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Sample records for atomic vapour laser

  1. Excitation and relaxation of metastable atomic states in an active medium of a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P A; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A; Lyabin, N A; Chursin, A D

    2016-02-28

    The influence of a pre-pulse population of copper atom metastable states and their sub-population at a current pulse edge on the copper vapour laser pulse energy is studied under optimal temperature conditions. Experiments have been performed with active elements of a commercial laser having an internal diameter of a discharge channel of 14 and 20 mm. It is found that at a pulse repetition frequency of 12 – 14 kHz, corresponding to a maximal output power, the reduction of the energy due to a residual population of metastable states is by an order of magnitude less than due to their sub-population at a current pulse edge. The modelling based on the experimental results obtained has shown that in the case of an active element with an internal diameter of 14 mm, a decrease in the pulse leading edge from ∼25 ns to 0.6 ns does not reduce the laser pulse energy up to the repetition frequency of ∼50 kHz at an average output power of 70 W m{sup -1} and efficiency of ∼11%. (lasers)

  2. IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ATOM AND MOLECULAR PULSED LASERS (AMPL'99): Critical electron density in a self-contained copper vapour laser in the restricted pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    2000-06-01

    One of the mechanisms of the inversion breaking in copper vapour lasers caused by a high prepulse electron density is considered. Inversion breaking occurs at a critical electron density Ne cr. If the prepulse electron density exceeds Ne cr, the electron temperature Te cr cannot reach, during a plasma heating pulse, the temperature of ~2eV required for lasing. A simple estimate of Ne cr is made.

  3. Metal Vapour Lasers: Physics, Engineering and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1999-03-01

    Metal Vapour Lasers Christopher E. Little University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland Since the first successful demonstration of a metal vapour laser (MVL) in 1962, this class of laser has become widely used in a broad range of fields including precision materials processing, isotope separation and medicine. The MVLs that are used today have a range of impressive characteristics that are not readily available using other technologies. In particular, the combination of high average output powers, pulse recurrence frequencies and beam quality available from green/yellow Cu vapour lasers (CVLs) and Cu bromide lasers, coupled with the high-quality, multiwatt ultraviolet (265-289 nm) radiation that can be produced using simple nonlinear optical techniques, means that Cu lasers will continue to be important for many years. Metal Vapour Lasers covers all the most commercially important and scientifically interesting pulsed and continuous wave (CW) gas-discharge MVLs, and includes device histories, operating characteristics, engineering, kinetics, commercial exploitation and applications. Short descriptions of gas discharges and excitation techniques make this volume self-consistent. A comprehensive bibliography is also provided. The greater part of this book is devoted to CVLs and their variants, including new sealed-off, high-power 'kinetically enhanced' CVLs and Cu bromide lasers. However, many other self-terminating MVLs are also discussed, including the red AuVL, green/infrared MnVL and infrared BaVL. Pulsed, high-gain, high average power lasers in the UV/violet (373.7, 430.5 nm) spectral regions are represented by Sr¯+ and Ca¯+ discharge-afterglow recombination lasers. The most commercially successful of the MVLs - the CW, UV/blue cataphoretic He-Cd¯+ ion laser - is described. Hollow cathode lasers are represented in two guises: 'white light' (blue/green/red) He-Cd¯+ ion lasers and UV/infrared Ne/He-Cu¯+ ion lasers. This unique volume is an

  4. Subpicotesla atomic magnetometry with a microfabricated vapour cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Knappe, Svenja; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Kitching, John

    2007-11-01

    Highly sensitive magnetometers capable of measuring magnetic fields below 1 pT have an impact on areas as diverse as geophysical surveying, the detection of unexploded ordinance, space science, nuclear magnetic resonance, health care and perimeter and remote monitoring. Recently, it has been shown that laboratory optical magnetometers, based on the precession of the spins of alkali atoms in the vapour phase, could achieve sensitivities in the femtotesla range, comparable to, or even exceeding, those of superconducting quantum interference devices. We demonstrate here an atomic magnetometer based on a millimetre-scale microfabricated alkali vapour cell with sensitivity below 70 fT Hz-1/2. Additionally, we use a simplified optical configuration that requires only a single low-power laser. This result suggests that millimetre-scale, low-power femtotesla magnetometers are feasible, and we support this proposition with a simple sensitivity scaling analysis. Such an instrument would greatly expand the range of applications in which atomic magnetometers could be used.

  5. Collisional thulium vapour gas-discharge laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V A; Pavlinskii, A V

    2004-01-31

    A collisional laser on a system of atomic levels based on the principle proposed by Gould is built for the first time. The population of the upper laser level and relaxation of the lower level occur upon inelastic collisions of excited thulium atoms with helium atoms. The lower-level relaxation occurs in a reaction with an energy defect of > 13000 cm{sup -1}. (active media. lasers)

  6. Transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2015-09-30

    We have studied theoretically the operation of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser. For the case of high-intensity laser radiation, we have obtained an analytical solution to a complex system of differential equations describing the laser. This solution allows one to exhaustively determine all the energy characteristics of the laser and to find optimal parameters of the working medium and pump radiation (temperature, buffer gas pressure, and intensity and width of the pump spectrum). (lasers)

  7. Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2006-04-30

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  8. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wu, J.; Feng, G.; Nute, J.; Piano, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Ma, J.; Xiao, L.; Jia, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load 1.5 × 107 atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 µK to 1.7 µK within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about 1.2 × 107. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  9. Double-resonance spectroscopy in Rubidium vapour-cells for high performance and miniature atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Mileti, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report our studies on using microwave-optical double-resonance (DR) spectroscopy for a high-performance Rb vapour-cell atomic clock in view of future industrial applications. The clock physics package is very compact with a total volume of only 0.8 dm3. It contains a recently in-house developed magnetron-type cavity and a Rb vapour cell. A homed-made frequency-stabilized laser system with an integrated acousto-optical-modulator (AOM) – for switching and controlling the light output power– is used as an optical source in a laser head (LH). The LH has the overall volume of 2.5 dm3 including the laser diode, optical elements, AOM and electronics. In our Rb atomic clock two schemes of continuous-wave DR and Ramsey-DR schemes are used, where the latter one strongly reduces the light-shift effect by separation of the interaction of light and microwave. Applications of the DR clock approach to more radically miniaturized atomic clocks are discussed.

  10. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, N. I.; Shaparev, N. Ya

    2006-04-01

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo.

  11. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  12. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-18

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  13. Subnatural-linewidth biphotons from a Doppler-broadened hot atomic vapour cell

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chi; Chen, Peng; Chow, Tsz Kiu Aaron; Zhu, Lingbang; Xiao, Yanhong; Loy, M.M.T.; Du, Shengwang

    2016-01-01

    Entangled photon pairs, termed as biphotons, have been the benchmark tool for experimental quantum optics. The quantum-network protocols based on photon–atom interfaces have stimulated a great demand for single photons with bandwidth comparable to or narrower than the atomic natural linewidth. In the past decade, laser-cooled atoms have often been used for producing such biphotons, but the apparatus is too large and complicated for engineering. Here we report the generation of subnatural-linewidth (<6 MHz) biphotons from a Doppler-broadened (530 MHz) hot atomic vapour cell. We use on-resonance spontaneous four-wave mixing in a hot paraffin-coated 87Rb vapour cell at 63 °C to produce biphotons with controllable bandwidth (1.9–3.2 MHz) and coherence time (47–94 ns). Our backward phase-matching scheme with spatially separated optical pumping is the key to suppress uncorrelated photons from resonance fluorescence. The result may lead towards miniature narrowband biphoton sources. PMID:27658721

  14. Subnatural-linewidth biphotons from a Doppler-broadened hot atomic vapour cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chi; Chen, Peng; Chow, Tsz Kiu Aaron; Zhu, Lingbang; Xiao, Yanhong; Loy, M. M. T.; Du, Shengwang

    2016-09-01

    Entangled photon pairs, termed as biphotons, have been the benchmark tool for experimental quantum optics. The quantum-network protocols based on photon-atom interfaces have stimulated a great demand for single photons with bandwidth comparable to or narrower than the atomic natural linewidth. In the past decade, laser-cooled atoms have often been used for producing such biphotons, but the apparatus is too large and complicated for engineering. Here we report the generation of subnatural-linewidth (<6 MHz) biphotons from a Doppler-broadened (530 MHz) hot atomic vapour cell. We use on-resonance spontaneous four-wave mixing in a hot paraffin-coated 87Rb vapour cell at 63 °C to produce biphotons with controllable bandwidth (1.9-3.2 MHz) and coherence time (47-94 ns). Our backward phase-matching scheme with spatially separated optical pumping is the key to suppress uncorrelated photons from resonance fluorescence. The result may lead towards miniature narrowband biphoton sources.

  15. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  16. Study of Laser Created Metal Vapour Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    appended as Appendix F. However, in this analysis we had assumed that the resonance state population can be regarded as being in equilibrium with the...value expected on the basis of LTE (local thermo- dynamic equilibrium ) and laser saturation, i.e., N N xlO21e -3 0 4 /k Te’ LTE o ogS(kTe) 3x(kTe )3...1 + g)R 1 / "I , (1) studies,"’ (v) neutral-hydrogen measurements where the rate of stimulated emission in Tokamaks ,?.ls and (vi) fusion-plasma

  17. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  18. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  19. Spatial homogeneity criteria for active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chebotarev, Gennady D; Prutsakov, Oleg O; Latush, Evgeny L

    2005-07-31

    The formation of the transverse distribution of the metal vapour concentration in repetitively pulsed lasers is analysed. The criterion for the homogeneity of this distribution is found. The optimal conditions for excitation of the active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers are determined under which a high degree of both longitudinal and transverse homogeneity is achieved. (active media)

  20. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    PubMed Central

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-01-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy. PMID:27857214

  1. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Atomic laser-beam finder.

    PubMed

    Viering, Kirsten; Medellin, David; Mo, Jianyong; Raizen, Mark G

    2012-11-05

    We report on an experimental method to align a laser beam to a cloud of atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We show how balanced lock-in detection leads to a very sensitive method to align the laser beam to the atoms in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. This provides a very reliable and fast way of aligning laser beams to atoms trapped in a MOT.

  3. Optical pumping spectroscopy of Rb vapour with co-propagating laser beams: line identification by a simple theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper the saturation spectra of rubidium vapour at room temperature, obtained with overlapped co-propagating laser beams, were examined. Unlike the standard saturation spectroscopy, here the transmission of the pump laser beam was detected. The pump laser was locked to an atomic transition of the D2 line, while the probe laser frequency was scanned in a wide frequency range. The pump and probe beams had approximately the same intensities; thus the probe laser can saturate transitions and contribute to optical pumping. This, together with Doppler broadening, leads to rich pump transmission spectra, with many lines appearing due to the interaction of lasers with atoms in different velocity groups. The advantages of this method are well-resolved structures and appearance of spectral lines on a flat, Doppler-free background. Agreement between experimental and theoretical results shows the usefulness of this simple model, based on the rate equations, for identification of lines and determination of relative contribution to the observed line intensity from atoms with different velocities. Theoretical spectra are a useful tool for the calibration of experimental spectra obtained by a nonlinear dependence of the laser frequency on the voltage applied to the piezo used for the laser diode frequency scanning.

  4. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  5. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  6. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  7. Copper bromide vapour laser with an output pulse duration of up to 320 ns

    SciTech Connect

    Gubarev, F A; Fedorov, K V; Evtushenko, G S; Fedorov, V F; Shiyanov, D V

    2016-01-31

    We report the development of a copper bromide vapour laser with an output pulse duration of up to 320 ns. To lengthen the pulse, the discharge current was limited using a compound switch comprising a pulsed hydrogen thyratron and a tacitron. This technique permits limiting the excitation of the working levels at the initial stage of the discharge development to lengthen the inversion lifetime. The longest duration of a laser pulse was reached in tubes 25 and 50 mm in diameter for a pulse repetition rate of 2 – 4 kHz. (lasers and laser beams)

  8. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  9. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  10. A simple method for experimental determination of electron temperature and electron density in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge used for excitation of high-power atomic and ionic metal and metal halide vapour lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    A simple method based on the time-resolved measurement of electrical discharge parameters, such as tube voltage and discharge current, is developed and applied for determination of electron temperature and electron density in the discharge period of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge, exciting high-power DUV Cu+ Ne-CuBr, He-Hg+ and He-Sr+ lasers.

  11. Vapour phase growth and grain boundary structure of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Najmaei, Sina; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Wu; Zou, Xiaolong; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; Yakobson, Boris I; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Single-layered molybdenum disulphide with a direct bandgap is a promising two-dimensional material that goes beyond graphene for the next generation of nanoelectronics. Here, we report the controlled vapour phase synthesis of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for the nucleation, growth, and grain boundary formation in its crystalline monolayers. Furthermore, a nucleation-controlled strategy is established to systematically promote the formation of large-area, single- and few-layered films. Using high-resolution electron microscopy imaging, the atomic structure and morphology of the grains and their boundaries in the polycrystalline molybdenum disulphide atomic layers are examined, and the primary mechanisms for grain boundary formation are evaluated. Grain boundaries consisting of 5- and 7- member rings are directly observed with atomic resolution, and their energy landscape is investigated via first-principles calculations. The uniformity in thickness, large grain sizes, and excellent electrical performance signify the high quality and scalable synthesis of the molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

  12. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Uspenskiy, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study.

  13. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  14. Legal requirements and guidelines for the control of harmful laser generated particles, vapours and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsey, John

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a review of the Health and Safety laws and guidelines relating to laser generated emissions into the workplace and outside environment with emphasis on the differences between legal requirements and guideline advice. The types and nature of contaminants released by various laser processes (i.e. cutting, coding, engraving, marking etc) are discussed, together with the best methods for controlling them to within legal exposure limits. A brief description of the main extract air filtration techniques, including the principles of particulate removal and the action of activated carbon for gas/vapour/odour filtration, is given.

  15. Laser-induced chemical vapour deposition of conductive and insulating thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisse, G.; Gaensicke, F.; Ebert, R.; Illmann, U.; Johansen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations concerning the laser-induced chemical vapour deposition of Mo, W, Co and TiSi 2 conductive thin film structures from Mo(CO) 6, W(CO) 6, Co 2(CO) 8, TiCl 4 and SiH 4 using a direct writing method are presented. SiO 2 thin films were deposited from SiH 4 and N 2O in a large area deposition process stimulated by an excimer laser by using a parallel beam configuration.

  16. Water Vapour Propulsion Powered by a High-Power Laser-Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Y.; Uchida, S.

    Most of the laser propulsion schemes now being proposed and developed assume neither power supplies nor on-board laser devices and therefore are bound to remote laser stations like a kite via a laser beam “string”. This is a fatal disadvantage for a space vehicle that flies freely though it is often said that no need of installing an energy source is an advantage of a laser propulsion scheme. The possibility of an independent laser propulsion space vehicle that carries a laser source and a power supply on board is discussed. This is mainly due to the latest development of high power laser diode (LD) technology. Both high specific impulse-low thrust mode and high thrust-low specific impulse mode can be selected by controlling the laser output by using vapour or water as a propellant. This mode change can be performed by switching between a high power continuous wave (cw), LD engine for high thrust with a low specific impulse mode and high power LD pumping Q-switched Nd:YAG laser engine for low thrust with the high specific impulse mode. This paper describes an Orbital Transfer Vehicle equipped with the above-mentioned laser engine system and fuel cell that flies to the Moon from a space platform or space hotel in Earth orbit, with cargo shipment from lunar orbit to the surface of the Moon, including the possibility of a sightseeing trip.

  17. Laser Trapping of Radioactive Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    2013-04-01

    Stuart Freedman conceived the idea of laser trapping radioactive atoms for the purpose of studying beta correlation effects. ``This is really the theorist's view of a radioactive source,'' as he fondly claimed. It is ideal because the atoms form a point source, compressed in both position and momentum space, with no material walls nearby. The Berkeley group succeeded in trapping ^21Na (half-life = 22 s) atoms [Lu et al., PRL 72, 3791 (1994)], and determined its beta-neutrino correlation coefficient a=0.5502(60) to be in agreement with the Standard Model [Vetter et al., PRC 77, 035502 (2008)]. Other groups have joined this effort with searches for scalar or tensor couplings in the weak interaction. Moreover, the technique has been extended to trap very short lived ^8He (0.1 s) to study its halo structure or the very long lived ^81Kr (230,000 yr) to map the movement of groundwater.

  18. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bykovskiy, D P; Petrovskii, V N; Uspenskiy, S A

    2015-03-31

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. Atomic-based stabilization for laser-pumped atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Gerginov, V; Shah, V; Knappe, S; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2006-06-15

    We describe a novel technique for stabilizing frequency shifts in laser-interrogated vapor-cell atomic clocks. The method suppresses frequency shifts due to changes in the laser frequency, intensity, and modulation index as well as atomic vapor density. The clock operating parameters are monitored by using the atoms themselves, rather than by using conventional schemes for laser frequency and cell temperature control. The experiment is realized using a chip-scale atomic clock. The novel atomic-based stabilization approach results in a simpler setup and improved long-term performance.

  20. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  1. Wavelength-tunable sources of entangled photons interfaced with atomic vapours

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Wildmann, Johannes S.; Piredda, Giovanni; Reindl, Marcus; Schimpf, Christian; Zallo, Eugenio; Stroj, Sandra; Edlinger, Johannes; Rastelli, Armando

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of using the quantum nature of light for secure communication keeps spurring the search and investigation of suitable sources of entangled photons. A single semiconductor quantum dot is one of the most attractive, as it can generate indistinguishable entangled photons deterministically and is compatible with current photonic-integration technologies. However, the lack of control over the energy of the entangled photons is hampering the exploitation of dissimilar quantum dots in protocols requiring the teleportation of quantum entanglement over remote locations. Here we introduce quantum dot-based sources of polarization-entangled photons whose energy can be tuned via three-directional strain engineering without degrading the degree of entanglement of the photon pairs. As a test-bench for quantum communication, we interface quantum dots with clouds of atomic vapours, and we demonstrate slow-entangled photons from a single quantum emitter. These results pave the way towards the implementation of hybrid quantum networks where entanglement is distributed among distant parties using optoelectronic devices. PMID:26815609

  2. [Research on the laser atomization treatment machine].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei-sheng; Tian, Rong-zhe; Zhang, Liang

    2005-07-01

    This text has introduces a new-type laser treatment device. It utilizes the ultrasound atomized gas passage as its optics and makes the laser beams together with the atomized medicine to be transmitted to the patient's respiratory track and lungs for treatment.

  3. Copper vapour laser with an efficient semiconductor pump generator having comparable pump pulse and output pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Yurkin, A A

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimental studies of a copper vapour laser with a semiconductor pump generator capable of forming virtually optimal pump pulses with a current rise steepness of about 40 A ns{sup -1} in a KULON LT-1.5CU active element. To maintain the operating temperature of the active element's channel, an additional heating pulsed oscillator is used. High efficiency of the pump generator is demonstrated. (lasers)

  4. Push-pull laser-atomic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Happer, W

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the "field-independent 0-0 frequency" of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  5. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  6. Kinetics of photoplasma of dense barium vapour

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I

    2015-03-31

    Barium vapour ionisation under laser photoexcitation of the resonance line at a wavelength of λ = 553.5 nm is studied numerically. Seed electrons, arising due to the associative ionisation of atoms, gain energy in superelastic collisions and lead to electron avalanche ionisation of the medium. The influence of radiative transfer in a cylindrical gas volume on the excitation kinetics of barium atoms, absorption dynamics of laser radiation and oscillation of ionisation-brightening wave under competition between ionising and quenching collisions of electrons with excited atoms is studied. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  7. Double radio-optical resonance in 87RB atomic vapour in a finite-size bufferless cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinov, Andrey; Kazakov, Georgy; Matisov, Boris; Mazets, Igor

    2008-06-01

    We study theoretically the formation of a double radio-optical resonance (DROR) in 87Rb vapour in a cell with an anti-relaxation coating. We develop a quantum-kinetic approach to the study of the Dicke narrowing. We examine various DROR schemes for different polarizations of the laser radiation. We find that the short-term stability σy of a DROR-based frequency standard improves significantly (by an order of magnitude) if a laser with a broad spectrum is used, in comparison to the case of excitation by a narrow-band laser radiation, and reaches ultimately the value σy ~ 1 × 10-14 τ-1/2, where τ is the integration time (in seconds).

  8. Determination of total arsenic content in water by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) using vapour generation assembly (VGA).

    PubMed

    Behari, Jai Raj; Prakash, Rajiv

    2006-03-01

    Analysis of arsenic in water is important in view of contamination of ground water with arsenic in some parts of the world including West Bengal in India and neighboring country Bangladesh. WHO has fixed the threshold for arsenic in drinking water to 10ppb (microg/l) level, hence the methodology for determination of arsenic is required to be sensitive at ppb level. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry with vapour generation assembly (AAS-VGA) is well known technique for the trace analysis of arsenic. However, total arsenic analysis [As(III)+As(V)] is very crucial and it requires reduction of As(V) to As(III) for correct analysis. As(III) is reduced to AsH3 vapours and finally to free As atoms, which are responsible for absorption signal in AAS. To accomplish this the vapour generation assembly attached to AAS has acid channel filled with 10 M HCl and the reduction channel with sodium borohydride. Further sample can be reduced either before aspiration for analysis, using potassium iodide (KI) or the sample can be introduced in the instrument directly and KI can be added in the reduction channel along with the sodium borohydride. The present work shows that samples prepared in 3 M HCl can be reduced with KI for 30 min before introduction in the instrument. Alternatively samples can be prepared in 6 M HCl and directly aspirated in AAS using KI in VGA reduction channel. The latter methodology is more useful when the sample size is large and time cycle is difficult to maintain. It is observed that the acid concentration of the sample in both the situations plays an important role. Further reduction in acid concentration and analysis time is achieved for the arsenic analysis by using modified method. Analysis in both the methods is sensitive at ppb level.

  9. Resonant Laser Manipulation of an Atomic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, T. C.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Gimelshein, S. F.

    2011-05-01

    Theories for laser-atom interactions have been under development since the advent of laser technology. The theories have yet to be adequately integrated into kinetic flow solvers. Realizing this integration would greatly enhance the scaling of laser-species interactions beyond the realm of ultra-cold atomic physics. A representative numerical investigation was conducted using a custom collisionless gas particle trajectory code, demonstrating this goal in the present study. The investigation covered neutral atomic beam steering and collimation using near-resonant laser fields. In addition to the numerical investigation, a validating experiment was conducted. The experimental results showed good agreement with the numerical simulations when experimental parameters, such as finite laser line width, were taken into account. These simulations showed trends and some limitations associated with the use of a continuous-wave Gaussian laser fields for the steering and collimation of a geometrically skimmed cesium atomic beam using the photon scattering force and the near-resonant induced dipole gradient force. These simulations indicate possible integration of the resonant laser-atom interaction with other rarefied and collisional solvers for similar species such as alkali metals.

  10. Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Kohel, J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Seidel, D. J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    The goals of the Glovebox Laser-cooled Atomic Clock Experiment (GLACE) are: (1) first utilization of tunable, frequency-stabilized lasers in space, (2) demonstrate laser cooling and trapping in microgravity, (3) demonstrate longest 'perturbation-free' interaction time for a precision measurement on neutral atoms, (4) Resolve Ramsey fringes 2-10 times narrower than achievable on Earth. The approach taken is: the use of COTS components, and the utilization of prototype hardware from LCAP flight definition experiments. The launch date is scheduled for Oct. 2002. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) specifications are reviewed, and a picture of the MSG is shown.

  11. Laser Cooling and Trapping of Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, William D.

    1998-05-01

    Laser cooling was proposed in 1975 and first demonstrated for trapped ions in 1978, but the effective laser cooling of neutral atoms took longer, in part because neutrals are so hard to trap. Laser deceleration and cooling of an atomic beam came in the early 1980s, followed by magnetic trapping of atoms in 1985. In 1988 we discovered that laser cooling results in temperatures far lower than expected from the then-accepted theory. The new understanding, developed in the groups of Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Steve Chu, of the physical process of laser cooling has allowed us to achieve temperatures below a microkelvin. Today, laser cooling and trapping is being used for applications ranging from atomic clocks to Bose-Einstein condensation. This talk is an adaptation of the Nobel Lecture given in Stockholm, December 1997. Special thanks go to my colleagues at NIST and to the entire laser cooling community. This work was supported by NIST and by the ONR.

  12. Determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples by flow injection cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James; Jones, Phil; Hill, Steve J.

    1996-12-01

    A simple and accurate method has been developed for the determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples. The method utilises an off-line microwave digestion stage followed by analysis using a flow injection system with detection by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The method has been validated using two certified reference materials (DORM-1 dogfish and MESS-2 estuarine sediment) and the results agreed well with the certified values. A detection limit of 0.2 ng g -1 Hg was obtained and no significant interference was observed. The method was finally applied to the determination of mercury in river sediments and canned tuna fish, and gave results in the range 0.1-3.0 mg kg -1.

  13. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  14. Laser cooling transitions in atomic erbium.

    PubMed

    Ban, H; Jacka, M; Hanssen, J; Reader, J; McClelland, J

    2005-04-18

    We discuss laser cooling opportunities in atomic erbium, identifying five J ? J + 1 transitions from the 4f126s2 3H6 ground state that are accessible to common visible and near-infrared continuous-wave tunable lasers. We present lifetime measurements for the 4f11(4Io 15/2)5d5/26s2 (15/2, 5/2)7o state at 11888 cm-1 and the 4f11(4Io 13/2)5d3/26s2 (13/2, 5/2)7o state at 15847 cm-1, showing values of 20 +/- 4 micros and 5.6 +/- 1.4 micros, respectively. We also present a calculated value of 13 +/- 7 s-1 for the transition rate from the 4f11(4Io 15/2)5d3/26s2 (15/2, 3/2)7 o state at 7697 cm-1 to the ground state, based on scaled Hartree-Fock energy parameters. Laser cooling on these transitions in combination with a strong, fast (5.8 ns) laser cooling transition at 401 nm, suggest new opportunities for narrowband laser cooling of a large-magnetic moment atom, with possible applications in quantum information processing, high-precision atomic clocks, quantum degenerate gases, and deterministic single-atom doping of materials.

  15. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  16. High intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmire, T

    2000-08-07

    The development of ultrashort pulse table top lasers with peak pulse powers in excess of 1 TW has permitted an access to studies of matter subject to unprecedented light intensities. Such interactions have accessed exotic regimes of multiphoton atomic and high energy-density plasma physics. Very recently, the nature of the interactions between these very high intensity laser pulses and atomic clusters of a few hundred to a few thousand atoms has come under study. Such studies have found some rather unexpected results, including the striking finding that these interactions appear to be more energetic than interactions with either single atoms or solid density plasmas. Recent experiments have shown that the explosion of such clusters upon intense irradiation can expel ions from the cluster with energies from a few keV to nearly 1 MeV. This phenomenon has recently been exploited to produce DD fusion neutrons in a gas of exploding deuterium clusters. Under this project, we have undertaken a general study of the intense femtosecond laser cluster interaction. Our goal is to understand the macroscopic and microscopic coupling between the laser and the clusters with the aim of optimizing high flux fusion neutron production from the exploding deuterium clusters or the x-ray yield in the hot plasmas that are produced in this interaction. In particular, we are studying the physics governing the cluster explosions. The interplay between a traditional Coulomb explosion description of the cluster disassembly and a plasma-like hydrodynamic explosion is not entirely understood, particularly for small to medium sized clusters (<1000 atoms) and clusters composed of low-Z atoms. We are focusing on experimental studies of the ion and electron energies resulting from such explosions through various experimental techniques. We are also examining how an intense laser pulse propagates through a dense medium containing these clusters.

  17. Laser manipulation of atoms and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Steven

    1991-08-01

    A variety of powerful techniques to control the position and velocity of neutral particles has been developed. As examples of this new ability, lasers have been used to construct a variety of traps, to cool atoms to temperatures below 3 x 10 exp -6th K, and to create atomic fountains that may give a hundredfold increase in the accuracy of atomic clocks. Bacteria can be held with laser traps while they are being viewed in an optical microscope, and organelles within a cell can be manipulated without puncturing the cell wall. Single molecules of DNA can now be stretched out and pinned down in a water solution with optical traps. These new capabilities may soon be applied to a wide variety of scientific questions as diverse as precision measurements of fundamental symmetries in physics and the study of biochemistry on a single molecule basis.

  18. Hydrogen atom in a laser-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, Babatunde J.; Sun, Guo-Hua; Liman, Muhammed S.; Oyewumi, K. J.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-11-01

    We scrutinize the behaviour of the eigenvalues of a hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma as it interacts with an electric field directed along θ  =  π and is exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. We refer to the interaction of the plasma with the laser light as laser-plasma. Using the Kramers-Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is the semiclassical counterpart of the Block-Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in the KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wavefunction have been expanded in Fourier series, and using Ehlotzky’s approximation we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate an intense laser field. By fitting the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to O≤ft({{r}4},α 09\\right) , we obtain the eigensolution (eigenvalues and wavefunction) of the hydrogen atom in laser-plasma encircled by an electric field, within the framework of perturbation theory formalism. Our numerical results show that for a weak external electric field and a very large Debye screening parameter length, the system is strongly repulsive, in contrast with the case for a strong external electric field and a small Debye screening parameter length, when the system is very attractive. This work has potential applications in the areas of atomic and molecular processes in external fields, including interactions with strong fields and short pulses.

  19. Strain and Structure Heterogeneity in MoS2 Atomic Layers Grown by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-18

    laser excitation focused through a 100 objective lens. This resulted in a spot size...heterogeneity, GBs are one of the most 3,200 Laser Tensile strain MoS2 PDMS 3,000 = 0 = 0% = 1.5% = 1.5% = 2.3% = 2.3% = 3.4% = 3.4% = 4.8...ns ity ( a. u. ) E ne ry s hi ft (m eV ) In te ns ity ( a. u. ) 2,600 2,400 0 –5 –10 –20 0 1 2 3 4 Tensile strain (%)Energy (eV) 1.75 1.80

  20. Laser manipulation of atomic and molecular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, Taylor C.

    The continuing advance of laser technology enables a range of broadly applicable, laser-based flow manipulation techniques. The characteristics of these laser-based flow manipulations suggest that they may augment, or be superior to, such traditional electro-mechanical methods as ionic flow control, shock tubes, and small scale wind tunnels. In this study, methodology was developed for investigating laser flow manipulation techniques, and testing their feasibility for a number of aerospace, basic physics, and micro technology applications. Theories for laser-atom and laser-molecule interactions have been under development since the advent of laser technology. The theories have yet to be adequately integrated into kinetic flow solvers. Realizing this integration would greatly enhance the scaling of laser-species interactions beyond the realm of ultra-cold atomic physics. This goal was realized in the present study. A representative numerical investigation, of laser-based neutral atomic and molecular flow manipulations, was conducted using near-resonant and non-resonant laser fields. To simulate the laser interactions over a range of laser and flow conditions, the following tools were employed: a custom collisionless gas particle trajectory code and a specifically modified version of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo statistical kinetic solver known as SMILE. In addition to the numerical investigations, a validating experiment was conducted. The experimental results showed good agreement with the numerical simulations when experimental parameters, such as finite laser line width, were taken into account. Several areas of interest were addressed: laser induced neutral flow steering, collimation, direct flow acceleration, and neutral gas heating. Near-resonant continuous wave laser, and non-resonant pulsed laser, interactions with cesium and nitrogen were simulated. These simulations showed trends and some limitations associated with these interactions, used for flow

  1. Control of nanoscale atomic arrangement in multicomponent thin films by temporally modulated vapour fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis of multicomponent thin films using vapor fluxes with a modulated deposition pattern is a potential route for accessing a wide gamut of atomic arrangements and morphologies for property tuning. In the current study, we present a research concept that allows for understanding the combined effect of flux modulation, kinetics and thermodynamics on the growth of multinary thin films. This concept entails the combined use of thin film synthesis by means of multiatomic vapor fluxes modulated with sub-monolayer resolution, deterministic growth simulations and nanoscale microstructure probes. Using this research concept we study structure formation within the archetype immiscible Ag-Cu binary system showing that atomic arrangement and morphology at different length scales is governed by diffusion of near-surface Ag atoms to encapsulate 3D Cu islands growing on 2D Ag layers. Moreover, we explore the relevance of the mechanism outlined above for morphology evolution and structure formation within the miscible Ag-Au binary system. The knowledge generated and the methodology presented herein provides the scientific foundation for tailoring atomic arrangement and physical properties in a wide range of miscible and immiscible multinary systems.

  2. Secondary laser cooling of strontium-88 atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkin, S. A.; Khabarova, K. Yu. Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N.

    2015-07-15

    The secondary laser cooling of a cloud of strontium-88 atoms on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (689 nm) intercombination transition captured into a magneto-optical trap has been demonstrated. We describe in detail the recapture of atoms from the primary trap operating on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 1}P{sub 1} (461 nm) transition and determine the recapture coefficient κ, the number of atoms, and their temperature in the secondary trap as a function of experimental parameters. A temperature of 2 µK has been reached in the secondary trap at the recapture coefficient κ = 6%, which confirms the secondary cooling efficiency and is sufficient to perform metrological measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (698 nm) clock transition in an optical lattice.

  3. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  4. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  5. Linear Atom Guides: Guiding Rydberg Atoms and Progress Toward an Atom Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traxler, Mallory A.

    In this thesis, I explore a variety of experiments within linear, two-wire, magnetic atom guides. Experiments include guiding of Rydberg atoms; transferring between states while keeping the atoms contained within the guide; and designing, constructing, and testing a new experimental apparatus. The ultimate goal of the atom guiding experiments is to develop a continuous atom laser. The guiding of 87Rb 59D5/2 Rydberg atoms is demonstrated. The evolution of the atoms is driven by the combined effects of dipole forces acting on the center-of-mass degree of freedom as well as internal-state transitions. Time delayed microwave and state-selective field ionization, along with ion detection, are used to investigate the evolution of the internal-state distribution as well as the Rydberg atom motion while traversing the guide. The observed decay time of the guided-atom signal is about five times that of the initial state. A population transfer between Rydberg states contributes to this lengthened lifetime, and also broadens the observed field ionization spectrum. The population transfer is attributed to thermal transitions and, to a lesser extent, initial state-mixing due to Rydberg-Rydberg collisions. Characteristic signatures in ion time-of-flight signals and spatially resolved images of ion distributions, which result from the coupled internal-state and center-of-mass dynamics, are discussed. Some groups have used a scheme to make BECs where atoms are optically pumped from one reservoir trap to a final state trap, irreversibly transferring those atoms from one trap to the other. In this context, transfer from one guided ground state to another is studied. In our setup, before the atoms enter the guide, they are pumped into the | F = 1, mF = --1> state. Using two repumpers, one tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 0 transition (R10) and the other tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 2 transition (R12), the atoms are pumped between these guided states. Magnetic reflections within the guide

  6. Atomic phenomena in bichromatic laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlotzky, Fritz

    2001-05-01

    We present a review of work that has been done during the last 10 years on atomic scattering and reaction processes in bichromatic laser fields. Of particular interest will be the case where the field is composed of two components of commensurate frequencies, usually consisting of a fundamental component ω and one of its low harmonics 2 ω or 3 ω. These two components are in general out of phase by an angle ϕ. The above processes are then investigated as a function of the relative phase ϕ. This procedure was termed the coherent phase control (CPC) of the atomic process considered. The idea was originally born in molecular physics as a possible means to manipulate molecular reactions.

  7. Measuring fast variations of δ^{18}O and δ^2H in atmospheric water vapour using laser spectroscopy: an instrument inter-comparison and characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-04-01

    Fast variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable lately using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This allows us to perform process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales of significant weather events. An important prerequisite for such studies implying automatic field measurements lasting for several weeks or even months is a detailed knowledge about sources of uncertainty and instrument properties. We present a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Resarch). The old versions (L1115-i, WVIA) and the new versions (L2130-i, WVIA-EP) of both systems were tested. The uncertainty components of the measurements were assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Knowledge from our laboratory experiments was used to setup a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the L1115-i and WVIA systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. Using this field measurement data we address the question of how well the deuterium excess (d=δ2H-8δ18O) of atmospheric water vapour can be determined with laser spectroscopy. The deuterium excess is an interesting parameter for process-based atmospheric water cycle studies, which depends on humidity and temperature conditions at source location of water vapour. Up to now only very few high-time-resolution measurements of deuterium excess exist. Our concurrent measurements of atmospheric isotopes in water vapour

  8. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  9. Lamb shift of laser-dressed atomic states.

    PubMed

    Jentschura, Ulrich D; Evers, Jörg; Haas, Martin; Keitel, Christoph H

    2003-12-19

    We discuss radiative corrections to an atomic two-level system subject to an intense driving laser field. It is shown that the Lamb shift of the laser-dressed states, which are the natural state basis of the combined atom-laser system, cannot be explained in terms of the Lamb shift received by the atomic bare states which is usually observed in spectroscopic experiments. In the final part, we propose an experimental scheme to measure these corrections based on the incoherent resonance fluorescence spectrum of the driven atom.

  10. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  11. Preparation, characterisation and optimisation of lithium battery anodes consisting of silicon synthesised using Laser assisted Chemical Vapour Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veliscek, Ziga; Perse, Lidija Slemenik; Dominko, Robert; Kelder, Erik; Gaberscek, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Suitability of silicon prepared using Laser assisted Chemical Vapour Pyrolysis (LaCVP) as a potential anode material in lithium batteries is systematically investigated. Its compositional, morphological, physical-chemical and electrochemical properties are compared to a current benchmark commercial silicon. Important differences in particle size and particle composition are found which, as shown, affect critically the rheological properties of the corresponding electrode slurries. In order to overcome the rheological problems of prepared nanosilicon, we introduce and optimise a spraying method instead of using the usual casting technique for slurry application. Interestingly, the optimised electrodes show similar electrochemical performance, regardless of the particle size or composition of nanosilicon. This unexpected result is explained by the unusually high resistance of electrochemical wiring in silicon-based electrodes (about 60 Ohm per 1 mg cm-2 of active material loading). Despite that, the optimised material still shows a capacity up to 1200 mA h g-1 at a relatively high loading of 1.6 mg cm-2 and after 20 cycles. On the other hand, by decreasing the loading to below ca. 0.9 mg cm-2 the wiring problems are effectively overcome and capacities close to theoretical values can be obtained.

  12. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  13. Spectral control of laser accelerated ions via deuterium vapour deposition onto cryogenically cooled targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Graeme

    2016-10-01

    A widely perceived criticism of the best understood laser driven ion acceleration mechanism, TNSA, is that the energy spectra routinely obtained are Maxwellian in nature, and are non-ideal for some of the long term envisaged applications of a laser accelerated ion source such as ion driven fast ignition or hadrontherapy. We, however, demonstrate a novel method to accelerate a quasi-monoenergetic deuterium beam in the TNSA regime of ion acceleration. This is made possible by recent developments in cryogenic targetry at the Central Laser Facility, and is achieved by cooling a gold target to approximately 7-8 K and introducing overcoats of isotopic deuterium layers on top of the hydrogen contaminant layer present on the original target. The presence of a lower charge to mass ion on top of the high charge to mass hydrogen, alters the sheath dynamics during the acceleration such that the high energy portion of the deuterium beam exhibits a full width at half maximum energy spread of δɛ / ɛ 0.3-0.5. Experimental results and multidimensional numerical modelling will be presented describing this effect. Further than this, experimental results show that the accelerated deuterium beam is found to significantly enhance the number of neutrons produced when fielded in a pitcher/catcher configuration, and provides avenues for investigation on the production of a high brightness neutron source.

  14. Search for a permanent EDM using laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The search for the electric-dipole moment (EDM) of laser-cooled francium (Fr) atoms could lead to a measurement for the electron EDM. It is predicted that the electron EDM would be enhanced by approximately three orders of magnitude in heavy atoms such as Fr. Laser-cooling and trapping techniques are expected to suppress statistical and systematic errors in precision measurements. The magneto-optical trap was achieved using stable rubidium in a developing factory of laser-cooled radioactive atoms. In light of the results from the rubidium experiments, we found that an upgrade of each apparatus is preferred for Fr trapping.

  15. Laser system for secondary cooling of {sup 87}Sr atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Khabarova, K Yu; Slyusarev, S N; Strelkin, S A; Belotelov, G S; Kostin, A S; Pal'chikov, Vitaly G; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N

    2012-11-30

    A laser system with a narrow generation line for secondary laser cooling of {sup 87}Sr atoms has been developed and investigated. It is planned to use ultracold {sup 87}Sr atoms loaded in an optical lattice in an optical frequency standard. To this end, a 689-nm semiconductor laser has been stabilised using an external reference ultrastable cavity with vibrational and temperature compensation near the critical point. The lasing spectral width was 80 Hz (averaging time 40 ms), and the frequency drift was at a level of 0.3 Hz s{sup -1}. Comparison of two independent laser systems yielded a minimum Allan deviation: 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} for 300-s averaging. It is shown that this system satisfies all requirements necessary for secondary cooling of 87Sr atoms using the spectrally narrow {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition ({lambda} = 689 nm). (cooling of atoms)

  16. Improved atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Pax, Paul; Yi, Leon; Howells, Sam; Gallagher, Mark; Chen, Ting; Elings, Virgil; Bocek, Dan

    1992-08-01

    The performance of an atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer has been improved to the point where its resolution is comparable to that of laser beam deflection systems. We describe the structure of this microscope, present a model that takes into account the main parameters associated with its operation, and demonstrate its sensitivity by showing images of a small area scan with atomic resolution as well as a large area scan in a stand-alone configuration.

  17. Infiltrating a thin or single-layer opal with an atomic vapour: Sub-Doppler signals and crystal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufarej, Elias; Maurin, Isabelle; Zabkov, Ilya; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ballin, Philippe; Klimov, Vasily; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Artificial thin glass opals can be infiltrated with a resonant alkali-metal vapour, providing novel types of hybrid systems. The reflection at the interface between the substrate and the opal yields a resonant signal, which exhibits sub-Doppler structures in linear spectroscopy for a range of oblique incidences. This result is suspected to originate in an effect of the three-dimensional confinement of the vapour in the opal interstices. It is here extended to a situation where the opal is limited to a few- or even a single-layer opal film, which is a kind of bidimensional grating. We have developed a flexible one-dimensional layered optical model, well suited for a Langmuir-Blodgett opal. Once extended to the case of a resonant infiltration, the model reproduces quick variations of the lineshape with incidence angle or polarization. Alternately, for an opal limited to a single layer of identical spheres, a three-dimensional numerical calculation was developed. It predicts crystalline anisotropy, which is demonstrated through diffraction on an empty opal made of a single layer of polystyrene spheres.

  18. Features of image colouring in a projection microscope based on a copper vapour laser with an unstable resonator and a Glan prism

    SciTech Connect

    Karpukhin, Vyacheslav T; Malikov, Mikhail M; Mendeleev, Vladimir Ya; Skovorod'ko, Sergei N; Klimovskii, Ivan I

    2004-06-30

    The effect of properties of metal surfaces on the colour of their images obtained with a 510.6/578.2-nm copper vapour laser projection microscope is studied. The metal surfaces were exposed to laser radiation polarised by 99 % in the horizontal plane. Radiation used for surface imaging is predominantly polarised in the vertical plane and is coupled out of the resonator in the direction perpendicular to its optical axis. It is found that the ratio of laser radiation powers at wavelengths 510.6 and 578.2 nm determining the image colour is dependent on the total reflection coefficients, the curvature, and statistical characteristics of the surface roughness. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms.

    PubMed

    Buffa, R

    1995-01-15

    An experiment that involves laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms is proposed and the spectral line shape of the cross section is calculated on the basis of data available in the literature. The feasibility of the experiment both in oven cells and in a crossed-atomic-beam geometry is discussed.

  20. Strongly driven one-atom laser and decoherence monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Casagrande, F.; Lulli, A.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-15

    We propose the implementation of a strongly driven one-atom laser, based on the off-resonant interaction of a three-level atom in {lambda} configuration with a single cavity mode and three laser fields. We show that the system can be described equivalently by a two-level atom resonantly coupled to the cavity and driven by a strong effective coherent field. The effective dynamics can be solved exactly, including a thermal field bath, allowing an analytical description of field statistics and entanglement properties. We also show the possible generation of quantum superposition (Schroedinger cat) states for the whole atom-field system and for the field alone after atomic measurement. We propose a way to monitor the system decoherence by measuring atomic populations. Finally, we confirm the validity of our model through numerical solutions.

  1. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using two commercial laser-based spectrometers: an instrument characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-07-01

    Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments, we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric water cycle and

  2. Mode Locking of Lasers with Atomic Layer Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    saturable absorption of the atomic layer graphene different forms of passive laser mode lockers were fabricated. These are the fiber pigtailed...ranging from 1m to 2m. The vector solitons operation of a graphene mode locked erbium fiber laser was experimentally investigated. 1...or fiber lasers; d) to use the modern material fabrication techniques to improve the performance of the graphene -based mode lockers. 3

  3. Automated continuous monitoring of inorganic and total mercury in wastewater and other waters by flow-injection analysis and cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated continuous monitoring system for the determination of inorganic and total mercury by flow-injection analysis followed by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The method uses a typical flow-injection manifold where digestion and reduction of the injected sample takes place. Mercury is removed by aeration from the flowing stream in a specially designed air-liquid separator and swept into a silica cell for absorption measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. A calibration curve up to 10 μg Hg ml-1 using three different path length cells is obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 μg Hg ml-1. The sampling rate of an injection every 3 min produces 20 results per hour from a flowing stream. PMID:18925201

  4. Laser-Free Cold-Atom Gymnastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, Benedict; Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have performed beam transport simulations on ultra cold (2 μK) and cold (130 μK) neutral Cs atoms in the F = M = + 4 (magnetic weak-field seeking) ground state. We use inhomogeneous magnetic fields to focus and accelerate the atoms. Acceleration of neutral atoms by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was demonstrated by Stern and Gerlach in 1922. In the simulations, a two mm diameter cloud of atoms is released to fall under gravity. A magnetic coil focuses the falling atoms. After falling 41 cm, the atoms are reflected in the magnetic fringe field of a solenoid. They return to their starting height, about 0.7 s later, having passed a second time through the focusing coil. The simulations show that > 98 % of ultra cold Cs atoms and > 70 % of cold Cs atoms will survive at least 15 round trips (assuming perfect vacuum). More than 100 simulations were run to optimize coil currents and focusing coil diameter and height. Simulations also show that atoms can be launched into a fountain. An experimental apparatus to test the simulations, is being constructed. This technique may find application in atomic fountain clocks, interferometers, and gravitometers, and may be adaptable for use in microgravity. It may also work with Bose-Einstein condensates of paramagnetic atoms.

  5. Laser cooling atoms to indistinguishability: Atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and entanglement through spin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Adam

    2016-05-01

    Motional control of neutral atoms has a rich history and increasingly interest has turned to single-atom control. In my thesis work, we created a platform to individually prepare single bosonic atoms in highly pure quantum states, by developing methods to laser cool single atoms to the vibrational ground state of optical tweezer traps. Applying this toolset, we observe the atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel effect when we arrange for atom tunneling to play the role of a balanced beam splitter between two optical tweezers. In another experiment, we utilize spin exchange to create entanglement, which we then verify after spatially separating the atoms to observe their non-local correlations. Merging these results with our recent demonstration of deterministic loading of atomic arrays, our results establish the concept of quantum gas assembly, which could be applied to a variety of systems ranging from the production of single dipolar molecules to the assembly of low-entropy arrays of atoms.

  6. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE PAGES

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; ...

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  7. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Evaporation-capillary instability in a deep vapour-gas cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoev, F. Kh

    1994-02-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of an instability of a molten metal surface on the walls of a deep vapour—gas cavity or crater when this surface absorbs a uniform flux of the energy of laser radiation. The instability is due to the growth of perturbations on the free surface of the melt. This growth is maintained by an associated space—time modulation of the evaporation pressure. The dispersion equation for weak hydrodynamic perturbations is derived and investigated. This equation allows for the dependence of the instability increment on the laser radiation and phase transition parameters, and also on the material constants of the medium. Quantitative estimates are obtained of the conditions for the realisation of the investigated instability mechanism.

  8. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  9. Atom lasers: Production, properties and prospects for precision inertial measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, N. P.; Altin, P. A.; Debs, J. E.; Close, J. D.

    2013-08-01

    We review experimental progress on atom lasers out-coupled from Bose-Einstein condensates, and consider the properties of such beams in the context of precision inertial sensing. The atom laser is the matter-wave analogue of the optical laser. Both devices rely on Bose-enhanced scattering to produce a macroscopically populated trapped mode that is output-coupled to produce an intense beam. In both cases, the beams often display highly desirable properties such as low divergence, high spectral flux and a simple spatial mode that make them useful in practical applications, as well as the potential to perform measurements at or below the quantum projection noise limit. Both devices display similar second-order correlations that differ from thermal sources. Because of these properties, atom lasers are a promising source for application to precision inertial measurements.

  10. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  11. Electron-atom collisions in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Philip H. G.; Flannery, M. R.

    1991-05-01

    Cross sections tor the 1S-2S and 1S-2P 0 transitions in laser assisted e-H(1S) collisions are calculated in both the multichannel eikonal and the Born-wave treatments as a function of impact energy and laser field intensity and phase. The laser considered is a monotonic, plane polarized CO 2 laser (photon energy = 0.117 eV), with the polarization direction parallel to the initial projectile velocity. Floquet dressing of the hydrogen atom in the soft-photon weak-field limit reveals a concise description of the laser assisted electron-atom collision. This model also links the microscopic detail of the individual collisions with the macroscopic considerations of experimental analysis.

  12. The calibration of the spectroscopic diode laser sensor for the water vapour diagnostics at output of singlet oxygen generator for COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megenin, A. V.; Chernyshov, A. K.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2005-06-01

    A1GaAs/GaAs quantum-well diode laser (824 nm) with the short external cavity was used for water diagnostics in the pumped out gas cell. The laser provided the 63 GHz continuous tuning of the optical frequency by the scanning of a pump current and a spectral linewidth of oscillation was less than 0,2 GHz. The experimentally obtained dependence of a second derivative amplitude on the vapour pressure coincides well with the calculated curve in the range of 0,4-20 Torr. The change of output signal close to linear was recorded at a pressure in the sample gas cell less than 5 Ton. The minimum concentration of H20, which is still measured by the diode laser sensor is estimated at a level 1,5x1015 molecule/cm3.

  13. Ionization of a multilevel atom by ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. V.; Stremoukhov, S. Yu.; Shutova, O. A.

    2010-01-15

    Specific features of ionization of single atoms by laser fields of a near-atomic strength are investigated. Calculations are performed for silver atoms interacting with femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths {lambda} = 800 nm (Ti:Sapphire) and {lambda} = 1.064 {mu}m (Nd:YAG). The dependences of the probability of ionization and of the form of the photoelectron energy spectra on the field of laser pulses for various values of their duration are considered. It is shown that the behavior of the probability of ionization in the range of subatomic laser pulse fields is in good agreement with the Keldysh formula. However, when the field strength attains values close to the atomic field strength, the discrepancies in these dependences manifested in a decrease in the ionization rate (ionization stabilization effect) or in its increase (accelerated ionization) are observed. These discrepancies are associated with the dependence of the population dynamics of excited discrete energy levels of the atom on the laser pulse field amplitude.

  14. A Laser Trap for Neutral Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-17

    alexandrite laser operating in DO , 1473 OITIow OFr I NOV ’IS 13 OBSOLETE S/N 0 102- I.F- 0 14- 6601 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF TNIS PAGE (WhenOnt...development and characterization of the new alexandrite laser, demonstration of the trap at low densities, and deter- mination of the spatial and...range and the trap depth down by vr). We have used spa- tial filtering to reliably and stabily operate our new cw alexandrite laser as well as argon and

  15. Atoms, molecules and clusters in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Zachary B.

    Recent advances in the technology of intense, short laser pulses have opened the possibility of investigating processes in atoms, molecules and clusters in which the normal intramolecular forces between electrons and nuclei, and between different electrons, are rivaled in strength by interactions with the driving laser, or with a cluster plasma. Experiments using rescattered electrons offer a means of probing atomic and molecular processes on ultrafast timescales. This thesis extends techniques and concepts of atomic and molecular physics to describe physics in the strong field regime. This involves investigating how electron scattering from atoms and molecules is affected by the intense and time-varying electric field of the laser, the effect of such scattering on experimental observables, and the role of intramolecular structure on strong field processes. Also investigated is the evolution of van derWaals atomic clusters when subject to intense laser pulses in the VUV regime. Here processes such as photoionization, inverse bremsstrahlung heating, and collisional ionization and recombination are affected both by the non-hydrogenic nature of the relevant atomic potentials but also by the screening of these potentials by the cluster plasma.

  16. Recirculation of Laser Power in an Atomic Fountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enzer, Daphna G.; Klipstein, WIlliam M.; Moore, James D.

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for laser-cooling atoms in a cesium atomic fountain frequency standard relies on recirculation of laser light through the atom-collection region of the fountain. The recirculation, accomplished by means of reflections from multiple fixed beam-splitter cubes, is such that each of two laser beams makes three passes. As described below, this recirculation scheme offers several advantages over prior designs, including simplification of the laser system, greater optical power throughput, fewer optical and electrical connections, and simplification of beam power balancing. A typical laser-cooled cesium fountain requires the use of six laser beams arranged as three orthogonal pairs of counter-propagating beams to decelerate the atoms and hold them in a three-dimensional optical trap in vacuum. Typically, these trapping/cooling beams are linearly polarized and are positioned and oriented so that (1) counter-propagating beams in each pair have opposite linear polarizations and (2) three of the six orthogonal beams have the sum of their propagation directions pointing up, while the other three have the sum of their propagation directions pointing down. In a typical prior design, two lasers are used - one to generate the three "up" beams, the other to generate the three "down" beams. For this purpose, the output of each laser is split three ways, then the resulting six beams are delivered to the vacuum system, independently of each other, via optical fibers. The present recirculating design also requires two lasers, but the beams are not split before delivery. Instead, only one "up" beam and one oppositely polarized "down" beam are delivered to the vacuum system, and each of these beams is sent through the collection region three times. The polarization of each beam on each pass through the collection region is set up to yield the same combination of polarization and propagation directions as described above. In comparison with the prior design, the present

  17. Possibilities of using pulsed lasers and copper-vapour laser system (CVL and CVLS) in modern technological equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labin, N. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Grigoryants, A. G.; Shiganov, I. N.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Sachkov, V. I.; Plyaka, P. S.; Feofanov, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Research on CVL installations with an average power of 20-25 W of cutting and drilling has shown wide range of applications of these lasers for micromachining of metals and a wide range of non-metallic materials up to 1-2 mm. From the analysis indicated that peak power density in the focused light spot of 10-30 μm diameter must be 109 -1012 W/cm2 the productivity and quality micromachining, when the treatment material is preferably in the evaporative mode micro explosions, followed by the expansion of the superheated vapor and the liquid. To achieve such levels of power density, a minimum heat affected zone (5- 10 μm) and a minimum surface roughness of the cut (1-2 μm), the quality of the output beam of radiation should be as high. Ideally, to ensure the quality of the radiation, the structure of CVL output beam must be single-beam, diffraction divergence and have at duration pulses τi = 20-40 ns. The pulse energy should have low values of 0.1-1 mJ at pulse repetition rates of 10-20 kHz. Axis of the radiation beam instability of the pattern to be three orders of magnitude smaller than the diffraction limit of the divergence. The spot of the focused radiation beam must have a circular shape with clear boundary, and a Gaussian intensity distribution.

  18. Search for electron EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the elementary particle has the sensitivity to the CP violation in the theories beyond the standard model (SM). The search for the EDM constitutes the stringent test to discriminate between the SM and beyond it. We plan to perform the electron EDM search by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom which has the largest enhancement factor of the electron EDM in the alkali atoms. In this paper, the present status of the laser cooled Fr factory that is being constructed at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University are reported.

  19. Laser heating of a transparent crystal via adsorbed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Smaalen, Sander; Arnoldus, Henk F.; George, Thomas F.

    1987-01-01

    A coated surface of a crystal is irradiated by intense infrared light. The optically active atomic bonds absorb photons from the laser field, and the subsequent spontaneous decay goes together with emissions of phonons into the crystal. This photon-to-phonon conversion results in an energy flux into the crystal. An equation for this flux is derived from the master equation for the level populations of the dressed atomic states. The saturation limit is discussed, and the general theory is illustrated with two examples. Furthermore, it is outlined with qualitative arguments that the quantum yield of photodesorption is not sensitive to the laser power.

  20. Cold-atom dynamics in crossed-laser-beam waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Echanobe, J.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of neutral cold atoms in an L-shaped crossed-beam optical waveguide formed by two perpendicular red-detuned lasers of different intensities and a blue-detuned laser at the corner. The motion in one sense is optimized, and the motion in the other sense may be suppressed even if it is energetically allowed. Quantum and classical simulations are performed and give similar results. Complemented with a vibrational cooling process we find a range of parameters for which this setting works as a one-way device or 'atom diode'.

  1. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    PubMed

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium.

  2. Laser enabled Auger decay in argon atoms and dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranitovic, Predrag; Tong, Xiao-Min; Hogle, Craig W.; Toshima, N.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.

    2011-05-01

    In rare-gas atoms, Auger decay in which an inner-valence shell ns hole is filled is normally not energetically allowed. However, in the presence of a strong laser field, a new laser-enabled Auger decay channel can open up to increase the double-ionization yield. This process is efficient at high laser intensities, and an ns hole can be filled within a few femtoseconds of its creation. This novel laser-enabled Auger decay (LEAD) process is of fundamental importance for controlling electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, and materials. We then use LEAD to investigate charge transfer in a Coulomb exploding Ar dimer. We can selectively double-ionize either the Ar dimer (threshold ~ 36 eV) or Ar atoms (threshold ~ 43.5 eV) using combined laser (1.5 eV) and XUV photons (36 eV) in a time-resolved fashion, and then comparing the kinetic energy releases. The Ar dimer can be double ionized when the 3s hole is filled by a 3p electron from either one of the two Ar atoms through LEAD. Theoretical calculation will support data taken using COLTRIMS and HHG.

  3. Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser Linewidth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    fiber optic sensors ; atomic frequency standards, applied laser spectroscopy, laser chemistry, atmospheric propagation and beam control, LIDAR/LADAR...SMC-TR-99-11 AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-98(8555)-14 Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser ...1999 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role

  4. Long Range Interactions With Laser Cooled Neutral Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gattobigio, Giovanni Luca; Michaud, Franck; Labeyrie, Guillaume; Kaiser, Robin; Loureiro, Jorge; Mendonca, Jose Tito; Tercas, Hugo; Pohl, Thomas

    2008-09-07

    Multiple scattering of light in a trap of laser cooled neutral atoms leads to repulsion forces between the atoms. The corresponding interactions have long range behavior in 1/r{sup 2} and are thus similar to Coulomb interaction in an one component confined plasma. Consequences of these interactions will be described in this paper, including the limitation of the spatial density one can obtain in such systems and self-sustained oscillations of the cloud.

  5. Resonant Laser Manipulation of an Atomic Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    direction, due to the photon scattering force from a near resonant laser field, is given by ( ) 1 2 0 scat 01 2 2 ks F s d -Gé ù = + + Gê ú ê úë û h (1...resonant laser field, is given by ( ) 2 2 dip sat ( )1 4 2 8 g I r F r r r I r e d d d æ ö¶ D ¶¶ W W¶W G÷ç ÷@- = - ç = - = -÷ç ÷ç¶ ¶ ¶ ¶è ø h h h (3

  6. Laser-assisted positron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Pan, Juan; Li, Shu-Min; Berakdar, Jamal

    2007-03-15

    We study the ionization of atomic hydrogen by a fast positron in the presence of an external linearly polarized laser field. We concentrate on the limit of a small momentum transfer and describe the fast positron's continuum states by Volkov wave functions. The ejected electron is described by a Coulomb-Volkov wave function. We are limited to small laser intensities such that the dressed state of the target is treatable within the time-dependent perturbation theory, even though the laser intensity is still quite high by laboratory standards. Numerical results for the triply differential cross sections and their dependencies on laser-field parameters are discussed and compared with the results of laser-assisted ionization by electron impact.

  7. Search for a permanent EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    To explore the mechanism for the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, the study on fundamental symmetry violation using the trapped radioactive atoms with laser cooling techniques is being promoted. An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A finite value of EDM means the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and the CP violation under the CPT invariance. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ~ 895 in atomic system. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e cm. To overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM, it is necessary to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ~ 10 6 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The extracted Fr ion beam is transported to the neutralizer, which is located 10 m downstream, and the produced neutral Fr atoms are introduced into the MOT to load the next trapping system such as the optical dipole force trap and optical lattice. The coherence time will be increased in the laser trapping system, and the present status of the experiment will be reported.

  8. Instrumentation for Creation and Diagnostics of an Intense Cold Atom Beam: CW Atom Laser and Nanotube Single Atom Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-14

    instrumentation for coherent optical information processing. This work was just published as the cover story of Nature, February 8, 2007 [ 2 ] and was...transmitted program ’Talk of the Nation: Science Friday’ (on February 9). For this setup, high-power DC Power supplies and high-laser-power acousto - optic ...introduced. Finally, the condensates are imaged with a laser beam (yellow), near resonance for the atoms’ F = 2 -- F = 3 transition, after optical

  9. A new laser cooling method for lithium atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geena

    An atom interferometer offers means to measure physical constants and physical quantities with a high precision, with relatively low cost and convenience as a table-top experiment. A precision measurement of a gravitational acceleration can test fundamental physics concepts such as Einstein equivalence principle (EEP). We identified that the two lithium isotopes (7Li and 6Li) have an advantage for the test of EEP, according to the standard model extension (SME). We aim to build the world's first lithium atom interferometer and test the Einstein equivalence principle. We demonstrate a new laser cooling method suitable for a lithium atom interferometer. Although lithium is often used in ultra-cold atom experiments for its interesting physical properties and measurement feasibility, it is more difficult to laser cool lithium than other alkali atoms due to its unresolved hyperfine states, light mass (large recoil velocity) and high temperature from the oven. Typically, standard laser cooling techniques such as Zeeman slowers and magneto-optical traps are used to cool lithium atoms to about 1 mK, and the evaporative cooling method is used to cool lithium atoms to a few muK for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) experiments. However, for the atom interferometry purpose, the evaporative cooling method is not ideal for several reasons: First, its cooling efficiency is so low (0.01 % or less) that typically only 104-105 atoms are left after cooling when one begins with 10. 9 atoms. More atoms in anatom interferometer are needed to have a better signal to noise ratio. Second, an evaporative cooling is used to make a BEC, but we do not need a BEC to make an atom interferometer. In an atom interferometer, a high density of atoms as in a BEC should be avoided since it causes a phase shift due to atom interactions. Third, a setup for an evaporative cooling requires intricate RF generating coils or a high power laser. With a simple optical lattice and a moderate laser power (100 m

  10. Atomic Beam Laser Spectrometer for In-field Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alonso

    2016-06-22

    This is a powerpoint presentation for the DTRA quarterly program review that goes into detail about the atomic beam laser spectrometer for in-field isotopic analysis. The project goals are the following: analysis of post-detonation debris, determination of U and Pu isotopic composition, and fieldable prototype: < 2ft3, < 1000W.

  11. Atomic excitation and acceleration in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, H.; Eichmann, U.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic excitation in the tunneling regime of a strong-field laser-matter interaction has been recently observed. It is conveniently explained by the concept of frustrated tunneling ionization (FTI), which naturally evolves from the well-established tunneling picture followed by classical dynamics of the electron in the combined laser field and Coulomb field of the ionic core. Important predictions of the FTI model such as the n distribution of Rydberg states after strong-field excitation and the dependence on the laser polarization have been confirmed in experiments. The model also establishes a sound basis to understand strong-field acceleration of neutral atoms in strong laser fields. The experimental observation has become possible recently and initiated a variety of experiments such as atomic acceleration in an intense standing wave and the survival of Rydberg states in strong laser fields. Furthermore, the experimental investigations on strong-field dissociation of molecules, where neutral excited fragments after the Coulomb explosion of simple molecules have been observed, can be explained. In this review, we introduce the subject and give an overview over relevant experiments supplemented by new results.

  12. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  13. Rate-equation approach to atomic-laser light statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chusseau, Laurent; Arnaud, Jacques; Philippe, Fabrice

    2002-11-01

    We consider three- and four-level atomic lasers that are either incoherently (unidirectionally) or coherently (bidirectionally) pumped, the single-mode cavity being resonant with the laser transition. The intracavity Fano factor and the photocurrent spectral density are evaluated on the basis of rate equations. According to that approach, fluctuations are caused by jumps in active and detecting atoms. The algebra is simple. Whenever a comparison is made, the expressions obtained coincide with the previous results. The conditions under which the output light exhibits sub-Poissonian statistics are considered in detail. Analytical results, based on linearization, are verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. An essentially exhaustive investigation of sub-Poissonian light generation by three- and four-level lasers has been performed. Only special forms were reported earlier.

  14. Automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of mercury species in natural water samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-Min; Zhang, Feng-Ping; Jiao, Bao-Yu; Rao, Jin-Yu; Leng, Geng

    2017-04-14

    An automated, home-constructed, and low cost dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) device that directly coupled to a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS) system was designed and developed for the determination of trace concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in natural waters. With a simple, miniaturized and efficient automated DLLME system, nanogram amounts of these mercury species were extracted from natural water samples and injected into a hyphenated HPLC-CVAFS for quantification. The complete analytical procedure, including chelation, extraction, phase separation, collection and injection of the extracts, as well as HPLC-CVAFS quantification, was automated. Key parameters, such as the type and volume of the chelation, extraction and dispersive solvent, aspiration speed, sample pH, salt effect and matrix effect, were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linear range was 10-1200ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 5-450ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Limits of detection were 3.0ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 1.5ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by spiking three natural water samples with different Hg concentrations, giving recoveries from 88.4-96.1%, and relative standard deviations <5.1%.

  15. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury determinations in water and fish samples by using solid phase extraction and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry combination.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Karaman, Isa; Citak, Demirhan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-01

    A method has been developed for mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Staphylococcus aureus loaded Dowex Optipore V-493 micro-column in the presented work, by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 molL(-1) HCl for methyl mercury and 2 molL(-1) HCl for mercury(II) were performed at the pH range of 2-6. Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes were investigated. The detection limits of the analytes were 2.5 ngL(-1) for Hg(II) and 1.7 ngL(-1) for methyl mercury. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 6.5 and 5.4 mgg(-1), respectively. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material. The speciation procedure established was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and microwave digested fish samples.

  16. Active Control of Laser Wavefronts in Atom Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimeche, A.; Langlois, M.; Merlet, S.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2017-03-01

    Wavefront aberrations are identified as a major limitation in quantum sensors. They are today the main contribution in the uncertainty budget of the best cold-atom interferometers based on two-photon laser beam splitters and constitute an important limit for their long-term stability, impeding these instruments from reaching their full potential. Moreover, they will also remain a major obstacle in future experiments based on large-momentum beam splitters. In this article, we tackle this issue by using a deformable mirror to control actively the laser wavefronts in atom interferometry. In particular, we demonstrate in an experimental proof of principle the efficient correction of wavefront aberrations in an atomic gravimeter.

  17. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms.

    PubMed

    Viteau, M; Reveillard, M; Kime, L; Rasser, B; Sudraud, P; Bruneau, Y; Khalili, G; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Guerri, I; Fioretti, A; Ciampini, D; Allegrini, M; Fuso, F

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1-5keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis.

  18. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  19. A compact atomic beam based system for Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of strontium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gunjan; Vishwakarma, Chetan; Dharmadhikari, C. V.; Rapol, Umakant D.

    2017-03-01

    We report the construction of a simple, light weight, and compact atomic beam spectroscopy cell for strontium atoms. The cell is built using glass blowing technique and includes a simple titanium sublimation pump for the active pumping of residual and background gases to maintain ultra-high vacuum. A commercially available and electrically heated dispenser source is used to generate the beam of Sr atoms. We perform spectroscopy on the 5 s2S10 →5 s 5 pP11 transition to obtain a well resolved Doppler free spectroscopic signal for frequency stabilization of the laser source. This design can be easily extended to other alkali and alkaline earth metals.

  20. Development of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with production of atomic iodine in a chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Censky, M; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Kodymova, J; Jakubec, I

    2009-11-30

    The alternative method of atomic iodine generation for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) in chemical reactions with gaseous reactants is investigated experimentally. The influence of the configuration of iodine atom injection into the laser cavity on the efficiency of the atomic iodine generation and small-signal gain is studied. (lasers)

  1. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B. Agostini, P.A. Kulander, K.C.

    1999-06-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.; Kulander, K.C.

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  3. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L. F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P. A.; Kulander, K. C.

    1999-06-11

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  4. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, P A; DiMauro, L F; Kulander, K; Sheehy, B; Walker, B

    1998-09-03

    Abstract. This talk examines two distinct cases in strong opbical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamic.s. In the first. example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two- level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one- electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unc

  5. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  6. Cs 728 nm Laser Spectroscopy and Faraday Atomic Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Zheng; Tao, Zhi-Ming; Jiang, Zhao-Jie; Chen, Jing-Biao

    2014-12-01

    We mainly present the 728 nm laser spectroscopy and Faraday atomic filter of Cs atoms with 650 MHz linewidth and 2.6% transmission based on an electrodeless discharge vapor lamp, compared with Rb 728 nm laser spectroscopy. Accidentally, this remarkably strong Cs 728 nm transition from the 6F7/2 state to the 5D5/2 state is only about 2.5 GHz away from the Rb 728 nm transition of the future potential four-level active optical clock, once laser cooled and trapped from the 7S1/2 state to the 5P1/2 state, as we proposed previously. A Faraday atomic filter stabilized 728 nm laser using a Cs electrodeless discharge vapor lamp with a power of 10mW will provide a frequency reference to evaluate the performance of the potential Rb four-level active optical clock at 728 nm with power less than 1 nW by 2.5 GHz heterodyne measurements.

  7. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-15

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  8. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  9. Mode transverse d'un laser à atomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, W.; Riou, J.-F.; Fauquembergue, M.; Le Coq, Y.; Josse, V.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.

    2006-10-01

    Nous réalisons à partir d'un condensat de Bose-Einstein un laser à atomes quasi-continu par application d'un coupleur radiofréquence. La très forte densité du condensat source rend les interactions entre celui-ci et le laser extrêmement importantes, modifiant considérablement la structure transverse du faisceau. Comme en optique photonique, nous caractérisons les faisceaux ainsi produits par un facteur de qualité M2.

  10. Strongly Interacting Atom Lasers in Three-Dimensional Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  11. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Haynam, C.; Johnson, M.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1986-09-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. We discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques that we use. We illustrate the methodology adopted with examples of other elements that are under study in our program.

  12. Colloidal mercury (Hg) distribution in soil samples by sedimentation field-flow fractionation coupled to mercury cold vapour generation atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, A; Terzano, R; Medici, L; Beciani, M; Pagnoni, A; Blo, G

    2012-01-01

    Diverse analytical techniques are available to determine the particle size distribution of potentially toxic elements in matrices of environmental interest such as soil, sediments, freshwater and groundwater. However, a single technique is often not exhaustive enough to determine both particle size distribution and element concentration. In the present work, the investigation of mercury in soil samples collected from a polluted industrial site was performed by using a new analytical approach which makes use of sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) coupled to cold vapour generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-ETAAS). The Hg concentration in the SdFFF fractions revealed a broad distribution from about 0.1 to 1 μm, roughly following the particle size distributions, presenting a maximum at about 400-700 nm in diameter. A correlation between the concentration of Hg in the colloidal fraction and organic matter (O.M.) content in the soil samples was also found. However, this correlation is less likely to be related to Hg sorption to soil O.M. but rather to the presence of colloidal mercuric sulfide particles whose size is probably controlled by the occurrence of dissolved O.M. The presence of O.M. could have prevented the aggregation of smaller particles, leading to an accumulation of mercuric sulfides in the colloidal fraction. In this respect, particle size distribution of soil samples can help to understand the role played by colloidal particles in mobilising mercury (also as insoluble compounds) and provide a significant contribution in determining the environmental impact of this toxic element.

  13. A difference in using atomic layer deposition or physical vapour deposition TiN as electrode material in metal-insulator-metal and metal-insulator-silicon capacitors.

    PubMed

    Groenland, A W; Wolters, R A M; Kovalgin, A Y; Schmitz, J

    2011-09-01

    In this work, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) capacitors are studied using titanium nitride (TiN) as the electrode material. The effect of structural defects on the electrical properties on MIS and MIM capacitors is studied for various electrode configurations. In the MIM capacitors the bottom electrode is a patterned 100 nm TiN layer (called BE type 1), deposited via sputtering, while MIS capacitors have a flat bottom electrode (called BE type 2-silicon substrate). A high quality 50-100 nm thick SiO2 layer, made by inductively-coupled plasma CVD at 150 degrees C, is deposited as a dielectric on top of both types of bottom electrodes. BE type 1 (MIM) capacitors have a varying from low to high concentration of structural defects in the SiO2 layer. BE type 2 (MIS) capacitors have a low concentration of structural defects and are used as a reference. Two sets of each capacitor design are fabricated with the TiN top electrode deposited either via physical vapour deposition (PVD, i.e., sputtering) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). The MIM and MIS capacitors are electrically characterized in terms of the leakage current at an electric field of 0.1 MV/cm (I leak) and for different structural defect concentrations. It is shown that the structural defects only show up in the electrical characteristics of BE type 1 capacitors with an ALD TiN-based top electrode. This is due to the excellent step coverage of the ALD process. This work clearly demonstrates the sensitivity to process-induced structural defects, when ALD is used as a step in process integration of conductors on insulation materials.

  14. Stabilizing an atom laser using spatially selective pumping and feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, Mattias; Haine, Simon; Hope, Joseph J.

    2005-11-15

    We perform a comprehensive study of stability of a pumped atom laser in the presence of pumping, damping, and outcoupling. We also introduce a realistic feedback scheme to improve stability by extracting energy from the condensate and determine its effectiveness. We find that while the feedback scheme is highly efficient in reducing condensate fluctuations, it usually does not alter the stability class of a particular set of pumping, damping, and outcoupling parameters.

  15. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  16. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  17. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  18. Search for a permanent EDM using laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakemi, Y.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Liu, S.; Nataraj, H. S.; Oikawa, A.; Saito, M.; Sato, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Aoki, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Murakami, T.; Imai, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Wakasa, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2011-07-01

    An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A non-zero EDM shows the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and under the CPT invariance it means the CP violation. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ~ 895. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to perform the search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e · cm. The important points to overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM are to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ~106 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The developments of the laser system and optical equipments are in progress, and the present status and future plan of the experimental project is reported.

  19. Comparison of the quantitative analysis performance between pulsed voltage atom probe and pulsed laser atom probe.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, J; Kawakami, K; Raabe, D

    2017-01-31

    The difference in quantitative analysis performance between the voltage-mode and laser-mode of a local electrode atom probe (LEAP3000X HR) was investigated using a Fe-Cu binary model alloy. Solute copper atoms in ferritic iron preferentially field evaporate because of their significantly lower evaporation field than the matrix iron, and thus, the apparent concentration of solute copper tends to be lower than the actual concentration. However, in voltage-mode, the apparent concentration was higher than the actual concentration at 40K or less due to a detection loss of matrix iron, and the concentration decreased with increasing specimen temperature due to the preferential evaporation of solute copper. On the other hand, in laser-mode, the apparent concentration never exceeded the actual concentration, even at lower temperatures (20K), and this mode showed better quantitative performance over a wide range of specimen temperatures. These results indicate that the pulsed laser atom probe prevents both detection loss and preferential evaporation under a wide range of measurement conditions.

  20. Secondary laser cooling and capturing of thulium atoms in traps

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Fedorov, S A; Vishnyakova, G A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, N N; Sorokin, V N

    2014-06-30

    Secondary laser cooling has been realised on the weak dipole transition 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sup o})6s{sup 2}, J = 7/2, F=4 → 4f{sup 12}({sup 3}H{sub 6}) 5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2}, J' = 9/2, F' = 5 with the wavelength of 530.7 nm and natural width of 350 kHz. The temperature of the atomic cloud in a magnetooptical trap (MOT) was 30 μK at the lifetime of 2 s and the number of atoms 10{sup 5}. Approximately 1% of atoms from the MOT have been reloaded to an optical dipole trap and to one-dimensional optical lattice at the wavelength of 532 nm. The atom lifetime in the optical lattice was 320 ms. We propose to employ thulium atoms captured in an optical lattice as an optical frequency reference. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  2. Atomic mass dependent electrostatic diagnostics of colliding laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.

    2013-09-15

    The behaviours of colliding laser plasma plumes (C{sub p}) compared with single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) are investigated for 14 different atomic mass targets. A Faraday cup, situated at the end of a drift tube (L = 0.99 m), is employed to record the time-of-flight (TOF) current traces for all elements and both plume configurations, for a fixed laser intensity of I{sub p} = 4.2 × 10{sup 10} W cm{sup −2} (F = 0.25 kJ cm{sup −2}). The ratio of the peak current from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the peak current ratio while the ratio of the integrated charge yield from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the charge yield ratio. Variation of the position of the Faraday cup within the drift tube (L = 0.33, 0.55, and 0.99 m) in conjunction with a lower laser fluence (F = 0.14 kJ cm{sup −2}) facilitated direct comparison of the changing TOF traces from both plasma configurations for the five lightest elements studied (C, Al, Si, Ti, and Mn). The results are discussed in the frame of laser plasma hydrodynamic modelling to approximate the critical recombination distance L{sub CR}. The dynamics of colliding laser plasma plumes and the atomic mass dependence trends observed are presented and discussed.

  3. Modeling a semiconductor laser with an intracavity atomic absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Masoller, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Oria, M.

    2009-07-15

    The dynamics of a semiconductor laser with an intracavity atomic absorber is studied numerically. The study is motivated by the experiments of Barbosa et al. [Opt. Lett. 32, 1869 (2007)], using a semiconductor junction as an active medium, with its output face being antireflection coated, and a cell containing cesium vapor placed in a cavity that was closed by a diffraction grating (DG). The DG allowed scanning the lasing frequency across the D{sub 2} line in the Cs spectrum, and different regimes such as frequency bistability or dynamic instability were observed depending on the operating conditions. Here we propose a rate-equation model that takes into account the dispersive losses and the dispersive refractive index change in the laser cavity caused by the presence of the Cs vapor cell. These effects are described through a modification of the complex susceptibility. The numerical results are found to be in qualitative good agreement with some of the observations; however, some discrepancies are also noticed, which can be attributed to multi-longitudinal-mode emission in the experiments. The simulations clearly show the relevant role of the Lamb dips and crossover resonances, which arise on top of the Doppler-broadened D{sub 2} line in the Cs spectrum, and are due to the forward and backward intracavity fields interacting resonantly with the Cs atoms. When the laser frequency is locked in a dip, a reduction in the frequency noise and of the intensity noise is demonstrated.

  4. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic particles. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theory and experiments on laser cooling and laser trapping of neutral atoms and atomic ions. Atoms and ions are cooled by laser radiation pressure to very low Kelvin temperatures and confined in electromagnetic traps of very high density. Atomic particles cover sodium atoms, mercury ions, beryllium ions, magnesium ions, and hydrogen. Citations discuss applications in high performance spectroscopy, atomic clocks, microwave and optical frequency standards, relativistic neutral particle beam weapons, exotic fuels, cooling of electron beams, and space propulsion. (Contains a minimum of 185 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic particles. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theory and experiments on laser cooling and laser trapping of neutral atoms and atomic ions. Atoms and ions are cooled by laser radiation pressure to very low Kelvin temperatures and confined in electromagnetic traps of very high density. Atomic particles cover sodium atoms, mercury ions, beryllium ions, magnesium ions, and hydrogen. Citations discuss applications in high performance spectroscopy, atomic clocks, microwave and optical frequency standards, relativistic neutral particle beam weapons, exotic fuels, cooling of electron beams, and space propulsion. (Contains a minimum of 204 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic particles. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theory and experiments on laser cooling and laser trapping of neutral atoms and atomic ions. Atoms and ions are cooled by laser radiation pressure to very low Kelvin temperatures and confined in electromagnetic traps of very high density. Atomic particles discussed include sodium atoms, mercury ions, beryllium ions, magnesium ions, and hydrogen. Applications for high performance spectroscopy, atomic clocks, microwave and optical frequency standards, relativistic neutral particle beam weapons, exotic fuels, cooling of electron beams, and space propulsion are examined. (Contains a minimum of 151 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Thermal relaxation of adsorbed atoms in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoldus, Henk F.; van Smaalen, Sander; George, Thomas F.

    1986-11-01

    Adsorbed atoms on the surface of a harmonic lattice are immersed in a strong laser field. The optical Bloch equations are derived, which include the thermal relaxation and the coherent excitation of the adbond. This is accomplished by a transformation to dressed states, which diagonalizes the interaction with the laser. The single-phonon couplings are then understood as transitions between dressed states. The radiative contributions for arbitrarily strong fields are obtained in the master equation, and it is shown that the coherences with respect to the dressed states decay exponentially, due to the phonon relaxation. General properties of the competing phonon-induced redistribution and optical excitation of the level populations are presented, and exemplified by an explicit elaboration of a three-level system. The results are amenable to analytical evaluation once the interaction potential is prescribed, and extensions of the approach to include multiphonon processes are straightforward.

  8. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  9. A stable 657nm laser for a Ca atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyenhuis, Brian; Erickson, Christopher; Tang, Rebecca; Doermann, Greg; van Zijll, Marshall; Durfee, Dallin

    2006-05-01

    We will present an extremely stable laser to be used in an atom interferometer. A 657nm grating-stabilized diode laser is locked to a high-finesse cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall method. Utilizing a feedback circuit with a bandwidth of 5 MHz we see a laser linewidth less than one kHz. In addition to a relatively high bandwidth, our circuit design allows for mode-hop-free scanning over a large range. We are also working on several improvements which should further reduce our linewidth; we are improving passive mechanical and thermal stability of the laser and the optical cavity and plan to change to a higher finesse cavity, we have designed and are testing a more stable current driver based on an updated Hall-Libbrecht design, and we calculating an optimized multiple-input feedback transfer function for our system. We will also present the measurement of the resonances of our optical cavity relative to the Ca intercombination line using a high-temperature vapor cell.

  10. Search for permanent EDM using laser cooled Fr atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Furukawa, T.; Harada, K.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Imai, K.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The existence of a non-zero electric dipole moment (EDM) implies the violation of time reversal symmetry. As the time-reversal symmetry violation predicted by the Standard Model (SM) for the electron EDM is too small to be observed with current experimental techniques and any a non-zero EDM would indicate new physics beyond the SM. The tiny signal from the electron EDM is enhanced in the heavy atoms such as francium (Fr). We are constructing the laser-cooled Fr factory to search for the electron EDM.

  11. Electron scattering by laser-excited barium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Jensen, S. W.; Poe, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Inelastic and superelastic scattering of 30- and 100-eV electrons by laser-excited 6s 6p 1P and subsequent cascade-populated 6s 6p 3P, 6s 5d 1D, and 6s 5d 3D Ba atoms have been observed. Absolute differential cross sections for the singlet and relative scattering intensities for the triplet species have been determined in the 5 to 20 deg angular region. Under the present conditions excitations dominate over deexcitations.

  12. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    Energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams were generated by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin films of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films were carried out by mass spectrometry. The peak flux, found to occur at 10 eV, is estimated from this data to be 3 x 10(20) m(-2) s(-1). Analysis of the time-of-flight data indicates a number of processes contribute to the formation of the atomic oxygen beam. The absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3) 3s(1) (5S) level of atomic oxygen blown off from ITO films is supported by the failure to observe emission at 777.3 nm from the 2p(3) 3p(1) (5P sub J) levels. Reactive scattering experiments with polymer film targets for atomic oxygen bombardment are planned using a universal crossed molecular beam apparatus.

  13. Low-threshold short-cavity diode laser for a miniature atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kargapol'tsev, Sergei V; Velichansky, Vladimir L; Vasil'ev, V V; Kobyakova, M Sh; Morozyuk, A V; Shiryaeva, N V; Konyaev, V P

    2009-06-30

    Short-cavity diode lasers (SCDLs) emitting at the 894-nm D{sub 1} line of caesium are developed. Low threshold currents and power consumption will make it possible to use these lasers in chip-size atomic clocks (CSACs) and magnetometers. The SCDL parameters are comparable with the parameters of surface-emitting lasers. (lasers)

  14. The History of Laser Trapping of Atoms and Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkin, Arthur

    2003-03-01

    This subject began in 1970 with the demonstration of relatively large radiation pressure forces on small transparent macroscopic particles. Two components of the force were identified: a scattering force in the direction of the incident laser beam and a gradient component in the direction of the intensity gradient. This led to the discovery of stable optical trapping and manipulation of small neutral particles, using these two components. Such trapping was used to levitate particles in air, and also in vacuum with feedback damping. The use of feedback gives a sensitive force measurement technique with applications to the measurement of optical, electric, magnetic, and viscous forces in the subpiconewton range. Early work on understanding of similar scattering and gradient light forces on atoms led to the first experiment on focusing and defocusing of atoms by light and the invention of the single beam gradient or tweezers trap for atoms. By 1980 the fundamentals of the field had been established [1]. Experiments in the mid-1980s on optical tweezer trapping and cooling of atoms resulted in a revolution in atomic physics experimental techniques. The almost simultaneous demonstration of tweezer trapping of macroscopic dielectric particles and the serendipitous discovery of trapping of living biological particles has opened a new field of applications of tweezers to biological sciences. It is now possible to use optical tweezers to separate living single cells, measure the mechanical properties of cellular cytoplasm, and study single biological molecules in vitro [2]. The growing role of optical forces in recent work on Bose-Einstein condensation will be briefly discussed. [1] A. Ashkin, Science 210, 1081 (1980). [2] A. Ashkin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 4853 (1997).

  15. In situ control of the growth of GaAs / GaAlAs structures in a metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy reactor by laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, R.; Raffle, Y.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Le Roux, G.; Dugrand, L.; Michel, J. C.

    1994-12-01

    Metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) growth of GaAs and GaAlAs has been studied by laser reflectometry using two wavelengths. At 1.32 μm, GaAs and GaAlAs are totally transparent for our growth temperature (750°C) so that layers up to a few micrometres thick can be monitored. On the other hand, 0.514 μm proves to be an optimum wavelength for the control of Bragg mirror, with layer thickness kin the range 60 to 90 nm. Effective optical indices have been determined for both wavelenghts by comparing in-situ and ex-situ measurements. By 1.32 μm reflectivity, in-situ determination of the composition of GaAlAs thick layer as well as the kperiod of a GaAs/GaAlAs multi quantum well (MQW) have been determined. Finally, by 0.514 nm reflectivity, Bragg reflectors centred at 980 nm have been grown. X-ray diffraction and reflectivity measurements performed on the reflectors confirm a 1% reproducibility and accuracy of the stop band centre wavelength.

  16. IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ATOM AND MOLECULAR PULSED LASERS (AMPL'99): IV International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Pulsed Gas Lasers (AMPL'99)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, Gennadii S.; Kopylova, T. N.; Soldatov, A. N.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.; Yancharina, A. M.

    2000-06-01

    A brief review of the most interesting papers presented at the IV International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Pulsed Gas Lasers (AMPL'99), which was held in Tomsk, September 13-17, 1999, is provided.

  17. Low temperature corneal laser welding investigated by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; Sbrana, Francesca; Tiribilli, Bruno; Pini, Roberto

    2009-02-01

    The structural modifications in the stromal matrix induced by low-temperature corneal laser welding were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This procedure consists of staining the wound with Indocyanine Green (ICG), followed by irradiation with a near-infrared laser operated at low-power densities. This induces a local heating in the 55-65 °C range. In welded tissue, extracellular components undergo heat-induced structural modifications, resulting in a joining effect between the cut edges. However, the exact mechanism generating the welding, to date, is not completely understood. Full-thickness cuts, 3.5 mm in length, were made in fresh porcine cornea samples, and these were then subjected to laser welding operated at 16.7 W/cm2 power density. AFM imaging was performed on resin-embedded semi-thin slices once they had been cleared by chemical etching, in order to expose the stromal bulk of the tissue within the section. We then carried out a morphological analysis of characteristic fibrillar features in the laser-treated and control samples. AFM images of control stromal regions highlighted well-organized collagen fibrils (36.2 +/- 8.7 nm in size) running parallel to each other as in a typical lamellar domain. The fibrils exhibited a beaded pattern with a 22-39 nm axial periodicity. Laser-treated corneal regions were characterized by a significant disorganization of the intralamellar architecture. At the weld site, groups of interwoven fibrils joined the cut edges, showing structural properties that were fully comparable with those of control regions. This suggested that fibrillar collagen is not denatured by low-temperature laser welding, confirming previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, and thus it is probably not involved in the closure mechanism of corneal cuts. The loss of fibrillar organization may be related to some structural modifications in some interfibrillar substance as proteoglycans or collagen VI. Furthermore, AFM

  18. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  19. Giant-laser-pulse-induced Rabi sideband of a multilevel dressed atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tian-Jie; Duan, Shao-Guang

    1993-03-01

    Rabi sidebands of the Na atomic vapor excited by a resonant-pulsed-laser beam were observed in the forward-direction radiation. While the laser power scans over a factor of 10, the change of Rabi shift is much less than what is expected by the two-level dressed-atom model. Therefore a multilevel dressed-atom model is developed to calculate the levels of the dressed Na atom, and the influence of the time evolution of the laser power is also taken into account in counting the real observable spectrum. After considering all these factors, the final calculated data fit the experimental results satisfactorily.

  20. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  1. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  2. Controlling H atom production in the 193 nm laser photolysis of triethylarsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Deshmukh, Subhash; Brum, Jeffrey L.; Koplitz, Brent

    1991-05-01

    We report on the production of atomic hydrogen subsequent to the 193 nm photolysis of triethylarsenic (TEAs) using an excimer laser. The H atoms are probed via two-photon (121.6+364.7 nm) ionization, and the resulting H atom Doppler profile at Lyman-α is presented. Photolysis power dependence studies demonstrate that substantial H atom formation occurs at relatively low laser powers. However, the H atom signal actually begins to diminish as the photolysis laser power is increased beyond ˜70 MW/cm2. Correlations with time-of-fight mass spectral data suggest that ion channels are being accessed. The possible mechanisms for TEAs excitation that lead to H atom formation/depletion are presented, and the implications of these observations on controlling carbon incorporation in the laser-enhanced growth of films of GaAs, AlGaAs, etc. are discussed.

  3. Laser intensity determination using nonadiabatic tunneling ionization of atoms in close-to-circularly polarized laser fields.

    PubMed

    Quan, Wei; Yuan, MingHu; Yu, ShaoGang; Xu, SongPo; Chen, YongJu; Wang, YanLan; Sun, RenPing; Xiao, ZhiLei; Gong, Cheng; Hua, LinQiang; Lai, XuanYang; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2016-10-03

    We conceive an improved procedure to determine the laser intensity with the momentum distributions from nonadiabatic tunneling ionization of atoms in the close-to-circularly polarized laser fields. The measurements for several noble gas atoms are in accordance with the semiclassical calculations, where the nonadiabatic effect and the influence of Coulomb potential are included. Furthermore, the high-order above-threshold ionization spectrum in linearly polarized laser fields for Ar is measured and compared with the numerical calculation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in the single-active-electron approximation to test the accuracy of the calibrated laser intensity.

  4. Clock Technology Development for the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Time and Frequency Sciences and Technology Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a laser cooling capability for flight and has been selected by NASA to support the Laser-Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. Current work in the group includes design and development for tee two laser-cooled atomic clock experiments which have been selected for flight on the International Space Station.

  5. Reactions of pulsed laser produced boron and nitrogen atoms in a condensing argon stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Lester; Hassanzadeh, Parviz; Burkholder, Thomas R.; Martin, J. M. L.

    1993-01-01

    Reactions of pulsed laser produced B and N atoms at high dilution in argon favored diboron species. At low laser power with minimum radiation, the dominant reaction with N2 gave BBNN (3Π). At higher laser power, reactions of N atoms contributed the B2N (2B2), BNB (2Σu+), NNBN (1Σ+), and BNBN (3Π) species. These new transient molecules were identified from mixed isotopic patterns, isotopic shifts, and ab initio calculations of isotopic spectra.

  6. Ordered many-electron motions in atoms and x-ray lasers. [Subpicosecond ultraviolet laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Subpicosecond ultraviolet laser technology is enabling the exploration of nonlinear atomic interactions with electric field strengths considerably in excess of an atomic unit. As this regime is approached, experiments studying multiple ionization, photoelectron energy spectra, and harmonically produced radiation all exhibit strong nonlinear coupling. Peak total energy transfer rates on the order of approx.2 x 10/sup -4/ W/atom have been observed at an intensity of approx.10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/, and it is expected that energy transfer rates approaching approx.0.1 to 1 W/atom will occur under more extreme conditions for which the ultraviolet electric field E is significantly greater than e/a/sub 0//sup 2/. In this high intensity regime, a wide range of new nonlinear phenomena will be open to study. These will include the possibility of ordered driven motions in atoms, molecules, and plasmas, mechanisms involving collisions, and relativistic processes such as electron-positron pair production. An understanding of these physical interactions may provide a basis for the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 100 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  8. Knee structure in double ionization of noble atoms in circularly polarized laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Jingtao

    2017-01-01

    Nonsequential double ionization is characterized by a knee structure in the plot of double-ionization probability versus laser intensity. In circularly polarized (CP) laser fields, this structure has only been observed for Mg atoms. By choosing laser fields according to a scaling law, we exhibit the knee structure in CP laser fields for Ar and He atoms. The collision of the ionized electron with the core enhances the ionization of the second electron and forms the knee structure. The electron recollision is universal in CP laser fields, but the ionization probability in the knee region decreases as the wavelength of the driven field increases. For experimental observations, it is beneficial to use target atoms with small ionization potentials and laser fields with short wavelengths.

  9. Annealing study of H2O and O3 grown Al2O3 deposited by atomic layer chemical vapour deposition on n-type 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avice, Marc; Grossner, Ulrike; Nilsen, Ola; Christensen, Jens S.; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2006-09-01

    Al2O3 has been grown by atomic layer chemical vapour deposition on HF cleaned n-type 4H-SiC using either H2O or O3 as an oxidant. After post-deposition annealing at high temperature (1000°C) in argon atmosphere for different durations (1, 2 and 3 h), bulk and interface properties of the films were studied by capacitance-voltage (CV), current-voltage (IV) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. Electrical measurements show a decreasing shift of the flatband voltage indicating a diminution of the negative oxide charges with increasing annealing time. The SIMS measurements reveal accumulation of boron, sodium and potassium at the Al2O3/SiC interface but the accumulation decreases with annealing at 1000°C where also out diffusion of silicon into the Al2O3 film takes place.

  10. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  11. A self-injected, diode-pumped, solid-state ring laser for laser cooling of Li atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Miake, Yudai; Mukaiyama, Takashi; O’Hara, Kenneth M.; Gensemer, Stephen

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed a solid-state light source for experiments with laser cooled lithium atoms based on a Nd:Y V O{sub 4} ring laser with second-harmonic generation. Unidirectional lasing, an improved mode selection, and a high output power of the ring laser were achieved by weak coupling to an external cavity which contained the lossy elements required for single frequency operation. Continuous frequency tuning is accomplished by controlling two piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) in the internal and the external cavities simultaneously. The light source has been utilized to trap and cool fermionic lithium atoms into the quantum degenerate regime.

  12. Methods and evaluation of frequency aging in distributed-feedback laser diodes for rubidium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, Renaud; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    Distributed-feedback laser diodes emitting at 780nm have been evaluated, with respect to the aging of the injection current required for reaching the rubidium D2 resonance line. Results obtained for lasers operating in air and in vacuum for 9 months are reported. When operated at constant temperature, the laser current required for emission at the wavelength of the desired atomic resonance is found to decrease by 50 to 80μA per month. The impact of this result on the lifetime and long-term performances of laser-pumped rubidium atomic clocks is discussed.

  13. Methods and evaluation of frequency aging in distributed-feedback laser diodes for rubidium atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Matthey, Renaud; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    Distributed-feedback laser diodes emitting at 780 nm have been evaluated, with respect to the aging of the injection current required for reaching the rubidium D2 resonance line. Results obtained for lasers operating in air and in vacuum for 9 months are reported. When operated at constant temperature, the laser current required for emission at the wavelength of the desired atomic resonance is found to decrease by 50 to 80 μA per month. The impact of this result on the lifetime and long-term performances of laser-pumped rubidium atomic clocks is discussed.

  14. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-04-24

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included.

  15. Construction and Characterization of External Cavity Diode Lasers for Atomic Physics

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Kyle S.; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E.; Kuhn, Carlos C. N.; McDonald, Gordon D.; Robins, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs1,2. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling1,2 makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman3, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included. PMID:24796259

  16. Influence of laser power on atom probe tomographic analysis of boron distribution in silicon.

    PubMed

    Tu, Y; Takamizawa, H; Han, B; Shimizu, Y; Inoue, K; Toyama, T; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Nagai, Y

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between the laser power and the three-dimensional distribution of boron (B) in silicon (Si) measured by laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is investigated. The ultraviolet laser employed in this study has a fixed wavelength of 355nm. The measured distributions are almost uniform and homogeneous when using low laser power, while clear B accumulation at the low-index pole of single-crystalline Si and segregation along the grain boundaries in polycrystalline Si are observed when using high laser power (100pJ). These effects are thought to be caused by the surface migration of atoms, which is promoted by high laser power. Therefore, for ensuring a high-fidelity APT measurement of the B distribution in Si, high laser power is not recommended.

  17. Determining the stable isotope composition of pore water from saturated and unsaturated zone core: improvements to the direct vapour equilibration laser spectrometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, M. J.; Schmeling, E.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Barbour, S. L.; Pratt, D.

    2015-11-01

    A method to measure the δ2H and δ18O composition of pore waters in saturated and unsaturated geologic core samples using direct vapour equilibration and laser spectrometry (DVE-LS) was first described in 2008, and has since been rapidly adopted. Here, we describe a number of important methodological improvements and limitations encountered in routine application of DVE-LS over several years. Generally, good comparative agreement, as well as accuracy, is obtained between core pore water isotopic data obtained using DVE-LS and that measured on water squeezed from the same core. In complex hydrogeologic settings, high-resolution DVE-LS depth profiles provide greater spatial resolution of isotopic profiles compared to long-screened or nested piezometers. When fluid is used during drilling and coring (e.g. water rotary or wet sonic drill methods), spiking the drill fluid with 2H can be conducted to identify core contamination. DVE-LS analyses yield accurate formational isotopic data for fine-textured core (e.g. clay, shale) samples, but are less effective for cores obtained from saturated permeable (e.g. sand, gravels) geologic media or on chip samples that are easily contaminated by wet rotary drilling fluid. Data obtained from DVE-LS analyses of core samples collected using wet (contamination by drill water) and dry sonic (water loss by heating) methods were also problematic. Accurate DVE-LS results can be obtained on core samples with gravimetric water contents > 5 % by increasing the sample size tested. Inexpensive Ziploc™ gas-sampling bags were determined to be as good as, if not better than, other, more expensive specialty bags. Sample storage in sample bags provides acceptable results for up to 10 days of storage; however, measurable water loss, as well as evaporitic isotopic enrichment, occurs for samples stored for up to 6 months. With appropriate care taken during sample collection and storage, the DVE-LS approach for obtaining high-resolution pore water

  18. Testing Lorentz Invariance with Laser-Cooled Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Lorentz invariance testing during the proposed PARCS experiment. It includes information on the primary atomic reference clock in space (PARCS), cesium, laser cooling, and the vision for the future.

  19. A Superradiant Raman Laser as a Hybrid Active/Passive Atomic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet, Justin; Weiner, Joshua; Cox, Kevin; Chen, Zilong; Thompson, James

    2013-05-01

    We have realized an atomic sensor that combines active, wideband sensing with passive measurement periods using dynamic control of a cold-atom, superradiant Raman laser. In a superradiant laser, collective emission of the atomic ensemble maps the quantum phase stored in the atoms onto the detected cavity field. We discuss the fundamental precision of the superradiant mapping and show theoretically that the precision of the non-demolition measurement is only a factor of two worse than the standard quantum limit on phase estimation for a coherent spin state. Using the superradiant readout, we experimentally demonstrate a repeated, non-demolition conditional Ramsey sequence that has the potential to combine the benefit of a high-bandwidth active frequency reference with a high-accuracy passive device. We also present an experimental realization of a superradiant Raman laser operated as a hybrid active/passive atomic magnetometer.

  20. Making custom fiber lasers for use in an atomic physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademian, Ali; Cameron, Garnet; Nault, Kyla; Shiner, David

    2016-05-01

    Fiber lasers can be a reasonable choice for a laser source in atomic physics. Our particular applications involve the optical pumping and in some applications cooling of various transitions in atomic helium. Doped fiber with emission at the required wavelengths is necessary. Readily available fiber and approximate wavelength emission ranges include Yb (990 - 1150 nm), Er/Yb (1530 - 1625 nm) and Th (1900 -2100 nm). High efficiency conversion of pump photons into stable single frequency laser emission at the required wavelength is the function of the fiber laser. A simple fiber laser cavity uses a short (~ few mm) fiber grating high reflector mirror, a doped fiber section for the laser cavity, and a long (~ few cm) fiber grating output coupler. To ensure reliable single frequency operation, the laser cavity length should be within 2-3 times the output grating length. However the cavity length must be long enough for round trip gains to compensate for the output mirror transmission loss. Efficiency can be maximized by avoiding fiber splices in the fiber laser cavity. This requires that the gratings be written into the doped fiber directly. In our previous designs, back coupling of the fiber laser into the pump laser contributes to instability and sometimes caused catastrophic pump failure. Current designs use a fiber based wavelength splitter (WDM) to study and circumvent this problem. Data will be presented on the fiber lasers at 1083 nm. Work on a Thulium 2057 nm fiber laser will also be discussed. This work is supported by NSF Grant # 1404498.

  1. Rapid laser induced energy transfer in atomic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the rapid transfer of stored populations from metastable states to selected target states of a different species are reported. Both laser-induced or laser-switched collision and laser-induced two-photon spontaneous emission are described. It is shown that the laser-induced collision method is particularly useful in the visible and UV spectral regions. It has applications in photochemistry, gas-phase kinetics, and in high-power, high-energy gas-phase lasers. The anti-Stokes source is useful in the VUV and soft X-ray spectral regions.

  2. Measuring positron-atom binding energies through laser-assisted photorecombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, C. M.; Danielson, J. R.; Gribakin, G. F.; Continetti, R. E.

    2012-06-01

    Described here is a proposed experiment to use laser-assisted photorecombination of positrons from a trap-based beam and metal atoms in the gas phase to measure positron-atom binding energies. Signal rates are estimated, based in part upon experience studying resonant annihilation spectra using a trap-based positron beam.

  3. Coincidence laser spectroscopy: A new ultrasensitive technique for fast ionic or atomic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Walker, P. M.; Smith, J. R. H.; Griffith, J. A. R.; Evans, D. E.; Wells, S. A.; Fawcett, M. J.; Grant, I. S.

    1986-12-01

    A new technique for laser spectroscopy of fast ionic or atomic beams is described. This involves measuring coincidences between resonantly scattered photons and ions (or atoms) in the fast beam. Measurements on strontium ions have shown that Doppler-free spectroscopy is possible with fewer than 100 ions s -1.

  4. A dense gas of laser-cooled atoms for hybrid atom-ion trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Glässel, Julian; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We describe the realization of a dark spontaneous-force trap of rubidium atoms. The atoms are loaded from a beam provided by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap yielding a capture efficiency of 75%. The dense and cold atomic sample is characterized by saturated absorption imaging. Up to 10^9 atoms are captured with a loading rate of 3× 10^9 atoms/s into a cloud at a temperature of 250 μK with the density exceeding 10^{11} atoms/cm^3. Under steady-state conditions, more than 90% of the atoms can be prepared into the absolute atomic ground state, which provides favorable conditions for the investigation of sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

  5. Laser-Induced Particle Adsorption on Atomically Thin MoS2.

    PubMed

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Choi, Seung Tae; Kim, Yong Soo; DelRio, Frank W; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-02-10

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) shows great potential for use in nanodevices because of its remarkable electronic, optoelectronic, and mechanical properties. These material properties are often dependent on the thickness or the number of layers, and hence Raman spectroscopy is widely used to characterize the thickness of atomically thin MoS2 due to the sensitivity of the vibrational spectrum to thickness. However, the lasers used in Raman spectroscopy can increase the local surface temperature and eventually damage the upper layers of the MoS2, thereby changing the aforementioned material properties. In this work, the effects of lasers on the topography and material properties of atomically thin MoS2 were systematically investigated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. In detail, friction force microscopy was used to study the friction characteristics of atomically thin MoS2 as a function of laser powers from 0.5 to 20 mW and number of layers from 1 to 3. It was found that particles formed on the top surface of the atomically thin MoS2 due to laser-induced thermal effects. The degree of particle formation increased as the laser power increased, prior to the thinning of the atomically thin MoS2. In addition, the degree of particle formation increased as the number of MoS2 layers increased, which suggests that the thermal behavior of the supported MoS2 may differ depending on the number of layers. The particles likely originated from the atmosphere due to laser-induced heating, but could be eliminated via appropriate laser powers and exposure times, which were determined experimentally. The outcomes of this work indicate that thermal management is crucial in the design of reliable nanoscale devices based on atomically thin MoS2.

  6. Laser diagnostics of the energy spectrum of Rydberg states of the lithium-7 atom

    SciTech Connect

    Zelener, B. B. Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2015-12-15

    The spectra of excited lithium-7 atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap are studied using a UV laser. The laser diagnostics of the energy of Rydberg atoms is developed based on measurements of the change in resonance fluorescence intensity of ultracold atoms as the exciting UV radiation frequency passes through the Rydberg transition frequency. The energies of various nS configurations are obtained in a broad range of the principal quantum number n from 38 to 165. The values of the quantum defect and ionization energy obtained in experiments and predicted theoretically are discussed.

  7. Hydrogen atom in a strong laser field: Numerical simulation versus Keldysh-type theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. M.; Tikhonov, M. A.; Tikhonova, O. V.; Volkova, E. A.

    2008-05-01

    The dynamics of a 3D hydrogen atom in an intense laser pulse is investigated using the direct numerical integration of the nonstationary Schrödinger equation in the multiphoton regime of ionization. The results obtained are compared with the theoretical data of the strong-field approximation (SFA) method and the validity of the SFA and other Keldysh-type theories in the problem of the strong-field ionization of atoms is analyzed in a wide range of laser frequencies and intensities. The Reiss approximation (SFA) provides qualitative agreement with the numerical simulation for moderate laser intensities and reveals the channel closing phenomena during the multiphoton ionization. However, this approach is found to be inappropriate in the presence of strong fields where we numerically demonstrate the suppression of atomic ionization. The reason for the stabilization lies in the formation of a new system (dressed atom), which is not taken into account in the SFA and other Keldysh-type theories.

  8. A Laser Stabilization System for Rydberg Atom Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-06

    offset locking method which we did. For each system, a small amount of light from a 852 nm (780 nm) diode laser is picked off from the output beam ...this way, tunable sidebands, from 1-10 GHz, that are themselves modulated at .05-5 MHz, can be generated on the input laser beam . The light from the...phase modulation signal. This signal is fed back into the fast (10 MHz bandwidth) locking electronics of the diode laser system to lock the laser to

  9. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  10. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  11. Phase-locked laser system for use in atomic coherence experiments.

    PubMed

    Marino, Alberto M; Stroud, C R

    2008-01-01

    We describe a phase-coherent laser system designed for use in experiments involving coherently prepared atomic media. We implement a simple technique based on a sample-and-hold circuit together with a reset of the integrating electronics that makes it possible to scan continuously the relative frequency between the lasers of over tens of gigahertz while keeping them phase locked. The system consists of three external-cavity diode lasers operating around 795 nm. A low-power laser serves as a frequency reference for two high-power lasers which are phased locked with an optical phase-locked loop. We measured the residual phase noise of the system to be less than 0.04 rad(2). In order to show the application of the system towards atomic coherence experiments, we used it to implement electromagnetically induced transparency in a rubidium vapor cell and obtained a reduction in the absorption coefficient of 92%.

  12. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected.

  13. Investigating tunneling process of atom exposed in circularly polarized strong-laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, MingHu; Xin, PeiPei; Chu, TianShu; Liu, HongPing

    2017-03-01

    We propose a method for studying the tunneling process by analyzing the instantaneous ionization rate of a circularly polarized laser. A numerical calculation shows that, for an atom exposed to a long laser pulse, if its initial electronic state wave function is non-spherical symmetric, the delayed phase shift of the ionization rate vs the laser cycle period in real time in the region close to the peak intensity of the laser pulse can be used to probe the tunneling time. In this region, an obvious time delay phase shift of more than 190 attoseconds is observed. Further study shows that the atom has a longer tunneling time in the ionization under a shorter wavelength laser pulse. In our method, a Wigner rotation technique is employed to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a single-active electron in a three-dimensional spherical coordinate system.

  14. Atomic processes modeling of X-ray free electron laser produced plasmas using SCFLY code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H.-K.; Cho, B. I.; Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Wark, J. S.; Lee, R. W.

    2017-03-01

    With the development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL), a novel state of matter of highly transient and non-equilibrium plasma has been created in laboratories. As high intensity X-ray laser beams interact with a solid density target, electrons are ionized from inner-shell orbitals and these electrons and XFEL photons create dense and finite temperature plasmas. In order to study atomic processes in XFEL driven plasmas, the atomic kinetics model SCFLY containing an extensive set of configurations needed for solid density plasmas was applied to study atomic processes of XFEL driven systems. The code accepts the time-dependent conditions of the XFEL as input parameters, and computes time-dependent population distributions and ionization distributions self-consistently with electron temperatures and densities assuming an instantaneous equilibration of electron energies. The methods and assumptions in the atomic kinetics model and unique aspects of atomic processes in XFEL driven plasmas are described.

  15. Diode-Pumped Alkali Atom Lasers 03-LW-024 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J

    2005-02-16

    The recent work at LLNL on alkali-atom lasers has been remarkably successful and productive. Three main phases (so far) can be identified. First, the concept and demonstration of red lasers using (Ti:sapphire pumping) took place; during this time, Rubidium and Cesium resonance-line lasers were tested, and theoretical models were developed and shown to describe experimental results very reliably. Work done during this first phase has been well documented, and the models from that period are still in use for their predictions and for designing power-scaled lasers. [1 - 3] Second, attempts were made to produce a blue alkali-vapor laser using sequentially-resonant two-step pumping (again, using Ti:sapphire lasers.) Although a blue laser did not result, the physical limitations of our approach are now better-defined. Third, diode-pumped operation of a red laser (Rubidium) was attempted, and we eventually succeeded in demonstrating the world's first diode-pumped gas laser. [4] Because we have a defensible concept for producing an efficient, compact, lightweight, power-scaled laser (tens of kW,) we are in a position to secure outside funding, and would like to find a sponsor. For descriptions of work done during the ''first phase,'' see References [1 - 3] ''Phase two'' work is briefly described in the section ''Blue laser,'' and ''phase three'' work is presented in the section entitled ''Diode-pumped red laser.''

  16. Quantitative laser atom probe analyses of hydrogenation-disproportionated Nd-Fe-B powders.

    PubMed

    Sepehri-Amin, H; Ohkubo, T; Nishiuchi, T; Hirosawa, S; Hono, K

    2011-05-01

    We report a successful atom probe tomography of hydrides in hydrogenation-disproportionated Nd-Fe-B powder using a green femtosecond laser. The atom probe specimens were prepared from one particle of powder using the focused ion beam lift-out method. The atom probe tomography taken from an α-Fe/NdH(2) structure suggested that B and Ga (trace added element) were partitioned in the NdH(2) phase. The hydrogen concentration of 64 at% determined from the atom probe analysis was in excellent agreement with the stoichiometry of the NdH(2) phase.

  17. High-sensitivity laser spectroscopy with atoms from a cooled helium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Evans, R.M.; Davids, C.N.; Finn, M.A.; Kaufman, S.L.; Greenlees, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a cryogenic He-jet system which efficiently transports radioactive atoms produced on-line at the Argonne National Laboratory Tandem-Linac Accelertor away from the production region and forms them into a cool atomic beam. This atomic beam will be probed with high sensitivity laser spectroscopy using the photon burst method. The ultimate goal of this work is to determine the sizes, shapes, and magnetic moments of short-lived nuclei through their atomic hyperfine structure. Preliminary measurements with the He-jet system and the adaption of the photon burst method to this new geometry are described.

  18. Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Bajcsy, M.; Hofferberth, S.; Balic, V.; Zibrov, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.; Peyronel, T.; Liang, Q.; Vuletic, V.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We describe different loading methods and compare their trade-offs in terms of implementation complexity and atom-loading efficiency. The most efficient procedure results in loading of {approx}30,000 rubidium atoms, which creates a medium with an optical depth of {approx}180 inside the fiber. Compared to our earlier study this represents a sixfold increase in the maximum achieved optical depth in this system.

  19. High-order-harmonic generation from Rydberg atoms driven by plasmon-enhanced laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikman, Y.; Yavuz, I.; Ciappina, M. F.; Chacón, A.; Altun, Z.; Lewenstein, M.

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically investigate high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) in Rydberg atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous laser fields, induced, for instance, by plasmonic enhancement. It is well known that the laser intensity should exceed a certain threshold in order to stimulate HHG when noble gas atoms in their ground state are used as an active medium. One way to enhance the coherent light coming from a conventional laser oscillator is to take advantage of the amplification obtained by the so-called surface plasmon polaritons, created when a low-intensity laser field is focused onto a metallic nanostructure. The main limitation of this scheme is the low damage threshold of the materials employed in the nanostructure engineering. In this work we propose the use of Rydberg atoms, driven by spatially inhomogeneous, plasmon-enhanced laser fields, for HHG. We exhaustively discuss the behavior and efficiency of these systems in the generation of coherent harmonic emission. Toward this aim we numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for an atom, with an electron initially in a highly excited n th Rydberg state, located in the vicinity of a metallic nanostructure. In this zone the electric field changes spatially on scales relevant for the dynamics of the laser-ionized electron. We first use a one-dimensional model to investigate systematically the phenomena. We then employ a more realistic situation, in which the interaction of a plasmon-enhanced laser field with a three-dimensional hydrogen atom is modeled. We discuss the scaling of the relevant input parameters with the principal quantum number n of the Rydberg state in question and demonstrate that harmonic emission can be achieved from Rydberg atoms well below the damage threshold, thus without deterioration of the geometry and properties of the metallic nanostructure.

  20. Laser-Assisted Field Evaporation and Three-Dimensional Atom-by-Atom Mapping of Diamond Isotopic Homojunctions.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Samik; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-02-10

    It addition to its high evaporation field, diamond is also known for its limited photoabsorption, strong covalent bonding, and wide bandgap. These characteristics have been thought for long to also complicate the field evaporation of diamond and make its control hardly achievable on the atomistic-level. Herein, we demonstrate that the unique behavior of nanoscale diamond and its interaction with pulsed laser lead to a controlled field evaporation thus enabling three-dimensional atom-by-atom mapping of diamond (12)C/(13)C homojunctions. We also show that one key element in this process is to operate the pulsed laser at high energy without letting the dc bias increase out of bounds for diamond nanotip to withstand. Herein, the role of the dc bias in evaporation of diamond is essentially to generate free charge carriers within the nanotip via impact ionization. The mobile free charges screen the internal electric field, eventually creating a hole rich surface where the pulsed laser is effectively absorbed leading to an increase in the nanotip surface temperature. The effect of this temperature on the uncertainty in the time-of-flight of an ion, the diffusion of atoms on the surface of the nanotip, is also discussed. In addition to paving the way toward a precise manipulation of isotopes in diamond-based nanoscale and quantum structures, this result also elucidates some of the basic properties of dielectric nanostructures under high electric field.

  1. Transverse laser cooling of a thermal atomic beam of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Leefer, N.; Cingoez, A.; Gerber-Siff, B.; Sharma, Arijit; Torgerson, J. R.; Budker, D.

    2010-04-15

    A thermal atomic beam of dysprosium atoms is cooled using the 4f{sup 10}6s{sup 2}(J=8){yields}4f{sup 10}6s6p(J=9) transition at 421 nm. The cooling is done via a standing light wave orthogonal to the atomic beam. Efficient transverse cooling to the Doppler limit is demonstrated for all observable isotopes of dysprosium. Branching ratios to metastable states are demonstrated to be <5x10{sup -4}. A scheme for enhancement of the nonzero-nuclear-spin-isotope cooling and a method for direct identification of possible trap states are proposed.

  2. Helium in chirped laser fields as a time-asymmetric atomic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2014-07-07

    Tuning the laser parameters exceptional points in the spectrum of the dressed laser helium atom are obtained. The weak linearly polarized laser couples the ground state and the doubly excited P-states of helium. We show here that for specific chirped laser pulses that encircle an exceptional point one can get the time-asymmetric phenomenon, where for a negative chirped laser pulse the ground state is transformed into the doubly excited auto-ionization state, while for a positive chirped laser pulse the resonance state is not populated and the neutral helium atoms remains in the ground state as the laser pulse is turned off. Moreover, we show that the results are very sensitive to the closed contour we choose. This time-asymmetric state exchange phenomenon can be considered as a time-asymmetric atomic switch. The optimal time-asymmetric switch is obtained when the closed loop that encircles the exceptional point is large, while for the smallest loops, the time-asymmetric phenomenon does not take place. A systematic way for studying the effect of the chosen closed contour that encircles the exceptional point on the time-asymmetric phenomenon is proposed.

  3. Atomic diffusion in laser surface modified AISI H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 steel using 0.09 and 0.4 mm of laser spot sizes with an aim to increase surface hardness and investigate elements diffusion in laser modified surface. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and overlap percentage. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. Metallographic study and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were performed to observe presence of elements and their distribution in the sample surface. Maximum hardness achieved in the modified surface was 1017 HV0.1. Change of elements composition in the modified layer region was detected in the laser modified samples. Diffusion possibly occurred for C, Cr, Cu, Ni, and S elements. The potential found for increase in surface hardness represents an important method to sustain tooling life. The EDXS findings signify understanding of processing parameters effect on the modified surface composition.

  4. Studies with Laser Cooled Atoms and Single Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    between soda lime glass slides. The bond-setting time can be tailored to allow time for precision optical alignment. We also extended our previous single...pulse separation of lOOms. Factors that lead to this progress include (i) an atomic fountain , which leads to more accurate control of the photon-atom...This method achieves 100% successful bonding rates between soda lime glass slides. The bond-setting time and be can tailored to allow time for

  5. Stand-off detection of alcohol vapours in moving cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Kubicki, Jan; Młyńczak, Jaroslaw; Mierczyk, Jadwiga; Hackiewicz, Klaudia

    2016-12-01

    In this article we present the research on optoelectronic system for stand-off detection of alcohol vapours in moving cars. The idea of using commercially available cascade lasers was presented. Special attention was paid to the optical characteristics of the car windowpanes. It was shown that using 3.45 μm and 3.59 μm wavelengths the alcohol vapours inside a car can be successfully detected even for cars with different windows

  6. Laser supported detonation wave source of atomic oxygen for aerospace material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A pulsed high-flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen was developed to perform accelerated erosion testing of spacecraft materials in a simulated low-earth orbit (LEO) environment. Molecular oxygen is introduced into an evacuated conical expansion nozzle at several atmospheres pressure through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A laser-induced breakdown is generated in the nozzle throat by a pulsed CO2 TEA laser. The resulting plasma is heated by the ensuing laser-supported detonation wave, and then it rapidly expands and cools. An atomic oxygen beam is generated with fluxes above 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse at 8 + or - 1.6 km/s with an ion content below 1 percent for LEO testing. Materials testing yielded the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as observed on the STS mission, and scanning electron micrographs of the irradiated polymer surfaces showed an erosion morphology similar to that obtained on low earth orbit.

  7. Active and passive sensing of collective atomic coherence in a superradiant laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet, Justin G.; Chen, Zilong; Weiner, Joshua M.; Cox, Kevin C.; Thompson, James K.

    2013-07-01

    We study the nondemolition mapping of collective quantum coherence onto a cavity light field in a superradiant, cold-atom 87Rb Raman laser. We show theoretically that the fundamental precision of the mapping is near the standard quantum limit on phase estimation for a coherent spin state, Δϕ=1/N, where N is the number of atoms. The associated characteristic measurement time scale τW∝1/N is collectively enhanced. The nondemolition nature of the measurement is characterized by only 0.5 photon recoils deposited per atom due to optical repumping in a time τW. We experimentally realize conditional Ramsey spectroscopy in our superradiant Raman laser, compare the results to the predicted precision, and study the mapping in the presence of decoherence, far from the steady-state conditions previously considered. Finally, we demonstrate a hybrid mode of operation in which the laser is repeatedly toggled between active and passive sensing.

  8. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  9. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO₄ using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; ...

    2014-09-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO₄ by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygenmore » concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ¹⁶O₂⁺ ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO₄. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O₂ loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.« less

  10. Influence of atomic modeling on integrated simulations of laser-produced Au plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Yechiel; Raicher, Erez; Ehrlich, Yosi; Hurvitz, Gilad; Shpilman, Zeev; Fraenkel, Moshe; Zigler, Arie; Henis, Zohar

    2015-11-01

    Time-integrated x-ray emission spectra of laser-irradiated Au disks were recorded using transmission grating spectrometry, at laser intensities of 1013 to 1014W/cm2 . Radiation-hydrodynamics and atomic physics calculations were used to simulate the emitted spectra. Three major plasma regions can be recognized: the heat wave, the corona, and an intermediate region connecting them. An analysis of the spectral contribution of these three plasma regions to the integrated recorded spectrum is presented. The importance of accurate atomic modeling of the intermediate plasma region, between the corona and the heat wave, is highlighted. The influence of several aspects of the atomic modeling is demonstrated, in particular multiply-excited atomic configurations and departure from local thermal equilibrium.

  11. Exotic hollow atom states pumped by relativistic laser plasma in a radiation dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Nigel; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya; Dance, R. J.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. L.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Colgan, J.

    2013-10-01

    In high-spectral resolution experiments with the petawatt Vulcan laser, strong x-ray radiation of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from aluminium targets was observed at high laser contrast, for intensities of 3 × 1020 Wcm-2 and micron thick targets. These spectral observations are interpreted using detailed atomic kinetics calculations suggesting these exotic hollow atom states occur at near solid density and are driven by an intense polychromatic x-ray field. We estimate that this x-ray radiation field has energy in the kilovolt range and has an intensity exceeding 1018 Wcm-2. The field may arise through relativistic electron Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the electrostatic fields at the target surface.

  12. A tunable low-drift laser stabilized to an atomic reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, T.; Schmöger, L.; Feuchtenbeiner, S.; Grebing, C.; Micke, P.; Scharnhorst, N.; Leroux, I. D.; López-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Schmidt, P. O.

    2016-09-01

    We present a laser system with a linewidth and long-term frequency stability at the 50 kHz level. It is based on a Ti:Sapphire laser emitting radiation at 882 nm which is referenced to an atomic transition. For this, the length of an evacuated transfer cavity is stabilized to a reference laser at 780 nm locked to the ^{85}Rb D_2-line via modulation transfer spectroscopy. Gapless frequency tuning of the spectroscopy laser is realized using the sideband-locking technique to the transfer cavity. In this configuration , the linewidth of the spectroscopy laser is derived from the transfer cavity, while the long-term stability is derived from the atomic resonance. Using an optical frequency comb, the frequency stability and linewidth of both lasers are characterized by comparison against an active hydrogen maser frequency standard and an ultra-narrow linewidth laser, respectively. The laser system presented here will be used for spectroscopy of the 1s22s22p 2P_{1/2} - 2P_{3/2} transition in sympathetically cooled Ar^{13+} ions at 441 nm after frequency doubling.

  13. Polarization dependence in inelastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in a circularly polarized laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buică, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study the influence of laser polarization in inelastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field in the domain of field strengths below 107 V/cm and high projectile energies. A semi-perturbative approach is used in which the interaction of the projectile electrons with the laser field is described by Gordon-Volkov wave functions, while the interaction of the hydrogen atom with the laser field is described by first-order time-dependent perturbation theory. A closed analytical solution is derived in laser-assisted inelastic electron-hydrogen scattering for the 1 s → nl excitation cross section which is valid for both circular and linear polarizations. For the excitation of the n=2 levels simple analytical expressions of differential cross section are derived for laser-assisted inelastic scattering in the perturbative domain, and the differential cross sections by the circularly and linearly polarized laser fields and their ratios for one- and two-photon absorption are calculated as a function of the scattering angle. Detailed numerical results for the angular dependence and the resonance structure of the differential cross sections are discussed for the 1 s → 4 l excitations of hydrogen in a circularly polarized laser field.

  14. Quantum–classical correspondence in chaotic dynamics of laser-driven atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    This paper is a review article on some aspects of quantum–classical correspondence in chaotic dynamics of cold atoms interacting with a standing-wave laser field forming an optical lattice. The problem is treated from both (semi)classical and quantum points of view. In both approaches, the interaction of an atomic electic dipole with the laser field is treated quantum mechanically. Translational motion is described, at first, classically (atoms are considered to be point-like objects) and then quantum mechanically as a propagation of matter waves. Semiclassical equations of motion are shown to be chaotic in the sense of classical dynamical chaos. Point-like atoms in an absolutely deterministic and rigid optical lattice can move in a random-like manner demonstrating a chaotic walking with typical features of classical chaos. This behavior is explained by random-like ‘jumps’ of one of the atomic internal variable when atoms cross nodes of the standing wave and occurs in a specific range of the atom-field detuning. When treating atoms as matter waves, we show that they can make nonadiabatic transitions when crossing the standing-wave nodes. The point is that atomic wave packets split at each node in the same range of the atom-field detuning where the classical chaos occurs. The key point is that the squared amplitude of those semiclassical ‘jumps’ equal to the quantum Landau–Zener parameter which defines the probability of nonadiabatic transitions at the nodes. Nonadiabatic atomic wave packets are much more complicated compared to adiabatic ones and may be called chaotic in this sense. A few possible experiments to observe some manifestations of classical and quantum chaos with cold atoms in horizontal and vertical optical lattices are proposed and discussed.

  15. The Magnification of Atomic Lines Intensity Originated by laser Breakdown in Ultrasound Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, A. V.; Nagorny, I. G.

    Atomic lines of some chemical elements like sodium and magnesium were investigated for laser breakdown of water with the ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of these atomic lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained. It is shown that the method of registration of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone allows to investigate thresholds and dynamics of laser breakdown which will be in accord with high-speed optical methods. The study revealed important practical applications of acoustic emission for breakdown and diagnostics of cavitation in opaque environments.

  16. Quasistatic limit of the strong-field approximation describing atoms in intense laser fields: Circular polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Jaroslaw H.

    2011-03-15

    In the recent work of Vanne and Saenz [Phys. Rev. A 75, 063403 (2007)] the quasistatic limit of the velocity gauge strong-field approximation describing the ionization rate of atomic or molecular systems exposed to linearly polarized laser fields was derived. It was shown that in the low-frequency limit the ionization rate is proportional to the laser frequency {omega} (for a constant intensity of the laser field). In the present work I show that for circularly polarized laser fields the ionization rate is proportional to {omega}{sup 4} for H(1s) and H(2s) atoms, to {omega}{sup 6} for H(2p{sub x}) and H(2p{sub y}) atoms, and to {omega}{sup 8} for H(2p{sub z}) atoms. The analytical expressions for asymptotic ionization rates (which become nearly accurate in the limit {omega}{yields}0) contain no summations over multiphoton contributions. For very low laser frequencies (optical or infrared) these expressions usually remain with an order-of-magnitude agreement with the velocity gauge strong-field approximation.

  17. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-dressed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buth, Christian; Santra, Robin

    2007-03-01

    An ab initio theory is devised for the x-ray photoabsorption cross section of atoms in the field of a moderately intense optical laser ( 800nm , 1013W/cm2 ). The laser dresses the core-excited atomic states, which introduces a dependence of the cross section on the angle between the polarization vectors of the two linearly polarized radiation sources. We use the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation to describe the atomic many-particle problem in conjunction with a nonrelativistic quantum-electrodynamic approach to treat the photon-electron interaction. The continuum wave functions of ejected electrons are treated with a complex absorbing potential that is derived from smooth exterior complex scaling. The solution to the two-color (x-ray plus laser) problem is discussed in terms of a direct diagonalization of the complex symmetric matrix representation of the Hamiltonian. Alternative treatments with time-independent and time-dependent non-Hermitian perturbation theories are presented that exploit the weak interaction strength between x rays and atoms. We apply the theory to study the photoabsorption cross section of krypton atoms near the K edge. A pronounced modification of the cross section is found in the presence of the optical laser.

  18. Experimental search for the electron electric dipole moment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Asahi, K.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Yoshimi, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2015-04-01

    A laser cooled heavy atom is one of the candidates to search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron due to the enhancement mechanism and its long coherence time. The laser cooled francium (Fr) factory has been constructed to perform the electron EDM search at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The present status of Fr production and the EDM measurement system is presented.

  19. Dynamics of laser excitation, ionization and harmonic conversion in inert gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.

    1995-10-01

    Studies of non-perturbative multiphoton processes in atoms in pulsed laser fields employ a single-active-electron (SAE) model which follows the time evolution of each valence electron in the frozen, mean-field of the remaining electrons, the nucleus and the laser field. The photoelectron and photon emission spectra, although related, are not identical. A simple two-step, quasi-classical model explains the differences and gives a more complete understanding of the strong field induced dynamics.

  20. Clock Technology Development in the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Dave; Thompson, R. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. It focuses on clock technology development. The topics include: 1) Overview of LCAP Flight Projects; 2) Space Clock 101; 3) Physics with Clocks in microgravity; 4) Space Clock Challenges; 5) LCAP Timeline; 6) International Space Station (ISS) Science Platforms; 7) ISS Express Rack; 8) Space Qualification of Components; 9) Laser Configuration; 10) Clock Rate Comparisons: GPS Carrier Phase Frequency Transfer; and 11) ISS Model Views. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  1. Evolution of dark state of an open atomic system in constant intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Krmpot, A. J.; Radonjic, M.; Cuk, S. M.; Nikolic, S. N.; Grujic, Z. D.; Jelenkovic, B. M.

    2011-10-15

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the evolution of open atomic systems in the constant intensity laser field. The study is performed by analyzing the line shapes of Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) obtained in different segments of a laser beam cross section of constant intensity, i.e., a {Pi}-shaped laser beam. Such Hanle EIT resonances were measured using a small movable aperture placed just in front of the photodetector, i.e., after the entire laser beam had passed through the vacuum Rb cell. The laser was locked to the open transition F{sub g}=2{yields}F{sub e}=1 at the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with laser intensities between 0.5 and 4 mW/cm{sup 2}. This study shows that the profile of the laser beam determines the processes governing the development of atomic states during the interaction. The resonances obtained near the beam center are narrower than those obtained near the beam edge, but the significant changes of the linewidths occur only near the beam edge, i.e., right after the atom enters the beam. The Hanle EIT resonances obtained near the beam center exhibit two pronounced minima next to the central maximum. The theoretical model reveals that the occurrence of these transmission minima is a joint effect of the preparation of atoms into the dark state and the optical pumping into the uncoupled ground level F{sub g}=1. The appearance of the transmission minima, although similar to that observed in the wings of a Gaussian beam [A. J. Krmpot et al., Opt. Express 17, 22491 (2009)], is of an entirely different nature for the {Pi}-shaped laser beam.

  2. Atom-at-a-time laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Lauth, Werner; Backe, Hartmut; Block, Michael; Ackermann, Dieter; Cheal, Bradley; Chhetri, Premaditya; Düllmann, Christoph Emanuel; van Duppen, Piet; Even, Julia; Ferrer, Rafael; Giacoppo, Francesca; Götz, Stefan; Heßberger, Fritz Peter; Huyse, Mark; Kaleja, Oliver; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kunz, Peter; Lautenschläger, Felix; Mistry, Andrew Kishor; Raeder, Sebastian; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Walther, Thomas; Wraith, Calvin; Yakushev, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy of a primordial isotope has traditionally formed the basis for understanding the atomic structure of an element. Such studies have been conducted for most elements and theoretical modelling can be performed to high precision, taking into account relativistic effects that scale approximately as the square of the atomic number. However, for the transfermium elements (those with atomic numbers greater than 100), the atomic structure is experimentally unknown. These radioactive elements are produced in nuclear fusion reactions at rates of only a few atoms per second at most and must be studied immediately following their production, which has so far precluded their optical spectroscopy. Here we report laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium (No; atomic number 102) in single-atom-at-a-time quantities, in which we identify the ground-state transition 1S0 1P1. By combining this result with data from an observed Rydberg series, we obtain an upper limit for the ionization potential of nobelium. These accurate results from direct laser excitations of outer-shell electrons cannot be achieved using state-of-the-art relativistic many-body calculations that include quantum electrodynamic effects, owing to large uncertainties in the modelled transition energies of the complex systems under consideration. Our work opens the door to high-precision measurements of various atomic and nuclear properties of elements heavier than nobelium, and motivates future theoretical work.

  3. New Experimental Approaches and Theoretical Modeling Methods for Laser Cooling Atoms and Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-27

    also working on the theory of Bose - Einstein condensates in double well potentials, using a two-mode model that goes beyond the usual Bose -Hubbard...laser-cooled atoms, for applications to "coherent chemistry," studies of molecule-atom and molecule-molecule interactions, Bose condensates of...range of the data, and the potential curves near the 5S+5P limit, are shown in Fig. 2. Since no spin - orbit functions for Rb2 were available at the

  4. AN ACTIVE NITROGEN PLASMA ATOM RESERVOIR FOR LASER-INDUCED IONIZATION SPECTROMETRY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    An active nitrogen plasma was generat-J using a laboratory - constructed Beenakker type microwave cavity. 2 5 The microwave power oscillator (Micro...exhausting of ozone. Microarc Atomizer A laboratory -constructed microarc atomizer was positioned at the rear of the Beenakker cavity in direct line with the...the regions of interest, the laser- induced ionization signal was monitored. A laboratory -constructed etalon system of very low finesse was used to

  5. Entropy driven atomic motion in laser-excited bismuth.

    PubMed

    Giret, Y; Gellé, A; Arnaud, B

    2011-04-15

    We introduce a thermodynamical model based on the two-temperature approach in order to fully understand the dynamics of the coherent A(1g) phonon in laser-excited bismuth. Using this model, we simulate the time evolution of (111) Bragg peak intensities measured by Fritz et al. [Science 315, 633 (2007)] in femtosecond x-ray diffraction experiments performed on a bismuth film for different laser fluences. The agreement between theoretical and experimental results is striking not only because we use fluences very close to the experimental ones but also because most of the model parameters are obtained from ab initio calculations performed for different electron temperatures.

  6. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  7. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone toward space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology, is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 l and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technological maturity by remaining frequency stabilized throughout the mission including the rocket's boost phase.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Phase-sensitive electric modulation of photoluminescence upon bichromatic excitation of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapenko, Valerii A.

    2005-12-01

    A new type of modulation of the photoluminescence intensity of atoms excited by a bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1:2 is proposed and analysed. The modulation is produced by alternating electric field acting on atoms and occurs due to the quantum interference of the amplitudes of two excitation channels of an atom, which proves to be possible because the applied electric field removes the parity selection rule for one of the excitation channels. An important feature of this process is the dependence of photoluminescence on the phase difference of monochromatic components of exciting radiation. The calculation was performed for an alkali metal atom excited at the s—s transition taking the saturation effect into account.

  9. Control of atomic transition rates via laser-light shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáuregui, R.

    2015-04-01

    A modular systematic analysis of the feasibility of modifying atomic transition rates by tailoring the electromagnetic field of an external coherent light source is presented. The formalism considers both the center of mass and internal degrees of freedom of the atom, and all properties of the field: frequency, angular spectrum, and polarization. General features of recoil effects for internal forbidden transitions are discussed. A comparative analysis of different structured light sources is explicitly worked out. It includes spherical waves, Gaussian beams, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, and propagation invariant beams with closed analytical expressions. It is shown that increments in the order of magnitude of the transition rates for Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian beams, with respect to those obtained in the paraxial limit, require waists of the order of the wavelength, while propagation invariant modes may considerably enhance transition rates under more favorable conditions. For transitions that can be naturally described as modifications of the atomic angular momentum, this enhancement is maximal (within propagation invariant beams) for Bessel modes, Mathieu modes can be used to entangle the internal and center-of-mass involved states, and Weber beams suppress this kind of transition unless they have a significant component of odd modes. However, if a recoil effect of the transition with an adequate symmetry is allowed, the global transition rate (center of mass and internal motion) can also be enhanced using Weber modes. The global analysis presented reinforces the idea that a better control of the transitions between internal atomic states requires both a proper control of the available states of the atomic center of mass, and shaping of the background electromagnetic field.

  10. Hyperfine structure measurement of rubidium atom and tunable diode laser stabilization by using Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Zhen, Liu; Kapitanov, Venedikt; Kim, Hyun Su; Park, Jong Rak; Park, Si-Hyun

    2006-11-01

    The Rubidium saturated absorption spectra for D2 transition lines are used to measure the Fabry-Perot interferometer free spectral range (FSR). The scale linearity of the laser frequency tuning is determined. The Sagnac interferometer has been used for the laser stabilization. The result shows that the laser frequency is stabilized upto sub-mega Herz level. Also the hyperfine structure [5(2)S(1/2) F = 3 --> F' = 2, 3, 4 5(2)P(3/2) 85Rb] of the rubidium atom has been measured by using the tilt locking method, which shows the same result as the conventional saturation spectroscopy.

  11. Study of transitions in thulium atoms in the 410-420-nm range for laser cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, A V; Chebakov, K Yu; Tolstikhina, I Yu; Sokolov, A V; Rodionov, P B; Kanorsky, S I; Sorokin, V N; Kolachevsky, N N

    2008-10-31

    The possibility of laser cooling of thulium atoms is considered. The hyperfine structure of almost cyclic 4f{sup 13}6s{sup 2} (J{sub g} = 7/2) {r_reversible} 4f{sup 12}5d{sub 3/2}6s{sup 2} (J{sub e} = 9/2) and 4f{sup 13}6s{sup 2} (J{sub g} = 7/2) {r_reversible} 4f{sup 12}5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2} (J{sub e} = 9/2) transitions at 410.6 and 420.4 nm, respectively, is studied by the method of sub-Doppler saturation spectroscopy in counterpropagating laser beams. The hyperfine splitting of excited levels involved in these transitions is measured and the natural linewidths of these transitions are determined. The structure of the neighbouring 4f{sup 13}6s6p (J{sub e} = 5/2) and 4f{sup 12}5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2} (J{sub e} = 7/2) levels is studied for the first time by this method. The decay probabilities of the J{sub e} = 9/2 levels via channels removing atoms from the cooling cycle are calculated. It is found that the branching ratio for the strong transition at 410.6 nm (A = 6x10{sup 7} s{sup -1}) is smaller than 2x10{sup -5}, which makes this transition most promising for laser cooling. The laser cooling of atoms in a Zeeman cooler at this transition is simulated. The possibility of using a laser-cooled cloud of thulium atoms to study the metrological transition at 1.14 {mu}m is discussed. (laser cooling of atoms)

  12. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a/sup 5/D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful.

  13. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-01

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites.

  14. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope

    DOEpatents

    Scheibner, Karl F.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Worden, Earl F.

    1999-01-01

    An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207.

  15. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibner, K.F.; Haynam, C.A.; Johnson, M.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1999-08-31

    An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207. 5 figs.

  16. Laser cooling of cesium atoms in far-detuned optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winoto, Sugiharto Lukman

    1999-11-01

    High-density cold Cesium atoms from a transiently compressed magneto-optical trap (MOT) are loaded into far red-detuned optical lattice traps. A subsequent independent laser cooling of the atoms in the trap is shown to be of the polarization gradient cooling (PGC) type. The PGC produces strong localization of atoms in the periodic anti-nodes of lattice sites corresponding to significant occupation of the lattice vibrational ground states. Adiabatic relaxation of the 3D optical lattice trap results in the highest phase-space density achievable for a large number of atoms through a purely optical method of cooling and trapping. The resulting atom cloud is to be loaded into a conservative optical dipole trap for an experimental search of Cesium Bose- Einstein condensation (BEC) through a method of evaporative cooling in the dipole trap.

  17. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  18. Interference stabilisation of Rydberg atoms in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Mikhail V

    1999-07-31

    A review is given of the published theoretical and experimental investigations of the interference stabilisation of Rydberg atoms by a strong optical field. The physical nature of the effect, the models used to describe it, the alternative stabilisation mechanisms, and the extent to which the theoretical results match the published experimental data are discussed. (this issue is dedicated to the memory of s a akhmanov)

  19. Theory of multiphoton ionization of atoms by strong, short pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.

    1987-07-10

    A numerical technique for investigating the behavior of many electron atoms in intense laser fields is presented. A description of the method is followed by results of an illustrative, application to helium for a number of wavelengths and intensities. A discussion of high order ionization dynamics for this system based on these calculations is provided. 10 refs.

  20. Comment on ``Approximate solution of the hydrogenlike atoms in intense laser radiation''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittleman, Marvin H.

    1991-11-01

    Rashid [Phys. Rev. A 40, 4242 (1989)] proposes an approximate solution for the relativistic hydrogen atom in a laser field. The error he quotes is such that the solution becomes exact in the nonrelativistic limit. It is shown here to be in error.

  1. Photoelectron momentum spectra for multiphoton ionization of Hydrogen atoms by intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Serge; Macek, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    Full three-dimensional electron momentum distribution for multiphoton ionization of Hydrogen atoms by intense laser pulses are calculated by solving the time-dependent solutions of Schr"odinger equation on a three-dimensional lattice in a scaled coordinate representation (CSLTDSE). This approach allows one to circumvent many difficulties related to the propagation of wave function to macroscopic distances.

  2. Quantum-mechanical theory including angular momenta analysis of atom-atom collisions in a laser field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of two atoms colliding in the presence of an intense radiation field, such as that of a laser, is investigated. The radiation field, which couples states of different electronic symmetry, is described by the number state representation while the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction) are discussed in terms of a diabatic representation. The total angular momentum of the field-free system and the angular momentum transferred by absorption (or emission) of a photon are explicitly considered in the derivation of the coupled scattering equations. A model calculation is discussed for the Xe + F collision system.

  3. Multiphoton and tunneling ionization of atoms in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan-Zhuo; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2012-11-01

    We study the ionization probabilities of atoms by a short laser pulse with three different theoretical methods, i.e., the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), the Perelomov—Popov—Terent'ev (PPT) theory, and the Ammosov—Delone—Krainov (ADK) theory. Our results show that laser intensity dependent ionization probabilities of several atoms (i.e., H, He, and Ne) obtained from the PPT theory accord quite well with the TDSE results both in the multiphoton and tunneling ionization regimes, while the ADK results fit well to the TDSE data only in the tunneling ionization regime. Our calculations also show that laser intensity dependent ionization probabilities of a H atom at three different laser wavelengths of 600 nm, 800 nm, and 1200 nm obtained from the PPT theory are also in good agreement with those from the TDSE, while the ADK theory fails to give the wavelength dependence of ionization probability. Only when the laser wavelength is long enough, will the results of ADK be close to those of TDSE.

  4. Stabilization window and attosecond pulse train production at atom ionization in superintense laser field.

    PubMed

    Ryabikin, M; Sergeev, A

    2000-12-04

    We present the results of numerical experiments on a two-dimensional model atom driven by a high-intense laser pulse. The electron wave-packet behavior is studied in a range of laser parameters corresponding to the dynamic stabilization regime. Wave packet localization in this regime with arbitrary laser polarizations is shown to manifest itself macroscopically by high-order harmonic production in the form of long trains of attosecond pulses. Calculations for the sub-relativistic regime of laser-atom interaction are carried out without making the dipole approximation in order to take into account the Lorentz force effect in wave packet evolution. The transition from polychotomy to the magnetic-field-induced drifting at very high laser intensities is documented which results in the electron delocalization. As a consequence, the intensity dependence of the atomic survival probability as well as that of the efficiency of high-order harmonic production possess a wide "stabilization window" followed by an abrupt drop because of the magnetic field effect.

  5. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Coherent phase control of excitation of atoms by bichromatic laser radiation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapenko, Valerii A.

    2005-06-01

    A new method for coherent phase control of excitation of atoms in a discrete spectrum under the action of bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1:2 is analysed. An important feature of this control method is the presence of a electrostatic field, which removes the parity selection rule for one of the control channels. It is shown that for the phase difference between the monochromatic radiation components, corresponding to the destructive interference between channels, there exists the electrostatic field strength at which the excited atomic transition is 'bleached'. It is proposed to use luminescence at the adjacent atomic transition for detecting the phase dependence of optical excitation.

  6. Synchronization of internal and external degrees of freedom of atoms in a standing laser wave

    SciTech Connect

    Argonov, V.Yu.; Prants, S.V.

    2005-05-15

    We consider dissipative dynamics of atoms in a strong standing laser wave and find a nonlinear dynamical effect of synchronization between center-of-mass motion and internal Rabi oscillations. The synchronization manifests itself in the phase space as limit cycles, which may have different periods and riddled basins of attraction. The effect can be detected in fluorescence spectra of atoms as equidistant sideband frequencies with the space between adjacent peaks to be inversely proportional to the value of the period of the respective limit cycle. With increasing intensity of the laser field, we numerically observe cascades of bifurcations that eventually end up in settling a strange chaotic attractor. A broadband noise is shown to destroy a fine structure of the bifurcation scenario, but prominent features of period-1 and period-3 limit cycles survive under a weak noise. The character of the atomic motion is analyzed with the help of the friction force whose zeroes are attractor or repellor points in the velocity space. We find ranges of the laser parameters where the atomic motion resembles a random but deterministic walking of atoms erratically jumping between different wells of the optical potential. Such a random walking is shown to be fractal.

  7. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  9. Accuracy of Nanoscale Pitch Standards Fabricated by Laser-Focused Atomic Deposition

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Jabez J.; Anderson, William R.; Bradley, Curtis C.; Walkiewicz, Mirek; Celotta, Robert J.; Jurdik, Erich; Deslattes, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    The pitch accuracy of a grating formed by laser-focused atomic deposition is evaluated from the point of view of fabricating nanoscale pitch standard artifacts. The average pitch obtained by the process, nominally half the laser wavelength, is simply traceable with small uncertainty to an atomic frequency and hence can be known with very high accuracy. An error budget is presented for a Cr on sapphire sample, showing that a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0049 nm, or a relative uncertainty of 2.3 × 10−5, is readily obtained, provided the substrate temperature does not change. Precision measurements of the diffraction of the 351.1 nm argon ion laser line from such an artifact are also presented. These yield an average pitch of (212.7777 ± 0.0069) nm, which agrees well with the expected value, as corrected for thermal contraction, of (212.7705 ± 0.0049) nm. PMID:27413597

  10. Kinetic model of atomic and molecular emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    A kinetic model previously developed to predict the relative intensities of atomic emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been extended to include processes related to CN and C(2) molecular emissions. Simulations with this model were performed to predict the relative excited-state populations. The results from the simulations are compared with experimentally determined excited-state populations from 1,064 nm laser irradiation of organic residues on aluminum foil. The model reasonably predicts the relative intensity of the molecular emissions. Significantly, the model reproduces the vastly different temporal profiles of the atomic and molecular emissions. The latter are found to extend to much longer times after the laser pulse, and this appears to be due to the increasing concentration of the molecules versus time. From the simulations, the important processes affecting the CN and C(2) concentrations are identified.

  11. Interaction of Atomic Hydrogen with Pico- and Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    in the previous section. Surprisingly, the density of states function p(E) completely drops out of the problem. The time-dependent wave function , then...arbitrary laser pulse shape. If all three terms of Eq. (2.23c) are retained, then the wave function (2.22) can be summed for Gaussian pulse shapes under...difficult to integrate numerically. In order to write Schr6dinger’s equation in matrix form, a complete set of states is needed as a basis set. The natural

  12. An electron of helium atom under a high-intensity laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Adepoju, Adenike Grace; Liman, Muhammed S.; Oyewumi, K. J.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2017-02-01

    We scrutinize the behavior of eigenvalues of an electron in a helium (He) atom as it interacts with electric field directed along the z-axis and is exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. To achieve this, we freeze one electron of the He atom at its ionic ground state and the motion of the second electron in the ion core is treated via a more general case of screened Coulomb potential model. Using the Kramers-Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is the semiclassical counterpart of the Block-Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in the KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wave function are expanded in Fourier series and using Ehlotzky’s approximation, we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate intense laser field. By fitting the more general case of screened Coulomb potential model into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to O≤ft({{r}4},α 09\\right) , we obtain the solution (eigenvalues and wave function) of an electron in a He atom under the influence of external electric field and high-intensity laser field, within the framework of perturbation theory formalism. We found that the variation in frequency of laser radiation has no effect on the eigenvalues of a He electron for a particular electric field intensity directed along z-axis. Also, for a very strong external electric field and an infinitesimal screening parameter, the system is strongly bound. This work has potential application in the areas of atomic and molecular processes in external fields including interactions with strong fields and short pulses.

  13. Effects of neutron fluence on the operating characteristics of diode lasers used in atomic frequency standards. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Frueholz, R.P.; Camparo, J.C.; Delcamp, S.B.; Barnes, C.E.

    1990-08-15

    One of the next major advances in rubidium and cesium atomic clock technology will center on the use of diode lasers for optical pumping. The atomic clocks used on board satellites have the potential to interact with various forms of radiation that are not present in the laboratory environment, and the effects of this radiation on the laser's operating characteristics relevant to clock applications are not well known. The present report describes an ongoing experiment to study the effects of neutron fluence on the operating characteristics of Mitsubishi Transverse Junction Stripe (TJS) AlGaAs diode lasers. Different models of the TJS diode laser produce optical radiation in both the 780 and 850 nm range, appropriate for optical pumping in rubidium and cesium atomic clocks, respectively. In this phase, a set of TJS diode lasers has been exposed to a neutron fluence of 2 x 1012 n/cm2, and four laser characteristics were examined after each exposure. The laser's light output versus injection current and single-mode linewidth versus output power both influence the efficiency of optical pumping and hence the atomic clock's signal-to-noise ratio. We have also measured the laser's single-mode wavelength versus injection current (laser tuning). Since the diode laser must remain tuned to the appropriate atomic transition, any degradation in the ability to tune the laser will impact atomic clock reliability. Finally, the diode laser's gain curve has been studied at several injection currents below threshold. This diode laser characteristic is taken as an indicator of the neutron damage mechanisms in the laser's semiconductor material. Changes in these characteristics due to the neutron exposure are reported.

  14. Discharge-pumped cw gas lasers utilizing 'dressed-atom' gain media

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, P.P.; Glownia, J.H.; Hodgson, R.T.

    2005-05-15

    The possibility of realizing an efficient gaseous laser-beam-generating medium that utilizes {lambda}-type coherently phased (i.e., 'dressed') atoms for the active laser species, but that does not inherently require the use of external laser beams for pumping, is explored. Specifically, it is investigated if multiphoton stimulated hyper-Raman scattering (SHRS) processes driven by fluorescence radiation generated in a continuous electrical discharge present within the vapor-containing cell could produce continuous-wave (cw) optical gain at the {lambda}-atom resonance frequencies {omega}{sub o} and {omega}{sub o}{sup '}. It is deduced that such gain could result from n-photon (n{>=}4) SHRS processes only if absorption of fluorescence pump light occurs in the first three transitions of the n-photon sequence representing the process unit step. Estimates of the amount of optical gain that could be produced in such a system indicate that it should be sufficient to allow multiwatt cw laser operation to occur on one set of {lambda} transitions connecting levels in a 'double-{lambda}' structure, with the pump light being discharge-produced fluorescence centered about the transitions of the other {lambda} pair. However, to initiate operation of such a device would require injection into the laser optical cavity of intense 'starter' laser pulses at both lasing frequencies. What should be an optimal experimental configuration for determining feasibility of the proposed laser device is described. In the suggested configuration, Cs-atom 6S{sub 1/2}-6P{sub 1/2} transitions form the double-{lambda} structure.

  15. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Photoionisation of a helium atom involving autoionisation states coupled by a circularly polarised laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryzlova, E. V.; Magunov, A. I.; Rotter, I.; Strakhova, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    The rotating wave approximation is used to obtain parametric expressions for the resonance cross section for the atomic ground state ionisation by linearly polarised probe radiation in the vicinity of an autoionisation state coupled resonantly to another autoionisation state through circularly polarised laser radiation. Calculations are made for the 2s2p 1P and 2s3d 1D states of the helium atom. It is shown that the structure of the photoionisation cross-section spectrum formed for circularly polarised laser radiation differs qualitatively from the structure formed in the case of linear polarisation. The dependence of this structure on the intensity and frequency of laser radiation and the direction of polarisation of the probe radiation is studied.

  16. Electron-atomic-hydrogen ``elastic" scattering in the presence of a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.-M.; Chen, J.; Zhou, Z.-F.

    2002-05-01

    Laser-assisted electron-atomic-hydrogen “elastic" scattering is studied in the first Born approximation. The initial and final states of projectile electron are described by the Volkov wavefunctions; the dressed state of target described by a time-dependent perturbative wavefunction in soft photon approximation. The laser modified cross-sections are calculated in two distinct geometries for laser polarization either parallel or perpendicular to the incident direction of electron. The numerical results shows that the multiphoton cross-sections oscillate by a few orders over the whole scattering angular region. The results for a parallel geometry oscillate more frequently in the intermediate angles; while the results for a perpendicular geometry oscillate more frequently in the forward and backward angles. At large scattering angles, the sum rule of Kroll and Watson is noticeably violated. The laser modification on summed total cross-section increases with field strength, but decreases with field frequency and polarization deviation from the incident direction.

  17. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  18. THERMAL EFFECTS ON MASS AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION DURING LASER PULSE ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY OF CERIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Kirchhofer; Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman

    2013-05-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) is an ideal surrogate material for trans-uranic elements and fission products found in nuclear fuels due to similarities in their thermal properties; therefore, cerium oxide was used to determine the best run condition for atom probe tomography (APT). Laser pulse APT is a technique that allows for spatial resolution in the nm scale and isotopic/elemental chemical identification. A systematic study of the impact of laser pulse energy and specimen base temperature on the mass resolution, measurement of stoichiometry, multiples, and evaporation mechanisms are reported in this paper. It was demonstrated that using laser pulse APT stoichiometric field evaporation of cerium oxide was achieved at 1 pJ laser pulse energy and 20 K specimen base temperature.

  19. Diode laser operating on an atomic transition limited by an isotope ⁸⁷Rb Faraday filter at 780 nm.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhiming; Hong, Yelong; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an extended cavity Faraday laser system using an antireflection-coated laser diode as the gain medium and the isotope (87)Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as the frequency selective device. Using this method, the laser wavelength works stably at the highest transmission peak of the isotope (87)Rb FADOF over the laser diode current from 55 to 140 mA and the temperature from 15°C to 35°C. Neither the current nor the temperature of the laser diode has significant influence on the output frequency. Compared with previous extended cavity laser systems operating at frequencies irrelevant to spectacular atomic transition lines, the laser system realized here provides a stable laser source with the frequency operating on atomic transitions for many practical applications.

  20. High-stability compact atomic clock based on isotropic laser cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esnault, Francois-Xavier; Holleville, David; Rossetto, Nicolas; Guerandel, Stephane; Dimarcq, Noel

    2010-09-15

    We present a compact cold-atom clock configuration where isotropic laser cooling, microwave interrogation, and clock signal detection are successively performed inside a spherical microwave cavity. For ground operation, a typical Ramsey fringe width of 20 Hz has been demonstrated, limited by the atom cloud's free fall in the cavity. The isotropic cooling light's disordered properties provide a large and stable number of cold atoms, leading to a high signal-to-noise ratio limited by atomic shot noise. A relative frequency stability of 2.2x10{sup -13{tau}-1/2} has been achieved, averaged down to 4x10{sup -15} after 5x10{sup 3} s of integration. Development of such a high-performance compact clock is of major relevance for on-board applications, such as satellite-positioning systems. As a cesium clock, it opens the door to a new generation of compact primary standards and timekeeping devices.

  1. Photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy of atoms, nanoparticles, and nanoplasmas irradiated with strong femtosecond laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickstein, Daniel D.

    Modern femtosecond lasers can produce pulses of light that are shorter than the vibrational periods in molecules and have electric fields stronger than the Coulomb field that binds electrons in atoms. These short pulse lasers enable the observation of chemical reactions, the production of attosecond bursts of high-energy photons, and the precision-machining of solid materials with minimal heat transport to the material. In this thesis, I describe three experiments that provide new insight into strong-field (1014 Watts/cm2) femtosecond laser-matter interactions in three important regimes. First, I discuss the strong-field ionization of gas-phase atoms, identify a new structure in the photoelectron angular distribution of xenon gas, and explain this structure as a result of field-driven electrons colliding with the Coulomb potential of the ion. Second, I describe a new method to perform photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy on single, isolated nanoparticles and demonstrate this technique by observing the directional ion ejection that takes place in the laser ablation of nanostructures. Finally, I present the first experimental observations of shock wave propagation in nanoscale plasmas. These findings will guide future efforts to probe the structure of atoms and molecules on the femtosecond timescale, design nanomaterials that enhance light on the subwavelength scale, and produce high-energy ions from plasmas.

  2. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  3. Ellipticity dependence of neutral Rydberg excitation of atoms in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Dong, Jingwei; Lv, Hang; Yang, Tianxiang; Lian, Yi; Jin, Mingxing; Xu, Haifeng; Ding, Dajun; Hu, Shilin; Chen, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Rydberg state excitation (RSE) of different atoms in elliptically polarized strong 800 nm laser fields is investigated experimentally, and the results are compared with calculations of the strong-field approximation (SFA) model and the semiclassical model. It is observed that the RSE probability declines with increasing laser ellipticity for all of the He, Ar, and Kr atoms. While the measured ellipticity dependence of He RSE is very consistent with the predictions of both the SFA and semiclassical calculations, the width of the ellipticity dependence for Ar and Kr atoms is wider than that of the SFA model but closer to the semiclassical calculations. Analysis indicates that unlike a tunneling-plus-rescattering process, the decline of the RSE yield with increasing ellipticity can be attributed to a decrease of electrons with low kinetic energy that could be captured in the Rydberg states by the Coulomb potential. It indicates that the atomic RSE process could be related to the very low or near-zero energy structure in the photoelectron spectrum in strong laser fields, which would stimulate further experimental and theoretical studies to reveal their underlying mechanisms.

  4. Characterization of one-dimensional gratings fabricated by laser-focused atomic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Cheng, Xinbin; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xingrui; Deng, Xiao; Ma, Yan; Li, Tongbao

    2016-09-01

    Nanometric lateral standards are essential to nanometrology. Using laser-focused atomic deposition, a one-dimensional (1D) grating has been manufactured. The pitch of the grating is 212.8 nm, which can be traced to the laser wavelength that is accurately locked to the 52Cr atomic resonance transition 7S3 →7P40. In this paper, the uniformity rather than the pitch accuracy of the 1D grating was evaluated using atomic force microscope (AFM). Based on the center-of-gravity method, the average pitch and the nonuniformity of the grating pitch were calculated. The results show that the average pitch of the grating is 213.2 nm which deviates from the design pitch due to the calibration of AFM, and the nonuniformity of the grating is 0.1 nm. The results preliminarily prove that 1D grating fabricated by laser-focused atomic deposition has good uniformity, and has great potential to become nanometric reference material for AFM and scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibration.

  5. A high-resolution pulsed-laser atom-probe field-ion microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelikov, Dmitriy V.

    2001-10-01

    The atom-probe field-ion microscope is a unique instrument for the analysis of materials on an atom-by- atom and atomic layer-by-atomic layer basis. It combines a point projection microscope, which allows one to observe individual atoms in direct lattice space on the surface of a sharply pointed tip under a high positive voltage, with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can measure mass-to-charge ratios of individual atoms field- evaporated from the surface of a tip during a few nanosecond wide high-voltage or laser pulse. The ability to distinguish atomic isotopes and molecular clusters of one species from the other is crucial in the atom-probe analysis of multi-component materials. One of the main sources of errors in such an analysis is energy deficits of field-evaporated ions inherent to the pulsed high- voltage evaporation process. Therefore, in this study the task of designing and fabricating an atom-probe field-ion microscope capable of compensating these energy deficits, and versatile enough to be able to analyze a wide spectrum of engineering materials, was undertaken. The instrument has the following features: (a)ultrahigh vacuum (UHV); (b)a specimen exchange device that will store up to 10 specimens and allows transferring specimens directly from atmospheric pressure to UHV conditions; (c)a closed cycle helium refrigerator with a temperature regulator capable of cooling the specimen to 10 K; (d)a 3D goniometer with +/-30° tilt in the horizontal and vertical planes; (e)a variable distance, high gain MCP assembly for field-ion microscopy; (f)a single stage reflectron lens; (g)a 1500 Hz solid-state high voltage pulser; (h)a 20 Hz, 300 μJ/pulse, 4 ns pulsed nitrogen laser analysis capability. The mass resolution of this instrument is D(/) /= / at full-width half-maximum (FWHM) with high-voltage pulsing and D(/) /= / at FWHM with laser pulsing.

  6. A portable laser system for high-precision atom interferometry experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Prevedelli, M.; Giorgini, A.; Tino, G. M.; Peters, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a modular rack-mounted laser system for the cooling and manipulation of neutral rubidium atoms which has been developed for a portable gravimeter based on atom interferometry that will be capable of performing high-precision gravity measurements directly at sites of geophysical interest. This laser system is constructed in a compact and mobile design so that it can be transported to different locations, yet it still offers improvements over many conventional laboratory-based laser systems. Our system is contained in a standard 19″ rack and emits light at five different frequencies simultaneously on up to 12 fibre ports at a total output power of 800 mW. These frequencies can be changed and switched between ports in less than a microsecond. The setup includes two phase-locked diode lasers with a phase noise spectral density of less than 1 μrad/Hz1/2 in the frequency range in which our gravimeter is most sensitive to noise. We characterise this laser system and evaluate the performance limits it imposes on an interferometer.

  7. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. A modification of the laser detonation-type hyperthermal oxygen atom beam source for a long-term operation.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Yatani, Hideaki; Ohmae, Nobuo

    2008-07-01

    It has been an impedimental problem, for the laser detonation-type atom beam generator, that a poppet in the pulsed supersonic valve is rapidly eroded by the irradiation of powerful laser light and high temperature plasma. In order to operate the atom beam source for a long duration, a modification was made to hide the poppet from direct irradiation of laser and plasma. The alteration of device configuration resulted in great improvement in endurance of poppet more than 300,000 repetitions. Morphology of a polyimide film exposed to approximately 200,000 pulses of hyperthermal oxygen atom beam showed a shaglike carpet structure, which is a characteristic to that exposed to energetic oxygen atoms. A flux of the oxygen atom beam was estimated to be 5x10(14) atoms/cm2/pulse at a location of 30 cm away from the nozzle throat.

  9. A modification of the laser detonation-type hyperthermal oxygen atom beam source for a long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Yatani, Hideaki; Ohmae, Nobuo

    2008-07-01

    It has been an impedimental problem, for the laser detonation-type atom beam generator, that a poppet in the pulsed supersonic valve is rapidly eroded by the irradiation of powerful laser light and high temperature plasma. In order to operate the atom beam source for a long duration, a modification was made to hide the poppet from direct irradiation of laser and plasma. The alteration of device configuration resulted in great improvement in endurance of poppet more than 300 000 repetitions. Morphology of a polyimide film exposed to approximately 200 000 pulses of hyperthermal oxygen atom beam showed a shaglike carpet structure, which is a characteristic to that exposed to energetic oxygen atoms. A flux of the oxygen atom beam was estimated to be 5×1014 atoms/cm2/pulse at a location of 30 cm away from the nozzle throat.

  10. Interaction of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms with higher order modes of an optical nanofibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravi; Gokhroo, Vandna; Deasy, Kieran; Maimaiti, Aili; Frawley, Mary C.; Phelan, Ciarán; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are used to confine light to sub-wavelength regions and are very promising tools for the development of optical fibre-based quantum networks using cold, neutral atoms. To date, experimental studies on atoms near nanofibres have focussed on fundamental fibre mode interactions. In this work, we demonstrate the integration of a few-mode optical nanofibre into a magneto-optical trap for 87Rb atoms. The nanofibre, with a waist diameter of ∼700 nm, supports both the fundamental and first group of higher order modes (HOMs) and is used for atomic fluorescence and absorption studies. In general, light propagating in higher order fibre modes has a greater evanescent field extension around the waist in comparison with the fundamental mode. By exploiting this behaviour, we demonstrate that the detected signal of fluorescent photons emitted from a cloud of cold atoms centred at the nanofibre waist is larger if HOMs are also included. In particular, the signal from HOMs appears to be about six times larger than that obtained for the fundamental mode. Absorption of on-resonance, HOM probe light by the laser-cooled atoms is also observed. These advances should facilitate the realization of atom trapping schemes based on HOM interference.

  11. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  12. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  13. Stabilization of circular Rydberg atoms by circularly polarized infrared laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Askeland, S.; Soerngaard, S. A.; Nepstad, R.; Foerre, M.; Pilskog, I.

    2011-09-15

    The ionization dynamics of circular Rydberg states in strong circularly polarized infrared (800 nm) laser fields is studied by means of numerical simulations with the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We find that at certain intensities, related to the radius of the Rydberg states, atomic stabilization sets in, and the ionization probability decreases as the intensity is further increased. Moreover, there is a strong dependence of the ionization probability on the rotational direction of the applied laser field, which can be understood from a simple classical analogy.

  14. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Metastable Atoms in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Tung Do; Hippler, Rainer

    2008-09-07

    Spatial density profile of neon metastable produced in dusty plasma was investigated by means of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The line averaged measured density drops about 30% with the presence of dust particles. The observations provide evidence for a significant interaction between atoms and powder particles which are important for energy transfer from plasma to particles. The power per unit area absorbed by dust particles due to the collision of metastable atoms with dust particle surface is about some tens of mW/m{sup 2}.

  15. Multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions by high-intensity X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Popruzhenko, S. B. Mur, V. D.; Popov, V. S.; Bauer, D.

    2009-06-15

    Coulomb corrections to the action function and rate of multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions in a strong linearly polarized electromagnetic field are calculated for high values of the Keldysh adiabaticity parameter. The Coulomb corrections significantly increase the ionization rate for atoms (by several orders of magnitude). An interpolation formula proposed for ionization rate is valid for arbitrary values of the adiabaticity parameter. The high accuracy of the formula is confirmed by comparison with the results of numerical calculations. The general case of elliptic polarization of laser radiation is also considered.

  16. Survival of Rydberg atoms in intense laser fields and the role of nondipole effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Dimitrovski, Darko

    2015-02-01

    We consider the interaction of Rydberg atoms with strong infrared laser pulses using an approach based on the Magnus expansion of the time evolution operator. First-order corrections beyond the electric dipole approximation are also included in the theory. We illustrate the dynamics of the interaction at the parameters of the experiment [Eichmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 203002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.203002]. It emerges that the depletion of Rydberg atoms in this regime comes predominantly from the nondipole effects.

  17. Two-photon dichroic atomic vapor laser lock using electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, F. E.; Willis, R. T.; Rolston, S. L.; Orozco, L. A.

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate a technique to lock the frequency of a laser to a transition between two excited states in Rb vapor using a two-photon process in the presence of a weak magnetic field. We use a ladder configuration from specific hyperfine sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2}, 5P{sub 3/2}, and 5D{sub 5/2} levels. This atomic configuration can show electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption processes. The error signal comes from the difference in the transparency or absorption felt by the two orthogonal polarizations of the probe beam. A simplified model is in good quantitative agreement with the observed signals for the experimental parameters. We have used this technique to lock the frequency of the laser up to 1.5 GHz off atomic resonance.

  18. Pulse duration dependence of atomic sequential double ionization by circular laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Aihong; Chen, Liangyuan; Li, Yingbin

    2016-09-01

    Using classical ensemble method, we have investigated the pulse duration dependence of sequential double ionization (SDI) of Ar atoms driven by circularly polarized laser pulses. The results show that the ion momentum distribution of Ar atoms depends strongly on the pulse duration. As the pulse duration increases, the ion momentum distribution changes from single-ring to double-ring structure, and finally to the single-ring structure. Back analysis of double ionization trajectories shows that the variation of the ring structure originates from the dependence of the ionization time of the second electron on the pulse duration. Moreover, our calculations clearly manifest the subcycle electron emission in sequential double ionization by circularly polarized laser pulses.

  19. Microwave lensing frequency shift of the PHARAO laser-cooled microgravity atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Phillip; Gibble, Kurt; Laurent, Phillipe; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We evaluate the microwave lensing frequency shift of the microgravity laser-cooled caesium clock PHARAO. We find microwave lensing frequency shifts of δν/ν  =  11  ×  10-17 to 13  ×  10-17, larger than the shift of typical fountain clocks. The shift has a weak dependence on PHARAO parameters, including the atomic temperature, size of the atomic cloud, detection laser intensities, and the launch velocity. We also find the lensing frequency shift to be insensitive to selection and detection spatial inhomogeneities and the expected low-frequency vibrations. We conservatively assign a nominal microwave lensing frequency uncertainty of  ±4  ×  10-17.

  20. Isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in polonium isotopes by atomic-beam laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewska, D.; Bekk, K.; Göring, S.; Hanser, A.; Kälber, W.; Meisel, G.; Rebel, H.

    1991-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a collimated atomic beam has been applied to determine isotope shifts and the hyperfine structure of an isotopic chain of the radioactive element polonium (200Po, 202Po, 204-210Po). The relative isotope shifts show a striking similarity with results for other elements in the vicinity of Pb, even reproducing details of the odd-even staggering.

  1. Towards the measurement of the electron EDM with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Yoshida, H. P.; Wakasa, T.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is a probe into new physics beyond the standard model. The electron EDM might be observed with an enhancement in heavier paramagnetic atoms. Francium (Fr), whose electron structure is useful for laser-cooling and trapping, has a large enhancement factor. Fr produced at high temperature via a fusion reaction will be laser-cooled and trapped in an optical lattice where the EDM is measured. The magneto-optical trapping of Fr is required in advance of the lattice trapping. The technique observing a small number of atoms makes it easy to search for the resonant frequency of Fr. The improvement of the beam purity should lead to a more efficient trap. The techniques towards Fr trapping and EDM measurement have been developed. The electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is a probe into new physics beyond the standard model. The electron EDM might be observed with an enhancement in heavier paramagnetic atoms. Francium (Fr), whose electron structure is useful for laser-cooling and trapping, has a large enhancement factor. Fr produced at high temperature via a fusion reaction will be laser-cooled and trapped in an optical lattice where the EDM is measured. The magneto-optical trapping of Fr is required in advance of the lattice trapping. The technique observing a small number of atoms makes it easy to search for the resonant frequency of Fr. The improvement of the beam purity should lead to a more efficient trap. The techniques towards Fr trapping and EDM measurement have been developed. Supported by MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI Grants (21104005, 25610112 and 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  2. Harmonic generation by atomic and nanoparticle precursors in a ZnS laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Harmonic generation of a driving laser propagating across a laser ablation plasma serves for the diagnosis of multicomponent plumes. Here we study the contribution of atomic and nanoparticle precursors to the generation of coherent ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet light as low-order harmonics of the fundamental emission (1064 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in a nanosecond infrared ZnS laser ablation plasma. Odd harmonics from the 3rd up to the 9th order (118.2 nm) have been observed with distinct temporal and spatial characteristics which were determined by varying the delay between the ablation and driving nanosecond pulses and by spatially scanning the plasma with the focused driving beam propagating parallel to the target. At short distances from the target surface (≤1 mm), the harmonic intensity displays two temporal components peaked at around 250 ns and 10 μs. While the early component dies off quickly with increasing harmonic order and vanishes for the 9th order, the late component is notably intense for the 7th harmonic and is still clearly visible for the 9th. Spectral analysis of spontaneous plume emissions help to assign the origin of the two components. While the early plasma component is mainly constituted by neutral Zn atoms, the late component is mostly due to nanoparticles, which upon interaction with the driving laser are subject to breakup and ionization. With the aid of calculations of the phase matching integrals within the perturbative model of optical harmonic generation, these results illustrate how atom and nanoparticle populations, with differing temporal and spatial distributions within the ablation plasma, contribute to the nonlinear medium.

  3. Comparison of Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observations in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2015-08-01

    1. In 2013 a suggestion was made by Graham et al. [1] [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 171102 (2013)] of possible GW observations over 10^3 km baselines using strongly forbidden single photon transitions in atoms such as Sr-87. A comparison of the requirements for such a mission with those for laser interferometer missions such as LISA or eLISA with roughly 10^6 km baselines was published in 2014 [Bender, Phys. Rev. D 89, 062004 (2014)]. The comparison will be somewhat updated in this talk.2. Recently, a possible method for gravitational wave observations with atom interferometry over million km scale baselines has been suggested by Hogan and Kasevich [arXiv:1501.06797v1 (2015)]. As an example, they consider observations similar to those discussed in [1], but over a 2*10^6 km baseline. The atomic transitions in the two spacecraft would be driven by separate lasers that are phase locked using 1 W laser power and 30 cm diam. telescopes. Total observation times for individual clouds of 80 to 320 s are assumed, along with 50 concurrent interferometers and a 60 Hz Rabi frequency for the laser pulses.3. After the flight of the LISA Pathfinder mission later this year, it is expected that more intensive work will start on a laser interferometer gravitational wave mission. Probably the most important objective will be the observation of GW signals from the mergers at high redshifts of massive black holes with masses in the range from perhaps 10^4 to 10^7 M_sun. Such signals would give new constraints on the mechanisms for the formation of intermediate mass and larger black holes at early times, and probably contribute to understanding the observed close correlation between the growth of galaxies and of the massive black holes at their centers.

  4. Ground state bromine atom density measurements by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirse, N.; Foucher, M.; Chabert, P.; Booth, J.-P.

    2014-12-01

    Ground state bromine atom detection by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) is demonstrated. The (4p5) {^2Po3/2} bromine atoms are excited by two-photon absorption at 252.594 nm to the (5p) {^4So3/2} state and detected by 635.25 nm fluorescence to the (5s) 4P5/2 state. The atoms are generated in a radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma in pure HBr. The excitation laser also causes some photodissociation of HBr molecules, but this can be minimized by not focussing the laser beam, still giving adequate signal levels. We determined the natural lifetime of the emitting (5p) {^4So3/2} state, τf^Br*=30.9 +/- 1.4 ns and the rate constant for quenching of this state by collision with HBr molecules, k_HBrQ = 1.02 +/- 0.07× 10-15 m3 s-1 .

  5. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Mesospheric Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingdi; Peng, Jian; Reppert, Kelsey; Callahan, Sara; Smith, Gregory P

    2016-06-09

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We remeasured its rate constant to reduce its uncertainty and extended the measurements to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques. H atoms were produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O((1)D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measured the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone using LIF. We monitored either the H atom decay by two photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH (v = 9) product time evolution with excitation of the B(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Π (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in the blue B(2)Σ(+)-A(2)Σ(+) (0,7) band. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 140 to 305 K at 20 to 200 Torr in Ar. Small kinetic modeling corrections were made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results are consistent with the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere.

  6. Controlling residual hydrogen gas in mass spectra during pulsed laser atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Kolli, R Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Residual hydrogen (H2) gas in the analysis chamber of an atom probe instrument limits the ability to measure H concentration in metals and alloys. Measuring H concentration would permit quantification of important physical phenomena, such as hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, hydrogen trapping, and grain boundary segregation. Increased insight into the behavior of residual H2 gas on the specimen tip surface in atom probe instruments could help reduce these limitations. The influence of user-selected experimental parameters on the field adsorption and desorption of residual H2 gas on nominally pure copper (Cu) was studied during ultraviolet pulsed laser atom probe tomography. The results indicate that the total residual hydrogen concentration, HTOT, in the mass spectra exhibits a generally decreasing trend with increasing laser pulse energy and increasing laser pulse frequency. Second-order interaction effects are also important. The pulse energy has the greatest influence on the quantity HTOT, which is consistently less than 0.1 at.% at a value of 80 pJ.

  7. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  8. A phase-locked laser system based on double direct modulation technique for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Pan, Xiong; Song, Ningfang; Xu, Xiaobin; Lu, Xiangxiang

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a laser system based on phase modulation technology and phase feedback control. The two laser beams with frequency difference of 6.835 GHz are modulated using electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, respectively. Parasitic frequency components produced by the electro-optic modulator are filtered using a Fabry-Perot Etalon. A straightforward phase feedback system restrains the phase noise induced by environmental perturbations. The phase noise of the laser system stays below -125 rad2/Hz at frequency offset higher than 500 kHz. Overall phase noise of the laser system is evaluated by calculating the contribution of the phase noise to the sensitivity limit of a gravimeter. The results reveal that the sensitivity limited by the phase noise of our laser system is lower than that of a state-of-the-art optical phase-lock loop scheme when a gravimeter operates at short pulse duration, which makes the laser system a promising option for our future application of atom interferometer.

  9. Preparation of nanowire specimens for laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumtritt, H.; Isheim, D.; Senz, S.; Seidman, D. N.; Moutanabbir, O.

    2014-10-01

    The availability of reliable and well-engineered commercial instruments and data analysis software has led to development in recent years of robust and ergonomic atom-probe tomographs. Indeed, atom-probe tomography (APT) is now being applied to a broader range of materials classes that involve highly important scientific and technological problems in materials science and engineering. Dual-beam focused-ion beam microscopy and its application to the fabrication of APT microtip specimens have dramatically improved the ability to probe a variety of systems. However, the sample preparation is still challenging especially for emerging nanomaterials such as epitaxial nanowires which typically grow vertically on a substrate through metal-catalyzed vapor phase epitaxy. The size, morphology, density, and sensitivity to radiation damage are the most influential parameters in the preparation of nanowire specimens for APT. In this paper, we describe a step-by-step process methodology to allow a precisely controlled, damage-free transfer of individual, short silicon nanowires onto atom probe microposts. Starting with a dense array of tiny nanowires and using focused ion beam, we employed a sequence of protective layers and markers to identify the nanowire to be transferred and probed while protecting it against Ga ions during lift-off processing and tip sharpening. Based on this approach, high-quality three-dimensional atom-by-atom maps of single aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires are obtained using a highly focused ultraviolet laser-assisted local electrode atom probe tomograph.

  10. Theoretical modeling of laser-induced plasmas using the ATOMIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, James; Johns, Heather; Kilcrease, David; Judge, Elizabeth; Barefield, James, II; Clegg, Samuel; Hartig, Kyle

    2014-10-01

    We report on efforts to model the emission spectra generated from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a popular and powerful method of quickly and accurately characterizing unknown samples in a remote manner. In particular, LIBS is utilized by the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory. We model the LIBS plasma using the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes. Since LIBS plasmas generally have temperatures of somewhere between 3000 K and 12000 K, the emission spectra typically result from the neutral and singly ionized stages of the target atoms. We use the Los Alamos atomic structure and collision codes to generate sets of atomic data and use the plasma kinetics code ATOMIC to perform LTE or non-LTE calculations that generate level populations and an emission spectrum for the element of interest. In this presentation we compare the emission spectrum from ATOMIC with an Fe LIBS laboratory-generated plasma as well as spectra from the ChemCam instrument. We also discuss various physics aspects of the modeling of LIBS plasmas that are necessary for accurate characterization of the plasma, such as multi-element target composition effects, radiation transport effects, and accurate line shape treatments. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC5206NA25396.

  11. Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography of Deformed Minerals: A Zircon Case Study.

    PubMed

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Piazolo, Sandra; Trimby, Patrick; Yang, Limei; Cairney, Julie M

    2017-01-30

    The application of atom probe tomography to the study of minerals is a rapidly growing area. Picosecond-pulsed, ultraviolet laser (UV-355 nm) assisted atom probe tomography has been used to analyze trace element mobility within dislocations and low-angle boundaries in plastically deformed specimens of the nonconductive mineral zircon (ZrSiO4), a key material to date the earth's geological events. Here we discuss important experimental aspects inherent in the atom probe tomography investigation of this important mineral, providing insights into the challenges in atom probe tomography characterization of minerals as a whole. We studied the influence of atom probe tomography analysis parameters on features of the mass spectra, such as the thermal tail, as well as the overall data quality. Three zircon samples with different uranium and lead content were analyzed, and particular attention was paid to ion identification in the mass spectra and detection limits of the key trace elements, lead and uranium. We also discuss the correlative use of electron backscattered diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to map the deformation in the zircon grains, and the combined use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and focused ion beam sample preparation to assist preparation of the final atom probe tip.

  12. Preparation of nanowire specimens for laser-assisted atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Blumtritt, H; Isheim, D; Senz, S; Seidman, D N; Moutanabbir, O

    2014-10-31

    The availability of reliable and well-engineered commercial instruments and data analysis software has led to development in recent years of robust and ergonomic atom-probe tomographs. Indeed, atom-probe tomography (APT) is now being applied to a broader range of materials classes that involve highly important scientific and technological problems in materials science and engineering. Dual-beam focused-ion beam microscopy and its application to the fabrication of APT microtip specimens have dramatically improved the ability to probe a variety of systems. However, the sample preparation is still challenging especially for emerging nanomaterials such as epitaxial nanowires which typically grow vertically on a substrate through metal-catalyzed vapor phase epitaxy. The size, morphology, density, and sensitivity to radiation damage are the most influential parameters in the preparation of nanowire specimens for APT. In this paper, we describe a step-by-step process methodology to allow a precisely controlled, damage-free transfer of individual, short silicon nanowires onto atom probe microposts. Starting with a dense array of tiny nanowires and using focused ion beam, we employed a sequence of protective layers and markers to identify the nanowire to be transferred and probed while protecting it against Ga ions during lift-off processing and tip sharpening. Based on this approach, high-quality three-dimensional atom-by-atom maps of single aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires are obtained using a highly focused ultraviolet laser-assisted local electrode atom probe tomograph.

  13. Time-dependent study of a black-hole laser in a flowing atomic condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nova, J. R. M.; Finazzi, S.; Carusotto, I.

    2016-10-01

    We numerically study the temporal evolution of a black-hole laser configuration displaying a pair of black- and white-hole horizons in a flowing atomic condensate. This configuration is initially prepared starting from a homogeneous flow via a suitable space-dependent change of the interaction constant and the evolution is then followed up to long times. Depending on the values of the system parameters, the system typically either converges to the lowest-energy solution by evaporating away the horizons or displays a continuous and periodic coherent emission of solitons. By making a physical comparison with optical laser devices, we identify the latter regime of continuous emission of solitons as the proper black-hole laser effect.

  14. Initial Atomic Motion Immediately Following Femtosecond-Laser Excitation in Phase-Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, E; Okada, S; Ichitsubo, T; Kawaguchi, T; Hirata, A; Guan, P F; Tokuda, K; Tanimura, K; Matsunaga, T; Chen, M W; Yamada, N

    2016-09-23

    Despite the fact that phase-change materials are widely used for data storage, no consensus exists on the unique mechanism of their ultrafast phase change and its accompanied large and rapid optical change. By using the pump-probe observation method combining a femtosecond optical laser and an x-ray free-electron laser, we substantiate experimentally that, in both GeTe and Ge_{2}Sb_{2}Te_{5} crystals, rattling motion of mainly Ge atoms takes place with keeping the off-center position just after femtosecond-optical-laser irradiation, which eventually leads to a higher symmetry or disordered state. This very initial rattling motion in the undistorted lattice can be related to instantaneous optical change due to the loss of resonant bonding that characterizes GeTe-based phase change materials. Based on the amorphous structure derived by first-principles molecular dynamics simulation, we infer a plausible ultrafast amorphization mechanism via nonmelting.

  15. Method using laser irradiation for the production of atomically clean crystalline silicon and germanium surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ownby, G.W.; White, C.W.; Zehner, D.M.

    1979-12-28

    This invention relates to a new method for removing surface impurities from crystalline silicon or germanium articles, such as off-the-shelf p- or n-type wafers to be doped for use as junction devices. The principal contaminants on such wafers are oxygen and carbon. The new method comprises laser-irradiating the contaminated surface in a non-reactive atmosphere, using one or more of Q-switched laser pulses whose parameters are selected to effect melting of the surface without substantial vaporization thereof. In a typical application, a plurality of pulses is used to convert a surface region of an off-the-shelf silicon wafer to an atomically clean region. This can be accomplished in a system at a pressure below 10-/sup 8/ Torr, using Q-switched ruber-laser pulses having an energy density in the range of from about 60 to 190 MW/cm/sup 2/.

  16. Dipole-forbidden atomic transitions induced by superintense x-ray laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Aleksander Skjerlie; Førre, Morten

    2016-06-01

    A hydrogen atom, initially prepared in the 2 s and/or 2 p (m =±1 ) states, is assumed irradiated by 0.8 keV (1.5 nm) photons in pulses of 1 -250 fs duration and intensities in the range 1020 to 1023W /cm2 . Solving the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation from first principles, we show that the ionization and excitation dynamics of the laser-atom system is strongly influenced by interactions beyond the electric dipole approximation. A beyond-dipole two-photon Raman-like transition between the 2 s and 2 p (m =±1 ) states is found to completely dominate the underlying laser-matter interaction. It turns out that the large difference in the ionization rates of the 2 s and 2 p (m =±1 ) states is important in this context, effectively leading to a symmetry breaking in the corresponding (beyond-dipole) bound-bound dynamics with the result that a net population transfer between the states occurs throughout the laser-matter interaction period. Varying the x-ray exposure time as well as the laser intensity, we probe the phenomenon as the bound wave packet oscillates between having 2 s and 2 p (m =±1 ) character, eventually giving rise to a Rabi-like oscillation pattern in the populations.

  17. Spectroscopy with Laser-cooled Francium and Progress on Atomic Parity Non-conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiehang

    Francium, the heaviest alkali, possesses a unique combination of structural simplicity and great sensitivity to effects such as atomic parity non-conservation (APNC). We report in this thesis our progress towards measuring weak-interaction physics in a low energy system: the francium atom. We have built a new generation of high-efficiency laser cooling and trapping facility at TRIUMF national laboratory in Canada. We constructed a precision science chamber and demonstrate francium atom transfer into the precision trap, where the electromagnetic field environments can be exquisitely controlled such that weak-interaction studies via optical and microwave excitations can take place. We perform laser spectroscopy measurements of the hyperfine structure and isotope shifts in a chain of francium isotopes near the neutron closed shell (N = 126), including both ground and isomeric nuclear states. These measurements provide a basis for benchmarking state of the art atomic theory, as well as future nuclear structure calculations in Fr, necessary for interpreting the weak-interaction studies. These developments lay important foundations for precision parity non-conservation measurements with francium.

  18. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter; Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong; Gu, Sihong

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  19. Quantum signature for laser-driven correlated excitation of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaizhi; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2017-01-01

    The excitation dynamics of a laser-driven Rydberg-atom system exhibits a cooperative effect due to the interatomic Rydberg-Rydberg interaction, but the large many-body system with inhomogeneous Rydberg coupling is hard to exactly solve or numerically study by density-matrix equations. In this paper, we find that the laser-driven Rydberg-atom system with most of the atoms being in the ground state can be described by a simplified interaction model resembling the optical Kerr effect if the distance-dependent Rydberg-Rydberg interaction is replaced by an infinite-range coupling. We can then quantitatively study the effect of the quantum fluctuations on the Rydberg excitation with the interatomic correlation involved and analytically calculate the statistical characteristics of the excitation dynamics in the steady state, revealing the quantum signature of the driven-dissipative Rydberg-atom system. The results obtained here will be of great interest for other spin-1/2 systems with spin-spin coupling.

  20. Evidence for unnatural-parity contributions to electron-impact ionization of laser-aligned atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Gregory S. J.; Colgan, James Patrick; Pindzola, M. S.; Amami, S.; Madison, D. H.; Pursehouse, J.; Nixon, K. L.; Murray, A. J.

    2015-09-11

    Recent measurements have examined the electron-impact ionization of excited-state laser-aligned Mg atoms. In this paper we show that the ionization cross section arising from the geometry where the aligned atom is perpendicular to the scattering plane directly probes the unnatural parity contributions to the ionization amplitude. The contributions from natural parity partial waves cancel exactly in this geometry. Our calculations resolve the discrepancy between the nonzero measured cross sections in this plane and the zero cross section predicted by distorted-wave approaches. Finally, we demonstrate that this is a general feature of ionization from p-state targets by additional studies of ionization from excited Ca and Na atoms.

  1. Evidence for unnatural-parity contributions to electron-impact ionization of laser-aligned atoms

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Gregory S. J.; Colgan, James Patrick; Pindzola, M. S.; ...

    2015-09-11

    Recent measurements have examined the electron-impact ionization of excited-state laser-aligned Mg atoms. In this paper we show that the ionization cross section arising from the geometry where the aligned atom is perpendicular to the scattering plane directly probes the unnatural parity contributions to the ionization amplitude. The contributions from natural parity partial waves cancel exactly in this geometry. Our calculations resolve the discrepancy between the nonzero measured cross sections in this plane and the zero cross section predicted by distorted-wave approaches. Finally, we demonstrate that this is a general feature of ionization from p-state targets by additional studies of ionizationmore » from excited Ca and Na atoms.« less

  2. Optically pumped rare-gas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheyev, P A

    2015-08-31

    The modern state of the research of a new promising optically pumped laser system with an active medium formed by metastable rare-gas atoms is briefly reviewed. The kinetics of these media is similar to that of laser media based on alkali metal vapour; however, the gas medium is inert. Metastable atoms can be produced in an electric discharge. As in alkali lasers, the specific laser power output under atmospheric pressure can be several hundreds of watts per 1 cm{sup 3}. The lasing wavelengths lie in the near-IR range and fall in the transparency window of the terrestrial atmosphere. This new concept makes it possible to develop a closed-cycle cw laser with megawatt power levels and high beam quality. (lasers)

  3. Stability analysis for bad cavity lasers using inhomogeneously broadened spin-1/2 atoms as a gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, G. A.; Schumm, T.

    2017-02-01

    Bad cavity lasers are experiencing renewed interest in the context of active optical frequency standards, due to their enhanced robustness against fluctuations of the laser cavity. The gain medium would consist of narrow-linewidth atoms, either trapped inside the cavity or intersecting the cavity mode dynamically. A series of effects like the atoms finite velocity distribution, atomic interactions, or interactions of realistic multilevel atoms with auxiliary or stray fields can lead to an inhomogeneous broadening of the atomic gain profile. This causes the emergence of unstable regimes of laser operation, characterized by complex temporal patterns of the field amplitude. We study the steady-state solutions and their stability for the metrology-relevant case of a bad cavity laser with spin-1/2 atoms, such as 171Yb, interacting with an external magnetic field. For the stability analysis, we present an efficient method, which can be applied to a broad class of single-mode bad cavity lasers with inhomogeneously broadened multilevel atoms acting as a gain medium.

  4. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  5. Double electron capture between an α particle and a helium atom in the presence of an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu-Min; Miao, Yan-Gang; Zhou, Zi-Fang; Chen, Ji; Liu, Yao-Yang

    1998-05-01

    In the first Born approximation, the symmetrical double-electron-capture collision between an α particle and a helium atom in the presence of an intense laser field is studied. The capture cross section is promoted considerably and is an increasing function of the ratio of the laser amplitude to frequency. With increasing impact energy, the dressing modification becomes notable.

  6. Diode laser atomic fluorescence temperature measurements in low-pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, I. S.; Lamoureux, N.; Kaminski, C. F.; Hult, J.; Desgroux, P.

    2008-12-01

    Temperature measurements have been performed in a low-pressure flame by the technique of diode laser induced atomic fluorescence. The experiments were done in a near-stoichiometric flat-flame of premixed methane, oxygen and nitrogen, at a pressure of 5.3 kPa. Indium atoms were seeded to the flame and probed using blue diode lasers; the lineshapes of the resulting fluorescence spectra were used to determine the flame temperature at a range of heights above the burner plate. The particular issues associated with the implementation of this measurement approach at low pressure are discussed, and it is shown to work especially well under these conditions. The atomic fluorescence lineshape thermometry technique is quicker to perform and requires less elaborate equipment than other methods that have previously been implemented in low-pressure flames, including OH-LIF and NO-LIF. There was sufficient indium present to perform measurements at all locations in the flame, including in the pre-heat zone close to the burner plate. Two sets of temperature measurements have been independently performed by using two different diode lasers to probe two separate transitions in atomic indium. The good agreement between the two sets of data provides a validation of the technique. By comparing thermocouple profiles recorded with and without seeding of the flame, we demonstrate that any influence of seeding on the flame temperature is negligible. The overall uncertainty of the measurements reported here is estimated to be ±2.5% in the burnt gas region.

  7. Laser-material interaction during atom probe tomography of oxides with embedded metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Shinde, D.; Arnoldi, L.; Devaraj, A.; Vella, A.

    2016-10-28

    Oxide-supported metal nano-particles are of great interest in catalysis but also in the development of new large-spectrum-absorption materials. The design of such nano materials requires three-dimensional characterization with a high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. The laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (La-APT) presents both these capacities if an accurate understanding of laser-material interaction is developed. In this paper, we focus on the fundamental physics of field evaporation as a function of sample geometry, laser power, and DC electric field for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO. By understanding the laser-material interaction through experiments and a theoretical model of heat diffusion inside the sample after the interaction with laser pulse, we point out the physical origin of the noise and determine the conditions to reduce it by more than one order of magnitude, improving the sensitivity of the La-APT for metal-dielectric composites. Published by AIP Publishing.

  8. QED Theory of Radiation Emission and Absorption Lines for Atoms and Ions in a Strong Laser Field

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.

    2008-10-22

    The results of numerical calculating the multi-photon resonance shift and width for transition 6S-6F in the atom of Cs (wavelength 1059nm) in a laser pulse of the Gaussian and soliton-like shapes are presented. QED theory of radiation atomic lines is used.

  9. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  10. Probing parity nonconservation effects with laser cooled and trapped francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Mukut; Aubin, Seth; Behr, John; Collister, Robert; Dehart, Austin; Gorelov, Alexandre; Garcia, Eduardo; Gwinner, Gerald; Kossin, Michael; Livermore, David; Orozco, Luis; Pearson, Matt; FrPNC Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of parity nonconservation (PNC) effects in atomic systems test the Standard Model at low energies. We are developing an experiment to probe PNC effect in neutral francium atoms. Francium ions produced at the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF are neutralized using a zirconium foil. The foil is momentarily heated and the released atoms are first trapped in a capture magneto optical trap (MOT). Then, the atoms are transported with about 50% efficiency to another MOT in a science chamber. In this chamber, in one experiment the 7S to 8S atomic transition will be probed using a laser beam, and in another experiment the ground state hyperfine transition will be probed using a microwave beam. In this talk I will report on recent developments towards the measurements. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work is also supported by NSERC from Canada, the DOE and NSF from the USA and CONACYT from Mexico.

  11. Measuring positron-atom binding energies through laser-assisted photo-recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, C. M.; Danielson, J. R.; Continetti, R. E.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2013-05-01

    Trap-based positron beams are important for a range of atomic physics experiments. They have, for example, enabled the measurement of positron binding energies for over 60 molecules to date. However, in spite of numerous, accurate theoretical predictions, there have been no experiments to study positron attachment to atoms, due primarily to the difficulty of forming these attached states in two-body collisions. Described here is the proposal for an experiment to use laser-assisted photo-recombination (LAPR) of positrons and metal atoms in the vapor phase to study positron binding to atoms. This experiment relies on the development of a new hot-cell apparatus to provide a collision chamber for metal vapors. Signal rates are estimated for zinc atoms using 0 . 35 eV photons. Important facets of the design of the experiment are based upon experience studying resonant annihilation spectra of molecules using a trapped based beam. Work supported by NSF grant PHY 10-68023.

  12. Quantum synchronization of many coupled atoms for an ultranarrow linewidth laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peiru; Xu, Minghui; Tieri, David; Zhu, Bihui; Rey, Ana Maria; Hazzard, Kaden; Holland, Murray

    2014-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of quantum synchronization on many coupled two-level atoms acting as high quality oscillators. We show that quantum synchronization - the spontaneous alignment of the phase (of the two-level superposition) between different atoms - provides a potential approach to produce robust atomic coherences and coherent light with ultranarrow linewidth and extreme phase stability. The atoms may be coupled either through their direct dipole-dipole interactions or, as in a superradiant laser, through an optical cavity. We develop a variety of analytic and computational approaches for this problem, including exact open quantum system methods for small systems, semiclassical theories, and approaches that make use of the permutation symmetry of identically coupled ensembles. We investigate the first and second order coherence properties of both the optical and atomic degrees of freedom. We study synchronization in both the steady-state, as well as during the dynamically applied pulse sequences of Rabi and Ramsey interferometry. This work was supported by the DARPA QuASAR program, the NSF, and NIST.

  13. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  14. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode is described. The goal is to produce a {approximately}10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately}10 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM), 1.06 {mu}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately}1 {mu}s FWHM dye laser beam tuned to 5890 {Angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the NaI resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated charge-coupled-device camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately}0.1 {Angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5{endash}2 eV. Laser-induced fluorescence from {approximately}1{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} NaI 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately}{plus_minus}0.06 {Angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  16. Atomic force microscopy visualization of injuries in Enterococcus faecalis surface caused by Er,Cr:YSGG and diode lasers

    PubMed Central

    López-Jiménez, Lidia; Viñas, Miguel; Vinuesa, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To visualize by Atomic Force Microscopy the alterations induced on Enterococcus. faecalis surface after treatment with 2 types of laser: Erbium chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser and Diode laser. Material and Methods: Bacterial suspensions from overnight cultures of E. faecalis were irradiated during 30 seconds with the laser-lights at 1 W and 2 W of power, leaving one untreated sample as control. Surface alterations on treated E. faecalis were visualized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and its surface roughness determined. Results: AFM imaging showed that at high potency of laser both cell morphology and surface roughness resulted altered, and that several cell lysis signs were easily visualized. Surface roughness clearly increase after the treatment with Er,Cr:YSGG at 2W of power, while the other treatments gave similar values of surface roughness. The effect of lasers on bacterial surfaces visualized by AFM revealed drastic alterations. Conclusions: AFM is a good tool to evaluate surface injuries after laser treatment; and could constitute a measure of antimicrobial effect that can complete data obtained by determination of microbial viability. Key words:Atomic force microscopy, Er,Cr:YSGG laser, diode laser, Enterococcus faecalis, surface roughness. PMID:25475770

  17. Inelastic processes in atomic collisions involving ground state and laser-prepared atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planje, Willem Gilles

    1999-11-01

    beschouwde moleculaire toestanden impliceert gecorreleerde overdracht van twee elektronen: He- + Ne + 2e- ! He + + Ne- Door het quasi-resonante systeem als resonant te beschouwen kan het fenomeen kwalitatief goed verklaard worden. 119?Samenvatting Inhet laatstedeelwordt de bevolkingvanauto¨oniserende natriumtoestanden bekeken in He +=0 + Na botsingen. In tegenstelling tot de voorgaande exper- imenten waarin elektronenoverdracht beschouwd werd, betreft het hier een excitatiemechanisme. De beschouwde `eind'producten, i.e. de auto¨oniserende natriumtoestanden, bestaan in het algemeen kort en gaan over naar een stabiele iontoestand onder uitzending van een elektron met een toestands- karakteristieke kinetische energie. Door de elektronenspectra te meten bij verschillende botsingsenergie¨en, wordt de bezetting van de auto¨oniserende toestanden onderzocht. Ook hier wordt het eect van laserexcitatie en laser- polarisatie van het natriumatoom op de vorming van deze toestanden, en de mate waarin, bekeken. De metingen laten zien dat zowel in He + -Na als in He 0 -Na botsingen de invloed van de ruimtelijk uitlijning van het buitenste natriumelektron op de elektronenspectra nihil is. Dit impliceert dat het betrokken 3p elektron hoofdzakelijk een passieve rol speelt in de vorming van auto¨oniserende toe- standen: het blijft hoofdzakelijk de 3p toestand bezetten als een `toeschouwer' zonder een overgang te maken naar een andere toestand. Dit wordt boven- dien bevestigd door het feit dat wanneer een fractie natriumatomen aange- slagen wordt naar de p toestand dit een even grote reductie betekent van onder meer de populatie van de auto¨oniserende toestand Na(2p 5 3s 2 ). De verwachte grote toename van Na(2p 5 3p 2 ) toestanden, in geval van Na(3p) doelwitten, is niet waargenomen. 120?121?122

  18. Persistence of atomic spectral line on laser-induced Cu plasma with spatial confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Anmin; Sui, Laizhi; Li, Suyu; Liu, Dunli; Wang, Xiaowei; Jiang, Yuanfei; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2016-11-01

    This paper carries out the spatial confinement effect on laser-induced Cu breakdown spectroscopy in a cylindrical cavity via a nanosecond pulsed Q-switch Nd:YAG laser operating at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the laser-induced plasma spectroscopy is used to investigate the characteristics of spectral persistence. The atomic spectral persistence in plasma generated from Cu with spatial confinement is experimentally demonstrated, where the results indicate that the diameter of the confinement cavity plays a very important role in the persistence of an excited neutral Cu emission line, while the depth of the confinement cavity is almost independent of Cu (I) line persistence. As the diameter of the confinement cavity increases, the persistence of the Cu (I) line in the plasma grows longer under a certain limit. The likely reason for this phenomenon is that under spatial confinement, the reflected shockwave compresses the plasma and leads to an increase in the plasma temperature and density at a certain delay time, which causes further excitation of atomic population to higher excited levels. Finally, the collision rate between particles in the plasma plume is increased.

  19. A high brightness laser-cooled atomic beam for application in high resolution FIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Steinar; Geer, Bas; Haaf, Gijs; Jansen, Bart; Mutsaers, Peter

    2013-05-01

    A new type of high-brightness ion source is under development which employs transverse laser cooling and compression of a thermal atomic rubidium beam, followed by in-field photo-ionization. When attached to a focusing column, this Focused Ion Beam (FIB) has the advantage of supplying a higher current in a smaller spot compared to conventional LMIS-based FIBs, thus increasing both the resolution and the speed of the FIB. Furthermore, different types of ion species can be used, broadening the range of applications of the FIB. Simulations using a 10 cm long laser cooling and compression stage and a realistic ionization and acceleration structure, predict an achievable brightness for 87Rb+ of order 107 A/m2 sr eV at an energy spread of less than 1 eV and a current of tens of pA. This would lead to a spot size below 5 nm. Simulations and modeling on the ionization process have led to a better understanding of stochastic heating. Experimental realization of the compact ion source has recently started with the development of an efficient high-flux atom source and a 2D laser cooler and compressor. Progress on simulations and experimental results will be reported.

  20. Hook spectroscopy as an atomic number density diagnostic applied to laser-ablated copper plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zerkle, D.K.; Sappey, A.D.; Gamble, T.K.

    1993-11-01

    Hook spectroscopy has been used to determine the absolute number density of ground state copper atoms in laser-ablated plasma plumes. An ablation laser power flux of {approximately} 1.5 GW/cm{sup 2} is applied to a solid copper target in a background gas, producing a plasma plume suitable for studying homogeneous copper vapor condensation. Density is measured at post-ablation time delays ranging from 10 {mu}s to 3 ms with 25 torr of argon as the background gas. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLEF) images containing relative density information are used in conjunction with the hook spectra to resolve spatially the absolute density within the plume. Copper atom densities thus measured ranged from 1.9 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} at a delay of 10 {mu}s to 2.7 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at 3 ms delay in 25 torr of argon The decrease in density is due to the condensation of copper vapor to form fine particulate. As a combustion diagnostic, the hook method may prove extremely useful for the determination of metal impurity density in coal fired flames as well as a single -- shot OH density and temperature diagnostic.

  1. Comparative study on atomic and molecular Rydberg-state excitation in strong infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hang; Zuo, Wanlong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun; Hu, Shilin; Chen, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Rydberg-state excitation of atoms in strong infrared laser fields provides a new complementary aspect of the perspective of atom-strong field interactions. In this article, we perform an experimental and theoretical study on the corresponding process of diatomic molecules, N2 and O2. We show that neutral molecules can also survive strong 800-nm laser fields in high Rydberg states, while their behavior is remarkably different in comparison with their companion atoms, Ar and Xe. The Rydberg excitation of N2 generally behaves similarly to Ar, while that of O2 is more significantly suppressed than the ionization compared to Xe in a high intensity region, which can be understood in the frame of a semiclassical picture, together with their different structures of molecular orbitals. However, distinct quantum features in the Rydberg excitation processes that are apparently beyond the semiclassical picture have been identified, i.e., the less suppressed probability of O2 at low intensity and the oscillation behavior of the ratio between N2 and Ar, indicating that our understanding of the relevant physics is still far from complete.

  2. Qualitative tissue differentiation by analysing the intensity ratios of atomic emission lines using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): prospects for a feedback mechanism for surgical laser systems.

    PubMed

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mahari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper focuses on qualitative tissue differentiation by monitoring the intensity ratios of atomic emissions using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) on the plasma plume created during laser tissue ablation. The background of this study is to establish a real time feedback control mechanism for clinical laser surgery systems during the laser ablation process. Ex-vivo domestic pig tissue samples (muscle, fat, nerve and skin) were used in this experiment. Atomic emission intensity ratios were analyzed to find a characteristic spectral line for each tissue. The results showed characteristic elemental emission intensity ratios for the respective tissues. The spectral lines and intensity ratios of these specific elements varied among the different tissue types. The main goal of this study is to qualitatively and precisely identify different tissue types for tissue specific laser surgery.

  3. Ionisation Mechanisms in AN Optically Pumped Mercury Vapour.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. A plasma formed in a mercury vapour by optical pumping at visible and U.V. wavelengths from a high current mercury discharge, has been investigated with a view to gaining an understanding of the ionisation processes giving rise to the plasma. These were believed to generate both atomic and molecular ions. The results of this work have applications in the fields of fluorescent lighting and the mercury-nitrogen laser. The plasma was studied with a variety of diagnostic tools. Electron number densities and temperatures were determined using Langmuir probes operating in the orbital motion limited regime. Populations of the 6^3 P triplet states, believed to be the only significantly populated excited states in the plasma, were determined using absorption spectroscopy. Lastly, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, coupled to the plasma with an electrostatic ion transport system, was used to investigate the flux of atomic and molecular ions to a body at floating potential in the plasma. The Langmuir probe and absorption spectroscopy results were included into a model describing ion motions in the plasma, based around the ion fluid equations and including source terms for the generation of atomic and molecular ions, both by electron impact and by binary collisions of atoms in the 6^3P triplet states. Where possible, ionisation rats in the model were calculated using published cross-sections. However, for the heavy body collisional processes in particular, many of these are unknown. Consequently, an attempt was made to determine these cross-sections by generating results from the model that could be compared to experimental measurements of the atomic and molecular ion fluxes to the mass spectrometer. A number of computational experiments were carried out, varying the cross-sections until a good fit to the experimental measurements was achieved. Using this technique it was possible to estimate cross

  4. Liquid/Vapour visualization of common rail diesel sprays in different ambient conditions with visible and UV laser light scattering and PLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allocca, L.; De Vita, A.; Merola, S. S.; Vaglieco, B. M.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper UV-visible elastic light scattering and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) have been applied for measuring the vaporization process of a diesel fuel in an optically accessible vessel at engine ambient conditions. The spray has been generated by an electronically controlled Common Rail injection system and emerged from an axial single-hole electroinjector, 0.18 mm in diameter (L/d = 5.55). The injected fluid has been a commercial Diesel fuel and a single strategy (1.0 ms in duration) has been implemented at the injection pressure of 60.0 MPa. The measurements have been carried out in a quiescent bomb filled with SF6 gas at pressures of 0.39 MPa and temperature ranging between 293 to 533 K. The ambient gas densities has varied from 12.64 kg/m3 to 23.0 kg/m3, equivalent to the diesel engine conditions between the Start of Injection (SOI) and the Start of Combustion (SOC). A Nd-YAG pulsed laser sheet has been used for excitation of the spray along its axis at two wavelengths: 532 and 355 nm; the sheet thickness and light pulse duration have been 0.10 mm and 12 ns, respectively. The scattered light has been collected and synchronized at different instant from the SOI. The comparison of the images of the fuel at different instant from the SOI has permitted the analysis of the spray characteristics in terms of tip penetration, cone angle and spray fragmentation. Elastic visible and UV scattering radiation have allowed investigations on the size of the droplets along a plane centered on the spray axis. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements on the same plane have been carried out exciting the droplets at 355 nm and collecting the light through an interference filter centered at 430 nm. PLIF has allowed a correlation between the liquid and the vapor structures of the jets in all the examined ambient conditions.

  5. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic particles. January 1970-September 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for Jan 70-Sep 89

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning theory and experiments on laser cooling and laser trapping of neutral atoms and atomic ions. Atoms and ions are cooled by laser radiation pressure to very low Kelvin temperatures and confined in electromagnetic traps with very high density. Atomic particles discussed include sodium atoms, mercury ions, beryllium ions, magnesium ions, and hydrogen. Applications include high performance spectroscopy, atomic clocks, microwave and optical frequency standards, relativistic neutral particle beam weapons, exotic fuels, cooling of electron beams, and space propulsion. (Contains 97 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  6. Laser-enhanced ionization of mercury atoms in an inert atmosphere with avalanche amplification of the signal.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, W L; Matveev, O I; Cabredo, S; Omenetto, N; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1997-07-01

    A new method for laser-enhanced ionization detection of mercury atoms in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method, which is based on the avalanche amplification of the signal resulting from the ionization from a selected Rydberg level reached by a three-step laser excitation of mercury vapor in a simple quartz cell, can be applied to the determination of this element in various matrices by the use of conventional cold atomization techniques. The overall (collisional + photo) ionization efficiency is investigated at different temperatures, and the avalanche amplification effect is reported for Ar and P-10 gases at atmospheric pressure. It is shown that the amplified signal is related to the number of charges produced in the laser-irradiated volume. Under amplifier noise-limited conditions, a detection limit of ∼15 Hg atoms/laser pulse in the interaction region is estimated.

  7. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.

    2004-06-01

    Within the framework of the coplanar binary geometry where it is justified to use plane wave solutions for the study of the (e,2e) reaction and in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field, we introduce as a first step the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 1 where we take into account only the relativistic dressing of the incident and scattered electrons. Then, we introduce the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 2 where we take totally into account the relativistic dressing of the incident, scattered, and ejected electrons. We then compare the corresponding triple differential cross sections for laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact both for the nonrelativistic and the relativistic regime.

  8. Atom Specific Ultrafast Surface Chemistry using a Soft X-ray Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2014-03-01

    Catalysis is central for many chemical energy transformations that occur at interfaces. One of the dreams is to follow catalytic reactions in real time from reactants over various intermediates to products. The prospective for the study of chemical reactions on surfaces using X-ray free-electron lasers (Linac Coherent Light Source, or LCLS, at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) will be presented. We induced the hot electron and phonon mediated excitation of adsorbates on Ru(0001) with synchronized excitation by a femtosecond optical laser pulse. We have followed the ultrafast evolution of the bond distortions, weakening and breaking, using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x ray emission spectroscopy resonantly tuned to the oxygen core level with ultrashort x-ray pulses delivered from LCLS. We can directly follow the time evolution of the molecular orbitals in an atom-specific way on a subpicosecond timescale. Three examples will be shown CO desorption, Oxygen activation and CO oxidation on Ru(0001).

  9. Application of Coulomb Wave Function DVR to Atomic Systems in Strong Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang-You; Starace, Anthony F.

    2006-05-01

    We present an efficient and accurate grid method for solving the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (TDSE) for atomic systems interacting with short laser pulses. The radial part of the wave function is expanded in a DVR (Discrete Variable Representation) basis constructed from the positive energy Coulomb wave function. The time propagation of the wave function is implemented using the well-known Arnoldi method. Compared with the usual finite difference (FD) discretization scheme for the radial coordinate, this method requires fewer grid points and handles naturally the Coulomb singularity at the origin. As examples, the method is shown to give accurate ionization rates for both H and H^- over a wide range of laser parameters.

  10. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Valderrama, B.; Henderson, H.B.; Gan, J.; Manuel, M.V.

    2015-04-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially, with high accuracy. However, it is known that compositional accuracy can be affected by experimental conditions. A study of the effect of laser energy, specimen base temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide (UO2). In laser-assisted mode, tip geometry and standing voltage also contribute to the evaporation behavior. In this investigation, it was determined that modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect the evaporation behavior as significantly as laser energy. It was also determined that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO2. Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser-assisted field evaporation characteristic and high laser energy induces thermal effects, negatively altering the evaporation behavior. The need for UO2 to be analyzed under moderate laser energies to produce accurate stoichiometry distinguishes it from other oxides. The following experimental conditions providing the best combination of mass resolving power, accurate stoichiometry, and uniform evaporation behavior: 50 K, 10 pJ laser energy, a detection rate of 0.003 atoms per pulse, and a 100 kHz repetition rate.

  11. Comparison of Gaussian and super Gaussian laser beams for addressing atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Gillen, Glen D.; Piotrowicz, M. J.; Saffman, M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the fidelity of single-qubit quantum gates performed with two-frequency laser fields that have a Gaussian or super Gaussian spatial mode. Numerical simulations are used to account for imperfections arising from atomic motion in an optical trap, spatially varying Stark shifts of the trapping and control beams, and transverse and axial misalignment of the control beams. Numerical results that account for the three-dimensional distribution of control light show that a super Gaussian mode with intensity I˜ e^{-2(r/w_0)^n} provides reduced sensitivity to atomic motion and beam misalignment. Choosing a super Gaussian with n=6 the decay time of finite temperature Rabi oscillations can be increased by a factor of 60 compared to an n=2 Gaussian beam, while reducing crosstalk to neighboring qubit sites.

  12. Atomic ionization by intense laser pulses of short duration: Photoelectron energy and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Dondera, M.

    2010-11-15

    We introduce an adequate integral representation of the wave function in the asymptotic region, valid for the stage postinteraction between a one-electron atom and a laser pulse of short duration, as a superposition of divergent radial spherical waves. Starting with this representation, we derive analytic expressions for the energy and angular distributions of the photoelectrons and we show their connection with expressions used before in the literature. Using our results, we propose a method to extract the photoelectron distributions from the time dependence of the wave function at large distances. Numerical results illustrating the method are presented for the photoionization of hydrogenlike atoms from the ground state and several excited states by extreme ultraviolet pulses with a central wavelength of 13.3 nm and several intensities around the value I{sub 0}{approx_equal}3.51x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Sensors Based on Nanograin ZnO Films Prepared by Pulse Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunfei; Chen Xuekang; Li Zhonghua; Zheng Kuohai; Wang Lanxi; Feng Zhanzu; Yang Shengsheng

    2009-01-05

    High-quality nanograin ZnO thin films were deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates by pulse laser deposition (PLD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the samples. The structural and morphological properties of ZnO films under different deposition temperature have been investigated before and after atomic oxygen (AO) treatment. XRD has shown that the intensity of the (0 0 2) peak increases and its FWHM value decreases after AO treatment. The AO sensing characteristics of nano ZnO film also has been investigated in a ground-based atomic oxygen simulation facility. The results show that the electrical conductivity of nanograin ZnO films decreases with increasing AO fluence and that the conductivity of the films can be recovered by heating.

  15. Discharge formation systems for generating atomic iodine in a pulse-periodic oxygen–iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aksinin, V I; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N; Antsiferov, S A; Velikanov, S D; Gerasimov, A Yu; Gostev, I V; Kalinovskii, V V; Konovalov, V V; Mikhalkin, V N; Sevryugin, I V

    2014-01-31

    Generation characteristics of a pulse-periodic oxygen–iodine laser with the electro-discharge production of atomic iodine were compared with inductively stabilised edged or anisotropic- resistive cathodes used for ignition of the volume discharge. The discharge was initiated by the radiation of a barrier discharge from the side of a grid anode. It was found that at equal specific electrical energy depositions to the gas-discharge plasma, the system with the anisotropic-resistive cathode provides a more stable and uniform volume discharge with the possibility of varying the composition and pressure of working mixtures over a wide range and a greater specific extraction of laser energy is observed (up to 2.4 J L{sup -1}). At a high pulse repetition rate of laser pulses (50 – 100 Hz) and long duration of the pulse trains (longer than a minute) the surface of anisotropic-resistive cathode became eroded. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Inner-shell ionization of potassium atoms ionized by a femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hertlein, M. P.; Adaniya, H.; Amini, J.; Feinberg, B.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.; Bressler, C.; Kaiser, M.; Neumann, N.

    2006-06-15

    With a femtosecond laser pulse we rapidly ionize potassium atoms (K{sup 0}) in the gas phase, generating potassium ions (K{sup +}), and monitor the altered energy-level scheme with a subsequent hard x-ray pulse. Removal of the potassium 4s valence electron increases the binding energies of both the valence and the 1s core levels, and induces an ultrafast change of the 1s-4p x-ray transition energy by about 2.8 eV. We simultaneously observe a 50% increase in oscillator strength of K{sup +} over K{sup 0} for that transition.

  17. Inner-shell ionization of potassium atoms ionized by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, M. P.; Adaniya, H.; Amini, J.; Bressler, C.; Feinberg, B.; Kaiser, M.; Neumann, N.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.

    2006-06-01

    With a femtosecond laser pulse we rapidly ionize potassium atoms (K0) in the gas phase, generating potassium ions (K+) , and monitor the altered energy-level scheme with a subsequent hard x-ray pulse. Removal of the potassium 4s valence electron increases the binding energies of both the valence and the 1s core levels, and induces an ultrafast change of the 1s-4p x-ray transition energy by about 2.8eV . We simultaneously observe a 50% increase in oscillator strength of K+ over K0 for that transition.

  18. Refraction and absorption of x rays by laser-dressed atoms.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Young, L.

    2010-06-01

    X-ray refraction and absorption by neon atoms under the influence of an 800 nm laser with an intensity of 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} is investigated. For this purpose, we use an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. Its results are interpreted in terms of a three-level model. On the Ne 1s {yields} 3p resonance, we find electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for x rays. Our work opens novel perspectives for ultrafast x-ray pulse shaping.

  19. Phase-space analysis for ionization processes in the laser-atom interaction using Gabor transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, X. F.; Liu, S. B.; Song, H. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the ionization processes during laser-atom interaction are investigated in phase-space using Gabor transformation. Based on the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), the depletion of the whole system caused by the mask function is taken into consideration in calculating the plasma density. We obtain the momentum distribution via the Gabor transformation of the escaping portions of the time-dependent wave packet at the detector-like points on the interior boundaries from which the kinetic energies carried by the escaping portions are calculated.

  20. Isotope effects in the harmonic response from hydrogenlike muonic atoms in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shahbaz, Atif; Mueller, Carsten; Buervenich, Thomas J.

    2010-07-15

    High-order harmonic generation from hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to ultraintense high-frequency laser fields is studied. Systems of low nuclear-charge number Z are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes, we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass and size in the harmonic spectra. In particular, for Z>1, an effective muon charge appears in the Schroedinger equation for the relative particle motion, which influences the position of the harmonic cutoff. Cutoff energies in the million-electron-volt domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses.

  1. The RMT method for describing many-electron atoms in intense short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysaght, M. A.; Moore, L. R.; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Parker, J. S.; van der Hart, H. W.; Taylor, K. T.

    2012-11-01

    We describe how we have developed an ab initio R-Matrix incorporating Time (RMT) method to provide an accurate description of the single ionization of a general many-electron atom exposed to short intense laser pulses. The new method implements the "division-of-space" concept central to R-matrix theory and takes over the sophisticated time-propagation algorithms of the HELIUM code. We have tested the accuracy of the new method by calculating multiphoton ionization rates of He and Ne and have found excellent agreement with other highly accurate and well-established methods.

  2. Opacity and atomic analysis of double pulse laser ablated Li plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-09-01

    Opacity effects for neutral and ionic emission lines of lithium have been investigated by Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS). Line ratios and opacity corrected photon emissivity coefficients are calculated over a wide range of electron temperatures and densities. The experimentally measured temporal evolution of the line profiles of the over dense Li plasma formed in the double pulse laser ablation experiment have been explained using the ADAS analysis and the plasma parameters of the plasma plume under consideration have been estimated. These results could be projected as a diagnostic tool to estimate plasma parameters of an over dense lithium plasma.

  3. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 1019 watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper Kα lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser.

  4. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-27

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 10(19) watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper Kα lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser.

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  6. Progress towards an electron electric dipole moment measurement with laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmeyer, Neal

    This dissertation recounts the progress made towards a measurement of the electron electric dipole moment. The existence of a permanent electric dipole moment of any fundamental particle would imply that both time reversal and parity invariance are violated. If an electric dipole moment were measured within current experimental limits it would be the first direct evidence for physics beyond the standard model. For our measurement we use laser-cooled alkali atoms trapped in a pair of 1D optical lattices. The lattices run through three electric field plates so that the two groups of atoms see opposing electric fields. The measurement chamber is surrounded by a four layer mu-metal magnetic shield. Under electric field quantization, the atoms are prepared in a superposition of magnetic sublevels that is sensitive to the electron electric dipole moment in Ramsey-like spectroscopy. The experiment requires very large electric fields and very small magnetic fields. Engineering a system compatible with both of these goals simultaneously is not trivial. Searches for electric dipole moments using neutral atoms in optical lattices have much longer possible interaction times and potentially give more precise information about the inherent symmetry breaking than other methods. This comes at the cost of a higher sensitivity to magnetic fields and possible sources of error associated with the trapping light. If noise and systematic errors can be controlled to our design specifications our experiment will significantly improve the current experimental limit of the electron electric dipole moment.

  7. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  8. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOEpatents

    Cross, Jon B.; Cremers, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  9. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOEpatents

    Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

    1986-01-10

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  10. Proposed method for laser spectroscopy of pionic helium atoms to determine the charged-pion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaki; Sótér, Anna; Korobov, Vladimir I.

    2014-04-01

    Metastable pionic helium (πHe+) is a three-body atom composed of a helium nucleus, an electron occupying the 1s ground state, and a negatively charged pion π- in a Rydberg state with principal and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers of n ˜ℓ+1˜16. We calculate the spin-independent energies of the π3He+ and π4He+ isotopes in the region n =15-19. These include relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections of orders R∞α2 and R∞α3 in atomic units, where R∞ and α denote the Rydberg and fine structure constants. The fine-structure splitting due to the coupling between the electron spin and the orbital angular momentum of the π- and the radiative and Auger decay rates of the states are also calculated. Some states (n,ℓ)=(16,15) and (17,16) retain nanosecond-scale lifetimes against π- absorption into the helium nucleus. We propose the use of laser pulses to induce π- transitions from these metastable states to states with large (˜1011 s-1) Auger rates. The πHe2+ ion that remains after Auger emission of the 1s electron undergoes Stark mixing with the s, p, and d states during collisions with the helium atoms in the experimental target. This leads to immediate nuclear absorption of the π -. The resonance condition between the laser beam and the atom is thus revealed as a sharp spike in the rates of neutrons, protons, deuterons, and tritons that emerge. A resonance curve is obtained from which the πHe+ transition frequency can in principle be determined with a fractional precision of 10-8-10-6 provided the systematic uncertainties can be controlled. By comparing the measured πHe+ frequencies with the calculated values, the π- mass may be determined with a similar precision. The πHe+ will be synthesized by allowing a high-intensity (>108 s-1) beam of π-produced by a cyclotron to come to rest in a helium target. The precise time structure of the π- beam is used to ensure a sufficient rate of coincidence between the resonant laser pulses

  11. Effects of Laser Energy and Wavelength on the Analysis of LiFePO4 Using Laser Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Rich; Janssen, Yuri; Kalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying S.

    2015-01-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative accuracy of atom probe tomography (APT) examinations of LiFePO4 (LFP) are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted APT of LFP has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of UV laser the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at. %) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ increased the observed oxygen concentration to near its correct stoichiometry and was well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of 16O2+ ions. This observation supports the premise that lower laser energies lead to a higher probability of oxygen molecule ionization. Conversely, at higher laser energies the resultant lower effective electric field reduces the probability of oxygen molecule ionization. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (~50% deficiency) and correct ratios of the remaining elements, including the oxygen concentration. The loss of Li is explained by selective dc evaporation of lithium between laser pulses and relatively negligible oxygen loss as neutrals during green-laser pulsing. Lastly, plotting of multihit events on a Saxey plot for the straight-flight path data (green laser only) revealed a surprising dynamic recombination process for some molecular ions mid-flight.

  12. Development of laser-plasma diagnostics using ultrafast atomic-scale dynamics. 96-ERD-046 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.; Kulander, K.C.; Boreham, B.W.

    1997-03-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse systems allow examination of intense, ultrafast laser-plasma interactions. More specifically, intense laser irradiation can induce short xuv/x-ray bursts from the surface of condensed phase targets. Ultrafast xuv/x-ray detection is needed to understand laser-plasma interactions in this dynamic regime. Support of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program requires this critical understanding. Our effort here has been to extend understanding of atomic-scale dynamics in such environments with the goal of developing next generation ultrafast xuv/x-ray diagnostics where the sensors will be the atoms and ions themselves and the time resolution will approach that of the induced atomic transitions ({approx} a few femtoseconds). Pivotal contributions to the rapidly developing field of highly nonperturbative interactions of ultrashort pulse lasers with atoms/ions have been made at this laboratory. In the visible/infrared wavelength regions the temporal and spectral content of ultrashort laser pulses are now reliably monitored within a single pulse using frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) which is based on rapid nonlinear optical processes such as the Kerr effect. New applications of this basic concept are still being developed. Corresponding detection for the xuv/x-ray wavelengths does not exist and is urgently needed in many laboratory programs. The FROG technique cannot be applied in the xuv/x-ray region. Current x-ray streak camera technology is limited to {approx}0.5 picosecond resolution.

  13. Pressure broadening of atomic oxygen two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Drag, Cyril; Blondel, Christophe; Guaitella, Olivier; Golda, Judith; Klarenaar, Bart; Engeln, Richard; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-12-01

    Atomic oxygen, considered to be a determining reactant in plasma applications at ambient pressure, is routinely detected by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Here, pressure broadening of the (2p 4 3 P 2  →  3p 3 P J=0,1,2) two-photon transition in oxygen atoms was investigated using a high-resolution TALIF technique in normal and Doppler-free configurations. The pressure broadening coefficients determined were {γ{{\\text{O}2}}}   =  0.40  ±  0.08  cm-1/bar for oxygen molecules and {γ\\text{He}}   =  0.46  ±  0.03 cm-1/bar for helium atoms. These correspond to pressure broadening rate constants k\\text{PB}{{\\text{O}2}}   =  9 · 10-9 cm3 s-1 and k\\text{PB}\\text{He}   =  4 · 10-9 cm3 s-1, respectively. The well-known quenching rate constants of O(3p 3 P J ) by O2 and He are at least one order of magnitude smaller, which signifies that non-quenching collisions constitute the main line-broadening mechanism. In addition to providing new insights into collisional processes of oxygen atoms in electronically excited 3p 3 P J state, reported pressure broadening parameters are important for quantification of oxygen TALIF line profiles when both collisional and Doppler broadening mechanisms are important. Thus, the Doppler component (and hence the temperature of oxygen atoms) can be accurately determined from high resolution TALIF measurements in a broad range of conditions.

  14. Pulsed filling of a dark magnetooptical trap for rubidium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Chapovskii, Pavel L

    2006-03-31

    The parameters of a dark magnetooptical trap for rubidium atoms are measured. The rubidium atoms captured and cooled in the trap occupy a hyperfine level of the ground electronic state, which does not interact with cooling laser radiation. The pulsed filling of the trap is produced due to desorption of rubidium caused by irradiation by a short (1 ms) light pulse. The trap captures and cools 2.5x10{sup 8} rubidium atoms approximately for 0.2 s. The absorption spectra of a weak probe field by cold atoms are obtained, which demonstrate a good spectral resolution of the hyperfine structure in the excited state. This structure is completely hidden by the Doppler broadening in rubidium vapours at room temperature. (laser cooling)

  15. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Tunable frequency-stabilised laser for studying the cooling dynamics of Rb atoms in a magnetooptical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarovitsky, Alexander V.; Prudnikov, O. N.; Vasil'ev, V. V.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Razin, Oleg A.; Sherstov, Ivan V.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valerii I.

    2004-04-01

    A system is developed which allows one to stabilise the diode laser frequency at any point in the vicinity of the cyclic D2-line transition in Rb in the interval from +40 to -150 MHz and to switch the laser frequency within this interval for ~1 ms. A method is proposed and realised for increasing the contrast of the reference sub-Doppler resonance observed in circularly polarised fields. The ultimate contrast of the resonance is estimated. This system can be used to study the anomalous light pressure force acting on atoms in an optical molasses. A magnetooptical trap for Rb atoms is described.

  16. Manipulating Neutral Atoms and Molecules by Strong Non-Resonant Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, Mark

    Manipulating neutral particles by laser light has been of great interest during the last decade. The main effort is placed on atom cooling together with atomic beam deceleration, deflection, focusing, mirroring, and related aspects of atom optics. In the present thesis we provide indepth analytical and numerical analysis of the optical shaker approach to non-resonant laser cooling, and propose new methods for deceleration and cooling atoms/molecules in a feedback-controlled bistable cavity. Moreover, application of the latter technique to cooling of a micromechanical object is also proposed and analyzed. In the Introduction we review the current state-of-the-art cooling techniques and provide a brief history of their development. Chapter I presents in-depth analysis of the optical shaker operation; we study the issue of the detection of the dipole force in the far zone, which is the main building block of the optical shaker technique. The effects of the finite response time of the detectors and of the phase modulator are modeled numerically. The thresholds for cooling are estimated analytically and verified numerically. Minimal requirements for the stability of the laser sources are formulated. Perturbation theory analysis of the heating rate of an ensemble of particles embedded in a non-stationary sinusoidal (non-harmonic) potential is provided. In addition, a preliminary study of the adaptive cooling strategy is outlined. Chapter II presents a new method for deceleration of a single particle and cooling of an ensemble of particles in a bistable optical cavity. Optical bistability is achieved by non-linear feedback control of the field incident on the cavity. The technique realizes cavity-induced Sisyphustype cooling mechanism. This approach is rather generic because of its off-resonance nature. The bistable cavity introduces a "dry friction" stopping force, and requires a relatively "bad cavity" for its implementation. We provide an analytical estimate for the

  17. High performance vapour-cell frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Bandi, T.; Gruet, F.; Pellaton, M.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report our investigations on a compact high-performance rubidium (Rb) vapour-cell clock based on microwave-optical double-resonance (DR). These studies are done in both DR continuous-wave (CW) and Ramsey schemes using the same Physics Package (PP), with the same Rb vapour cell and a magnetron-type cavity with only 45 cm3 external volume. In the CW-DR scheme, we demonstrate a DR signal with a contrast of 26% and a linewidth of 334 Hz; in Ramsey-DR mode Ramsey signals with higher contrast up to 35% and a linewidth of 160 Hz have been demonstrated. Short-term stabilities of 1.4×10-13 τ-1/2 and 2.4×10-13 τ-1/2 are measured for CW-DR and Ramsey-DR schemes, respectively. In the Ramsey-DR operation, thanks to the separation of light and microwave interactions in time, the light-shift effect has been suppressed which allows improving the long-term clock stability as compared to CW-DR operation. Implementations in miniature atomic clocks are considered.

  18. Strong-field atomic ionization in an elliptically polarized laser field and a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylyuk, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the quasistationary quasienergy state (QQES) formalism, the tunneling and multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions subjected to a perturbation by a high intense laser radiation field of an arbitrary polarization and a constant magnetic field are considered. On the basis of the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Green's function for the electron moving in an arbitrary laser field and crossed constant electric and magnetic fields, the integral equation for the complex quasienergy and the energy spectrum of the ejected electron are derived. Using the "imaginary-time" method, the extremal subbarrier trajectory of the photoelectron moving in a nonstationary laser field and a constant magnetic field are considered. Within the framework of the QQES formalism and the quasiclassical perturbation theory, ionization rates when the Coulomb interaction of the photoelectron with the parent ion is taken into account at arbitrary values of the Keldysh parameter are derived. The high accuracy of rates is confirmed by comparison with the results of numerical calculations. Simple analytical expressions for the ionization rate with the Coulomb correction in the tunneling and multiphoton regimes in the case of an elliptically polarized laser beam propagating at an arbitrary angle to the constant magnetic field are derived and discussed. The limits of small and large magnetic fields and low and high frequency of a laser field are considered in details. It is shown that in the presence of a nonstationary laser field perturbation, the constant magnetic field may either decrease or increase the ionization rate. The analytical consideration and numerical calculations also showed that the difference between the ionization rates for an s electron in the case of right- and left-elliptically polarized laser fields is especially significant in the multiphoton regime for not-too-high magnetic fields and decreases as the magnetic field increases. The paper

  19. Multiphoton and tunneling ionization probability of atoms and molecules in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Liu, Lu; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-02-01

    We theoretically studied ionization of atoms exposed to an intense laser field by using three different methods, i.e., the numerical solution of the single-active-electron approximation based time-dependent Schrödinger equation (SAE-TDSE), the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (PPT) model, and the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) model. The ionization of several linear molecules in a strong laser field is also investigated with the molecular ADK (MO-ADK) and the molecular PPT (MO-PPT) model. We show that the ionization probability from the PPT and the MO-PPT model agrees well with the corresponding SAE-TDSE result in both the multiphoton and tunneling ionization regimes. By considering the volume effect of the laser field, the ionization signal obtained from the PPT and the MO-PPT model fits well the experimental data in the whole range of the multiphoton and tunneling ionization regimes. However, both the ADK and MO-ADK models seriously underestimate the ionization probabilities (or signals) in the multiphoton regime.

  20. Intra- and intercycle interference of electron emissions in laser-assisted XUV atomic ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, A. A.; Della Picca, R.; Garibotti, C. R.; Arbó, D. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the ionization of atomic hydrogen in the direction of polarization due to a linearly polarized XUV pulse in the presence of a strong IR laser. We describe the photoelectron spectra as an interference problem in the time domain. Electron trajectories stemming from different optical laser cycles give rise to intercycle interference energy peaks known as sidebands. These sidebands are modulated by a coarse-grained structure coming from the intracycle interference of the two electron trajectories born during the same optical cycle. We make use of a simple semiclassical model that offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the photoelectron kinetic energy. We analyze such interference pattern as a function of the time delay between the IR and the XUV pulses and also as a function of the laser intensity. We compare the semiclassical predictions with the continuum-distorted-wave strong-field approximation and the ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  1. A calibrated atomic force microscope using an orthogonal scanner and a calibrated laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Min; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Park, Jinwon

    2007-02-01

    A compact and two-dimensional atomic force microscope (AFM) using an orthogonal sample scanner, a calibrated homodyne laser interferometer and a commercial AFM head was developed for use in the nano-metrology field. The x and y position of the sample with respect to the tip are acquired by using the laser interferometer in the open-loop state, when each z data point of the AFM head is taken. The sample scanner, which has a motion amplifying mechanism was designed to move a sample up to 100 μm × 100 μm in orthogonal way, which means less crosstalk between axes. Moreover, the rotational errors between axes are measured to ensure the accuracy of the calibrated AFM within the full scanning range. The conventional homodyne laser interferometer was used to measure the x and y displacements of the sample and compensated via an X-ray interferometer to reduce the nonlinearity of the optical interferometer. The repeatability of the calibrated AFM was measured to sub-nanometers within a few hundred nanometers scanning range.

  2. Study of laser uncaging induced morphological alteration of rat cortical neurites using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Tu, Chunlong; Liang, Yitao; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-09-30

    Activity-dependent structural remodeling is an important aspect of neuronal plasticity. In the previous researches, neuronal structure variations resulting from external interventions were detected by the imaging instruments such as the fluorescence microscopy, the scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and the laser confocal microscopy. In this article, a new platform which combined the photochemical stimulation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) was set up to detect the activity-dependent structural remodeling. In the experiments, the cortical neurites on the glass coverslips were stimulated by locally uncaged glutamate under the ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses, and a calcium-related structural collapse of neurites (about 250 nm height decrease) was observed by an AFM. This was the first attempt to combine the laser uncaging with AFM in living cell researches. With the advantages of highly localized stimulation (<5 μm), super resolution imaging (<3.8 nm), and convenient platform building, this system was suitable for the quantitative observation of the neuron mechanical property variations and morphological alterations modified by neural activities under different photochemical stimulations, which would be helpful for studying physiological and pathological mechanisms of structural and functional changes induced by the biomolecule acting.

  3. A new approach to driving and controlling precision lasers for cold-atom science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luey, Ben; Shugrue, Jeremy; Anderson, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Vescent's Integrated Control Electronics (ICE) Platform is a new approach to controlling and driving lasers and other electoral devices in complex atomic and optical experiments. By employing low-noise, high-bandwidth analog electronics with digital control, ICE combines the performance of analog design with the convenience of the digital world. Utilizing a simple USB COM port interface, ICE can easily be controlled via LabView, Python, or an FPGA. High-speed TTL inputs enable precise external timing or triggering. ICE is capable of generating complex timing internally, enabling ICE to drive an entire experiment or it can be directed by an external control program. The system is capable of controlling up to 8 unique ICE slave boards providing flexibility to tailor an assortment of electronics hardware to the needs of a specific experiment. Examples of ICE slave boards are: a current controller and peak-lock laser servo, a four channel temperature controller, a current controller and offset phase lock servo. A single ensemble can drive, stabilize, and frequency lock 3 lasers in addition to powering an optical amplifier, while still leaving 2 remaining slots for further control needs. Staff Scientist

  4. Towards an Atomic Parity Violation Measurement with Laser Trapped Francium at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, R.; Tandecki, M.; Gwinner, G.; Zhang, J.; Orozco, L.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Gomez-Garcia, E.; Aubin, S.

    2012-10-01

    The neutral atom trap for parity violation measurements at TRIUMF has recently accepted its first radioactive beam. The longest lived francium isotopes have half-lives of minutes, requiring us to produce them with the online mass separator of the ISAC facility. The ion beam is embedded into a catcher made of yttrium foil where it is neutralized. Subsequently, the foil is rotated and heated to release a pulse of atomic francium into the laser trap cell. Francium isotopes 207, 209 and 221 have successfully been cooled and confined in a magneto-optical trap, a crucial first step for later experiments. The next online measurements are planned for November 2012 where two physics goals will be pursued. Firstly, the hyperfine anomaly will be probed via high precision spectroscopy on the atomic D1 transition in order to investigate the nuclear magnetization distribution. This will be followed by ionization cross-section measurements from the 7p3/2 state to evaluate this as a potential problematic trap loss mechanism for future parity violation measurements.

  5. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  6. High-coherence electron and ion bunches from laser-cooled atoms.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Ben M; Thompson, Daniel J; McCulloch, Andrew J; Murphy, Dene; Speirs, Rory W; Torrance, Joshua S J; Scholten, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Cold atom electron and ion sources produce electron bunches and ion beams by photoionization of laser-cooled atoms. They offer high coherence and the potential for high brightness, with applications including ultra-fast electron-diffractive imaging of dynamic processes at the nanoscale. The effective brightness of electron sources has been limited by nonlinear divergence caused by repulsive interactions between the electrons, known as the Coulomb explosion. It has been shown that electron bunches with ellipsoidal shape and uniform density distribution have linear internal Coulomb fields, such that the Coulomb explosion can be reversed using conventional optics. Our source can create bunches shaped in three dimensions and hence in principle achieve the transverse spatial coherence and brightness needed for picosecond-diffractive imaging with nanometer resolution. Here we present results showing how the shaping capability can be used to measure the spatial coherence properties of the cold electron source. We also investigate space-charge effects with ions and generate electron bunches with durations of a few hundred picoseconds. Future development of the cold atom electron and ion source will increase the bunch charge and charge density, demonstrate reversal of Coulomb explosion, and ultimately, ultra-fast coherent electron-diffractive imaging.

  7. Correlated input-port, matter-wave interferometer: Quantum-noise limits to the atom-laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1998-06-01

    I derive the quantum phase-noise limit to the sensitivity of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in which the incident quantum particles enter via both input ports. I show that if the incident particles are entangled and correlated properly, then the phase sensitivity scales asymptotically like the Heisenberg-limited Δφ=O(1/N), for large N, where N is the number of particles incident per unit time. (In a one-input-port device, the sensitivity can be at best Δφ=1/N.) My calculation applies to bosons or fermions of arbitrary integer or half-integer spin. Applications to optical, atom-beam, and atom-laser gyroscopes are discussed-in particular, an atom-laser can be used to obtain the required entanglements for achieving this Heisenberg-limited sensitivity with atomic matter waves.

  8. Single-mode vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers for {sup 87}Rb-based chip-scale atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Derebezov, I. A. Haisler, V. A.; Bakarov, A. K.; Kalagin, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.; Kachanova, M. M.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Semenova, O. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2010-11-15

    The results of numerical simulation and study of lasing characteristics of semiconductor verticalcavity surface-emitting lasers based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As alloys are presented. Lasers exhibit stable single-mode lasing at a wavelength of 795 nm at low operating currents {approx}1.5 mA and an output power of 350 {mu}W, which offers prospects of their applications in next-generation chip-scale atomic clocks

  9. Vapour Intrusion into Buildings - A Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a review of recent research on vapour intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The chapter builds on a report from Tillman and Weaver (2005) which reviewed the literature on vapour intrusion through 2005. Firstly, the term ‘vapour intru...

  10. Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action

    ScienceCinema

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-07-12

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Just two years after turning on in 2009, breakthrough science is emerging from the LCLS at a rapid pace. A recent experiment used the X-rays to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time-a significant leap toward understanding the extreme conditions found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and a finding which could further guide research into nuclear fusion, the mechanism that powers the sun. Upcoming experiments will investigate the fundamental, atomic-scale processes behind such phenomena as superconductivity and magnetism, as well as peering into the molecular workings of photosynthesis in plants.

  11. Orientational dependence of optically detected magnetic resonance signals in laser-driven atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Simone; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Scholtes, Theo; Grujić, Zoran D.; Lebedev, Victor; Weis, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of lock-in-demodulated M_x-magnetometer signals on the orientation of the static magnetic field B0 of interest. Magnetic resonance spectra for 2400 discrete orientations of B0 covering a 4π solid angle have been recorded by a PC-controlled steering and data acquisition system. Off-line fits by previously derived lineshape functions allow us to extract the relevant resonance parameters (shape, amplitude, width, and phase) and to represent their dependence on the orientation of B0 with respect to the laser beam propagation direction. We have performed this study for two distinct M_x-magnetometer configurations, in which the rf-field is either parallel or perpendicular to the light propagation direction. The results confirm well the algebraic theoretical model functions. We suggest that small discrepancies are related to hitherto uninvestigated atomic alignment contributions.

  12. Triple Differential Cross Sections for Ionization of Laser-Aligned Mg Atoms by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Madison, Don; Nixon, Kate; Murray, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    3DW (3-body distorted wave) triple differential cross sections have been calculated for electron impact ionization of magnesium atoms aligned by lasers. Calculations have been performed for the kinematics of the experiment performed by Kate Nixon and Andrew Murray at Manchester, England [K. L. Nixon and A. J. Murray 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 123201]. An incident projectile was produced with energy of 41.91eV, scattered and ejected electrons were detected with equal energies (E1 =E2 =20eV), the scattered projectile was detected at a fixed angle of 30deg, and the ejected electrons were detected at angles ranging between 0circ; - 180circ; . The theoretical 3DW results will be compared with the experimental data. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grant.No.PHY-1068237.

  13. Spinor dynamics-driven formation of a dual-beam atom laser.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, N; Thompson, R J; Aveline, D C; Maleki, L

    2006-10-30

    We demonstrate a novel dual-beam atom laser formed by outcoupling oppositely polarized components of an all-optical F = 1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate whose Zeeman sublevel populations have been coherently evolved through spin dynamics. The condensate is formed through all-optical means using a single-beam running-wave dipole trap. We create a condensate in the magnetic field-insensitive m(F) = 0 state, and drive coherent spin-mixing evolution through adiabatic compression of the initially weak trap. Such dual beams, number-correlated through the angular momentum-conserving reaction 2m(0) ?m(+1) +m(-1), have been proposed as tools to explore entanglement and squeezing in Bose-Einstein condensates, and have potential use in precision phase measurements.

  14. Characterization of 1064nm laser-induced damage on antireflection coatings grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhichao; Wei, Yaowei; Chen, Songlin; Luo, Jin; Ma, Ping

    2011-12-01

    Damage tests were carried out to measure the laser resistance of Al2O3/TiO2 and Al2O3/HfO2 antireflection coatings at 1064nm grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The S-on-1 and R-on-1 damage results are given. It's interesting to find that ALD coatings damage performance seems closed to those grown by conventional e-beam evaporation process. For Al2O3/TiO2 coatings, the grown temperature will impact the damage resistance of thin films. Crystallization of TiO2 layer at higher temperature could play an importance role as absorption defects that reduced the LIDT of coatings. In addition, it is found that using inorganic compound instead of organic compound as precursors for ALD process can effective prevent residual carbon in films and will increase the LIDT of coatings.

  15. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases.

  16. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-01-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm(2) for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  17. Investigations of ion-irradiated uranium dioxide nuclear fuel with laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy

    Performance in commercial light water reactors is dictated by the ability of its fuel material, uranium dioxide (UO2), to transport heat generated during the fission process. It is widely known that the service lifetime is limited by irradiation-induced microstructural changes that degrade the thermal performance of UO2. Studying the role of complex, often interacting mechanisms that occur during the early stages of microstructural evolution presents a challenge. Phenomena of particular interest are the segregation of fission products to form bubbles and their resultant effect on grain boundary (GB) mobility, and the effect of irradiation on fuel stoichiometry. Each mechanism has a profound consequence on fuel thermal conductivity. Several advanced analytical techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etc. have been used to study these mechanisms. However, they each have limitations and cannot individually provide the necessary information for deeper understanding. One technique that has been under utilized is atom probe tomography (APT), which has a unique ability to spatially resolve small-scale chemical variations. APT uses the principle of field ionization to evaporate surface ions for chemical analysis. For low electrical conductivity systems, a pulsed laser is used to thermally assist in the evaporation process. One factor complicating the analysis is that laser-material interactions are poorly understood for oxide materials and literature using this technique with UO2 is lacking. Therefore, an initial systematic study to identify the optimal conditions for the analysis of UO2 using laser-assisted APT was conducted. A comparative study on the evaporation behavior between CeO2 and UO2 was followed. CeO2 was chosen due to its technological relevancy and availability of comparative studies with laser-assisted APT. Dissimilar evaporation behavior between these materials was identified and attributed

  18. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future. PMID:27239245

  19. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanicky, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-06-01

    Tungsten carbide coatings (thickness 0.1-0.2 mm) containing 8.0, 12.2, 17.2 and 22.9% Co were studied with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES). Composition of these plasma sprayed deposits on steel disks was determined using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and electron microprobe energy/wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The coatings were ablated by means of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm (10 Hz, 10 mJ per shot) coupled to an ICP echelle-based spectrometer equipped with a segmented charge-coupled device detector. Non-linear dependences of cobalt lines intensities on the Co percentage were observed both at a single spot ablation and at a sample translation. This behaviour could be attributed to a complex phase composition of the system W-C-Co. However, employing tungsten as internal standard the linear calibration was obtained for studied analytical lines Co II 228.616 nm, Co II 230.786 nm, Co II 236.379 nm and Co II 238.892 nm.

  20. Determination of additives in PVC material by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerlin, M.; Mermet, J. M.; Bertucci, M.; Zydowicz, P.

    1997-04-01

    UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) has been applied to the direct determination of additives in solid poly(vinyl chloride) materials. A Nd:YAG laser, operating at its fourth harmonic (266 nm), was used with a beam masking device, in the most reproducible conditions, to introduce solid particles into the plasma torch of a simultaneous ICP-AES system. Emphasis was placed on both precision and accuracy in the analysis of PVC materials by LA-ICP-AES. A series of six in-house PVC reference materials was prepared by incorporating several additives in increasing concentrations. Three alternative methods were evaluated to certify the amount of incorporated elements: ICP-AES with sample dissolution, NAA and XRF. Satisfactory results and good agreement were obtained for seven elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Mg, Sb, Sn and Ti) among the ten incorporated. Sample homogeneity appeared to be satisfactory, and calibration graphs obtained by LA-ICP-AES for several elements are presented. Finally, the performance of the technique in terms of repeatability (1.6-5%), reproducibility (2-5%), and limits of detection was investigated.

  1. An atomic force microscopy statistical analysis of laser-induced azo-polyimide periodic tridimensional nanogrooves.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Iuliana; Epure, Luiza; Sava, Ion; Damian, Victor; Hurduc, Nicolae

    2013-09-01

    The surface morphology of azo-polyimide films was investigated after 355 nm Nd: YAG laser irradiation with two different incident fluencies. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to correlate the laser-induced tridimensional nanogrooved surface relief with the incident fluence and the number of irradiation pulses. The height images revealed that the grooves depth increased even tens of times by increasing the incident fluence, using the same numbers of irradiation pulses. For low incident fluence, the films were uniformly patterned till 100 pulses of irradiation. Instead, when using higher fluence, after 15 pulses of irradiation the accuracy of the surface relief definition was reduced. This behavior could be explained by means of two different mechanisms, one that suppose the film photo-fluidization due to the cis-trans isomerization processes of the azo-groups and the second one responsible for the directional mass displacement. The dominant surface direction and parameters like isotropy, periodicity, and period were evaluated from the polar representation for texture analysis, revealing the appearance of ordered and directionated nanostructures for most of the experimental conditions. Also, the graphical studies of the functional volume parameters have evidenced the improvement of the relief structuration during surface nanostructuration. The correlation of these statistical texture parameters with the irradiation characteristics is important in controlling the alignment of either the liquid crystals or the cells/tissues on patterned azo-polyimide surfaces for optoelectronic devices and implantable biomaterials, respectively.

  2. A general approach to few-cycle laser interactions with complex atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Feist, Johannes; Schneider, Barry; Noble, Cliff

    2007-06-01

    We are developing a general method to solve the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for the interaction of a strong laser pulse with a general atom, i.e., beyond the models of quasi-one or quasi-two-electron targets. The field-free hamiltonian matrices are generated in a B-spline R-matrix method [1], and the laser field is coupled in through dipole matrices generated with the same program. The major advantages of our approach are i) its generality and ii) the possibility of generating highly accurate target descriptions with small configuration interaction expansions. We propagate the solution of the TDSE by the Arnoldi method [2]. The generalized eigenvalue problem is transformed by diagonalizing the overlap matrix S of the non-orthogonal basis functions and generating new field-free hamiltonian and dipole matrix blocks through H' = S-1/2 H S-1/2 and D' = S-1/2 DS-1/2. Details of various numerical implementations will be discussed. 0.1truecm[1] O. Zatsarinny, Comp. Phys. Commun. 174, 273 (2006). [2] T.J. Park and J.C. Light, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 5870 (1986).

  3. Three-photon resonant atomic excitation in spatially incoherent laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peet, Victor; Shchemeljov, Sergei

    2003-10-01

    Two-color excitation by spatially coherent and incoherent laser beams has been used to study three-photon-resonant excitation and subsequent ionization of xenon in conditions, when internally generated sum-frequency field plays an important role in excitation of atomic resonances through interfering one-photon excitation pathway. We show that the incoherence in one of the pumping fields reduces the efficiency of generated sum-frequency field, and thus suppresses the interference between the three- and the one-photon excitation channels. The degree of suppression is controlled by varying the crossing angle between coherent and incoherent laser beams. We show that ionization profiles can be analyzed on the basis of the well-studied interference of one- and three-photon transition amplitudes, but with pumping field decomposed into multiple small-scale uncorrelated domains where coherent process of four-wave mixing occurs. The gain length for a coherent process in these domains depends on the coherence degree and excitation geometry. It gives a possibility of controlling the contribution of coherent processes to the excitation of multiphoton resonances.

  4. Time-resolved Absorption Spectra of the Laser-dressed Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-05-01

    A theoretical study of the transient absorption spectra for the laser-dressed hydrogen atom based on the accurate numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is presented. The timing of absorption is controlled by the time delay between an isolated extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse and a dressing infrared (IR) field. We identify two different kinds of physical processes in the spectra. One is the formation of dressed states, signified by the appearance of sidebands between the XUV absorption lines separated by one IR-photon energy. We show that their population is maximized when the XUV pulse coincides with the zero-crossing of the IR field, and that their energy can be manipulated by using a chirped IR field. The other process is the dynamical AC Stark shift induced by the IR field and probed by the XUV pulse. Our calculations indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen atom leads to the multiple splittings of each XUV absorption line whose separations change in response to a slowly-varying IR envelope. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 states using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional 3-level model that neglects the dynamical AC Stark effects.

  5. Performance predictions of a focused ion beam from a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Haaf, G.; Wouters, S. H. W.; van der Geer, S. B.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Focused ion beams are indispensable tools in the semiconductor industry because of their ability to image and modify structures at the nanometer length scale. Here, we report on performance predictions of a new type of focused ion beam based on photo-ionization of a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam. Particle tracing simulations are performed to investigate the effects of disorder-induced heating after ionization in a large electric field. They lead to a constraint on this electric field strength which is used as input for an analytical model which predicts the minimum attainable spot size as a function of, amongst others, the flux density of the atomic beam, the temperature of this beam, and the total current. At low currents (I < 10 pA), the spot size will be limited by a combination of spherical aberration and brightness, while at higher currents, this is a combination of chromatic aberration and brightness. It is expected that a nanometer size spot is possible at a current of 1 pA. The analytical model was verified with particle tracing simulations of a complete focused ion beam setup. A genetic algorithm was used to find the optimum acceleration electric field as a function of the current. At low currents, the result agrees well with the analytical model, while at higher currents, the spot sizes found are even lower due to effects that are not taken into account in the analytical model.

  6. No sodium in the vapour plumes of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nicholas M; Burger, Matthew H; Schaller, Emily L; Brown, Michael E; Johnson, Robert E; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Dougherty, Michele K; Achilleos, Nicholas A

    2009-06-25

    The discovery of water vapour and ice particles erupting from Saturn's moon Enceladus fuelled speculation that an internal ocean was the source. Alternatively, the source might be ice warmed, melted or crushed by tectonic motions. Sodium chloride (that is, salt) is expected to be present in a long-lived ocean in contact with a rocky core. Here we report a ground-based spectroscopic search for atomic sodium near Enceladus that places an upper limit on the mixing ratio in the vapour plumes orders of magnitude below the expected ocean salinity. The low sodium content of escaping vapour, together with the small fraction of salt-bearing particles, argues against a situation in which a near-surface geyser is fuelled by a salty ocean through cracks in the crust. The lack of observable sodium in the vapour is consistent with a wide variety of alternative eruption sources, including a deep ocean, a freshwater reservoir, or ice. The existing data may be insufficient to distinguish between these hypotheses.

  7. No sodium in the vapour plumes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; Burger, Matthew H.; Schaller, Emily L.; Brown, Michael E.; Johnson, Robert E.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Dougherty, Michele K.; Achilleos, Nicholas A.

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of water vapour and ice particles erupting from Saturn's moon Enceladus fuelled speculation that an internal ocean was the source. Alternatively, the source might be ice warmed, melted or crushed by tectonic motions. Sodium chloride (that is, salt) is expected to be present in a long-lived ocean in contact with a rocky core. Here we report a ground-based spectroscopic search for atomic sodium near Enceladus that places an upper limit on the mixing ratio in the vapour plumes orders of magnitude below the expected ocean salinity. The low sodium content of escaping vapour, together with the small fraction of salt-bearing particles, argues against a situation in which a near-surface geyser is fuelled by a salty ocean through cracks in the crust. The lack of observable sodium in the vapour is consistent with a wide variety of alternative eruption sources, including a deep ocean, a freshwater reservoir, or ice. The existing data may be insufficient to distinguish between these hypotheses.

  8. Voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed atom probe tomography of a multiphase high-strength low-carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Michael D; Seidman, David N

    2011-12-01

    The differences in artifacts associated with voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed (wavelength = 532 or 355 nm) atom-probe tomographic (APT) analyses of nanoscale precipitation in a high-strength low-carbon steel are assessed using a local-electrode atom-probe tomograph. It is found that the interfacial width of nanoscale Cu precipitates increases with increasing specimen apex temperatures induced by higher laser pulse energies (0.6-2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm). This effect is probably due to surface diffusion of Cu atoms. Increasing the specimen apex temperature by using pulse energies up to 2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm is also found to increase the severity of the local magnification effect for nanoscale M2C metal carbide precipitates, which is indicated by a decrease of the local atomic density inside the carbides from 68 ± 6 nm(-3) (voltage pulsing) to as small as 3.5 ± 0.8 nm(-3). Methods are proposed to solve these problems based on comparisons with the results obtained from voltage-pulsed APT experiments. Essentially, application of the Cu precipitate compositions and local atomic density of M2C metal carbide precipitates measured by voltage-pulsed APT to 532 or 355 nm wavelength laser-pulsed data permits correct quantification of precipitation.

  9. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  10. Electron Transport in Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2015-09-01

    Sets of electron collision cross sections for water vapour previously reported are examined by comparing calculated electron swarm parameters with measured parameters. Further, reliable cross section set of water vapour is estimated by the electron swarm method using Monte Carlo simulation to ensure the accuracy of the swarm parameter calculation. The values of an electron drift velocity, a longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and an effective ionisation coefficient calculated from Yousfi and Benabdessadok's set and those calculated from Itikawa and Mason's set do not necessarily agree with measured data. A new cross section set of water vapour, which consists of three kinds of rotational excitation, two kinds of vibrational excitation, three kinds of electron attachment, twenty-six kinds of electronic excitation, and six kinds of ionisation cross sections, and an elastic collision cross section, is estimated, and an anisotropic electron scattering for elastic and rotational excitation collision is considered. The swarm parameters calculated from the estimated cross section set is in good agreement with measured data in a wide range of reduced electric field.

  11. Effects of Neutron Fluence on the Operating Characteristics of Diode Lasers Used in Atomic Frequency Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-15

    Threshold Laser (E) Before (X) and After (0) N eutron Exposure ........................................................ 8 3. Wavelength Versus...Injection Current for a Low Threshold Laser (D) and a High Threshold Laser (E) Before (X) and After (0) N eutron Exposure...9 4. Energy of Gain Curve for a Low Threshold Laser (C) and a High Threshold Laser (E) Before (X) and After (0) N eutron

  12. Pump-probe study of atoms and small molecules with laser driven high order harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei

    A commercially available modern laser can emit over 1015 photons within a time window of a few tens of femtoseconds (10-15second), which can be focused into a spot size of about 10 mum, resulting in a peak intensity above 1014W/cm2. This paves the way for table-top strong field physics studies such as above threshold ionization (ATI), non-sequential double ionization (NSDI), high order harmonic generation (HHG), etc.. Among these strong laser-matter interactions, high order harmonic generation, which combines many photons of the fundamental laser field into a single photon, offers a unique way to generate light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region. High order harmonic photons are emitted within a short time window from a few tens of femtoseconds down to a few hundreds of attoseconds (10 -18second). This highly coherent nature of HHG allows it to be synchronized with an infrared (IR) laser pulse, and the pump-probe technique can be adopted to study ultrafast dynamic processes in a quantum system. The major work of this thesis is to develop a table-top VUV(EUV) light source based on HHG, and use it to study dynamic processes in atoms and small molecules with the VUV(EUV)-pump IR-probe method. A Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) apparatus is used for momentum imaging of the interaction products. Two types of high harmonic pump pulses are generated and applied for pump-probe studies. The first one consists of several harmonics forming a short attosecond pulse train (APT) in the EUV regime (around 40 eV). We demonstrate that, (1) the auto-ionization process triggered by the EUV in cation carbon-monoxide and oxygen molecules can be modified by scanning the EUV-IR delay, (2) the phase information of quantum trajectories in bifurcated high harmonics can be extracted by performing an EUV-IR cross-correlation experiment, thus disclosing the macroscopic quantum control in HHG. The second type of high harmonic source

  13. Quantum control of ultracold atoms and molecules via linearly chirped laser pulses and optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Thomas A.

    This work investigates the potential of performing high yield quantum control operations on atomic and molecular systems using frequency modulated laser fields. The effectiveness of a single laser pulse in creating desired superposition states within the valence shell of Rubidium and the utilization of a single pulse train in order to perform internal state cooling of diatomic hetero-nuclear molecules, in this case KRb, are investigated. These methods are an alternative to the current protocol in the field of quantum control which typically calls for the employment of two laser fields, be they single pulses or pulse trains. Manipulation of the state of the valence electron within Rubidium was studied for two different models of the hyperfine levels of the 5s and 5p orbitals: a three level Λ system and the more realistic four level system accounting for all allowed optical transitions. Numerical analysis of the population dynamics that occur within the system during the time of interaction with the pulse was carried out for various values of the field parameters as well as for two different forms of the pulse envelope. Population inversion within the hyperfine levels of the 5s orbital of Rubidium is demonstrated for a single linearly polarized, linearly down chirped, laser pulse of nanosecond duration and beam intensity on the order of kWcm2 . Superpositions of equally populated hyperfine states, a phenomenon which is crucial in the development of qubits, were also observed for certain values of the field parameters. The results of this analysis are applicable to 85Rb and 87Rb and both the D1 and D2 transitions and are valid for the two models used. For the case of internal state cooling, the power spectrum of a standard pulse train was compared to that of a pulse with sinusoidal phase modulation revealing that the envelope of the frequency comb associated with such a pulse train is controllable via the phase modulation. Thus through frequency modulation the

  14. Self-injection and acceleration of electrons during ionization of gas atoms by a short laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.P.

    2006-04-15

    Using a relativistic three-dimensional single-particle code, acceleration of electrons created during the ionization of nitrogen and oxygen gas atoms by a laser pulse has been studied. Barrier suppression ionization model has been used to calculate ionization time of the bound electrons. The energy gained by the electrons peaks for an optimum value of laser spot size. The electrons created near the tail do not gain sufficient energy for a long duration laser pulse. The electrons created at the tail of pulse escape before fully interacting with the trailing part of the pulse for a short duration laser pulse, which causes electrons to retain sufficient energy. If a suitable frequency chirp is introduced then energy of the electrons created at the tail of the pulse further increases.

  15. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses of low-temperature laser welding of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Matteini, Paolo; Sbrana, Francesca; Tiribilli, Bruno; Pini, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    Low-temperature laser welding of the cornea is a technique used to facilitate the closure of corneal cuts. The procedure consists of staining the wound with a chromophore (indocyanine green), followed by continuous wave irradiation with an 810 nm diode laser operated at low power densities (12-16 W/cm(2)), which induces local heating in the 55-65 degrees C range. In this study, we aimed to investigate the ultrastructural modifications in the extracellular matrix following laser welding of corneal wounds by means of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results evidenced marked disorganization of the normal fibrillar assembly, although collagen appeared not to be denatured under the operating conditions we employed. The mechanism of low-temperature laser welding may be related to some structural modifications of the nonfibrillar extracellular components of the corneal stroma.

  16. Non-contact quantification of laser micro-impulse in water by atomic force microscopy and its application for biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2011-12-01

    We developed a local force measurement system of a femtosecond laser-induced impulsive force, which is due to shock and stress waves generated by focusing an intense femtosecond laser into water with a highly numerical aperture objective lens. In this system, the force localized in micron-sized region was detected by bending movement of a cantilever of atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we calculated the bending movement of the AFM cantilever when the femtosecond laser is focused in water at the vicinity of the cantilever and the impulsive force is loaded on the cantilever. From the result, a method to estimate the total of the impulsive force at the laser focal point was suggested and applied to estimate intercellular adhesion strength.

  17. Improved production of Br atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, L. Z. Yin, J. P.

    2014-10-28

    We theoretically investigated the improvement on the production rate of the decelerated bromine (Br) atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br{sub 2} precursors. Adiabatic alignment of Br{sub 2} precursors exposed to long laser pulses with duration on the order of nanoseconds was investigated by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The dynamical fragmentation of adiabatically aligned Br{sub 2} precursors was simulated and velocity distribution of the Br atoms produced was analyzed. Our study shows that the larger the degree of the precursor alignment, 〈cos{sup 2} θ〉, the higher the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed. For Br{sub 2} molecules with an initial rotational temperature of ∼1 K, a 〈cos{sup 2} θ〉 value of ∼0.88 can result in an improvement factor of over ∼20 on the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed, requiring a laser intensity of only ∼1 × 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} for alignment.

  18. Multiphoton ionization of the calcium atom by linearly and circularly polarized laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buica, Gabriela; Nakajima, Takashi

    2010-04-15

    We theoretically study multiphoton ionization of the Ca atom irradiated by the second (photon energy 3.1 eV) and third (photon energy 4.65 eV) harmonics of Ti:sapphire laser pulses (photon energy 1.55 eV). Because of the dense energy level structure the second and third harmonics of a Ti:sapphire laser are nearly single-photon resonant with the 4s4p {sup 1}P{sup o} and 4s5p {sup 1}P{sup o} states, respectively. Although two-photon ionization takes place through the near-resonant intermediate states with the same symmetry in both cases, it turns out that there are significant differences between them. The photoelectron energy spectra exhibit the absence or presence of substructures. More interestingly, the photoelectron angular distributions clearly show that the main contribution to the ionization processes by the third harmonic arises from the far-off-resonant 4s4p {sup 1}P{sup o} state rather than the near-resonant 4s5p {sup 1}P{sup o} state. These findings can be attributed to the fact that the dipole moment for the 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sup e}-4s5p {sup 1}P{sup o} transition is much smaller than that for the 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sup e}-4s4p {sup 1}P{sup o} transition.

  19. Noncontact estimation of intercellular breaking force using a femtosecond laser impulse quantified by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Hagiyama, Man; Iino, Takanori; Murakami, Yoshinori; Ito, Akihiko

    2011-02-01

    When a femtosecond laser pulse (fsLP) is focused through an objective lens into a culture medium, an impulsive force (fsLP-IF) is generated that propagates from the laser focal point (O(f)) in a micron-sized space. This force can detach individual adherent cells without causing considerable cell damage. In this study, an fsLP-IF was reflected in the vibratory movement of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. Based on the magnitude of the vibration and the geometrical relationship between O(f) and the cantilever, the fsLP-IF generated at O(f) was calculated as a unit of impulse [N-s]. This impulsive force broke adhesion molecule-mediated intercellular interactions in a manner that depended on the adhesion strength that was estimated by the cell aggregation assay. The force also broke the interactions between streptavidin-coated microspheres and a biotin-coated substrate with a measurement error of approximately 7%. These results suggest that fsLP-IF can be used to break intermolecular and intercellular interactions and estimate the adhesion strength. The fsLP-IF was used to break intercellular contacts in two biologically relevant cultures: a coculture of leukocytes seeded over on an endothelial cell monolayer, and a polarized monolayer culture of epithelial cells. The impulses needed to break leukocyte-endothelial and interepithelial interactions, which were calculated based on the geometrical relationship between O(f) and the adhesive interface, were on the order of 10(-13) and 10(-12) N-s, respectively. When the total impulse at O(f) is well-defined, fsLP-IF can be used to estimate the force required to break intercellular adhesions in a noncontact manner under biologically relevant conditions.

  20. Atoms and molecules in intense laser fields: gauge invariance of theory and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, A. D.; Fillion-Gourdeau, F.; Lorin, E.

    2013-08-01

    Gauge invariance was discovered in the development of classical electromagnetism and was required when the latter was formulated in terms of the scalar and vector potentials. It is now considered to be a fundamental principle of nature, stating that different forms of these potentials yield the same physical description: they describe the same electromagnetic field as long as they are related to each other by gauge transformations. Gauge invariance can also be included into the quantum description of matter interacting with an electromagnetic field by assuming that the wavefunction transforms under a given local unitary transformation. The result of this procedure is a quantum theory describing the coupling of electrons, nuclei and photons. Therefore, it is a very important concept: it is used in almost every field of physics and it has been generalized to describe electroweak and strong interactions in the standard model of particles. A review of quantum mechanical gauge invariance and general unitary transformations is presented for atoms and molecules in interaction with intense short laser pulses, spanning the perturbative to highly nonlinear non-perturbative interaction regimes. Various unitary transformations for a single spinless particle time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) are shown to correspond to different time-dependent Hamiltonians and wavefunctions. Accuracy of approximation methods involved in solutions of TDSEs such as perturbation theory and popular numerical methods depend on gauge or representation choices which can be more convenient due to faster convergence criteria. We focus on three main representations: length and velocity gauges, in addition to the acceleration form which is not a gauge, to describe perturbative and non-perturbative radiative interactions. Numerical schemes for solving TDSEs in different representations are also discussed. A final brief discussion of these issues for the relativistic time-dependent Dirac equation

  1. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  2. Development of an electric field application system with transparent electrodes towards the electron EDM measurement with laser-cooled Fr atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Taisuke; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Inoue, Takeshi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Kato, Ko; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. This work is supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  3. Photo-electron momentum distribution and electron localization studies from laser-induced atomic and molecular dissociations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dipanwita

    The broad objective of ultrafast strong-field studies is to be able to measure and control atomic and molecular dynamics on a femtosecond timescale. This thesis work has two major themes: (1) Study of high-energy photoelectron distributions from atomic targets. (2) Electron localization control in atomic and molecular reactions using shaped laser pulses. The first section focuses on the study of photoelectron diffraction patterns of simple atomic targets to understand the target structure. We measure the full vector momentum spectra of high energy photoelectrons from atomic targets (Xe, Ar and Kr) generated by intense laser pulses. The target dependence of the angular distribution of the highest energy photoelectrons as predicted by Quantitative Rescattering Theory (QRS) is explored. More recent developments show target structure information can be retrieved from photoelectrons over a range of energies, from 4Up up to 10Up, independent of the peak intensity at which the photoelectron spectra have been measured. Controlling the fragmentation pathways by manipulating the pulse shape is another major theme of ultrafast science today. In the second section we study the asymmetry of electron (and ion) emission from atoms (and molecules) by interaction with asymmetric pulses formed by the superposition of two colors (800 & 400 nm). Xe electron momentum spectra obtained as a function of the two-color phase exhibit a pronounced asymmetry. Using QRS theory we can analyze this asymmetric yield of the high energy photoelectrons to determine accurately the laser peak intensity and the absolute phase of the two-color electric field. This can be used as a standard pulse calibration method for all two-color studies. Experiments showing strong left-right asymmetry in D+ ion yield from D2 molecules using two-color pulses is also investigated. The asymmetry effect is found to be very ion-energy dependent.

  4. Formation of atomic clusters through the laser ablation of refractory materials in a supersonic molecular beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.; Puretzky, A.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Concepts which guide the design of atomic cluster supersonic beam sources have been developed. These ideas are founded on the knowledge of laser ablation dynamics and are structured in order to take advantage of certain features of the ablation event. Some of the drawbacks of previous cluster source designs become apparent when the sequence of events following laser ablation are clarified. Key features of the new cluster source design include control of the cluster size distribution, uniform performance with a variety of solid materials and elements, high beam intensity, and significant removal of internal energy during the supersonic expansion.

  5. Role of Photoexcitation and Field Ionization in the Measurement of Accurate Oxide Stoichiometry by Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Hess, Wayne P.; Perea, Daniel E.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-03-06

    Pulsed lasers extend the high spatial and mass resolution of atom probe tomography (APT) to non-conducting materials, such as oxides. For prototypical metal oxide MgO, measured stoichiometry depends strongly upon pulse energy and applied voltage. Very low laser energies (0.02 pJ) and high electric fields yield optimal stoichiometric accuracy, attributed to the field-dependent ionization of photo-desorbed O or O2 neutrals. This emphasizes the importance of considering electronic excitations in APT analysis of oxides ionic materials.

  6. Hydrogen and Carbon Vapour Pressure Isotope Effects in Liquid Fluoroform Studied by Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Takao; Mitome, Ryota; Yanase, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    H/D and 12C/13C vapour pressure isotope effects (VPIEs) in liquid fluoroform (CHF3) were studied at the MPW1PW91/6-31 ++ G(d) level of theory. The CHF3 monomer and CHF3 molecules surrounded by other CHF3 molecules in every direction in CHF3 clusters were used as model molecules of vapour and liquid CHF3. Although experimental results in which the vapour pressure of liquid 12CHF3 is higher than that of liquid 12CDF3 and the vapour pressure of liquid 13CHF3 is higher than that of liquid 12CHF3 between 125 and 212 K were qualitatively reproduced, the present calculations overestimated the H/D VPIE and underestimated the 12C/13C VPIE. Temperature-dependent intermolecular interactions between hydrogen and fluorine atoms of neighbouring molecules were required to explain the temperature dependences of both H/D and 12C/13C VPIEs.

  7. Stabilization of atoms in ultra-strong laser fields, a decade later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrila, M.

    2000-07-01

    This overview presents basic notions on atomic stabilization, some new illustrative results, as well as the recent controversy it has stirred. We start with quasistationary (adiabatic) stabilization (QS), the original form in which the concept has emerged from high-frequency Floquet theory (HFFT). QS designates the property of the high-frequency ionization rates to decrease with intensity beyond some critical high value of the latter. Other forms of Floquet theory (Sturmian basis diagonalization, close coupling in the angular momentum basis, R-matrix) have confirmed the existence of QS, and obtained concordant numerical values for the rates of H. The experimental manifestation of QS can be obtained with adiabatically varying pulses. Dynamic stabilization (DS), on the other hand, is the general form of the phenomenon, covering also the case of rapidly turned-on pulses. It designates the fact that, for wave-packet solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, the ionization probability of an atomic electron at the end of a laser pulse of given shape and length, starts decreasing (albeit in an oscillatory manner) beyond a certain critical value of the peak intensity. At still higher intensities, a "destabilization" regime was found, in which the ionization probability increases slowly to 1. We illustrate this behavior with recent results. Further, we give an interpretation of DS based on the expansion of Schrödinger wave packets in terms of Floquet eigenstates ("multistate Floquet theory"). The interpretation relies on the fact that the Floquet states involved manifest QS, that several of them may be populated during the turn-on of the pulse ("shake-up"), and that, if the turn-on is very rapid, the initial population can be projected directed directly into the continuum ("shake-off"). We also comment on the controversy around DS in recent years, originating, on the one hand, in numerical results disagreeing with mainstream calculations, and, on the other, in

  8. Isothermal vapour flow in extremely dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, L. C.; Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.; Templeton, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    In dry soils hydraulic connectivity within the liquid water phase decreases and vapour flow becomes a significant transport mechanism for water. The temperature or solute concentration of the liquid phase affects the vapour pressure of the surrounding air, thus temperature or solute gradients can drive vapour flows. However, in extremely dry soils where water is retained by adsorptive forces rather than capillarity, vapour flows can also occur. In such soils tiny changes in water content significantly affect the equilibrium vapour pressure in the soil, and hence small differences in water content can initiate vapour pressure gradients. In many field conditions this effect may be negligible compared to vapour flows driven by other factors. However, flows of this type are particularly significant in a new type of subsurface irrigation system which uses pervaporation, via a polymer tubing, as the mechanism for water supply. In this system, water enters the soil in vapour phase. Experiments were performed in laboratory conditions using marine sand that had previously been oven dried and cooled. This dry sand was used to represent the desert conditions in which this irrigation system is intended for use. Experimental results show that isothermal vapour flows can significantly affect the performance of such irrigation systems due to the rapid transport of water through the soil via the vapour phase. When the irrigation pipe was buried at a depth of 10cm a vapour flow from the soil surface was observed in less than 2 hours. These flows therefore affect the loss of mass into the atmosphere and thus must be considered when evaluating the availability of water for the irrigated crop. The experiments also provide a rare opportunity to observe isothermal vapour flows initiating from a subsurface source. Such experiments allow the significance of these flows to be quantified and potentially applied to other areas of arid zone hydrology.

  9. Quantitative two-photon laser-induced fluorescence of hydrogen atoms in a 1 kW arcjet thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysong, I. J.; Pobst, J. A.

    1998-08-01

    Quantitative measurements of atomic hydrogen are reported for an arcjet thruster using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence. Number density, axial and radial velocity, and temperature of ground state atomic hydrogen are obtained at the nozzle exit plane and in the downstream plume of a 1 kW arcjet operating on hydrogen propellant. Details of the technique and data analysis are provided. Comparisons with other related available data are made, as well as with several computational models. The observed dissociation fraction of 31ᆢ %is significantly higher than predicted by the models.

  10. Angular distribution of atoms emitted from a SrZrO{sub 3} target by laser ablation under different laser fluences and oxygen pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Azuma, H.; Asaoka, T.; Nakazato, T.; Sato, E.; Shimizu, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sarukura, N.; Nishimura, H.

    2010-05-15

    Angular distributions of atoms emitted by laser ablation of perovskite-type oxide SrZrO{sub 3} have been investigated using electron probe microanalysis with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy and charge-coupled device photography with an interference filter. Each constituent element has been analyzed as a two-modal distribution composed of a broad cos{sup m} {theta} distribution and a narrow cos{sup n} {theta} distribution. The exponent n characterizes the component of laser ablation while the exponent m characterizes that of thermal evaporation, where a larger n or m means a narrower angular distribution. In vacuum, O (n=6) showed a broader distribution than those of Sr (n=16) and Zr (n=17), and Sr{sup +} exhibited a spatial distribution similar to that of Sr. As the laser fluence was increased from 1.1 to 4.4 J/cm{sup 2}, the angular distribution of Sr became narrower. In the laser fluence range of 1.1-4.4 J/cm{sup 2}, broadening of the angular distribution of Sr was observed only at the fluence of 1.1 J/cm{sup 2} under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate approximately the energy of emitted atoms, focusing on the broadening of the angular distribution under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. The energies of emitted atoms were estimated to be 1-20 eV for the laser fluence of 1.1 J/cm{sup 2}, and more than 100 eV for 2.2 and 4.4 J/cm{sup 2}.

  11. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present.

  12. Thermocamera studies of gases and vapours.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, P; Ljungqvist, B; Neikter, K

    1982-01-01

    Most gases and vapours with a bipolar molecular structure absorb infrared energy. If such a gas is interposed between an object emitting infrared radiation and a thermocamera the gas will absorb some of the infrared radiation and thus cast a shadow on the thermocamera picture. In this assay it is possible to visualise the gas. This method had been used to study pollution with anaesthetic gases and vapours in operating theatres. The vapours of other chemicals used in hospitals and other places of work also have been studied. The method permits the study of dispersion and flow patterns of polluting gases and vapours during work. Images PMID:7093159

  13. Enhanced Raman scattering for temperature measurement of a laser-heated atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Brendan; Zhao, Yanming; Grover, Ranjan; Sarid, Dror

    2005-03-01

    Illuminating a silicon cantilever of an atomic force microscope with a focused laser beam creates heat that can be funneled into a nanoscale area at the apex of its tip. To characterize the heating dynamics and measure the temperature of the tip, a Raman scattering pump-and-probe method is used. It is found that at the apex of the tip the intensity of the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes components are significantly enhanced relative to those obtained on a bulk silicon sample. Modeling the temperature rise at the tip of the cantilever by a closed-form analytical expression gives good agreement with the Raman measurements. This model can be used to design the structure of the cantilever so that the heat delivery to its tip is optimized. Such an optimized cantilever can potentially be used in high-density, heat-assisted magnetic recording, optical data storage using phase-change media and thermomechanical recording systems, for example, where nanoscale heated regions are of importance.

  14. Double resonance fequency light shift compensation in optically oriented laser-pumped alkali atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, A. A. Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2015-09-15

    The contributions of the vector and scalar components to the magnetically dependent microwave transition frequency light shift are analyzed and the compensation of these components is experimentally demonstrated for the {sup 87}Rb atoms optically oriented by a laser tuned to the D{sub 2} line of the head doublet. The Allan variance is studied as a function of the averaging time for a tandem of optically pumped quantum magnetometers (OPQMs), one of which is based on a low-frequency spin oscillator while another is based on a quantum microwave discriminator with a resonance frequency that corresponds to magnetically dependent transitions between HFS sublevels with the extremal value of the magnetic quantum number. It is shown that the compensation of the scalar and vector components of the light shift in OPQMs reduces the Allan variance at averaging times that exceed hundreds of seconds compared to a quantum discriminator based on the magnetically independent 0–0 transition. In this case, the minimal Allan variance in OPQMs at the end resonance is achieved at considerably longer averaging times than in the case of the quantum discriminator that is tuned to the 0–0 transition frequency.

  15. Presynaptic structure of Aplysia single live neuron by atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Aee-Young; Chae, Yeon-Su; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Seonghoon

    2013-05-02

    The structural and functional plasticity of Aplysia mechanosensory presynaptic neurons has been studied in relation with the mechanism underlying learning and memory. Long-term facilitation (LTF), which is a well-known cellular model for long-term memory in Aplysia, is accompanied by new synaptic structural growth or change. We developed a combined atomic force microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope (AFM-CLSM) system integrated with a MATLAB routine for image processing to concurrently obtain high-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) outer-surface morphological images and 3D interior fluorescence images. With our combined AFM-CLSM system, volumetric changes in the presynaptic structures (varicosities) of Aplysia live sensory-motor neuron cocultures were observed. The spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle molecules in the preexisting varicosities was monitored together with a volumetric change in the varicosities. Our combined AFM-CLSM system is successfully adapted for measuring learning-related structural changes and the movement of synaptic molecules in the single live neuron through interaction force and fluorescence imaging.

  16. Analytic description of high-order harmonic generation by atoms in a two-color laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Silaev, A. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2010-06-15

    A closed-form analytic formula describing high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a two-color field of frequencies {omega} and 2{omega} is derived quantum mechanically in the low-frequency (tunneling) limit for an electron bound by a short-range potential and generalized to the case of an active electron in a neutral atom. The HHG rates are presented as a product of an electron wave packet describing the ionization of an active electron and its propagation in a laser field up to the recombination event and an atom-specific cross section of the electron's photorecombination. In contrast to the case of a monochromatic laser pulse [Frolov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 243901 (2009)], the two-color wave packet involves the interference of two terms (involving the Airy function) that describe the emission of harmonics during the first and second half-cycles of the fundamental laser cycle and give rise to the two-plateau structures in the HHG spectra. For the case of the H atom, we show that our analytic results are in good agreement with those obtained from a numerical solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The factorization formula is used for describing the dependence of HHG rates for inert gases on the relative phase and intensities of the {omega} and 2{omega} components of a laser field. It is shown that atomic structure (including electron correlation) effects can modify substantially the two-color HHG spectra of inert gases.

  17. Measurement and simulations of hollow atom X-ray spectra of solid-density relativistic plasma created by high-contrast PW optical laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Colgan, J.; Dance, R. J.; Abdallah, J.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. L.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2013-09-01

    K-shell spectra of solid Al excited by petawatt picosecond laser pulses have been investigated at the Vulcan PW facility. Laser pulses of ultrahigh contrast with an energy of 160 J on the target allow studies of interactions between the laser field and solid state matter at 1020 W/cm2. Intense X-ray emission of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from thin aluminum foils is observed from optical laser plasma for the first time. Specifically for 1.5 μm thin foil targets the hollow atom yield dominates the resonance line emission. It is suggested that the hollow atoms are predominantly excited by the impact of X-ray photons generated by radiation friction to fast electron currents in solid-density plasma due to Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the transverse plasma fields. Numerical simulations of Al hollow atom spectra using the ATOMIC code confirm that the impact of keV photons dominates the atom ionization. Our estimates demonstrate that solid-density plasma generated by relativistic optical laser pulses provide the source of a polychromatic keV range X-ray field of 1018 W/cm2 intensity, and allows the study of excited matter in the radiation-dominated regime. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atom radiation is found to be a powerful tool to study the properties of high-energy density plasma created by intense X-ray radiation.

  18. Quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers: Exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhu, S. )

    1989-11-15

    A quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers (CEL's) is developed, starting from the exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian for cascade three-level atoms interacting with a single-mode radiation field. We consider the situation where the active atoms are prepared initially in a coherent superposition of three atomic levels and derive a master equation for the field-density operator by using a quantum theory for coherently pumped lasers. The master equation is transformed into a Fokker-Planck equation for the antinormal-ordering {ital Q} function. The drift coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation enable us to study the steady-state operation of the two-photon CEL's analytically. We have studied both resonant two-photon CEL for which there is no threshold, and off-resonant two-photon CEL for which there exists a threshold. In both cases the initial atomic coherences provide phase locking, and squeezing in the phase quadrature of the field is found. The off-resonant two-photon CEL can build up from a vacuum when its linear gain is larger than the cavity loss (even without population inversion). Maximum squeezing is found in the no-population-inversion region with the laser intensities far below saturation in both cases, which are more than 90% for the resonant two-photon CEL and nearly 50% for the off-resonant one. Approximate steady-state {ital Q} functions are obtained for the resonant two-photon CEL and, in certain circumstances, for the off-resonant one.

  19. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by infrared laser-induced argon spark with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanický, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-10-01

    Infrared laser ablation was studied for application to the analysis of plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide/cobalt coatings. The potential of the laser induced argon-spark (LINA-Spark™), as a sample introduction device in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was studied. The use of an IR laser along with defocusing led to laser-induced microplasma-based ablation. The mass ablation rate, represented by the ICP emission intensity per laser beam unit area, exhibited a flat increase in the irradiance range 2-250 GW/cm 2. A low slope (0.5) of this dependence in log-log scale gave evidence of plasma shielding. The steep increase in the measured acoustic signal when focused in front of the sample, i.e. in argon, indicated a breakdown of argon. Consequently, considerably lower ICP emissions were observed within the same range of irradiance. The cobalt/tungsten line intensity ratio in the ICP was practically constant from 1.5 up to at least 250 GW/cm 2. Acceptable precision (R.S.D.<5%) was obtained without internal standardization for irradiance between 2 and 8 GW/cm 2. Optimization of the laser pulse energy, repetition rate, beam focusing and sample displacement during interaction led to the linearization of dependences of signal vs. cobalt percentage, at least up to the highest studied value of 23% Co.

  20. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  1. Spectroscopy of intercombination transition {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} for secondary cooling of strontium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Khabarova, K Yu; Kolachevsky, N N; Galyshev, A A; Strelkin, S A; Kostin, A S; Belotelov, G S; Berdasov, O I; Gribov, A; Slyusarev, S N

    2015-02-28

    In the framework of the project aimed at creating an optical standard on cold Sr atoms we have realised sub-Doppler spectroscopy of the intercombination transition {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} (689 nm) in a cell with Sr vapour and in a cloud of atoms loaded in a magneto- optical trap (MOT). By measuring Zeeman splitting of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} level in the magnetic field of the MOT we have succeeded in fine adjustment of the MOT relative to a minimum of the magnetic field, which is necessary for successful secondary-stage cooling on the intercombination transition. In turn, absorption saturation spectroscopy in the vapour cell provides the long-term frequency stability of the second-stage cooling laser at λ = 689 nm. (laser spectroscopy)

  2. Spectroscopy of the three-photon laser excitation of cold Rubidium Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2013-05-15

    The spectra of the three-photon laser excitation 5S{sub 1/2} {yields} 5P{sub 3/2} {yields} 6S{sub 1/2}nP of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in an operating magneto-optical trap based on continuous single-frequency lasers at each stage are studied. These spectra contain two partly overlapping peaks of different amplitudes, which correspond to coherent three-photon excitation and incoherent three-step excitation due to the presence of two different ways of excitation through the dressed states of intermediate levels. A four-level theoretical model based on optical Bloch equations is developed to analyze these spectra. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated data is achieved by introducing additional decay of optical coherence induced by a finite laser line width and other broadening sources (stray electromagnetic fields, residual Doppler broadening, interatomic interactions) into the model.

  3. Study of a low power dissipation, miniature laser-pumped rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Bin; Zhao, Feng; Gu, Si-Hong

    2009-09-01

    This paper studies a miniature low power consumption laser-pumped atom vapour cell clock scheme. Pumping 87Rb with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode pump and locking the laser frequency on a Doppler-broadened spectral line, it records a 5 × 10-11τ-1/2 (τ < 500 s) frequency stability with a table-top system in a primary experiment. The study reveals that the evaluated scheme is at the level of 2.7 watts power consumption, 90 cm3 volume and 10-12τ-1/2 short-term frequency stability.

  4. In situ observation of atomic hydrogen etching on diamond-like carbon films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Chia, C.-T.; Chiu, C.-C.; Wu, C.-C.; Cheng, H.-F.; Lin, I.-N.

    2001-04-01

    Atomic hydrogen etching on the pulsed laser deposited (PLD) diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were examined in situ by using Raman spectroscopy. Thermal annealing of the as-prepared DLC films was found to alter the D-band (˜1355 cm -1) and G-band (˜1582 cm -1) from unresolved features at room temperature to clearly separated bands at above 500°C, indicating graphitization of the films. The presence of atomic hydrogen retards graphitization at temperatures lower than 500°C, presumably because reactive atomic hydrogen formed sp 3-bonding carbons which prevented graphitization at below 500°C, while at above 500°C, the hydrogen etches away disordered structure of the DLC film as the intensity changes of the D-bands demonstrate.

  5. Influence of surface stress and atomic defect generation on Rayleigh wave propagation in laser-excited solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzade, F. Kh.

    2013-07-01

    The surface stress effects on the Rayleigh wave propagation characteristics in solids with distributions of laser-induced atomic defects (vacancies, interstitial atoms) are studied. Defect-density fields are governed by the strain-induced generation, recombination and diffusion of atomic defects. Formulation of the general surface wave propagation problem has been made, and the corresponding frequency equation has been derived and analyzed. Some important frequency equations, as obtained by other authors, have been deduced as special cases from the frequency equation for Rayleigh waves. The combined effects of surface stress and defect density field on the Rayleigh wave velocities are shown by numerical calculations and graphs. It is found that the Rayleigh waves are generally dispersive; and in the case of low frequency with residual surface tension, a critical wave length exists, below which the propagation of Rayleigh waves is not possible. This critical wave length depends on both the residual stress and the defect distribution.

  6. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  7. Reflection Spectrum of Two Level Atoms by an Evanescent Laser Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Weihan; Li, Qingning

    1996-01-01

    An exact solution and numerical calculation of the reflection of two level atoms by atomic mirror are presented. The curve of reflection coefficient against Rabi frequency calculated shows some new features, and the physical machanism underlying is analyzed.

  8. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography of Ti/TiN films deposited on Si.

    PubMed

    Sanford, N A; Blanchard, P T; White, R; Vissers, M R; Diercks, D R; Davydov, A V; Pappas, D P

    2017-03-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (L-APT) was used to examine superconducting TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer films with nominal respective thicknesses of 5/5/5 (nm). Such materials are of interest for applications that require large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors. The trilayers were deposited on Si substrates by reactive sputtering. Electron energy loss microscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM/EELS) was used to corroborate the L-APT results and establish the overall thicknesses of the trilayers. Three separate batches were studied where the first (bottom) TiN layer was deposited at 500°C (for all batches) and the subsequent TiN/Ti bilayer was deposited at ambient temperature, 250°C, and 500°C, respectively. L-APT rendered an approximately planar TiN/Si interface by making use of plausible mass-spectral assignments to N3(1+), SiN(1+), and SiO(1+). This was necessary since ambiguities associated with the likely simultaneous occurrence of Si(1+) and N2(1+) prevented their use in rendering the TiN/Si interface upon reconstruction. The non-superconducting Ti2N phase was also revealed by L-APT. Neither L-APT nor STEM/EELS rendered sharp Ti/TiN interfaces and the contrast between these layers diminished with increased film deposition temperature. L-APT also revealed that hydrogen was present in varying degrees in all samples including control samples that were composed of single layers of Ti or TiN.

  9. Zeeman effects in the hyperfine structure of atomic iodine photodissociation laser emission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Kasper, J. V. V.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of hyperfine structure in laser emission from CF3I and C2F5I photodissociation lasers. Constant magnetic fields affect the time behavior of the emission by changing the relative gains of the hyperfine transitions. Time-varying fields usually present in photodissociation lasers further complicate the emission.

  10. Physical properties of vapour grown indium monotelluride platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunjomana, A. G.; Chandrasekharan, K. A.; Teena, M.

    2015-02-01

    Indium monotelluride (InTe) crystals were grown from vapour phase under different temperature gradients by employing physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. The morphology of these crystals such as whiskers, needles, platelets etc., strongly depends on the temperature distribution in the horizontal dual zone furnace. InTe platelets were deposited by setting the temperature of the charge (TC) and growth (TS) zones at 1073 K and 773 K (ΔT=300 K), respectively, for different growth periods (24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h). The surface growth features have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopes, which indicate layer growth mechanism for all the crystals. Various crystals grown under ΔT=200 K and 300 K (retaining TS invariant) were examined by X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. InTe samples exhibited consistent lattice parameters, density and atomic percentage, establishing stoichiometry and chemical homogeneity. The results obtained for Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, power factor, dislocation density and microhardness are found to be reproducible as well. The vapour deposited InTe platelets are mechanically stable and possess high value of TEP, which ensure their practical application in thermoelectric power generation.

  11. The Saga of Light-Matter Interaction and Magneto-optical Effects Applications to Atomic Magnetometry, Laser-cooled Atoms, Atomic Clocks, Geomagnetism, and Plant Bio-magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.

    The quest to expand the limited sensorial domain, in particular to bridge the inability to gauge magnetic fields near and far, has driven the fabrication of remedial tools. The interaction of ferromagnetic material with a magnetic field had been the only available technique to gauge that field for several millennium. The advent of electricity and associated classical phenomena captured in the four Maxwell equations, were a step forward. In the early 1900s, the model of quantum mechanics provided a two-way leap forward. One came from the newly understood interaction of light and matter, and more specifically the three-way coupling of photons, atoms' angular momenta, and magnetic field, which are the foundations of atomic magnetometry. The other came from magnetically sensitive quantum effects in a fabricated energy-ladder form of matter cooled to a temperature below that of the energy steps; these quantum effects gave rise to the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Research using atomic magnetometers and SQUIDs has resulted in thousands of publications, text books, and conferences. The current status in each field is well described in Refs. [48,49,38,42] and all references therein. In this work we develop and investigate techniques and applications pertaining to atomic magnetometry. [Full text: eric.corsini gmail.com].

  12. Frequency control of tunable lasers using a frequency-calibrated λ-meter in an experiment on preparation of Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Saakyan, S A; Vilshanskaya, E V; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V; Sautenkov, V A; Vasiliev, V V

    2015-09-30

    A new technique is proposed and applied to study the frequency drift of an external-cavity semiconductor laser, locked to the transmission resonances of a thermally stabilised Fabry–Perot interferometer. The interferometer frequency drift is measured to be less than 2 MHz h{sup -1}. The laser frequency is measured using an Angstrom wavemeter, calibrated using an additional stabilised laser. It is shown that this system of laser frequency control can be used to identify Rydberg transitions in ultracold {sup 7}Li atoms. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Applications of direct atomic laser spectral analysis of laser plasma for determination of inorganic component presence in biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriger, Alexey E.; Surmenko, Elena L.; Surmenko, Lev A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2000-04-01

    The LDMA which permits to carry out the element analysis without an additional excitement of laser plasma is described. Some results on identification and differentiation of bone tumors on the basis of measured spectral characteristics are presented.

  14. L. V. Keldysh's "Ionization in the Field of a Strong Electromagnetic Wave" and modern physics of atomic interaction with a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    Basic premises, approximations, and results of L.V. Keldysh's 1964 work on multiphoton ionization of atoms are discussed, as well as its influence on the modern science of the interaction of atomic-molecular systems with a strong laser field.

  15. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lee, Yong Inn; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H--He and F--He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  16. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukra Lie, Zener; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Inn Lee, Yong; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H-He and F-He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  17. Atomic physics of relativistic high contrast laser-produced plasmas in experiments on Leopard laser facility at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Faenov, A. Y.; Safronova, U. I.; Wiewior, P.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Wilcox, P.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Osborne, G. C.; Chalyy, O.; Paudel, Y.

    2012-06-01

    The results of the recent experiments focused on study of x-ray radiation from multicharged plasmas irradiated by relativistic (I > 1019 W/cm2) sub-ps laser pulses on Leopard laser facility at NTF/UNR are presented. These shots were done under different experimental conditions related to laser pulse and contrast. In particular, the duration of the laser pulse was 350 fs or 0.8 ns and the contrast was varied from high (10-7) to moderate (10-5). The thin laser targets (from 4 to 750 μm) made of a broad range of materials (from Teflon to iron and molybden to tungsten and gold) were utilized. Using the x-ray diagnostics including the high-precision spectrometer with resolution R ˜ 3000 and a survey spectrometer, we have observed unique spectral features that are illustrated in this paper. Specifically, the observed L-shell spectra for Fe targets subject to high intensity lasers (˜1019 W/cm2) indicate electron beams, while at lower intensities (˜1016 W/cm2) or for Cu targets there is much less evidence for an electron beam. In addition, K-shell Mg features with dielectronic satellites from high-Rydberg states, and the new K-shell F features with dielectronic satellites including exotic transitions from hollow ions are highlighted.

  18. Mesoscale modelling of water vapour in the tropical UTLS: two case studies from the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, V.; Durry, G.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Rivière, E. D.; Pirre, M.

    2006-08-01

    In this study, we evaluate the ability of the BRAMS mesoscale model compared to ECMWF global analysis to simulate the observed vertical variations of water vapour in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The observations are balloon-borne measurements of water vapour mixing ratio and temperature from micro-SDLA (Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer) instrument. Data from two balloon flights performed during the 2004 HIBISCUS field campaign are used to compare with the mesoscale simulations and to ECMWF analysis. The mesoscale model performs significantly better than ECMWF analysis for water vapour in the upper troposphere and similarly or slightly worse for temperature. The improvement provided by the mesoscale model for water vapour comes mainly from (i) the enhanced vertical resolution in the UTLS (250 m for BRAMS and ~1 km for ECMWF model) and (ii) the more detailed microphysical parameterization providing ice supersaturations as in the observations. The ECMWF vertical resolution (~1 km) is too coarse to capture the observed fine scale vertical variations of water vapour in the UTLS. In near saturated or supersaturated layers, the mesoscale model relative humidity with respect to ice saturation is close to observations provided that the temperature profile is realistic. For temperature, ECMWF analysis gives good results partly thanks to data assimilation. The analysis of the mesoscale model results showed that in undersaturated layers, the water vapour profile depends mainly on the dynamics. In saturated/supersaturated layers, microphysical processes play an important role and have to be taken into account on top of the dynamical processes to understand the water vapour profiles. In the lower stratosphere, the ECMWF model and the BRAMS model give very similar water vapour profiles that are significantly dryer than micro-SDLA measurements. This similarity comes from the fact that BRAMS is initialised using ECMWF analysis and that no mesoscale

  19. High-resolution Rydberg tagging time-of-flight measurements of atomic photofragments by single-photon vacuum ultraviolet laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant; Zhou Jingang; Yang Lei; Ng, C. Y.

    2008-12-15

    By coupling a comprehensive tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser system to a velocity-mapped ion imaging apparatus, we show that high-resolution high-n Rydberg tagging time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of nascent atomic photofragments formed by laser photodissociation can be made using single-photon VUV laser photoexcitation. To illustrate this single-photon Rydberg tagging TOF method, we present here the results of the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF measurements of O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and S({sup 3}P{sub 2}) formed in the photodissociation of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} at 193.3 and 202.3 nm, respectively. These results are compared to those obtained by employing the VUV laser photoionization time-sliced velocity-mapped ion imaging technique. The fact that the kinetic energy resolutions achieved in the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF measurements of O and S atoms are found to be higher than those observed in the VUV laser photoionization, time-sliced velocity-mapped ion imaging studies show that the single-photon VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF method is useful and complementary to state-of-the-art time-sliced velocity-mapped ion imaging measurements of heavier atomic photofragments, such as O and S atoms. Furthermore, the general agreement observed between the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF and velocity-mapped ion imaging experiments supports the conclusion that the lifetimes of the tagged Rydberg states of O and S atoms are sufficiently long to allow the reliable determination of state-resolved UV photodissociation cross sections of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} by using the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF method.

  20. High-resolution Rydberg tagging time-of-flight measurements of atomic photofragments by single-photon vacuum ultraviolet laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brant; Zhou, Jingang; Yang, Lei; Ng, C Y

    2008-12-01

    By coupling a comprehensive tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser system to a velocity-mapped ion imaging apparatus, we show that high-resolution high-n Rydberg tagging time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of nascent atomic photofragments formed by laser photodissociation can be made using single-photon VUV laser photoexcitation. To illustrate this single-photon Rydberg tagging TOF method, we present here the results of the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF measurements of O((3)P(2)) and S((3)P(2)) formed in the photodissociation of SO(2) and CS(2) at 193.3 and 202.3 nm, respectively. These results are compared to those obtained by employing the VUV laser photoionization time-sliced velocity-mapped ion imaging technique. The fact that the kinetic energy resolutions achieved in the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF measurements of O and S atoms are found to be higher than those observed in the VUV laser photoionization, time-sliced velocity-mapped ion imaging studies show that the single-photon VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF method is useful and complementary to state-of-the-art time-sliced velocity-mapped ion imaging measurements of heavier atomic photofragments, such as O and S atoms. Furthermore, the general agreement observed between the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF and velocity-mapped ion imaging experiments supports the conclusion that the lifetimes of the tagged Rydberg states of O and S atoms are sufficiently long to allow the reliable determination of state-resolved UV photodissociation cross sections of SO(2) and CS(2) by using the VUV laser high-n Rydberg tagging TOF method.

  1. Water vapour in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, C.

    2003-04-01

    The water vapour abundance increased at all levels in the stratosphere during the last decades. Though the observed increase cannot be explained quantitatively, the water vapour distribution and underlying processes seem to be sufficiently understood in the overworld. In the lowermost stratosphere and in the tropical tropopause layer, however, the complex transport and temperature patterns on different scales result in a high variability and strong gradients of the water vapour distribution. The long-term increase of water vapour seems to be apparent also in the lowermost stratosphere, but its significance is decreasing towards the tropopause. In this presentation, measurements of water vapour in the extratropical UT/LS from several airborne campaigns are discussed and compared to distribution patterns obtained from satellite data sets. A mixing layer with H2O mixing ratios up to 100 ppmv is found above the tropopause, frequently resulting in saturation of these air masses. A seasonal cycle of the water content with a late spring and summer maximum is apparent in the LS. The role of jet streams moistening the lowermost stratosphere will be discussed. In a second part, water vapour distributions in the tropics as the stratospheric source region are presented. As an example, measurements over the Indian ocean are discussed where temperatures and water vapour mixing ratios as low as in the classical 'fountain' region over Micronesia occurred. Frequently, ongoing dehydration was observed in the TTL up to the tropopause, independent on deep convection cells.

  2. Extensive theoretical study on electronically excited states of calcium monochloride: Molecular laser cooling and production of ultracold chlorine atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Mingkai; Ma, Haitao; Cao, Jianwei; Bian, Wensheng

    2016-05-01

    Nine doublet Λ-S states of calcium monochloride (CaCl) are calculated using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method with the Davidson correction. Both the core subvalence and spin-orbit coupling effects are taken into account. Laser cooling of CaCl and production of ultracold chlorine atoms are investigated and assessed. Our computed spectroscopic constants and radiative lifetimes match the available experimental data very well. The determined Franck-Condon factors and vibrational branching ratios of the A 2 Π 1 / 2 ( ν ' ) ← X 2 Σ1 / 2 + ( ν ) transition are highly diagonally distributed and the evaluated radiative lifetime for the A2Π1/2(ν' = 0) state is 28.2 ns, which is short enough for rapid laser cooling. Subsequently, detection of cold molecules via resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization to determine the final quantum state populations is discussed and the ionization energy calculated. A multi-pulse excitation scheme is proposed for producing ultracold chlorine atoms from zero-energy photodissociation of the cooled CaCl. Our results demonstrate the possibility of producing ultracold CaCl molecules and Cl atoms.

  3. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  4. Two-Photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence O and N Atoms for the Study of Heterogeneous Catalysis in a Diffusion Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallix, Joan B.; Copeland, Richard A.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Advanced laser-based diagnostics have been developed to examine catalytic effects and atom/surface interactions on thermal protection materials. This study establishes the feasibility of using laser-induced fluorescence for detection of O and N atom loss in a diffusion tube to measure surface catalytic activity. The experimental apparatus is versatile in that it allows fluorescence detection to be used for measuring species selective recombination coefficients as well as diffusion tube and microwave discharge diagnostics. Many of the potential sources of error in measuring atom recombination coefficients by this method have been identified and taken into account. These include scattered light, detector saturation, sample surface cleanliness, reactor design, gas pressure and composition, and selectivity of the laser probe. Recombination coefficients and their associated errors are reported for N and O atoms on a quartz surface at room temperature.

  5. Effect of the electronic structure of target atoms on the emission continuum of laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kask, Nikolai E; Michurin, Sergei V; Fedorov, Gennadii M

    2004-06-30

    The low-temperature laser plasma at the surface of metal targets is experimentally investigated. Continuous spectra emitted from a laser plume are found to be similar for targets consisting of the elements of the same subgroup of the Mendeleev periodic table. The similarity manifests itself both in the dependence of the emission intensity on the external pressure and in the structure of absorption bands related to a fine-dispersed phase existing in the peripheral regions of the plume. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. A High-resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Photoionization and Photoelectron Study of the Co Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang; Wang, Hailing; Luo, Zhihong; Shi, Xiaoyu; Chang, Yih-Chung; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the vacuum ultraviolet-photoionization efficiency (VUV-PIE) spectrum of Co in the energy range of 63,500-67,000 cm-1, which covers the photoionization transitions of Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F4), Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F2), and Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d74s1 5F5). We have also recorded the pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectrum of Co in the same energy range, allowing accurate determinations of ionization energies (IEs) for the photoionization transitions from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state to the Co+(3F J ) (J = 4 and 3) and Co+(5F5) ionic states, as well as from the Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) excited neural state to the Co+(3d8 3F3) ionic state. The high-resolution nature of the VUV laser used has allowed the observation of many well-resolved autoionizing resonances in the VUV-PIE spectrum, among which an autoionizing Rydberg series, 3d74s1(5F5)np (n = 19-38), converging to the Co+(3d74s1 5F5) ionic state from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state is identified. The fact that no discernible step-like structures are present at these ionization thresholds in the VUV-PIE spectrum indicates that direct photoionization of Co is minor compared to autoionization in this energy range. The IE values, the autoionizing Rydberg series, and the photoionization cross sections obtained in this experiment are valuable for understanding the VUV opacity and abundance measurement of the Co atom in stars and solar atmospheres, as well as for benchmarking the theoretical results calculated in the Opacity Project and the IRON Project, and thus are of relevance to astrophysics.

  7. Three-dimensional atom localization by laser fields in a four-level tripod system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir S.; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri V.; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2014-12-01

    We present a scheme for high-precision three-dimensional (3D) localization by the measurement of the atomic-level population. The scheme is applied to a four-level tripod-type atom coupled by three strong standing waves and a probe running wave. As a result, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength, which is achieved by the increase of standing-wave intensities. The upper-level distribution depends crucially on the atom-field coupling and it forms 3D periodic structures composed of spheres, hourglasses, bowls, donuts, or deformed barrels.

  8. Toward cold atom guidance in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre using a blue detuned hollow laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Jerome

    single mode, high purity, LG01 beam was generated with over 50% conversion efficiency from a Gaussian mode using a complex-valued computer generated hologram (CGH) rendered on a phase-only liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). A system-wide 35% conversion efficiency was achieved from the laser output to the vacuum chamber input. Several micro-structured polymer optical fibres and silica hollow-core band-gap photonic crystal fibres with Kagome claddings were evaluated. A single defect, large hollow core (˜ 5mum diameter) Kagome cladding fibre was identified as a suitable solution for guiding cold 85Rb atoms. The LG01 mode generated by the SLM was coupled into a single first order hollow mode with a high efficiency of 43% and 76% for the Gaussian mode by controlling the blazed grating period and the input beam size with the CGH. All these achievements opened a way for the challenging realisation of cold atom fibre guidance in this optimal system which has shown to have an order of magnitude less heating than in comparable red-detuned coupling and guidance. This guiding scheme also allows the keeping of the coldest atoms within the distribution to interact minimally with the guiding potential, showing promise of enabling single mode atomic wave guiding with less experimental constraints than red detuned schemes.

  9. Theoretical and experimental (e ,2 e ) study of electron-impact ionization of laser-aligned Mg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Murray, Andrew; Stauffer, Al; Nixon, Kate; Armstrong, Gregory; Colgan, James; Madison, Don

    2014-12-01

    We have performed calculations of the fully differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of magnesium atoms. Three theoretical approximations, the time-dependent close coupling, the three-body distorted wave, and the distorted wave Born approximation, are compared with experiment in this article. Results will be shown for ionization of the 3 s ground state of Mg for both asymmetric and symmetric coplanar geometries. Results will also be shown for ionization of the 3 p state which has been excited by a linearly polarized laser which produces a charge cloud aligned perpendicular to the laser beam direction and parallel to the linear polarization. Theoretical and experimental results will be compared for several different alignment angles, both in the scattering plane as well as in the plane perpendicular to the incident beam direction.

  10. Multiple-composition hyperthermal atomic beams formed by a laser-induced plasma for planetary environmental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Kumiko; Watanabe, Daiki; Ohira, Junki; Tagawa, Masahito

    2014-05-01

    A multiple-composition beam with a velocity of 8 km s-1 was formed using a laser detonation source in order to simulate the physical and chemical effects of neutral gas collisions on a material in the sub-low earth orbit (LEO). A premixed target gas was applied in the laser detonation beam technique. It was found that atoms of different masses, O and Ar for Ar + O2 target gas, are accelerated to similar velocities, i.e. different translational energies. Promotion of O2 decomposition is confirmed by using a mixed gas target. It is concluded that the multiple-composition beam obtained using a mixed target gas is suitable for simulating a neutral gas environment in the sub-LEO region.

  11. Investigation of material property influenced stoichiometric deviations as evidenced during UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography in fluorite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy; Henderson, Hunter B.; Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Gan, Jian; Allen, Todd R.; Manuel, Michele V.

    2015-09-01

    Oxide materials are used in numerous applications such as thermal barrier coatings, nuclear fuels, and electrical conductors and sensors, all applications where nanometer-scale stoichiometric changes can affect functional properties. Atom probe tomography can be used to characterize the precise chemical distribution of individual species and spatially quantify the oxygen to metal ratio at the nanometer scale. However, atom probe analysis of oxides can be accompanied by measurement artifacts caused by laser-material interactions. In this investigation, two technologically relevant oxide materials with the same crystal structure and an anion to cation ratio of 2.00, pure cerium oxide (CeO2) and uranium oxide (UO2) are studied. It was determined that electronic structure, optical properties, heat transfer properties, and oxide stability strongly affect their evaporation behavior, thus altering their measured stoichiometry, with thermal conductance and thermodynamic stability being strong factors.

  12. R-matrix-incorporating-time theory of one-electron atomic and molecular systems in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broin, Cathal Ó.; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this thesis tutorial we discuss the R-matrix-incorporating-time ab initio theoretical framework for the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of one-electron atomic and molecular systems under strong electromagnetic fields. Within this approach, a division-of-space method is developed with the configuration space of the electron’s coordinates separated over two regions, the inner and outer regions. In the inner region the quantum system’s time-dependent wavefunction is expanded on the eigenstate basis set of its field-free Hamiltonian representation while in the outer region its grid representation is considered. The present tutorial describes in detail the theoretical formulation for one-electron quantum systems. Example calculations are discussed for atomic hydrogen, H, and the molecular hydrogen ion, {{{H}}}2+, in intense laser fields.

  13. Laser induced asymmetry and inhomogeneous broadening of the microwave lineshape of a gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camparo, J. C.; Freuholz, R. P.; Volk, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of replacing the RF discharge lamp in a rubidium gas cell clock with a single mode laser diode is addressed. Since the short term stability of the rubidium frequency standard is limited by the shot noise of the photodetector, an increased signal-to-noise ratio due to more efficient laser diode optical pumping might improve the short term performance. Because the emission wavelength of the laser diode can be tuned, improved long term performance could be gained through the control of the light shift effect. However, due to the nature of the gas cell frequency standard, various physical phenomena are strongly coupled in their effect on the frequency output, and thus careful consideration must be given to any change in one parameter because of its interrelation with other parameters. Some investigations concerning the coupled effect of the optical and microwave fields in the rubidium atomic clock are reported. It is shown that this type of coupling is an important consideration for any attempt to incorporate a laser diode into a gas cell clock.

  14. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  15. Numerical simulation of the double-to-single ionization ratio for the helium atom in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangjin; Zheng, Yanyan; Yang, Weifeng; Song, Xiaohong; Xu, Junliang; DiMauro, L. F.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Morishita, Toru; Zhao, Song-Feng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present calculations on the ratio between double and single ionization of helium by a strong laser pulse at a wavelength of 780 nm using the quantitative rescattering (QRS) model. According to this model, the yield for the doubly charged ion He+2 can be obtained by multiplying the returning electron wave packet (RWP) with the total cross sections (TCSs) for electron impact ionization and electron impact excitation of +He in the singlet spin channel. The singlet constraint was imposed since the interaction of the helium atom with the laser and the recollision processes both preserve the total spin of the system. An R -matrix (close-coupling) code is used to obtain accurate TCSs, while the RWPs, according to the QRS, are calculated by the strong-field approximation for high-energy photoelectrons. The laser field, which lowers the required energy for the electron to escape from the nucleus at the time of recollision, is also taken into account. The simulated results are in good agreement with the measured He+2/+He ratio over a broad range of laser intensities. The result demonstrates that the QRS approach based on the rescattering model is fully capable of quantitatively interpreting nonsequential double ionization processes.

  16. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert

    2009-07-07

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science.

  17. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert

    2009-07-14

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science.

  18. Infrared spectra of the ethynyl metal hydrides produced in reactions of laser-ablated Mn and Re atoms with acetylene.

    PubMed

    Cho, Han-Gook; Andrews, Lester

    2011-05-19

    The ethynyl metal hydride molecules (HM-C≡CH) are identified in the matrix infrared spectra from reactions of laser-ablated Mn and Re atoms with acetylene using D and (13)C isotopic substitution and density functional computed frequencies. The assignment of strong M-H as well as C≡C bond stretching product absorptions suggests oxidative C-H insertion during reagent codeposition and subsequent photolysis. The unique linear structure calculated for HMn-C≡CH is parallel to C(3v) structures found recently for Mn complexes including CH(3)-MnF.

  19. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Schoenlein, Robert [Deputy Director, Advanced Light Source

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science.

  20. Studies on production of metastable core-excited atoms by laser-produced x-rays. Final report, 1 October 1984-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.E.; Young, J.F.

    1986-04-01

    The overall objective of the work on this program was to study methods for production of core-excited metastable atoms by laser-generated x-rays. We are interested in the spectroscopy of these levels, their autoionizing and radiative rates, and their metastability in the presence of hot electrons and ions. The concept of using x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma to excite large densities of energetic excited levels in atoms and ions has been thoroughly experimentally investigated using modest, 100 mJ, plasma-producing lasers. One of the objectives of this work was to verify that these techniques could be scaled up to higher energies, such as 20 J. Thus a major effort this year has been devoted to the design and construction of the high energy (20 J) 1064 nm plasma-forming laser system and the tunable probe/transfer laser.

  1. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Pulsed, controlled, frequency-chirped laser light at GHz detunings for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, B.; Paltoo, T.; Grogan, T.; Pena, T.; John, J. P. St.; Wright, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a means to control rapidly frequency-chirped laser light at large detuning, by controlling the input modulation frequency of a ˜7 GHz signal into an electro-optical phase modulator in an injection-locked laser system. We show that we can extend the capabilities of the system to effectively pulse the laser on timescales less than 3 ns by turning the injection lock on/off and create arbitrary frequency-chirp shapes on the laser on the tens of nanosecond time scales. We have been able to use this pulsed frequency-chirped laser to control the excitation of a thermal Rb gas via rapid adiabatic passage.

  3. Nano structured carbon nitrides prepared by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppannan, Ramesh; Prashantha, M.

    2010-08-01

    Nanostructured carbon nitride films were prepared by pyrolysis assisted chemical vapour deposition(CVD). A two zone furnace with a temperature profile having a uniform temperature over a length of 20 cm length has been designed and developed. The precursor Azabenzimidazole was taken in a quartz tube and evaporated at 400 0C. The dense vapours enter the pyrolysis zone kept at a desired temperature and deposit on the quartz substrates. The FTIR spectrum of the prepared samples shows peaks at 1272 cm-1 (C.N stretching) and 1600 cm-1 (C=N) confirms the bonding of nitrogen with carbon. Raman D and G peaks, are observed at 1360 cm-1 and 1576 cm-1 respectively. XPS core level spectra of C 1s and N 1s show the formation of π bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms. The size of the nano crystals estimated from the SEM images and XRD is ~100 nm. In some regions of the sample a maximum of 57 atom % of nitrogen has been observed.

  4. Pulse duration effects on laser-assisted electron transfer cross section for He2+ ions colliding with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, Francisco Javier; Cabrera-Trujillo, Remigio

    2014-08-01

    We study the effect of the pulse duration for an ultra-fast and intense laser on the fundamental process of electron capture by analyzing the excitation probability into the n = 2 and n = 3 states when He2+ collides with atomic hydrogen in the 0.05-10 keV/amu energy range, a region of interest for diagnostic processes on plasma and fusion power reactors. We solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation to calculate the electron capture probability by means of a finite-differences, as well as by an electron-nuclear dynamics approach. In particular, we study the effects of 1, 3, 6, and 10 fs laser pulses at FWHM, wavelength of 780 nm and intensity of 3.5 × 1012 W/cm2. We report good agreement for the laser-free state and total electron transfer cross-sections when compared to available theoretical and experimental data. The effect of the laser pulse on the electron capture probability as a function of the impact parameter is such that the charge exchange probability increases considerably in the impact parameter radial region with an increase in the amplitude oscillations and a phase shift on the Stückelberg oscillations. We find an increase on the total electron exchange cross-section for low projectile collision energy when compared to the laser-free case with a minimal effect at high collision energies. We find that the 1 fs laser pulse has a minimal effect, except for very low collision energies. Although in general, the longer the laser pulse, the larger the electron capture probability, at very low collision energies all pulse widths have an effect. For processes in the atto-second region, our findings suggest that to enhance the laser-assisted charge exchange, the best region for short pulses is at very low collision energies. We also find that the s and p state charge exchange cross section are equally affected. We provide a qualitative discussion of these findings.

  5. Synergistic effect of EUV from the laser-sustained detonation plasma in a ground-based atomic oxygen simulation on fluorinated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Masahito; Abe, Shingo; Kishida, Kazuhiro; Yokota, Kumiko; Okamoto, Akio

    2009-01-05

    The contribution of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) from a laser-sustained plasma on the mass loss phenomenon of fluorinated polymer in a ground-based laser-detonation atomic oxygen beam source was evaluated. The atomic oxygen beam and EUV from the oxygen plasma were separated by the high-speed chopper wheel installed in the beam source. The mass changes of the fluorinated polymer and polyimide were measured from the frequency shift of the quartz crystal microbalance during the beam exposures. It has been made clear that the fluorinated polymer erodes by EUV exposure alone. In contrast, no erosion was detected for polyimide by EUV alone. The atomic oxygen-induced erosion was measured for both materials even without EUV exposure. However, no strong synergistic effect was observed for a fluorinated polymer even under the simultaneous exposure condition of atomic oxygen and EUV. Similar results were observed even in simultaneous exposure of atomic oxygen (without EUV) and 172 nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from an excimer lamp. These experiments suggest that the primary origin of the accelerated erosion of fluorinated polymer observed in a laser detonation atomic oxygen source is not the EUV from the laser-sustained plasma.

  6. Design and fabrication of diffractive atom chips for laser cooling and trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, J. P.; McGilligan, J. P.; Griffin, P. F.; Rabey, I. M.; Docherty, K.; Riis, E.; Arnold, A. S.; Hinds, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been shown that optical reflection gratings fabricated directly into an atom chip provide a simple and effective way to trap and cool substantial clouds of atoms (Nshii et al. in Nat Nanotechnol 8:321-324, 2013; McGilligan et al. in Opt Express 23(7):8948-8959, 2015). In this article, we describe how the gratings are designed and microfabricated and we characterise their optical properties, which determine their effectiveness as a cold atom source. We use simple scalar diffraction theory to understand how the morphology of the gratings determines the power in the diffracted beams.

  7. X-ray scattering by atoms and molecules dressed with strong fs laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, Marcus; Belkacem, Ali; Prior, Michael; Feinberg, Benedict; Roesch, Juergen; Maddi, Jason; Glover, T. Ernest; Ackerman, Glenn

    2002-05-01

    We set up an experiment at the Advanced Light Source to study fs laser-induced modifications to the resulting charge state distribution of argon ions after a K-shell is removed by a synchrotron radiation x-ray. Measurements of the "laser-off" charge state distribution of Ar ions following Auger relaxation show very clear post collision interaction effects in agreement with results found in the literature. Our "laser-on" measurements of the charge state distribution of ions, with the laser is overlapped in time (100 ps) and space (< 0.1 mm) with the ALS x-ray pulse, show an unexpected time dependence, on the nano second time scale, of the electron yield correlated to high charge states. These results will be discussed.

  8. Toward an In Situ Organic and Atomic Microprobe with Laser TOF-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cornish, T. J.; McEntire, R. W.; Cheng, A. F.; Benson, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    We present details of a new miniature laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) with improved resolution and sensitivity, for in situ analysis of elemental, isotopic, and organic/molecular composition.

  9. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fraia, M.; Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Lyamayev, V.; Feyer, V.; Moise, A.; Devetta, M.; Piseri, P.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  10. Atomistic modeling of femtosecond laser-induced melting and atomic mixing in Au film - Cu substrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Derek A.; Lin, Zhibin; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Kittel, Silke; Hergenröder, Roland

    2009-09-01

    The mechanisms of femtosecond laser-induced transient melting and atomic mixing in a target composed of a 30 nm Au film deposited on a bulk Cu substrate are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The relative strength and the electron temperature dependence of the electron-phonon coupling of the metals composing the layered target are identified as major factors affecting the initial energy redistribution and the location of the region(s) undergoing transient melting and resolidification. The higher strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Cu, as compared to Au, results in a preferential sub-surface heating and melting of the Cu substrate, while the overlaying Au film largely retains its original crystalline structure. The large difference in the atomic mobility in the transiently melted and crystalline regions of the target makes it possible to connect the final distributions of the components in the resolidified targets to the history of the laser-induced melting process, thus allowing for experimental verification of the computational predictions.

  11. Atomic Processes in Emission Characteristics of a Lithium Plasma Plume Formed by Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Ajai, Kumar; K. Singh, R.; Prahlad, V.; C. Joshi, H.

    2013-03-01

    High resolution spectral analysis of lithium plasma formed by single and double laser ablation has been undertaken to understand the plume-laser interaction, especially at the early stages of the plasma plume. In order to identify different atomic processes in evolving plasma, time resolved spectral emission studies at different inter-pulse delays have been performed for ionic and neutral lithium lines emitting from different levels. Along with the enhancement in emission intensity, a large line broadening and spectral shift, especially in the case of excited state transition Li I 610.3 nm have been observed in the presence of the second pulse. This broadening and shift gradually decrease with increasing time delay. Another interesting feature is the appearance of a multi-component structure in the ionic line at 548.4 nm and these components change conversely into a single structure at the later stages of the plasma. The multi-component structures are correlated with the presence of different velocity (temperature) distributions in non-LTE conditions. Atomic analyses by computing photon emissivity coefficients with an ADAS code have been used to identify the above processes.

  12. Laser damage properties of TiO2/Al2O3 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yaowei; Liu, Hao; Sheng, Ouyang; Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin; Yang, Liming

    2011-08-01

    Research on thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) for laser damage resistance is rare. In this paper, it has been used to deposit TiO2/Al2O3 films at 110° C and 280° C on fused silica and BK7 substrates. Microstructure of the thin films was investigated by x-ray diffraction. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of samples was measured by a damage test system. Damage morphology was studied under a Nomarski differential interference contrast microscope and further checked under an atomic force microscope. Multilayers deposited at different temperatures were compared. The results show that the films deposited by ALD had better uniformity and transmission; in this paper, the uniformity is better than 99% over 100mm Φ samples, and the transmission is more than 99.8% at 1064nm. Deposition temperature affects the deposition rate and the thin film microstructure and further influences the LIDT of the thin films. As to the TiO2/Al2O3 films, the LIDTs were 6.73±0.47J/cm2 and 6.5±0.46J/cm2 at 110° C on fused silica and BK7 substrates, respectively. The LIDTs at 110° C are notably better than 280° C.

  13. Application of Gas Lasers to Studies of Fundamental Molecular and Atomic Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-12

    jas chosen to exnlain observed efficiencies. Such techniques are susceotihle to considerable error since many factors (some tndoubtedly unrecognized...2 1 yielding an estimate of about 4 GHz for the laser full width. A larger grating with beam expanding telescope was also used with the high pressure...associated with the telescope . The high voltage pulsing system was then modified to re- ducd the electrical noise pickup on the laser pulse detection

  14. Compilation of Atomic and Molecular Data Relevant to Gas Lasers. Volume VII.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Continue on reverse side If neceeary nd Identify by block n-mber) Excitation Laser pumping mechanisms High energy electron beams Ionization Heavy...prepared in the context of the two most-used techniques for gas laser pumping: electrical discharges and high intensity, high energy electron aij ’in...energy electron and ion beams, but are oriented toward a third pumping technique: nuclear pumping. Since nuclear reactions may also become interesting

  15. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Anderson, Sarah E; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-20

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes the multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is not often employed. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. Here we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants underlying physics. The spatial resolution of ponderomotive spectroscopy is orders of magnitude better than the transition frequency would suggest, promising single-site addressability in dense particle arrays for quantum computing applications.

  16. Comparison of nanosecond and picosecond excitation for interference-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of atomic hydrogen in flames.

    PubMed

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Patterson, Brian D; Frank, Jonathan H; Settersten, Thomas B

    2008-09-10

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) line imaging of atomic hydrogen was investigated in a series of premixed CH4/O2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/O2/N2 flames using excitation with either picosecond or nanosecond pulsed lasers operating at 205 nm. Radial TP-LIF profiles were measured for a range of pulse fluences to determine the maximum interference-free signal levels and the corresponding picosecond and nanosecond laser fluences in each of 12 flames. For an interference-free measurement, the shape of the TP-LIF profile is independent of laser fluence. For larger fluences, distortions in the profile are attributed to photodissociation of H2O, CH3, and/or other combustion intermediates, and stimulated emission. In comparison with the nanosecond laser, excitation with the picosecond laser can effectively reduce the photolytic interference and produces approximately an order of magnitude larger interference-free signal in CH4/O2/N2 flames with equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5< or =Phi< or =1.4, and in H2/O2 flames with 0.3< or =Phi< or =1.2. Although photolytic interference limits the nanosecond laser fluence in all flames, stimulated emission, occurring between the laser-excited level, H(n=3), and H(n=2), is the limiting factor for picosecond excitation in the flames with the highest H atom concentration. Nanosecond excitation is advantageous in the richest (Phi=1.64) CH4/O2/N2 flame and in H2/O2/N2 flames. The optimal excitation pulse width for interference-free H atom detection depends on the relative concentrations of hydrogen atoms and photolytic precursors, the flame temperature, and the laser path length within the flame.

  17. Low-pressure water vapour plasma treatment of surfaces for biomolecules decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, F.; Kylián, O.; Amato, L.; Hanuš, J.; Rossi, F.

    2012-04-01

    Decontamination treatments of surfaces are performed on bacterial spores, albumin and brain homogenate used as models of biological contaminations in a low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma reactor operated with water-vapour-based gas mixtures. It is shown that removal of contamination can be achieved using pure H2O or Ar/H2O mixtures at low temperatures with removal rates comparable to oxygen-based mixtures. Particle fluxes (Ar+ ions, O and H atomic radicals and OH molecular radicals) from water vapour discharge are measured by optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe under several operating conditions. Analysis of particle fluxes and removal rates measurements illustrates the role of ion bombardment associated with O radicals, governing the removal rates of organic matter. Auxiliary role of hydroxyl radicals is discussed on the basis of experimental data. The advantages of a water vapour plasma process are discussed for practical applications in medical devices decontamination.

  18. Light induced chemical vapour deposition of titanium oxide thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary, E.; Benvenuti, G.; Wagner, F.; Hoffmann, P.

    2000-02-01

    High resolution patterned deposition of titania is achieved by light induced chemical vapour deposition (LICVD), by imaging a mask onto a glass substrate. A long pulse XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm) provides, by perpendicular irradiation, the energy to convert titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapour into titanium dioxide films, in an oxygen atmosphere, on unheated glass substrates. The amorphous titania deposits contain about 6% carbon contamination according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The deposition rate increases with increasing laser fluence until a maximum value is reached, then remains constant over a wide range, and finally decreases with further fluence increase due to titania ablation or thermal effects. The film thickness increases linearly with the number of pulses after a nucleation period. The strong influence of the laser pulse repetition rate on the growth rate and the thickness profile are reported.

  19. High power room temperature 1014.8 nm Yb fiber amplifier and frequency quadrupling to 253.7 nm for laser cooling of mercury atoms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinmeng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hongli; Liu, Kangkang; Xu, Zhen; Feng, Yan

    2013-12-16

    An 8 W continuous wave linearly-polarized single-frequency 1014.8 nm fiber amplifier working at room temperature is developed with commercial double-clad single-mode Yb-doped silica fiber. Re-absorption at the laser wavelength and amplified spontaneous emission at longer wavelength are managed by optimizing the amplifier design. The laser has a linewidth of ~24 kHz without noticeable broadening after amplification. Using two resonant cavity frequency doublers, 1.03 W laser at 507.4 nm and 75 mW laser at 253.7 nm are generated with 4 W 1014.8 nm laser. Both absorption and saturated absorption spectra of the (1)S(0) - (3)P(1) transition of atomic mercury are measured with the 253.7 nm laser.

  20. Improved laser damage threshold performance of calcium fluoride optical surfaces via Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Svrluga, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optics are not keeping up with the pace of laser advancements. The laser industry is rapidly increasing its power capabilities and reducing wavelengths which have exposed the optics as a weak link in lifetime failures for these advanced systems. Nanometer sized surface defects (scratches, pits, bumps and residual particles) on the surface of optics are a significant limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, magnesium fluoride, zinc sulfide, LBO and others presents a unique challenge for traditional polishing techniques. Exogenesis Corporation, using its new and proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and particle contamination leaving many material surfaces with roughness typically around one Angstrom. This surface defect mitigation via ANAB processing can be shown to increase performance properties of high intensity optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for calcium fluoride laser windows. It further correlates laser damage threshold improvements with the smoothing produced by ANAB surface treatment. All ANAB processing was performed at Exogenesis Corporation using an nAccel100TM Accelerated Particle Beam processing tool. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis on a Park Model XE70 AFM, and all laser damage testing was performed at Spica Technologies, Inc. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply mechanical forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface

  1. Atomization efficiency and photon yield in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of single nanoparticles in an optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Pablo; Fortes, Francisco J.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for investigating the influence of particle size on the dissociation efficiency and the absolute production of photons per mass unit of airborne solid graphite spheres under single-particle regime. Particles of average diameter of 400 nm were probed and compared with 2 μm particles. Samples were first catapulted into aerosol form and then secluded in an optical trap set by a 532 nm laser. Trap stability was quantified before subjecting particles to LIBS analysis. Fine alignment of the different lines comprising the optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument and tuning of excitation parameters conditioning the LIBS signal such as fluence and acquisition delay are described in detail with the ultimate goal of acquiring clear spectroscopic data on masses as low as 75 fg. The atomization efficiency and the photon yield increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Time-resolved plasma imaging studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanisms leading to particle disintegration and excitation.

  2. Spatial discrimination against background with different optical systems for collection of fluorescence in laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a graphite tube electrothermal atomizer.

    PubMed

    Yuzefovsky, A I; Lonardo, R F; Michel, R G

    1995-07-01

    A single 90 degrees off-axis ellipsoidal mirror fragment was used in a dispersive detection system for electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The performance of the new optical arrangement was compared with those of optical arrangements that employed a plane mirror in combination with biconvex or plano-convex lenses. All the optical arrangements collected fluorescence in a scheme called front surface illustration. BEAM-4, an optical ray tracing program, was used for calculations of spatial ray distributions and optical collection efficiency for the various optical configurations. Experimentally, the best collection efficiency was obtained by use of the ellipsoidal mirror, in qualitative agreement with simulations done by use of the BEAM-4 software. The best detection limit for cobalt with the new optical arrangement was 20 fg, which was a factor of 5 better than that obtained with conventional optical arrangements with otherwise the same instrumentation. The signal-to-background ratio and the fluorescence collection efficiency were also studied as a function of position of the optical components for the various optical arrangements. For both cobalt and phosphorus, the signal-to-background ratio with the new optical arrangement remained stable within 10-20% during +/- 8 mm shifts in the position of the detection system from the focal plane of the optics. Overall, the new optical arrangement offered high collection efficiency, excellent sensitivity, and facile optical alignment due to efficient spatial separation between the fluorescence signal and the background radiation. The advantages of the new optical arrangement were particularly important during measurements in the presence of high levels of blackbody radiation.

  3. Characterization of energetic and thermalized sputtered atoms in pulsed plasma using time-resolved tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Desecures, M.; Poucques, L. de; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Bougdira, J.

    2014-11-03

    In this work, a time-resolved tunable diode-laser (DL) induced fluorescence (TR-TDLIF) method calibrated by absorption spectroscopy has been developed in order to determine atom and flux velocity distribution functions (AVDF and FVDF) of the energetic and the thermalized atoms in pulsed plasmas. The experimental set-up includes a low-frequency (∼3 Hz) and high spectral-resolution DL (∼0.005 pm), a fast rise-time pulse generator, and a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system. The induced TR-TDLIF signal is recorded every 0.5 μs with a digital oscilloscope of a second-long trace. The technique is illustrated with determining the AVDF and the FVDF of a metastable state of the sputtered neutral tungsten atoms in the HiPIMS post-discharge. Gaussian functions describing the population of the four W isotopes were used to fit the measured TR-TDLIF signal. These distribution functions provide insight into transition from the energetic to thermalized regimes from the discharge onset. This technique may be extended with appropriate DLs to probe any species with rapidly changing AVDF and FVDF in pulsed and strongly oscillating plasmas.

  4. IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ATOM AND MOLECULAR PULSED LASERS (AMPL'99): Discharge characteristics in a nonchain HF(DF) laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Kazantsev, S. Yu; Saifulin, A. V.; Firsov, K. N.

    2000-06-01

    It is found that for SF6—hydrocarbon (deuterocarbon) mixtures having a composition typical for nonchain HF(DF) lasers, the electric field strength reduced to the partial pressure of SF6 (pSF6) in the quasistationary phase of a volume self-sustained discharge (E/pSF6)st=92 V m-1 Pa-1 is close to the known critical value (E/p)cr=89 V m-1 Pa-1, which is specified by the condition that the electron-impact ionisation rate of SF6 is equal to the rate of electron attachment to SF6 molecules. This testifies to the decisive role of these two processes and allows the use of the known approximations of the effective ionisation coefficient and the electron drift velocity for pure SF6 when calculating the discharge characteristics. The oscilloscope traces of voltage and current calculated in this approximation for lasers with apertures ranging from 4 to 27 cm deviated from the experimental data by no more than 10%.

  5. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Effect of the electronic structure of target atoms on the emission continuum of laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kask, Nikolai E.; Michurin, Sergei V.; Fedorov, Gennadii M.

    2004-06-01

    The low-temperature laser plasma at the surface of metal targets is experimentally investigated. Continuous spectra emitted from a laser plume are found to be similar for targets consisting of the elements of the same subgroup of the Mendeleev periodic table. The similarity manifests itself both in the dependence of the emission intensity on the external pressure and in the structure of absorption bands related to a fine-dispersed phase existing in the peripheral regions of the plume.

  6. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Amirifar, Nooshin; Lardé, Rodrigue Talbot, Etienne; Pareige, Philippe; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lorenzo; Houard, Jonathan; Castro, Celia; Sallet, Vincent; Zehani, Emir; Hassani, Said; Sartel, Corine; Ziani, Ahmed; Portier, Xavier

    2015-12-07

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials.

  7. Spinor atom-molecule conversion via laser-induced three-body recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, H.; Deng, Y.; Meystre, P.

    2011-04-15

    We study the theory of several aspects of the dynamics of coherent atom-molecule conversion in spin-one Bose-Einstein condensates. Specifically, we discuss how, for a suitable dark-state condition, the interplay of spin-exchange collisions and photo association leads to the stable creation of an atom-molecule pair from three initial spin-zero atoms. This process involves two two-body interactions and can be intuitively viewed as an effective three-body recombination. We investigate the relative roles of photo association and of the initial magnetization in the 'resonant' case, where the dark-state condition is perfectly satisfied. We also consider the 'nonresonant' case, where that condition is satisfied either only approximately - the so-called adiabatic case - or not at all. In the adiabatic case, we derive an effective nonrigid pendulum model that allows one to conveniently discuss the onset of an antiferromagnetic instability in an 'atom-molecule pendulum', as well as large-amplitude pair oscillations and atom-molecule entanglement.

  8. Formation and stimulated photodissociation of metastable molecules with emission of photon at the collision of two atoms in a laser radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazazyan, E.; Gazazyan, A.

    2017-04-01

    The formation of metastable molecules (Feshbach resonances) at the collision of two atoms and subsequent stimulated transition to a lower unbound electronic molecular state, with emission of a photon of the laser radiation has been investigated. This can develop, in particular, for Rb 2 molecules due to resonance scattering of two Rb atoms. This process is a basis for the creation of excimer lasers. Expressions have been obtained for the cross sections of elastic and inelastic resonance scattering and the intensity of the stimulated emission of the photons.

  9. Unified Time and Frequency Picture of Ultrafast Atomic Excitation in Strong Laser Fields.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Patchkovskii, S; Ivanov, M; Eichmann, U

    2017-01-06

    Excitation and ionization in strong laser fields lies at the heart of such diverse research directions as high-harmonic generation and spectroscopy, laser-induced diffraction imaging, emission of femtosecond electron bunches from nanotips, self-guiding, filamentation and mirrorless lasing during propagation of light in atmospheres. While extensive quantum mechanical and semiclassical calculations on strong-field ionization are well backed by sophisticated experiments, the existing scattered theoretical work aiming at a full quantitative understanding of strong-field excitation lacks experimental confirmation. Here we present experiments on strong-field excitation in both the tunneling and multiphoton regimes and their rigorous interpretation by time dependent Schrödinger equation calculations, which finally consolidates the seemingly opposing strong-field regimes with their complementary pictures. Most strikingly, we observe an unprecedented enhancement of excitation yields, which opens new possibilities in ultrafast strong-field control of Rydberg wave packet excitation and laser intensity characterization.

  10. Method using laser irradiation for the production of atomically clean crystalline silicon and germanium surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ownby, Gary W.; White, Clark W.; Zehner, David M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to a new method for removing surface impurities from crystalline silicon or germanium articles, such as off-the-shelf p- or n-type wafers to be doped for use as junction devices. The principal contaminants on such wafers are oxygen and carbon. The new method comprises laser-irradiating the contaminated surface in a non-reactive atmosphere, using one or more of Q-switched laser pulses whose parameters are selected to effect melting of the surface without substantial vaporization thereof. In a typical application, a plurality of pulses is used to convert a surface region of an off-the-shelf silicon wafer to an automatically clean region. This can be accomplished in a system at a pressure below 10.sup.-8 Torr, using Q-switched ruby-laser pulses having an energy density in the range of from about 60 to 190 MW/cm.sup.2.

  11. Unified Time and Frequency Picture of Ultrafast Atomic Excitation in Strong Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, H.; Patchkovskii, S.; Ivanov, M.; Eichmann, U.

    2017-01-01

    Excitation and ionization in strong laser fields lies at the heart of such diverse research directions as high-harmonic generation and spectroscopy, laser-induced diffraction imaging, emission of femtosecond electron bunches from nanotips, self-guiding, filamentation and mirrorless lasing during propagation of light in atmospheres. While extensive quantum mechanical and semiclassical calculations on strong-field ionization are well backed by sophisticated experiments, the existing scattered theoretical work aiming at a full quantitative understanding of strong-field excitation lacks experimental confirmation. Here we present experiments on strong-field excitation in both the tunneling and multiphoton regimes and their rigorous interpretation by time dependent Schrödinger equation calculations, which finally consolidates the seemingly opposing strong-field regimes with their complementary pictures. Most strikingly, we observe an unprecedented enhancement of excitation yields, which opens new possibilities in ultrafast strong-field control of Rydberg wave packet excitation and laser intensity characterization.

  12. Polarization spectroscopy and laser-locking for excitation of ultracold potassium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Charles; Eberhart, Max; Adamson, Philip

    2016-05-01

    We report on the use of polarization spectroscopy to lock the frequency of an external-cavity diode laser to a the 4s - 4 p1/2 (770 nm), 4s - 4 p3/2 (767 nm) and 4s - 5 p1/2 and 4s - 5 p3/2 (405 nm) transitions in potassium. A rate equation model is in good agreement with the observed lineshapes and the D2 transition lineshapes agree with prior experiments. We have used the dispersion shaped lines to lock the frequency of lasers for probing a magneto-optical trap's density on the D1 line and for stepwise excitation of potassium Rydberg states using the 4s - 5 p3/2 transition. The technique has proven particularly helpful by enabling modulation-free locking of blue diode lasers. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1126599.

  13. Continuous-variable entanglement and two-mode squeezing in a single-atom Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sete, Eyob A.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2012-06-01

    The quantum statistical properties of light emitted by a two-photon double Raman laser is investigated. Using the master equation derived in the good-cavity limit, we study the squeezing and entanglement properties of the cavity field. It turns out that the cavity radiation exhibits two-mode squeezing and entanglement in the transient as well as steady state regime for realizable parameters. We establish a connection between two-mode squeezing and entanglement that gives insight into the physical origin of these quantum features. We also discuss the interplay between the laser detuning and amplitude in modifying the properties of the cavity field.

  14. Broadening and shift of the spectral lines of hydrogen atoms and silicon ions in laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kask, N E; Leksina, E G; Michurin, S V; Fedorov, G M; Chopornyak, D B

    2015-06-30

    We report an experimental investigation of the broadening and shift of discrete lines in the plasma spectrum produced in the laser ablation of silicon in a broad pressure range (10{sup 2} – 10{sup 7} Pa) of the ambient gas (Ar, He, H{sub 2}). The broadening and line shifts are measured in relation to the distance from the target and initial gas pressure. The threshold nature of the resulting dependences is found to be related to the formation of virtual percolation clusters proceeding in the hot dense plasma. (laser plasma)

  15. Optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, C.; Münchow, F.; Görlitz, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of {}^{87}Rb and {}^{176}Yb in a continuously loaded double-species magneto-optical trap. An excited vibrational level of Rb*Yb which is energetically close to the 5^2P_{1/2} state of Rb is coupled by a strong laser field to a vibrational level in the ground state of RbYb and probed by a weak probe laser field. The induced Autler-Townes splittings in the photoassociation spectra allow us to determine relative Franck-Condon factors of molecular transitions in RbYb.

  16. Atomic hydrogen and diatomic titanium-monoxide molecular spectroscopy in laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.

    2017-03-01

    This article gives a brief review of experimental studies of hydrogen Balmer series emission spectra. Ongoing research aims to evaluate early plasma evolution following optical breakdown in laboratory air. Of interest is as well laser ablation of metallic titanium and characterization of plasma evolution. Emission of titanium monoxide is discussed together with modeling of diatomic spectra to infer temperature. The behavior of titanium particles in plasma draws research interests ranging from the modeling of stellar atmospheres to the enhancement of thin film production via pulsed laser deposition.

  17. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Investigation of the properties of resonance holograms in a beam of sodium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Igor'S.; Likhanskiĭ, V. V.; Semerok, A. F.; Firsov, Valerii A.; Chankin, A. V.

    1987-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical (using a two-level approximation) investigations were made of the properties of resonance holograms (excited-state gratings) created by monochromatic linearly polarized radiation from a cw dye laser in a beam of sodium atoms as a result of the 32P3/2- 32S1/2(F=2) transition. A good qualitative agreement was observed between the theory and experimental results. It was established that the maximum diffraction efficiency was attained when the intensity of the radiation used to form the hologram was of the order of the intensity needed to saturate the transition and the optical thickness of the beam was ~1.1. The sensitivity of the medium was ~1 nJ/cm2 for 1% diffraction efficiency.

  18. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser-trapped alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Sprouse, G. D.; Orozco, L. A.; DeMille, D. P.

    2007-03-15

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent, parity-violating electromagnetic moment, the anapole moment. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the antinode of a standing wave Fabry-Perot cavity driving the anapole-induced microwave E1 transition. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  19. Novel approach for observing the asymmetrical evolution and the compositional nonuniformity of laser pulsed atom probe tomography of a single ZnO nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Jae-Bok; Kim, Young-Tae; Kim, Bo-Hwa; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of ZnO nanowires is crucial for developing nanostructured devices together with related compounds and alloys with an atomic-scale regime. This study describes the effects of laser energy on the atom probe tomography analysis of a single ZnO nanowire with a high aspect ratio, diameters of 80?100 nm and lengths of 10 µm. We observed both an asymmetrical evolution in the apex morphology and the compositional nonuniformities of Zn and O ions with respect to the laser energies ranging from 5 to 40 nJ. When the higher laser illumination exposed to the ZnO nanowires, non-uniform field strength becomes noticeable especially at the laser incident side of the samples. Moreover, we measured the charge state ratios of Zn+ and Zn2+ ions as a function of the applied laser energies. Our results proved important for accurate quantitative characterization and better interpretation for the laser-pulsed atom probe tomography of ZnO-based devices.

  20. Spectroscopy of laser-induced autoionizing nonlinear resonances in atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, L. I.; Kovachev, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    Efficient harmonic generation at laser-induced autoionizing state in continuum, were observed for the first time by our laboratory [1,2,3]. In this paper, nonlinear frequency mixing in alkali metal vapors at induced continuum structure in Na, are studied in detail. Besides, measurement of nonlinear optical susceptibility at induced autoionizing resonance, is performed. Tunable ultraviolet radiations by four-photon processes near induced resonances are obtained. Estimations of the real and imaginary parts of the nonlinearities, are estimated. We will specially note, that the resonant photoabsorption of ions is experimentally investigated since it gives information about the autoionizing states, which is impossible to obtain on the base only of the emission spectra. We use also laser inducing for obtaining of powerful radiation source in VUV. Thus, many actual problems as the selective impact on matter, laser photochemistry and laser isotope separation are connected directly with the induced autoionizing nonlinear resonances. The main interest is to control the spectral characteristics of continuum. The discrete level from the continuum structure leads to appearance of asymmetrical autoionizing resonance onto the background of the broad-band absorption line.