuk, Lauren M.; Leibowitz, Jonathan H.; Heffern, Marie C.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Ratner, Mark A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the structural optimization and mechanistic investigation of a series of bio-activated MRI contrast agents that transform from low relaxivity to high relaxivity in the presence of Zn(II). The change in relaxivity results from a structural transformation of the complex that alters the coordination environment about the Gd(III) center. Here, we have performed a series of systematic modifications to determine the structure which provides the optimal change in relaxivity in response to the presence of Zn(II). Relaxivity measurements in the presence and absence of Zn(II) were used in conjunction with regarding water access (namely number of water molecules bound) to the Gd(III) center and temperature-dependent 13C NMR spectroscopy to determine how the coordination environment about the Gd(III) center is affected by: the distance between the Zn(II)-binding domain and the Gd(III)-chelate, the number of functional groups on the Zn(II)-binding domain, and the presence of Zn(II). The results of this study provide valuable insight into the elucidation of design principles for future bio-activated MR probes. PMID:23777423

  18. COLLISIONAL EXCITATION OF THE [C II] FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITION IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Velusamy, T.

    2012-11-15

    We analyze the collisional excitation of the 158 {mu}m (1900.5 GHz) fine structure transition of ionized carbon in terms of line intensities produced by simple cloud models. The single C{sup +} fine structure transition is a very important coolant of the atomic interstellar medium (ISM) and of photon-dominated regions in which carbon is partially or completely in ionized form. The [C II] line is widely used as a tracer of star formation in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Excitation of the [C II] fine structure transition can be via collisions with hydrogen molecules, atoms, and electrons. Analysis of [C II] observations is complicated by the fact that it is difficult to determine the optical depth of the line. We discuss the excitation of the [C II] line, deriving analytic results for several limiting cases and carry out numerical solutions using a large velocity gradient model for a more inclusive analysis. For antenna temperatures up to 1/3 of the brightness temperature of the gas kinetic temperature, the antenna temperature is linearly proportional to the column density of C{sup +} irrespective of the optical depth of the transition. This is appropriately referred to as the effectively optically thin approximation. We review the critical densities for excitation of the [C II] line by various collision partners, briefly analyze C{sup +} absorption, and conclude with a discussion of C{sup +} cooling and how the considerations for line intensities affect the behavior of this important coolant of the ISM.

  19. Which One Is Better? Jigsaw II versus Jigsaw IV on the Subject of the Building Blocks of Matter and Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Hakan; Buyukaltay, Didem

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of using Jigsaw II and Jigsaw IV techniques on the subject of "Atoms-The Basic Unit of Matter" in science course of 6th grade on academic achievement was examined. Pre-test post-test control group research was used in the study. Study population is all secondary schools in Turgutlu district of Manisa province…

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure, and thermal decomposition of the cobalt(II) complex with 2-picolinic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Di; Zhong, Guo-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt(II) complex of 2-picolinic acid (Hpic), namely, [Co(pic)₂(H₂O)₂] · 2H₂O, was synthesized with the reaction of cobalt acetate and 2-picolinic acid as the reactants by solid-solid reaction at room temperature. The composition and structure of the complex were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The crystal structure of the complex belongs to monoclinic system and space group P2(1)/n, with cell parameters of a = 9.8468(7) Å, b = 5.2013(4) Å, c = 14.6041(15) Å, β = 111.745(6)°, V = 747.96(11) ų, Z = 2, D(c) = 1.666 g cm⁻³, R₁ = 0.0297, and wR₂ = 0.0831. In the title complex, the Co(II) ion is six-coordinated by two pyridine N atoms and two carboxyl O atoms from two 2-picolinic acid anions, and two O atoms from two H2O molecules, and forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition processes of the complex under nitrogen include dehydration and pyrolysis of the ligand, and the final residue is cobalt oxalate at about 450°C.

  1. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Thermal Decomposition of the Cobalt(II) Complex with 2-Picolinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt(II) complex of 2-picolinic acid (Hpic), namely, [Co(pic)2(H2O)2] · 2H2O, was synthesized with the reaction of cobalt acetate and 2-picolinic acid as the reactants by solid-solid reaction at room temperature. The composition and structure of the complex were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The crystal structure of the complex belongs to monoclinic system and space group P2(1)/n, with cell parameters of a = 9.8468(7) Å, b = 5.2013(4) Å, c = 14.6041(15) Å, β = 111.745(6)°, V = 747.96(11) Å3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.666 g cm−3, R1 = 0.0297, and wR2 = 0.0831. In the title complex, the Co(II) ion is six-coordinated by two pyridine N atoms and two carboxyl O atoms from two 2-picolinic acid anions, and two O atoms from two H2O molecules, and forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition processes of the complex under nitrogen include dehydration and pyrolysis of the ligand, and the final residue is cobalt oxalate at about 450°C. PMID:24578654

  2. Atomic Structure. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit S2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on atomic structure is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit consists of two levels. Level one focuses on the atomic nucleus. Level two focuses on the arrangement of extranuclear electrons, approaching atomic orbitals through both electron bombardment and spectra.…

  3. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group II Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Keating, Kevin S.; Taylor, Sean D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-04-10

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  4. New version: GRASP2K relativistic atomic structure package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, P.; Gaigalas, G.; Bieroń, J.; Fischer, C. Froese; Grant, I. P.

    2013-09-01

    , Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 730252 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14808872 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran. Computer: Intel Xeon, 2.66 GHz. Operating system: Suse, Ubuntu, and Debian Linux 64-bit. RAM: 500 MB or more Classification: 2.1. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADZL_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 177 (2007) 597 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of atomic properties — atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, radiative decay rates, hyperfine structure parameters, Landé gJ-factors, and specific mass shift parameters — using a multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach. Solution method: The computational method is the same as in the previous GRASP2K [1] version except that for v3 codes the njgraf library module [2] for recoupling has been replaced by librang [3,4]. Reasons for new version: New angular libraries with improved performance are available. Also methodology for transforming from jj- to LSJ-coupling has been developed. Summary of revisions: New angular libraries where the coefficients of fractional parentage have been extended to j=9/2, making calculations feasible for the lanthanides and actinides. Inclusion of a new program jj2lsj, which reports the percentage composition of the wave function in LSJ. Transition programs have been modified to produce a file of transition data with one record for each transition in the same format as Atsp2K [C. Froese Fischer, G. Tachiev, G. Gaigalas and M.R. Godefroid, Comput. Phys. Commun. 176 (2007) 559], which identifies each atomic state by the total energy and a label for the CSF with the largest expansion coefficient in LSJ intermediate coupling. Updated to 64-bit architecture. A

  5. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-21

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces.

  6. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  7. Voronoi analysis of the short-range atomic structure in iron and iron-carbon melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron-carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short-range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  8. Million Atom Pseudopotential Manybody Theory of Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex

    2003-03-01

    Semiconductor Quantum Dots that are of sufficient structural quality (good crystallinity, surface passivation, size uniformity) to produce ultra sharp spectroscopic lines worthy of a detailed theoretical effort tend to be rather BIG, containing thousands to million atoms. Yet, in this size regime, the only theoretical methods available are effective-mass based, particle-in-a-box approaches, that neglect multi-band and inter-valley coupling, leading to significant qualitative errors.(A. Zunger,Phys. Stat. Sol. (a) 190), 467 (2002). While LDA-based methods are capable of solving the Single-Particle problem even for ˜1,000 atom dots, the all important many-body problem can be currently addressed only for considerably smaller dots. I will present here a computational alternative which addresses both the single-particle and the Manybody parts of the problem for 10^3 to 10^6 atom dots .The method is applicable both to ``free Standing" (e.g. colloidal) dots of CdSe, InP, InAs and Si, as well as to the strained, ``self-assembled" epitaxial dots of, e.g., InGaAs/GaAs. It is based on a ``Linear Combination of Bulk Bands" (LCBB) approach that expands the dot states in terms of plane wave based (pseudopotential) Bloch states throughout the Brillouin zone. The manybody part is treated via Configuration Interaction. I will illustrate how this method addresses some of the recent striking experimental observations on semiconductor quantum dots:(i) Scaling laws for band gaps and exchange interactions (ii) Rapid Auger transitions in colloidal dots (iii) Coulomb Blocade and Spin Blockade in colloidal dots (iv) Charged Excitons (e.g. Trions) in Self-assembled dots, and (v) excitonic Fine-Structure in self assembled dots.

  9. Correlating Atomic Structure and Transport in Suspended Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are promising candidates for next generation integrated circuit (IC) components; this fact motivates exploration of the relationship between crystallographic structure and transport of graphene patterned at IC-relevant length scales (<10 nm). We report on the controlled fabrication of pristine, freestanding GNRs with widths as small as 0.7 nm, paired with simultaneous lattice-resolution imaging and electrical transport characterization, all conducted within an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. Few-layer GNRs very frequently formed bonded-bilayers and were remarkably robust, sustaining currents in excess of 1.5 μA per carbon bond across a 5 atom-wide ribbon. We found that the intrinsic conductance of a sub-10 nm bonded bilayer GNR scaled with width as GBL(w) ≈ 3/4(e2/h)w, where w is the width in nanometers, while a monolayer GNR was roughly five times less conductive. Nanosculpted, crystalline monolayer GNRs exhibited armchair-terminated edges after current annealing, presenting a pathway for the controlled fabrication of semiconducting GNRs with known edge geometry. Finally, we report on simulations of quantum transport in GNRs that are in qualitative agreement with the observations. PMID:24954396

  10. Correlating atomic structure and transport in suspended graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhengqing John; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Botello-Méndez, Andrés R; Hong, Sung Ju; Stach, Eric A; Park, Yung Woo; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Drndić, Marija; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2014-08-13

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are promising candidates for next generation integrated circuit (IC) components; this fact motivates exploration of the relationship between crystallographic structure and transport of graphene patterned at IC-relevant length scales (<10 nm). We report on the controlled fabrication of pristine, freestanding GNRs with widths as small as 0.7 nm, paired with simultaneous lattice-resolution imaging and electrical transport characterization, all conducted within an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. Few-layer GNRs very frequently formed bonded-bilayers and were remarkably robust, sustaining currents in excess of 1.5 μA per carbon bond across a 5 atom-wide ribbon. We found that the intrinsic conductance of a sub-10 nm bonded bilayer GNR scaled with width as GBL(w) ≈ 3/4(e(2)/h)w, where w is the width in nanometers, while a monolayer GNR was roughly five times less conductive. Nanosculpted, crystalline monolayer GNRs exhibited armchair-terminated edges after current annealing, presenting a pathway for the controlled fabrication of semiconducting GNRs with known edge geometry. Finally, we report on simulations of quantum transport in GNRs that are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  11. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials.

  12. Atomic structure of intracellular amorphous calcium phosphate deposits.

    PubMed

    Betts, F; Blumenthal, N C; Posner, A S; Becker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1975-06-01

    The radial distribution function calculated from x-ray diffraction of mineralized cytoplasmic structures isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is very similar to that previously found for synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. Both types of mineral apparently have only short-range atomic order, represented as a neutral ion cluster of about 10 A in longest dimension, whose probable composition is expressed by the formula Ca9(PO4)6. The minor differences observed are attributed to the presence in the biological mineral of significant amounts of Mg-2+ and ATP. Synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate in contact with a solution containing an amount of ATP equivalent to that of the biological mineral failed to undergo conversion to the thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite. The amorphous calcium phosphate of the cytoplasmic mineral granules is similarly stable, and does not undergo conversion to hydroxyapatite, presumably owing to the presence of ATP and Mg-2+, known in inhibitors of the conversion process. The physiological implications of mineral deposits consisting of stabilized calcium phosphate ion clusters are discussed.

  13. Synthesis, crystal structures and magnetic behaviour of four coordination compounds constructed with a phosphinic amide-TEMPO radical and [M(hfac)2] (M = Cu(II), Co(II) and Mn(II)).

    PubMed

    Reis, Samira G; Del Águila-Sánchez, Miguel A; Guedes, Guilherme P; Ferreira, Glaucio B; Novak, Miguel A; Speziali, Nivaldo L; López-Ortiz, Fernando; Vaz, Maria G F

    2014-10-21

    In the present work we describe the synthesis, crystal structures and magnetic properties of four coordination compounds obtained by assembling a new phosphinic amide containing the TEMPO moiety, 1-piperidinyloxy-4-[(diphenylphosphinyl)amino]-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl radical (dppnTEMPO), with [M(hfac)2] building blocks (M = Cu(II), Co(II), Mn(II)). The crystal structures of the coordination compounds revealed the usefulness of the functionalized radical to provide discrete or extended architectures. In the copper compound () the ligand is coordinated through the oxygen atom of the NP[double bond, length as m-dash]O linkage to the metal, which exists in a square pyramidal or octahedral geometry. For the cobalt and manganese complexes (), both the phosphinic amide and the nitroxide oxygen atoms are involved in the coordination to the metal leading to one dimensional systems. In the cobalt complex () an interesting spin topology in the zig-zag chain was obtained due to the oxygen atom of the phosphinic amide group being μ2 coordinated to two cobalt(ii) ions. The magnetic behaviour of the coordination compounds shows overall antiferromagnetic interactions involving the metal ion and the organic radical. DFT calculations were performed in order to assign the main path for the magnetic interactions. PMID:25177845

  14. Atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide coatings on KD-II silicon carbide fibers and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shiyi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    To provide oxidation protection and/or to act as an interfacial coating, titanium oxide (TiO2) coatings were deposited on KD-II SiC fibers by employing atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water (H2O) as precursors. The average deposition rate was about 0.08 nm per cycle, and the prepared coatings were smooth, uniform and conformal, shielding the fibers entirely. The as-deposited coatings were amorphous regardless of the coating thickness, and changed to anatase and rutile crystal phase after annealing at 600 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. The oxidation measurement suggests that the TiO2 coating enhanced the oxidation resistance of SiC fibers obviously. SiC fibers coated with a 70-nm-thick TiO2 layer retained a relatively high tensile strength of 1.66 GPa even after exposition to air at 1400 °C for 1 h, and thick silica layer was not observed. In contrast, uncoated SiC fibers were oxidized dramatically through the same oxidation treatment, covered with a macro-cracked thick silica film, and the tensile strength was not measurable due to interfilament adhesion. The above results indicate that TiO2 films deposited by ALD are a promising oxidation resistance coating for SiC fibers.

  15. The Formation of IRIS Diagnostics. V. A Quintessential Model Atom of C II and General Formation Properties of the C II Lines at 133.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Bhavna; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-10-01

    The C ii 133.5 {nm} lines are important observables for the NASA/SMEX mission Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. To make three-dimensional (3D) non-LTE radiative transfer computationally feasible, it is crucial to have a model atom with as few levels as possible while retaining the main physical processes. We here develop such a model atom and we study the general formation properties of the C ii lines. We find that a nine-level model atom of C i-C iii with the transitions treated assuming complete frequency redistribution (CRD) suffices to describe the C ii 133.5 {nm} lines. 3D scattering effects are important for the intensity in the core of the line. The lines are formed in the optically thick regime. The core intensity is formed in layers where the temperature is about 10 kK at the base of the transition region. The lines are 1.2-4 times wider than the atomic absorption profile due to the formation in the optically thick regime. The smaller opacity broadening happens for single peak intensity profiles where the chromospheric temperature is low with a steep source function increase into the transition region, the larger broadening happens when there is a temperature increase from the photosphere to the low chromosphere leading to a local source function maximum and a double peak intensity profile with a central reversal. Assuming optically thin formation with the standard coronal approximation leads to several errors: neglecting photoionization severly underestimates the amount of C ii at temperatures below 16 kK, erroneously shifts the formation from 10 kK to 25 kK, and leads to too low intensities.

  16. Crystal structure of bis-(N,N,N',N'-tetra-methyl-guanidinium) tetra-chlorido-cuprate(II).

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Mamadou; Samb, Abdoulaye; Diop, Libasse; Maris, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    In the structure of the title salt, (C5H14N3)2[CuCl4], the Cu(II) atom in the anion lies on a twofold rotation axis. The tetra-chlorido-cuprate(II) anion adopts a flattened tetra-hedral coordination environment and inter-acts electrostatically with the tetra-methyl-guanidinium cation. The crystal packing is additionally consolidated through N-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional network structure. PMID:27555960

  17. Structure of ultrathin oxide layers on metal surfaces from grazing scattering of fast atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, H.; Seifert, J.; Blauth, D.; Busch, M.; Schüller, A.; Wethekam, S.

    2009-10-01

    The structure of ultrathin oxide layers grown on metal substrates is investigated by grazing scattering of fast atoms from the film surface. We present three recent experimental techniques which allow us to study the structure of ordered oxide films on metal substrates in detail. (1) A new variant of a triangulation method with fast atoms based on the detection of emitted electrons, (2) rainbow scattering under axial surface channeling conditions, and (3) fast atom diffraction (FAD) for studies on the structure of oxide films. Our examples demonstrate the attractive features of grazing fast atom scattering as a powerful analytical tool in surface physics.

  18. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  19. Local structures of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) on atomic scales: An overview

    DOE PAGES

    Diao, Haoyan; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tang, Zhi; Egami, Takeshi; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The high-entropy alloys, containing several elements mixed in equimolar or near-equimolar ratios, have shown exceptional engineering properties. Local structures on the atomic level are essential to understand the mechanical behaviors and related mechanisms. This article covers the local structure and stress on the atomic level are reviewed by the pair-distribution function of neutron-diffraction data, ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations, and the atomic probe microscopy.

  20. The cytotoxicity of organobismuth compounds with certain molecular structures can be diminished by replacing the bismuth atom with an antimony atom in the molecules.

    PubMed

    Kohri, Kumiko; Yoshida, Eiko; Yasuike, Shuji; Fujie, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Chika; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid molecules, which are composed of an organic structure and metal(s), are indispensable for synthetic chemical reactions; however, their toxicity has been incompletely understood. In the present study, we discovered two cytotoxic organobismuth compounds whose cytotoxicity diminished upon replacement of the intramolecular bismuth atom with an antimony atom. The intracellular accumulation of the organobismuth compounds was much higher than that of the organoantimony compounds with the corresponding organic structures. We also showed that both the organic structure and bismuth atom are required for certain organobismuth compounds to exert their cytotoxic effect, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of such a compound is a result of an interaction between the organic structure and the bismuth atom. The present data suggest that organobismuth compounds with certain molecular structures exhibit cytotoxicity via an interaction between the molecular structure and the bismuth atom, and this cytotoxicity can be diminished by replacing the bismuth atom with an antimony atom, resulting in lower intracellular accumulation.

  1. Structured Forms Reference Set of Binary Images II (SFRS2)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Structured Forms Reference Set of Binary Images II (SFRS2) (PC database for purchase)   The second NIST database of structured forms (Special Database 6) consists of 5,595 pages of binary, black-and-white images of synthesized documents containing hand-print. The documents in this database are 12 different tax forms with the IRS 1040 Package X for the year 1988.

  2. X-ray crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Naito, Philip-Kunio; Ogawa, Yu; Sawada, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Tadahisa; Wada, Masahisa

    2016-07-01

    We determined the crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution, using X-ray fiber diffraction data extending to 1.17 Å resolution. The unit cell [a = 8.129(7) Å, b = 8.347(6) Å, c = 10.311(7) Å, space group P21 21 21 ] of anhydrous chitosan contains two chains having one glucosamine residue in the asymmetric unit with the primary hydroxyl group in the gt conformation, that could be directly located in the Fourier omit map. The molecular arrangement of chitosan is very similar to the corner chains of cellulose II implying similar intermolecular hydrogen bonding between O6 and the amine nitrogen atom, and an intramolecular bifurcated hydrogen bond from O3 to O5 and O6. In addition to the classical hydrogen bonds, all the aliphatic hydrogens were involved in one or two weak hydrogen bonds, mostly helping to stabilize cohesion between antiparallel chains. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 361-368, 2016.

  3. Gyration-radius dynamics in structural transitions of atomic clusters.

    PubMed

    Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang S; Marsden, Jerrold E; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2007-03-28

    This paper is concerned with the structural transition dynamics of the six-atom Morse cluster with zero total angular momentum, which serves as an illustrative example of the general reaction dynamics of isolated polyatomic molecules. It develops a methodology that highlights the interplay between the effects of the potential energy topography and those of the intrinsic geometry of the molecular internal space. The method focuses on the dynamics of three coarse variables, the molecular gyration radii. By using the framework of geometric mechanics and hyperspherical coordinates, the internal motions of a molecule are described in terms of these three gyration radii and hyperangular modes. The gyration radii serve as slow collective variables, while the remaining hyperangular modes serve as rapidly oscillating "bath" modes. Internal equations of motion reveal that the gyration radii are subject to two different kinds of forces: One is the ordinary force that originates from the potential energy function of the system, while the other is an internal centrifugal force. The latter originates from the dynamical coupling of the gyration radii with the hyperangular modes. The effects of these two forces often counteract each other: The potential force generally works to keep the internal mass distribution of the system compact and symmetric, while the internal centrifugal force works to inflate and elongate it. Averaged fields of these two forces are calculated numerically along a reaction path for the structural transition of the molecule in the three-dimensional space of gyration radii. By integrating the sum of these two force fields along the reaction path, an effective energy curve is deduced, which quantifies the gross work necessary for the system to change its mass distribution along the reaction path. This effective energy curve elucidates the energy-dependent switching of the structural preference between symmetric and asymmetric conformations. The present

  4. Crystal structure of di-chlorido-bis-(dimethyl N-cyano-dithio-imino-carbonate)cobalt(II).

    PubMed

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Oliver, Allen G

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the mononuclear title complex, [{(H3CS)2C=NC  N}2CoCl2], consists of a Co(II) atom coordinated in a distorted tetra-hedral manner by two Cl(-) ligands and the terminal N atoms of two dimethyl N-cyano-dithio-imino-carbonate ligands. The two organic ligands are almost coplanar, with a dihedral angle of 5.99 (6)° between their least-squares planes. The crystal packing features pairs of inversion-related complexes that are held together through C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯S inter-actions and π-π stacking [centroid-to-centroid distance = 3.515 (su?) Å]. Additional C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯S inter-actions, as well as Cl⋯S contacts < 3.6 Å, consolidate the crystal packing. PMID:26870588

  5. Cis-Diammine(Pyridine)Chloroplatinum(II), a Monofunctional Platinum(II) Antitumor Agent: Uptake, Structure, Function, And Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, K.S.; Todd, R.C.; Zhang, S.; McCormick, M.S.; D'Aquino, J.A.; Reardon, J.T.; Sancar, A.; Giacomini, K.M.; Lippard, S.J.

    2009-05-19

    We have identified unique chemical and biological properties of a cationic monofunctional platinum(II) complex, cis-diammine(pyridine)chloroplatinum(II), cis-[Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(py)Cl]{sup +} or cDPCP, a coordination compound previously identified to have significant anticancer activity in a mouse tumor model. This compound is an excellent substrate for organic cation transporters 1 and 2, also designated SLC22A1 and SLC22A2, respectively. These transporters are abundantly expressed in human colorectal cancers, where they mediate uptake of oxaliplatin, cis-[Pt(DACH)(oxalate)] (DACH = trans-R,R-1,2-diaminocyclohexane), an FDA-approved first-line therapy for colorectal cancer. Unlike oxaliplatin, however, cDPCP binds DNA monofunctionally, as revealed by an x-ray crystal structure of cis-{l_brace}Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(py){r_brace}{sup 2+} bound to the N7 atom of a single guanosine residue in a DNA dodecamer duplex. Although the quaternary structure resembles that of B-form DNA, there is a base-pair step to the 5{prime} side of the Pt adduct with abnormally large shift and slide values, features characteristic of cisplatin intrastrand cross-links. cDPCP effectively blocks transcription from DNA templates carrying adducts of the complex, unlike DNA lesions of other monofunctional platinum(II) compounds like {l_brace}Pt(dien){r_brace}{sup 2+}. cDPCP-DNA adducts are removed by the nucleotide excision repair apparatus, albeit much less efficiently than bifunctional platinum-DNA intrastrand cross-links. These exceptional characteristics indicate that cDPCP and related complexes merit consideration as therapeutic options for treating colorectal and other cancers bearing appropriate cation transporters.

  6. Software for relativistic atomic structure theory: The grasp project at oxford

    SciTech Connect

    Parpia, F.A.; Grant, I.P. )

    1991-08-05

    GRASP is an acronym for General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The objective of the GRASP project at Oxford is to produce user-friendly state-of-the-art multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) software packages for rleativistic atomic structure theory.

  7. Testing the existence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions in H II regions after assessing atomic data accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, C.; Bautista, M. A. E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu

    2014-04-20

    The classic optical nebular diagnostics [N II], [O II], [O III], [S II], [S III], and [Ar III] are employed to search for evidence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions, namely κ distributions, in a sample of well-observed Galactic H II regions. By computing new effective collision strengths for all these systems and A-values when necessary (e.g., S II), and by comparing with previous collisional and radiative data sets, we have been able to obtain realistic estimates of the electron-temperature dispersion caused by the atomic data, which in most cases are not larger than ∼10%. If the uncertainties due to both observation and atomic data are then taken into account, it is plausible to determine for some nebulae a representative average temperature while in others there are at least two plasma excitation regions. For the latter, it is found that the diagnostic temperature differences in the high-excitation region, e.g., T{sub e} (O III), T{sub e} (S III), and T{sub e} (Ar III), cannot be conciliated by invoking κ distributions. For the low-excitation region, it is possible in some, but not all, cases to arrive at a common, lower temperature for [N II], [O II], and [S II] with κ ≈ 10, which would then lead to significant abundance enhancements for these ions. An analytic formula is proposed to generate accurate κ-averaged excitation rate coefficients (better than 10% for κ ≥ 5) from temperature tabulations of the Maxwell-Boltzmann effective collision strengths.

  8. Embedded-atom-method study of structural, thermodynamic, and atomic-transport properties of liquid Ni-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.; Morgan, D.; Hoyt, J.J.; Sadigh, B.; Althoff, J.D.; de Fontaine, D.; Foiles, S.M.

    1999-06-01

    Structural, thermodynamic, and atomic-transport properties of liquid Ni-Al alloys have been studied by Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics simulations based upon three different embedded-atom method (EAM) interatomic potentials, namely those due to Foiles and Daw (FD) [J. Mater. Res. {bold 2}, 5 (1987)], Voter and Chen (VC) [in {ital Characterization of Defects in Materials}, edited by R. W. Siegel {ital et al.} MRS Symposia Proceedings. No. 82 (Materials Research Society, Pittsburgh, 1987), p.175] and Ludwig and Gumbsch (LG) [Model. Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. {bold 3}, 533 (1995)]. We present detailed comparisons between calculated results and experimental data for structure factors, atomic volumes, enthalpies of mixing, activities, and viscosities. Calculated partial structure factors are found to be in semiquantitative agreement with published neutron scattering measurements for Ni{sub 20}Al{sub 80} alloys, indicating that short-range order in the liquid phase is qualitatively well described. Calculated thermodynamic properties of mixing are found to agree very well with experimental data for Ni compositions greater than 75 atomic {percent}, while for alloys richer in Al the magnitudes of the enthalpies and entropies of mixing are significantly underestimated. The VC and LG potentials give atomic densities and viscosities in good agreement with experiment for Ni-rich compositions, while FD potentials consistently underestimate both properties at all concentrations. The results of this study demonstrate that VC and LG potentials provide a realistic description of the thermodynamic and atomic transport properties for Ni{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x} liquid alloys with x{ge}0.75, and point to the limitations of EAM potentials for alloys richer in Al. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Embedded-atom-method study of structural, thermodynamic, and atomic-transport properties of liquid Ni-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asta, Mark; Morgan, Dane; Hoyt, J. J.; Sadigh, Babak; Althoff, J. D.; de Fontaine, D.; Foiles, S. M.

    1999-06-01

    Structural, thermodynamic, and atomic-transport properties of liquid Ni-Al alloys have been studied by Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics simulations based upon three different embedded-atom method (EAM) interatomic potentials, namely those due to Foiles and Daw (FD) [J. Mater. Res. 2, 5 (1987)], Voter and Chen (VC) [in Characterization of Defects in Materials, edited by R. W. Siegel et al. MRS Symposia Proceedings. No. 82 (Materials Research Society, Pittsburgh, 1987), p.175] and Ludwig and Gumbsch (LG) [Model. Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. 3, 533 (1995)]. We present detailed comparisons between calculated results and experimental data for structure factors, atomic volumes, enthalpies of mixing, activities, and viscosities. Calculated partial structure factors are found to be in semiquantitative agreement with published neutron scattering measurements for Ni20Al80 alloys, indicating that short-range order in the liquid phase is qualitatively well described. Calculated thermodynamic properties of mixing are found to agree very well with experimental data for Ni compositions greater than 75 atomic %, while for alloys richer in Al the magnitudes of the enthalpies and entropies of mixing are significantly underestimated. The VC and LG potentials give atomic densities and viscosities in good agreement with experiment for Ni-rich compositions, while FD potentials consistently underestimate both properties at all concentrations. The results of this study demonstrate that VC and LG potentials provide a realistic description of the thermodynamic and atomic transport properties for NixAl1-x liquid alloys with x>=0.75, and point to the limitations of EAM potentials for alloys richer in Al.

  10. Atomic shell structure from the Single-Exponential Decay Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Piotr de; Korchowiec, Jacek; Wesolowski, Tomasz A.

    2014-04-28

    The density of atomic systems is analysed via the Single-Exponential Decay Detector (SEDD). SEDD is a scalar field designed to explore mathematical, rather than physical, properties of electron density. Nevertheless, it has been shown that SEDD can serve as a descriptor of bonding patterns in molecules as well as an indicator of atomic shells [P. de Silva, J. Korchowiec, and T. A. Wesolowski, ChemPhysChem 13, 3462 (2012)]. In this work, a more detailed analysis of atomic shells is done for atoms in the Li–Xe series. Shell populations based on SEDD agree with the Aufbau principle even better than those obtained from the Electron Localization Function, which is a popular indicator of electron localization. A link between SEDD and the local wave vector is given, which provides a physical interpretation of SEDD.

  11. Supramolecular structure formation of molecular copper(II)methylsalicylate complexes with nicotinamide or methylnicotinamide - Crystal structure and spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchoňová, Miroslava; Repická, Zuzana; Moncol, Jan; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Mazúr, Milan; Valigura, Dušan

    2015-07-01

    As the systematic investigation of salicylatocopper complexes with nicotinamide derivatives the preparation, characterization and X-ray structure determination of four new molecular copper(II) complexes with x-methylsalicylate anion (x-Mesal-) and nicotinamide (nia) or N-methylnicotinamide (mna) are reported. The molecular complexes [Cu(5-Mesal)2(nia)2] (1), [Cu(3-Mesal)2(nia)2] (2) build up 2-D supramolecular structures of different character. The ladder-type supramolecular structure of (1) is formed by the head-to-head H-bonds of neighbouring carboxamide groups, while the supramolecular structure of (2) is formed by Nsbnd H⋯O H-bonds of carboxamide groups into 1-D chain that are by the additional Hsbnd H⋯O H-bonds of Nsbnd H carboxamide and the carboxylate group oxygen atoms linked to 2-D layers. The centrosymmetrical crystal molecular structure of [Cu(4-Mesal)2(mna)2(H2O)2]ṡ2EtOH (3) or [Cu(5-Mesal)2(mna)2(H2O)2]ṡ2MeOH (4) are forming 1-D supramolecular chains that involve the methylcarboxamide Nsbnd H group, the crystalosolvate alcohol Osbnd H group, the coordinated water molecule Osbnd H bond and oxygen atom of neighbouring complex molecule. The coordination polyhedron symmetry corresponds with the isotropic character of EPR spectra of (1) and (2) while the EPR spectrum of (4) is of axial symmetry.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, natural bond orbitals and Mulliken atomic charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex, [Cd(DDTC)₂].

    PubMed

    Soto, C A Téllez; Costa, A C; Versiane, O; Lemma, T; Machado, N C F; Mondragón, M A; Martin, A A

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned to the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Cd(II) complex, abbreviated as ([Cd(DDTC)2]). The calculations and spectral interpretation have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, infrared and Raman second derivative spectra, and band deconvolution analysis to assist in the assignment of observed fundamentals. This study validated the unusual pseudo tetrahedral molecular structure formed around the Cd(II) cation. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to determine the interactions of the normal-modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex on nano-structured silver surfaces. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was also carried out to study the Cd(II) hybridization causing the pseudo tetrahedral geometry of the framework of the [Cd(DDTC)2] complex, and to confirm the charge transfer mechanisms through second order perturbation theory analysis of the Fox Matrix. In order to find out the electronic dispersion of the Mulliken atomic charges (MAC) in the normal modes, we calculated the MAC for each normal mode and correlated these values with the SERS effect. Experimental UV-Vis spectra were obtained and charge transfer bands were assigned. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental values for the vibrational and UV-Vis spectra was obtained.

  13. Smallest Nanoelectronic with Atomic Devices with Precise Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    2000-01-01

    Since its invention in 1948, the transistor has revolutionized our everyday life - transistor radios and TV's appeared in the early 1960s, personal computers came into widespread use in the mid-1980s, and cellular phones, laptops, and palm-sized organizers dominated the 1990s. The electronics revolution is based upon transistor miniaturization; smaller transistors are faster, and denser circuitry has more functionality. Transistors in current generation chips are 0.25 micron or 250 nanometers in size, and the electronics industry has completed development of 0.18 micron transistors which will enter production within the next few years. Industry researchers are now working to reduce transistor size down to 0.13 micron - a thousandth of the width of a human hair. However, studies indicate that the miniaturization of silicon transistors will soon reach its limit. For further progress in microelectronics, scientists have turned to nanotechnology to advance the science. Rather than continuing to miniaturize transistors to a point where they become unreliable, nanotechnology offers the new approach of building devices on the atomic scale [see sidebar]. One vision for the next generation of miniature electronics is atomic chain electronics, where devices are composed of atoms aligned on top of a substrate surface in a regular pattern. The Atomic Chain Electronics Project (ACEP) - part of the Semiconductor Device Modeling and Nanotechnology group, Integrated Product Team at the NAS Facility has been developing the theory of understanding atomic chain devices, and the author's patent for atomic chain electronics is now pending.

  14. Similarity recognition of molecular structures by optimal atomic matching and rotational superposition.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Sierka, Marek

    2012-01-15

    An algorithm for similarity recognition of molecules and molecular clusters is presented which also establishes the optimum matching among atoms of different structures. In the first step of the algorithm, a set of molecules are coarsely superimposed by transforming them into a common reference coordinate system. The optimum atomic matching among structures is then found with the help of the Hungarian algorithm. For this, pairs of structures are represented as complete bipartite graphs with a weight function that uses intermolecular atomic distances. In the final step, a rotational superposition method is applied using the optimum atomic matching found. This yields the minimum root mean square deviation of intermolecular atomic distances with respect to arbitrary rotation and translation of the molecules. Combined with an effective similarity prescreening method, our algorithm shows robustness and an effective quadratic scaling of computational time with the number of atoms.

  15. Racing carbon atoms. Atomic motion reaction coordinates and structural effects on Newtonian kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Andujar-De Sanctis, Ivonne L; Singleton, Daniel A

    2012-10-19

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of methacrolein. Trajectory studies accurately predict the isotope effects and support an origin in Newton's second law of motion, with no involvement of zero-point energy or transition state recrossing. Atomic motion reaction coordinate diagrams are introduced as a way to qualitatively understand the selectivity.

  16. Mononuclear copper (II) salicylate complexes with 1,2-dimethylimidazole and 2-methylimidazole: Synthesis, spectroscopic and crystal structure characterization and their superoxide scavenging activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuhijleh, A. Latif

    2010-09-01

    The complexes cis-bis (1,2-dimethylimidazole) bis (salicylato) copper (II) ( 1) and tris (2-methylimidazole) (salicylato) copper (II) ( 2) have been prepared by the reaction of appropriate methylimidazole derivative with binuclear copper (II) aspirinate. Spectral and X-ray structural studies for complex 1 showed that the copper ion is coordinated in a cis arrangement to two imidazole nitrogen atoms and two carboxylate oxygen atoms from the salicylate mono-anion ligands. The second carboxylate oxygen atoms form weak axial interactions with the copper ion. Spectral, magnetic and analytical data for complex 2 showed that the copper ion is bonded to three 2-methylimidazole nitrogen atoms and one doubly deprotonated salicylate di-anion, which is chelated to Cu (II) ion through one of its carboxylate oxygen atoms and the deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen atom to form distorted square-pyramidal geometry having CuN 3O + O chromophore. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activities (IC 50) of the complexes 1, 2 and the structurally known mixture complexes Cu (imidazole) n(salicylato) 2( 3) (where n = 2, 5 and 6) were determined using the xanthine-xanthine oxidase assay and compared with those reported for other copper (II) complexes with anti-inflammatory drugs. The results obtained indicated that complexes 1- 3 have high SOD-like activities, which may act as good mimics for native Cu, Zn-SOD enzyme.

  17. Dirac structures in Lagrangian mechanics Part II: Variational structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Hiroaki; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2006-12-01

    Part I of this paper introduced the notion of implicit Lagrangian systems and their geometric structure was explored in the context of Dirac structures. In this part, we develop the variational structure of implicit Lagrangian systems. Specifically, we show that the implicit Euler-Lagrange equations can be formulated using an extended variational principle of Hamilton called the Hamilton-Pontryagin principle. This variational formulation incorporates, in a natural way, the generalized Legendre transformation, which enables one to treat degenerate Lagrangian systems. The definition of this generalized Legendre transformation makes use of natural maps between iterated tangent and cotangent spaces. Then, we develop an extension of the classical Lagrange-d'Alembert principle called the Lagrange-d'Alembert-Pontryagin principle for implicit Lagrangian systems with constraints and external forces. A particularly interesting case is that of nonholonomic mechanical systems that can have both constraints and external forces. In addition, we define a constrained Dirac structure on the constraint momentum space, namely the image of the Legendre transformation (which, in the degenerate case, need not equal the whole cotangent bundle). We construct an implicit constrained Lagrangian system associated with this constrained Dirac structure by making use of an Ehresmann connection. Two examples, namely a vertical rolling disk on a plane and an L- C circuit are given to illustrate the results.

  18. Atomic Structure and Fundamental Symmetry Measurements in a Thallium Atomic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, P. K.; Nicholas, P. C.

    1998-05-01

    We have completed construction and testing of a new high-flux thallium atomic beam apparatus. Using a multiple slit oven source we achieve a favorable combination of throughput and modest Doppler narrowing. An in-vacuum chopper wheel provides ≈ 100 Hz modulation of the atomic beam and allows lock-in detection in the case of weak atomic beam absorption. Electric field plates allow precise application of ± 30 kV/cm fields in the interaction region. We will describe ongoing atomic beam spectroscopy of the 378 nm E1 transition, and a planned measurement of the Stark-induced amplitudes within the thallium 6P_1/2 - 6P_3/2 1283 nm M1 transition. We will also present the details of a new experimental proposal to search for time reversal-violating (T-odd, P-even) forces in thallium. In this new scheme, the 1283 nm M1 laser, tuned near the F=0arrowF'=1 transition, would be directed into high-finesse cavity which incorporates the atomic beam. In the presence of a longitudinal static electric field, E, a `TOPE' signature is revealed here by a cavity phase shift proportional to (hatk\\cdotE). We would search for a differential phase shift of counterpropagating (± hatk) laser beams correlated to electric field reversal. The cavity finesse both amplifies any TOPE effect and increases the precision with which it can be detected, while the differencing technique greatly reduces sensitivity to laser frequency or mechanical fluctuations.

  19. Crystal structure of lead(II) tartrate: a redetermination.

    PubMed

    Weil, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of poly[μ4-tartrato-κ(6) O (1),O (3):O (1'):O (2),O (4):O (4')-lead], [Pb(C4H4O6)] n , were grown in a gel medium. In comparison with the previous structure determination of this compound from laboratory powder X-ray diffraction data [De Ridder et al. (2002 ▶). Acta Cryst. C58, m596-m598], the redetermination on the basis of single-crystal data reveals the absolute structure, all atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and a much higher accuracy in terms of bond lengths and angles. It could be shown that a different space group or incorporation of water as reported for similarly gel-grown lead tartrate crystals is incorrect. In the structure, each Pb(2+) cation is bonded to eight O atoms of five tartrate anions, while each tartrate anion links four Pb(2+) cations. The resulting three-dimensional framework is stabilized by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the OH groups of one tartrate anion and the carboxyl-ate O atoms of adjacent anions.

  20. The structure of the local interstellar medium. VI. New Mg II, Fe II, and Mn II observations toward stars within 100 pc

    SciTech Connect

    Malamut, Craig; Redfield, Seth; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.; Ayres, Thomas R. E-mail: sredfield@wesleyan.edu

    2014-05-20

    We analyze high-resolution spectra obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope toward 34 nearby stars (≤100 pc) to record Mg II, Fe II, and Mn II absorption due to the local interstellar medium (LISM). Observations span the entire sky, probing previously unobserved regions of the LISM. The heavy ions studied in this survey produce narrow absorption features that facilitate the identification of multiple interstellar components. We detected one to six individual absorption components along any given sight line, and the number of absorbers roughly correlates with the pathlength. This high-resolution near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectroscopic survey was specifically designed for sight lines with existing far-UV (FUV) observations. The FUV spectra include many intrinsically broad absorption lines (i.e., of low atomic mass ions) and are often observed at medium resolution. The LISM NUV narrow-line absorption component structure presented here can be used to more accurately interpret the archival FUV observations. As an example of this synergy, we present a new analysis of the temperature and turbulence along the line of sight toward ε Ind. The new observations of LISM velocity structure are also critical in the interpretation of astrospheric absorption derived from fitting the saturated H I Lyα profile. As an example, we reanalyze the spectrum of λ And and find that this star likely does have an astrosphere. Two stars in the sample that have circumstellar disks (49 Cet and HD141569) show evidence for absorption due to disk gas. Finally, the substantially increased number of sight lines is used to test and refine the three-dimensional kinematic model of the LISM and search for previously unidentified clouds within the Local Bubble. We find that every prediction made by the Redfield and Linsky kinematic model of the LISM is confirmed by an observed component in the new lines of sight.

  1. Functional implications on the mechanism of the function of photosystem II including water oxidation based on the structure of photosystem II.

    PubMed Central

    Fromme, Petra; Kern, Jan; Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jaceck; Saenger, Wolfram; Witt, Horst T; Krauss, Norbert; Zouni, Athina

    2002-01-01

    The structure of photosystem I at 3.8 A resolution illustrated the main structural elements of the water-oxidizing photosystem II complex, including the constituents of the electron transport chain. The location of the Mn cluster within the complex has been identified for the first time to our knowledge. At this resolution, no individual atoms are visible, however, the electron density of the Mn cluster can be used to discuss both the present models of the Mn cluster as revealed from various spectroscopic methods and the implications for the mechanisms of water oxidation. Twenty-six chlorophylls from the antenna system of photosystem II have been identified. They are arranged in two layers, one close to the stromal side and one close to the lumenal side. Comparing the structure of the antenna system of photosystem II with the chlorophyll arrangement in photosystem I, which was recently determined at 2.5 A resolution shows that photosystem II lacks the central domain of the photosystem I antenna, which is discussed in respect of the repair cycle of photosystem II due to photoinhibition. PMID:12437872

  2. Ligand effects on the structures and magnetic properties of tricyanomethanide-containing copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Consuelo; Bentama, Abdeslem; Stiriba, Salah-Eddine; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2007-11-28

    The preparation, crystal structure and magnetic properties of four heteroleptic copper(II) complexes with the tricyanomethanide (tcm(-)) and the heterocyclic nitrogen donors 3,6-bis(2-pyridyl)pyridazine (dppn), 2,5-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (2,5-dpp), 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (2,3-dpp) and 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)quinoxaline (2,3-dpq) are reported, {[Cu(2)(dppn)(OH)(tcm)(2)] x tcm}(n) (1), {[Cu(2,5-dpp)(tcm)] x tcm}(n) (2), {[Cu(2)(2,3-dpp)(2)(tcm)(3)(H(2)O)(0.5)] x tcm x 0.5H(2)O}(n) (3) and [Cu(2,3-dpq)(tcm)(2)](n) (4). 1 has a ladder-like structure with single mu-1,5-tcm ligands forming the sides and a bis-bidentate dppn and a single mu-hydroxo providing the rung. Each copper atom in 1 exhibits a distorted square pyramidal CuN(4)O surrounding: the basal plane is built by the hydroxo-oxygen, a nitrile-nitrogen atom from a tcm group and one pyrazine and a pyridyl nitrogen atoms from the dppn whereas the apical position is filled by a nitrile-nitrogen atom from a symmetry-related tcm ligand. The structures of 2-4 consists of zig-zag (2 and 3)/linear (4) chains of copper(II) ions which are bridged by either bis-bidentate 2,5-dpp (2) and 2,3-dpp (3) molecules or single mu-1,5-tcm (4) groups. The copper atoms in 2 and 4 are five coordinated with distorted trigonal bipyramidal (2) and square pyramidal (4) CuN(5) surroundings. The axial positions in 2 are occupied by two pyridyl-nitrogen atoms from two 2,5-dpp ligands whereas the trigonal plane is built by a nitrile-nitrogen from a terminally bound tcm group and two pyrazine nitrogen atoms from two 2,5-dpp molecules. The basal plane in 4 is defined by a pyridyl and a pyrazine nitrogen atoms from the bidentate 2,3-dpq ligand and two nitrile nitrogen atoms from two tcm groups (one terminal and the other bridging) whereas the apical position is filled by a nitrile nitrogen from another tcm ligand. The crystallographically independent copper atoms in 3 [Cu(1) and Cu(2)] exhibit elongated octahedral geometries being defined by four

  3. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death.

  4. Structural insights into transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Sebastian; Hahn, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is one of the most important steps in control of cell identity, growth, differentiation and development. Many signaling pathways controlling these processes ultimately target the core transcription machinery that, for protein coding genes, consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors (GTFs). New studies on the structure and mechanism of the core assembly and how it interfaces with promoter DNA and coactivator complexes have given tremendous insight into early steps in the initiation process, genome-wide binding, and mechanisms conserved for all nuclear and archaeal Pols. Here we review recent developments in dissecting the architecture of the Pol II core machinery with a focus on early and regulated steps in transcription initiation. PMID:24120742

  5. Observation of Metastable Structural Excitations and Concerted Atomic Motions on a Crystal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Golovchenko, Jene

    1992-11-01

    The addition of a small number of lead atoms to a germanium(111) surface reduces the energy barrier for activated processes, and with a tunneling microscope it is possible to observe concerted atomic motions and metastable structures on this surface near room temperature. The formation and annihilation of these metastable structural surface excitations is associated with the shift in position of large numbers of germanium surface atoms along a specific row direction like beads on an abacus. The effect provides a mechanism for understanding the transport of atoms on a semiconductor surface.

  6. Syntheses, characterizations and crystal structures of two new lead(II) amino and carboxylate-sulfonates with a layered and a pillared layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yan-Ping; Mao, Jiang-Gao; Song, Jun-Ling

    2004-03-01

    Reactions of lead(II) acetate with m-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (H L1) and 5-sulfoisophthalic acid (H 3L2) afforded two new lead(II) sulfonates, Pb( L1) 21 and Pb 2( L2)( μ3-OH)(H 2O) 2. In compound 1, the lead(II) ion is eight-coordinated by two sulfonate groups bidentately, two sulfonate groups unidentately and two amino groups from six ligands. Each L1 ligand is tetradentate and bridges with three Pb(II) ions. The interconnection of the Pb(II) ions via bridging sulfonate ligands resulted in <100> and <200> layers. In compound 2, one Pb(II) ion is six-coordinated by a carboxylate group bidentately, by two carboxylate groups unidentately, by a sulfonate oxygen atom and by an OH anion, whereas the other one is six-coordinated by a bidentate chelating carboxylate group, two μ3-OH anions, a sulfonate oxygen atom and an aqua ligand. The interconnection of irregular PbO 6 polyhedra via carboxylate-sulfonate ligands resulted in the formation of a pillared layered structure with the 2D layer being formed; the lead(II) ions, hydroxyl groups, carboxylate and sulfonate groups and the benzene ring as the pillar agent.

  7. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Deisenhofer, J.

    1988-01-12

    Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.

  8. Characterization of atomic structure of oxide films on carbon steel in simulated concrete pore solutions using EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunay, H. Burak; Ghods, Pouria; Isgor, O. Burkan; Carpenter, Graham J. C.; Wu, Xiaohua

    2013-06-01

    The atomic structure of oxide films formed on carbon steel that are exposed to highly alkaline simulated concrete pore solutions was investigated using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). In particular, the effect of chloride exposure on film structure was studied in two types of simulated pore solutions: saturated calcium hydroxide (CH) and a solution prepared to represent typical concrete pore solutions (CP). It was shown that the films that form on carbon steel in simulated concrete pore solutions contained three indistinct layers. The inner oxide film had a structure similar to that of FeIIO, which is known to be unstable in the presence of chlorides. The outer oxide film mainly resembled Fe3O4 (FeIIO·Fe2IIIO3) in the CH solution and α-Fe2IIIO3/Fe3O4 in the CP solution. The composition of the transition layer between the inner and outer layers of the oxide film was mainly composed of Fe3O4 (FeIIO·Fe2IIIO3). In the presence of chloride, the relative amount of the FeIII/FeII increased, confirming that chlorides induce valence state transformation of oxides from FeII to FeIII, and the difference between the atomic structures of oxide film layers diminished.

  9. First-principles mobility calculations and atomic-scale interface roughness in nanoscale structures.

    PubMed

    Evans, M H; Zhang, X-G; Joannopoulos, J D; Pantelides, S T

    2005-09-01

    Calculations of mobilities have so far been carried out using approximate methods that suppress atomic-scale detail. Such approaches break down in nanoscale structures. Here we report the development of a method to calculate mobilities using atomic-scale models of the structures and density functional theory at various levels of sophistication and accuracy. The method is used to calculate the effect of atomic-scale roughness on electron mobilities in ultrathin double-gate silicon-on-insulator structures. The results elucidate the origin of the significant reduction in mobility observed in ultrathin structures at low electron densities.

  10. First-Principles Mobility Calculations and Atomic-Scale Interface Roughness in Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Matthew H; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2005-01-01

    Calculations of mobilities have so far been carried out using approximate methods that suppress atomic-scale detail. Such approaches break down in nanoscale structures. Here we report the development of a method to calculate mobilities using atomic-scale models of the structures and density functional theory at various levels of sophistication and accuracy. The method is used to calculate the effect of atomic-scale roughness on electron mobilities in ultrathin double-gate silicon-on-insulator structures. The results elucidate the origin of the significant reduction in mobility observed in ultrathin structures at low electron densities.

  11. An exploratory study of high school students' conceptions of atomic and cellular structure and the relationship between atoms and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Elizabeth Anne Edwards

    Constructivist learning theory is based upon the tenets that students come to learning experiences with prior knowledge and experiences that the learner will choose from to make sense of the present situation. This leads to a mixture of understandings among students. This study proposed to reveal students' understanding of atomic structure and cell structure as well as the relationships between atoms and cells. High school students from one private school participated in a paper-and-pencil test to uncover conceptual understanding and content knowledge of atoms and cells. The 120 participants were from grades: 9 (13m, 15f), 10 (9m, 20f), 11 (21m, 17f), and 12 (17m, 8f). All 120 students took the paper-and-pencil test and 16 students (4 per grade) participated in a follow-up interview. Drawings were analyzed by individual characteristics then using groups of characteristics models classes were formed. Open-ended questions were scored holistically by rubric scores and then deconstructed into individual content statements. A limited number of findings follow. Students were more likely to draw a Bohr model. Freshmen were less likely to indicate living materials contained atoms and more likely to indicate forms of energy contained atoms. As students progressed through high school, details included in cells decreased. Students failed to recognize that the sum of the products from cell division will be larger than the original cell due to the two growth periods included in the division cycle. Students were often able to provide the correct yes or no answer to are atoms and cells similar, different, or related but the follow-up answers often included non-scientific conceptions. Recommendations include implementing instructional strategies that promote long-term retention of conceptual understanding and the underlying content knowledge. Design evaluation methods to monitor student understanding throughout a unit of study that go beyond traditional closed-ended questions

  12. Structure of type II dehydroquinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, Scott; Kelleher, Alan; Matsumoto, Monica M.; Robinson, Gonteria; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections and is resistant to most antibiotics. Ongoing efforts to generate much-needed new antibiotics include targeting enzymes that are vital for P. aeruginosa but are absent in mammals. One such enzyme, type II dehydroquinase (DHQase), catalyzes the interconversion of 3-dehydroquinate and 3-dehydroshikimate, a necessary step in the shikimate pathway. This step is vital for the proper synthesis of phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and other aromatic metabolites. The recombinant expression, purification and crystal structure of catalytically active DHQase from P. aeruginosa (PaDHQase) are presented. Cubic crystals belonging to space group F23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 125.39 Å, were obtained by vapor diffusion in sitting drops and the structure was refined to an R factor of 16% at 1.74 Å resolution. PaDHQase is a prototypical type II DHQase with the classical flavodoxin-like α/β topology. PMID:25372814

  13. On the reproducibility of protein crystal structures: five atomic resolution structures of trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Dauter, Miroslawa; Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Structural studies of proteins usually rely on a model obtained from one crystal. By investigating the details of this model, crystallographers seek to obtain insight into the function of the macromolecule. It is therefore important to know which details of a protein structure are reproducible or to what extent they might differ. To address this question, the high-resolution structures of five crystals of bovine trypsin obtained under analogous conditions were compared. Global parameters and structural details were investigated. All of the models were of similar quality and the pairwise merged intensities had large correlation coefficients. The Cα and backbone atoms of the structures superposed very well. The occupancy of ligands in regions of low thermal motion was reproducible, whereas solvent molecules containing heavier atoms (such as sulfur) or those located on the surface could differ significantly. The coordination lengths of the calcium ion were conserved. A large proportion of the multiple conformations refined to similar occupancies and the residues adopted similar orientations. More than three quarters of the water-molecule sites were conserved within 0.5 Å and more than one third were conserved within 0.1 Å. An investigation of the protonation states of histidine residues and carboxylate moieties was consistent for all of the models. Radiation-damage effects to disulfide bridges were observed for the same residues and to similar extents. Main-chain bond lengths and angles averaged to similar values and were in agreement with the Engh and Huber targets. Other features, such as peptide flips and the double conformation of the inhibitor molecule, were also reproducible in all of the trypsin structures. Therefore, many details are similar in models obtained from different crystals. However, several features of residues or ligands located in flexible parts of the macromolecule may vary significantly, such as side-chain orientations and the occupancies

  14. Atomic and Electronic Structure of Polar Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija

    2014-01-17

    In this project we developed fundamental understanding of atomic and electronic mechanisms for stabilization of polar oxide interfaces. An integrated experimental and theoretical methodology was used to develop knowledge on this important new class of ionic materials with limited dimensionality, with implications for multiple branches of the basic and applied energy sciences.

  15. The atom in a molecule: Implications for molecular structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhoff, Peter; Mills, Jeffrey; Boatz, Jerry

    2016-05-01

    The apparent impossibility of meaningful assignments of indistinguishable electrons to particular atomic nuclei in a molecule seemingly precludes quantum-mechanical definition of fragment atomic Hamiltonian operators. Structural symmetry, conformations, and isomers, as well as the electronic energies and properties of constituent atoms are accordingly perceived as ill defined. Here we provide assignments of electrons to atoms in molecules and define their energies and properties. A separable Hilbert space in the form of orthonormal (Eisenschitz-London) outer-products of atomic eigenstates facilitates assignments of electrons to particular atomic nuclei and also provides support for totally antisymmetric solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Self-adjoint atomic operators within a molecule are shown to have Hermitian matrix representatives and physically significant expectation values in molecular eigenstates. Nuanced descriptions of molecular structures and properties emerge naturally from this representation in the absence of additional subjective conditions, including the interplay between atomic promotion and interaction energies, atomic hybridization and charge apportionment, and atomic-state entanglements upon dissociation, attributes revealed by illustrative calculations. Work support in part by Grants from AFRL, NRC, ASEE, NSF.

  16. Atomic spectral methods for molecular electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Langhoff, P W; Boatz, J A; Hinde, R J; Sheehy, J A

    2004-11-15

    Theoretical methods are reported for ab initio calculations of the adiabatic (Born-Oppenheimer) electronic wave functions and potential energy surfaces of molecules and other atomic aggregates. An outer product of complete sets of atomic eigenstates familiar from perturbation-theoretical treatments of long-range interactions is employed as a representational basis without prior enforcement of aggregate wave function antisymmetry. The nature and attributes of this atomic spectral-product basis are indicated, completeness proofs for representation of antisymmetric states provided, convergence of Schrodinger eigenstates in the basis established, and strategies for computational implemention of the theory described. A diabaticlike Hamiltonian matrix representative is obtained, which is additive in atomic-energy and pairwise-atomic interaction-energy matrices, providing a basis for molecular calculations in terms of the (Coulombic) interactions of the atomic constituents. The spectral-product basis is shown to contain the totally antisymmetric irreducible representation of the symmetric group of aggregate electron coordinate permutations once and only once, but to also span other (non-Pauli) symmetric group representations known to contain unphysical discrete states and associated continua in which the physically significant Schrodinger eigenstates are generally embedded. These unphysical representations are avoided by isolating the physical block of the Hamiltonian matrix with a unitary transformation obtained from the metric matrix of the explicitly antisymmetrized spectral-product basis. A formal proof of convergence is given in the limit of spectral closure to wave functions and energy surfaces obtained employing conventional prior antisymmetrization, but determined without repeated calculations of Hamiltonian matrix elements as integrals over explicitly antisymmetric aggregate basis states. Computational implementations of the theory employ efficient recursive

  17. Tetrabromidocuprates(II)—Synthesis, Structure and EPR

    PubMed Central

    Zabel, André; Winter, Alette; Kelling, Alexandra; Schilde, Uwe; Strauch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Metal-containing ionic liquids (ILs) are of interest for a variety of technical applications, e.g., particle synthesis and materials with magnetic or thermochromic properties. In this paper we report the synthesis of, and two structures for, some new tetrabromidocuprates(II) with several “onium” cations in comparison to the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analyses. The sterically demanding cations were used to separate the paramagnetic Cu(II) ions for EPR measurements. The EPR hyperfine structure in the spectra of these new compounds is not resolved, due to the line broadening resulting from magnetic exchange between the still-incomplete separated paramagnetic Cu(II) centres. For the majority of compounds, the principal g values (g‖ and g⊥) of the tensors could be determined and information on the structural changes in the [CuBr4]2− anions can be obtained. The complexes have high potential, e.g., as ionic liquids, as precursors for the synthesis of copper bromide particles, as catalytically active or paramagnetic ionic liquids. PMID:27104522

  18. Adsorption process, atomic geometry, electronic structure and stability of Si(001)/Te surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, R. H.; Ferraz, A. C.

    2000-03-01

    The adsorption process, atomic geometry, electronic structure and energetics of a Si(001) surface covered by Te atoms have been studied using first-principles total-energy calculations. Our findings indicate that the Te atoms adsorb in the 'bridge' site on the surface Si dimer bond, in agreement with recent experimental results. We have also verified that the Si dimers (underneath adsorbed Te atoms) do not dissociate. The subsequent atomic exchange between the adsorbed Te atom and the surface Si atom, giving rise to an interdiffusion process of Te atoms towards Si substrate, is not an exothermic process. We have considered a number of possible coverages of Te atoms on Si(001) surface and our results indicate that for a coverage of one monolayer (1 ML), the Si(001)/Te-(1×1) surface represents the energetically more stable configuration. For a coverage of 2/3 ML, we have verified the formation of TeSiTe mixed trimers, in a (3×1) reconstructed surface. At 1/3 ML coverage, we have obtained the formation of Si dimers with a single Te atom at the surface, in a (3×1) reconstruction. Finally, for a coverage of 1/2 ML, we have obtained the formation of SiTe mixed dimers, in a (2×1) reconstructed surface, but the calculated formation energy indicates that this atomic configuration is not energetically favourable.

  19. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2007-11-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure of air-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  20. The Local Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding in Sodium Tin Phases

    DOE PAGES

    Baggetto, Loic; Bridges, Craig A.; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude; Mullins, David R.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Meisner, Roberta; Crumlin, Ethan; Liu, Xiason; Yang, Wanli; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-09-25

    To understand these electrochemically-derived materials we have reinvestigated the formation of Na-Sn alloys to identify all the phases which form when x ≥ 1 (NaxSn) and characterized the local bonding around the Sn atoms with X-ray diffraction, 119Sn M ssbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The results from the well-defined crystallographic materials were compared to the spectroscopic measurements of the local Sn structures in the electrochemically prepared materials. The reinvestigation of the Na-Sn compounds yields a number of new results: (i) Na7Sn3 is a new thermodynamically-stable phase with a rhombohedral structure and R-3m space group; (ii) orthorhombic Na9Sn4 (Cmcm) hasmore » relatively slow formation kinetics suggesting why it does not form at room temperature during the electrochemical reaction; (iii) orthorhombic Na14.78Sn4 (Pnma), better described as Na16-xSn4, is Na-richer than cubic Na15Sn4 (I-43d). Characterization of electrochemically prepared Na-Sn alloys indicate that, at the exception of Na7Sn3 and Na15Sn4, different crystal structures than similar Na-Sn compositions prepared via classic solid state reactions are formed. These phases are composed of disordered structures characteristic of kinetic-driven solid-state amorphization reactions. In these structures, Sn coordinates in asymmetric environments, which differ significantly from the environments present in Na-Sn model compounds.« less

  1. The Local Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding in Sodium Tin Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Bridges, Craig A.; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude; Mullins, David R.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Meisner, Roberta; Crumlin, Ethan; Liu, Xiason; Yang, Wanli; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-09-25

    To understand these electrochemically-derived materials we have reinvestigated the formation of Na-Sn alloys to identify all the phases which form when x ≥ 1 (NaxSn) and characterized the local bonding around the Sn atoms with X-ray diffraction, 119Sn M ssbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The results from the well-defined crystallographic materials were compared to the spectroscopic measurements of the local Sn structures in the electrochemically prepared materials. The reinvestigation of the Na-Sn compounds yields a number of new results: (i) Na7Sn3 is a new thermodynamically-stable phase with a rhombohedral structure and R-3m space group; (ii) orthorhombic Na9Sn4 (Cmcm) has relatively slow formation kinetics suggesting why it does not form at room temperature during the electrochemical reaction; (iii) orthorhombic Na14.78Sn4 (Pnma), better described as Na16-xSn4, is Na-richer than cubic Na15Sn4 (I-43d). Characterization of electrochemically prepared Na-Sn alloys indicate that, at the exception of Na7Sn3 and Na15Sn4, different crystal structures than similar Na-Sn compositions prepared via classic solid state reactions are formed. These phases are composed of disordered structures characteristic of kinetic-driven solid-state amorphization reactions. In these structures, Sn coordinates in asymmetric environments, which differ significantly from the environments present in Na-Sn model compounds.

  2. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Ohmori, Kenji; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-07-13

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  3. Correlation between atomic structure evolution and strength in a bulk metallic glass at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Wang, G; Liu, Z Y; Bednarčík, J; Gao, Y L; Zhai, Q J; Mattern, N; Eckert, J

    2014-01-28

    A model Zr41.25Ti13.75Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) is selected to explore the structural evolution on the atomic scale with decreasing temperature down to cryogenic level using high energy X-ray synchrotron radiation. We discover a close correlation between the atomic structure evolution and the strength of the BMG and find out that the activation energy increment of the concordantly atomic shifting at lower temperature is the main factor influencing the strength. Our results might provide a fundamental understanding of the atomic-scale structure evolution and may bridge the gap between the atomic-scale physics and the macro-scale fracture strength for BMGs.

  4. Guanine-containing copper(II) complexes: synthesis, X-ray structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Mastropietro, Teresa F; Armentano, Donatella; Grisolia, Ettore; Zanchini, Claudia; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; De Munno, Giovanni

    2008-01-28

    Three new compounds of formula {[Cu(gua)(H(2)O)(3)](BF(4))(SiF(6))(1/2)}(n) (1), {[Cu(gua)(H(2)O)(3)](CF(3)SO(3))(2).H(2)O}(n) (2) and [Cu(gua)(2)(H(2)O)(HCOO)]ClO(4).H(2)O.1/2HCOOH] (3) [gua = 2-amino-1H-purin-6(9H)-one] showing the unprecedented coordination of neutral guanine, have been synthesised and structurally characterized. The structures of the compounds 1 and 2 contain uniform copper(II) chains of formula [Cu(gua)(H(2)O)(3)](n)(2n+), where the copper atoms are bridged by guanine ligands coordinated via N(3) and N(7). The electroneutrality is achieved by uncoordinated tetrafluoroborate and hexafluorosilicate (1) and triflate (2). Each copper atom in 1 and 2 is five-coordinated in a distorted square pyramidal environment: two water molecules in trans positions and the N(3) and N(7a) nitrogen atoms of two guanine ligands build the basal plane whereas a water molecule fills the axial position. The values of the copper-copper separation across the bridging guanine ligand are 7.183(1) (1) and 7.123(1) A (2). is an ionic salt whose structure is made up of mononuclear [Cu(gua)(2)(H(2)O)(HCOO)](+) cations and perchlorate anions plus water and formic acid as crystallization molecules. The two guanine ligands in the cation are coordinated to the copper centre through the N(9) atom. The copper atom in 3 is four-coordinated with two monodentate guanine molecules in the trans position, a water molecule and a monodenate formate ligand building a quasi square planar surrounding. Magnetic susceptibility measurements for 1 and 2 in the temperature range 1.9-300 K show the occurrence of significant intrachain antiferromagnetic interactions between the copper(ii) ions across the guanine bridge [J = -9.6(1) (1) and -10.3(1) cm(-1) (2) with H = -J summation operator(i)S(i).S(i+1)].

  5. Realizing high magnetic moments in fcc Fe nanoparticles through atomic structure stretch.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Thornton, S C; Binns, C

    2012-05-01

    We describe the realization of a high moment state in fcc Fe nanoparticles through a controlled change in their atomic structure. Embedding Fe nanoparticles in a Cu(1-x)Au(x) matrix causes their atomic structure to switch from bcc to fcc. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements show that the structure in both the matrix and the Fe nanoparticles expands as the amount of Au in the matrix is increased, with the data indicating a tetragonal stretch in the Fe nanoparticles. The samples were prepared directly from the gas phase by co-deposition, using a gas aggregation source and MBE-type sources respectively for the nanoparticle and matrix materials. The structure change in the Fe nanoparticles is accompanied by a sharp increase in atomic magnetic moment, ultimately to values of ~2.5 ± 0.3 μ(B)/atom .

  6. Atomic-Resolution Kinked Structure of an Alkylporphyrin on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite.

    PubMed

    Chin, Yiing; Panduwinata, Dwi; Sintic, Maxine; Sum, Tze Jing; Hush, Noel S; Crossley, Maxwell J; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-20

    The atomic structure of the chains of an alkyl porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetranonadecylporphyrin) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at the solid/liquid interface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and 1-phenyloctane is resolved using calibrated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT) image simulations, and ONIOM-based geometry optimizations. While atomic structures are often readily determined for porphyrin SAMs, the determination of the structure of alkyl-chain connections has not previously been possible. A graphical calibration procedure is introduced, allowing accurate observation of SAM lattice parameters, and, of the many possible atomic structures modeled, only the lowest-energy structure obtained was found to predict the observed lattice parameters and image topography. Hydrogen atoms are shown to provide the conduit for the tunneling current through the alkyl chains.

  7. Atomic structures of silicene layers grown on Ag(111): scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy observations.

    PubMed

    Resta, Andrea; Leoni, Thomas; Barth, Clemens; Ranguis, Alain; Becker, Conrad; Bruhn, Thomas; Vogt, Patrick; Le Lay, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Silicene, the considered equivalent of graphene for silicon, has been recently synthesized on Ag(111) surfaces. Following the tremendous success of graphene, silicene might further widen the horizon of two-dimensional materials with new allotropes artificially created. Due to stronger spin-orbit coupling, lower group symmetry and different chemistry compared to graphene, silicene presents many new interesting features. Here, we focus on very important aspects of silicene layers on Ag(111): First, we present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM) observations of the major structures of single layer and bi-layer silicene in epitaxy with Ag(111). For the (3 × 3) reconstructed first silicene layer nc-AFM represents the same lateral arrangement of silicene atoms as STM and therefore provides a timely experimental confirmation of the current picture of the atomic silicene structure. Furthermore, both nc-AFM and STM give a unifying interpretation of the second layer (√3 × √3)R ± 30° structure. Finally, we give support to the conjectured possible existence of less stable, ~2% stressed, (√7 × √7)R ± 19.1° rotated silicene domains in the first layer.

  8. HAAD: A quick algorithm for accurate prediction of hydrogen atoms in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqi; Roy, Ambrish; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-20

    Hydrogen constitutes nearly half of all atoms in proteins and their positions are essential for analyzing hydrogen-bonding interactions and refining atomic-level structures. However, most protein structures determined by experiments or computer prediction lack hydrogen coordinates. We present a new algorithm, HAAD, to predict the positions of hydrogen atoms based on the positions of heavy atoms. The algorithm is built on the basic rules of orbital hybridization followed by the optimization of steric repulsion and electrostatic interactions. We tested the algorithm using three independent data sets: ultra-high-resolution X-ray structures, structures determined by neutron diffraction, and NOE proton-proton distances. Compared with the widely used programs CHARMM and REDUCE, HAAD has a significantly higher accuracy, with the average RMSD of the predicted hydrogen atoms to the X-ray and neutron diffraction structures decreased by 26% and 11%, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen atoms placed by HAAD have more matches with the NOE restraints and fewer clashes with heavy atoms. The average CPU cost by HAAD is 18 and 8 times lower than that of CHARMM and REDUCE, respectively. The significant advantage of HAAD in both the accuracy and the speed of the hydrogen additions should make HAAD a useful tool for the detailed study of protein structure and function. Both an executable and the source code of HAAD are freely available at http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/HAAD.

  9. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of two new blue luminescent pyridylbenzimidazole zinc(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Matthew R; Geiger, David K

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent metal complexes are used in photooptical devices. Zinc(II) complexes are of interest because of the ability to tune their color, their high thermal stability and their favorable carrier transport character. In particular, some zinc(II) complexes with aryl diimine and/or heterocyclic ligands have been shown to emit brightly in the blue region of the spectrum. Zinc(II) complexes bearing derivatized imidazoles have been explored for possible optoelectronic applications. The structures of two zinc(II) complexes of 5,6-dimethyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1-[(pyridin-2-yl)methyl]-1H-benzimidazole (L), namely dichlorido(dimethylformamide-κO){5,6-dimethyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl-κN)-1-[(pyridin-2-yl)methyl]-1H-benzimidazole-κN(3)}zinc(II) dimethylformamide monosolvate, [ZnCl2(C20H18N4)(C3H7NO)]·C3H7NO, (I), and bis(acetato-κ(2)O,O'){5,6-dimethyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl-κN)-1-[(pyridin-2-yl)methyl]-1H-benzimidazole-κN(3)}zinc(II) ethanol monosolvate, [Zn(C2H3O2)2(C20H18N4)]·C2H5OH, (II), are reported. Complex (I) crystallized as a dimethylformamide solvate and exhibits a distorted trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry. The coordination sphere consists of a bidentate L ligand spanning axial to equatorial sites, two chloride ligands in equatorial sites, and an O-bound dimethylformamide ligand in the remaining axial site. The other complex, (II), crystallized as an ethanol solvate. The Zn(II) atom has a distorted trigonal prismatic coordination geometry, with two bidentate acetate ligands occupying two edges and a bidentate L ligand occupying the third edge of the prism. Complexes (I) and (II) emit in the blue region of the spectrum. The results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the luminescence of L results from π*←π transitions and that the luminescence of the complexes results from interligand charge-transfer transitions. The orientation of the 2-(pyridin-2-yl) substituent with respect to the benzimidazole system was found to have an impact on

  10. In vitro heavy-atom effect of palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes of pyrrolidine-fused chlorin in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Obata, Makoto; Hirohara, Shiho; Tanaka, Rika; Kinoshita, Isamu; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Tanihara, Masao; Yano, Shigenobu

    2009-05-14

    Introduction of a heavy atom into photosensitizers generally facilitates intersystem crossing and improves the quantum yield (Phi(Delta)) of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), which is a key species in photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, little information is available about the physiological importance of this heavy-atom effect. The aim of this study is to examine the heavy-atom effect in simple metallochlorins in vitro at the cellular level. 1,3-Dipolar cycloaddition of azomethine ylide to 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrinato palladium(II) and platinum(II) afforded metallochlorins 4b and 4c in yields of 17.1 and 12.9%, respectively. The Phi(Delta) values increased in the order of 4a (0.28) < 4b (0.89) < 4c (0.92) in C(6)D(6). The photocytotoxicity of 4a, 4b, and 4c was evaluated in HeLa cells at a light dose of 16 J x cm(-2) with lambda > 500 nm and increased in the order of 4a < 4b < 4c at the concentration of 0.5 microM. The photocytotoxicity of 4b and 4c was significantly inhibited by addition of sodium azide, but not D-mannitol, suggesting that (1)O(2) is the major species causing cell death. Our results clearly indicate that 4b and 4c act as efficient (1)O(2) generators due to the heavy-atom effect in a cellular microenvironment as well as in nonphysiological media. PMID:19378972

  11. Identifying Atomic Structure as a Threshold Concept: Student Mental Models and Troublesomeness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun Jung; Light, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Atomic theory or the nature of matter is a principal concept in science and science education. This has, however, been complicated by the difficulty students have in learning the concept and the subsequent construction of many alternative models. To understand better the conceptual barriers to learning atomic structure, this study explores the…

  12. Arguments, Contradictions, Resistances, and Conceptual Change in Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Aguilera, Damarys; Maza, Arelys; Liendo, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study aimed at facilitating freshman general chemistry students' understanding of atomic structure based on the work of Thomson, Rutherford, and Bohr. Hypothesizes that classroom discussions based on arguments/counterarguments of the heuristic principles on which these scientists based their atomic models can facilitate students'…

  13. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Spectra Properties of the Cadmium (II) Complex with Bis(N-allylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huilu; Yuan, Jingkun; Bai, Ying; Kou, Fan; Jia, Fei; Liu, Bin

    2011-01-01

    A novel complex of cadmium (II) picrate (pic) with V-shaped ligand bis(N-allylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine (babb), with composition [Cd(babb)2](pic)2, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses and electrical conductivity, IR, and UV/visible spectra. The crystal structure of the complex has been determined by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In the complex, the coordination sphere around Cd (II) is distorted octahedral, six nitrogen atoms involved in coordination afforded by two tridentate ligand babb. Moreover, The DNA-binding properties of the ligand babb and Cd (II) complex were investigated by spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements, and the results suggest that they bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode, and the Cd (II) complex shows higher affinity than the ligand. PMID:22007154

  14. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Deepjyoti; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  15. Preconcentration of Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) using an Optimized Enrichment Procedure: Useful and Alternative Methodology for Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tokay, Feyzullah; Bağdat, Sema

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new solid phase extraction procedure is described for Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). Silica gel which was coated with N,N'-bis(4-methoxysalicylidene) ethylenediamine (MSE) is used as a sorbent. Three independent variables were optimized using central composite design (CCD) for sorption and elution of metal ions. The optimum values of sorption and elution variables allowed simultaneous preconcentration of the ions in same conditions as follows, for sorption, pH 6.9, flow rate 5.4 mL min(-1), sample volume 50.0 mL, and for elution, flow rate 2.6 mL min(-1), eluent concentration 1.0 mol L(-1), eluent volume 5.0 mL. The detection limits (LOD) were found to be 1.1 µg L(-1) for Cu(II), 7.4 µg L(-1) for Co(II), and 7.5 µg L(-1) for Ni(II) and preconcentration factor was 200 for each of the ions. The accuracy of the method was tested with Lake Ontario water and multi-element standard solution. The proposed method was also applied to various water samples. The proposed method can be alternatively suggested as accurate, precise, easy, and a cheap method for Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) determination. PMID:26823544

  16. Structural characterization of a metal-based perfusion tracer: copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone).

    PubMed

    John, E; Fanwick, P E; McKenzie, A T; Stowell, J G; Green, M A

    1989-01-01

    Copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone), Cu(PTSM), has been obtained as a dark red crystalline solid from EtOH-DMSO solvent mixture and structurally characterized by x-ray crystallography. The molecule possesses the expected pseudo-square planar N2S2 metal coordination sphere; however, the copper center also interacts through its axial coordination site with the sulfur atom of an adjacent Cu(PTSM) molecule in the crystal lattice. The structure of this compound is compared with the structures of other metal complexes that have been proposed in the nuclear medicine literature as perfusion tracers. PMID:2621114

  17. TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE AND METALLICITY IN H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Monica; GarcIa-Rojas, Jorge E-mail: jogarcia@iac.e

    2010-01-10

    The metallicities implied by collisionally excited lines (CELs) of heavy elements in H II regions are systematically lower than those implied by recombination lines (RLs) by factors of approx2, introducing uncertainties of the same order in the metallicities inferred for the interstellar medium of any star-forming galaxy. Most explanations of this discrepancy are based on the different sensitivities of CELs and RLs to electron temperature, and invoke either some extra heating mechanism producing temperature fluctuations in the ionized region or the addition of cold gas in metal-rich inclusions or ionized by cosmic rays or X-rays. These explanations will change the temperature structure of the ionized gas from the one predicted by simple photoionization models, and depending on which one is correct, will imply different metallicities for the emitting gas. We select nine H II regions with observed spectra of high quality and show that simple models with metallicities close to the ones implied by oxygen CELs reproduce easily their temperature structure, measured with T{sub e}([N II])/T{sub e}([O III]), and their oxygen CELs emission. We discuss the strong constraints that this agreement places on the possible explanations of the discrepancy and suggest that the simplest explanation, namely errors in the line recombination coefficients by factors approx2, might be the correct one. In such case, CELs will provide the best estimates of metallicity.

  18. The structure of N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine and its complexes with Zn(II) and Cd(II).

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Alvaro S; Reisinger, Sandra A; Fernandes, Manuel A; Perry, Christopher B; Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Marques, Helder M

    2009-12-14

    The crystal structure of the nitrate salt of N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-ethane-1,2-diamine (BHEEN), and its complex with Zn(II) and Cd(II) are reported. (H(2)BHEEN)(NO(3))(2) packs in a layered structure with a herringbone pattern within each layer arising from H-bonding between amino and alcohol protons and NO(3)(-) counterions. In [Zn(BHEEN)(2)]Cl(2), each ligand coordinates to Zn(II) through its two N-donors producing a distorted tetrahedral geometry at the metal centre. The two hydroxyethyl arms of each ligand are trans to each other and the crystals obtained contained a racemic mixture of the bis-trans-R,R and the bis-trans-S,S isomers. All four hydroxyl groups are H-bonded to chloride counter ions, creating a layered structure. Whilst distant from the metal ion (average 3.00 A), the four O atoms of the pendent hydroxylamino groups appear positioned to interact with the metal. The orientation of the arms is preserved in a B3LYP gas phase calculation of the structure. An analysis using Bader's Atoms in Molecules indicates that the Zn-N bonds are predominantly ionic with some covalent character and that there is a weak interaction between the metal and the hydroxyl groups. Several other weak interactions including four O...HN, five O...HC and a H-H dihydrogen bond were identified. The Cd(II) complex of BHEEN crystallised as a dimer [(mu-Cl)(2)(Cd(BHEEN)Cl)(2))] with two asymmetrically-bound bridging Cl(-) ligands and a terminally-coordinated Cl(-) on each metal ion. One hydroxyl group of each ligand is coordinated to the metal and the uncoordinated hydroxyl group is H-bonded to the H atom of the coordinated hydroxyl group of the second ligand in the complex. The ESI-MS spectrum shows the presence of di-cadmium complexes, but the most intense peaks are due to mono-cadmium complexes. The gas phase B3LYP structure of the dimer energy-minimises into two monomers and the longer bond between Cd(II) and bridging Cl(-) breaks. Hence, dimerisation may be a consequence of

  19. The structure of orange HgI2. II. Diamond-type structure and twinning.

    PubMed

    Hostettler, Marc; Schwarzenbach, Dieter

    2002-12-01

    The metastable orange crystals of HgI(2) comprise three different crystal structures all of which are built from corner-linked Hg(4)I(10) supertetrahedra. Two of the structures are end members with the maximum degree of order (MDO) of a polytypic layer structure. In this paper, the third structure (D) determined from X-ray diffraction, a crystal chemical discussion of the four known tetrahedral HgI(2) structures, and a twinning model are presented. All the various diffraction results published during the past 70 years are now explained. The Hg(4)I(10) supertetrahedra of the tetragonal structure D are corner-linked into two interpenetrating diamond-type networks. The stable red form and the three orange structures show the same cubic densest packing of I atoms and differ only in the distribution of Hg atoms in the tetrahedral voids. Transformations between the structures may involve only movements of Hg atoms, as implied by larger thermal displacement parameters of Hg than of I. A multiply twinned conglomerate of MDO1, MDO2 and D, each structure occurring in three orientations, results in metrically cubic crystals whose Bragg reflections are very close to reciprocal lattice points.

  20. One-dimensional Co(II)/Ni(II) complexes of 2-hydroxyisophthalate: Structures and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Zou, Hua-Hong; Chen, Zi-Lu; Zhang, Zhong; Sun, Wei-Yin; Liang, Fu-Pei

    2015-03-15

    The solvothermal reactions of 2-hydroxyisophthalic acid (H{sub 3}ipO) with M(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}∙6H{sub 2}O (M=Co, Ni) afforded two complexes [Co{sub 2}(HipO){sub 2}(Py){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and [Ni(HipO)(Py)H{sub 2}O] (2) (Py=pyridine). They exhibit similar zig-zag chain structures with the adjacent two metal centers connected by a anti-syn bridging carboxylate group from the HipO{sup 2−} ligand. The magnetic measurements reveal the dominant antiferromagnetic interactions and spin-canting in 1 while ferromagnetic interactions in 2. Both of them exhibit magnetocaloric effect (MCE) with the resulting entropy changes (−ΔS{sub m}) of 12.51 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} when ΔH=50 kOe at 3 K for 1 and 11.01 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} when ΔH=50 kOe at 3 K for 2, representing the rare examples of one-dimensional complexes with MCE. - Graphical abstract: Synopsis: Two Co(II)/Ni(II) complexes with zig-zag chain structures have been reported. 1-Co shows cant-antiferromagnetism while 2-Ni shows ferromagnetism. Magnetocaloric effect is also found in both of them. - Highlights: • Two one-dimensional Co(II)/Ni(II) complexes were solvothermally synthesized. • The Co-complex exhibits canted antiferromagnetism. • The Ni-complex exhibits ferromagnetism. • Both of the complexes display magnetocaloric effect.

  1. Voronoia4RNA--a database of atomic packing densities of RNA structures and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Ismer, Jochen; Rose, Alexander S; Tiemann, Johanna K S; Goede, Andrean; Rother, Kristian; Hildebrand, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    Voronoia4RNA (http://proteinformatics.charite.de/voronoia4rna/) is a structural database storing precalculated atomic volumes, atomic packing densities (PDs) and coordinates of internal cavities for currently 1869 RNAs and RNA-protein complexes. Atomic PDs are a measure for van der Waals interactions. Regions of low PD, containing water-sized internal cavities, refer to local structure flexibility or compressibility. RNA molecules build up the skeleton of large molecular machineries such as ribosomes or form smaller flexible structures such as riboswitches. The wealth of structural data on RNAs and their complexes allows setting up representative data sets and analysis of their structural features. We calculated atomic PDs from atomic volumes determined by the Voronoi cell method and internal cavities analytically by Delaunay triangulation. Reference internal PD values were derived from a non-redundant sub-data set of buried atoms. Comparison of internal PD values shows that RNA is more tightly packed than proteins. Finally, the relation between structure size, resolution and internal PD of the Voronoia4RNA entries is discussed. RNA, protein structures and their complexes can be visualized by the Jmol-based viewer Provi. Variations in PD are depicted by a color code. Internal cavities are represented by their molecular boundaries or schematically as balls.

  2. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen bonding between water and platinum(II): an atom in molecule (AIM) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Guiqiu; Chen, Dezhan

    2012-02-01

    Recently, Rizzato et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 7440 (2010)] [1] reported a hydrogen-bonding-like interaction between a water molecule and a d8 metal ion (PtII) based on neutron diffraction, and provided the first crystallographic evidence for this interaction. We studied the hydrogen bonding of the O-H ... Pt interaction theoretically using atoms in molecule (AIM) and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) in the crystallographic geometries. The method used density functional theory (DFT) with the hybrid B3LYP function. For platinum atoms, we used the Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-Double-Zeta (LANL2DZ) basis set, and for the other atoms we used 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Criteria based on a topological analysis of the electron density were used in order to characterize the nature of interactions in the complexes. The main purpose of the present work is to provide an answer to the following questions: Why can a filled d orbital of square-planar d8 metal ions such as platinum(II) also act as hydrogen-bond acceptors? Can a study based on the electron charge density answer this question? A good correlation between the density at the intermolecular bond critical point and the energy interaction was found. The interaction is mainly closed-shell and there is some charge transfer in this system.

  3. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  4. An intramolecular antiferromagnetically coupled pentanuclear Mn(II) cluster containing acetate and tetracarboxylate linkers: Synthesis, structure and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Liu, Wei-Cong; Wu, Xi-Ren; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Yadav, Reena; Kumar, Abhinav

    2016-06-01

    A new Mn(II) complex {[Mn5(CH3COO)2(L)2(DMF)8](DMF)}n (1), (H4L = 3,5-bis(3‧,5‧-dicarboxylphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole), has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The complex 1 have pentanuclear Mn(II) core, where the two sides of metal centers (Mn2 and Mn3) have trigonal bipyramidal arrangement and the middle metal center (Mn1) have octahedral environment utilizing two O atoms from adjacent bridging bidentate carboxylate groups and four O atoms from four coordinated DMF molecules. The planar arrangement of pentanuclear Mn(II) atoms are linked by L linkage to generate two dimensional sheet. The magnetic property of the compound indicates χMT value for the five Mn(II) unit to be 21.3 cm3 K mol-1 at 300 K, which is close to the spin-only value (21.9 cm3 K mol-1) for the pentamer having S = 5/2. Also, the Hirshfeld surface analyses have been performed which indicated the absence of weak Mn···Mn interaction thereby corroborating the results of observed magnetic properties.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization and Thermal Studies of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) Complexes of N-Methyl-N-Phenyldithiocarbamate: The Single Crystal Structure of [(C6H5)(CH3)NCS2]4Hg2

    PubMed Central

    Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes of N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectral studies (IR, 1H and 13C-NMR). The single crystal X-ray structure of the mercury complex revealed that the complex contains a Hg centre with a distorted tetrahedral coordination sphere in which the dinuclear Hg complex resides on a crystallographic inversion centre and each Hg atom is coordinated to four S atoms from the dithiocarbamate moiety. One dithiocarbamate ligand acts as chelating ligand while the other acts as chelating bridging ligand between two Hg atoms, resulting in a dinuclear eight-member ring. The course of the thermal degradation of the complexes has been investigated using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis of the complexes show a single weight loss to give MS (M = Zn, Cd, Hg) indicating that they might be useful as single source precursors for the synthesis of MS nanoparticles and thin films. PMID:21673933

  6. Semiempirical Studies of Atomic Structure. Final Report for July 1, 2000 - June 30, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, L. J.

    2004-05-01

    This project has developed a comprehensive and reliable base of accurate atomic structure data for complex many-electron systems. This has been achieved through the use of sensitive data-based parametric systematizations, precise experimental measurements, and supporting theoretical computations. The atomic properties studies involved primary data (wavelengths, frequency intervals, lifetimes, relative intensities, production rates, etc.) and derived structural parameters (energy levels, ionization potentials, line strengths, electric polarizabilities, branching fractions, excitation functions, etc).

  7. On the reproducibility of protein crystal structures: five atomic resolution structures of trypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Dauter, Miroslawa; Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2013-08-01

    Details of five very high-resolution accurate structures of bovine trypsin are compared in the context of the reproducibility of models obtained from crystals grown under identical conditions. Structural studies of proteins usually rely on a model obtained from one crystal. By investigating the details of this model, crystallographers seek to obtain insight into the function of the macromolecule. It is therefore important to know which details of a protein structure are reproducible or to what extent they might differ. To address this question, the high-resolution structures of five crystals of bovine trypsin obtained under analogous conditions were compared. Global parameters and structural details were investigated. All of the models were of similar quality and the pairwise merged intensities had large correlation coefficients. The C{sup α} and backbone atoms of the structures superposed very well. The occupancy of ligands in regions of low thermal motion was reproducible, whereas solvent molecules containing heavier atoms (such as sulfur) or those located on the surface could differ significantly. The coordination lengths of the calcium ion were conserved. A large proportion of the multiple conformations refined to similar occupancies and the residues adopted similar orientations. More than three quarters of the water-molecule sites were conserved within 0.5 Å and more than one third were conserved within 0.1 Å. An investigation of the protonation states of histidine residues and carboxylate moieties was consistent for all of the models. Radiation-damage effects to disulfide bridges were observed for the same residues and to similar extents. Main-chain bond lengths and angles averaged to similar values and were in agreement with the Engh and Huber targets. Other features, such as peptide flips and the double conformation of the inhibitor molecule, were also reproducible in all of the trypsin structures. Therefore, many details are similar in models obtained

  8. Local structure of the metal-organic perovskite dimethylammonium manganese(ii) formate.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Helen D; Dove, Martin T; Keen, David A; Phillips, Anthony E

    2016-03-14

    We report total neutron scattering measurements on the metal-organic perovskite analogue dimethylammonium manganese(ii) formate, (CD3)2ND2[Mn(DCO2)3]. Reverse Monte Carlo modelling shows that, in both the disordered high-temperature and ordered low-temperature phases, the ammonium moiety forms substantially shorter hydrogen bonds (N...O = 2.4 Å and 2.6 Å) than are visible in the average crystal structures. These bonds result from a pincer-like motion of two adjacent formate ions about the dimethylammonium ion in such a way that the framework can adjust independently to the positions of nearest-neighbour dimethylammonium ions. At low temperatures the shortest hydrogen bond is less favourable, apparently because it involves a greater distortion of the framework. Furthermore, in the high-temperature phase, in addition to the three disordered nitrogen positions expected from the average crystal structure, there appear to be also smaller probability maxima between these positions, corresponding to orientations in which the dimethylammonium is hydrogen-bonded to the two oxygen atoms of a single formate ion. The spontaneous strain across the phase transition reveals a contraction of the framework about the dimethylammonium cation, continuing as the material is cooled below the transition temperature. These results provide direct evidence of the local atomic structure of the guest-framework hydrogen bonding, and in particular the distortions of the framework responsible for the phase transition in this system. PMID:26763144

  9. Crystal structure of cis-diamminebis(nitrito-κN)platinum(II)

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, Volker; Gelbrich, Thomas; Tessadri, Richard; Klauser, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of cis-[Pt(NO2)2(NH3)2], were obtained by means of hyper­saturation directly out of a plating electrolyte. The square-planar coordination environment of the divalent PtII atom is formed by four N atoms belonging to two ammine and two monodentate nitrite ligands. The ligands adopt a cis configuration. The crystal structure contains stacks of close-packed mol­ecules which run parallel to [001]. There are nine crystallographically independent inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a hydrogen-bonded hxl-type framework in which each mol­ecule serves as an eight-connected node. Four of the nine distinct hydrogen bonds connect complexes which belong to the same close-packed column parallel to [001]. In contrast to the previously reported crystal structure of the trans isomer, the title structure does not display intra­molecular hydrogen bonding. PMID:26029392

  10. Novel Features of Eukaryotic Photosystem II Revealed by Its Crystal Structure Analysis from a Red Alga.

    PubMed

    Ago, Hideo; Adachi, Hideyuki; Umena, Yasufumi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo; Tian, Lirong; Han, Guangye; Kuang, Tingyun; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa; Enami, Isao; Miyano, Masashi; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-03-11

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes light-induced water splitting, leading to the evolution of molecular oxygen indispensible for life on the earth. The crystal structure of PSII from cyanobacteria has been solved at an atomic level, but the structure of eukaryotic PSII has not been analyzed. Because eukaryotic PSII possesses additional subunits not found in cyanobacterial PSII, it is important to solve the structure of eukaryotic PSII to elucidate their detailed functions, as well as evolutionary relationships. Here we report the structure of PSII from a red alga Cyanidium caldarium at 2.76 Å resolution, which revealed the structure and interaction sites of PsbQ', a unique, fourth extrinsic protein required for stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex in the lumenal surface of PSII. The PsbQ' subunit was found to be located underneath CP43 in the vicinity of PsbV, and its structure is characterized by a bundle of four up-down helices arranged in a similar way to those of cyanobacterial and higher plant PsbQ, although helices I and II of PsbQ' were kinked relative to its higher plant counterpart because of its interactions with CP43. Furthermore, two novel transmembrane helices were found in the red algal PSII that are not present in cyanobacterial PSII; one of these helices may correspond to PsbW found only in eukaryotic PSII. The present results represent the first crystal structure of PSII from eukaryotic oxygenic organisms, which were discussed in comparison with the structure of cyanobacterial PSII.

  11. Putting structure into context: fitting of atomic models into electron microscopic and electron tomographic reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels

    2012-02-01

    A complete understanding of complex dynamic cellular processes such as cell migration or cell adhesion requires the integration of atomic level structural information into the larger cellular context. While direct atomic-level information at the cellular level remains inaccessible, electron microscopy, electron tomography and their associated computational image processing approaches have now matured to a point where sub-cellular structures can be imaged in three dimensions at the nanometer scale. Atomic-resolution information obtained by other means can be combined with this data to obtain three-dimensional models of large macromolecular assemblies in their cellular context. This article summarizes some recent advances in this field.

  12. Progress towards a precision measurement of the n=2 triplet P fine structure of atomic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; Fitzakerley, D. W.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report progress on the measurement of the J = 1 to J = 2 23 P fine-structure interval of atomic helium. The measurement uses a liquid-nitrogen-cooled DC discharge source of metastable helium and the atomic beam is laser cooled in the transverse directions. The atoms are excited to 23 P by a 1083-nm diode laser, and the fine-structure transition is driven by microwaves using the frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique. The transition is detected by further laser excitation to a Rydberg state, followed by Stark ionization. This work is supported by NSERC, CRC.

  13. STM study of the atomic structure of the icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, T.; Fournée, V.; Lograsso, T.; Ross, A.; Thiel, P. A.

    2002-04-01

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the atomic structure of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Studies show that large, atomically flat terraces feature many ten-petal ``flowers'' with internal structure. The observed flower patterns can be associated with features on Al rich dense atomic planes generated from two-dimensional cuts of bulk models based on x-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The results confirm that the fivefold surface of i-Al-Cu-Fe corresponds to a bulk-terminated plane.

  14. Atomic Structure of Highly Strained BiFeO3 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Rossell, M.D.; Erni, R.; Prange, Micah P; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Luo, Weidong; Zeches, R J; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Ramesh, R

    2012-01-01

    We determine the atomic structure of the pseudotetragonal T phase and the pseudorhombohedral R phase in highly strained multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films by using a combination of atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The coordination of the Fe atoms and their displacement relative to the O and Bi positions are assessed by direct imaging. These observations allow us to interpret the electronic structure data derived from electron energy-loss spectroscopy and provide evidence for the giant spontaneous polarization in strained BiFeO3 thin films.

  15. Structure determination in 55-atom Li-Na and Na-K nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Andrés; López, José M

    2010-09-01

    The structure of 55-atom Li-Na and Na-K nanoalloys is determined through combined empirical potential (EP) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The potential energy surface generated by the EP model is extensively sampled by using the basin hopping technique, and a wide diversity of structural motifs is reoptimized at the DFT level. A composition comparison technique is applied at the DFT level in order to make a final refinement of the global minimum structures. For dilute concentrations of one of the alkali atoms, the structure of the pure metal cluster, namely, a perfect Mackay icosahedron, remains stable, with the minority component atoms entering the host cluster as substitutional impurities. At intermediate concentrations, the nanoalloys adopt instead a core-shell polyicosahedral (p-Ih) packing, where the element with smaller atomic size and larger cohesive energy segregates to the cluster core. The p-Ih structures show a marked prolate deformation, in agreement with the predictions of jelliumlike models. The electronic preference for a prolate cluster shape, which is frustrated in the 55-atom pure clusters due to the icosahedral geometrical shell closing, is therefore realized only in the 55-atom nanoalloys. An analysis of the electronic densities of states suggests that photoelectron spectroscopy would be a sufficiently sensitive technique to assess the structures of nanoalloys with fixed size and varying compositions.

  16. Control of oxygen atom chirality and chelate ring conformation by protected/free sugar hydroxyl groups in glucose-pendant dipicolylamine-copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Mikata, Yuji; Sugai, Yuko; Yano, Shigenobu

    2004-08-01

    A pair of copper(II) complexes 1 and 2 exhibit an enantiomeric chiral center at the oxygen atom that coordinates to the metal center. The configurations of the oxygen atom chirality and the chelate ring conformation are simply controlled by protected/free hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety, yielding mirror image CD spectra. In this system, repulsive and attractive forces are used to regulate chirality on the copper-coordinated oxygen atom both in the solid state and in solution.

  17. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  18. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  19. Atomic structural features of dopant segregated grain boundary complexions in alumina by EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Shantanu Kumar

    The primary objective of this undertaking was to characterize the atomic structural features of dopant-segregated interfaces in a (pseudo) single phase microstructure and relate the same to atomic diffusion in the grain boundaries. Alumina was chosen as a model host system based on prior observations of grain boundary complexions in this system by electron microscopy. Two types of dopant chemistry were selected that are known to produce dramatically different microstructural behavior in alumina. These were, (i) rare earth element doping (Y) and (ii) Y-Si co-doping in alumina. In Y-doped alumina microstructures, different Gibbsian excess of the segregated dopant has been known to produce two distinct types of interface complexions. On the other hand, three distinct types of disordered grain boundary complexions have been observed in Y-Si codoped alumina. A quantitative grain growth study was performed in dense microstructures of these materials and different kinetic regimes of boundary mobility were identified. Subsequently, samples annealed at various temperatures were quenched to preserve the grain boundary structure and characterized using synchrotron extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) at the Y K-edge. Distinct local structural features of the dopant segregation induced interface phases were observed and were used to distinguish between each of the complexion types. Computation of EXAFS spectra of theoretical clusters by ab initio methods and fitting the same with experimental data identified several types of interface complexions including: (i) sub-monolayer adsorption, where oversized isovalent dopants (Y) occupy substitutional cation sites at the grain boundary core and reduce the interface energy, (ii) saturation of dopants at the interface leading to bilayer adsorption, where dopants (Y) substitute host cations on both sides of the boundary interpolating into the crystals, (iii) multilayered adsorption, where a pseudo

  20. Crystal structure of a eukaryotic group II intron lariat

    PubMed Central

    Robart, Aaron R.; Chan, Russell T.; Peters, Jessica K.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Toor, Navtej

    2014-01-01

    The formation of branched lariat RNA is an evolutionarily conserved feature of splicing reactions for both group II and spliceosomal introns. The lariat is important for the fidelity of 5′ splice site selection and consists of a 2′-5′ phosphodiester bond between a bulged adenosine and the 5′ end of the intron. To gain insight into this ubiquitous intramolecular linkage, we determined the crystal structure of a eukaryotic group IIB intron in the lariat form at 3.7 Å. This revealed that two tandem tetraloop-receptor interactions, η-η’ and π-π’, place domain VI in the core to position the lariat bond in the post-catalytic state. Based on structural and biochemical data, we propose that π-π’ is a dynamic interaction that mediates the transition between the two steps of splicing, with η-η’ serving an ancillary role. The structure also reveals a four-magnesium-ion cluster involved in both catalysis and positioning of the 5′ end. Given the evolutionary relationship between group II and nuclear introns, it is likely that this active site configuration exists in the spliceosome as well. PMID:25252982

  1. Adhesion and Atomic Structures of Gold on Ceria Nanostructures: The Role of Surface Structure and Oxidation State of Ceria Supports.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuyuan; Wu, Zili; Wen, Jianguo; Ding, Kunlun; Yang, Xiaoyun; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R; Marks, Laurence D

    2015-08-12

    We report an aberration-corrected electron microscopy analysis of the adhesion and atomic structures of gold nanoparticle catalysts supported on ceria nanocubes and nanorods. Under oxidative conditions, the as-prepared gold nanoparticles on the ceria nanocubes have extended atom layers at the metal-support interface. In contrast, regular gold nanoparticles and rafts are present on the ceria nanorod supports. Under the reducing conditions of water-gas shift reaction, the extended gold atom layers and rafts vanish. In addition, the gold particles on the nanocubes change in morphology and increase in size while those on the nanorods are almost unchanged. The size, morphology, and atomic interface structures of gold strongly depend on the surface structures of ceria supports ((100) surface versus (111) surface) and the reaction environment (reductive versus oxidative). These findings provide insights into the deactivation mechanisms and the shape-dependent catalysis of oxide supported metal catalysts.

  2. Structural Fluctuations and Thermophysical Properties of Molten II-VI Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Zhu, Shen; Li, Chao; Scripa, R.; Lehoczky, Sandra L.; Kim, Y. W.; Baird, J. K.; Lin, B.; Ban, Heng; Benmore, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the project are to conduct ground-based experimental and theoretical research on the structural fluctuations and thermophysical properties of molten II-VI compounds to enhance the basic understanding of the existing flight experiments in microgravity materials science programs as well as to study the fundamental heterophase fluctuation phenomena in these melts by: 1) conducting neutron scattering analysis and measuring quantitatively the relevant thermophysical properties of the II-VI melts (such as viscosity, electrical conductivity, thermal diffusivity and density) as well as the relaxation characteristics of these properties to advance the understanding of the structural properties and the relaxation phenomena in these melts and 2) performing theoretical analyses on the melt systems to interpret the experimental results. All the facilities required for the experimental measurements have been procured, installed and tested. It has long been recognized that liquid Te presents a unique case having properties between those of metals and semiconductors. The electrical conductivity for Te melt increases rapidly at melting point, indicating a semiconductor-metal transition. Te melts comprise two features, which are usually considered to be incompatible with each other: covalently bound atoms and metallic-like behavior. Why do Te liquids show metallic behavior? is one of the long-standing issues in liquid metal physics. Since thermophysical properties are very sensitive to the structural variations of a melt, we have conducted extensive thermophysical measurements on Te melt.

  3. Atomic structures and oxygen dynamics of CeO2 grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bin; Sugiyama, Issei; Hojo, Hajime; Ohta, Hiromichi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Material performance is significantly governed by grain boundaries (GBs), a typical crystal defects inside, which often exhibit unique properties due to the structural and chemical inhomogeneity. Here, it is reported direct atomic scale evidence that oxygen vacancies formed in the GBs can modify the local surface oxygen dynamics in CeO2, a key material for fuel cells. The atomic structures and oxygen vacancy concentrations in individual GBs are obtained by electron microscopy and theoretical calculations at atomic scale. Meanwhile, local GB oxygen reduction reactivity is measured by electrochemical strain microscopy. By combining these techniques, it is demonstrated that the GB electrochemical activities are affected by the oxygen vacancy concentrations, which is, on the other hand, determined by the local structural distortions at the GB core region. These results provide critical understanding of GB properties down to atomic scale, and new perspectives on the development strategies of high performance electrochemical devices for solid oxide fuel cells.

  4. Atomic structures and oxygen dynamics of CeO2 grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Sugiyama, Issei; Hojo, Hajime; Ohta, Hiromichi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Material performance is significantly governed by grain boundaries (GBs), a typical crystal defects inside, which often exhibit unique properties due to the structural and chemical inhomogeneity. Here, it is reported direct atomic scale evidence that oxygen vacancies formed in the GBs can modify the local surface oxygen dynamics in CeO2, a key material for fuel cells. The atomic structures and oxygen vacancy concentrations in individual GBs are obtained by electron microscopy and theoretical calculations at atomic scale. Meanwhile, local GB oxygen reduction reactivity is measured by electrochemical strain microscopy. By combining these techniques, it is demonstrated that the GB electrochemical activities are affected by the oxygen vacancy concentrations, which is, on the other hand, determined by the local structural distortions at the GB core region. These results provide critical understanding of GB properties down to atomic scale, and new perspectives on the development strategies of high performance electrochemical devices for solid oxide fuel cells. PMID:26838958

  5. Magnetic-field effects in transitions of X Li molecules (X: even isotopes of group II atoms)

    SciTech Connect

    Gopakumar, Geetha; Abe, Minori; Hada, Masahiko; Kajita, Masatoshi

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the Zeeman shift in the (v,N)=(0,0){yields}(1,0) transition frequency of X Li molecules (X: even isotopes of group II atoms), which is of interest in metrology. The Zeeman shift in the transition frequency between stretching states is found to be less than 1 mHz with a magnetic field of 1 G. X {sup 6}Li molecules are more advantageous than X {sup 7}Li molecules for measuring the transition frequency without the Zeeman shift because of the smaller g factor of the Li nuclear spin.

  6. Prediction of structural and mechanical properties of atom-decorated porous graphene via density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Reza; Ajori, Shahram; Malakpour, Sina

    2016-04-01

    The considerable demand for novel materials with specific properties has motivated the researchers to synthesize supramolecular nanostructures through different methods. Porous graphene is the first two-dimensional hydrocarbon synthesized quite recently. This investigation is aimed at studying the mechanical properties of atom-decorated (functionalized) porous graphene by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculation within both local density approximations (LDA) and generalized gradient approximations (GGA). The atoms are selected from period 3 of periodic table as well as Li and O atom from period 2. The results reveal that metallic atoms and noble gases are adsorbed physically on porous graphene and nonmetallic ones form chemical bonds with carbon atom in porous graphene structure. Also, it is shown that, in general, atom decoration reduces the values of mechanical properties such as Young's, bulk and shear moduli as well as Poisson's ratio, and this reduction is more considerable in the case of nonmetallic atoms (chemical adsorption), especially oxygen atoms, as compared to metallic atoms and noble gases (physical adsorption).

  7. Visualization of the atomic structure of solid solutions with the NaCl structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanov, Yu. A.; Ponomarev, D. A.; Ustinov, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown how an atomic cluster for a solid solution with a rock salt structure can be constructed using the Pauling model. Simulation has been performed for 343000 ions of Ni x Zn1 - x O3 ( x = 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0) oxide substitutional solid solutions. Coordinates of all cluster ions are obtained and distribution functions of ion pairs (Ni-O, Ni-Ni, Ni-Zn, Zn-Zn, Zn-O, O-O) are constructed as functions of distance. The shape of the normal distribution indicates the existence of bounded chaos in the system of oxide solid solutions. The width of the Gaussian distribution function is determined by the difference of metal ionic radii. The results are in agreement with both X-ray diffraction and EXAFS spectroscopy data.

  8. Simple Nuclear Structure in Cd-129111 from Atomic Isomer Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, D. T.; Balabanski, D. L.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Budinčević, I.; Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K.; Frömmgen, N.; Georgiev, G.; Geppert, Ch.; Hammen, M.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Krieger, A.; Meng, J.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Rajabali, M. M.; Papuga, J.; Schmidt, S.; Zhao, P. W.

    2016-01-01

    Isomer shifts have been determined in 111-129>Cd by high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CERN-ISOLDE. The corresponding mean square charge-radii changes, from the 1 /2+ and the 3 /2+ ground states to the 11 /2- isomers, have been found to follow a distinct parabolic dependence as a function of the atomic mass number. Since the isomers have been previously associated with simplicity due to the linear mass dependence of their quadrupole moments, the regularity of the isomer shifts suggests a higher order of symmetry affecting the ground states in addition. A comprehensive description assuming nuclear deformation is found to accurately reproduce the radii differences in conjunction with the known quadrupole moments. This intuitive interpretation is supported by covariant density functional theory.

  9. Geometric structure, electronic structure, and spin transition of several Fe{sup II} spin-crossover molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2012-04-01

    We present a density functional study on the geometric structure, electronic structure, and spin transition of a series of Fe{sup II} spin-crossover (SCO) molecules, i.e., [Fe(abpt){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] (1), [Fe(abpt){sub 2}(NCSe){sub 2}] (2), and [Fe(dpbo)(HIm){sub 2}] (3) with dpbo diethyl(E,E)-2,2'-[1,2-phenylbis(iminomethylidyne)]bis[3-oxobutanoate](2-), N',O{sup 3},O{sup 3}', and abpt = 4-amino-3,5-bis(pyridin-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazole in order to explore more about the way to control SCO behavior of transition metal complexes. Our calculated results show that the spin transition of these Fe{sup II} molecules is accompanied with charge transfer between the Fe atom and ligands. This causes change in the electrostatic energy ({Delta}U) as well as the total electronic energy of SCO molecules. Moreover, our calculated results demonstrate an important contribution of the interionic interactions to {Delta}U, and there is the relation between {Delta}U and the thermal hysteresis behavior of SCO molecules. These results should be helpful for developing new SCO molecules.

  10. Atomic Models of Strong Solids Interfaces Viewed as Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staffell, I.; Shang, J. L.; Kendall, K.

    2014-02-01

    This paper looks back through the 1960s to the invention of carbon fibres and the theories of Strong Solids. In particular it focuses on the fracture mechanics paradox of strong composites containing weak interfaces. From Griffith theory, it is clear that three parameters must be considered in producing a high strength composite:- minimising defects; maximising the elastic modulus; and raising the fracture energy along the crack path. The interface then introduces two further factors:- elastic modulus mismatch causing crack stopping; and debonding along a brittle interface due to low interface fracture energy. Consequently, an understanding of the fracture energy of a composite interface is needed. Using an interface model based on atomic interaction forces, it is shown that a single layer of contaminant atoms between the matrix and the reinforcement can reduce the interface fracture energy by an order of magnitude, giving a large delamination effect. The paper also looks to a future in which cars will be made largely from composite materials. Radical improvements in automobile design are necessary because the number of cars worldwide is predicted to double. This paper predicts gains in fuel economy by suggesting a new theory of automobile fuel consumption using an adaptation of Coulomb's friction law. It is demonstrated both by experiment and by theoretical argument that the energy dissipated in standard vehicle tests depends only on weight. Consequently, moving from metal to fibre construction can give a factor 2 improved fuel economy performance, roughly the same as moving from a petrol combustion drive to hydrogen fuel cell propulsion. Using both options together can give a factor 4 improvement, as demonstrated by testing a composite car using the ECE15 protocol.

  11. The Three-Dimensional Structural Basis of Type II Hyperprolinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Dhiraj; Singh, Ranjan K.; Moxley, Michael A.; Henzl, Michael T.; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2012-08-31

    Type II hyperprolinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in {Delta}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH; also known as ALDH4A1), the aldehyde dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate. Here, we report the first structure of human P5CDH (HsP5CDH) and investigate the impact of the hyperprolinemia-associated mutation of Ser352 to Leu on the structure and catalytic properties of the enzyme. The 2. 5-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of HsP5CDH was determined using experimental phasing. Structures of the mutant enzymes S352A (2.4 {angstrom}) and S352L (2.85 {angstrom}) were determined to elucidate the structural consequences of altering Ser352. Structures of the 93% identical mouse P5CDH complexed with sulfate ion (1.3 {angstrom} resolution), glutamate (1.5 {angstrom}), and NAD{sup +} (1.5 {angstrom}) were determined to obtain high-resolution views of the active site. Together, the structures show that Ser352 occupies a hydrophilic pocket and is connected via water-mediated hydrogen bonds to catalytic Cys348. Mutation of Ser352 to Leu is shown to abolish catalytic activity and eliminate NAD{sup +} binding. Analysis of the S352A mutant shows that these functional defects are caused by the introduction of the nonpolar Leu352 side chain rather than the removal of the Ser352 hydroxyl. The S352L structure shows that the mutation induces a dramatic 8-{angstrom} rearrangement of the catalytic loop. Because of this conformational change, Ser349 is not positioned to interact with the aldehyde substrate, conserved Glu447 is no longer poised to bind NAD{sup +}, and Cys348 faces the wrong direction for nucleophilic attack. These structural alterations render the enzyme inactive.

  12. Atomic-structural synergy for catalytic CO oxidation over palladium-nickel nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Joseph, Pharrah; Mayzel, Dina; Prasai, Binay; Wang, Lingyan; Engelhard, Mark; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-05-14

    Alloying palladium (Pd) with other transition metals at the nanoscale has become an important pathway for preparation of low-cost, highly active and stable catalysts. However, the lack of understanding of how the alloying phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of the alloys at the nanoscale influence their catalytic activity impedes the rational design of Pd-nanoalloy catalysts. This work addresses this challenge by a novel approach to investigating the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) over palladium-nickel (PdNi) nanoalloys with well-defined bimetallic composition, which reveals a remarkable maximal catalytic activity at Pd:Ni ratio of ~50:50. Key to understanding the structural-catalytic synergy is the use of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function (HE-XRD/PDF) analysis to probe the atomic structure of PdNi nanoalloys under controlled thermochemical treatments and CO reaction conditions. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the atomic structure of the nanoalloy particles were generated by reverse Monte Carlo simulations (RMC) guided by the experimental HE-XRD/PDF data. Structural details of the PdNi nanoalloys were extracted from the respective 3D models and compared with the measured catalytic properties. The comparison revealed a strong correlation between the phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of PdNi nanoalloys and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation. This correlation is further substantiated by analyzing the first atomic neighbor distances and coordination numbers inside the nanoalloy particles and at their surfaces. These findings have provided new insights into the structural synergy of nanoalloy catalysts by controlling the phase state, composition and atomic structure, complementing findings of traditional density functional theory studies.

  13. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Joseph, Pharrah; Mayzel, Dina; Prasai, Binay; Wang, Lingyan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-05-05

    Alloying palladium (Pd) with other transition metals at the nanoscale has become an important pathway for preparation of low-cost, highly-active and stable catalysts. However the lack of understanding of how the alloying phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of the alloys at the nanoscale influence their catalytic activity impedes the rational design of Pd-nanoalloy catalysts. This work addresses this challenge by a novel approach to investigating the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) over palladium-nickel (PdNi) nanoalloys with well-defined bimetallic composition, which reveals a remarkable a maximal catalytic activity at Pd:Ni ratio of ~50:50. Key to understanding the structural-catalytic synergy is the use of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function (HE-XRD/PDF) analysis to probe the atomic structure of PdNi nanoalloys under controlled thermochemical treatments and CO reaction conditions. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the atomic structure of the nanoalloy particles were generated by reverse Monte Carlo simulations (RMC) guided by the experimental HE-XRD/PDF data. Structural details of the PdNi nanoalloys were extracted from the respective 3D models and compared with the measured catalytic properties. The comparison revealed a strong correlation between the phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of PdNi nanoalloys and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation. This correlation is further substantiated by analyzing the first atomic neighbor distances and coordination numbers inside the nanoalloy particles and at their surfaces. These findings have provided new insights into the structural synergy of nanoalloy catalysts by controlling the phase state, composition and atomic structure, complementing findings of traditional density functional theory studies.

  14. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Joseph, Pharrah; Mayzel, Dina; Prasai, Binay; Wang, Lingyan; Engelhard, Mark; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-05-05

    Alloying palladium (Pd) with other transition metals at the nanoscale has become an important pathway for preparation of low-cost, highly active and stable catalysts. However, the lack of understanding of how the alloying phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of the alloys at the nanoscale influence their catalytic activity impedes the rational design of Pd-nanoalloy catalysts. This work addresses this challenge by a novel approach to investigating the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) over palladium–nickel (PdNi) nanoalloys with well-defined bimetallic composition, which reveals a remarkable maximal catalytic activity at Pd:Ni ratio of ~50:50. Key to understanding the structural-catalytic synergy is the use of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function (HE-XRD/PDF) analysis to probe the atomic structure of PdNi nanoalloys under controlled thermochemical treatments and CO reaction conditions. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the atomic structure of the nanoalloy particles were generated by reverse Monte Carlo simulations (RMC) guided by the experimental HE-XRD/PDF data. Structural details of the PdNi nanoalloys were extracted from the respective 3D models and compared with the measured catalytic properties. The comparison revealed a strong correlation between the phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of PdNi nanoalloys and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation. This correlation is further substantiated by analyzing the first atomic neighbor distances and coordination numbers inside the nanoalloy particles and at their surfaces. These findings have provided new insights into the structural synergy of nanoalloy catalysts by controlling the phase state, composition and atomic structure, complementing findings of traditional density functional theory studies.

  15. Structural, spectral, pH-metric and biological studies on mercury (II), cadmium (II) and binuclear zinc (II) complexes of NS donor thiosemicarbazide ligand.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Ola A; Abu El-Reash, Gaber M; El-Gamil, Mohammed M

    2014-04-01

    Hg(II), Cd(II) and binuclear Zn(II) complexes derived from the tetradentate N(1)-ethyl-N(2)-(pyridine-2-yl) hydrazine-1, 2-bis (carbothioamide) ligand (H2PET) have been prepared and characterized by conventional techniques. The isolated complexes acquired the formulas, [Hg(HPET)(H2O)2Cl]⋅H2O, [Cd(HPET)Cl] and [Zn2(HPET)(PET)(OAc)]⋅H2O, respectively. IR data revealed that the ligand behaves as monobasic tridentate through (CN)py, (C-S) and new (NC)azomethine(∗) groups in both Hg(II) and Cd(II) complexes. In the binuclear Zn(II) complex, the behavior of ligand contains two types, where H2PET acts as dibasic tetradentate via (CN)py, both deprotonated (C-SH) and the new (NC)azomethine(∗) towards two Zn atoms and also it acts as monobasic tridentate via (CS), deprotonated (C-SH) and (CN)py towards the same Zn atoms. An octahedral geometry for Hg(II) complex and tetrahedral geometry for both Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes were proposed. The bond lengths, bond angles, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moment have been calculated by DFT using materials studio program to confirm the geometry of ligand and its metal complexes. The association constant of the ligand and the stability constants of its complexes as well as the thermodynamic parameters were calculated by pH metric measurements at 298, 308 and 318K in 50% dioxane-water mixture, respectively. Also, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal degradation steps of the complexes were determined by Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the anti-oxidant (using ABTS and DPPH methods), anti-hemolytic, and cytotoxic activities of the compounds have been tested.

  16. Relativistic all-order calculations of In I and Sn II atomic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2007-08-15

    We use all-order relativistic many-body perturbation theory to study 5s{sup 2}nl configurations of In I and Sn II. Energies, E1 amplitudes, and hyperfine constants are calculated using all-order method, which accounts for single and double excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions. A comprehensive review of experimental and theoretical studies of In I and Sn II properties is given. Our results are compared with other studies were available.

  17. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  18. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  19. Atomic-scale structural evolution from disorder to order in an amorphous metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Liu, X. J.; Hou, H. Y.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to study the atomic-scale structural evolution from disorder to order during the isothermal annealing of an amorphous Ni. Three plateaus in the time dependent potential energy and mean square displacement (MSD) curves were observed, indicating that the atomic ordering process from amorphous to nanocrystalline Ni undergoes three distinct stages. The structural analyses reveal that the atomic structural evolution is associated with these three stages: Disordered atoms adjust their relative positions to form a one-dimensional (1D) periodic structure at the first stage, then form a 2D periodic structure at the second stage, and finally form a 3D periodic nanocrystal. Further analyses of potential energy and MSD difference and dynamics demonstrate that the structural change from the 2D to 3D structure is more difficult than that from the 1D to 2D structure, because both the 1D and 2D quasi-ordered structures belong to transition states and have similar structural features in nature. Our findings may provide new insights into the nanocrystallization of amorphous alloys and implications for producing nanostructured materials.

  20. Deducing chemical structure from crystallographically determined atomic coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Ian J.; Shields, Gregory P.; Taylor, Robin

    2011-01-01

    An improved algorithm has been developed for assigning chemical structures to incoming entries to the Cambridge Structural Database, using only the information available in the deposited CIF. Steps in the algorithm include detection of bonds, selection of polymer unit, resolution of disorder, and assignment of bond types and formal charges. The chief difficulty is posed by the large number of metallo-organic crystal structures that must be processed, given our aspiration that assigned chemical structures should accurately reflect properties such as the oxidation states of metals and redox-active ligands, metal coordination numbers and hapticities, and the aromaticity or otherwise of metal ligands. Other complications arise from disorder, especially when it is symmetry imposed or modelled with the SQUEEZE algorithm. Each assigned structure is accompanied by an estimate of reliability and, where necessary, diagnostic information indicating probable points of error. Although the algorithm was written to aid building of the Cambridge Structural Database, it has the potential to develop into a general-purpose tool for adding chemical information to newly determined crystal structures. PMID:21775812

  1. Determining polarity and dislocation core structures at atomic level for epitaxial AlN/(0001)6H-SiC from a single image in HRTEM.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y X; Wang, Y M; Wen, C; Ge, B H; Li, F H; Chen, Y; Chen, H

    2013-03-01

    The polarity of epitaxial AlN film grown on (0001)6H-SiC and dislocation core structures in the film have been studied using a 200 kV LaB6 high-resolution transmission electron microscope of point resolution about 0.2 nm. A posterior image processing technique, the image deconvolution, was utilized to transform a single [21¯1¯0] image that does not intuitively represent the structure into the projected structure map. The adjacent Al and N projected atomic columns with the interatomic distance 0.109 nm can be distinguished from each other by analyzing the image contrast change with the sample thickness based on the pseudo-weak phase object approximation. This makes possible to derive the polarity and core structures of partial dislocations in the epitaxial AlN film at atomic level from a single image without relying on any other additional structure information. The atomic configurations for two partial dislocations containing a 10-atom ring and a 12-atom ring, respectively, have been attained. The method is available for II-VI and other III-V compounds. Its principle and procedure are briefly introduced.

  2. Structural insight into the type-II mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yue; Li, Wenfei; Li, Jian; Wang, Jiawei; Ge, Jingpeng; Xu, Duo; Liu, Yanjing; Wu, Kaiqi; Zeng, Qingyin; Wu, Jia-Wei; Tian, Changlin; Zhou, Bing; Yang, Maojun

    2012-11-15

    The single-component type-II NADH dehydrogenases (NDH-2s) serve as alternatives to the multisubunit respiratory complex I (type-I NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-1), also called NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase; EC 1.6.5.3) in catalysing electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The yeast NDH-2 (Ndi1) oxidizes NADH on the matrix side and reduces ubiquinone to maintain mitochondrial NADH/NAD(+) homeostasis. Ndi1 is a potential therapeutic agent for human diseases caused by complex I defects, particularly Parkinson's disease, because its expression restores the mitochondrial activity in animals with complex I deficiency. NDH-2s in pathogenic microorganisms are viable targets for new antibiotics. Here we solve the crystal structures of Ndi1 in its substrate-free, NADH-, ubiquinone- and NADH-ubiquinone-bound states, to help understand the catalytic mechanism of NDH-2s. We find that Ndi1 homodimerization through its carboxy-terminal domain is critical for its catalytic activity and membrane targeting. The structures reveal two ubiquinone-binding sites (UQ(I) and UQ(II)) in Ndi1. NADH and UQ(I) can bind to Ndi1 simultaneously to form a substrate-protein complex. We propose that UQ(I) interacts with FAD to act as an intermediate for electron transfer, and that NADH transfers electrons through this FAD-UQ(I) complex to UQ(II). Together our data reveal the regulatory and catalytic mechanisms of Ndi1 and may facilitate the development or targeting of NDH-2s for potential therapeutic applications.

  3. Atomic structure and chemistry of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been determined crystallographically to a resolution of 2.8 A. It comprises three homologous domains that assemble to form a heart-shaped molecule. Each domain is a product of two subdomains that possess common structural motifs. The principal regions of ligand binding to human serum albumin are located in hydrophobic cavities in subdomains IIA and ILIA, which exhibit similar chemistry. The structure explains numerous physical phenomena and should provide insight into future pharmacokinetic and genetically engineered therapeutic applications of serum albumin.

  4. Structural mechanisms of the Ih–II and II → Ic transitions between the crystalline phases of aqueous ice

    SciTech Connect

    Zheligovskaya, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    Structural mechanisms are proposed for experimentally observed phase transitions between crystalline modifications of aqueous ice, Ih and II, as well as II and Ic. It is known that the Ih–II transition occurs with the conservation of large structural units (hexagonal channels) common for these ices. It is shown that the Ih → II transition may occur with the conservation of 5/6 of all hydrogen bonds in crystal, including all hydrogen bonds in the retained channels (3/4 of the total number of bonds in crystal) and 1/3 of the bonds between these channels (1/12 of the total number). The transformation of other hydrogen bonds between the retained channels leads to the occurrence of proton order in ice II. A structural mechanism is proposed to explain the transformation of single crystals of ice Ih either into single crystals of ice II or into crystalline twins of ice II with c axes rotated by 180° with respect to each other, which is often observed at the Ih → II transition. It is established that up to 7/12 of all hydrogen bonds are retained at the irreversible cooperative II → Ic transition.

  5. Accessibility of selenomethionine proteins by total chemical synthesis: structural studies of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II.

    PubMed

    Shao, W; Fernandez, E; Wilken, J; Thompson, D A; Siani, M A; West, J; Lolis, E; Schweitzer, B I

    1998-12-11

    The determination of high resolution three-dimensional structures by X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a time-consuming process. Here we describe an approach to circumvent the cloning and expression of a recombinant protein as well as screening for heavy atom derivatives. The selenomethionine-modified chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-II (MIP-II) from human herpesvirus-8 has been produced by total chemical synthesis, crystallized, and characterized by NMR. The protein has a secondary structure typical of other chemokines and forms a monomer in solution. These results indicate that total chemical synthesis can be used to accelerate the determination of three-dimensional structures of new proteins identified in genome programs.

  6. Accessibility of selenomethionine proteins by total chemical synthesis: structural studies of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II.

    PubMed

    Shao, W; Fernandez, E; Wilken, J; Thompson, D A; Siani, M A; West, J; Lolis, E; Schweitzer, B I

    1998-12-11

    The determination of high resolution three-dimensional structures by X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a time-consuming process. Here we describe an approach to circumvent the cloning and expression of a recombinant protein as well as screening for heavy atom derivatives. The selenomethionine-modified chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-II (MIP-II) from human herpesvirus-8 has been produced by total chemical synthesis, crystallized, and characterized by NMR. The protein has a secondary structure typical of other chemokines and forms a monomer in solution. These results indicate that total chemical synthesis can be used to accelerate the determination of three-dimensional structures of new proteins identified in genome programs. PMID:9877169

  7. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Tengteng; Liu Wei; Chen Shuang; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter; Zhao Jingtai; Kniep, Ruediger; Hoffmann, Stefan

    2012-08-15

    A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that the title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters a=8.392(2) A, b=6.3960(10) A, c=16.670(2) A, {beta}=109.470(10) Degree-Sign , V=843.6(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The crystal structure is characterized by a complex chain of copper-centered polyhedra running along [0 1 0] which are connected by phosphate tetrahedra. The resulting three-dimensional polyhedra framework exhibits channels filled by additional copper and sodium atoms. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the specific heat and the magnetic susceptibility reveal low-dimensional magnetic behavior. The compound starts to decompose at 700 K under release of oxygen and evaporation of Cu{sup I}Cl as shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new copper(II) phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], exhibits linear chains of copper tetrahedra which show low-dimensional magnetic behavior proven by specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure comprises chains of Cu{sub 4}O tetrahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dimensional behavior has been proven by magnetic and specific heat measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating, Cu{sup I}Cl and oxygen are released shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of the structure of complex compounds of Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) with. cap alpha. - and. beta. -diketone

    SciTech Connect

    Krymova, N.M.; Ivanov, V.E.; Ostapkevich, N.A.

    1986-11-10

    In the reactions of Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) chlorides with 2,3-butanedione and 2,4-pentanedione isonicotinoylhydrazones in neutral and weakly acid media complex compounds of the addition-product type are formed, but in an alkaline medium inner-complex compounds are formed. By methods of electronic and ESR spectroscopy it was shown that the Cu(II) complex compounds have a planar-square structure, the Ni(II) complexes are octrahedral, but the Co(II) complexes have a tetrahedral or distorted tetrahedral structure. In the spectrochemical series 2,3-butanedione and 2,4-pentanedione isonicotinoylhydrazones occupy positions between water and ammonia.

  9. Ab initio protein folding simulations using atomic burials as informational intermediates between sequence and structure.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marx Gomes; Ferreira, Diogo César; de Oliveira, Leandro Cristante; Onuchic, José N; de Araújo, Antônio F Pereira

    2014-07-01

    The three-dimensional structure of proteins is determined by their linear amino acid sequences but decipherment of the underlying protein folding code has remained elusive. Recent studies have suggested that burials, as expressed by atomic distances to the molecular center, are sufficiently informative for structural determination while potentially obtainable from sequences. Here we provide direct evidence for this distinctive role of burials in the folding code, demonstrating that burial propensities estimated from local sequence can indeed be used to fold globular proteins in ab initio simulations. We have used a statistical scheme based on a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to classify all heavy atoms of a protein into a small number of burial atomic types depending on sequence context. Molecular dynamics simulations were then performed with a potential that forces all atoms of each type towards their predicted burial level, while simple geometric constraints were imposed on covalent structure and hydrogen bond formation. The correct folded conformation was obtained and distinguished in simulations that started from extended chains for a selection of structures comprising all three folding classes and high burial prediction quality. These results demonstrate that atomic burials can act as informational intermediates between sequence and structure, providing a new conceptual framework for improving structural prediction and understanding the fundamentals of protein folding.

  10. I.I. Rabi Prize Talk: Artificial gauge fields in multi-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, Ian

    2015-05-01

    We used Raman lasers to induce artificial gauge fields or spin-orbit coupling in the three-level system formed by the f=1 electronic ground state manifold of rubidium-87. In this colloquium I will report on two effects of this laser-coupling. I will explore the itinerant magnetic phases present in a spin-1 spin-orbit coupled atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC); in this system, itinerant ferromagnetic order is stabilized by the spin-orbit coupling, vanishing in its absence. We first located a second-order phase transition that continuously stiffens until, at a tricritical point, it transforms into a first-order transition. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. We engineered a two-dimensional magnetic lattice in an elongated strip geometry, with effective per-plaquette flux about 4/3 times the flux quanta. We imaged the localized edge and bulk states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip, with single lattice-site resolution along the narrow direction. Further, we observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down our system's edges, analogues to edge magnetoplasmons in 2-D electron systems. Our lattice's long direction consisted of the sites of an optical lattice and its narrow direction consisted of the internal atomic spin states: a synthetic dimension.

  11. Evaluating and interpreting the chemical relevance of the linear response kernel for atoms II: open shell.

    PubMed

    Boisdenghien, Zino; Fias, Stijn; Van Alsenoy, Christian; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-07-28

    Most of the work done on the linear response kernel χ(r,r') has focussed on its atom-atom condensed form χAB. Our previous work [Boisdenghien et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 1007] was the first effort to truly focus on the non-condensed form of this function for closed (sub)shell atoms in a systematic fashion. In this work, we extend our method to the open shell case. To simplify the plotting of our results, we average our results to a symmetrical quantity χ(r,r'). This allows us to plot the linear response kernel for all elements up to and including argon and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table and in the different representations of χ(r,r'). Within the context of Spin Polarized Conceptual Density Functional Theory, the first two-dimensional plots of spin polarized linear response functions are presented and commented on for some selected cases on the basis of the atomic ground state electronic configurations. Using the relation between the linear response kernel and the polarizability we compare the values of the polarizability tensor calculated using our method to high-level values. PMID:24837234

  12. 1,8-Dihydroxyanthraquinone anchored on silica gel: synthesis and application as solid phase extractant for lead(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II) prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Anupama; Singh, Ajai K

    2002-10-16

    A new chelating matrix has been prepared by immobilizing 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ) on silica gel modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. After characterizing the matrix with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR and diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transformation (DRIFT) spectroscopy, it has been used to preconcentrate Pb(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimum pH ranges for quantitative sorption are 6.0-7.5, 7.0-8.0 and 6.0-8.0 for Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively. All the metal ions can be desorbed with 2 mol l(-1) HCl/HNO(3). The sorption capacity of the matrix has been found to be 76.0, 180.0 and 70.2 mumol g(-1) for Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively, with the preconcentration factor of approximately 200. The limits upto which electrolytes NaNO(3), NaCl, NaBr, Na(2)SO(4), Na(3)PO(4) sodium citrate, EDTA, glycine and humic acid and cations Ca(II), Mg(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Mn(II) Al(III), Cr(III) and Fe(III) can co-exist with the metal ions during their sorption without any adverse effect are reported. The lowest concentration of metal ions for quantitative recovery is 5.0 ng ml(-1) The simultaneous enrichment and determination of all the metals is possible if total load of metal ions is less than sorption capacity. The flame AAS was used to determine these metal ions in underground, tap and river water samples (relative standard deviation (R.S.D.)

  13. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Michael E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu; Schlaf, Rudy E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  14. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-08-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to -0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  15. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure and spectroscopy of a Werner-type host Co(II) complex, trans-bisisothiocyanatotetrakis( trans-4-styrylpyridine)cobalt(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, C.; Thomas, K. R. J.; Shunmugasundaram, A.; Murugesan, R.

    2000-05-01

    Single crystals of the title Co(II) complex, [Co(stpy) 4(NCS) 2] [stpy= trans-4-styrylpyridine] are prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, and UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure determination. The complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pna2 1 with unit-cell parameters, a=32.058(3), b=15.362(5), c=9.818(5) Å, and Z=4. The structure consists of discrete monomeric units of [Co(stpy) 4(NCS) 2]. The equatorial positions of the Co(II) polyhedron are occupied by nitrogen atoms of the four stpy ligands and the axial positions are occupied by the nitrogen atoms of the two thiocyanate ions. The unit cell packing reveals interpenetration of styryl groups owing to conformational flexibility of phenyl and pyridyl rings in stpy ligands. Thus, it leads to efficient packing of the crystal lattice leaving no space available for guest inclusion. IR spectra reveal nitrogen coordination from stpy and terminal -NCS coordination of the thiocyanate group. The optical reflectance bands 475, 540 (shoulder) and 1022 nm suggest octahedral geometry in accordance with the X-ray data. However, the optical spectrum of acetonitrile solution shows an intense band at 615 nm and a weak shoulder at 570 nm suggesting participation of the solvent molecules in the coordination sphere. These bands indicate the presence of both tetrahedral and octahedral species in solution.

  16. Local atomic structure in equilibrium and supercooled liquid Zr(75.5)Pd(24.5).

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Fu, W; Bendert, J C; Cheng, Y Q; Ma, E; Kelton, K F

    2012-07-28

    Atomic structures were obtained in equilibrium and supercooled eutectic Zr(75.5)Pd(24.5) liquids by in situ high-energy synchrotron diffraction measurements using the beamline electrostatic levitation (BESL) technique, which provides a high-vacuum, containerless, environment. Reverse Monte Carlo fits to the x-ray static structure factors, constrained using partial pair correlation functions obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, indicate the presence of medium-range order (MRO) in the form of a strong tendency for Pd-Pd (solute-solute) avoidance. This order persists over the entire temperature range studied, from 170 °C above the equilibrium liquidus temperature to 263 °C below it. Further, a quantitative analysis of the atomic structures obtained indicates a modest degree of icosahedral-like local order around Pd atoms, with the clusters showing an increased tendency for face-sharing to form more extended structures with decreasing temperature. PMID:22852625

  17. First-principles calculation of atomic forces and structural distortions in strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Leonov, I; Anisimov, V I; Vollhardt, D

    2014-04-11

    We introduce a novel computational approach for the investigation of complex correlated electron materials which makes it possible to evaluate interatomic forces and, thereby, determine atomic displacements and structural transformations induced by electronic correlations. It combines ab initio band structure and dynamical mean-field theory and is implemented with the linear-response formalism regarding atomic displacements. We apply this new technique to explore structural transitions of prototypical correlated systems such as elemental hydrogen, SrVO3, and KCuF3. PMID:24765993

  18. Determining Chemically and Spatially Resolved Atomic Profile of Low Contrast Interface Structure with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Maheswar; Pradhan, P. C.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present precise measurements of atomic distributions of low electron density contrast at a buried interface using soft x-ray resonant scattering. This approach allows one to construct chemically and spatially highly resolved atomic distribution profile upto several tens of nanometer in a non-destructive and quantitative manner. We demonstrate that the method is sensitive enough to resolve compositional differences of few atomic percent in nano-scaled layered structures of elements with poor electron density differences (0.05%). The present study near the edge of potential impurities in soft x-ray range for low-Z system will stimulate the activity in that field. PMID:25726866

  19. Heterobimetallic oxalato-bridged Cu(II)Re(IV) complexes. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Chiozzone, R; González, R; Kremer, C; De Munno, G; Armentano, D; Cano, J; Lloret, F; Julve, M; Faus, J

    2001-08-13

    Three copper(II)-rhenium(IV) bimetallic complexes of formula [ReCl(4)(mu-ox)Cu(phen)(2)] (1), [ReCl(4)(mu-ox)Cu(phen)(2)].CH(3)CN (2), and [ReCl(4)(mu-ox)Cu(terpy) (H(2)O)][ReCl(4)(mu-ox)Cu(terpy)(CH(3)CN)] (3) (ox = oxalate anion, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and terpy = 2,2':6,2"- terpyridine) have been synthesized and their crystal structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 crystallizes in the triclinic system, space group P(-1), with a = 9.776(2), b = 11.744(3), c = 14.183(3) A, alpha =102.09(2) degrees, beta = 109.42(2) degrees, gamma = 107.11(2) degrees, and Z = 2, whereas 2 and 3 crystallize in the monoclinic system, space groups P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c, respectively, with a = 12.837(3), b = 17.761(4), c = 12.914(3) A, beta = 91.32(2) degrees, and Z = 4 for 2, and a = 8.930(2), b = 18.543(4), c = 27.503(6) A, beta = 94.67(2) degrees, and Z = 4 for 3. The structures of 1 and 2 are made up of neutral [ReCl(4)(mu-ox)Cu(phen)(2)] bimetallic units. Re(IV) and Cu(II) metal ions exhibit distorted octahedral coordination geometries, being bridged by a bis(bidentate) oxalato ligand. The presence of acetonitrile molecules of crystallization in 2 causes a somewhat greater separation between the bimetallic complexes and a different packing of these units in the crystal structure with respect to 1. The copper-rhenium separation across oxalato is 5.628(2) in 1 and 5.649(3) A in 2. The structure of 3 is made up of two different and neutral bimetallic units, [ReCl(4)(mu-ox)Cu(terpy)(H(2)O)] and [ReCl(4)(mu-ox)Cu(terpy)(CH(3)CN)]. In the first one, the oxalate group behaves as a bis(bidentate) ligand occupying one equatorial and one axial position in the elongated octahedral environment of Cu(II). The water molecule is axially coordinated. In the second one, the oxalate group behaves as a bidentate/monodentate ligand occupying the axial position in the square pyramidal environment of Cu(II). The acetonitrile molecule occupies a basal coordination

  20. Structural changes of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II during the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry.

  1. Two ferromagnetic azido-bridged copper(II) complexes studied by first-principle electronic-structure calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. S.; Yao, K. L.; Liu, Z. L.

    2005-09-01

    The electronic structures of two ferromagnetic polynuclear copper(II) complexes, derived from end-to-end azido ligand and tridentate (NNN donor) Schiff base ligand, have been studied using the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method based on the density-functional theory. They are [Cu(L1)(μ-1,3-N3)]n(ClO4)n (1) and [Cu(L2)(μ-1,3-N3)]n(ClO4)n (2). The result shows that the spin populations in these two complexes are mainly distributed on the equatorial planes of a square pyramidal that surround the copper(II) ions. There are large and positive spin populations on copper(II) ions, small and positive spin populations on the three nitrogen atoms of tridentate Schiff base ligand, and the two terminal nitrogen atoms of asymmetrical end-to-end azido ligand, while weak and negative spin populations on the central nitrogen atoms of asymmetrical end-to-end azido ligand. Ferromagnetic coupling through the asymmetrical azido ligand in these two complexes has been mainly attributed to the spin delocalization, also with weak spin-polarization effect.

  2. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  3. Homochiral Cu(II) and Ni(II) malates with tunable structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Zavakhina, Marina S.; Samsonenko, Denis G.; Virovets, Alexander V.; Dybtsev, Danil N.; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2014-02-15

    Four new homochiral metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) based on S-malate anions and N-donor linkers of different length have been prepared under solvothermal conditions. [Cu(mal)(bpy)]·H{sub 2}O (1), [Cu(mal)(bpe)]·2H{sub 2}O (2), [Ni(mal)(bpy)]·1.3CH{sub 3}OH (3) and [Ni(mal)(bpe)]·4H{sub 2}O (4) (mal=S-malate, bpy=4,4′-bipyridil, bpe=trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene) were characterized by a number of analytical methods including powder X-ray diffraction, elemental, thermogravimetric analyses, IR spectroscopy. Compounds 1–3 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The absence of the chiral ligand racemization under synthetic conditions was unambiguously confirmed by polarimetry experiments. Compounds 1 and 2 contain metal-malate layered motives, connected by N-donor linkers and contribute to the family of isoreticular Cu(II) malates and tartrates [Cu(mal)L] and [Cu(tart)L], (tart=tartrate; L=ditopic rigid organic ligand). The Ni-based compounds 3 and 4 share 1D chiral (Ni(mal)) motives and possess novel type of the chiral framework, previously unknown for chiral carboxylates. The linear N-donor linkers connect these chiral chains, thus controlling the channel diameter and guest accessible volume of the homochiral structure, which exceeds 60 %. - Graphical abstract: Four new homochiral metal–organic frameworks are built from Ni{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+} cations, S-malate anions and N-donor linkers of different length, which controls the size of pores and guest accessible volume of the homochiral structure. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Four new homohiral metal–organic frameworks based on Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+}. • Cu(II)–malate layers and Ni(II)–malate chains are connected by N-donor linkers. • N-donor linkers of different length control the size of pores.

  4. A solid phase extraction procedure for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in food and water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2015-05-01

    A relatively rapid, accurate and precise solid phase extraction method is presented for the determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) in various food and water samples. Quantitation is carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the retention of the trace metal ions on Dowex Marathon C, a strong acid cation exchange resin. Some important parameters affecting the analytical performance of the method such as pH, flow rate and volume of the sample solution; type, concentration, volume, flow rate of the eluent; and matrix effects on the retention of the metal ions were investigated. Common coexisting ions did not interfere on the separation and determination of the analytes. The detection limits (3 σb) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were found as 0.13 and 0.18 μg L(-1), respectively, while the limit of quantification values (10 σb) were computed as 0.43 and 0.60 μg L(-1) for the same sequence of the analytes. The precision (as relative standard deviation was lower than 4% at 5 μg L(-1) Cd(II) and 10 μg L(-1) Pb(II) levels, and the preconcentration factor was found to be 250. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was verified by analysing the certified reference materials, SPS-WW2 Batch 108 wastewater level 2 and INCT-TL-1 tea leaves, with the satisfactory results. In addition, for the accuracy of the method the recovery studies (⩾ 95%) were carried out. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in the various natural waters (lake water, tap water, waste water with boric acid, waste water with H2SO4) and food samples (pomegranate flower, organic pear, radish leaf, lamb meat, etc.), and good results were obtained. While the food samples almost do not contain cadmium, they have included lead at low levels of 0.13-1.12 μg g(-1). PMID:25529724

  5. Chemical Structure and Properties: A Modified Atoms-First, One-Semester Introductory Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.; McKenna, Anna G.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Fazal, M. A.; Peterson, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    A one-semester, introductory chemistry course is described that develops a primarily qualitative understanding of structure-property relationships. Starting from an atoms-first approach, the course examines the properties and three-dimensional structure of metallic and ionic solids before expanding into a thorough investigation of molecules. In…

  6. Ultrathin film of nickel on the Cu (100) surface: Atomic structure and phonons

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, Svetlana D. E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru Rusina, Galina G. E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the structural and vibrational properties of the Cu (100) surface covered with ultrathin (1-5 ML) Ni films using interaction potential from the embedded atom method. The surface relaxation, dispersion relation and polarization of vibrational modes are discussed. Our calculated structural parameters are in good agreement with experimental results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare well with the available experimental data.

  7. Getting CAD in shape: the atomic structure of human dihydroorotase domain.

    PubMed

    Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-02-01

    CAD is a large multifunctional polypeptide that initiates and controls the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidines in animals. In this issue of Structure, Grande-García and colleagues provide the first atomic information of this antitumoral target by reporting the crystal structure of the dihydroorotase domain of human CAD.

  8. Kangaroo IGF-II is structurally and functionally similar to the human [Ser29]-IGF-II variant.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-06-01

    Kangaroo IGF-II has been purified from western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum and characterised in a number of in vitro assays. In addition, the complete cDNA sequence of mature IGF-II has been obtained by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of the kangaroo IGF-II cDNA sequence with known IGF-II sequences from other species revealed that it is very similar to the human variant, [Ser29]-hIGF-II. Both the variant and kangaroo IGF-II contain an insert of nine nucleotides that encode the amino acids Leu-Pro-Gly at the junction of the B and C domains of the mature protein. The deduced kangaroo IGF-II protein sequence also contains three other amino acid changes that are not observed in human IGF-II. These amino acid differences share similarities with the changes described in many of the IGF-IIs reported for non-mammalian species. Characterisation of human IGF-II, kangaroo IGF-II, chicken IGF-II and [Ser29]-hIGF-II in a number of in vitro assays revealed that all four proteins are functionally very similar. No significant differences were observed in the ability of the IGF-IIs to bind to the bovine IGF-II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor or to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts. However, differences were observed in their abilities to bind to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) present in human serum. Kangaroo, chicken and [Ser29]-hIGF-II had lower apparent affinities for human IGFBPs than did human IGF-II. Thus, it appears that the major circulating form of IGF-II in the kangaroo and a minor form of IGF-II found in human serum are structurally and functionally very similar. This suggests that the splice site that generates both the variant and major form of human IGF-II must have evolved after the divergence of marsupials from placental mammals.

  9. Atomic Structure and Phase Transformations in Pu Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Cynn, H; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Moore, K T; Evans, W J; Farber, D L; Jeffries, J R; Massalski, T B

    2008-04-28

    Plutonium and plutonium-based alloys containing Al or Ga exhibit numerous phases with crystal structures ranging from simple monoclinic to face-centered cubic. Only recently, however, has there been increased convergence in the actinides community on the details of the equilibrium form of the phase diagrams. Practically speaking, while the phase diagrams that represent the stability of the fcc {delta}-phase field at room temperature are generally applicable, it is also recognized that Pu and its alloys are never truly in thermodynamic equilibrium because of self-irradiation effects, primarily from the alpha decay of Pu isotopes. This article covers past and current research on several properties of Pu and Pu-(Al or Ga) alloys and their connections to the crystal structure and the microstructure. We review the consequences of radioactive decay, the recent advances in understanding the electronic structure, the current research on phase transformations and their relations to phase diagrams and phase stability, the nature of the isothermal martensitic {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation, and the pressure-induced transformations in the {delta}-phase alloys. New data are also presented on the structures and phase transformations observed in these materials following the application of pressure, including the formation of transition phases.

  10. Synthesis of Calcium(II) Amidinate Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition through a Redox Reaction between Calcium and Amidines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Yang, Chuanxi; Powers, Tamara; Davis, Luke M; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2016-08-22

    We have prepared two new Ca(II) amidinates, which comprise a new class of ALD precursors. The syntheses proceed by a direct reaction between Ca metal and the amidine ligands in the presence of ammonia. Bis(N,N'-diisopropylformamidinato)calcium(II) (1) and bis(N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinato)calcium(II) (2) adopt dimeric structures in solution and in the solid state. X-ray crystallography revealed asymmetry in one of the bridging ligands to afford the structure [(η(2) -L)Ca(μ-η(2) :η(2) -L)(μ-η(2) :η(1) -L)Ca(η(2) -L)]. These amidinate complexes showed unprecedentedly high volatility as compared to the widely employed and commercially available Ca(II) precursor, [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ]. In CaS ALD with 1 and H2 S, the ALD window was approximately two times wider and lower in temperature by about 150 °C than previously reported with [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ] and H2 S. Complexes 1 and 2, with their excellent volatility and thermal stability (up to at least 350 °C), are the first homoleptic Ca(II) amidinates suitable for use as ALD precursors.

  11. Synthesis of Calcium(II) Amidinate Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition through a Redox Reaction between Calcium and Amidines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Yang, Chuanxi; Powers, Tamara; Davis, Luke M; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2016-08-22

    We have prepared two new Ca(II) amidinates, which comprise a new class of ALD precursors. The syntheses proceed by a direct reaction between Ca metal and the amidine ligands in the presence of ammonia. Bis(N,N'-diisopropylformamidinato)calcium(II) (1) and bis(N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinato)calcium(II) (2) adopt dimeric structures in solution and in the solid state. X-ray crystallography revealed asymmetry in one of the bridging ligands to afford the structure [(η(2) -L)Ca(μ-η(2) :η(2) -L)(μ-η(2) :η(1) -L)Ca(η(2) -L)]. These amidinate complexes showed unprecedentedly high volatility as compared to the widely employed and commercially available Ca(II) precursor, [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ]. In CaS ALD with 1 and H2 S, the ALD window was approximately two times wider and lower in temperature by about 150 °C than previously reported with [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ] and H2 S. Complexes 1 and 2, with their excellent volatility and thermal stability (up to at least 350 °C), are the first homoleptic Ca(II) amidinates suitable for use as ALD precursors. PMID:27351794

  12. Structure and stability of a silicon cluster on sequential doping with carbon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AzeezullaNazrulla, Mohammed; Joshi, Krati; Israel, S.; Krishnamurty, Sailaja

    2016-02-01

    SiC is a highly stable material in bulk. On the other hand, alloys of silicon and carbon at nanoscale length are interesting from both technological as well fundamental view point and are being currently synthesized by various experimental groups (Truong et. al., 2015 [26]). In the present work, we identify a well-known silicon cluster viz., Si10 and dope it sequentially with carbon atoms. The evolution of electronic structure (spin state and the structural properties) on doping, the charge redistribution and structural properties are analyzed. It is interesting to note that the ground state SiC clusters prefer to be in the lowest spin state. Further, it is seen that carbon atoms are the electron rich centres while silicon atoms are electron deficient in every SiC alloy cluster. The carbon-carbon bond lengths in alloy clusters are equivalent to those seen in fullerene molecules. Interestingly, the carbon atoms tend to aggregate together with silicon atoms surrounding them by donating the charge. As a consequence, very few Si-Si bonds are noted with increasing concentrations of C atoms in a SiC alloy. Physical and chemical stability of doped clusters is studied by carrying out finite temperature behaviour and adsorbing O2 molecule on Si9C and Si8C2 clusters, respectively.

  13. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. II. Four-atom systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-11-28

    A rigorous, general, and simple method to fit global and permutation invariant potential energy surfaces (PESs) using neural networks (NNs) is discussed. This so-called permutation invariant polynomial neural network (PIP-NN) method imposes permutation symmetry by using in its input a set of symmetry functions based on PIPs. For systems with more than three atoms, it is shown that the number of symmetry functions in the input vector needs to be larger than the number of internal coordinates in order to include both the primary and secondary invariant polynomials. This PIP-NN method is successfully demonstrated in three atom-triatomic reactive systems, resulting in full-dimensional global PESs with average errors on the order of meV. These PESs are used in full-dimensional quantum dynamical calculations.

  14. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. II. Four-atom systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-11-28

    A rigorous, general, and simple method to fit global and permutation invariant potential energy surfaces (PESs) using neural networks (NNs) is discussed. This so-called permutation invariant polynomial neural network (PIP-NN) method imposes permutation symmetry by using in its input a set of symmetry functions based on PIPs. For systems with more than three atoms, it is shown that the number of symmetry functions in the input vector needs to be larger than the number of internal coordinates in order to include both the primary and secondary invariant polynomials. This PIP-NN method is successfully demonstrated in three atom-triatomic reactive systems, resulting in full-dimensional global PESs with average errors on the order of meV. These PESs are used in full-dimensional quantum dynamical calculations.

  15. Photoassociation of a cold-atom-molecule pair. II. Second-order perturbation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lepers, M.; Vexiau, R.; Bouloufa, N.; Dulieu, O.; Kokoouline, V.

    2011-04-15

    The electrostatic interaction between an excited atom and a diatomic ground-state molecule in an arbitrary rovibrational level at large mutual separations is investigated with a general second-order perturbation theory, in the perspective of modeling the photoassociation between cold atoms and molecules. We find that the combination of quadrupole-quadrupole and van der Waals interactions competes with the rotational energy of the dimer, limiting the range of validity of the perturbative approach to distances larger than 100 Bohr radii. Numerical results are given for the long-range interaction between Cs and Cs{sub 2}, showing that the photoassociation is probably efficient for any Cs{sub 2} rotational energy.

  16. Student perception and conceptual development as represented by student mental models of atomic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eun Jung

    The nature of matter based upon atomic theory is a principal concept in science; hence, how to teach and how to learn about atoms is an important subject for science education. To this end, this study explored student perceptions of atomic structure and how students learn about this concept by analyzing student mental models of atomic structure. Changes in student mental models serve as a valuable resource for comprehending student conceptual development. Data was collected from students who were taking the introductory chemistry course. Responses to course examinations, pre- and post-questionnaires, and pre- and post-interviews were used to analyze student mental models of atomic structure. First, this study reveals that conceptual development can be achieved, either by elevating mental models toward higher levels of understanding or by developing a single mental model. This study reinforces the importance of higher-order thinking skills to enable students to relate concepts in order to construct a target model of atomic structure. Second, Bohr's orbital structure seems to have had a strong influence on student perceptions of atomic structure. With regard to this finding, this study suggests that it is instructionally important to teach the concept of "orbitals" related to "quantum theory." Third, there were relatively few students who had developed understanding at the level of the target model, which required student understanding of the basic ideas of quantum theory. This study suggests that the understanding of atomic structure based on the idea of quantum theory is both important and difficult. Fourth, this study included different student assessments comprised of course examinations, questionnaires, and interviews. Each assessment can be used to gather information to map out student mental models. Fifth, in the comparison of the pre- and post-interview responses, this study showed that high achieving students moved toward more improved models or to advanced

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Filenko, Nina A.; Palets, Dmytro B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their populationmore » was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed.« less

  18. Structure of magnetic resonance in 87Rb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. N.; Zibrov, S. A.; Zibrov, A. A.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Tsygankov, E. A.; Zibrov, A. S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Velichansky, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance at the F g = 1 rightleftarrows F e = 1 transition of the D 1 line in 87Rb has been studied with pumping and detection by linearly polarized radiation and detection at the double frequency of the radiofrequency field. The intervals of allowed values of the static and alternating magnetic fields in which magnetic resonance has a single maximum have been found. The structure appearing beyond these intervals has been explained. It has been shown that the quadratic Zeeman shift is responsible for the three-peak structure of resonance; the radiofrequency shift results in the appearance of additional extrema in resonance, which can be used to determine the relaxation constant Γ2. The possibility of application in magnetometry has been discussed.

  19. Electron spectra and structure of atomic and molecular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in electronic structure that occur during the stepwise transition from gas phase monomers to large clusters which resemble the condensed phase were studied. This basic information on weakly bound clusters is critical to the understanding of such phenomena as nucleation, aerosol formation, catalysis, and gas-to-particle conversion, yet there exist almost no experimental data on neutral particle energy levels or binding energies as a function of cluster size. (GHT)

  20. Quantitative Statistical Analysis of Atomic Scale Structural and Chemical Variations in Complex Oxides Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao

    Grain boundaries (GBs) are known to have far-reaching effects on the electrical and mechanical properties of materials. Understanding the atomic scale mechanisms behind these effects requires an accurate determination of the interplay between GB structure and composition. Based on the analysis of a range of grain boundaries using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), a general structural units model has been derived for the structure of grain boundaries in various dense packing cubic materials including FCC metals, perovskites and fluorites. The similarities in the observed grain boundary structures of these materials originate from related space (and point) group symmetries of the parent structures. The presence of structural variations away from the general structural units model may be caused by frustrations of certain symmetry operations that result from the incorporation of point defects (vacancies and impurities). A clear understanding of the similarity and variation in grain boundary atomic structures will not only provide a means to infer the structure-property relationships in broad classes of materials, but also enables us eventually to effectively manipulate the GB structures to achieve better materials properties. To understand these chemical induced variations, and further quantify exactly how atomic scale variations at the boundary plane extend to the practical mesoscale operating length of the system, statistical analysis has been applied to the aberration corrected STEM Z-contrast images acquired from a series of undoped and doped SrTiO3 GBs. In order to understand the effects of oxygen vacancies incorporation, in-situ characterization of GB atomic structures were performed using the Environmental TEM under the reduced gas and heating environment. This analysis of GB similarity and variation provides insights into the structure-composition relationship in GBs to understand the influence of nonstoichiometry and dopant

  1. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and antimicrobial studies of a novel Cu(II) complex based on itaconic acid and nicotinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tella, Adedibu C.; Owalude, Samson O.; Ajibade, Peter A.; Simon, Nzikahyel; Olatunji, Sunday J.; Abdelbaky, Mohammed S. M.; Garcia-Granda, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    A novel complex was synthesized from Cu(II), nicotinamide and itaconic acid and is formulated as [Cu(C5H4O4)2(C6H6N2O)2(H2O)2·2(H2O)] (1). The compound was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic P-1 space group, with a = 7.5111(2) Å, b = 9.8529(3) Å, c = 10.5118(4) Å, α = 116.244(3)°, β = 90.291(3)°, γ = 103.335(3)°, V = 673.81(4) Å3, Z = 1.The octahedral geometry around the copper(II) ion is of the form CuN2O4 consisting of two molecules of nicotinamide acting as monodentate ligand through the nitrogen atoms, two molecules itaconate ligand and two coordinated water molecules each coordinating through the oxygen atoms. The structure of 1 showed infinite chains build up linking the molecules together via strong Osbnd H⋯O and Nsbnd H⋯O intermolecular hydrogen bonds generating a two dimensional network sheet along c axis. The antimicrobial study of the synthesized complex 1 was investigated and showed higher antibacterial activity against all the organisms comparing with Copper(II) nicotinamide 2 and Copper(II) itaconate 3.

  2. Atomic Structure of Au329(SR)84 Faradaurate Plasmonic Nanomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Jan; Cullen, David; Dass, Amala

    2015-04-03

    To design novel nanomaterials, it is important to precisely control the composition, determine the atomic structure, and manipulate the structure to tune the materials property. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the material whose composition is Au329(SR)84 precisely, therefore referred to as a nanomolecule. The size homogeneity was shown by electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and mass spectrometry. We proposed its atomic structure to contain the Au260 core using experiments and modeling of a total-scattering-based atomic-pair distribution functional analysis. HAADF-STEM images shows fcc-like 2.0 ± 0.1 nm diameter nanomolecules.

  3. Modelling the atomic structure of Al92U8 metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Michalik, S; Bednarcik, J; Jóvári, P; Honkimäki, V; Webb, A; Franz, H; Fazakas, E; Varga, L K

    2010-10-13

    The local atomic structure of the glassy Al(92)U(8) alloy was modelled by the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method, fitting x-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) signals. The final structural model was analysed by means of partial pair correlation functions, coordination number distributions and Voronoi tessellation. In our study we found that the most probable atomic separations between Al-Al and U-Al pairs in the glassy Al(92)U(8) alloy are 2.7 Å and 3.1 Å with coordination numbers 11.7 and 17.1, respectively. The Voronoi analysis did not support evidence of the existence of well-defined building blocks directly embedded in the amorphous matrix. The dense-random-packing model seems to be adequate for describing the connection between solvent and solute atoms. PMID:21386570

  4. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  5. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature. PMID:27220411

  6. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-25

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous-crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  7. Crystal structure of bis­(azido-κN)bis­(quinolin-8-amine-κ2 N,N′)iron(II)

    PubMed Central

    Setifi, Fatima; Moon, Dohyun; Koen, Robeyns; Setifi, Zouaoui; Lamsayah, Morad; Touzani, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    The search for new mol­ecular materials with inter­esting magnetic properties using the pseudohalide azide ion and quinolin-8-amine (aqin, C9H8N2) as a chelating ligand, led to the synthesis and structure determination of the title complex, [Fe(N3)2(C9H8N2)2]. The complex shows an octa­hedral geometry, with the FeII atom surrounded by six N atoms; the two N3 − anions coordinate in a cis configuration, while the remaining N atoms originate from the two quinolin-8-amine ligands with the quinoline N atoms lying on opposite sides of the Fe atom. The crystal packing is dominated by layers of hydro­philic and aromatic regions parallel to the ac plane, stabilized by a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network and π–π stacking. PMID:27746947

  8. Toward the atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex: when top down meets bottom up.

    PubMed

    Hoelz, André; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Elucidating the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a prerequisite for understanding the molecular mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, owing to its sheer size and flexibility, the NPC is unapproachable by classical structure determination techniques and requires a joint effort of complementary methods. Whereas bottom-up approaches rely on biochemical interaction studies and crystal-structure determination of NPC components, top-down approaches attempt to determine the structure of the intact NPC in situ. Recently, both approaches have converged, thereby bridging the resolution gap from the higher-order scaffold structure to near-atomic resolution and opening the door for structure-guided experimental interrogations of NPC function.

  9. Structural Preferences in Phosphanylthiolato Platinum(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Duran, Josep; Polo, Alfonso; Real, Julio; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Solà, Miquel; Poater, Albert

    2016-02-01

    The transition-metal complexes of heterotopic phosphanylthiolato ligands are useful in various reactions which depend on the stereochemistry of the complexes. Bis-chelate complex [Pt(SCH2CH2PPh2-κ(2) P,S)2] (1) was obtained in good yields by direct base-free substitution reaction of the corresponding phosphanylthiol (HSCH2CH2PPh2) with K2PtCl4 or by oxidative addition of the same phosphanylthiol to Pt(PPh3)4. In agreement with the antisymbiosis rule, complex 1 shows a cis-P,P arrangement in solid state crystallizing in the monoclinic system (C2/c). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on 1 reveal the right characteristics for the preferred cis-P,P arrangement, rationalizing its formation. Direct base-free reaction of [PtCl2(1,5-cyclooctadiene)] with one equivalent of the same phosphanylthiol produce the trinuclear complex [PtCl(μ-SCH2CH2PPh2-κ(2) P,S)]3 (2) instead of the binuclear structure common in palladium and nickel derivatives. Crystals of 2 are triclinic (P 1‾ ) showing a sulfur-bridging edge-sharing cyclic trinuclear complex with square-planar coordination geometry around the platinum atoms and a Pt3S3 cycle in skew-boat conformation. This preference for the trinuclear structure was rationalized mechanistically and through conceptual DFT. PMID:27308212

  10. Structural Preferences in Phosphanylthiolato Platinum(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Josep; Real, Julio; Benet‐Buchholz, Jordi; Solà, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The transition‐metal complexes of heterotopic phosphanylthiolato ligands are useful in various reactions which depend on the stereochemistry of the complexes. Bis‐chelate complex [Pt(SCH2CH2PPh2‐κ2 P,S)2] (1) was obtained in good yields by direct base‐free substitution reaction of the corresponding phosphanylthiol (HSCH2CH2PPh2) with K2PtCl4 or by oxidative addition of the same phosphanylthiol to Pt(PPh3)4. In agreement with the antisymbiosis rule, complex 1 shows a cis‐P,P arrangement in solid state crystallizing in the monoclinic system (C2/c). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on 1 reveal the right characteristics for the preferred cis‐P,P arrangement, rationalizing its formation. Direct base‐free reaction of [PtCl2(1,5‐cyclooctadiene)] with one equivalent of the same phosphanylthiol produce the trinuclear complex [PtCl(μ‐SCH2CH2PPh2‐κ2 P,S)]3 (2) instead of the binuclear structure common in palladium and nickel derivatives. Crystals of 2 are triclinic (P 1‾ ) showing a sulfur‐bridging edge‐sharing cyclic trinuclear complex with square‐planar coordination geometry around the platinum atoms and a Pt3S3 cycle in skew‐boat conformation. This preference for the trinuclear structure was rationalized mechanistically and through conceptual DFT. PMID:27308212

  11. Structural Investigation of Zn(II) Insertion in Bayerite, an Aluminum Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Suraj Shiv Charan; Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Forano, Claude; Rees, Gregory J; Prevot, Vanessa; Hanna, John V; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-19

    Bayerite was treated under hydrothermal conditions (120, 130, 140, and 150 °C) to prepare a series of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with an ideal composition of ZnAl4(OH)12(SO4)0.5·nH2O (ZnAl4-LDHs). These products were investigated by both bulk techniques (powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis) and atomic-level techniques ((1)H and (27)Al solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy) to gain a detailed insight into the structure of ZnAl4-LDHs and sample composition. Four structural models (one stoichiometric and three different defect models) were investigated by Rietveld refinement of the PXRD data. These were assessed using the information obtained from other characterization techniques, which favored the ideal (nondefect) structural model for ZnAl4-LDH, as, for example, (27)Al magic-angle spinning NMR showed that excess Al was present as amorphous bayerite (Al(OH)3) and pseudoboehmite (AlOOH). Moreover, no evidence of cation mixing, that is, partial substitution of Zn(II) onto any of four Al sites, was observed. Altogether this study highlights the challenges involved to synthesize pure ZnAl4-LDHs and the necessity to use complementary techniques such as PXRD, elemental analysis, and solid-state NMR for the characterization of the local and extended structure of ZnAl4-LDHs. PMID:27598036

  12. Structural Investigation of Zn(II) Insertion in Bayerite, an Aluminum Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Suraj Shiv Charan; Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Forano, Claude; Rees, Gregory J; Prevot, Vanessa; Hanna, John V; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-19

    Bayerite was treated under hydrothermal conditions (120, 130, 140, and 150 °C) to prepare a series of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with an ideal composition of ZnAl4(OH)12(SO4)0.5·nH2O (ZnAl4-LDHs). These products were investigated by both bulk techniques (powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis) and atomic-level techniques ((1)H and (27)Al solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy) to gain a detailed insight into the structure of ZnAl4-LDHs and sample composition. Four structural models (one stoichiometric and three different defect models) were investigated by Rietveld refinement of the PXRD data. These were assessed using the information obtained from other characterization techniques, which favored the ideal (nondefect) structural model for ZnAl4-LDH, as, for example, (27)Al magic-angle spinning NMR showed that excess Al was present as amorphous bayerite (Al(OH)3) and pseudoboehmite (AlOOH). Moreover, no evidence of cation mixing, that is, partial substitution of Zn(II) onto any of four Al sites, was observed. Altogether this study highlights the challenges involved to synthesize pure ZnAl4-LDHs and the necessity to use complementary techniques such as PXRD, elemental analysis, and solid-state NMR for the characterization of the local and extended structure of ZnAl4-LDHs.

  13. Synthesis, crystal structure and antifungal activity of a divalent cobalt(II) complex with uniconazole.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Jie; Ren, Guoyu; Qin, Baofu; Ma, Haixia

    2016-06-01

    Azole compounds have attracted commercial interest due to their high bactericidal and plant-growth-regulating activities. Uniconazole [or 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pent-1-en-3-ol] is a highly active 1,2,4-triazole fungicide and plant-growth regulator with low toxicity. The pharmacological and toxicological properties of many drugs are modified by the formation of their metal complexes. Therefore, there is much interest in exploiting the coordination chemistry of triazole pesticides and their potential application in agriculture. However, reports of complexes of uniconazole are rare. A new cobalt(II) complex of uniconazole, namely dichloridotetrakis[1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl-κN(4))pent-1-en-3-ol]cobalt(II), [CoCl2(C15H18ClN3O)4], was synthesized and structurally characterized by element analysis, IR spectrometry and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The crystal structural analysis shows that the Co(II) atom is located on the inversion centre and is coordinated by four uniconazole and two chloride ligands, forming a distorted octahedral geometry. The hydroxy groups of an uniconazole ligands of adjacent molecules form hydrogen bonds with the axial chloride ligands, resulting in one-dimensional chains parallel to the a axis. The complex was analysed for its antifungal activity by the mycelial growth rate method. It was revealed that the antifungal effect of the title complex is more pronounced than the effect of fungicide uniconazole for Botryosphaeria ribis, Wheat gibberellic and Grape anthracnose. PMID:27256696

  14. Determination of atomic structure at surfaces and interfaces by high-resolution stem

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Chisholm, M.F.; Nellist, P.D.; Browning, N.D.; Wallis, D.J.; Dickey, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    It is over 100 y since Lord Rayleigh first showed the differences between coherent and incoherent imaging in the light microscope, pointing out the advantages of the latter for resolution and image interpretation. The annular detector in the high-resolution STEM provides the same advantages for electrons, allowing incoherent imaging at atomic resolution, with image contrast strongly dependent on atomic number (Z). Since incoherent imaging has no phase problem, these Z-contrast images may be directly inverted to given the (projected) atomic positions. A maximum entropy method avoids false detail associated with direct deconvolution, and gives atomic coordinates to an accuracy of {+-}0.1{Angstrom}. Electron energy loss spectroscopy can provide valuable complementary information on light element bonding and the presence of impurities in specific atomic planes selected from the image. Together, these techniques have revealed some surprisingly complex interfacial structures. For surface studies, the 1.3{Angstrom} probe of the VG Microscopes HB603U STEM provides sufficient penetration and contrast to image single Pt and Rh atoms on {gamma}-alumina supports. Such images reveal preferred atomic configurations and allow possible surface adsorption sites to be deduced.

  15. Atomic structure of icosahedral B4C boron carbide from a first principles analysis of NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Mauri, F; Vast, N; Pickard, C J

    2001-08-20

    Density functional theory is demonstrated to reproduce the 13C and 11B NMR chemical shifts of icosahedral boron carbides with sufficient accuracy to extract previously unresolved structural information from experimental NMR spectra. B4C can be viewed as an arrangement of 3-atom linear chains and 12-atom icosahedra. According to our results, all the chains have a CBC structure. Most of the icosahedra have a B11C structure with the C atom placed in a polar site, and a few percent have a B (12) structure or a B10C2 structure with the two C atoms placed in two antipodal polar sites.

  16. Theoretical study of the Pb(II)-catechol system in dilute aqueous solution: Complex structure and metal coordination sphere determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapouge, Christine; Cornard, Jean-Paul

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the unknown interaction of Pb(II) with catechol ligand in diluted aqueous solution by electronic spectroscopies combined with quantum chemical calculations. The aim of this work is the determination of the complete structure of the complex formed and particularly the metal coordination sphere. Three successive steps have been necessary to reach this goal: (i) the comparison of the experimental electronic absorption spectrum with theoretical spectra calculated from various hypothetical structures, (ii) complexation reaction pathways calculations in vacuum and with taking into account the solvent effects and finally (iii) the fluorescence emission wavelength calculations. All these investigations led to identify a monodentate complex with the monodeprotonated ligand, in which the Pb atom presents a coordination number of five. The formula of the complex is [Pb(Hcat)(HO)4]mono+.

  17. Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure of NAD+-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Bacterium Moraxella sp. C-1

    PubMed Central

    Shabalin, I.G.; Polyakov, K.M.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of the ternary complex of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from the methylotrophic bacterium Moraxella sp. C-1 with the cofactor (NAD+) and the inhibitor (azide ion) was established at 1.1 A resolution. The complex mimics the structure of the transition state of the enzymatic reaction. The structure was refined with anisotropic displacitalicents parameters for non-hydrogen atoms to a R factor of 13.4%. Most of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon atoms were distinguished based on the analysis of the titalicperature factors and electron density peaks, with the result that side-chain rotamers of histidine residues and most of asparagine and glutamine residues were unambiguously determined. A comparative analysis of the structure of the ternary complex determined at the atomic resolution and the structure of this complex at 1.95 A resolution was performed. In the atomic resolution structure, the covalent bonds in the nicotinamide group are somewhat changed in agreitalicent with the results of quantum mechanical calculations, providing evidence that the cofactor acquires a bipolar form in the transition state of the enzymatic reaction. PMID:22649619

  18. Volumes and surface areas: geometries and scaling relationships between coarse- grained and atomic structures.

    PubMed

    Flatow, Daniel; Leelananda, Sumudu P; Skliros, Aris; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Computing volumes and surface areas of molecular structures is generally considered to be a solved problem, however, comparisons presented in this review show that different ways of computing surface areas and volumes can yield dramatically different values. Volumes and surface areas are the most basic geometric properties of structures, and estimating these becomes especially important for large scale simulations when individual components are being assembled in protein complexes or drugs being fitted into proteins. Good approximations of volumes and surfaces are derived from Delaunay tessellations, but these values can differ significantly from those from the rolling ball approach of Lee and Richards (3V webserver). The origin of these differences lies in the extended parts and the less well packed parts of the proteins, which are ignored in some approaches. Even though surface areas and volumes from the two approaches differ significantly, their correlations are high. Atomic models have been compared, and the poorly packed regions of proteins are found to be most different between the two approaches. The Delaunay complexes have been explored for both fully atomic and for coarse-grained representations of proteins based on only C(α) atoms. The scaling relationships between the fully atomic models and the coarse-grained model representations of proteins are reported, and the lines fit yield simple relationships for the surface areas and volumes as a function of the number of protein residues and the number of heavy atoms. Further, the atomic and coarse-grained values are strongly correlated and simple relationships are reported.

  19. Spatially localized structures and oscillons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charukhchyan, M. V.; Sedov, E. S.; Arakelian, S. M.; Alodjants, A. P.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of formation of small-amplitude spatially localized oscillatory structures for atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in two- and three-dimensional optical lattices, respectively. Our approach is based on applying the regions with different signs of atomic effective masses where an atomic system exhibits effective hyperbolic dispersion within the first Brillouin zone. By using the kp method we have demonstrated mapping of the initial Gross-Pitaevskii equation on nonlinear Klein-Gordon and/or Ginzburg-Landau-Higgs equations, which is inherent in matter fields within ϕ4-field theories. Formation of breatherlike oscillating localized states—atomic oscillons—as well as kink-shaped states have been predicted in this case. Apart from classical field theories atomic field oscillons occurring in finite lattice structures possess a critical number of particles for their formation. The obtained results pave the way to simulating some analogues of fundamental cosmological processes occurring during our Universe's evolution and to modeling nonlinear hyperbolic metamaterials with condensed matter (atomic) systems.

  20. Crystal structures and Hirshfeld surface analysis calculations of mercury(II) complexes with a diiminopyridine ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Mahmoudi, Ghodrat; Garczarek, Piotr; Hazendonk, Paul; Abedi, Marjan; Servati Gargari, Masoumeh

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of a diiminopyridine ligand, N,N‧-bis(phenyl(pyridin-2-yl)methylene)propane-1,3-diamine (L), with mercury(II) salts gave two complexes namely [Hg(L)Cl]·0.5[Hg2Cl6] (1) and [Hg(L)(μ-I)HgI3] (2), which were characterized by XRD, NMR and FTIR. The crystal structure of 1 consists of discrete units of [Hg(L)CI]+cations and [Hg2C16]2- anions in the ratio 2:1. The coordination of mercury in the cation is approximately square pyramidal (sp), the metal center is chelated in a tetradentate manner by the ligand and further coordinated by one chlorine atom. In 2 the packing can be described as units of μ-I-connected square pyramidal (sp) and tetrahedral Hg complexes. The sp coordination around the metal atom is defined by the N4 donor set of the ligand and one bridging iodide. The hydrogen-chlorine donor-accepter interactions in 1 stabilize an infinite 1-D chain; however, such interactions were not observed in 2. Analysis of their Hirshfeld surfaces indicates that the molecules in 1 and 2 are packed predominately by means of van der Waals forces, 'edge to face' aromatic ring packing and weak C-H··X donor-acceptor interactions.

  1. Plausible molecular and crystal structures of chitosan/HI type II salt.

    PubMed

    Lertworasirikul, Amornrat; Noguchi, Keiichi; Ogawa, Kozo; Okuyama, Kenji

    2004-03-15

    Chitosan/HI type II salt prepared from crab tendon was investigated by X-ray fiber diffraction. Two polymer chains and 16 iodide ions (I(-)) crystallized in a tetragonal unit cell with lattice parameters of a = b = 10.68(3), c (fiber axis) = 40.77(13) A, and a space group P4(1). Chitosan forms a fourfold helix with a 40.77 A fiber period having a disaccharide as the helical asymmetric unit. One of the O-3... O-5 intramolecular hydrogen bonds at the glycosidic linkage is weakened by interacting with iodide ions, which seems to cause the polymer to take the 4/1-helical symmetry rather than the extended 2/1-helix. The plausible orientations of two O-6 atoms in the helical asymmetric unit were found to be gt and gg. Two chains are running through at the corner and the center of the unit cell along the c-axis. They are linked by hydrogen bonds between N-21 and O-61 atoms. Two out of four independent iodide ions are packed between the corner chains while the other two are packed between the corner and center chains when viewing through the ab-plane. The crystal structure of the salt is stabilized by hydrogen bonds between these iodide ions and N-21, N-22, O-32, O-61, O-62 of the polymer chains.

  2. Crystal structure of catena-poly[[aqua(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-κ(3) N,N',N'')cobalt(II)]-μ-cyanido-κ(2) N:C-[dicyanidoplatinum(II)]-μ-cyanido-κ(2) C:N].

    PubMed

    White, Frankie; Sykora, Richard E

    2014-09-01

    The title compound, [Co(C15H11N3)(H2O){Pt(CN)4}] n , is a one-dimensional coordination polymer formed under hydro-thermal reaction conditions. The Co(II) site has sixfold coordination with a distorted octa-hedral geometry, while the Pt(II) ion is coordinated by four cyanide groups in an almost regular square-planar geometry. The compound contains twofold rotation symmetry about its Co(II) ion, the water molecule and the terpyridine ligand, and the Pt(II) atom resides on an inversion center. trans-Bridging by the tetra-cyanidoplatinate(II) anions links the Co(II) cations, forming chains parallel to [-101]. Additionally, each Co(II) atom is coordin-ated by one water mol-ecule and one tridentate 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine ligand. O-H⋯N hydrogen-bonding inter-actions are found between adjacent chains and help to consolidate the crystal packing. In addition, relatively weak π-π stacking inter-actions exist between the terpyridine ligands of adjacent chains [inter-planar distance = 3.464 (7) Å]. No Pt⋯Pt inter-actions are observed in the structure. PMID:25309181

  3. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of the atomic structure of nanoparticles in different metallic matrices.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Gurman, S J; Binns, C

    2009-05-01

    It has been appreciated for some time that the novel properties of particles in the size range 1-10 nm are potentially exploitable in a range of applications. In order to ultimately produce commercial devices containing nanosized particles, it is necessary to develop controllable means of incorporating them into macroscopic samples. One way of doing this is to embed the nanoparticles in a matrix of a different material, by co-deposition for example, to form a nanocomposite film. The atomic structure of the embedded particles can be strongly influenced by the matrix. Since some of the key properties of materials, including magnetism, strongly depend on atomic structure, the ability to determine atomic structure in embedded nanoparticles is very important. This review focuses on nanoparticles, in particular magnetic nanoparticles, embedded in different metal matrices. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provides an excellent means of probing atomic structure in nanocomposite materials, and an overview of this technique is given. Its application in probing catalytic metal clusters is described briefly, before giving an account of the use of EXAFS in determining atomic structure in magnetic nanocomposite films. In particular, we focus on cluster-assembled films comprised of Fe and Co nanosized particles embedded in various metal matrices, and show how the crystal structure of the particles can be changed by appropriate choice of the matrix material. The work discussed here demonstrates that combining the results of structural and magnetic measurements, as well as theoretical calculations, can play a significant part in tailoring the properties of new magnetic cluster-assembled materials.

  4. Materials by Design—A Perspective From Atoms to Structures

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-01-01

    Biological materials are effectively synthesized, controlled, and used for a variety of purposes—in spite of limitations in energy, quality, and quantity of their building blocks. Whereas the chemical composition of materials in the living world plays a some role in achieving functional properties, the way components are connected at different length scales defines what material properties can be achieved, how they can be altered to meet functional requirements, and how they fail in disease states and other extreme conditions. Recent work has demonstrated this by using large-scale computer simulations to predict materials properties from fundamental molecular principles, combined with experimental work and new mathematical techniques to categorize complex structure-property relationships into a systematic framework. Enabled by such categorization, we discuss opportunities based on the exploitation of concepts from distinct hierarchical systems that share common principles in how function is created, linking music to materials science. PMID:24163499

  5. Materials by Design-A Perspective From Atoms to Structures.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Markus J

    2013-02-01

    Biological materials are effectively synthesized, controlled, and used for a variety of purposes-in spite of limitations in energy, quality, and quantity of their building blocks. Whereas the chemical composition of materials in the living world plays a some role in achieving functional properties, the way components are connected at different length scales defines what material properties can be achieved, how they can be altered to meet functional requirements, and how they fail in disease states and other extreme conditions. Recent work has demonstrated this by using large-scale computer simulations to predict materials properties from fundamental molecular principles, combined with experimental work and new mathematical techniques to categorize complex structure-property relationships into a systematic framework. Enabled by such categorization, we discuss opportunities based on the exploitation of concepts from distinct hierarchical systems that share common principles in how function is created, linking music to materials science. PMID:24163499

  6. Materials by Design-A Perspective From Atoms to Structures.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Markus J

    2013-02-01

    Biological materials are effectively synthesized, controlled, and used for a variety of purposes-in spite of limitations in energy, quality, and quantity of their building blocks. Whereas the chemical composition of materials in the living world plays a some role in achieving functional properties, the way components are connected at different length scales defines what material properties can be achieved, how they can be altered to meet functional requirements, and how they fail in disease states and other extreme conditions. Recent work has demonstrated this by using large-scale computer simulations to predict materials properties from fundamental molecular principles, combined with experimental work and new mathematical techniques to categorize complex structure-property relationships into a systematic framework. Enabled by such categorization, we discuss opportunities based on the exploitation of concepts from distinct hierarchical systems that share common principles in how function is created, linking music to materials science.

  7. Energetic Materials and Atomic Force Microscopy: Structure and Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, B.L.; Weese, R.K.; Zaug, J.M.

    2002-07-31

    Understanding the structure and composition of energetic materials at the sub-micron level is imperative for the fundamental studies of hot-spot formation and structural composition of energetic materials. Using in situ high-temperature AFM we have observed the solid-solid phase transition of Octahydro-1,3,5,7,-tetrazocine, HMX, in real time. Massive surface reconstruction occurs during the 1st-order transition. The temperature induced increase in void space and surface roughness observed in the delta phase polymorph of HMX serve to increase the growth rate and volume of shock initiated hot spots and possibly reaction sensitivity. HMX exists in four solid phase polymorphs, labeled {alpha}, {beta}, {chi}, and {delta}. The phase conversion of the {beta} phase to the {delta} phase involves a major disruption of the crystal lattice. The energy required to bring about this change is a measurable quantity. Multiple thermal analysis techniques carried out simultaneously are preferable because the results are directly comparable. Thermal methods are dynamic techniques, where heating or cooling is applied to a sample, unless isothermal conditions are employed. Thermogravimetic Analysis, TGA, can be used to quantify decomposition components in a substance while Differential Thermal Analysis, DTA, can be used to measure the heat flow or the specific heat capacity, with respect to time and temperature. The advantage of TGA/DTA analysis is that the measurement of weight loss and heat flow are taken simultaneously and the observed events are directly related with respect to time and temperature. TGA/DTA experiments were performed to help us take a different look at the chemical nature of HMX and aid us in understanding the void formation process.

  8. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms. II - Infinite order sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1979-01-01

    The infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation is extended to rotational excitation of symmetric tops by collisions with atoms. After development of a formalism for 'primitive' or 'one-ended' tops, proper parity-adapted linear combinations describing real rotors are considered and modifications needed for asymmetric rigid rotors are noted. The generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are discussed. IOS calculations for NH3-He and H2CO-He are performed and compared with more accurate calculations, and the IOS approximation is found to provide a reasonably accurate description.

  9. Constructing Atomic-Resolution RNA Structural Ensembles Using MD and Motionally Decoupled NMR RDCs

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Andrew C.; Frank, Aaron T.; Bailor, Maximillian H.; Andricioaei, Ioan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2012-01-01

    A broad structural landscape often needs to be characterized in order to fully understand how regulatory RNAs perform their biological functions at the atomic level. We present a protocol for visualizing thermally accessible RNA conformations at atomic-resolution and with timescales extending up to milliseconds. The protocol combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with experimental residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured in partially aligned 13C/15N isotopically enriched elongated RNA samples. The structural ensembles generated in this manner provide insights into RNA dynamics and its role in functionally important transitions. PMID:19699798

  10. Atomic calligraphy: the direct writing of nanoscale structures using a microelectromechanical system.

    PubMed

    Imboden, Matthias; Han, Han; Chang, Jackson; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A; Lowell, Evan; Bishop, David J

    2013-07-10

    We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist-free patterning of nanostructures. Using a focused ion beam to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures with features less than 50 nm in diameter on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20 × 20 μm(2). Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter positioned micrometers above the aperture enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. With this shutter, different-sized apertures can be opened and closed selectively for nanostructure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms. PMID:23782403

  11. Synthesis, structure and electrochemical behavior of a 3D crystalline copper(II) metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hong-Ye; Fan, Wei-Qiang; Liu, Chun-Bo; Shi, Wei-Dong; Yan, Yong-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    Using an flexible amide-type tripodal ligand N,N‧,N″-tris(3-pyridyl)-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamide (L) and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H2bdc), a three-dimensional copper(II) metal-organic framework (MOF) formulated as [Cu(bdc)(L)]n has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by IR, elemental, X-ray single-crystal diffraction and thermal analysis. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic, space group P - 1, a = 8.891(2) Å, b = 11.760(2) Å, c = 15.348(3) Å, α = 96.73(3)°, β = 105.96(3)°, γ = 106.47(3)°, V = 1446.2(5) Å3, Mr = 666.10, Dc = 1.530 g/cm3, Z = 2, F(000) = 682, GOOF = 1.0560, μ(MoKα) = 0.817 mm-1, R = 0.0366 and wR = 0.0885. The structural analyses reveal that the title compound consists of one Cu(II) atom, two halves of bdc, and one L ligand. Each Cu(II) atom is linked by two bdc ligands and three L ligands to form a three-dimensional network. In addition, the electrochemical behavior of title compound has been studied. CCDC No. 990526.

  12. Atomic structure, alloying behavior, and magnetism in small Fe-Pt clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittari, Bheema Lingam; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-09-01

    We report results of the atomic structure, alloying behavior, and magnetism in F emP tn(m +n =2 -10 ) clusters using projector augmented wave (PAW) pseudopotential method and spin-polarized generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy. These results are compared with those obtained by using HCTH exchange-correlation functional and LANL2DZ basis set in the Gaussian program and the overall trends are found to be similar. As in bulk Fe-Pt alloys, clusters with equal composition of Fe and Pt have the largest binding energy and the largest heat of nanoalloy formation for a given number of atoms in the cluster. There are some deviations due to the different symmetries in clusters and in cases where the total number of atoms is odd. The lowest energy isomers tend to maximize bonds between unlike atoms with Fe (Pt) atoms occupying high (low) coordination sites in the core (surface) of the cluster. The binding energy, heat of formation, and the second order difference of the total energy show F e2P t2 , F e4P t4 , and F e4P t6 clusters to be the most stable ones among the different clusters we have studied. The magnetic moments on Fe atoms are high in Pt-rich clusters as well as in small Fe-rich clusters and decrease as the aggregation of Fe atoms and the cluster size increases. The maximum value of the magnetic moments on Fe atoms is ˜3.8 μB , whereas for Pt atoms it is 1 μB. These are quite high compared with the values for bulk Fe as well as bulk FePt and F e3Pt phases while bulk Pt is nonmagnetic. There is significant charge transfer from those Fe atoms that interact directly with Pt atoms. We discuss the hybridization between the electronic states of Pt and Fe atoms as well as the variation in the magnetic moments on Fe and Pt atoms. Our results provide insight into the understanding of the nanoalloy behavior of Fe-Pt and we hope that this would help to design Fe based nanoalloys and their assemblies with high magnetic moments for

  13. Photonic band gap response of structurally modified non-close-packed inverse opals by template directed multilayer atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graugnard, Elton; Gaillot, Davy P.; King, Jeffrey S.; Summers, Christopher J.

    2006-04-01

    We report the controllable and tunable fabrication of structurally modified non-close-packed inverse shell opals using multi-layer atomic layer deposition and present a model and simulation algorithm to calculate the structural parameters critical to fabrication. This powerful, flexible and unique technique enables opal inversion, structural modification and backfilling and was applied to the fabrication of TiO II non-close-packed inverse opals. Using successive conformal backfilling it was possible to tune the Bragg peak over 600 nm and enhance the Bragg peak width by >50%. Additionally, band structure calculations, using dielectric functions approximating the true network topology, were used to predict the optical properties during the fabrication process. 3D finite-difference-time-domain results predict experimentally achievable structures with a complete band gap as large as 7.2%. Additionally, the refractive index requirement was predicted to decrease from 3.3 in an 86% infiltrated inverse shell opal to 3.0 in an optimized non-close-packed inverse shell opal. It was also shown for these structures that the complete photonic band gap peak can be statically tuned by over 70% by increasing the backfilled thickness.

  14. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of Co(II) and Ni(II) PCP Pincer Borohydride Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 15e square-planar complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (2a) and [Co(PCP-tBu)Cl] (2b), respectively, react readily with NaBH4 to afford complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (4a) and [Co(PCP-tBu)(η2-BH4)] (4b) in high yields, as confirmed by IR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and elemental analysis. The borohydride ligand is symmetrically bound to the cobalt center in η2-fashion. These compounds are paramagnetic with effective magnetic moments of 2.0(1) and 2.1(1) μB consistent with a d7 low-spin system corresponding to one unpaired electron. None of these complexes reacted with CO2 to give formate complexes. For structural and reactivity comparisons, we prepared the analogous Ni(II) borohydride complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) via two different synthetic routes. One utilizes [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (3) and NaBH4, the second one makes use of the hydride complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)H] (6) and BH3·THF. In both cases, 5 is obtained in high yields. In contrast to 4a and 4b, the borohydride ligand is asymmetrically bound to the nickel center but still in an η2-mode. [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) loses readily BH3 at elevated temperatures in the presence of NEt3 to form 6. Complexes 5 and 6 are both diamagnetic and were characterized by a combination of 1H, 13C{1H}, and 31P{1H} NMR, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Additionally, the structure of these compounds was established by X-ray crystallography. Complexes 5 and 6 react with CO2 to give the formate complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(OC(C=O)H] (7). The extrusion of BH3 from [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (4a) and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) with the aid of NH3 to yield the respective hydride complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)H] and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)H] (6) and BH3NH3 was investigated by DFT calculations showing that formation of the Ni hydride is thermodynamically favorable, whereas the formation of the Co(II) hydride, in agreement with the experiment, is unfavorable. The electronic structures and the bonding of the borohydride ligand in [Co

  15. Homochiral Cu(II) and Ni(II) malates with tunable structural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavakhina, Marina S.; Samsonenko, Denis G.; Virovets, Alexander V.; Dybtsev, Danil N.; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2014-02-01

    Four new homochiral metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on S-malate anions and N-donor linkers of different length have been prepared under solvothermal conditions. [Cu(mal)(bpy)]·H2O (1), [Cu(mal)(bpe)]·2H2O (2), [Ni(mal)(bpy)]·1.3CH3OH (3) and [Ni(mal)(bpe)]·4H2O (4) (mal=S-malate, bpy=4,4‧-bipyridil, bpe=trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene) were characterized by a number of analytical methods including powder X-ray diffraction, elemental, thermogravimetric analyses, IR spectroscopy. Compounds 1-3 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The absence of the chiral ligand racemization under synthetic conditions was unambiguously confirmed by polarimetry experiments. Compounds 1 and 2 contain metal-malate layered motives, connected by N-donor linkers and contribute to the family of isoreticular Cu(II) malates and tartrates [Cu(mal)L] and [Cu(tart)L], (tart=tartrate; L=ditopic rigid organic ligand). The Ni-based compounds 3 and 4 share 1D chiral {Ni(mal)} motives and possess novel type of the chiral framework, previously unknown for chiral carboxylates. The linear N-donor linkers connect these chiral chains, thus controlling the channel diameter and guest accessible volume of the homochiral structure, which exceeds 60 %.

  16. Access to a Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) motif: spectroscopic properties, solution structure, and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Haack, Peter; Kärgel, Anne; Greco, Claudio; Dokic, Jadranka; Braun, Beatrice; Pfaff, Florian F; Mebs, Stefan; Ray, Kallol; Limberg, Christian

    2013-10-30

    We report a complex with a rare Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) structural motif that is stable at room temperature, which allows its in-depth characterization by a variety of spectroscopic methods. Interest in such compounds is fueled by the recent discovery that a Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) species on the surface of Cu-ZSM-5 is capable of oxidizing methane to methanol, and this in turn ties into mechanistic discussions on the methane oxidation at the dicopper site within the particulate methane monooxygenase. For the synthesis of our Cu2O complex we have developed a novel, neutral ligand system, FurNeu, exhibiting two N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)amino binding pockets connected by a dibenzofuran spacer. The reaction of FurNeu with CuCl yielded [FurNeu](Cu2(μ-Cl))(CuCl2), 1, demonstrating the geometric potential of the ligand to stabilize Cu-X-Cu moieties. A Cu(I) precursor with weakly coordinating anions was chosen in the next step, namely [Cu(NCCH3)4]OTf, which led to the formation of [FurNeu](Cu(NCCH3))2(OTf)2, 3. Treatment of 3 with O2 or PhIO led to identical green solutions, whose UV-vis spectra were markedly different from the one displayed by [FurNeu](Cu)2(OTf)4, 4, prepared independently from FurNeu and Cu(OTf)2. Further investigations including PhIO consumption experiments, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy, HR-ESI mass spectrometry, and protonation studies led to the identification of the green product as [FurNeu](Cu2(μ-O))(OTf)2, 5. DOSY NMR spectroscopy confirmed its monomeric character. Over longer periods of time 5 decomposes to give [Cu(picoloyl)2], formed through an oxidative N-dealkylation reaction followed by further oxidation of the ligand. Due to its slow decomposition reaction, all attempts to crystallize 5 failed. However, its structure in solution could be determined by EXAFS analysis in combination with DFT calculations, which revealed a Cu-O-Cu angle that amounts to 105.17°. Moreover, TDDFT calculations helped to rationalize the UV-vis absorptions of 5

  17. The Factor Structure of the CIBS-II-Readiness Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotch, Chad M.; French, Brian F.

    2011-01-01

    The Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-II (CIBS-II)-Readiness form is a diagnostic battery intended for children aged 5 and 6 years. The CIBS-II-Readiness is a new version of the CIBS-Revised-Readiness and includes updated normative information on a larger representative sample in comparison to the CIBS-Revised-Readiness. Empirical…

  18. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-01

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different.

  19. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-25

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different. PMID:24316543

  20. Crystal structures of bis(cyanido)bis(N,N Prime -diethylthiourea-{kappa}S) mercury(II) and bis(cyanido)bis(N,N Prime -dipropylthiourea-{kappa}S) mercury(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Saeed Sadaf, Haseeba; Altaf, Muhammad; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen; Seerat-ur-Rehman; Bashir, Sarfaraz Ahmed

    2013-09-15

    Two mercury(II) complexes containing cyanide and, N,N Prime -diethylthiourea (detu) and N,N Prime -dipropylthiourea (dprtu) ligands, [(detu){sub 2}Hg(CN){sub 2}] (1) and [(dprtu){sub 2}Hg(CN){sub 2}] (2), respectively, have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. In the both complexes Hg atom lies on a 2-fold rotation axis, and is coordinated to the sulfur atoms of two thiourea ligands and to two cyanide carbon atoms. Both have a distorted tetrahedral environment with bond angles about the Hg atoms in the range of 93.41(4) Degree-Sign -146.75(19) Degree-Sign . In the crystal structures symmetry related molecules are linked via N-H-N hydrogen bonds resulting in the formation of a two-dimensional network in 1, while in 2 a double stranded one-dimensional chain is formed.

  1. Breit–Pauli atomic structure calculations for Fe XI

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Sunny Singh, Jagjit; Mohan, Man

    2013-11-15

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities are calculated for the lowest-lying 165 energy levels of Fe XI using configuration-interaction wavefunctions. The calculations include all the major correlation effects. Relativistic effects are included in the Breit–Pauli approximation by adding mass-correction, Darwin, and spin–orbit interaction terms to the non-relativistic Hamiltonian. For comparison with the calculated ab initio energy levels, we have also calculated the energy levels by using the fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac–Fock method. The calculated results are in close agreement with the National Institute of Standards and Technology compilation and other available results. New results are predicted for many of the levels belonging to the 3s3p{sup 4}3d and 3s3p{sup 3}3d{sup 2} configurations, which are very important in astrophysics, relevant, for example, to the recent observations by the Hinode spacecraft. We expect that our extensive calculations will be useful to experimentalists in identifying the fine structure levels in their future work.

  2. Importance of the structural zinc atom for the stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Magonet, E; Hayen, P; Delforge, D; Delaive, E; Remacle, J

    1992-01-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase is a tetrameric enzyme containing zinc. Initially we confirmed the presence of two zinc atoms per subunit. Incubation of the enzyme with increasing concentrations of dithiothreitol, a method for partial chelation, allowed first the reduction of four disulphide bridges per enzyme, but eventually was sufficient to chelate the structural zinc atom without having any effect on the zinc located in the active site. The enzyme activity was not affected but the enzyme became very sensitive to heat denaturation. Chelation by EDTA was also performed. Given its location at an external position in the globular protein, protected in each subunit by one disulphide bridge, the results establish that the second zinc atom present on each enzymic subunit plays a prominent conformational role, probably by stabilizing the tertiary structure of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Recovery experiments were performed by incubation of the native enzyme, or the dithiothreitol-treated enzyme, with a small amount of Zn2+. A stabilization effect was found when the structural zinc was re-incorporated after its removal by dithiothreitol. In all cases a large increase in activity was also observed, which was much greater than that expected based on the amount of re-incorporated zinc atom, suggesting the re-activation of some inactive commercial enzyme which had lost some of its original catalytic zinc atoms. PMID:1445195

  3. Structure-property-relationship of p-toluidinium tetrachloromercurate(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Dinesh; Kumar, Mukesh; Dalela, S.

    2014-04-24

    The single crystals of p-toluidinium tetrachloromercurate(II) hybrid materials have been grown with perfect crystal of size 0.35 × 0.30 × 0.27 mm. The hybrid material is exposed to X-rays for 3D intensity data which is used to refine the crystal structure upto reliability-factor of 0.034. The phenyl ring has planar conformation with skeletal torsion angle of 0.003(6)° and the aromatic ring (C1-C6) forms an angle of 78.7(1)° to the plane of inorganic layer. The N-H...Cl hydrogen bonded tetramer pattern is observed in p-toluidinium tetrachloromercurate(II) and the two tetramer layers are separated by a distance of 3.925(6)Å and the minimum distance between two mercury atoms is 4.112(1)Å which is quite larger for any metallophilic interaction. The inorganic layers form zig-zag ribbons which are separated by a distance of 12.987(5)Å.

  4. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  5. A new nano-scale manganese (II) coordination polymer constructed from semicarbazone Schiff base and dicyanamide ligands: Synthesis, crystal structure and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Farzaneh; Simpson, Jim

    2016-03-01

    A new nano-structured Mn(II) coordination polymer [Mn(HL)(dca)(Cl)]n(1), [HL= Pyridine-2-carbaldehyde semicarbazone, dca= dicyanamide] has been synthesized by a sonochemical method and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy. Single crystals of compound 1 was synthesized by slow evaporation method and was structurally characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The single crystal structure shows one dimensional zig-zag chains with end-to-end dicyanamide-bridged ligand. A distorted octahedral geometry around the Mn2+centers was achieved by NNO atoms from HL, two nitrogen atoms of dicyanamide and one chlorine atom. Also for more details, the structure of 1, has been optimized by density functional theory (DFT calculations).

  6. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Sob, M; Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-02-26

    We present a comprehensive study of the relationship between the ferromagnetism and the structural properties of Fe systems from three-dimensional ones to isolated atoms based on the spin-density functional theory. We have found a relation between the magnetic moment and the volume of the Voronoi polyhedron, determining, in most cases, the value of the total magnetic moment as a function of this volume with an average accuracy of ±0.28 μ(B) and of the 3d magnetic moment with an average accuracy of ±0.07 μ(B) when the atomic volume is larger than 22 ų. It is demonstrated that this approach is applicable for many three-dimensional systems, including high-symmetry structures of perfect body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp), and simple cubic (sc) crystals, as well as for lower-symmetry ones, for example atoms near a grain boundary (GB) or a surface, around a vacancy or in a linear chain (for low-dimensional cases, we provide a generalized definition of the Voronoi polyhedron). Also, we extend the validity of the Stoner model to low-dimensional structures, such as atomic chains, free-standing monolayers and surfaces, determining the Stoner parameter for these systems. The ratio of the 3d-exchange splitting to the magnetic moment, corresponding to the Stoner parameter, is found to be I(3d) = (0.998 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B) for magnetic moments up to 3.0 μ(B). Further, the 3d exchange splitting changes nearly linearly in the region of higher magnetic moments (3.0-4.0 μ(B)) and the corresponding Stoner exchange parameter equals I(h)(3d) = (0.272 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B). The existence of these two regions reflects the fact that, with increasing Voronoi volume, the 3d bands separate first and, consequently, the 3d magnetic moment increases. When the Voronoi volume is sufficiently large (≥22 ų), the separation of the 3d bands is complete and the magnetic moment reaches a value of 3.0

  7. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  8. The Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Atomic Diffusion and Structural Transition for Gold.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang; Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-01-01

    For the kinetic simulation of metal nanoparticles, we developed a self-consistent coordination-averaged energies for Au atoms based on energy properties of gold bulk phases. The energy barrier of the atom pairing change is proposed and holds for the microscopic reversibility principle. By applying the lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulation on gold films, we found that the atomic diffusion of Au on the Au(111) surface undergoes a late transition state with an energy barrier of about 0.2 eV and a prefactor between 40~50 Å(2)/ps. This study also investigates the structural transition from spherical to faceted gold nanoparticles upon heating. The temperatures of structural transition are in agreement with the experimental melting temperatures of gold nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 2 nm to 8 nm. PMID:27629538

  9. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belianinov, Alex; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1-xSex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  10. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization. PMID:26787443

  11. Atomic and electronic structures of lattice mismatched Cu2O/TiO2 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuzhi; Kavaipatti, Balasubramaniam; Kim, Sung-Joo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Ager, Joel W.; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2014-05-01

    Heterojunction interfaces between metal oxides are often highly lattice mismatched. The atomic and electronic structures of such interfaces, however, are not well understood. We have synthesized Cu2O/TiO2 heterojunction thin films with 13% lattice mismatch and studied the interface via experimental methods and large-scale density function theory calculations of supercells containing ˜1300 atoms. We find that an interface of epitaxial quality is formed via a coincidence site lattice of 8 Cu2O unit cells matching 9 TiO2 unit cells. Calculations reveal the existence of a dislocation core of the O sublattices at the interface and a random arrangement of one layer of interfacial Cu atoms. The interfacial electronic structure is found to be mostly determined by the interfacial Cu distribution, rather than by the O dislocation core. The conduction band minimum and valence band maximum states are spatially separated, and there is no strongly localized state near the core.

  12. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization.

  13. The Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Atomic Diffusion and Structural Transition for Gold

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang; Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-01-01

    For the kinetic simulation of metal nanoparticles, we developed a self-consistent coordination-averaged energies for Au atoms based on energy properties of gold bulk phases. The energy barrier of the atom pairing change is proposed and holds for the microscopic reversibility principle. By applying the lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulation on gold films, we found that the atomic diffusion of Au on the Au(111) surface undergoes a late transition state with an energy barrier of about 0.2 eV and a prefactor between 40~50 Å2/ps. This study also investigates the structural transition from spherical to faceted gold nanoparticles upon heating. The temperatures of structural transition are in agreement with the experimental melting temperatures of gold nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 2 nm to 8 nm. PMID:27629538

  14. Combined EXAFS and DFT structure calculations provide structural insights into the 1:1 multi-histidine complexes of Cu(II) , Cu(I) , and Zn(II) with the tandem octarepeats of the mammalian prion protein.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Nienaber, Kurt H; McDonald, Alex; Millhauser, Glenn L; George, Graham N

    2014-07-28

    The metal-coordinating properties of the prion protein (PrP) have been the subject of intense focus and debate since the first reports of its interaction with copper just before the turn of the century. The picture of metal coordination to PrP has been improved and refined over the past decade, but structural details of the various metal coordination modes have not been fully elucidated in some cases. In the present study, we have employed X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy as well as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to structurally characterize the dominant 1:1 coordination modes for Cu(II) , Cu(I) , and Zn(II) with an N-terminal fragment of PrP. The PrP fragment corresponds to four tandem repeats representative of the mammalian octarepeat domain, designated as OR4 , which is also the most studied PrP fragment for metal interactions, making our findings applicable to a large body of previous work. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have provided additional structural and thermodynamic data, and candidate structures have been used to inform EXAFS data analysis. The optimized geometries from DFT calculations have been used to identify potential coordination complexes for multi-histidine coordination of Cu(II) , Cu(I) , and Zn(II) in an aqueous medium, modelled using 4-methylimidazole to represent the histidine side chain. Through a combination of in silico coordination chemistry as well as rigorous EXAFS curve-fitting, using full multiple scattering on candidate structures derived from DFT calculations, we have characterized the predominant coordination modes for the 1:1 complexes of Cu(II) , Cu(I) , and Zn(II) with the OR4 peptide at pH 7.4 at atomic resolution, which are best represented as square-planar [Cu(II) (His)4 ](2+) , digonal [Cu(I) (His)2 ](+) , and tetrahedral [Zn(II) (His)3 (OH2 )](2+) , respectively.

  15. The CHX Beamline at NSLS-II: a Tool to probe Structure and Dynamics in Soft-Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluerasu, Andrei; Wiegart, Lutz

    2012-02-01

    The Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline currently under construction at NSLS-II (Brookhaven National Laboratory) will serve as an optimized tool for the study of structure and dynamics in soft condensed matter. The unprecedented coherent flux will enable the study of dynamics in soft matter systems down to microsecond time scales via X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS). The available scattering geometries such as (GI)SAXS and (GI)WAXS can be used in a simultaneous fashion to collect static and dynamic scattering information on length scales ranging from supramolecular assemblies to atomic distances.

  16. Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Local Structure of Materials at Atomic Resolution by Electron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chun

    Electron tomography was originally developed in 1968, and has been primarily applied to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of biological systems. In the last decade, the application of electron tomography in materials science and nanoscience has revived due to the utilization of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in the high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) mode, and a highest resolution of ˜1 nm3 has been achieved. However, improving the resolution from ˜1 nm 3 to the atomic level remains a challenging task, which requires new tomographic reconstruction algorithms, better projection alignment methods, state-of-the-art STEM instruments, and more accurate data-acquisition procedures. In this thesis, important progress has been made in all these four areas. First, a novel tomographic method, termed equally sloped tomography (EST), was developed and allows the 3D image reconstruction of tilt series with a limited number projections and a "missing wedge" (i.e. specimens cannot usually be tilted beyond +/-70°). Second, an alignment method which can be used to align the projections of a tilt series at atomic-level resolution was developed based on center of mass. Finally, by using a Titan 80-300 STEM instrument at the California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA, more accurate data acquisition procedures were developed and a number of tomographic tilt series of atomic resolution projections from different nanoparticles have been obtained. With all these combinations, the 3D structure of a 10 nm gold nanoparticle was determined at 2.4 A resolution, the highest resolution ever achieved in any general tomography method. More recently, this novel electron tomography method has been applied to observe nearly all the atoms in a Pt nanoparticle, and imaged for the first time the 3D core structure of edge and screw dislocations at atomic resolution. Furthermore, through numerical simulations the feasibility of determining the 3D atomic structure of

  17. Atomically precise self-assembly of one-dimensional structures on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barke, I.; Rügheimer, T. K.; Zheng, Fan; Himpsel, F. J.

    2007-10-01

    This work has three main themes: (1) fabricate atomically precise nanostructures at surfaces, particularly nanowires consisting of atom chains; (2) explore the behavior of one-dimensional electrons in atomic chains; (3) find the fundamental limits of data storage using an atomic scale memory. Semiconductor surfaces lend themselves towards self-assembly, because the broken covalent bonds create elaborate reconstruction patterns to minimize the surface energy. An example is the large 7 × 7 unit cell on Si(1 1 1), which can be used as building block. On semiconductors, the surface electrons completely de-couple from the substrate, as long as their energy lies in the band gap. Angle-resolved photoemission reveals surprising features, such as a fractional band filling and a spin-splitting at a non-magnetic surface. An interesting by-product is a memory structure with self-assembled tracks that are five atom rows wide and store a bit by the presence or absence of a single silicon atom. This toy memory is used to test the fundamental limits of data storage and to see how storage on silicon compares to storage in DNA.

  18. Electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with nitrogen atoms: a theoretical insight.

    PubMed

    Torres, A E; Fomine, S

    2015-04-28

    The electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with a graphitic type of nitrogen atoms has been studied using B3LYP, B2PLYP and CAS methods. In all but one case the restricted B3LYP solutions were unstable and the CAS calculations provided evidence for the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state with contributions from two dominant configurations. The relative stability of the doped nanoribbons depends mostly on the mutual position of the dopant atoms and notably less on the position of nitrogen atoms within the nanoribbon. N-graphitic doping affects cationic states much more than anionic ones due the participation of the nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge, resulting in a drop in ionization energies (IPs) for N-graphitic doped systems. Nitrogen atoms do not participate in the negative charge stabilization of anionic species and, therefore, the doping does not affect the electron affinities (EAs). The unrestricted B3LYP method is the method of choice for the calculation of IPs and EAs. Restricted B3LYP and B2PLYP produces unreliable results for both IPs and EAs while CAS strongly underestimates the electron affinities. This is also true for the reorganization energies where restricted B3LYP produces qualitatively incorrect results. Doping changes the reorganization energy of the nanoribbons; the hole reorganization energy is generally higher than the corresponding electron reorganization energy due to the participation of nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge.

  19. Atomic Structure Study of the Quantum Spin-ice Pyrochlore Yb2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaed, Ali; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Lees, Martin; Beanland, Richard; Microscopy Team; Superconductivity; Magnetism Team

    The quantum spin-ice candidate Yb2Ti2O7 (YTO) lies on the boundary between a number of competing magnetic ground states. Features in the low-temperature specific heat capacity are found to vary in sharpness and temperature depending on materials processing. It has been suggested that these changes in the magnetic ground state could be influenced by several factors, including the degree of cation stuffing, changes in oxygen occupancy and/or vacancies. In the present work, the structures of three different YTO samples, grown by the optical floating zone technique and that exhibit quite different heat capacity behaviour, have been studied by annular dark field scanning transmission microscopy (ADF-STEM). We show that the detailed intensity distribution around the visible atomic columns is sensitive to the presence of nearby atoms of low atomic number (in this case oxygen), even though they are not directly visible in the images. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that oxygen columns with a distance of ~30 pm have been distinguished in ADF-STEM images. Furthermore, by comparing atomic columns with different configurations of nearby oxygen atoms, we are able to distinguish between the different YTO samples Finally, the ADF data for the crystal that exhibits no specific heat anomaly shows signs of the substitution of Yb atoms on Ti sites, supporting the view that the magnetic ground state of YTO is extremely sensitive to disorder.

  20. The Factor Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanheule, Stijn; Desmet, Mattias; Groenvynck, Hans; Rosseel, Yves; Fontaine, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a frequently used scale for measuring depressive severity. BDI-II data (404 clinical; 695 nonclinical adults) were analyzed by means of confirmatory factor analysis to test whether the factor structure model with a somatic-affective and cognitive component of depression, formulated by Beck and…

  1. The Latent Symptom Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Outpatients with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Lena C.; Zhang, K. Anne; Bagby, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument frequently used in clinical and research settings to assess depression severity. Although investigators have examined the factor structure of the BDI-II, a clear consensus on the best fitting model has not yet emerged, resulting in different recommendations regarding how to best…

  2. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S. . E-mail: ssuzuki@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-11-15

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, {alpha}-FeOOH and {gamma}-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO{sub 6} octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces.

  3. Crystal structure of bis­(N,N,N′,N′-tetra­methyl­guanidinium) tetra­chlorido­cuprate(II)

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mamadou; Samb, Abdoulaye; Diop, Libasse; Maris, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    In the structure of the title salt, (C5H14N3)2[CuCl4], the CuII atom in the anion lies on a twofold rotation axis. The tetra­chlorido­cuprate(II) anion adopts a flattened tetra­hedral coordination environment and inter­acts electrostatically with the tetra­methyl­guanidinium cation. The crystal packing is additionally consolidated through N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional network structure. PMID:27555960

  4. Synthesis and structural characterization of zinc(II) and cobalt(II) complexes based on multidentate hydrazone ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Yuan Zhuo; Liu, E.; Yang, Chengxiong; Golen, James A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Zhang, Guoqi

    2016-04-01

    Two multidentate Schiff base ligands containing a hydrazone unit have been synthesized and investigated for zinc(II) and cobalt(II) coordination chemistry. The reactions of the 4-pyridyl derived hydrazone ligand HL1 with zinc(II) or cobalt(II) salts gave three mononuclear complexes that were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. The results revealed that the ligand could adopt different coordination modes when various counter anions were employed. While in the case that zinc dichloride was used as a metal salt a neutral mononuclear mono-ligand complex was formed, the deprotonation of hydrazone occurred when zinc(II) or cobalt(II) nitrate were present and two new isostructural mononuclear bis-ligand complexes were isolated. Modification of the hydrazone ligand with oxygen donors was found to have a significant impact on the ligand reactivity, and a similar reaction of H2L2 with cobalt(II) nitrate gave a protonated product of H2L2 without the incorporation of cobalt(II), which features a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network in the solid state.

  5. Atomic structure and phason modes of the Sc-Zn icosahedral quasicrystal.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsunetomo; Takakura, Hiroyuki; Euchner, Holger; Pay Gómez, Cesar; Bosak, Alexei; Fertey, Pierre; de Boissieu, Marc

    2016-07-01

    The detailed atomic structure of the binary icosahedral (i) ScZn7.33 quasicrystal has been investigated by means of high-resolution synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction and absolute scale measurements of diffuse scattering. The average atomic structure has been solved using the measured Bragg intensity data based on a six-dimensional model that is isostructural to the i-YbCd5.7 one. The structure is described with a quasiperiodic packing of large Tsai-type rhombic triacontahedron clusters and double Friauf polyhedra (DFP), both resulting from a close-packing of a large (Sc) and a small (Zn) atom. The difference in chemical composition between i-ScZn7.33 and i-YbCd5.7 was found to lie in the icosahedron shell and the DFP where in i-ScZn7.33 chemical disorder occurs on the large atom sites, which induces a significant distortion to the structure units. The intensity in reciprocal space displays a substantial amount of diffuse scattering with anisotropic distribution, located around the strong Bragg peaks, that can be fully interpreted as resulting from phason fluctuations, with a ratio of the phason elastic constants K 2/K 1 = -0.53, i.e. close to a threefold instability limit. This induces a relatively large perpendicular (or phason) Debye-Waller factor, which explains the vanishing of 'high-Q perp' reflections. PMID:27437112

  6. Compensation of logarithmic corrections in calculating the fine structure of levels in hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Boikova, N. A. Tyukhtyaev, Yu. N.; Faustov, R. N.

    2011-01-15

    Special features of the quasipotential approach to calculating logarithmic (in the fine-structure constant) contributions to the fine splitting of energy levels in hydrogen-like atoms are analyzed. The boundaries of the region of applicability of the Fell technique are indicated, and the order of corrections beyond this region is estimated.

  7. The Structure of the Atom: Teacher's Guide Levels A, B, and C. Preliminary Limited Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Physics Outlet, Woburn, MA. Education Programs Dept.

    This is a two-part curriculum package for teaching the structure of atoms. The first part--the Teacher's Guide--contains information necessary for using the equipment in a typical classroom including learning goals, vocabulary, math skills, and sample data for each activity. The second part of the package consists of photocopy masters for a set of…

  8. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel's Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  9. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J.; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F. Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H.; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L.; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  10. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Nevo Dinur, Nir; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  11. Current State of Web Sites in Science Education--Focus on Atomic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuvi, Inbal; Nachmias, Rafi

    2001-01-01

    Explores to what extent the web's advanced graphical tools and computational power are implemented in science education. Focuses on the pedagogical and technological characteristics of web sites attempting to teach the subject of atomic structure. (Contains 33 references.) (Author/YDS)

  12. Supporting Students in Learning with Multiple Representation to Improve Student Mental Models on Atomic Structure Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunyono; Yuanita, L.; Ibrahim, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is identify the effectiveness of a multiple representation-based learning model, which builds a mental model within the concept of atomic structure. The research sample of 108 students in 3 classes is obtained randomly from among students of Mathematics and Science Education Studies using a stratified random sampling…

  13. Atomic structure and phason modes of the Sc-Zn icosahedral quasicrystal.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsunetomo; Takakura, Hiroyuki; Euchner, Holger; Pay Gómez, Cesar; Bosak, Alexei; Fertey, Pierre; de Boissieu, Marc

    2016-07-01

    The detailed atomic structure of the binary icosahedral (i) ScZn7.33 quasicrystal has been investigated by means of high-resolution synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction and absolute scale measurements of diffuse scattering. The average atomic structure has been solved using the measured Bragg intensity data based on a six-dimensional model that is isostructural to the i-YbCd5.7 one. The structure is described with a quasiperiodic packing of large Tsai-type rhombic triacontahedron clusters and double Friauf polyhedra (DFP), both resulting from a close-packing of a large (Sc) and a small (Zn) atom. The difference in chemical composition between i-ScZn7.33 and i-YbCd5.7 was found to lie in the icosahedron shell and the DFP where in i-ScZn7.33 chemical disorder occurs on the large atom sites, which induces a significant distortion to the structure units. The intensity in reciprocal space displays a substantial amount of diffuse scattering with anisotropic distribution, located around the strong Bragg peaks, that can be fully interpreted as resulting from phason fluctuations, with a ratio of the phason elastic constants K 2/K 1 = -0.53, i.e. close to a threefold instability limit. This induces a relatively large perpendicular (or phason) Debye-Waller factor, which explains the vanishing of 'high-Q perp' reflections.

  14. Do General Physics Textbooks Discuss Scientists' Ideas about Atomic Structure? A Case in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Kwon, Sangwoon; Kim, Nahyun; Lee, Gyoungho

    2013-01-01

    Research in science education has recognized the importance of teaching atomic structure within a history and philosophy of science perspective. The objective of this study is to evaluate general physics textbooks published in Korea based on the eight criteria developed in previous research. The result of this study shows that Korean general…

  15. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M

    2016-05-27

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel's Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms.

  16. Atomic structure and phason modes of the Sc–Zn icosahedral quasicrystal

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tsunetomo; Takakura, Hiroyuki; Euchner, Holger; Pay Gómez, Cesar; Bosak, Alexei; Fertey, Pierre; de Boissieu, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The detailed atomic structure of the binary icosahedral (i) ScZn7.33 quasicrystal has been investigated by means of high-resolution synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction and absolute scale measurements of diffuse scattering. The average atomic structure has been solved using the measured Bragg intensity data based on a six-dimensional model that is isostructural to the i-YbCd5.7 one. The structure is described with a quasiperiodic packing of large Tsai-type rhombic triacontahedron clusters and double Friauf polyhedra (DFP), both resulting from a close-packing of a large (Sc) and a small (Zn) atom. The difference in chemical composition between i-ScZn7.33 and i-YbCd5.7 was found to lie in the icosahedron shell and the DFP where in i-ScZn7.33 chemical disorder occurs on the large atom sites, which induces a significant distortion to the structure units. The intensity in reciprocal space displays a substantial amount of diffuse scattering with anisotropic distribution, located around the strong Bragg peaks, that can be fully interpreted as resulting from phason fluctuations, with a ratio of the phason elastic constants K 2/K 1 = −0.53, i.e. close to a threefold instability limit. This induces a relatively large perpendicular (or phason) Debye–Waller factor, which explains the vanishing of ‘high-Q perp’ reflections. PMID:27437112

  17. Imaging the atomic surface structures of CeO2 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuyuan; Wu, Zili; Wen, Jianguo; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R; Marks, Laurence D

    2014-01-01

    Atomic surface structures of CeO2 nanoparticles are under debate owing to the lack of clear experimental determination of the positions of the surface oxygen atoms. Particularly controversial is the (100) surface structure of this material. In this study, with oxygen atoms clearly observed using aberration corrected high resolution electron microscopy, we determined the atomic structures of the (100), (110) and (111) surfaces of CeO2 nanocubes. The predominantly exposed (100) surface has a mixture of Ce, O, and reduced CeO terminations, underscoring the complex structures of this polar surface that previously was often oversimplified. The (110) surface shows saw-like (111) nanofacets and flat CeO2-x terminations with oxygen vacancies. The (111) surface has an O termination. As these three low index surfaces are the most often exposed facets in the majority of CeO2 nanoparticles, these findings can be extended to the surfaces of differently shaped CeO2 nanoparticles as well as provide insight about face-selective catalysis.

  18. Atomic and Molecular Structure in Chemical Education: A Critical Analysis from Various Perspectives of Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios

    1997-01-01

    Provides a critical analysis of the role that atomic theory plays in the science curriculum from elementary through secondary school. Examines structural concepts from the perspective of the theory of meaningful learning, information processing theory, and the alternative conceptions movement. Contains 54 references. (DDR)

  19. An iron(II) diketonate-diamine complex as precursor for thin film fabrication by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratvold, Jon E.; Carraro, Giorgio; Barreca, Davide; Nilsen, Ola

    2015-08-01

    A new divalent Fe precursor has been explored for deposition of iron-containing thin films by atomic layer deposition and molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD). The Fe(II) β-diketonate-diamine complex, Fe(hfa)2TMEDA, (hfa = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionate, TMEDA = N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylethylenediamine) can be handled in air, and sublimation at 60 °C ensures a satisfactory vaporization rate. The reactivity of the precursor does not allow for direct reaction with water as co-reactant. Nevertheless, it reacts with carboxylic acids, resulting in organic-inorganic hybrid materials, and with ozone, yielding α-Fe2O3. The divalent oxidation state of iron was maintained during deposition when oxalic acid was used as co-reactant, demonstrating the first preservation of Fe(II) from precursor to film during an MLD process. A self-saturating growth mode was proven by in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, and the films were further characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  20. Synthesis and crystal structure of a novel Mn(II) coordination polymer with 3-(4-(1 H-benzo[d]imidazol-1-yl)-4-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.-F.; Zhang, X.; Sun, S.-W.; Han, Q.-P.; Yang, X.; Li, H.; Ma, H.-X.; Yao, C.-Z.; Sun, H.; Dong, H.-B.

    2015-12-01

    3-(4-(1 H-Benzo[d]imidazol-1-yl)-4-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one ( L 1 , 1) and its Mn(II) complex, [Mn( L 1 )2(SCN)2]∞ ( 2), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Mn(II) ion in 2 is six-coordinated to four nitrogen atoms of two L 1 ligands, two SCN-ligands, and two oxygen atoms of other two L 1 ligands to form a distorted octahedral geometry. Therefore, each L 1 links Mn ions through the O and N atoms to generate 2D sheet structure.

  1. Syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of acetato- and diphenolato-bridged 3d-4f binuclear complexes [M(3-MeOsaltn)(MeOH)x(ac)Ln(hfac)2] (M = Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II); Ln = La(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III); 3-MeOsaltn = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato; ac = acetato; hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetonato; x = 0 or 1).

    PubMed

    Towatari, Masaaki; Nishi, Koshiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naohide; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Kojima, Masaaki; Mochida, Naotaka; Ishida, Takayuki; Re, Nazzareno; Mrozinski, Jerzy

    2013-05-20

    A series of 3d-4f binuclear complexes, [M(3-MeOsaltn)(MeOH)x(ac)Ln(hfac)2] (x = 0 for M = Cu(II), Zn(II); x = 1 for M = Co(II), Ni(II); Ln = Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), La(III)), have been synthesized and characterized, where 3-MeOsaltn, ac, and hfac denote N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato, acetato, and hexafluoroacetylacetonato, respectively. The X-ray analyses demonstrated that all the complexes have an acetato- and diphenolato-bridged M(II)-Ln(III) binuclear structure. The Cu(II)-Ln(III) and Zn(II)-Ln(III) complexes are crystallized in an isomorphous triclinic space group P1, where the Cu(II) or Zn(II) ion has square pyramidal coordination geometry with N2O2 donor atoms of 3-MeOsaltn at the equatorial coordination sites and one oxygen atom of the bridging acetato ion at the axial site. The Co(II)-Ln(III) and Ni(II)-Ln(III) complexes are crystallized in an isomorphous monoclinic space group P2(1)/c, where the Co(II) or Ni(II) ion at the high-spin state has an octahedral coordination environment with N2O2 donor atoms of 3-MeOsaltn at the equatorial sites, and one oxygen atom of the bridged acetato and a methanol oxygen atom at the two axial sites. Each Ln(III) ion for all the complexes is coordinated by four oxygen atoms of two phenolato and two methoxy oxygen atoms of "ligand-complex" M(3-MeOsaltn), four oxygen atoms of two hfac(-), and one oxygen atom of the bridging acetato ion; thus, the coordination number is nine. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibilities from 1.9 to 300 K and the field-dependent magnetization up to 5 T at 1.9 K were measured. Due to the important orbital contributions of the Ln(III) (Tb(III), Dy(III)) and to a lesser extent the M(II) (Ni(II), Co(II)) components, the magnetic interaction between M(II) and Ln(III) ions were investigated by an empirical approach based on a comparison of the magnetic properties of the M(II)-Ln(III), Zn(II)-Ln(III), and M(II)-La(III) complexes. The differences of χ(M)T and M

  2. Segregation and temperature effect on the atomic structure of Bi30Ga70 liquid alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbihi, D. Es; Grosdidier, B.; Kaban, I.; Gruner, S.; Hoyer, W.; Gasser, J.-G.

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the structure of liquid monotectic alloy Bi30Ga70 above and below the critical point. The three-dimensional structure at 265 °C is modelled by means of the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique using neutron and x-ray diffraction experimental data. It is shown that atomic segregation on the short-range scale exists in the liquid Bi30Ga70 slightly above the critical temperature (TC = 262 °C). We present also the structure factors of Bi30Ga70 liquid alloy under the critical point at 240 and 230 °C obtained with neutron diffraction to highlight the temperature effect in the atomic structure.

  3. Segregation and temperature effect on the atomic structure of Bi(30)Ga(70) liquid alloy.

    PubMed

    Sbihi, D Es; Grosdidier, B; Kaban, I; Gruner, S; Hoyer, W; Gasser, J-G

    2009-06-17

    We investigate the structure of liquid monotectic alloy Bi(30)Ga(70) above and below the critical point. The three-dimensional structure at 265 °C is modelled by means of the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique using neutron and x-ray diffraction experimental data. It is shown that atomic segregation on the short-range scale exists in the liquid Bi(30)Ga(70) slightly above the critical temperature (T(C) = 262 °C). We present also the structure factors of Bi(30)Ga(70) liquid alloy under the critical point at 240 and 230 °C obtained with neutron diffraction to highlight the temperature effect in the atomic structure. PMID:21693940

  4. Influences of halogen atoms on indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN): Crystal structure and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Yang, Li-Jing; Han, Guangjun; Liu, Qing-Ling; Wang, Wei; Ling, Yang; Sun, Bai-Wang

    2014-11-01

    Crystal structural investigations and Hirshfeld surface analysis of three halogen atoms (4-Cl, 6-Cl and 4-Br) substituted indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) were reported in this work. The structures of the present three compounds were characterized by Infrared spectra, Elemental analyses, NMR spectra, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and hot stage microscopy (HSM). The Hirshfeld surfaces analysis in terms of crystal structure, intermolecular interactions and π⋯π stacking motifs were performed. We found that the different kinds of halogen atoms and the different substituted positions have a significant effect on the crystal structures, molecular π⋯π stacking motifs, melting points, and the nature of intermolecular interactions for IANs.

  5. Formation and atomic structure of ordered Sr-induced nanostrips on Ge(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanov, Boris R.; Garrity, Kevin F.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Altman, Eric I.

    2014-04-01

    The deposition of alkaline earths onto Ge(100) surfaces leads to well-ordered arrays of narrow trenches and elongated plateaus that extend for thousands of angstroms. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT), the atomic scale details of these nanostructures are revealed and the driving force responsible for their formation is evaluated. The STM data reveal a dramatic contrast reversal when the polarity of the imaging bias is switched. An energetically favorable structure for the plateaus was found using DFT that can reproduce all of the observed features. This structure is based upon a double dimer vacancy model in which Sr atoms displace two Ge dimers from the surface. Interestingly, the ordered plateau-trench structure is unique to Ge(100) despite the structural and chemical similarities to the Si(100) surface.

  6. Evolution of local atomic structure during solidification of Al2Au liquid: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, L H; Lou, H B; Wang, X D; Debela, T T; Cao, Q P; Zhang, D X; Wang, S Y; Wang, C Z; Jiang, J Z

    2014-04-01

    The local atomic structure evolution in Al2Au alloy during solidification from 2000 K to 400 K was studied by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed using the structure factor, pair correlation functions, bond angle distributions, the Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) index and Voronoi tessellation methods. It was found that the icosahedral-like clusters are negligible in the Al2Au stable liquid and supercooled liquid states, and the most abundant clusters are those having HA indices of 131 and 120 or Voronoi indices of < 0,4,4,0 >, < 0,3, 6,0 > and < 0,4,4,2 > with coordination numbers of 8, 9 and 10, respectively. These clusters are similar to the local atomic structures in the CaF2-type Al2Au crystal, revealing the existence of structure heredity between liquid and crystalline phase in Al2Au alloy. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energetic stability, atomic and electronic structures of extended γ-graphyne: A density functional study.

    PubMed

    Chi, Baoqian; Liu, Yi; Li, Xiaowu; Xu, Jingcheng; Qin, Xuming; Sun, Chen; Bai, Chenghao; Zhao, Xinluo

    2015-06-01

    The energetic stability, atomic and electronic structures of γ-graphyne and its derivatives (γ-GYs) with extended carbon chains were investigated as a function of chain length by density functional calculations in this work. The studied γ-GYs consist of hexagon carbon rings connected by linear chains with C atoms n = 0-22. We predict that the even-numbered C chains of γ-GYs consist of alternating single and triple C-C bonds (polyyne), energetically more stable than the odd-numbered C chains made of continuous C-C double bonds (polycumulene). The calculated electronic structures indicate that γ-GYs can be either metallic (odd n) or semiconductive (even n) depending on the parity of the number of C chain atoms. The semiconducting γ-GYs are predicted to have ~1.2 eV direct band gaps and 0.1-0.2 effective electron masses independent of the chain length. Thus introducing sp carbon atoms into sp (2)-based graphene provides a novel way to open up band gaps without doping and defects while maintaining small electron masses critical to good transport properties. Graphical Abstract The typical atomic model of graphyne (middle) as well as their band gaps (left) and electron density (right).

  8. Atomic dynamics and the problem of the structural stability of free clusters of solidified inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtseva, É. T.; Gospodarev, I. A.; Grishaev, A. V.; Kovalenko, S. I.; Solnyshkin, D. D.; Syrkin, E. S.; Feodos'ev, S. B.

    2003-05-01

    The dependence of the rms amplitudes of atoms in free clusters of solidified inert gases on the cluster size is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Free clusters are produced by homogeneous nucleation in an adiabatically expanding supersonic stream. Electron diffraction is used to measure the rms amplitudes of the atoms; the Jacobi-matrix method is used for theoretical calculations. A series of distinguishing features of the atomic dynamics of microclusters was found. This was necessary to determine the character of the formation and the stability conditions of the crystal structure. It wass shown that for clusters consisting of less than N˜103 atoms, as the cluster size decreases, the rms amplitudes grow much more rapidly than expected from the increase in the specific contribution of the surface. It is also established that an fcc structure of a free cluster, as a rule, contains twinning defects (nuclei of an hcp phase). One reason for the appearance of such defects is the so-called vertex instability (anomalously large oscillation amplitudes) of the atoms in coordination spheres.

  9. Correlating structure, conductance, and mechanics of silver atomic-scale contacts.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Frei, Michael; Halbritter, András; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-04-23

    We measure simultaneously force and conductance of Ag metal point-contacts under ambient conditions at room temperature. We observe the formation of contacts with a conductance close to 1 G0, the quantum of conductance, which can be attributed to a single-atom contact, similar to those formed by Au. We also find two additional conductance features at ∼0.4 G0 and ∼1.3 G0, which have been previously ascribed to contacts with oxygen contaminations. Here, using a conductance cross-correlation technique, we distinguish three different atomic-scale structural motifs and analyze their rupture forces and stiffness. Our results allow us to assign the ∼0.4 G0 conductance feature to an Ag-O-Ag contact and the ∼1.3 G0 feature to an Ag-Ag single-atom contact with an oxygen atom in parallel. Utilizing complementary information from force and conductance, we thus demonstrate the correlation of conductance with the structural evolution at the atomic scale.

  10. The meloxicam complexes of Co(II) and Zn(II): Synthesis, crystal structures, photocleavage and in vitro DNA-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanatkar, Tahereh Hosseinzadeh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Simpson, Jim; Jannesari, Zahra

    2013-10-01

    Two neutral mononuclear complexes of Co(II) and Zn(II) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam (H2mel, 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(5-methyl-2-thiazolyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxammide-1,1-dioxide), [Co(Hmel)2(EtOH)2] (1), and [Zn(Hmel)2(EtOH)2] (2), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy and their solid-state structures were studied by single-crystal diffraction. The complexes have a distorted octahedral geometry around the metal atom. The experimental data indicate that the meloxicam acts as a deprotonated bidentate ligand (through the amide oxygen and the nitrogen atom of the thiazolyl ring) in the complexes, and a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the amide N-H function and the enolate O atom stabilizes the ZZZ conformation of meloxicam ligands. Absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been used to investigate the binding of the complexes with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA). Additionally, the photocleavage studies have been also used to investigate the binding of the complexes with plasmid DNA. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was monitored by a blue shift and hyperchromism in the UV-Vis spectra attributed to an electrostatic binding mode. A competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that the complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that they bind to DNA in strong competition with EB. The experimental results show that the complexes can cleave pUC57 plasmid DNA.

  11. Accurate determination of atomic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by nondestructive nanobeam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zejian; Zhang Qi; Qin Luchang

    2005-05-09

    We report a method that allows direct, systematic, and accurate determination of the atomic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by analyzing the scattering intensities on the nonequatorial layer lines in the electron diffraction pattern. Complete structure determination of a quadruple-walled carbon nanotube is described as an example, and it was found that the intertubular distance varied from 0.36 nm to 0.5 nm with a mean value of 0.42 nm.

  12. Single-molecule reconstruction of oligonucleotide secondary structure by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice; Thompson, Ruth; Leung, Carl; Roy, Debdulal; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2014-08-27

    Based on soft-touch atomic force microscopy, a method is described to reconstruct the secondary structure of single extended biomolecules, without the need for crystallization. The method is tested by accurately reproducing the dimensions of the B-DNA crystal structure. Importantly, intramolecular variations in groove depth of the DNA double helix are resolved, which would be inaccessible for methods that rely on ensemble-averaging.

  13. Classical trajectory simulation of the cluster-atom association reaction I-Arn+I --> I2+nAr. II. Diffusion of captured iodine and evaporative cooling of I2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiche; Martens, Craig C.

    1993-12-01

    This is Part II of a series of papers in which we address the role of microscopic solvation in the association reaction between a free iodine atom and an iodine doped van der Waals cluster: I+I(Ar)n→I2+nAr. The influence of microscopic solvation on the I+I to I2 reactivity, reaction mechanism, energetics, and product energy partitioning is the major focus of our study. The overall reaction for I+I(Ar)12→I2+12Ar can be characterized by three fundamental processes: (1) capture of the incident iodine atom by the I(Ar)12 cluster; (2) diffusive migration of the captured I atom on the surface or in the interior of the cluster, leading ultimately to an encounter with the other I atom to form a highly excited I*2 molecule; (3) vibrational relaxation of the nascent I*2 product, leading to evaporative cooling and decomposition of the cluster. Part I [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 8551 (1993)] dealt with the capture process. This article focuses on the chemical dynamics of the subsequent processes of diffusion, vibrational energy transfer, and evaporative cooling. The stabilization of the chemically activated I*2 molecule through evaporative cooling eliminate the need of a third body collision as required in isolation gas phase recombination. The overall distribution of final energies is nonstatistical for the chemically activated I*2Arn. The final vibrational energy of I2 exhibits a nonthermal structure even after all the argon atoms are evaporated. In addition to monoatomic sequential evaporation, a ``fissioning'' mechanism, leading to the formation of at least one multiatom fragment, is observed. The relationship between structure and dynamics is explored. The dynamics of vibrational relaxation, diffusion of the captured iodine, evaporation, and fragmentation pattern, final I2 energy partitioning are found to be strongly dependent upon structure and temperature of the doped cluster. A spectroscopic experimental verification of the above observations is also proposed.

  14. Structural Diversity of Copper(II) Complexes with 9-Deazahypoxanthine and Their in Vitro SOD-Like Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gáliková, Jana; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Two structurally different copper(II) complexes of the compositions [{Cu(9dhx)(H2O)3}2(µ-SO4)2] (1) and [Cu(9dhx)2(H2O)2(NO3)2]·H2O (2), involving 9-deazahypoxanthine (9dhx; 6-oxo-9-deazapurine; 9-deazahypoxanthine), have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared and electronic spectroscopy, electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal (DTA) analyses, and cyclic voltammetry. The X-ray structures of complexes 1 and [Cu(9dhx)2(H2O)2(NO3)2] (2a) revealed the distorted octahedral geometry in the vicinity of the copper(II) atoms, with the NO5 and N2O4 donor set, respectively. In the dimeric compound 1, the {Cu(9dhx)(H2O)3}2 units are bridged by sulfate groups with the Cu···Cu separation being 5.3446(2) Å. In both structures the 9dhx ligands are coordinated through the N3 atoms of the pyrimidine moieties. The SOD-like activity of complexes 1 and 2 was evaluated in vitro showing moderate effect, with the IC50 values equal to 18.20, and 53.33 μM, respectively. PMID:26184182

  15. Structural diversity in mercury(II) coordination complexes with asymmetrical hydrazone-based ligands derived from pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Asad; Servati Gargari, Masoumeh; Mahmoudi, Ghodrat; Miroslaw, Barbara; Therrien, Bruno; Abedi, Marjan; Hazendonk, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Three novel Hg(II) complexes 1-3 of asymmetrical hydrazone-pyridine based ligands, L1-L3, with distinct coordination structures have been prepared and characterized by a single crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental and thermal analysis, and IR spectroscopy. The complexes form either discrete units with one (1) or two (2) organic ligands, or one-dimensional polymers (3). Hence the ligands can be regarded as chelating (1), mono-dentate (2) or bridging (3) agents. The mercury center is essentially neutralized in each complex by two iodide anions. The coordination in complexes 2 and 3 adopts deformed tetrahedral shapes. In contrast the Hg(II) cation in complex 1 binds three coplanar ligating atoms (O,N,N) and, as with pincer ligands, its coordination polyhedron is supplemented with two I- anions in apical positions. The structural diversity in these complexes is strongly influenced by the position of N atom in pyridine derived moieties. The crystal structure is stabilized by N/O-H⋯N/O/I hydrogen bonds and π⋯π interactions.

  16. Structural Diversity of Copper(II) Complexes with 9-Deazahypoxanthine and Their in Vitro SOD-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Gáliková, Jana; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Two structurally different copper(II) complexes of the compositions [{Cu(9dhx)(H2O)3}2(µ-SO4)2] (1) and [Cu(9dhx)2(H2O)2(NO3)2]·H2O (2), involving 9-deazahypoxanthine (9dhx; 6-oxo-9-deazapurine; 9-deazahypoxanthine), have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared and electronic spectroscopy, electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal (DTA) analyses, and cyclic voltammetry. The X-ray structures of complexes 1 and [Cu(9dhx)2(H2O)2(NO3)2] (2a) revealed the distorted octahedral geometry in the vicinity of the copper(II) atoms, with the NO5 and N2O4 donor set, respectively. In the dimeric compound 1, the {Cu(9dhx)(H2O)3}2 units are bridged by sulfate groups with the Cu···Cu separation being 5.3446(2) Å. In both structures the 9dhx ligands are coordinated through the N3 atoms of the pyrimidine moieties. The SOD-like activity of complexes 1 and 2 was evaluated in vitro showing moderate effect, with the IC50 values equal to 18.20, and 53.33 μM, respectively.

  17. Cobalt(II) sheet-like systems based on diacetic ligands: from subtle structural variances to different magnetic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Oscar; Pasán, Jorge; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Delgado, Fernando S; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2009-07-01

    The preparation, X-ray crystallography, and magnetic investigation of the compounds [Co(H(2)O)(2)(phda)](n) (1), [Co(phda)](n) (2), and [Co(chda)](n) (3) [H(2)phda = 1,4-phenylenediacetic acid and H(2)chda = 1,1-cyclohexanediacetic acid] are described herein. The cobalt atoms in this series are six- (1) and four-coordinated (2 and 3) in distorted octahedral (CoO(6)) and tetrahedral (CoO(4)) environments. The structures of 1-3 consists of rectangular-grids which are built up by sheets of cobalt atoms linked through anti-syn carboxylate bridges, giving rise to either a three-dimensional structure across the phenyl ring (1 and 2) or to regularly stacked layers with the cyclohexyl groups acting as organic separators (3). The magnetic properties of 1-3 were investigated as a function of the temperature and the magnetic field. Ferromagnetic coupling between the six-coordinate cobalt(II) ions across the anti-syn carboxylate bridge occurs in 1 (J = +1.2 cm(-1)) whereas antiferromagnetic coupling among the tetrahedral cobalt(II) centers within the sheets is observed in 2 and 3 [J = -1.63 (2) and -1.70 cm(-1) (3)] together with a spin-canted structure in 3 giving rise a long-range magnetic ordering (T(c) = 7.5 K).

  18. Structural Diversity of Copper(II) Complexes with 9-Deazahypoxanthine and Their in Vitro SOD-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Gáliková, Jana; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Two structurally different copper(II) complexes of the compositions [{Cu(9dhx)(H2O)3}2(µ-SO4)2] (1) and [Cu(9dhx)2(H2O)2(NO3)2]·H2O (2), involving 9-deazahypoxanthine (9dhx; 6-oxo-9-deazapurine; 9-deazahypoxanthine), have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared and electronic spectroscopy, electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal (DTA) analyses, and cyclic voltammetry. The X-ray structures of complexes 1 and [Cu(9dhx)2(H2O)2(NO3)2] (2a) revealed the distorted octahedral geometry in the vicinity of the copper(II) atoms, with the NO5 and N2O4 donor set, respectively. In the dimeric compound 1, the {Cu(9dhx)(H2O)3}2 units are bridged by sulfate groups with the Cu···Cu separation being 5.3446(2) Å. In both structures the 9dhx ligands are coordinated through the N3 atoms of the pyrimidine moieties. The SOD-like activity of complexes 1 and 2 was evaluated in vitro showing moderate effect, with the IC50 values equal to 18.20, and 53.33 μM, respectively. PMID:26184182

  19. Crystal structure of anhydrous poly[bis­(μ2-sarcosinato-κ3 O,N:O′)copper(II)

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Ray J.; Brewer, Greg; Zemba, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, [Cu(C3H6NO2)2]n, is a bis-complex of the anion of sarcosine (N-methyl­glycine). The asymmetric unit consists of a copper(II) ion, located on a center of inversion, and one mol­ecule of the uninegative sarcosinate anion. The copper(II) ion exhibits a typical Jahn–Teller distorted [4 + 2] coordination geometry. The four shorter equatorial bonds are to the nitro­gen and carboxyl­ate O atoms of two sarcosinate anions, and the longer axial bonds are to carboxyl­ate O atoms of neighboring complexes. The overall structure is made up from two chains formed by these longer axial Cu—O bonds, one extending parallel to [011] and the other parallel to [0-11]. Each one-dimensional array is connected by the equatorial bridging moieties to the chains on either side, creating an extended two-dimensional framework parallel to (100). There is a single inter­molecular hydrogen-bonding inter­action within the sheets between the amino NH group and an O atom of an adjacent mol­ecule. PMID:25484653

  20. The FT-IR spectrometric analysis of the changes of polyphenol oxidase II secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunhua; Dai, Ya; Liu, Qingliang; Xie, Yongshu; Xu, Xiaolong

    2003-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase II is a novel protein purified from tobacco, which acts as a key role in plant defense system. From the analysis of FT-IR spectrums, Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) spectrums and second-derivative spectrums of PPO II at different pH and peroxide PPO II adduct, the secondary structure fractions are analyzed. PPO II at low pH (pH=3.0) and peroxide PPO II adduct almost keep the same secondary structure of native PPO II. The percentages of β-turn and random coil increase rapidly and the percentages of α-helix and anti-parallel β-sheet decrease rapidly at high pH (pH=10.0) comparing with that of native PPO II. All these conclusions are proved by the secondary structure calculations of circular dichroism spectrums in different states.