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Sample records for atp hydrolysis mechanism

  1. Insights into the Chemomechanical Coupling of the Myosin Motor from Simulation of Its ATP Hydrolysis Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzl, S.M.; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2006-03-01

    The molecular motor myosin converts chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work, thus driving a variety of essential motility processes. Although myosin function has been studied extensively, the catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and its chemomechanical coupling to the motor cycle are not completely understood. Here, the catalysis mechanism in myosin II is examined using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical reaction path calculations. The resulting reaction pathways, found in the catalytically competent closed/closed conformation of the Switch-1/Switch-2 loops of myosin, are all associative with a pentavalent bipyramidal oxyphosphorane transition state but can vary in the activation mechanism of the attacking water molecule and in the way the hydrogens are transferred between the heavy atoms. The coordination bond between the Mg2+ metal cofactor and Ser237 in the Switch-1 loop is broken in the product state, thereby facilitating the opening of the Switch-1 loop after hydrolysis is completed, which is required for subsequent strong rebinding to actin. This reveals a key element of the chemomechanical coupling that underlies the motor cycle, namely, the modulation of actin unbinding or binding in response to the ATP or ADP{circle_dot}Pi state of nucleotide-bound myosin.

  2. Lytic Water Dynamics Reveal Evolutionarily Conserved Mechanisms of ATP Hydrolysis by TIP49 AAA+ ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Afanasyeva, Arina; Hirtreiter, Angela; Schreiber, Anne; Grohmann, Dina; Pobegalov, Georgii; McKay, Adam R.; Tsaneva, Irina; Petukhov, Michael; Käs, Emmanuel; Grigoriev, Mikhail; Werner, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic TIP49a (Pontin) and TIP49b (Reptin) AAA+ ATPases play essential roles in key cellular processes. How their weak ATPase activity contributes to their important functions remains largely unknown and difficult to analyze because of the divergent properties of TIP49a and TIP49b proteins and of their homo- and hetero-oligomeric assemblies. To circumvent these complexities, we have analyzed the single ancient TIP49 ortholog found in the archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri (mkTIP49). All-atom homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations validated by biochemical assays reveal highly conserved organizational principles and identify key residues for ATP hydrolysis. An unanticipated crosstalk between Walker B and Sensor I motifs impacts the dynamics of water molecules and highlights a critical role of trans-acting aspartates in the lytic water activation step that is essential for the associative mechanism of ATP hydrolysis. PMID:24613487

  3. Mechanism of the αβ conformational change in F1-ATPase after ATP hydrolysis: free-energy simulations.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuko; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    One of the motive forces for F1-ATPase rotation is the conformational change of the catalytically active β subunit due to closing and opening motions caused by ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. The closing motion is accomplished in two steps: the hydrogen-bond network around ATP changes and then the entire structure changes via B-helix sliding, as shown in our previous study. Here, we investigated the opening motion induced by ATP hydrolysis using all-atom free-energy simulations, combining the nudged elastic band method and umbrella sampling molecular-dynamics simulations. Because hydrolysis requires residues in the α subunit, the simulations were performed with the αβ dimer. The results indicate that the large-scale opening motion is also achieved by the B-helix sliding (in the reverse direction). However, the sliding mechanism is different from that of ATP binding because sliding is triggered by separation of the hydrolysis products ADP and Pi. We also addressed several important issues: 1), the timing of the product Pi release; 2), the unresolved half-closed β structure; and 3), the ADP release mechanism. These issues are fundamental for motor function; thus, the rotational mechanism of the entire F1-ATPase is also elucidated through this αβ study. During the conformational change, conserved residues among the ATPase proteins play important roles, suggesting that the obtained mechanism may be shared with other ATPase proteins. When combined with our previous studies, these results provide a comprehensive view of the β-subunit conformational change that drives the ATPase.

  4. Mechanism of the αβ Conformational Change in F1-ATPase after ATP Hydrolysis: Free-Energy Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuko; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    One of the motive forces for F1-ATPase rotation is the conformational change of the catalytically active β subunit due to closing and opening motions caused by ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. The closing motion is accomplished in two steps: the hydrogen-bond network around ATP changes and then the entire structure changes via B-helix sliding, as shown in our previous study. Here, we investigated the opening motion induced by ATP hydrolysis using all-atom free-energy simulations, combining the nudged elastic band method and umbrella sampling molecular-dynamics simulations. Because hydrolysis requires residues in the α subunit, the simulations were performed with the αβ dimer. The results indicate that the large-scale opening motion is also achieved by the B-helix sliding (in the reverse direction). However, the sliding mechanism is different from that of ATP binding because sliding is triggered by separation of the hydrolysis products ADP and Pi. We also addressed several important issues: 1), the timing of the product Pi release; 2), the unresolved half-closed β structure; and 3), the ADP release mechanism. These issues are fundamental for motor function; thus, the rotational mechanism of the entire F1-ATPase is also elucidated through this αβ study. During the conformational change, conserved residues among the ATPase proteins play important roles, suggesting that the obtained mechanism may be shared with other ATPase proteins. When combined with our previous studies, these results provide a comprehensive view of the β-subunit conformational change that drives the ATPase. PMID:25564855

  5. Pathway of processive ATP hydrolysis by kinesin

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susan P.; Webb, Martin R.; Brune, Martin; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct measurement of the kinetics of kinesin dissociation from microtubules, the release of phosphate and ADP from kinesin, and rebinding of kinesin to the microtubule have defined the mechanism for the kinesin ATPase cycle. The processivity of ATP hydrolysis is ten molecules per site at low salt concentration but is reduced to one ATP per site at higher salt concentration. Kinesin dissociates from the microtubule after ATP hydrolysis. This step is rate-limiting. The subsequent rebinding of kinesin · ADP to the microtubule is fast, so kinesin spends only a small fraction of its duty cycle in the dissociated state. These results provide an explanation for the motility differences between skeletal myosin and kinesin. PMID:7854446

  6. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  7. MgATP-concentration dependence of protection of yeast vacuolar V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole supports a bi-site catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, Elena M.; Milgrom, Yakov M.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MgATP protects V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer V-ATPase activity saturation with MgATP is not sufficient for complete protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results support a bi-site catalytic mechanism for V-ATPase. -- Abstract: Catalytic site occupancy of the yeast vacuolar V-ATPase during ATP hydrolysis in the presence of an ATP-regenerating system was probed using sensitivity of the enzyme to inhibition by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). The results show that, regardless of the presence or absence of the proton-motive force across the vacuolar membrane, saturation of V-ATPase activity at increasing MgATP concentrations is accompanied by only partial protection of the enzyme from inhibition by NBD-Cl. Both in the presence and absence of an uncoupler, complete protection of V-ATPase from inhibition by NBD-Cl requires MgATP concentrations that are significantly higher than those expected from the K{sub m} values for MgATP. The results are inconsistent with a tri-site model and support a bi-site model for a mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by V-ATPase.

  8. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  9. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites. PMID:27296627

  10. Structural asymmetry in the closed state of mitochondrial Hsp90 (TRAP1) supports a two-step ATP hydrolysis mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, Laura A.; Partridge, James R.; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Elnatan, Daniel; Kennedy, Michael A.; Agard, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary While structural symmetry is a prevailing feature of homo-oligomeric proteins, asymmetry provides unique mechanistic opportunities. We present the crystal structure of full-length TRAP1, the mitochondrial Hsp90 molecular chaperone, in a catalytically active closed state. The TRAP1 homodimer adopts a distinct, asymmetric conformation, where one protomer is reconfigured via a helix swap at the Middle:C-terminal Domain (MD:CTD) interface. Importantly, this interface plays a critical role in client binding. Solution methods validate the asymmetry and show extension to Hsp90 homologs. Point mutations that disrupt unique contacts at each MD:CTD interface reduce catalytic activity, substrate binding, and demonstrate that each protomer needs access to both conformations. Crystallographic data on a dimeric NTD:MD fragment suggests that asymmetry arises from strain induced by simultaneous NTD and CTD dimerization. The observed asymmetry provides the potential for an additional step in the ATPase cycle, allowing sequential ATP hydrolysis steps to drive both client remodeling and client release. PMID:24462206

  11. Studies of the Maltose Transport System Reveal a Mechanism for Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Substrate Translocation without Direct Recognition of Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Alister D.; Shilton, Brian H.

    2010-10-11

    The ATPase activity of the maltose transporter (MalFGK{sub 2}) is dependent on interactions with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). To determine whether direct interactions between the translocated sugar and MalFGK{sub 2} are important for the regulation of ATP hydrolysis, we used an MBP mutant (sMBP) that is able to bind either maltose or sucrose. We observed that maltose- and sucrose-bound sMBP stimulate equal levels of MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase activity. Therefore, the ATPase activity of MalFGK{sub 2} is coupled to translocation of maltose solely by interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and MBP. For both maltose and sucrose, the ability of sMBP to stimulate the MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase was greatly reduced compared with wild-type MBP, indicating that the mutations in sMBP have interfered with important interactions between MBP and MalFGK{sub 2}. High resolution crystal structure analysis of sMBP shows that in the closed conformation with bound sucrose, three of four mutations are buried, and the fourth causes only a minor change in the accessible surface. In contrast, in the open form of sMBP, all of the mutations are accessible, and the main chain of Tyr{sup 62}-Gly{sup 69} is destabilized and occupies an alternative conformation due to the W62Y mutation. On this basis, the compromised ability of sMBP to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by MalFGK{sub 2} is most likely due to a disruption of interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and the open, rather than the closed, conformation of sMBP. Modeling the open sMBP structure bound to MalFGK{sub 2} in the transition state for ATP hydrolysis points to an important site of interaction and suggests a mechanism for coupling ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation that is independent of the exact structure of the substrate.

  12. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering.

  13. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-12-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering.

  14. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering. PMID:26678797

  15. Cation Transport Coupled to ATP Hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase: An Integrated, Animated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Francisco A.; Furriel, Rosa P. M.; McNamara, John C.; Horisberger, Jean D.; Borin, Ivana A.

    2010-01-01

    An Adobe[R] animation is presented for use in undergraduate Biochemistry courses, illustrating the mechanism of Na[superscript +] and K[superscript +] translocation coupled to ATP hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase, a P[subscript 2c]-type ATPase, or ATP-powered ion pump that actively translocates cations across plasma membranes. The enzyme is also…

  16. [Magnetic Magnesium Isotope Accelerates ATP Hydrolysis Catalyzed by Myosin].

    PubMed

    Koltover, V K; Labyntseva, R D; Karandashev, V K; Kosterin, S O

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of experimental studies on the influence of different magnesium isotopes, the magnetic 25Mg and nonmagnetic 24Mg and 26Mg on ATP activity of the isolated myosin subfragment-1. The reaction rate in the presence of magetic 25Mg isotope turned out to be 2.0-2.5 times higher than that using nonmagnetic 24Mg and 2 Mg isotopes. No magnetic isotope effect was observed in the absence of the enzyme as in spontaneous ATP hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Hence, a significant catalytic effect of the magnetic 25Mg isotope (nuclear spin catalysis) was observed in the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP.

  17. Minimum energy reaction profiles for ATP hydrolysis in myosin.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, Bella L; Kaliman, Ilya A; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2011-11-01

    The minimum energy reaction profiles corresponding to two possible reaction mechanisms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis in myosin are computed in this work within the framework of the quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method by using the same partitioning of the model system to the QM and MM parts and the same computational protocol. On the first reaction route, one water molecule performs nucleophilic attack at the phosphorus center P(γ) from ATP while the second water molecule in the closed protein cleft serves as a catalytic base assisted by the Glu residue from the myosin salt bridge. According to the present QM/MM calculations consistent with the results of kinetic studies this reaction pathway is characterized by a low activation energy barrier about 10 kcal/mol. The computed activation energy barrier for the second mechanism, which assumes the penta-coordinated oxyphosphorane transition state upon involvement of single water molecule in the reaction, is considerably higher than that for the two-water mechanism.

  18. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  19. Treatment of heterotopic ossification through remote ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jonathan R; De La Rosa, Sara; Eboda, Oluwatobi; Cilwa, Katherine E; Agarwal, Shailesh; Buchman, Steven R; Cederna, Paul S; Xi, Chuanwu; Morris, Michael D; Herndon, David N; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G; Krebsbach, Paul H; Wang, Stewart C; Levi, Benjamin

    2014-09-24

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the pathologic development of ectopic bone in soft tissues because of a local or systemic inflammatory insult, such as burn injury or trauma. In HO, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are inappropriately activated to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Through the correlation of in vitro assays and in vivo studies (dorsal scald burn with Achilles tenotomy), we have shown that burn injury enhances the osteogenic potential of MSCs and causes ectopic endochondral heterotopic bone formation and functional contractures through bone morphogenetic protein-mediated canonical SMAD signaling. We further demonstrated a prevention strategy for HO through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis at the burn site using apyrase. Burn site apyrase treatment decreased ATP, increased adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, and decreased phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 in MSCs in vitro. This ATP hydrolysis also decreased HO formation and mitigated functional impairment in vivo. Similarly, selective inhibition of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation with LDN-193189 decreased HO formation and increased range of motion at the injury site in our burn model in vivo. Our results suggest that burn injury-exacerbated HO formation can be treated through therapeutics that target burn site ATP hydrolysis and modulation of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. PMID:25253675

  20. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  1. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  2. Catalytic Mechanism of the Maltose Transporter Hydrolyzing ATP.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenting; Liao, Jie-Lou

    2016-01-12

    We use quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations to study ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the maltose transporter. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family that consists of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The ABC proteins catalyze ATP hydrolysis to perform a variety of biological functions. Despite extensive research efforts, the precise molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the ABC enzymes remains elusive. In this work, the reaction pathway for ATP hydrolysis in the maltose transporter is evaluated using a QM/MM implementation of the nudged elastic band method without presuming reaction coordinates. The potential of mean force along the reaction pathway is obtained with an activation free energy of 19.2 kcal/mol in agreement with experiments. The results demonstrate that the reaction proceeds via a dissociative-like pathway with a trigonal bipyramidal transition state in which the cleavage of the γ-phosphate P-O bond occurs and the O-H bond of the lytic water molecule is not yet broken. Our calculations clearly show that the Walker B glutamate as well as the switch histidine stabilizes the transition state via electrostatic interactions rather than serving as a catalytic base. The results are consistent with biochemical and structural experiments, providing novel insight into the molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis in the ABC proteins. PMID:26666844

  3. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems.

  4. Utilization of positional isotope exchange experiments to evaluate reversibility of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by Escherichia coli Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Lee, Irene

    2010-02-01

    Lon protease, also known as protease La, is an ATP-dependent serine protease. Despite the presence of a proteolytic Ser-Lys dyad, the enzyme only catalyzes protein degradation in the presence of ATP. Lon possesses an intrinsic ATPase activity that is stimulated by protein and certain peptide substrates. Through sequence alignment and analysis, it is concluded that Lon belongs to the AAA+ protein family. Previous kinetic characterization of the ATPase domain of Escherichia coli Lon protease implicates a half-site reactivity model in which only 50% of the ATP bound to Lon are hydrolyzed to yield ADP; the remaining ATPase sites remain bound with ATP and are considered non-catalytic. In this model, it is implied that ATP hydrolysis is irreversible. To further evaluate the proposed half-site reactivity model, the reversibility of the ATPase activity of E. coli Lon was evaluated by positional isotope exchange experiments. The ATPase reactions were conducted in the 18O-enriched buffer such that the extent of 18O incorporation into inorganic phosphate generated from ATP hydrolysis could be used to evaluate the extent of reversibility in ATP hydrolysis. Collectively, our experimental data reveal that the ATPase reaction catalyzed by E. coli Lon in the presence and absence of peptide substrate that stimulated the enzyme's ATPase activity is irreversible. Therefore, the half-site ATPase reactivity of E. coli Lon is validated, and can be used to account for the kinetic mechanism of the ATP-dependent peptidase activity of the enzyme.

  5. Coupling of CFTR Cl- channel gating to an ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Baukrowitz, T; Hwang, T C; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1994-03-01

    For cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels to open, they must be phosphorylated by protein kinase A and then exposed to a hydrolyzable nucleoside triphosphate, such as ATP. To test whether channel opening is linked to ATP hydrolysis, we applied VO4 and BeF3 to CFTR channels in inside-out patches excised from cardiac myocytes. These inorganic phosphate analogs interrupt ATP hydrolysis cycles by binding tightly in place of the released hydrolysis product, inorganic phosphate. The analogs acted only on CFTR channels opened by ATP and locked them open, increasing their mean open time by 2-3 orders of magnitude. These findings establish that opening and closing of CFTR channels are coupled to an ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  6. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-01-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion. Images Scheme 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:8789082

  7. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by α-subunit motif controlling active site conformation

    PubMed Central

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. FoF1 ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F1 performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate. PMID:23345443

  8. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by α-subunit motif controlling active site conformation.

    PubMed

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt

    2013-02-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate. PMID:23345443

  9. The a subunit asymmetry dictates the two opposite rotation directions in the synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP by the mitochondrial ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Nesci, Salvatore; Trombetti, Fabiana; Ventrella, Vittoria; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The main and best known role of the mitochondrial ATP synthase is to synthesize ATP by exploiting the transmembrane electrochemical gradient of protons and their downhill movement. However, under different conditions, the same enzyme can also switch to the opposite function of ATP hydrolysis and exploits its energy to pump protons against their gradient and energize the membrane. The change in functionality is linked to the change of direction of rotation of the two matched sectors of this unique complex, namely the hydrophilic F1, which performs the catalysis, and the hydrophobic membrane-embedded FO, which channels protons. Accordingly, viewed from the matrix side, ATP synthesis is driven by counterclockwise rotation and ATP hydrolysis by clockwise rotation of the FO rotor which is transmitted to F1. ATP dissipation through this mechanism features some diseases such as myocardial ischemia. Increasing evidence shoulders the hypothesis that the asymmetry of the a subunit of FO and particularly the steric arrangement of the two inner semi-channels for protons, play a key role in conferring to the coupled bi-functional complex the ability to reverse rotation by switching from ATP synthesis to ATP hydrolysis and vice versa. Accordingly, the conserved steric arrangement of the chiral a subunit of FO yields the same direction of rotation for all the ATP synthases. According to this hypothesis, the a subunit chirality imposes the direction of rotation of the rotor according to the proton gradient across the membrane. It seems likely that the direction of rotation of the membrane-embedded c-ring, which is adjacent to the a-subunit and acts as a rotor, may be under multiple control, being rotation essential to make the whole enzyme machinery work. However, the asymmetric features of the a subunit would make it the master regulator, thus directly determining which of the two functions, ATP production or ATP dissipation, will be performed. The handedness of a subunit should

  10. Drug-protein hydrogen bonds govern the inhibition of the ATP hydrolysis of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This multidrug transporter utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of a variety of hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Most of the substrates and modulators of P-gp stimulate its basal ATPase activity, although some inhibit it. The molecular mechanisms that are in play in either case are unknown. In this report, mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies of P-gp led to the identification of a pair of phenylalanine-tyrosine structural motifs in the transmembrane region that mediate the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by certain drugs (zosuquidar, elacridar and tariquidar), with high affinity (IC50's ranging from 10 to 30nM). Upon mutation of any of these residues, drugs that inhibit the ATPase activity of P-gp switch to stimulation of the activity. Molecular modeling revealed that the phenylalanine residues F978 and F728 interact with tyrosine residues Y953 and Y310, respectively, in an edge-to-face conformation, which orients the tyrosines in such a way that they establish hydrogen-bond contacts with the inhibitor. Biochemical investigations along with transport studies in intact cells showed that the inhibitors bind at a high affinity site to produce inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and transport function. Upon mutation, they bind at lower affinity sites, stimulating ATP hydrolysis and only poorly inhibiting transport. These results also reveal that screening chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the basal ATP hydrolysis can be a reliable tool to identify modulators with high affinity for P-gp. PMID:26686578

  11. Drug-protein hydrogen bonds govern the inhibition of the ATP hydrolysis of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This multidrug transporter utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of a variety of hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Most of the substrates and modulators of P-gp stimulate its basal ATPase activity, although some inhibit it. The molecular mechanisms that are in play in either case are unknown. In this report, mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies of P-gp led to the identification of a pair of phenylalanine-tyrosine structural motifs in the transmembrane region that mediate the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by certain drugs (zosuquidar, elacridar and tariquidar), with high affinity (IC50's ranging from 10 to 30nM). Upon mutation of any of these residues, drugs that inhibit the ATPase activity of P-gp switch to stimulation of the activity. Molecular modeling revealed that the phenylalanine residues F978 and F728 interact with tyrosine residues Y953 and Y310, respectively, in an edge-to-face conformation, which orients the tyrosines in such a way that they establish hydrogen-bond contacts with the inhibitor. Biochemical investigations along with transport studies in intact cells showed that the inhibitors bind at a high affinity site to produce inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and transport function. Upon mutation, they bind at lower affinity sites, stimulating ATP hydrolysis and only poorly inhibiting transport. These results also reveal that screening chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the basal ATP hydrolysis can be a reliable tool to identify modulators with high affinity for P-gp.

  12. Effects of iodide on the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and motile activity in axonemal dynein.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Izumi; Fujiwara, Rin; Wada, Mikiyo; Shingyoji, Chikako

    2011-05-01

    Dynein transduces the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work through conformational changes. To identify the factors governing the coupling between the ATPase activity and the motile activity of the dynein molecule, we examined the effects of potassium iodide, which can unfold protein tertiary structures, on dynein activity in reactivated sea urchin sperm flagella. The presence of low concentrations of KI (0.05-0.1 M) in the reactivating solution did not influence the stable beating of demembranated flagella at 0.02-1 mM ATP, when the total concentration of potassium was kept at 0.15 M by adding K-acetate. However, double-reciprocal plots of ATP concentration and beat frequency showed a mixed type of inhibition by KI, indicating the possibility that KI inhibits the ATP hydrolysis and decreases the maximum sliding velocity. The ATPase activity of 21S dynein with or without microtubules did not decrease with the KI concentration. In the elastase-treated axonemes, KI decreased the velocity of sliding disintegration, while it increased the frequency of occurrence of axonemes showing no sliding. This may be related to some defect in the coordination of dynein activities. On 21S dynein adsorbed on a glass surface, however, the velocity of microtubule sliding was increased by KI, while KI lowered the dynein-microtubule affinity. The velocity further increased under lower salt conditions enhancing the dynein-microtubule interactions. The results suggest the importance of organized regulation of the dynamic states of dynein-microtubule interactions through the stalk for the coupling between the ATPase activity and the motile activity of dynein in beating flagella. PMID:21520430

  13. ATP hydrolysis by the viral RNA sensor RIG-I prevents unintentional recognition of self-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lässig, Charlotte; Matheisl, Sarah; Sparrer, Konstantin MJ; de Oliveira Mann, Carina C; Moldt, Manuela; Patel, Jenish R; Goldeck, Marion; Hartmann, Gunther; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Hornung, Veit; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Beckmann, Roland; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cytosolic antiviral innate immune sensor RIG-I distinguishes 5′ tri- or diphosphate containing viral double-stranded (ds) RNA from self-RNA by an incompletely understood mechanism that involves ATP hydrolysis by RIG-I's RNA translocase domain. Recently discovered mutations in ATPase motifs can lead to the multi-system disorder Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS) and increased interferon levels, suggesting misregulated signaling by RIG-I. Here we report that SMS mutations phenocopy a mutation that allows ATP binding but prevents hydrolysis. ATPase deficient RIG-I constitutively signals through endogenous RNA and co-purifies with self-RNA even from virus infected cells. Biochemical studies and cryo-electron microscopy identify a 60S ribosomal expansion segment as a dominant self-RNA that is stably bound by ATPase deficient RIG-I. ATP hydrolysis displaces wild-type RIG-I from this self-RNA but not from 5' triphosphate dsRNA. Our results indicate that ATP-hydrolysis prevents recognition of self-RNA and suggest that SMS mutations lead to unintentional signaling through prolonged RNA binding. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10859.001 PMID:26609812

  14. ATP hydrolysis by the viral RNA sensor RIG-I prevents unintentional recognition of self-RNA.

    PubMed

    Lässig, Charlotte; Matheisl, Sarah; Sparrer, Konstantin M J; de Oliveira Mann, Carina C; Moldt, Manuela; Patel, Jenish R; Goldeck, Marion; Hartmann, Gunther; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Hornung, Veit; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Beckmann, Roland; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-11-26

    The cytosolic antiviral innate immune sensor RIG-I distinguishes 5' tri- or diphosphate containing viral double-stranded (ds) RNA from self-RNA by an incompletely understood mechanism that involves ATP hydrolysis by RIG-I's RNA translocase domain. Recently discovered mutations in ATPase motifs can lead to the multi-system disorder Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS) and increased interferon levels, suggesting misregulated signaling by RIG-I. Here we report that SMS mutations phenocopy a mutation that allows ATP binding but prevents hydrolysis. ATPase deficient RIG-I constitutively signals through endogenous RNA and co-purifies with self-RNA even from virus infected cells. Biochemical studies and cryo-electron microscopy identify a 60S ribosomal expansion segment as a dominant self-RNA that is stably bound by ATPase deficient RIG-I. ATP hydrolysis displaces wild-type RIG-I from this self-RNA but not from 5' triphosphate dsRNA. Our results indicate that ATP-hydrolysis prevents recognition of self-RNA and suggest that SMS mutations lead to unintentional signaling through prolonged RNA binding.

  15. Synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP and the phosphate-ATP exchange reaction in soluble mitochondrial F1 in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Pérez-Hernández, G; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1999-12-01

    In medium containing 40% dimethylsulfoxide, soluble F1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP introduced at concentrations lower than that of the enzyme [Al-Shawi, M.K. & Senior, A.E. (1992), Biochemistry 31, 886-891]. At this concentration of dimethylsulfoxide, soluble F1 also catalyzes the spontaneous synthesis of a tightly bound ATP to a level of approximately 0.15 mol per mol F1 [Gómez-Puyou, A., Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M. & de Meis, L. (1986) Eur. J. Biochem. 159, 133-140]. The mechanisms that allow soluble F1 to carry out these apparently opposing reactions were studied. The rate of hydrolysis of ATP bound to F1 under uni-site conditions and that of synthesis of ATP were markedly similar, indicating that the two ATP molecules lie in equivalent high affinity catalytic sites. The number of enzyme molecules that have ATP at the high affinity catalytic site under conditions of synthesis or uni-site hydrolysis is less than the total number of enzyme molecules. Therefore, it was hypothesized that when the enzyme was treated with dimethylsulfoxide, a fraction of the F1 population carried out synthesis and another hydrolysis. Indeed, measurements of the two reactions under identical conditions showed that different fractions of the F1 population carried out simultaneously synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP. The reactions continued until an equilibrium level between F1.ADP + Pi <--> F1.ATP was established. At equilibrium, about 15% of the enzyme population was in the form F1.ATP. The DeltaG degrees of the reaction with 0.54 microM F1, 2 mM Pi and 10 mM Mg2+ at pH 6.8 was -2.7 kcal.mol-1 in favor of F1.ATP. The DeltaG degrees of the reaction did not exhibit important variations with Pi concentration; thus, the reaction was in thermodynamic equilibrium. In contrast, DeltaG degrees became significantly less negative as the concentration of dimethylsulfoxide was decreased. In water, the reaction was far to the left. The equilibrium constant of the reaction diminished linearly with

  16. Kinetic Validation of the Models for P-Glycoprotein ATP Hydrolysis and Vanadate-Induced Trapping. Proposal for Additional Steps

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, Miguel Ramón; Sharom, Frances Jane

    2014-01-01

    P-Glycoprotein, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is a multidrug transporter responsible for cellular efflux of hundreds of structurally unrelated compounds, including natural products, many clinically used drugs and anti-cancer agents. Expression of P-glycoprotein has been linked to multidrug resistance in human cancers. ABC transporters are driven by ATP hydrolysis at their two cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains, which interact to form a closed ATP-bound sandwich dimer. Intimate knowledge of the catalytic cycle of these proteins is clearly essential for understanding their mechanism of action. P-Glycoprotein has been proposed to hydrolyse ATP by an alternating mechanism, for which there is substantial experimental evidence, including inhibition of catalytic activity by trapping of ortho-vanadate at one nucleotide-binding domain, and the observation of an asymmetric occluded state. Despite many studies of P-glycoprotein ATPase activity over the past 20 years, no comprehensive kinetic analysis has yet been carried out, and some puzzling features of its behaviour remain unexplained. In this work, we have built several progressively more complex kinetic models, and then carried out simulations and detailed analysis, to test the validity of the proposed reaction pathway employed by P-glycoprotein for ATP hydrolysis. To establish kinetic parameters for the catalytic cycle, we made use of the large amount of published data on ATP hydrolysis by hamster P-glycoprotein, both purified and in membrane vesicles. The proposed kinetic scheme(s) include a high affinity priming reaction for binding of the first ATP molecule, and an independent pathway for ADP binding outside the main catalytic cycle. They can reproduce to varying degrees the observed behavior of the protein's ATPase activity and its inhibition by ortho-vanadate. The results provide new insights into the mode of action of P-glycoprotein, and some hypotheses about the nature of the

  17. Role of divalent metal cations in ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase: Magnesium provides a bridge for ATP to fuel unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Frick, David N.; Banik, Sukalyani; Rypma, Ryan S.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of magnesium ions in coupling ATP hydrolysis to the nucleic acid unwinding catalyzed by the NS3 protein encoded by the hepatitis C virus. Analyses of steady-state ATP hydrolysis rates at various RNA and magnesium concentrations were used to determine values for the 15 dissociation constants describing the formation of a productive enzyme-metal-ATP-RNA complex and the 4 rate constants describing hydrolysis of ATP by the possible enzyme-ATP complexes. These values coupled with direct binding studies, specificity studies and analyses of site-directed mutants reveal only one ATP binding site on HCV helicase centered on the catalytic base Glu291. An adjacent residue, Asp290, binds a magnesium ion that forms a bridge to ATP, reorienting the nucleotide in the active site. RNA stimulates hydrolysis while decreasing the affinity of the enzyme for ATP, magnesium, and MgATP. The binding scheme described here explains the unusual regulation of the enzyme by ATP that has been reported previously. Binding of either free magnesium or free ATP to HCV helicase competes with MgATP, the true fuel for helicase movements, and leads to slower hydrolysis and nucleic acid unwinding. PMID:17084859

  18. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in assembly of MacAB-TolC macrolide transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2012-12-01

    MacB is a founding member of the Macrolide Exporter family of transporters belonging to the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily. These proteins are broadly represented in genomes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are implicated in virulence and protection against antibiotics and peptide toxins. MacB transporter functions together with MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, which stimulates MacB ATPase. In Gram-negative bacteria, MacA is believed to couple ATP hydrolysis to transport of substrates across the outer membrane through a TolC-like channel. In this study, we report a real-time analysis of concurrent ATP hydrolysis and assembly of MacAB-TolC complex. MacB binds nucleotides with a low millimolar affinity and fast on- and off-rates. In contrast, MacA-MacB complex is formed with a nanomolar affinity, which further increases in the presence of ATP. Our results strongly suggest that association between MacA and MacB is stimulated by ATP binding to MacB but remains unchanged during ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also found that the large periplasmic loop of MacB plays the major role in coupling reactions separated in two different membranes. This loop is required for MacA-dependent stimulation of MacB ATPase and at the same time, contributes to recruitment of TolC into a trans-envelope complex. PMID:23057817

  19. Nucleotide-induced asymmetry within ATPase activator ring drives σ54-RNAP interaction and ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2013-12-10

    It is largely unknown how the typical homomeric ring geometry of ATPases associated with various cellular activities enables them to perform mechanical work. Small-angle solution X-ray scattering, crystallography, and electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions revealed that partial ATP occupancy caused the heptameric closed ring of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) NtrC1 to rearrange into a hexameric split ring of striking asymmetry. The highly conserved and functionally crucial GAFTGA loops responsible for interacting with σ54–RNA polymerase formed a spiral staircase. We propose that splitting of the ensemble directs ATP hydrolysis within the oligomer, and the ring's asymmetry guides interaction between ATPase and the complex of σ54 and promoter DNA. Similarity between the structure of the transcriptional activator NtrC1 and those of distantly related helicases Rho and E1 reveals a general mechanism in homomeric ATPases whereby complex allostery within the ring geometry forms asymmetric functional states that allow these biological motors to exert directional forces on their target macromolecules.

  20. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for simultaneous measurement of calcium uptake and ATP hydrolysis in sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Karon, B S; Nissen, E R; Voss, J; Thomas, D D

    1995-05-20

    A continuous, spectrophotometric assay to simultaneously measure Ca uptake and ATP hydrolysis has been developed, in order to assess the function of the Ca-ATPase in skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles. The absorbance of Fura Red was measured continuously at 490 nm, in EGTA-buffered solutions containing initial free ionized calcium concentrations of 300 nM, 500 nM, 790 nM, and 2 microM, during assays of oxalate-facilitated or phosphate-facilitated active calcium uptake in skeletal SR. Simultaneous measurement of ATP hydrolysis during the measurement of phosphate-facilitated Ca uptake was accomplished by measuring the disappearance of NADH at 340 nm, coupled to the hydrolysis of ATP by an enzyme-linked, continuous ATPase assay. This new method, unlike the standard 45Ca-filtration assay, measures calcium uptake in real time and eliminates the need for radioactivity. Moreover, the rates of calcium uptake and ATP hydrolysis are measured simultaneously, allowing the direct quantitative comparison of the two parameters. This assay will facilitate the characterization of Ca-ATPase function and malfunction in skeletal and cardiac SR and advances the methodology for comparison of normal and physically, chemically, or biologically altered Ca-ATPase.

  1. Caldesmon inhibits the rotation of smooth actin subdomain-1 and alters its mobility during the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Natalia; Avrova, Stanislava V; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2009-12-01

    Smooth muscle thin filaments have been reconstituted in muscle ghost fibers by incorporation of smooth muscle actin, tropomyosin and caldesmon. For the first time, rotation of subdomain-1 and changes of its mobility in IAEDANS-labeled actin during the ATP hydrolysis cycle simulated using nucleotides and non-hydrolysable ATP analogs have been demonstrated directly. Binding of caldesmon altered the mobility and inhibited the rotation of actin subdomain-1 during the transition from AM * *.ADP.Pi to AM state, resulting in inhibition of both strong and weak-binding intermediate states. These new results imply that regulation of actomyosin interaction by caldesmon during the ATPase cycle is fulfilled via the inhibition of actin subdomain-1 rotation toward the periphery of the thin filament, which decreases the area of the specific binding between actin and myosin molecules and is likely to underlie at least in part the mechanism of caldesmon-induced contractility suppression.

  2. Deletion of a unique loop in the mycobacterial F-ATP synthase γ subunit sheds light on its inhibitory role in ATP hydrolysis-driven H(+) pumping.

    PubMed

    Hotra, Adam; Suter, Manuel; Biuković, Goran; Ragunathan, Priya; Kundu, Subhashri; Dick, Thomas; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    The F1 FO -ATP synthase is one of the enzymes that is essential to meet the energy requirement of both the proliferating aerobic and hypoxic dormant stages of the life cycle of mycobacteria. Most F-ATP synthases consume ATP in the α3 :β3 headpiece to drive the γ subunit, which couples ATP cleavage with proton pumping in the c ring of FO via the bottom of the γ subunit. ATPase-driven H(+) pumping is latent in mycobacteria. The presence of a unique 14 amino acid residue loop of the mycobacterial γ subunit has been described and aligned in close vicinity to the c-ring loop Priya R et al. (2013) J Bioenerg Biomembr 45, 121-129 Here, we used inverted membrane vesicles (IMVs) of fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and a variety of covalent and non-covalent inhibitors to characterize the ATP hydrolysis activity of the F-ATP synthase inside IMVs. These vesicles formed a platform to investigate the function of the unique mycobaterial γ loop by deleting the respective loop-encoding sequence (γ166-179 ) in the genome of M. smegmatis. ATP hydrolysis-driven H(+) pumping was observed in IMVs containing the Δγ166-179 mutant protein but not for IMVs containing the wild-type F-ATP synthase. In addition, when compared to the wild-type enzyme, IMVs containing the Δγ166-179 mutant protein showed increased ATP cleavage and lower levels of ATP synthesis, demonstrating that the loop affects ATPase activity, ATPase-driven H(+) pumping and ATP synthesis. These results further indicate that the loop may affect coupling of ATP hydrolysis and synthesis in a different mode.

  3. RecA-mediated SOS induction requires an extended filament conformation but no ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Renzette, Nicholas; Long, Edward; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Inman, Ross B.; Cox, Michael M.; Sandler, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Escherichia coli SOS response to DNA damage is modulated by the RecA protein, a recombinase that forms an extended filament on single-stranded DNA and hydrolyzes ATP. The RecA K72R (recA2201) mutation eliminates the ATPase activity of RecA protein. The mutation also limits the capacity of RecA to form long filaments in the presence of ATP. Strains with this mutation do not undergo SOS induction in vivo. We have combined the K72R variant of RecA with another mutation, RecA E38K (recA730). In vitro, the double mutant RecA E38K/K72R (recA730,2201) mimics the K72R mutant protein in that it has no ATPase activity. The double mutant protein will form long extended filaments on ssDNA and facilitate LexA cleavage almost as well as wild type, and do so in the presence of ATP. Unlike recA K72R, the recA E38K/K72R double mutant promotes SOS induction in vivo after UV treatment. Thus, SOS induction does not require ATP hydrolysis by the RecA protein, but does require formation of extended RecA filaments. The RecA E38K/K72R protein represents an improved reagent for studies of the function of ATP hydrolysis by RecA in vivo and in vitro. PMID:18627467

  4. Modeling the mechanisms of biological GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Alexandra T P; Szeler, Klaudia; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Åqvist, Johan; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes that hydrolyze GTP are currently in the spotlight, due to their molecular switch mechanism that controls many cellular processes. One of the best-known classes of these enzymes are small GTPases such as members of the Ras superfamily, which catalyze the hydrolysis of the γ-phosphate bond in GTP. In addition, the availability of an increasing number of crystal structures of translational GTPases such as EF-Tu and EF-G have made it possible to probe the molecular details of GTP hydrolysis on the ribosome. However, despite a wealth of biochemical, structural and computational data, the way in which GTP hydrolysis is activated and regulated is still a controversial topic and well-designed simulations can play an important role in resolving and rationalizing the experimental data. In this review, we discuss the contributions of computational biology to our understanding of GTP hydrolysis on the ribosome and in small GTPases.

  5. Asp-52 in combination with Asp-398 plays a critical role in ATP hydrolysis of chaperonin GroEL.

    PubMed

    Koike-Takeshita, Ayumi; Mitsuoka, Kaoru; Taguchi, Hideki

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin GroEL is a double-ring chaperone that assists protein folding with the aid of GroES and ATP. Asp-398 in GroEL is known as one of the critical residues on ATP hydrolysis because GroEL(D398A) mutant is deficient in ATP hydrolysis (<2% of the wild type) but not in ATP binding. In the archaeal Group II chaperonin, another aspartate residue, Asp-52 in the corresponding E. coli GroEL, in addition to Asp-398 is also important for ATP hydrolysis. We investigated the role of Asp-52 in GroEL and found that ATPase activity of GroEL(D52A) and GroEL(D52A/D398A) mutants was ∼ 20% and <0.01% of wild-type GroEL, respectively, indicating that Asp-52 in E. coli GroEL is also involved in the ATP hydrolysis. GroEL(D52A/D398A) formed a symmetric football-shaped GroEL-GroES complex in the presence of ATP, again confirming the importance of the symmetric complex during the GroEL ATPase cycle. Notably, the symmetric complex of GroEL(D52A/D398A) was extremely stable, with a half-time of ∼ 150 h (∼ 6 days), providing a good model to characterize the football-shaped complex.

  6. ATP requirement for chloroplast protein import is set by the Km for ATP hydrolysis of stromal Hsp70 in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; McNeilage, Robert T; Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    The 70-kD family of heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) is involved in a number of seemingly disparate cellular functions, including folding of nascent proteins, breakup of misfolded protein aggregates, and translocation of proteins across membranes. They act through the binding and release of substrate proteins, accompanied by hydrolysis of ATP. Chloroplast stromal Hsp70 plays a crucial role in the import of proteins into plastids. Mutations of an ATP binding domain Thr were previously reported to result in an increase in the Km for ATP and a decrease in the enzyme's kcat. To ask which chloroplast stromal chaperone, Hsp70 or Hsp93, both of which are ATPases, dominates the energetics of the motor responsible for protein import, we made transgenic moss (Physcomitrella patens) harboring the Km-altering mutation in the essential stromal Hsp70-2 and measured the effect on the amount of ATP required for protein import into chloroplasts. Here, we report that increasing the Km for ATP hydrolysis of Hsp70 translated into an increased Km for ATP usage by chloroplasts for protein import. This thus directly demonstrates that the ATP-derived energy long known to be required for chloroplast protein import is delivered via the Hsp70 chaperones and that the chaperone's ATPase activity dominates the energetics of the reaction.

  7. Rate of chase-promoted hydrolysis of ATP in the high affinity catalytic site of beef heart mitochondrial ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Penefsky, H.S.

    1988-05-05

    Incubation of (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP with a molar excess of the soluble, homogeneous ATPase from beef heart mitochondria (F/sub 1/) results in binding of substrate primarily in a single, very high affinity catalytic site and in a slow rate of hydrolysis characteristic of single site catalysis. Subsequent addition of millimolar concentrations of nonradioactive ATP as a cold chase, sufficient to fill catalytic sites on the enzyme, results in an acceleration of hydrolysis of bound radioactive ATP of as much as 10/sup 6/-fold, that is to V/sub max/ rates. For this reason, it was proposed that the high affinity catalytic site is a normal catalytic site on the molecule. This paper shows, in experiments with a rapid mixing-chemical quench apparatus, that hydrolysis of ATP bound in the high affinity catalytic site is accelerated to V/sub max/ rates following addition of 5 ..mu..M ATP as a cold chase. Hydrolysis of bound ATP appears to precede that of the chase. The weight of the available evidence continues to support the original suggestion that the high affinity catalytic site of beef heart F/sub 1/ is a normal catalytic site.

  8. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Melkani, Girish C; Bernstein, Sanford I; Geeves, Michael A

    2016-01-22

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25-30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  9. Sequential Action of MalE and Maltose Allows Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Translocation in the MalFGK2 Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Cytrynbaum, Eric; Duong, Franck

    2015-10-16

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have evolved an ATP-dependent alternating-access mechanism to transport substrates across membranes. Despite important progress, especially in their structural analysis, it is still unknown how the substrate stimulates ATP hydrolysis, the hallmark of ABC transporters. In this study, we measure the ATP turnover cycle of MalFGK2 in steady and pre-steady state conditions. We show that (i) the basal ATPase activity of MalFGK2 is very low because the cleavage of ATP is rate-limiting, (ii) the binding of open-state MalE to the transporter induces ATP cleavage but leaves release of Pi limiting, and (iii) the additional presence of maltose stimulates release of Pi, and therefore increases the overall ATP turnover cycle. We conclude that open-state MalE stabilizes MalFGK2 in the outward-facing conformation until maltose triggers return to the inward-facing state for substrate and Pi release. This concerted action explains why ATPase activity of MalFGK2 depends on maltose, and why MalE is essential for transport. PMID:26338707

  10. Sequential Action of MalE and Maltose Allows Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Translocation in the MalFGK2 Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Cytrynbaum, Eric; Duong, Franck

    2015-10-16

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have evolved an ATP-dependent alternating-access mechanism to transport substrates across membranes. Despite important progress, especially in their structural analysis, it is still unknown how the substrate stimulates ATP hydrolysis, the hallmark of ABC transporters. In this study, we measure the ATP turnover cycle of MalFGK2 in steady and pre-steady state conditions. We show that (i) the basal ATPase activity of MalFGK2 is very low because the cleavage of ATP is rate-limiting, (ii) the binding of open-state MalE to the transporter induces ATP cleavage but leaves release of Pi limiting, and (iii) the additional presence of maltose stimulates release of Pi, and therefore increases the overall ATP turnover cycle. We conclude that open-state MalE stabilizes MalFGK2 in the outward-facing conformation until maltose triggers return to the inward-facing state for substrate and Pi release. This concerted action explains why ATPase activity of MalFGK2 depends on maltose, and why MalE is essential for transport.

  11. Nucleotide-induced asymmetry within ATPase activator ring drives σ54–RNAP interaction and ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2013-01-01

    It is largely unknown how the typical homomeric ring geometry of ATPases associated with various cellular activities enables them to perform mechanical work. Small-angle solution X-ray scattering, crystallography, and electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions revealed that partial ATP occupancy caused the heptameric closed ring of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) NtrC1 to rearrange into a hexameric split ring of striking asymmetry. The highly conserved and functionally crucial GAFTGA loops responsible for interacting with σ54–RNA polymerase formed a spiral staircase. We propose that splitting of the ensemble directs ATP hydrolysis within the oligomer, and the ring's asymmetry guides interaction between ATPase and the complex of σ54 and promoter DNA. Similarity between the structure of the transcriptional activator NtrC1 and those of distantly related helicases Rho and E1 reveals a general mechanism in homomeric ATPases whereby complex allostery within the ring geometry forms asymmetric functional states that allow these biological motors to exert directional forces on their target macromolecules. PMID:24240239

  12. ATP-Binding Cassette Proteins: Towards a Computational View of Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jielou

    2004-03-01

    Many large machine proteins can generate mechanical force and undergo large-scale conformational changes (LSCC) to perform varying biological tasks in living cells by utilizing ATP. Important examples include ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. They are membrane proteins that couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the translocation of substrates across membranes [1]. To interpret how the mechanical force generated by ATP binding and hydrolysis is propagated, a coarse-grained ATP-dependent harmonic network model (HNM) [2,3] is applied to the ABC protein, BtuCD. This protein machine transports vitamin B12 across membranes. The analysis shows that subunits of the protein move against each other in a concerted manner. The lowest-frequency modes of the BtuCD protein are found to link the functionally critical domains, and are suggested to be responsible for large-scale ATP-coupled conformational changes. [1] K. P. Locher, A. T. Lee and D. C. Rees. Science 296, 1091-1098 (2002). [2] Atilgan, A. R., S. R. Durell, R. L. Jernigan, M. C. Demirel, O. Keskin, and I. Bahar. Biophys. J. 80, 505-515(2002); M. M Tirion, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1905-1908 (1996). [3] J. -L. Liao and D. N. Beratan, 2003, to be published.

  13. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the nucleotide-binding domain from the ATP-binding Cassette transporter MsbA: ATP hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Syberg, Falk; Suveyzdis, Yan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard

    2012-07-01

    MsbA is an essential Escherichia coli ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter involved in the flipping of lipid A across the cytoplasmic membrane. It is a close homologue of human P-glycoprotein involved in multidrug resistance, and it similarly accepts a variety of small hydrophobic xenobiotics as transport substrates. X-ray structures of three full-length ABC multidrug exporters (including MsbA) have been published recently and reveal large conformational changes during the transport cycle. However, how ATP hydrolysis couples to these conformational changes and finally the transport is still an open question. We employed time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy, a powerful method to elucidate molecular reaction mechanisms of soluble and membrane proteins, to address this question with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we monitored the hydrolysis reaction in the nucleotide-binding domain of MsbA at the atomic level. The isolated MsbA nucleotide-binding domain hydrolyzed ATP with V(max) = 45 nmol mg(-1) min(-1), similar to the full-length transporter. A Hill coefficient of 1.49 demonstrates positive cooperativity between the two catalytic sites formed upon dimerization. Global fit analysis of time-resolved FTIR data revealed two apparent rate constants of ~1 and 0.01 s(-1), which were assigned to formation of the catalytic site and hydrolysis, respectively. Using isotopically labeled ATP, we identified specific marker bands for protein-bound ATP (1245 cm(-1)), ADP (1101 and 1205 cm(-1)), and free phosphate (1078 cm(-1)). Cleavage of the β-phosphate-γ-phosphate bond was found to be the rate-limiting step; no protein-bound phosphate intermediate was resolved.

  14. The effect of pH and free Mg2+ on ATP linked enzymes and the calculation of Gibbs free energy of ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Christian; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Veech, Richard L

    2010-12-16

    The apparent equilibrium constants, K′, of biochemical reactions containing substrates which bind [Mg2+] unequally can be significantly altered by changes in free intracellular [Mg2+]. Intracellular free [Mg2+] can be estimated by measurements of [citrate]/[isocitrate], a ratio known to vary with tissue free [Mg2+]. The combined equilibrium constant for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and triose phosphate isomerase for the three reactions (K(GG-TPI)′) was corrected using new binding constants for dihydroxyacetone-phosphate and 3-phosphoglycerate. The result of this calculation is demonstrated in the calculation of the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. In addition, the dependence of the equilibrium constant for the glutamine synthetase reaction on pH and free [Mg2+] was demonstrated. Furthermore, a theory linking the ΔG′ value of mitochondrial complex I−II and the cytosolic ΔG′ value of ATP hydrolysis is discussed with evidence from previous publications.

  15. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-15

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This 'DNA sliding' is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding.

  16. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This ‘DNA sliding’ is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding. PMID:26538601

  17. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients.

  18. Electrical response of beef-heart submitochondrial particles bound to phospholipid-impregnated millipore filters during ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pfister, C; Pougeois, R

    1980-02-01

    1. Beef heart submitochondrial particles bound to asolectin impregnated Millipore filter, according to the method described earlier (Drachev et al. (1974) Nature 249, 321--324), are able to generate, upon addition of ATP, an electrical potential which can be directly measured. 2. The transmembrane electrical potential generated by ATP hydrolysis reaches values up to 80 mV. The half-time required to attain the plateau of potential is paradoxically long (5 to 10 min at room temperature) and is temperature-dependent. Among different phospholipid species which have been used to impregnate the Millipore filter, phosphatidylethanolamine was found to be the most effective for generation of electrical potential. 3. The potential generated by ATP hydrolysis is inhibited by inhibitors of mitochondrial ATPase, by the uncoupler FCCP and by reagents collapsing the membrane potential. 4. Addition of inhibitors of mitochondrial ATPase, when the plateau of potential is attained, results in a decay of potential. This decay of potential is as slow as the generation of potential induced by ATP hydrolysis. 5. The initial rise in electrical potential is proportional to the ATPase activity.

  19. A Reconsideration of the Link between the Energetics of Water and of ATP Hydrolysis Energy in the Power Strokes of Molecular Motors in Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Widdas, Wilfred F.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick’s work, energetics were revised by Joule’s experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration. PMID:19325829

  20. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation. PMID:24129575

  1. Mutations in the NB-ARC Domain of I-2 That Impair ATP Hydrolysis Cause Autoactivation1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Tameling, Wladimir I.L.; Vossen, Jack H.; Albrecht, Mario; Lengauer, Thomas; Berden, Jan A.; Haring, Michel A.; Cornelissen, Ben J.C.; Takken, Frank L.W.

    2006-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants confer specificity to the innate immune system. Most R proteins have a centrally located NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4) domain. For two tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) R proteins, I-2 and Mi-1, we have previously shown that this domain acts as an ATPase module that can hydrolyze ATP in vitro. To investigate the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the function of I-2 in planta, specific mutations were introduced in conserved motifs of the NB-ARC domain. Two mutations resulted in autoactivating proteins that induce a pathogen-independent hypersensitive response upon expression in planta. These mutant forms of I-2 were found to be impaired in ATP hydrolysis, but not in ATP binding, suggesting that the ATP- rather than the ADP-bound state of I-2 is the active form that triggers defense signaling. In addition, upon ADP binding, the protein displayed an increased affinity for ADP suggestive of a change of conformation. Based on these data, we propose that the NB-ARC domain of I-2, and likely of related R proteins, functions as a molecular switch whose state (on/off) depends on the nucleotide bound (ATP/ADP). PMID:16489136

  2. The Central Cavity of ABCB1 Undergoes Alternating Access During ATP Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Christopher A.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Kerr, Ian D.; MacMillan, Fraser; Callaghan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the process that underlies multi-drug recognition and efflux by P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) remains a key biological challenge. Structural data has recently become available for the murine and C. elegans homologues of ABCB1; however all structures were obtained in the absence of nucleotide. A feature of these structures was the presence of a central cavity that is inaccessible from the extracellular face of the protein. To determine the conformational dynamics of this region several residues in transmembrane helices TM6 (331, 343 and 354) and TM12 (980) were mutated to cysteine. Based upon structural predictions these residues are proposed to line, or reside proximal to, the central cavity. The mutant isoforms were labelled with a paramagnetic probe enabling the application of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods. Power saturation EPR spectra were recorded in the presence of hydrophobic (O2) or hydrophilic (NiEDDA) quenching agents to study the local environment of each residue. ABCB1 was trapped in both its nucleotide bound and post-hydrolytic conformations and EPR spectra were again recorded in the presence and absence of quenching agents. The EPR line shapes provide information on the movements of these residues within TM6 and TM12 during ATP hydrolysis. Rationalisation of the data with molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the cavity is converted to a configuration open to the aqueous phase following nucleotide binding, thereby suggesting alternating access to the cavity on opposite sides of the membrane during translocation. PMID:24597976

  3. A dynamic supramolecular polymer with stimuli-responsive handedness for in situ probing of enzymatic ATP hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohit; Brocorens, Patrick; Tonnelé, Claire; Beljonne, David; Surin, Mathieu; George, Subi J.

    2014-12-01

    Design of artificial systems, which can respond to fluctuations in concentration of adenosine phosphates (APs), can be useful in understanding various biological processes. Helical assemblies of chromophores, which dynamically respond to such changes, can provide real-time chiroptical readout of various chemical transformations. Towards this concept, here we present a supramolecular helix of achiral chromophores, which shows chiral APs responsive tunable handedness along with dynamically switchable helicity. This system, composing of naphthalenediimides with phosphate recognition unit, shows opposite handedness on binding with ATP compared with ADP or AMP, which is comprehensively analysed with molecular dynamic simulations. Such differential signalling along with stimuli-dependent fast stereomutations have been capitalized to probe the reaction kinetics of enzymatic ATP hydrolysis. Detailed chiroptical analyses provide mechanistic insights into the enzymatic hydrolysis and various intermediate steps. Thus, a unique dynamic helical assembly to monitor the real-time reaction processes via its stimuli-responsive chiroptical signalling is conceptualized.

  4. A dynamic supramolecular polymer with stimuli-responsive handedness for in situ probing of enzymatic ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mohit; Brocorens, Patrick; Tonnelé, Claire; Beljonne, David; Surin, Mathieu; George, Subi J

    2014-01-01

    Design of artificial systems, which can respond to fluctuations in concentration of adenosine phosphates (APs), can be useful in understanding various biological processes. Helical assemblies of chromophores, which dynamically respond to such changes, can provide real-time chiroptical readout of various chemical transformations. Towards this concept, here we present a supramolecular helix of achiral chromophores, which shows chiral APs responsive tunable handedness along with dynamically switchable helicity. This system, composing of naphthalenediimides with phosphate recognition unit, shows opposite handedness on binding with ATP compared with ADP or AMP, which is comprehensively analysed with molecular dynamic simulations. Such differential signalling along with stimuli-dependent fast stereomutations have been capitalized to probe the reaction kinetics of enzymatic ATP hydrolysis. Detailed chiroptical analyses provide mechanistic insights into the enzymatic hydrolysis and various intermediate steps. Thus, a unique dynamic helical assembly to monitor the real-time reaction processes via its stimuli-responsive chiroptical signalling is conceptualized. PMID:25511998

  5. Stabilization of the ADP/metaphosphate intermediate during ATP hydrolysis in pre-power stroke myosin: quantitative anatomy of an enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed recently that ATP hydrolysis in ATPase enzymes proceeds via an initial intermediate in which the dissociated γ-phosphate of ATP is bound in the protein as a metaphosphate (PγO3(-)). A combined quantum/classical analysis of this dissociated nucleotide state inside myosin provides a quantitative understanding of how the enzyme stabilizes this unusual metaphosphate. Indeed, in vacuum, the energy of the ADP(3-) · PγO3(-) · Mg(2+) complex is much higher than that of the undissociated ATP(4-). The protein brings it to a surprisingly low value. Energy decomposition reveals how much each interaction in the protein stabilizes the metaphosphate state; backbone peptides of the P-loop contribute 50% of the stabilization energy, and the side chain of Lys-185(+) contributes 25%. This can be explained by the fact that these groups make strong favorable interactions with the α- and β-phosphates, thus favoring the charge distribution of the metaphosphate state over that of the ATP state. Further stabilization (16%) is achieved by a hydrogen bond between the backbone C=O of Ser-237 (on loop Switch-1) and a water molecule perfectly positioned to attack the PγO3(-) in the subsequent hydrolysis step. The planar and singly negative PγO3(-) is a much better target for the subsequent nucleophilic attack by a negatively charged OH(-) than the tetrahedral and doubly negative PγO4(2-) group of ATP. Therefore, we argue that the present mechanism of metaphosphate stabilization is common to the large family of nucleotide-hydrolyzing enzymes. Methodologically, this work presents a computational approach that allows us to obtain a truly quantitative conception of enzymatic strategy. PMID:24165121

  6. Mechanism of ATP-driven PCNA clamp loading by S. cerevisiae RFC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siying; Levin, Mikhail K.; Sakato, Miho; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M.

    2009-01-01

    Circular clamps tether polymerases to DNA, serving as essential processivity factors in genome replication, and function in other critical cellular processes as well. Clamp loaders catalyze clamp assembly onto DNA, and the question of how these proteins construct a topological link between a clamp and DNA remains open, especially the mechanism by which ATP is utilized for the task. Here we describe pre-steady state analysis of ATP hydrolysis, PCNA clamp opening and DNA binding by S. cerevisiae RFC, and present the first kinetic model of a eukaryotic clamp loading reaction validated by global data analysis. ATP binding to multiple RFC subunits initiates a slow conformational change in the clamp loader, enabling it to bind and open PCNA, and bind DNA as well. PCNA opening locks RFC into an active state, and the resulting RFC•ATP•PCNA(open) intermediate is ready for entry of DNA into the clamp. DNA binding commits RFC to ATP hydrolysis, which is followed by PCNA closure and PCNA•DNA release. This model enables quantitative understanding of the multi-step mechanism of a eukaryotic clamp loader, and furthermore facilitates comparative analysis of loaders from diverse organisms. PMID:19285992

  7. How Does Protein Architecture Facilitate the Transduction of ATP Chemical-Bond Energy into Mechanical Work? The Cases of Nitrogenase and ATP Binding-Cassette Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jie-Lou; Beratan, David N.

    2004-01-01

    Transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) chemical-bond energy into work to drive large-scale conformational changes is common in proteins. Two specific examples of ATP-utilizing proteins are the nitrogenase iron protein and the ATP binding-cassette transporter protein, BtuCD. Nitrogenase catalyzes biological nitrogen fixation whereas BtuCD transports vitamin B12 across membranes. Both proteins drive their reactions with ATP. To interpret how the mechanical force generated by ATP binding and hydrolysis is propagated in these proteins, a coarse-grained elastic network model is employed. The analysis shows that subunits of the proteins move against each other in a concerted manner. The lowest-frequency modes of the nitrogenase iron protein and of the ATP binding-cassette transporter BtuCD protein are found to link the functionally critical domains, and these modes are suggested to be responsible for (at least the initial stages) large-scale ATP-coupled conformational changes. PMID:15298939

  8. Cancer-associated mutants of RNA helicase DDX3X are defective in RNA-stimulated ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Janet F.; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3X is frequently mutated in pediatric medulloblastoma. We dissect how these mutants affect DDX3X function with structural, biochemical, and genetic experiments. We identify an N-terminal extension (“ATP-binding loop”, ABL) that is critical for the stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by RNA. We present crystal structures that suggest the ABL interacts dynamically with ATP and confirm the interaction occurs in solution by NMR chemical shift perturbation (CSP) and isothermal calorimetry (ITC). DEAD-box helicases require interaction between two conserved RecA-like helicase domains, D1 and D2 for function. We use NMR CSP to show that DDX3X interacts specifically with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) through its D1 domain, with contact mediated by residues G302 and G325. Mutants of these residues, G302V and G325E, are associated with pediatric medulloblastoma. These mutants are defective in RNA-stimulated ATP hydrolysis. We show that DDX3X complements the growth defect in a ded1 temperature-sensitive strain of S. pombe, but the cancer-associated mutants G302V and G325E do not complement and exhibit protein expression defects. Taken together, our results suggest that impaired translation of important mRNA targets by mutant DDX3X represents a key step in the development of medulloblastoma. PMID:25724843

  9. ATP/GTP hydrolysis is required for oxazole and thiazole biosynthesis in the peptide antibiotic microcin B17.

    PubMed

    Milne, J C; Eliot, A C; Kelleher, N L; Walsh, C T

    1998-09-22

    In the maturation of the Escherichia coli antibiotic Microcin B17, the product of the mcbA gene is modified posttranslationally by the multimeric Microcin synthetase complex (composed of McbB, C, and D) to cyclize four Cys and four Ser residues to four thiazoles and four oxazoles, respectively. The purified synthetase shows an absolute requirement for ATP or GTP in peptide substrate heterocyclization, with GTP one-third as effective as ATP in initial rate studies. The ATPase/GTPase activity of the synthetase complex is conditional in that ADP or GDP formation requires the presence of substrate; noncyclizable versions of McbA bind to synthetase, but do not induce the NTPase activity. The stoichiometry of ATP hydrolysis and heterocycle formation is 5:1 for a substrate that contains two potential sites of modification. However, at high substrate concentrations (>50Km) heterocycle formation is inhibited, while ATPase activity occurs undiminished, consistent with uncoupling of NTP hydrolysis and heterocycle formation at high substrate concentrations. Sequence homology reveals that the McbD subunit has motifs reminiscent of the Walker B box in ATP utilizing enzymes and of motifs found in small G protein GTPases. Mutagenesis of three aspartates to alanine in these motifs (D132, D147, and D199) reduced Microcin B17 production in vivo and heterocycle formation in vitro, suggesting that the 45 kDa McbD has a regulated ATPase/GTPase domain in its N-terminal region necessary for peptide heterocyclization.

  10. Torque generation mechanism of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Maric, Sladjana; Scoppa, M.; Cheung, M.

    2010-03-01

    ATP synthase is a rotary motor that produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical currency of life. Our proposed electric field driven torque (EFT) model of FoF1-ATP synthase describes how torque, which scales with the number of c-ring proton binding sites, is generated by the proton motive force (pmf) across the mitochondrial inner membrane. When Fo is coupled to F1, the model predicts a critical pmf to drive ATP production. In order to fully understand how the electric field resulting from the pmf drives the c-ring to rotate, it is important to examine the charge distributions in the protonated c-ring and a-subunit containing the proton channels. Our calculations use a self-consistent field approach based on a refinement of reported structural data. The results reveal changes in pKa for key residues on the a-subunit and c-ring, as well as titration curves and protonation state energy diagrams. Health implications will be briefly discussed.

  11. ATP hydrolysis is essential for Bag-1M-mediated inhibition of the DNA binding by the glucocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wei; Chen, Linfeng; Liu, Yunde; Gao, Weizhen

    2009-12-04

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) is involved in providing the appropriate conformation of various nuclear hormone receptors, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The Bcl-2 associated athanogene 1M (Bag-1M) is known to downregulate the DNA binding by the GR. Also, Bag-1M interacts with the ATPase domain of Hsp70 to modulate the release of the substrate from Hsp70. In this study, we demonstrate that ATP hydrolysis enhances Bag-1M-mediated inhibition of the DNA binding by the GR. However, the inhibitory effect of Bag-1M was abolished when the intracellular ATP was depleted. In addition, a Bag-1M mutant lacking the interaction with Hsp70 did not influence the GR to bind DNA, suggesting the interaction of Bag-1M with Hsp70 in needed for its negative effect. These results indicate that ATP hydrolysis is essential for Bag-1M-mediated inhibition of the DNA binding by the GR and Hsp70 is a mediator for this process.

  12. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  13. RNA translocation and unwinding mechanism of HCV NS3 helicase and its coordination by ATP

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Sophie; Cheng, Wei; Serebrov, Victor; Beran, Rudolf K.; Tinoco, Ignacio; Pyle, Anna Marie; Bustamante, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Helicases are a ubiquitous class of enzymes involved in nearly all aspects of DNA and RNA metabolism. Despite recent progress in understanding their mechanism of action, limited resolution has left inaccessible the detailed mechanisms by which these enzymes couple the rearrangement of nucleic acid structures to the binding and hydrolysis of ATP1,2. Observing individual mechanistic cycles of these motor proteins is central to understanding their cellular functions. Here we follow in real time, at a resolution of two base pairs and 20 ms, the RNA translocation and unwinding cycles of a hepatitis C virus helicase (NS3) monomer. NS3 is a representative superfamily-2 helicase essential for viral replication3, and therefore a potentially important drug target4. We show that the cyclic movement of NS3 is coordinated by ATP in discrete steps of 11 ± 3 base pairs, and that actual unwinding occurs in rapid smaller substeps of 3.6 ± 1.3 base pairs, also triggered by ATP binding, indicating that NS3 might move like an inchworm5,6. This ATP-coupling mechanism is likely to be applicable to other non-hexameric helicases involved in many essential cellular functions. The assay developed here should be useful in investigating a broad range of nucleic acid translocation motors. PMID:16397502

  14. /sup 31/P NMR studies of ATP synthesis and hydrolysis kinetics in the intact myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley-Hickman, P.B.; Sako, E.Y.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Robitaille, P.M.L.; From, A.H.L.; Foker, J.E.; Ugurbil, K.

    1987-11-17

    The origin of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-measurable ATP in equilibrium P/sub i/ exchange and whether it can be used to determine net oxidative ATP synthesis rates in the intact myocardium were examined by detailed measurements of ATP in equilibrium P/sub i/ exchange rates in both directions as a function of the myocardial oxygen consumption rate (MVO/sub 2/) in (1) glucose-perfused, isovolumic rat hearts with normal glycolytic activity and (2) pyruvate-perfused hearts where glycolytic activity was reduced or eliminated either by depletion of their endogenous glycogen or by use of the inhibitor iodoacetate. In glucose-perfused hearts, the P/sub i/ ..-->.. ATP rate measured by the conventional two-site saturation transfer (CST) technique remained constant while MVO2 was increased approximately 2-fold. When the glycolytic activity was reduced, the P/sub i/ ..-->.. ATP rate decreased significantly, demonstrating the existence of a significant glycolytic contribution. The ATP ..-->.. P/sub i/ rates and rate:MVO ratios measured by the multiple-site saturation transfer method at two MVO/sub 2/ levels were equal to the corresponding P/sub i/..-->.. ATP rates and rate:MVO ratios obtained in the absence of a glycolytic contribution. The following conclusions are drawn from these studies: (1) unless the glycolytic contribution to the ATP in equilibrium P/sub i/ exchange is inhibited or is specifically shown not to exist, the myocardial P/sub i/ in equilibrium ATP exchange due to oxidative phosphorylation cannot be studied by NMR; (2) at moderate MVO/sub 2/ levels, the reaction catalyzed by the two glycolytic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase is near equilibrium; (3) the ATP synthesis by the mitochondrial H/sup +/-ATPase occurs unidirectionally (i.e., the reaction is far out of equilibrium); (4) the operative P:O ratio in the intact myocardium under our conditions is significantly less than the canonically accepted value

  15. Superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake supported by hydrolysis of endogenous ATP in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1975-10-10

    The nature of the energy store causing rapid superstoichiometric leads to H+/2e minus ejection and leads to Ca2+/2e minus uptake ratios in rat liver mitochondria pulsed with Ca2+ has been investigated. The extent and the rate of the initial fast superstoichiometric phase of H plus ejection were greatly reduced by oligomycin and other ATPase inhibitors; the subsequent shoichiometric phase was unaffected. No such inhibition was seen with atractyloside. Similarly, the initial fast phase of Ca2+ uptake was reduced in extent by oligomycin, whereas the slower stoichiometric phase was unaffected. Moreover, the ATP content of mitochondria previously incubated with succinate decreased by about 80% within 5 s after pulsing with Ca2+. The energy store for superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake and H plus injection is thus identified as endogenous ATP.

  16. [C-terminal sites of caldesmon drive ATP hydrolysis cycle by shifting actomyosin itermediates from strong to weak binding of myosin and actin].

    PubMed

    Pronina, O E; Copeland, O; Marston, S; Borovikov, Iu S

    2006-01-01

    Polarized fluorimetry technique and ghost muscle fibers containing tropomyosin were used to study effects of caldesmon (CaD) and recombinant peptides CaDH1 (residues 506-793), CaDH2 (residues 683-767), CaDH12 (residues 506-708) and 658C (residues 658-793) on the orientation and mobility of fluorescent label 1.5-IAEDANS specifically bound to Cys-707 of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) in the absence of nucleotide, and in the presence of MgADP, MgAMP-PNP, MgATPgammaS or MgATP. It was shown that at modelling different intermediates of actomyosin ATPase, the orientation and mobility of dye dipoles changed discretely, suggesting a multi-step changing of the myosin head structural state in ATP hydrolysis cycle. The maximum difference in orientation and mobility of the oscillator (4 degrees and 30%, respectively) was observed between actomyosin in the presence of MgATP, and actomyosin in the presence of MgADP. Caldesmon actin-binding sites C and B' inhibit formation of actomyosin strong binding states, while site B activates it. It is suggested that actin-myosin interaction in ATP hydrolysis cycle initiates nucleotide-dependent rotation of myosin motor domain, or that of its site for dye binding as well as the change in myosin head mobility. Caldesmon drives ATP hydrolysis cycle by shifting the equilibrium between strong and weak forms of actin-myosin binding.

  17. Dependence of RIG-I Nucleic Acid-Binding and ATP Hydrolysis on Activation of Type I Interferon Response.

    PubMed

    Baek, Yu Mi; Yoon, Soojin; Hwang, Yeo Eun; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous nucleic acids induce an innate immune response in mammalian host cells through activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We evaluated RIG-I protein for RNA binding and ATPase stimulation with RNA ligands to investigate the correlation with the extent of immune response through RIG-I activation in cells. RIG-I protein favored blunt-ended, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) ligands over sticky-ended dsRNA. Moreover, the presence of the 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) moiety in dsRNA further enhanced binding affinity to RIG-I. Two structural motifs in RNA, blunt ends in dsRNA and 5'-ppp, stimulated the ATP hydrolysis activity of RIG-I. These structural motifs also strongly induced IFN expression as an innate immune response in cells. Therefore, we suggest that IFN induction through RIG-I activation is mainly determined by structural motifs in dsRNA that increase its affinity for RIG-I protein and stimulate ATPase activity in RIG-I. PMID:27574504

  18. Dependence of RIG-I Nucleic Acid-Binding and ATP Hydrolysis on Activation of Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yu Mi; Yoon, Soojin; Hwang, Yeo Eun

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous nucleic acids induce an innate immune response in mammalian host cells through activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We evaluated RIG-I protein for RNA binding and ATPase stimulation with RNA ligands to investigate the correlation with the extent of immune response through RIG-I activation in cells. RIG-I protein favored blunt-ended, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) ligands over sticky-ended dsRNA. Moreover, the presence of the 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) moiety in dsRNA further enhanced binding affinity to RIG-I. Two structural motifs in RNA, blunt ends in dsRNA and 5'-ppp, stimulated the ATP hydrolysis activity of RIG-I. These structural motifs also strongly induced IFN expression as an innate immune response in cells. Therefore, we suggest that IFN induction through RIG-I activation is mainly determined by structural motifs in dsRNA that increase its affinity for RIG-I protein and stimulate ATPase activity in RIG-I. PMID:27574504

  19. The transport mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier.

    PubMed

    Kunji, Edmund R S; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; King, Martin S; Majd, Homa; Ashton, Valerie L; Cerson, Elizabeth; Springett, Roger; Kibalchenko, Mikhail; Tavoulari, Sotiria; Crichton, Paul G; Ruprecht, Jonathan J

    2016-10-01

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier imports ADP from the cytosol and exports ATP from the mitochondrial matrix, which are key transport steps for oxidative phosphorylation in eukaryotic organisms. The transport protein belongs to the mitochondrial carrier family, a large transporter family in the inner membrane of mitochondria. It is one of the best studied members of the family and serves as a paradigm for the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial carriers. Structurally, the carrier consists of three homologous domains, each composed of two transmembrane α-helices linked with a loop and short α-helix on the matrix side. The transporter cycles between a cytoplasmic and matrix state in which a central substrate binding site is alternately accessible to these compartments for binding of ADP or ATP. On both the cytoplasmic and matrix side of the carrier are networks consisting of three salt bridges each. In the cytoplasmic state, the matrix salt bridge network is formed and the cytoplasmic network is disrupted, opening the central substrate binding site to the intermembrane space and cytosol, whereas the converse occurs in the matrix state. In the transport cycle, tighter substrate binding in the intermediate states allows the interconversion of conformations by lowering the energy barrier for disruption and formation of these networks, opening and closing the carrier to either side of the membrane in an alternating way. Conversion between cytoplasmic and matrix states might require the simultaneous rotation of three domains around a central translocation pathway, constituting a unique mechanism among transport proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  20. Highly Dynamic Interactions Maintain Kinetic Stability of the ClpXP Protease During the ATP-Fueled Mechanical Cycle.

    PubMed

    Amor, Alvaro J; Schmitz, Karl R; Sello, Jason K; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2016-06-17

    The ClpXP protease assembles in a reaction in which an ATP-bound ring hexamer of ClpX binds to one or both heptameric rings of the ClpP peptidase. Contacts between ClpX IGF-loops and clefts on a ClpP ring stabilize the complex. How ClpXP stability is maintained during the ATP-hydrolysis cycle that powers mechanical unfolding and translocation of protein substrates is poorly understood. Here, we use a real-time kinetic assay to monitor the effects of nucleotides on the assembly and disassembly of ClpXP. When ATP is present, complexes containing single-chain ClpX assemble via an intermediate and remain intact until transferred into buffers containing ADP or no nucleotides. ATP binding to high-affinity subunits of the ClpX hexamer prevents rapid dissociation, but additional subunits must be occupied to promote assembly. Small-molecule acyldepsipeptides, which compete with the IGF loops of ClpX for ClpP-cleft binding, cause exceptionally rapid dissociation of otherwise stable ClpXP complexes, suggesting that the IGF-loop interactions with ClpP must be highly dynamic. Our results indicate that the ClpX hexamer spends almost no time in an ATP-free state during the ATPase cycle, allowing highly processive degradation of protein substrates.

  1. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  2. The homodimeric ATP-binding cassette transporter LmrA mediates multidrug transport by an alternating two-site (two-cylinder engine) mechanism

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, Hendrik W.; Margolles, Abelardo; Müller, Michael; Higgins, Christopher F.; Konings, Wil N.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial LmrA protein and the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein are closely related ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that confer multidrug resistance on cells by mediating the extrusion of drugs at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The mechanisms by which transport is mediated, and by which ATP hydrolysis is coupled to drug transport, are not known. Based on equilibrium binding experiments, photoaffinity labeling and drug transport assays, we conclude that homodimeric LmrA mediates drug transport by an alternating two-site transport (two-cylinder engine) mechanism. The transporter possesses two drug-binding sites: a transport-competent site on the inner membrane surface and a drug-release site on the outer membrane surface. The interconversion of these two sites, driven by the hydrolysis of ATP, occurs via a catalytic transition state intermediate in which the drug transport site is occluded. The mechanism proposed for LmrA may also be relevant for P-glycoprotein and other ABC transporters. PMID:10835349

  3. Change of Na+ pump current reversal potential in sheep cardiac Purkinje cells with varying free energy of ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Glitsch, H G; Tappe, A

    1995-01-01

    1. The Na(+)-K+ pump current, Ip, of cardioballs from isolated sheep cardiac Purkinje cells was measured at 30-34 degrees C by means of whole-cell recording. 2. Under physiological conditions Ip is an outward current. Experimental conditions which cause a less negative free energy of intracellular ATP hydrolysis (delta GATP) and steeper sarcolemmal gradients for the pumped Na+ and Cs+ ions evoked an Ip in the inward direction over a wide range of membrane potentials. The reversal of the Ip direction was reversible. 3. The inwardly directed Ip increased with increasingly negative membrane potentials and amounted to -0.13 +/- 0.03 microA cm-2 (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 6) at -95 mV. 4. The reversal potential (Erev) of Ip was studied as a function of delta GATP at constant sarcolemmal gradients of the pumped cations. 5. In order to vary delta GATP the cell interior was dialysed with patch pipette solutions containing 10 mM ATP and different concentrations of ADP and inorganic phosphate. The media were composed to produce delta GATP levels of about -58, -49 and -39 kJ mol-1. 6. A less negative delta GATP shifted Erev to more positive membrane potentials. From measurements of Ip as a function of membrane potential Erev was estimated to be -195, -115 and -60 mV at delta GATP levels of approximately -58, -49 and -39 kJ mol-1, respectively. The calculated Erev amounted to -224 mV at delta GATP approximately -58 kJ mol-1, -126 mV at delta GATP approximately 49 kJ mol-1 and -24 mV at delta GATP approximately -39 kJ mol-1. 7. Possible reasons for the discrepancy between estimated and calculated Erev values are discussed. 8. Shifting delta GATP to less negative values not only altered Erev but also diminished Ip at each membrane potential tested. The maximal Ip (Ip,max), which can be activated by external Cs+ (Cs+o), decreased under these conditions, whereas [Cs+]o causing half-maximal Ip activation remained unchanged. Similarly, the voltage dependence of Ip activation by Cs+o was

  4. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle

    PubMed Central

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-01-01

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  5. The Competing Mechanisms of Phosphate Monoester Dianion Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical studies on phosphate monoester hydrolysis, significant questions remain concerning the mechanistic details of these biologically critical reactions. In the present work we construct a linear free energy relationship for phosphate monoester hydrolysis to explore the effect of modulating leaving group pKa on the competition between solvent- and substrate-assisted pathways for the hydrolysis of these compounds. Through detailed comparative electronic-structure studies of methyl phosphate and a series of substituted aryl phosphate monoesters, we demonstrate that the preferred mechanism is dependent on the nature of the leaving group. For good leaving groups, a strong preference is observed for a more dissociative solvent-assisted pathway. However, the energy difference between the two pathways gradually reduces as the leaving group pKa increases and creates mechanistic ambiguity for reactions involving relatively poor alkoxy leaving groups. Our calculations show that the transition-state structures vary smoothly across the range of pKas studied and that the pathways remain discrete mechanistic alternatives. Therefore, while not impossible, a biological catalyst would have to surmount a significantly higher activation barrier to facilitate a substrate-assisted pathway than for the solvent-assisted pathway when phosphate is bonded to good leaving groups. For poor leaving groups, this intrinsic preference disappears. PMID:27471914

  6. Hydrolysis of iron and chromium fluorides: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, José L; Dufour, Javier; Negro, Carlos; López-Mateos, Federico

    2008-06-15

    Fluoride complexes of metallic ions are one of the main problems when processing industrial effluents with high content of fluoride anion. The most important case is derived from pickling treatment of stainless steel, which is performed with HNO3/HF mixtures to remove oxides scale formed over the metal surface. Waste from this process, spent pickling liquor, must be treated for recovering metallic and acid content. Conventional treatments produce a final effluent with high quantity of fluoride complexes of iron and chromium. This work proposes a hydrolysis treatment of these solid metal fluorides by reacting them with a basic agent. Metal oxides are obtained, while fluoride is released to solution as a solved salt, which can be easily recovered as hydrofluoric acid. Solid iron and chromium fluorides, mainly K2FeF5(s) and CrF3(s), obtained in the UCM treatment process, were employed in this work. Optimal hydrolysis operating conditions were obtained by means of a factorial design: media must be basic but pH cannot be higher than 9.5, temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C and alkali concentration (potassium hydroxide) below 1.1 mol L(-1). Secondary reactions have been detected, which are probably due to fluoride adsorption onto obtained oxides surface. Mechanism of reaction consists of several stages, involving solid fluoride dissolution and complexes decomposition. Hydrolysis kinetics has been modeled with classical crystal dissolution kinetics, based on mass transfer phenomena. PMID:17988794

  7. A Screen for Dominant Negative Mutants of SEC18 Reveals a Role for the AAA Protein Consensus Sequence in ATP Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Gregor J.; Harley, Carol; Boyd, Alan; Morgan, Alan

    2000-01-01

    An evolutionarily ancient mechanism is used for intracellular membrane fusion events ranging from endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi traffic in yeast to synaptic vesicle exocytosis in the human brain. At the heart of this mechanism is the core complex of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF), soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs), and SNAP receptors (SNAREs). Although these proteins are accepted as key players in vesicular traffic, their molecular mechanisms of action remain unclear. To illuminate important structure–function relationships in NSF, a screen for dominant negative mutants of yeast NSF (Sec18p) was undertaken. This involved random mutagenesis of a GAL1-regulated SEC18 yeast expression plasmid. Several dominant negative alleles were identified on the basis of galactose-inducible growth arrest, of which one, sec18-109, was characterized in detail. The sec18-109 phenotype (abnormal membrane trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway, accumulation of a membranous tubular network, growth suppression, increased cell density) is due to a single A-G substitution in SEC18 resulting in a missense mutation in Sec18p (Thr394→Pro). Thr394 is conserved in most AAA proteins and indeed forms part of the minimal AAA consensus sequence that serves as a signature of this large protein family. Analysis of recombinant Sec18-109p indicates that the mutation does not prevent hexamerization or interaction with yeast α-SNAP (Sec17p), but instead results in undetectable ATPase activity that cannot be stimulated by Sec17p. This suggests a role for the AAA protein consensus sequence in regulating ATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, this approach of screening for dominant negative mutants in yeast can be applied to other conserved proteins so as to highlight important functional domains in their mammalian counterparts. PMID:10749934

  8. Hemolysis is a primary ATP-release mechanism in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Jacek; Orlov, Sergei N; Furuya, Kishio; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2014-09-25

    The hypothesis that regulated ATP release from red blood cells (RBCs) contributes to nitric oxide-dependent control of local blood flow has sparked much interest in underlying release mechanisms. Several stimuli, including shear stress and hypoxia, have been found to induce significant RBC ATP release attributed to activation of ATP-conducting channels. In the present study, we first evaluated different experimental approaches investigating stimulated RBC ATP release and quantifying hemolysis. We then measured ATP and free hemoglobin in each and every RBC supernatant sample to directly assess the contribution of hemolysis to ATP release. Hypotonic shock, shear stress, and hypoxia, but not cyclic adenosine monophosphate agonists, significantly enhanced ATP release. It tightly correlated, however, with free hemoglobin in RBC supernatants, indicating that lysis was responsible for most, if not all, ATP release. Luminescence ATP imaging combined with simultaneous infrared cell imaging showed that ATP was released exclusively from lysing cells with no contribution from intact cells. In summary, with all stimuli tested, we found no evidence of regulated ATP release from intact RBCs other than by cell lysis. Such a release mechanism might be physiologically relevant in vivo, eg, during exercise and hypoxia where intravascular hemolysis, predominantly of senescent cells, is augmented.

  9. Extracellular ATP mediates Ca2+ signaling in cultured myenteric neurons via a PLC-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kimball, B C; Yule, D I; Mulholland, M W

    1996-04-01

    In the myenteric plexus, ATP is released as a neurotransmitter by "purinergic" nerves, relaxing visceral smooth muscle. We report a signal transduction mechanism for ATP in cultured myenteric neurons involving receptor-mediated release of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Primary cultures of myenteric neurons from guinea pigs taenia coli were loaded with the Ca2+ indicator fura 2-acetoxymethyl ester (AM) and examined using digital imaging microscopy. Superfusion of single neurons with ATP (0.01-1,000 microM) resulted in concentration-dependent increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) that were independent of extracellular Ca2+. Decrements in peak [Ca2+]i were seen with repetitive ATP exposure. Responsiveness of myenteric neurons to purinergic agonists (100 microM) was consistent with action at a neuronal P 2y purinoceptor: 2-chloro-ATP = ATP = 2-methyl-thio-ATP (MeSATP) > ADP > alpha, beta-MeATP = beta,gamma-MeATP > AMP > adenosine. ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients were inhibited dose dependently by suramin, a nonspecific P2 antagonist, and reactive blue 2, a specific P 2y antagonist. ATP and cyclopiazonic acid (30 microM) appear to release an identical intracellular Ca2+ store. Preincubation with the aminosteroid U-73122 (10 microM) inhibited ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients by 71 +/- 7%, whereas phorbol ester pretreatment (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, 100 nM, 5 min) caused a 76 +/- 4% inhibition. Peak [Ca2+]i evoked by ATP was not affected by preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml, 24 h) or nifedipine (10 microM). These data suggest a signal transduction mechanism for ATP in cultured myenteric neurons involving purinoceptor-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC), with release of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores.

  10. Prokineticin 2 facilitates mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-methylene ATP in rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Gan, Xiong; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Rao, Zhiguo; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-11-15

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2), a new chemokine, causes mechanical hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw, but little is known about the molecular mechanism. Here, we have found that ionotropic P2X receptor is essential to mechanical allodynia induced by PK2. First, intraplantar injection of high dose (3 or 10 pmol) of PK2 significantly increased paw withdrawal response frequency (%) to innocuous mechanical stimuli (mechanical allodynia). And the mechanical allodynia induced by PK2 was prevented by co-administration of TNP-ATP, a selective P2X receptor antagonist. Second, although low dose (0.3 or 1 pmol) of PK2 itself did not produce an allodynic response, it significantly facilitated the mechanical allodynia evoked by intraplantar injection of α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP). Third, PK2 concentration-dependently potentiated α,β-meATP-activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Finally, PK2 receptors and intracellular signal transduction were involved in PK2 potentiation of α,β-meATP-induced mechanical allodynia and α,β-meATP-activated currents, since the potentiation were blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist PKRA and selective PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. These results suggested that PK2 facilitated mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-meATP through a mechanism involved in sensitization of cutaneous P2X receptors expressed by nociceptive nerve endings.

  11. Mechanisms of ATP release and signalling in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has classically been considered the cell's primary energy currency. Importantly, a novel role for ATP as an extracellular autocrine and/or paracrine signalling molecule has evolved over the past century and extensive work has been conducted to characterize the ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors expressed on almost all cell types in the body. Extracellular ATP elicits potent effects on vascular cells to regulate blood vessel tone but can also be involved in vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. While the effects of purinergic signalling in the vasculature have been well documented, the mechanism(s) mediating the regulated release of ATP from cells in the blood vessel wall and circulation are now a key target of investigation. The aim of this review is to examine the current proposed mechanisms of ATP release from vascular cells, with a special emphasis on the transporters and channels involved in ATP release from vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, circulating red blood cells, and perivascular sympathetic nerves, including vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane F1/F0-ATP synthase, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, connexin hemichannels, and pannexin channels. PMID:22678409

  12. The Role of ATP in Mechanically Stimulated Rapid Closure of the Venus's Flytrap.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M J

    1973-01-01

    When the midribs of untreated traps of Dionaea muscipula are frozen in liquid nitrogen after rapid closure, they contain significantly less ATP than those frozen before closure. Exogenous ATP causes a significant increase in the rate of mechanically stimulated trap closure. Illuminated traps close faster than those kept in the dark. The traps of plants placed in 100% O(2) close much faster than do air controls, while 100% CO(2) inhibits closure. It is concluded that ATP is probably the native source of potential energy for contraction of the trap's midrib, and that if the endogenous ATP titer is increased by oxidative phosphorylation or an exogenous source, the trap will close faster.

  13. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Kirby, Brett S.; Richards, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP]venous and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP]v (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP]v) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP]v increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144–161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP]v increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans. PMID:23429876

  14. The Specialized Hsp70 (HscA) Interdomain Linker Binds to Its Nucleotide-Binding Domain and Stimulates ATP Hydrolysis in Both cis and trans Configurations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proteins from the isc operon of Escherichia coli constitute the machinery used to synthesize iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters for delivery to recipient apoproteins. Efficient and rapid [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from the holo-scaffold protein IscU depends on ATP hydrolysis in the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of HscA, a specialized Hsp70-type molecular chaperone with low intrinsic ATPase activity (0.02 min−1 at 25 °C, henceforth reported in units of min–1). HscB, an Hsp40-type cochaperone, binds to HscA and stimulates ATP hydrolysis to promote cluster transfer, yet while the interactions between HscA and HscB have been investigated, the role of HscA’s interdomain linker in modulating ATPase activity has not been explored. To address this issue, we created three variants of the 40 kDa NBD of HscA: NBD alone (HscA386), NBD with a partial linker (HscA389), and NBD with the full linker (HscA395). We found that the rate of ATP hydrolysis of HscA395 (0.45 min–1) is nearly 15-fold higher than that of HscA386 (0.035 min–1), although their apparent affinities for ATP are equivalent. HscA395, which contains the full covalently linked linker peptide, exhibited intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission and basal thermostability that were higher than those of HscA386. Furthermore, HscA395 displayed narrower 1HN line widths in its two-dimensional 1H–15N TROSY-HSQC spectrum in comparison to HscA386, indicating that the peptide in the cis configuration binds to and stabilizes the structure of the NBD. The addition to HscA386 of a synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of the interdomain linker (L387LLDVIPLS395) stimulated its ATPase activity and induced widespread NMR chemical shift perturbations indicative of a binding interaction in the trans configuration. PMID:25372495

  15. The specialized Hsp70 (HscA) interdomain linker binds to its nucleotide-binding domain and stimulates ATP hydrolysis in both cis and trans configurations.

    PubMed

    Alderson, T Reid; Kim, Jin Hae; Cai, Kai; Frederick, Ronnie O; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2014-11-25

    Proteins from the isc operon of Escherichia coli constitute the machinery used to synthesize iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters for delivery to recipient apoproteins. Efficient and rapid [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from the holo-scaffold protein IscU depends on ATP hydrolysis in the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of HscA, a specialized Hsp70-type molecular chaperone with low intrinsic ATPase activity (0.02 min(-1) at 25 °C, henceforth reported in units of min(-1)). HscB, an Hsp40-type cochaperone, binds to HscA and stimulates ATP hydrolysis to promote cluster transfer, yet while the interactions between HscA and HscB have been investigated, the role of HscA's interdomain linker in modulating ATPase activity has not been explored. To address this issue, we created three variants of the 40 kDa NBD of HscA: NBD alone (HscA386), NBD with a partial linker (HscA389), and NBD with the full linker (HscA395). We found that the rate of ATP hydrolysis of HscA395 (0.45 min(-1)) is nearly 15-fold higher than that of HscA386 (0.035 min(-1)), although their apparent affinities for ATP are equivalent. HscA395, which contains the full covalently linked linker peptide, exhibited intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission and basal thermostability that were higher than those of HscA386. Furthermore, HscA395 displayed narrower (1)H(N) line widths in its two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N TROSY-HSQC spectrum in comparison to HscA386, indicating that the peptide in the cis configuration binds to and stabilizes the structure of the NBD. The addition to HscA386 of a synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of the interdomain linker (L(387)LLDVIPLS(395)) stimulated its ATPase activity and induced widespread NMR chemical shift perturbations indicative of a binding interaction in the trans configuration. PMID:25372495

  16. [Stabilization of Cadmium Contaminated Soils by Ferric Ion Modified Attapulgite (Fe/ATP)--Characterizations and Stabilization Mechanism].

    PubMed

    Rong, Yang; Li, Rong-bo; Zhou, Yong-li; Chen, Jing; Wang, Lin-ling; Lu, Xiao-hua

    2015-08-01

    Ferric ion modified attapulgite (Fe/ATP) was prepared by impregnation and its structure and morphology were characterized. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effect of Cadmium( Cd) stabilization in soil with the addition of attapulgite (ATP) and Fe/ATP. The stabilization mechanism of Cd was further elucidated by comparing the morphologies and structure of ATP and Fe/ATP before and after Cd adsorption. Fe/ATP exhibited much better adsorption capacity than ATP, suggesting different adsorption mechanisms occurred between ATP and Fe/ATP. The leaching concentrations of Cd in soil decreased by 45% and 91% respectively, with the addition of wt. 20% ATP and Fe/ATP. The former was attributed to the interaction between Cd2 and --OH groups by chemical binding to form inner-sphere complexes in ATP and the attachment between Cd2+ and the defect sites in ATP framework. Whereas Cd stabilization with Fe/ATP was resulted from the fact that the active centers (--OH bonds or O- sites) on ATP could react with Fe3+ giving Fe--O--Cd-- bridges, which helped stabilize Cd in surface soil. What'more, the ferric oxides and metal hydroxides on the surface of ATP could interact with Cd, probably by the formation of cadmium ferrite. In conclusion, Fe/ATP, which can be easily prepared, holds promise as a potential low-cost and environmental friendly stabilizing agent for remediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals.

  17. ATP synthase from Escherichia coli: Mechanism of rotational catalysis, and inhibition with the ε subunit and phytopolyphenols.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Sekiya, Mizuki; Futai, Masamitsu

    2016-02-01

    ATP synthases (FoF1) are found ubiquitously in energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. These enzymes couple proton transport and ATP synthesis or hydrolysis through subunit rotation, which has been studied mainly by observing single molecules. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of rotational catalysis of ATP synthases, mainly that from Escherichia coli, emphasizing the high-speed and stochastic rotation including variable rates and an inhibited state. Single molecule studies combined with structural information of the bovine mitochondrial enzyme and mutational analysis have been informative as to an understanding of the catalytic site and the interaction between rotor and stator subunits. We discuss the similarity and difference in structure and inhibitory regulation of F1 from bovine and E. coli. Unlike the crystal structure of bovine F1 (α3β3γ), that of E. coli contains a ε subunit, which is a known inhibitor of bacterial and chloroplast F1 ATPases. The carboxyl terminal domain of E. coli ε (εCTD) interacts with the catalytic and rotor subunits (β and γ, respectively), and then inhibits rotation. The effects of phytopolyphenols on F1-ATPase are also discussed: one of them, piceatannol, lowered the rotational speed by affecting rotor/stator interactions. PMID:26589785

  18. Calcium induced ATP synthesis: Isotope effect, magnetic parameters and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Kuznetsov, D. A.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Shchegoleva, L. N.; Arkhangelsky, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    ATP synthesis by creatine kinase with calcium ions is accompanied by 43Ca/ 40Ca isotope effect: the enzyme with 43Ca 2+ was found to be 2.0 ± 0.3 times more active than enzymes, in which Ca 2+ ions have nonmagnetic nuclei 40Ca. The effect demonstrates that primary reaction in ATP synthesis is electron transfer between reaction partners, Сa( HO)n2+ ( n ⩽ 3) and Ca 2+(ADP) 3-. It generates ion-radical pair, in which spin conversion results in the isotope effect. Magnetic parameters (g-factors and HFC constants a( 43Ca) and a( 31P)) confirm that namely terminal oxygen atom of the ADP ligand in the complex Ca 2+(ADP) 3- donates electron to the Ca( HO)n2+ ion.

  19. ATP decreases mechanical sensitivity of muscle thin-fiber afferents in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Teru; Kubo, Asako; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue

    2015-08-01

    ATP is an energy rich substance contained in cells in the order of mM. It is released when cells are damaged and when muscle is compressed or contracted. Subcutaneous injection of ATP induces pain-related behavior and hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimulation in rats. However, the effects of ATP in muscle have not been fully studied. In the present study we examined the effects of ATP on muscle C-fiber afferent activities using single fiber recordings, and on nociceptive behavior. Muscle C-fiber activities were recorded in vitro using extensor digitorum longus muscle-common peroneal nerve preparations excised from rats deeply anesthetized with pentobarbital. ATP (100 μM and 1 mM, but not 1 μM) superfused for 5 min before the mechanical stimulation suppressed the mechanical responses of muscle thin fibers irrespective of whether they excited the fiber. This suppressive effect was reversed by P2X receptor antagonists PPADS (100 μM) and suramin (300 μM). We also found that subcutaneous injection of ATP (10 mM) induced nociceptive behavior, whereas intramuscular injection had no effect. These findings showed that effects of ATP on muscle afferents differ from those on cutaneous afferents.

  20. Structure and Mechanism of Soybean ATP Sulfurylase and the Committed Step in Plant Sulfur Assimilation*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; McKinney, Samuel E.; Westfall, Corey S.; Lee, Soon Goo; Baraniecka, Patrycja; Giovannetti, Marco; Kopriva, Stanislav; Krishnan, Hari B.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes of the sulfur assimilation pathway are potential targets for improving nutrient content and environmental stress responses in plants. The committed step in this pathway is catalyzed by ATP sulfurylase, which synthesizes adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) from sulfate and ATP. To better understand the molecular basis of this energetically unfavorable reaction, the x-ray crystal structure of ATP sulfurylase isoform 1 from soybean (Glycine max ATP sulfurylase) in complex with APS was determined. This structure revealed several highly conserved substrate-binding motifs in the active site and a distinct dimerization interface compared with other ATP sulfurylases but was similar to mammalian 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate synthetase. Steady-state kinetic analysis of 20 G. max ATP sulfurylase point mutants suggests a reaction mechanism in which nucleophilic attack by sulfate on the α-phosphate of ATP involves transition state stabilization by Arg-248, Asn-249, His-255, and Arg-349. The structure and kinetic analysis suggest that ATP sulfurylase overcomes the energetic barrier of APS synthesis by distorting nucleotide structure and identifies critical residues for catalysis. Mutations that alter sulfate assimilation in Arabidopsis were mapped to the structure, which provides a molecular basis for understanding their effects on the sulfur assimilation pathway. PMID:24584934

  1. Effects of fibrillation on the wood fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced by mechanical refining.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Hou, Qingxi; Chen, Wei; Wu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The hardwood bleached kraft pulp (HBKP) fibers were pretreated by PFI mill to obtain the substrates, the effects of fibrillation on HBKP fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis was studied. The results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was enhanced obviously by mechanical refining. The mechanical refining alterated the fibers' characteristics such as fibrillation degree, specific surface area, swelling ability, crystallinity, fiber length and fines content. All these factors correlating to the enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated through mathematical analysis. Among these factors, the fibrillation degree has the profoundest impact on the enzymatic hydrolysis of wood fibers. Consequently, the mechanical refining aiming for a high fibrillation degree was feasible to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:26851576

  2. Hydrolysis mechanism of methyl parathion evidenced by Q-Exactive mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Caixiang; Liao, Xiaoping; Luo, Yinwen; Wu, Sisi; Wang, Jianwei

    2015-12-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), a kind of widely used pesticides, are currently attracting great attention due to their adverse effects on human central nervous systems, particularly in children. Although the hydrolysis behavior of OPPs has been studied well, its hydrolysis mechanism remained controversial, especially at various pH conditions, partly due to their relatively complex structures and abundant moieties that were prone to be attacked by nucleophiles. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer, part of those hybrid high-resolution mass spectrometers (HRMS), was used to determine hydrolysis products of methyl parathion (MP), a kind of OPPs in situ buffer aqueous solution with pH ranging from 1 to 13 in this study. Most of the complex hydrolysis products of MP were identified due to the high sensitivity and accuracy of HRMS. The results demonstrated that the hydrolysis rate and pathway of MP were strong pH dependent. With the increase of pH, the hydrolysis rate of MP increased, and two different reaction mechanisms were identified: SN (2)@P pathway dominated the hydrolysis process at high pH (e.g., pH ≥ 11) while SN (2)@C was the main behavior at low pH (e.g., pH ≤ 9). This study helps understand the hydrolysis mechanism of OPPs at various pH and extends the use of Q-Exactive mass spectrometry in identifying organic pollutants and their degradation products in environmental matrices.

  3. Assembly of the yeast vacuolar H+-ATPase and ATP hydrolysis occurs in the absence of subunit c''.

    PubMed

    Whyteside, Graham; Gibson, Lucien; Scott, Moira; Finbow, Malcolm E

    2005-06-01

    The V-ATPases are ubiquitous enzymes of eukaryotes. They are involved in many cellular processes via their ability to pump protons across biological membranes. They are two domain enzymes comprising an ATP hydrolysing sector and a proton translocating sector. Both sectors are functionally coupled. The proton tanslocating sector, V0, is comprised of five polypeptides in an as yet undetermined stoichiometry. In V0 three homologous proteins, subunit c, c' and c'' have previously been reported to be essential for assembly of the enzyme. However, we report that subunit c'' is not essential for assembly but is for functional coupling of the enzyme.

  4. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  5. A dynamic model for cellulosic biomass hydrolysis: a comprehensive analysis and validation of hydrolysis and product inhibition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chien-Tai; Morales-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Sin, Gürkan; Meyer, Anne S

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study is to perform a comprehensive enzyme kinetics analysis in view of validating and consolidating a semimechanistic kinetic model consisting of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass proposed by the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (Kadam et al., Biotechnol Prog 20(3):698-705, 2004) and its variations proposed in this work. A number of dedicated experiments were carried out under a range of initial conditions (Avicel® versus pretreated barley straw as substrate, different enzyme loadings and different product inhibitors such as glucose, cellobiose and xylose) to test the hydrolysis and product inhibition mechanisms of the model. A nonlinear least squares method was used to identify the model and estimate kinetic parameters based on the experimental data. The suitable mathematical model for industrial application was selected among the proposed models based on statistical information (weighted sum of square errors). The analysis showed that transglycosylation plays a key role at high glucose levels. It also showed that the values of parameters depend on the selected experimental data used for parameter estimation. Therefore, the parameter values are not universal and should be used with caution. The model proposed by Kadam et al. (Biotechnol Prog 20(3):698-705, 2004) failed to predict the hydrolysis phenomena at high glucose levels, but when combined with transglycosylation reaction(s), the prediction of cellulose hydrolysis behaviour over a broad range of substrate concentrations (50-150 g/L) and enzyme loadings (15.8-31.6 and 1-5.9 mg protein/g cellulose for Celluclast and Novozyme 188, respectively) was possible. This is the first study introducing transglycosylation into the semimechanistic model. As long as these type of models are used within the boundary of their validity (substrate type, enzyme source and substrate concentration), they can support process design and

  6. The Acid Hydrolysis Mechanism of Acetals Catalyzed by a Supramolecular Assembly in Basic Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-09-24

    A self-assembled supramolecular host catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetals in basic aqueous solution. The mechanism of hydrolysis is consistent with the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model. Further investigation of the rate limiting step of the reaction revealed a negative entropy of activation ({Delta}S{double_dagger} = -9 cal mol{sup -1}K{sup -1}) and an inverse solvent isotope effect (k(H{sub 2}O)/k(D{sub 2}O) = 0.62). These data suggest that the mechanism of hydrolysis that takes place inside the assembly proceeds through an A-2 mechanism, in contrast to the A-1 mechanism operating in the uncatalyzed reaction. Comparison of the rates of acetal hydrolysis in the assembly with the rate of the reaction of unencapsulated substrates reveals rate accelerations of up to 980 over the background reaction for the substrate diethoxymethane.

  7. Catalytic and mechanical cycles in F-ATP synthases: Fourth in the Cycles Review Series

    PubMed Central

    Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Meier, T

    2006-01-01

    Cycles have a profound role in cellular life at all levels of organization. Well-known cycles in cell metabolism include the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycle, in which a specific carrier substrate undergoes a sequence of chemical transformations and is regenerated at the end. Other examples include the interconversions of cofactors, such as NADH or ATP, which are present in the cell in limiting amounts and have to be recycled effectively for metabolism to continue. Every living cell performs a rapid turnover of ATP to ADP to fulfil various energetic demands and effectively regenerates the ATP from ADP in an energy-consuming process. The turnover of the ATP cycle is impressive; a human uses about its body weight in ATP per day. Enzymes perform catalytic reaction cycles in which they undergo several chemical and physical transformations before they are converted back to their original states. The ubiquitous F1Fo ATP synthase is of particular interest not only because of its biological importance, but also owing to its unique rotational mechanism. Here, we give an overview of the membrane-embedded Fo sector, particularly with respect to the recent crystal structure of the c ring from Ilyobacter tartaricus, and summarize current hypotheses for the mechanism by which rotation of the c ring is generated. PMID:16607397

  8. Mechanisms of ATP-mediated vasodilation in humans: modest role for nitric oxide and vasodilating prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Kirby, Brett S.; Richards, Jennifer C.; Garcia, Leora J.; Voyles, Wyatt F.; Larson, Dennis G.; Luckasen, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    ATP is an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and findings regarding the underlying signaling mechanisms are equivocal. We sought to determine the independent and interactive roles of nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilating prostaglandins (PGs) in ATP-mediated vasodilation in young, healthy humans and determine whether any potential role was dependent on ATP dose or the timing of inhibition. In protocol 1 (n = 18), a dose-response curve to intrabrachial infusion of ATP was performed before and after both single and combined inhibition of NO synthase [NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA)] and cyclooxygenase (ketorolac). Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured via venous occlusion plethysmography and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated. In this protocol, neither individual nor combined NO/PG inhibition had any effect on the vasodilatory response (P = 0.22–0.99). In protocol 2 (n = 16), we determined whether any possible contribution of both NO and PGs to ATP vasodilation was greater at low vs. high doses of ATP and whether inhibition during steady-state infusion of the respective dose of ATP impacted the dilation. FBF in this protocol was measured via Doppler ultrasound. In protocol 2, infusion of low (n = 8)- and high-dose (n = 8) ATP for 5 min evoked a significant increase in FVC above baseline (low = 198 ± 24%; high = 706 ± 79%). Infusion of l-NMMA and ketorolac together reduced steady-state FVC during both low- and high-dose ATP (P < 0.05), and in a subsequent trial with continuous NO/PG blockade, the vasodilator response from baseline to 5 min of steady-state infusion was similarly reduced for both low (ΔFVC = −31 ± 11%)- and high-dose ATP (ΔFVC −25 ± 11%; P = 0.70 low vs. high dose). Collectively, our findings indicate a potential modest role for NO and PGs in the vasodilatory response to exogenous ATP in the human forearm that does not appear to be dose or timing dependent; however, this is dependent on the method for assessing forearm vascular

  9. Effects and mechanism of acid rain on plant chloroplast ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwen; Hu, Huiqing; Li, Yueli; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Acid rain can directly or indirectly affect plant physiological functions, especially photosynthesis. The enzyme ATP synthase is the key in photosynthetic energy conversion, and thus, it affects plant photosynthesis. To clarify the mechanism by which acid rain affects photosynthesis, we studied the effects of acid rain on plant growth, photosynthesis, chloroplast ATP synthase activity and gene expression, chloroplast ultrastructure, intracellular H(+) level, and water content of rice seedlings. Acid rain at pH 4.5 remained the chloroplast structure unchanged but increased the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, promoted chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and increased photosynthesis and plant growth. Acid rain at pH 4.0 or less decreased leaf water content, destroyed chloroplast structure, inhibited the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, decreased chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and reduced photosynthesis and plant growth. In conclusion, acid rain affected the chloroplast ultrastructure, chloroplast ATPase transcription and activity, and P n by changing the acidity in the cells, and thus influencing the plant growth and development. Finally, the effects of simulated acid rain on the test indices were found to be dose-dependent. PMID:27278067

  10. Effects and mechanism of acid rain on plant chloroplast ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwen; Hu, Huiqing; Li, Yueli; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Acid rain can directly or indirectly affect plant physiological functions, especially photosynthesis. The enzyme ATP synthase is the key in photosynthetic energy conversion, and thus, it affects plant photosynthesis. To clarify the mechanism by which acid rain affects photosynthesis, we studied the effects of acid rain on plant growth, photosynthesis, chloroplast ATP synthase activity and gene expression, chloroplast ultrastructure, intracellular H(+) level, and water content of rice seedlings. Acid rain at pH 4.5 remained the chloroplast structure unchanged but increased the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, promoted chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and increased photosynthesis and plant growth. Acid rain at pH 4.0 or less decreased leaf water content, destroyed chloroplast structure, inhibited the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, decreased chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and reduced photosynthesis and plant growth. In conclusion, acid rain affected the chloroplast ultrastructure, chloroplast ATPase transcription and activity, and P n by changing the acidity in the cells, and thus influencing the plant growth and development. Finally, the effects of simulated acid rain on the test indices were found to be dose-dependent.

  11. The Signaling Mechanism of Contraction Induced by ATP and UTP in Feline Esophageal Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae Hoon; Jung, Hyunwoo; Cho, Eun Jeong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    P2 receptors are membrane-bound receptors for extracellular nucleotides such as ATP and UTP. P2 receptors have been classified as ligand-gated ion channels or P2X receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Recently, purinergic signaling has begun to attract attention as a potential therapeutic target for a variety of diseases especially associated with gastroenterology. This study determined the ATP and UTP-induced receptor signaling mechanism in feline esophageal contraction. Contraction of dispersed feline esophageal smooth muscle cells was measured by scanning micrometry. Phosphorylation of MLC20 was determined by western blot analysis. ATP and UTP elicited maximum esophageal contraction at 30 s and 10 μM concentration. Contraction of dispersed cells treated with 10 μM ATP was inhibited by nifedipine. However, contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP, 0.1 μM UTP and 10 μM UTP was decreased by U73122, chelerythrine, ML-9, PTX and GDPβS. Contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP and UTP was inhibited by Gαi3 or Gαq antibodies and by PLCβ1 or PLCβ3 antibodies. Phosphorylated MLC20 was increased by ATP and UTP treatment. In conclusion, esophageal contraction induced by ATP and UTP was preferentially mediated by P2Y receptors coupled to Gαi3 and G q proteins, which activate PLCβ1 and PLCβ3. Subsequently, increased intracellular Ca2+ and activated PKC triggered stimulation of MLC kinase and inhibition of MLC phosphatase. Finally, increased pMLC20 generated esophageal contraction. PMID:26013385

  12. Conversion between two conformational states of KaiC is induced by ATP hydrolysis as a trigger for cyanobacterial circadian oscillation.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Katsuaki; Azai, Chihiro; Nakamura, Kaori; Tanaka, Syun; Terauchi, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro by mixing three clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC, with ATP. KaiC is the only protein with circadian rhythmic activities. In the present study, we tracked the complex formation of the three Kai proteins over time using blue native (BN) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), in which proteins are charged with the anionic dye Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB). KaiC was separated as three bands: the KaiABC complex, KaiC hexamer and KaiC monomer. However, no KaiC monomer was observed using gel filtration chromatography and CBB-free native PAGE. These data indicate two conformational states of KaiC hexamer and show that the ground-state KaiC (gs-KaiC) is stable and competent-state KaiC (cs-KaiC) is labile and degraded into monomers by the binding of CBB. Repeated conversions from gs-KaiC to cs-KaiC were observed over 24 h using an in vitro reconstitution system. Phosphorylation of KaiC promoted the conversion from gs-KaiC to cs-KaiC. KaiA sustained the gs-KaiC state, and KaiB bound only cs-KaiC. An E77Q/E78Q-KaiC variant that lacked N-terminal ATPase activity remained in the gs-KaiC state. Taken together, ATP hydrolysis induces the formation of cs-KaiC and promotes the binding of KaiB, which is a trigger for circadian oscillations. PMID:27580682

  13. Conversion between two conformational states of KaiC is induced by ATP hydrolysis as a trigger for cyanobacterial circadian oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Katsuaki; Azai, Chihiro; Nakamura, Kaori; Tanaka, Syun; Terauchi, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro by mixing three clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC, with ATP. KaiC is the only protein with circadian rhythmic activities. In the present study, we tracked the complex formation of the three Kai proteins over time using blue native (BN) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), in which proteins are charged with the anionic dye Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB). KaiC was separated as three bands: the KaiABC complex, KaiC hexamer and KaiC monomer. However, no KaiC monomer was observed using gel filtration chromatography and CBB-free native PAGE. These data indicate two conformational states of KaiC hexamer and show that the ground-state KaiC (gs-KaiC) is stable and competent-state KaiC (cs-KaiC) is labile and degraded into monomers by the binding of CBB. Repeated conversions from gs-KaiC to cs-KaiC were observed over 24 h using an in vitro reconstitution system. Phosphorylation of KaiC promoted the conversion from gs-KaiC to cs-KaiC. KaiA sustained the gs-KaiC state, and KaiB bound only cs-KaiC. An E77Q/E78Q-KaiC variant that lacked N-terminal ATPase activity remained in the gs-KaiC state. Taken together, ATP hydrolysis induces the formation of cs-KaiC and promotes the binding of KaiB, which is a trigger for circadian oscillations. PMID:27580682

  14. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL) of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD). Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in other proteins.

  15. Decipher the Mechanisms of Protein Conformational Changes Induced by Nucleotide Binding through Free-Energy Landscape Analysis: ATP Binding to Hsp70

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL) of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD). Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in other proteins

  16. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  17. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  18. The Role of Gln61 in HRas GTP Hydrolysis: A Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-García, Fernando; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús Ignacio; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Mendieta, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the water molecule involved in GTP hydrolysis within the HRas⋅RasGAP system is analyzed using a tailored approach based on hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation. A new path emerges: transfer of a proton from the attacking water molecule to a second water molecule, then a different proton is transferred from this second water molecule to the GTP. Gln61 will stabilize the transient OH− and H3O+ molecules thus generated. This newly proposed mechanism was generated by using, for the first time to our knowledge, the entire HRas-RasGAP protein complex in a QM/MM simulation context. It also offers a rational explanation for previous experimental results regarding the decrease of GTPase rate found in the HRas Q61A mutant and the increase exhibited by the HRas Q61E mutant. PMID:22225809

  19. Sucralose, an activator of the glucose-sensing receptor, increases ATP by calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Longfei; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Kojima, Itaru

    2016-08-31

    Sucralose is an artificial sweetener and activates the glucose-sensing receptor expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Although sucralose does not enter β-cells nor acts as a substrate for glucokinase, it induces a marked elevation of intracellular ATP ([ATP]c). The present study was conducted to identify the signaling pathway responsible for the elevation of [ATP]c induced by sucralose. Previous studies have shown that sucralose elevates cyclic AMP (cAMP), activates phospholipase C (PLC) and stimulates Ca(2+) entry by a Na(+)-dependent mechanism in MIN6 cells. The addition of forskolin induced a marked elevation of cAMP, whereas it did not affect [ATP]c. Carbachol, an activator of PLC, did not increase [ATP]c. In addition, activation of protein kinase C by dioctanoylglycerol did not affect [ATP]c. In contrast, nifedipine, an inhibitor of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel, significantly reduced [ATP]c response to sucralose. Removal of extracellular Na(+) nearly completely blocked sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Stimulation of Na(+) entry by adding a Na(+) ionophore monensin elevated [ATP]c. The monensin-induced elevation of [ATP]c was only partially inhibited by nifedipine and loading of BAPTA, both of which completely abolished elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. These results suggest that Na(+) entry is critical for the sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Both calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms are involved in the action of sucralose. PMID:27250218

  20. ATP synthases from archaea: the beauty of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Grüber, Gerhard; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Mayer, Florian; Müller, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Archaea live under different environmental conditions, such as high salinity, extreme pHs and cold or hot temperatures. How energy is conserved under such harsh environmental conditions is a major question in cellular bioenergetics of archaea. The key enzymes in energy conservation are the archaeal A1AO ATP synthases, a class of ATP synthases distinct from the F1FO ATP synthase ATP synthase found in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts and the V1VO ATPases of eukaryotes. A1AO ATP synthases have distinct structural features such as a collar-like structure, an extended central stalk, and two peripheral stalks possibly stabilizing the A1AO ATP synthase during rotation in ATP synthesis/hydrolysis at high temperatures as well as to provide the storage of transient elastic energy during ion-pumping and ATP synthesis/-hydrolysis. High resolution structures of individual subunits and subcomplexes have been obtained in recent years that shed new light on the function and mechanism of this unique class of ATP synthases. An outstanding feature of archaeal A1AO ATP synthases is their diversity in size of rotor subunits and the coupling ion used for ATP synthesis with H(+), Na(+) or even H(+) and Na(+) using enzymes. The evolution of the H(+) binding site to a Na(+) binding site and its implications for the energy metabolism and physiology of the cell are discussed.

  1. Mechanisms of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Motors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Coral Y; Johnson, Stephanie L; Gamarra, Nathan I; Narlikar, Geeta J

    2016-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling motors play essential roles in all DNA-based processes. These motors catalyze diverse outcomes ranging from sliding the smallest units of chromatin, known as nucleosomes, to completely disassembling chromatin. The broad range of actions carried out by these motors on the complex template presented by chromatin raises many stimulating mechanistic questions. Other well-studied nucleic acid motors provide examples of the depth of mechanistic understanding that is achievable from detailed biophysical studies. We use these studies as a guiding framework to discuss the current state of knowledge of chromatin remodeling mechanisms and highlight exciting open questions that would continue to benefit from biophysical analyses. PMID:27391925

  2. Light- and metabolism-related regulation of the chloroplast ATP synthase has distinct mechanisms and functions.

    PubMed

    Kohzuma, Kaori; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Meurer, Jörg; Kramer, David M

    2013-05-01

    The chloroplast CF0-CF1-ATP synthase (ATP synthase) is activated in the light and inactivated in the dark by thioredoxin-mediated redox modulation of a disulfide bridge on its γ subunit. The activity of the ATP synthase is also fine-tuned during steady-state photosynthesis in response to metabolic changes, e.g. altering CO2 levels to adjust the thylakoid proton gradient and thus the regulation of light harvesting and electron transfer. The mechanism of this fine-tuning is unknown. We test here the possibility that it also involves redox modulation. We found that modifying the Arabidopsis thaliana γ subunit by mutating three highly conserved acidic amino acids, D211V, E212L, and E226L, resulted in a mutant, termed mothra, in which ATP synthase which lacked light-dark regulation had relatively small effects on maximal activity in vivo. In situ equilibrium redox titrations and thiol redox-sensitive labeling studies showed that the γ subunit disulfide/sulfhydryl couple in the modified ATP synthase has a more reducing redox potential and thus remains predominantly oxidized under physiological conditions, implying that the highly conserved acidic residues in the γ subunit influence thiol redox potential. In contrast to its altered light-dark regulation, mothra retained wild-type fine-tuning of ATP synthase activity in response to changes in ambient CO2 concentrations, indicating that the light-dark- and metabolic-related regulation occur through different mechanisms, possibly via small molecule allosteric effectors or covalent modification.

  3. Hydrolysis of phosphotriesters: a theoretical analysis of the enzymatic and solution mechanisms.

    PubMed

    López-Canut, Violeta; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Castillo, Raquel; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2012-07-27

    A theoretical study on the alkaline hydrolysis of paraoxon, one of the most popular organophosphorus pesticides, in aqueous solution and in the active site of Pseudomonas diminuta phosphotriesterase (PTE) is presented. Simulations by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) potentials show that the hydrolysis of paraoxon takes place through an A(N)D(N) or associative mechanism both in solution and in the active site of PTE. The results correctly reproduce the magnitude of the activation free energies and can be used to rationalize the observed kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the hydrolysis of paraoxon in both media. Enzymatic hydrolysis of O,O-diethyl p-chlorophenyl phosphate, a phosphotriester having a leaving group with higher pK(a) than paraoxon, was also simulated. Hydrolysis of this phosphotriester by PTE follows a A(N)+D(N) mechanism with a pentacoordinate intermediate. Moreover, the leaving group of this new substrate coordinates to one of the zinc ions of the bimetallic active site in order to stabilize the large negative charge developed on the oxygen atom of the leaving group when the P-O bond is broken in the products state. To accommodate this new ligand in the coordination shell, carbamylated Lys169 must be displaced from one zinc ion to the other, which in turn affects the acidity of Asp301, a residue originally bound to the second zinc ion. This ability to displace some of the ligands of the coordination shell of the zinc centers would explain the promiscuity of this enzyme, which is capable of catalyzing hydrolysis of different substrate by means of different mechanisms. PMID:22745111

  4. Ion-radical mechanism of enzymatic ATP synthesis: DFT calculations and experimental control.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A; Breslavskaya, Natalia N

    2010-02-18

    A new, ion-radical mechanism of enzymatic ATP synthesis was recently discovered by using magnesium isotopes. It functions at a high concentration of MgCl(2) and includes electron transfer from the Mg(H(2)O)(m)(2+)(ADP(3-)) complex (m = 0-4) to the Mg(H(2)O)(n)(2+) complex as a primary reaction of ATP synthesis in catalytic sites of ATP synthase and kinases. Here, the structures and electron transfer reaction energies of magnesium complexes related to ATP synthesis are calculated in terms of DFT. ADP is modeled by pyrophosphate anions, protonated (HP(2)O(7)H(2-), HP(2)O(7)CH(3)(2-)) and deprotonated (HP(2)O(7)(3-), CH(3)P(2)O(7)(3-)). The reaction generates an ion-radical pair, composed of Mg(H(2)O)(n)(+) ion and pyrophosphate anion-radical coordinated to Mg(2+) ion. The addition of the latter to the substrate P=O bond results in ATP formation. Populations of the singlet and triplet states and singlet-triplet spin conversion in the pair are controlled by hyperfine coupling of unpaired electrons with magnetic (25)Mg and (31)P nuclei and by Zeeman interaction. Due to these two interactions, the yield of ATP is a function of nuclear magnetic moment and magnetic field; both of these effects were experimentally detected. Electron transfer reaction does not depend on m but strongly depends on n. It is exoergic and energy allowed at 0 < or = n < infinity for the deprotonated pyrophosphate anions and at 0 < or = n < 4 for the protonated ones; for other values of n, the reaction is energy deficient and forbidden. The boundary between exoergic and endoergic regimes corresponds to the trigger magnitude n* (n* = 4 for protonated anions and 6 < n* < infinity for deprotonated ones). These results explain why ATP synthesis occurs only in special devices, molecular enzymatic machines, but not in water (n = infinity). Biomedical consequences of the ion-radical enzymatic ATP synthesis are also discussed.

  5. Preparations and mechanism of hydrolysis of ((8)annulene)actinide compounds. [Uranocene

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.M. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    The mechanism of hydrolysis for bis(8)annulene actinide and lanthanide complexes has been studied in detail. The uranium complex, uranocene, decomposes with good pseudo-first order kinetics (in uranocene) in 1 M degassed solutions of H/sub 2/O in THF. Decomposition of a series of aryl-substituted uranocenes demonstrates that the hydrolysis rate is dependent on the electronic nature of the substituent (Hammett rho value = 2.1, r/sup 2/ = 0.999), with electron-withdrawing groups increasing the rate. When D/sub 2/O is substituted for H/sub 2/O, kinetic isotope effects of 8 to 14 are found for a variety of substituted uranocenes. These results suggest a pre-equilibrium involving approach of a water molecule to the central metal, followed by rate determining proton transfer to the eight membered ring and rapid decomposition to products. Each of the four protonations of the complex has a significant isotope effect. The product ratio of cyclooctatriene isomers formed in the hydrolysis varies, depending on the central metal of the complex. However, the general mechanism of hydrolysis, established for uranocene, can be extended to the hydrolysis and alcoholysis of all the (8)annulene complexes of the lanthanides and actinides.

  6. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles—including their nucleotide-free states—at ∼7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin–microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03680.001 PMID:25209998

  7. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of BMS-582664: degradation product identification and mechanism elucidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Derbin, George; Miller, Scott; Badawy, Sherif; Hussain, Munir

    2012-09-01

    BMS-582664 is an investigational drug intended for cancer treatment through oral administration. The preformulation studies revealed two unexpected degradation products under acidic conditions by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Additional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results suggested that these were cleavage (hydrolysis) products of a diaryl ether. To further understand the degradation mechanism, the reaction was carried out in (18) O-labeled water. The (18) O was found to be incorporated in only one of the two hydrolysis products. The results suggest that the corresponding α carbon in the heterocycle was unusually eletrophilic in acidic conditions probably because of the protonation of the neighboring nitrogen. This led to the selective attack by water and the consequent hydrolysis products. The study provides a new example of hydrolytic degradation of pharmaceutical compounds, and the reaction center is an aromatic heterocyclic carbon with an aryloxy substitution. PMID:22189636

  8. Impaired ATP release from red blood cells promotes their adhesion to endothelial cells: A mechanism of hypoxemia after transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongmei; Zennadi, Rahima; Xu, Bruce X.; Eu, Jerry P.; Torok, Jordan A.; Telen, Marilyn J.; McMahon, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) has been linked to disappointing clinical outcomes in the critically ill, but specific mechanisms of organ dysfunction after transfusion remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that RBC storage impairs the ability of RBCs to release ATP and that impaired ATP-release was injurious in vivo, in part through increased RBC adhesion. Design Prospective, controlled, mechanistic study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Human and mouse blood donors; nude mouse transfusion recipients. Interventions Manipulation of ATP release, supplemental ATP, and antibodies to RBC and endothelial adhesion receptors were used in vitro and in vivo to probe the roles of released ATP and adhesion in responses to (transfused) RBCs. Measurements and main results The ability of stored RBCs to release ATP declined markedly within 14 days after collection, despite relatively stable levels of ATP within the RBCs. Inhibiting ATP release promoted the adhesion of stored RBCs to endothelial cells in vitro and RBC sequestration in the lungs of transfused mice in vivo. Unlike transfusion of fresh human RBCs, stored-RBC transfusion in mice decreased blood oxygenation and increased extravasation of RBCs into the lung’s alveolar airspaces. Similar findings were seen with transfusion of fresh RBCs treated with the ATP-release inhibitors glibenclamide and carbenoxolone. These findings were prevented by either co-infusion of an ATP analog or pre-transfusion incubation of the RBCs with an antibody against the erythrocyte adhesion receptor LW (Landsteiner-Wiener; ICAM-4). Conclusions The normal flow of RBCs in pulmonary microvessels depends in part on the release of anti-adhesive ATP from RBCs, and storage-induced deficiency in ATP release from transfused RBCs may promote or exacerbate microvascular pathophysiology in the lung, in part through increased RBC adhesion. PMID:21765360

  9. Dephosphorylation of the core clock protein KaiC in the cyanobacterial KaiABC circadian oscillator proceeds via an ATP synthase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H

    2012-02-28

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P(i) (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  10. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.

    2014-10-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P{sub i} (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  11. Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of the blue crab, Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda, Brachyura): modulation of ATP hydrolysis by the biogenic amines spermidine and spermine.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Daniela P; Lucena, Malson N; França, Juliana L; McNamara, John C; Fontes, Carlos F L; Leone, Francisco A

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the effect of the exogenous polyamines spermine, spermidine and putrescine on modulation by ATP, K⁺, Na⁺, NH₄⁺ and Mg²⁺ and on inhibition by ouabain of posterior gill microsomal Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity in the blue crab, Callinectes ornatus, acclimated to a dilute medium (21‰ salinity). This is the first kinetic demonstration of competition between spermine and spermidine for the cation sites of a crustacean Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase. Polyamine inhibition is enhanced at low cation concentrations: spermidine almost completely inhibited total ATPase activity, while spermine inhibition attained 58%; putrescine had a negligible effect on Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity. Spermine and spermidine affected both V and K for ATP hydrolysis but did not affect ouabain-insensitive ATPase activity. ATP hydrolysis in the absence of spermine and spermidine obeyed Michaelis-Menten behavior, in contrast to the cooperative kinetics seen for both polyamines. Modulation of V and K by K⁺, Na⁺, NH₄⁺ and Mg²⁺ varied considerably in the presence of spermine and spermidine. These findings suggest that polyamine inhibition of Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity may be of physiological relevance to crustaceans that occupy habitats of variable salinity.

  12. Lag phase and hydrolysis mechanisms of triacylglycerol film lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Snabe, Torben; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn

    2003-09-01

    We here present novel insights into the dynamic changes of a nanosized lipid film during enzymatic degradation. When adding an aqueous solution containing a triacylglycerol lipase to an approximately 100nm thin triolein film, which is supported on a hard surface, the film thickness, elasticity, viscosity, and chemical composition were obtained continuously. Both a mechanical technique (quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring) and a spectroscopic technique (attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) were utilised for this study. Detailed data revealed the effects of pH, Ca(2+), and catalytic rate on lipolysis, including product release from the film. It was found that under basic conditions and without Ca(2+), the lipolytic activity commence instantaneously upon addition of enzyme, whereas product release from the substrate film awaits conditions that favours release. A model for removal of degradation products from the film is introduced, including a novel interpretation of the lag phase phenomenon.

  13. The switching mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier explored by free-energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Klingenberg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) of mitochondria has been an early example for elucidating the transport mechanism alternating between the external (c-) and internal (m-) states (M. Klingenberg, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1778 (2008) 1978-2021). An atomic resolution crystal structure of AAC is available only for the c-state featuring a three repeat transmembrane domain structure. Modeling of transport mechanism remained hypothetical for want of an atomic structure of the m-state. Previous molecular dynamics studies simulated the binding of ADP or ATP to the AAC remaining in the c-state. Here, a full description of the AAC switching from the c- to the m-state is reported using well-tempered metadynamics simulations. Free-energy landscapes of the entire translocation from the c- to the m-state, based on the gyration radii of the c- and m-gates and of the center of mass, were generated. The simulations revealed three free-energy basins attributed to the c-, intermediate- and m-states separated by activation barriers. These simulations were performed with the empty and with the ADP- and ATP-loaded AAC as well as with the poorly transported AMP and guanine nucleotides, showing in the free energy landscapes that ADP and ATP lowered the activation free-energy barriers more than the other substrates. Upon binding AMP and guanine nucleotides a deeper free-energy level stabilized the intermediate-state of the AAC2 hampering the transition to the m-state. The structures of the substrate binding sites in the different states are described producing a full picture of the translocation events in the AAC.

  14. Rotary movements within the ATP synthase do not constitute an obligatory element of the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Berden, Jan A

    2003-08-01

    After a brief history of the proposals for the mechanism of the ATP synthase, the main experimental arguments for a rotational mechanism of catalysis are analyzed and on the basis of this analysis it is concluded that no evidence has been provided for rotation as an obligatory element of the catalytic mechanism. On the other hand, the experimental evidence in favor of a two-sites catalytic mechanism, derived from various approaches and not compatible with a three-sites rotary mechanism, appear to be very solid. Finally a brief characterization of the various nucleotide binding sites is provided and a suggestion is made how the enzyme has evolutionarily developed from a rotating machine into an asymmetrical device for energy conservation.

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of the mercury(II)-assisted hydrolysis of methyl iodide.

    PubMed

    Celo, Valbona; Scott, Susannah L

    2005-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of aqueous Hg(II) with methyl iodide have been investigated. The overall reaction is best described as Hg(II)-assisted hydrolysis, resulting in quantitative formation of methanol and, in the presence of excess methyl iodide, ultimately, HgI2 via the intermediate HgI+. The kinetics are biexponential when methyl iodide is in excess. At 25 degrees C, the acceleration provided by Hg2+ is 7.5 times greater than that caused by HgI+, while assistance of hydrolysis was not observed for HgI2. Thus, the reactions are not catalytic in Hg(II). The kinetics are consistent with an SN2-M+ mechanism involving electrophilic attack at iodide. As expected, methylation of mercury is not a reaction pathway; traces of methylmercury(II) are artifacts of the extraction/preconcentration procedure used for methylmercury analysis.

  16. Application of the luciferin-luciferase enzyme system for determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to studies on the mechanisms of herbicide action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.john, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The luciferin-luciferase enzyme system for determination of ATP is valuable for studies on the mechanisms of herbicide action. Investigations using this system have shown that certain herbicides may act by interfering with ATP production or by blocking ATP use, or by both mechanisms.

  17. Mechanics regulates ATP-stimulated collective calcium response in fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Lembong, Josephine; Sabass, Benedikt; Sun, Bo; Rogers, Matthew E.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells constantly sense their chemical and mechanical environments. We study the effect of mechanics on the ATP-induced collective calcium response of fibroblast cells in experiments that mimic various tissue environments. We find that closely packed two-dimensional cell cultures on a soft polyacrylamide gel (Young's modulus E = 690 Pa) contain more cells exhibiting calcium oscillations than cultures on a rigid substrate (E = 36 000 Pa). Calcium responses of cells on soft substrates show a slower decay of calcium level relative to those on rigid substrates. Actin enhancement and disruption experiments for the cell cultures allow us to conclude that actin filaments determine the collective Ca2+ oscillatory behaviour in the culture. Inhibition of gap junctions results in a decrease of the oscillation period and reduced correlation of calcium responses, which suggests additional complexity of signalling upon cell–cell contact. Moreover, the frequency of calcium oscillations is independent of the rigidity of the substrate but depends on ATP concentration. We compare our results with those from similar experiments on individual cells. Overall, our observations show that collective chemical signalling in cell cultures via calcium depends critically on the mechanical environment. PMID:26063818

  18. Controlled drug release and hydrolysis mechanism of polymer-magnetic nanoparticle composite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Song, Lina; Cui, Huating; Myers, John N; Bai, Tingting; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Zhan; Gu, Ning

    2015-05-13

    Uniform and multifunctional poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-nanoparticle composite has enormous potential for applications in biomedical and materials science. A detailed understanding of the surface and interface chemistry of these composites is essential to design such materials with optimized function. Herein, we designed and investigated a simple PLA-magnetic nanoparticle composite system to elucidate the impact of nanoparticles on the degradation of polymer-nanoparticle composites. In order to have an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of hydrolysis in PLA-nanoparticle composites, degradation processes were monitored by several surface sensitive techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy, and sum frequency generation spectroscopy. As a second-order nonlinear optical technique, SFG spectroscopy was introduced to directly probe in situ chemical nature at the PLA-magnetic nanoparticle composite/aqueous interface, which allowed for the delineation of molecular mechanisms of various hydrolysis processes for degradation at the molecular level. The best PLA-NP material, with a concentration of 20% MNP in the composite, was found to enhance the drug release rate greater than 200 times while maintaining excellent controlled drug release characteristics. It was also found that during hydrolysis, various crystalline-like PLA domains on the surfaces of PLA-nanoparticle composites influenced various hydrolysis behaviors of PLA. Results from this study provide new insight into the design of nanomaterials with controlled degradation and drug release properties, and the underlined molecular mechanisms. The methodology developed in this study to characterize the polymer-nanoparticle composites is general and widely applicable.

  19. Controlled drug release and hydrolysis mechanism of polymer-magnetic nanoparticle composite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Song, Lina; Cui, Huating; Myers, John N; Bai, Tingting; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Zhan; Gu, Ning

    2015-05-13

    Uniform and multifunctional poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-nanoparticle composite has enormous potential for applications in biomedical and materials science. A detailed understanding of the surface and interface chemistry of these composites is essential to design such materials with optimized function. Herein, we designed and investigated a simple PLA-magnetic nanoparticle composite system to elucidate the impact of nanoparticles on the degradation of polymer-nanoparticle composites. In order to have an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of hydrolysis in PLA-nanoparticle composites, degradation processes were monitored by several surface sensitive techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy, and sum frequency generation spectroscopy. As a second-order nonlinear optical technique, SFG spectroscopy was introduced to directly probe in situ chemical nature at the PLA-magnetic nanoparticle composite/aqueous interface, which allowed for the delineation of molecular mechanisms of various hydrolysis processes for degradation at the molecular level. The best PLA-NP material, with a concentration of 20% MNP in the composite, was found to enhance the drug release rate greater than 200 times while maintaining excellent controlled drug release characteristics. It was also found that during hydrolysis, various crystalline-like PLA domains on the surfaces of PLA-nanoparticle composites influenced various hydrolysis behaviors of PLA. Results from this study provide new insight into the design of nanomaterials with controlled degradation and drug release properties, and the underlined molecular mechanisms. The methodology developed in this study to characterize the polymer-nanoparticle composites is general and widely applicable. PMID:25881356

  20. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-03-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or 'bathing solution' ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature.

  1. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or ‘bathing solution’ ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r2 = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature. PMID:22227202

  2. Protein phosphorylation and prevention of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by ATP: coupled mechanisms of energy metabolism regulation.

    PubMed

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Gatti, Domenico L; Bai, Yidong; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-06-01

    Rapid regulation of oxidative phosphorylation is crucial for mitochondrial adaptation to swift changes in fuels availability and energy demands. An intramitochondrial signaling pathway regulates cytochrome oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, through reversible phosphorylation. We find that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of a COX subunit dictates mammalian mitochondrial energy fluxes and identify the specific residue (S58) of COX subunit IV-1 (COXIV-1) that is involved in this mechanism of metabolic regulation. Using protein mutagenesis, molecular dynamics simulations, and induced fit docking, we show that mitochondrial energy metabolism regulation by phosphorylation of COXIV-1 is coupled with prevention of COX allosteric inhibition by ATP. This regulatory mechanism is essential for efficient oxidative metabolism and cell survival. We propose that S58 COXIV-1 phosphorylation has evolved as a metabolic switch that allows mammalian mitochondria to rapidly toggle between energy utilization and energy storage.

  3. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  4. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures.

  5. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures. PMID:26558996

  6. Structural Characterization of Two Metastable ATP-Bound States of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Megan L.; Mark, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters couple the binding and hydrolysis of ATP to the transport of substrate molecules across the membrane. The mechanism by which ATP binding and/or hydrolysis drives the conformational changes associated with substrate transport has not yet been characterized fully. Here, changes in the conformation of the ABC export protein P-glycoprotein on ATP binding are examined in a series of molecular dynamics simulations. When one molecule of ATP is placed at the ATP binding site associated with each of the two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), the membrane-embedded P-glycoprotein crystal structure adopts two distinct metastable conformations. In one, each ATP molecule interacts primarily with the Walker A motif of the corresponding NBD. In the other, the ATP molecules interacts with both Walker A motif of one NBD and the Signature motif of the opposite NBD inducing the partial dimerization of the NBDs. This interaction is more extensive in one of the two ATP binding site, leading to an asymmetric structure. The overall conformation of the transmembrane domains is not altered in either of these metastable states, indicating that the conformational changes associated with ATP binding observed in the simulations in the absence of substrate do not lead to the outward-facing conformation and thus would be insufficient in themselves to drive transport. Nevertheless, the metastable intermediate ATP-bound conformations observed are compatible with a wide range of experimental cross-linking data demonstrating the simulations do capture physiologically important conformations. Analysis of the interaction between ATP and its cofactor Mg2+ with each NBD indicates that the coordination of ATP and Mg2+ differs between the two NBDs. The role structural asymmetry may play in ATP binding and hydrolysis is discussed. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our results are not heavily influenced by the crystal structure chosen for initiation of the simulations

  7. Yeast mitochondria import ATP through the calcium-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier Sal1p, and are ATP consumers during aerobic growth in glucose.

    PubMed

    Traba, Javier; Froschauer, Elisabeth Maria; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Del Arco, Araceli

    2008-08-01

    Sal1p, a novel Ca2+-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier, is essential in yeast lacking all adenine nucleotide translocases. By targeting luciferase to the mitochondrial matrix to monitor mitochondrial ATP levels, we show in isolated mitochondria that both ATP-Mg and free ADP are taken up by Sal1p with a K(m) of 0.20 +/- 0.03 mM and 0.28 +/- 0.06 mM respectively. Nucleotide transport along Sal1p is strictly Ca2+ dependent. Ca2+ increases the V(max) with a S(0.5) of 15 muM, and no changes in the K(m) for ATP-Mg. Glucose sensing in yeast generates Ca2+ transients involving Ca2+ influx from the external medium. We find that carbon-deprived cells respond to glucose with an immediate increase in mitochondrial ATP levels which is not observed in the presence of EGTA or in Sal1p-deficient cells. Moreover, we now report that during normal aerobic growth on glucose, yeast mitochondria import ATP from the cytosol and hydrolyse it through H+-ATP synthase. We identify two pathways for ATP uptake in mitochondria, the ADP/ATP carriers and Sal1p. Thus, during exponential growth on glucose, mitochondria are ATP consumers, as those from cells growing in anaerobic conditions or deprived of mitochondrial DNA which depend on cytosolic ATP and mitochondrial ATPase working in reverse to generate a mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, the results show that growth on glucose requires ATP hydrolysis in mitochondria and recruits Sal1p as a Ca2+-dependent mechanism to import ATP-Mg from the cytosol. Whether this mechanism is used under similar settings in higher eukaryotes is an open question.

  8. Amine-Promoted Organosilicate Hydrolysis Mechanism at Near-Neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delak, K. M.; Sahai, N.

    2006-12-01

    Proteins bearing polylysine moeities and histidine and serine amino-aicd residues, isolated from diatoms and sponges, are known to promote biological nanoporous silica formation [1, 2]. Using 29Si NMR, we have shown quantitatively that monoamines and small polyamines can chemically accelerate the hydrolysis and condensation rates of organosilicate starting materials, in biomimetic silica synthesis pathways, at circum- neutral pHs and room temperature [3, 4]. The present study is focused on understanding the mechanistic role of these amines in catalyzing the hydrolysis step that precedes condensation [5]. We conducted 29Si NMR experimental studies over a range of temperature and pHs for the hydrolysis rates of trimethylethoxysilane (TMES), a model compound with only one hydrolyzable bond. Experimental results were combined with quantum mechanical hybrid Density Functional Theory calculations of putative intermediate and transition state structures for TMES and tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) which has four hydrolyzable bonds. Comparison of calculated energies with experimentally-determined activation energies indicated that amines promote TMES hydrolysis mainly due to the amine's acidity at neutral pH. The proton released by the amine is transferred to the organosilicate, producing a protonated, ethoxy leaving group that can be displaced by water in an SN2 reaction. For TMOS, the activation energy of proton-transfer coupled with SN2 substitution is comparable to that for Corriu's nucleophile-activated nucleophilic displacement mechanism [6], such that the mechanism of amine-catalyzed hydrolysis is mostly dependent on the ambient pH conditions as well as the type of amine. The molecular mechanisms of hydrolysis and aggregation are reflected, ultimately, on the larger scale in the silica morphology where amines promoting faster hydrolysis result in glassy products compared to slower hydrolyzing amines forming particulate silica [7, 8]. REFERENCES [1] Kroger N

  9. ATP hydrolysis is critically required for function of CaV1.3 channels in cochlear inner hair cells via fueling Ca2+ clearance.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Simon; Krinner, Stefanie; Wong, Aaron B; Moser, Tobias; Pangršič, Tina

    2014-05-14

    Sound encoding is mediated by Ca(2+) influx-evoked release of glutamate at the ribbon synapse of inner hair cells. Here we studied the role of ATP in this process focusing on Ca(2+) current through CaV1.3 channels and Ca(2+) homeostasis in mouse inner hair cells. Patch-clamp recordings and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrate that hydrolyzable ATP is essential to maintain synaptic Ca(2+) influx in inner hair cells via fueling Ca(2+)-ATPases to avoid an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and subsequent Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation of CaV1.3 channels.

  10. Structure guided simulations illuminate the mechanism of ATP transport through VDAC1

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, O.P.; Paz, A.; Adelman, J.L.; Colletier, J.P.; Abramson, J.; Grabe, M.

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) mediates metabolite and ion flow across the outer mitochondrial membrane of all eukaryotic cells. The open channel passes millions of ATP molecules per second, while the closed state exhibits no detectable ATP flux. High-resolution structures of VDAC1 revealed a 19-stranded β-barrel with an α-helix partially occupying the central pore. To understand ATP permeation through VDAC, we solved the crystal structure of mouse VDAC1 (mVDAC1) in the presence of ATP, revealing a low-affinity binding site. Guided by these coordinates, we initiated hundreds of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to construct a Markov State Model (MSM) of ATP permeation. These simulations indicate that ATP flows through VDAC using multiple pathways, consistent with our structural data and experimentally determined physiological rates. PMID:24908397

  11. Cruciferous vegetables: cancer protective mechanisms of glucosinolate hydrolysis products and selenium.

    PubMed

    Keck, Anna-Sigrid; Finley, John W

    2004-03-01

    Dietetic professionals urge Americans to increase fruit and vegetable intakes. The American Institute of Cancer Research estimates that if the only dietary change made was to increase the daily intake of fruits and vegetables to 5 servings per day, cancer rates could decline by as much as 20%. Among the reasons cited for this health benefit are that fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. They also contain nonnutritive components that may provide substantial health benefits beyond basic nutrition. Examples of the latter are the glucosinolate hydrolysis products, sulforaphane, and indole-3-carbinol. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that the consumption of cruciferous vegetables protects against cancer more effectively than the total intake of fruits and vegetables. This review describes the anticarcinogenic bioactivities of glucosinolate hydrolysis products, the mineral selenium derived from crucifers, and the mechanisms by which they protect against cancer. These mechanisms include altered estrogen metabolism, protection against reactive oxygen species, altered detoxification by induction of phase II enzymes, decreased carcinogen activation by inhibition of phase I enzymes, and slowed tumor growth and induction of apoptosis.

  12. Mechanical modulation of ATP-binding affinity of V1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tirtom, Naciye Esma; Okuno, Daichi; Nakano, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Ken; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    V(1)-ATPase is a rotary motor protein that rotates the central shaft in a counterclockwise direction hydrolyzing ATP. Although the ATP-binding process is suggested to be the most critical reaction step for torque generation in F(1)-ATPase (the closest relative of V(1)-ATPase evolutionarily), the role of ATP binding for V(1)-ATPase in torque generation has remained unclear. In the present study, we performed single-molecule manipulation experiments on V(1)-ATPase from Thermus thermophilus to investigate how the ATP-binding process is modulated upon rotation of the rotary shaft. When V(1)-ATPase showed an ATP-waiting pause, it was stalled at a target angle and then released. Based on the response of the V(1)-ATPase released, the ATP-binding probability was determined at individual stall angles. It was observed that the rate constant of ATP binding (k(on)) was exponentially accelerated with forward rotation, whereas the rate constant of ATP release (k(off)) was exponentially reduced. The angle dependence of the k(off) of V(1)-ATPase was significantly smaller than that of F(1)-ATPase, suggesting that the ATP-binding process is not the major torque-generating step in V(1)-ATPase. When V(1)-ATPase was stalled at the mean binding angle to restrict rotary Brownian motion, k(on) was evidently slower than that determined from free rotation, showing the reaction rate enhancement by conformational fluctuation. It was also suggested that shaft of V(1)-ATPase should be rotated at least 277° in a clockwise direction for efficient release of ATP under ATP-synthesis conditions.

  13. Mechanism of action of ATP on canine pulmonary vagal C fibre nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Pelleg, A; Hurt, C M

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on pulmonary vagal afferent fibres (n = 46) was studied in a canine model in vivo (n = 38). 2. ATP (3-6 mumol kg-1), administered as a rapid bolus into the right atrium, elicited a transient burst of action potentials in cervical vagal fibres, which was not affected by either blockade of ganglionic transmission (hexamethonium) or a drop in arterial blood pressure (nitroglycerine). 3. The fibres with ATP-sensitive terminals were otherwise quiescent with no activity related to either cardiac or respiratory cycles and their conduction velocity was 0.85 +/- 0.13 m s-1 (n = 7). 4. Inflation of the lungs to 2-3 times the tidal volume triggered brief bursts of action potentials in these fibres. 5. Capsaicin (10 micrograms kg-1), given as a rapid bolus into the right atrium, elicited a burst of action potentials in these ATP-sensitive fibres. 6. Smaller amounts of ATP and capsaicin (0.5-3 mumol kg-1 and 1-5 micrograms kg-1, respectively) had similar effects when the two compounds were given into the right pulmonary artery. 7. Adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, or adenosine 5'-diphosphate did not excite these fibres (n = 30). 8. The non-degradable analogue of ATP alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-mATP) was tenfold more potent than ATP while beta,gamma-methylene ATP (beta,gamma-mATP) was in active. 9. The selective P2x-purinoceptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid markedly attenuated the effect of ATP but not of capsaicin. The P2Y-purinoceptor antagonist Reactive Blue 2 was without effect. 10. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) did not affect this action of ATP. 11. In the canine lungs ATP activates vagal C fibre nerve terminals. This action is mediated by P2X-purinoceptors and is independent of a PTX-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein). PMID:8745294

  14. Mechanisms of hydrolysis-oligomerization of aluminum alkoxide Al(OC3H7)3.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xueli; Liu, Yongjun; Chen, Dairong

    2011-05-12

    As one of the representative superinsulating materials, the aluminum trioxypropyl Al(OC(3)H(7))(3) aerogel may be applied in launch vehicles and manned spacecrafts. In this study, the structures and hydrolysis mechanisms of the monomer, dimers, and trimers of Al(OC(3)H(7))(3) in neutral and alkaline environments were studied at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level by using the CPCM solvation model to understand the fundamental chemistry of Al(OC(3)H(7))(3) hydrolysis and oligomerization. Our calculation shows that the first-order hydrolyses of the monomer and oligomers are energetically favorable in both alkaline and neutral solutions. In alkaline solutions, they are more apt to oligomerize than to hydrolyze due to high energy barriers and large binding energies in the formation of anionic species. For the oligomers under neutral condition (1) Al(OC(3)H(7))(3) is linked by four-membered Al-O rings with pentacoordinated bridging and tetracoordinated Al atoms, (2) the hydrolyzed propoxy groups will be expelled by solvent molecules, and (3) partly hydrolyzed species can condense to oligomers with bridging OH groups or O atoms. PMID:21500848

  15. Production of fermentable sugars from sugarcane bagasse by enzymatic hydrolysis after autohydrolysis and mechanical refining.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Larisse Aparecida Ribas; Han, Qiang; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min; Colodette, Jorge Luiz; Borges Gomes, Fernando José

    2015-03-01

    The autohydrolysis process has been considered a simple, low-cost and environmental friendly technology for generation of sugars from biomass. In order to improve accessibility of enzymes during enzymatic hydrolysis as well as to allow the recovery of hemicellulose in the filtrate, the sugarcane bagasse was pretreated using autohydrolysis followed by a mechanical refining process. The autohydrolysis was carried out in three different conditions. Autohydrolysis at 190°C for 10min provided the highest overall sugar (19.2/100g raw bagasse) in prehydrolyzate. The enzymatic hydrolysis step was performed for all the post-treated solids with and without refining at enzyme loadings of 5 and 10FPU/g for 96h. A total of 84.4% of sugar can be recovered from sugarcane bagasse at 180°C for 20min with 5 FPU/g enzyme charge. The economic analysis for the proposed method showed that the bioethanol production can have a financial return larger than 12%.

  16. Modulator-induced interference in functional cross talk between the substrate and the ATP sites of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Maki, Nazli; Moitra, Karobi; Silver, Cara; Ghosh, Pratiti; Chattopadhyay, Apurba; Dey, Saibal

    2006-02-28

    ) from vanadate-trapped Pgp, which is essential for subsequent rounds of ATP hydrolysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate a distinct mechanism of Pgp modulation that involves allosteric disruption of molecular cross talk between the substrate, and the ATP, sites without any direct interference with their individual functions.

  17. Atomic structure of the apoptosome: mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mengying; Li, Yini; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-chen; Huang, Weiyun; Yan, Chuangye; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Shi, Yigong

    2015-01-01

    The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) controls the onset of many known forms of intrinsic apoptosis in mammals. Apaf-1 exists in normal cells as an autoinhibited monomer. Upon binding to cytochrome c and dATP, Apaf-1 oligomerizes into a heptameric complex known as the apoptosome, which recruits and activates cell-killing caspases. Here we present an atomic structure of an intact mammalian apoptosome at 3.8 Å resolution, determined by single-particle, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural analysis, together with structure-guided biochemical characterization, uncovered how cytochrome c releases the autoinhibition of Apaf-1 through specific interactions with the WD40 repeats. Structural comparison with autoinhibited Apaf-1 revealed how dATP binding triggers a set of conformational changes that results in the formation of the apoptosome. Together, these results constitute the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1. PMID:26543158

  18. Atomic structure of the apoptosome: mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mengying; Li, Yini; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Huang, Weiyun; Yan, Chuangye; Scheres, Sjors H W; Shi, Yigong

    2015-11-15

    The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) controls the onset of many known forms of intrinsic apoptosis in mammals. Apaf-1 exists in normal cells as an autoinhibited monomer. Upon binding to cytochrome c and dATP, Apaf-1 oligomerizes into a heptameric complex known as the apoptosome, which recruits and activates cell-killing caspases. Here we present an atomic structure of an intact mammalian apoptosome at 3.8 Å resolution, determined by single-particle, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural analysis, together with structure-guided biochemical characterization, uncovered how cytochrome c releases the autoinhibition of Apaf-1 through specific interactions with the WD40 repeats. Structural comparison with autoinhibited Apaf-1 revealed how dATP binding triggers a set of conformational changes that results in the formation of the apoptosome. Together, these results constitute the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

  19. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Bind ATP: A putative Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J.; Soloveichick, L.; Shavit, S.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Korczyn, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) generated in experimental animals cross-react with ATP. We therefore examined the possibility that aPL IgG from human subjects bind to ATP by affinity column and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sera with high levels of aPL IgG were collected from 12 patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). IgG fractions from 10 of 12 APS patients contained aPL that could be affinity-bound to an ATP column and completely eluted with NaCl 0.5 M. A significant (>50%) inhibition of aPL IgG binding by ATP 5 mM was found in the majority. Similar inhibition was obtained with ADP but not with AMP or cAMP. All the affinity purified anti-ATP antibodies also bound β2-glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI, also known as apolipoprotein H) suggesting that, similar to most pathogenic aPL, their binding depends on this serum cofactor. We further investigated this possibility and found that the binding of β2-GPI to the ATP column was similar to that of aPL IgG in that most was reversed by NaCl 0.5 M. Furthermore, addition of β2-GPI to aPL IgG significantly increased the amount of aPL binding to an ATP column. We conclude that aPL IgG bind ATP, probably through β2-GPI. This binding could interfere with the normal extracellular function of ATP and similar neurotransmitters. PMID:16295522

  20. ATP synthase with its gamma subunit reduced to the N-terminal helix can still catalyze ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mnatsakanyan, Nelli; Hook, Jonathon A; Quisenberry, Leah; Weber, Joachim

    2009-09-25

    ATP synthase uses a unique rotary mechanism to couple ATP synthesis and hydrolysis to transmembrane proton translocation. As part of the synthesis mechanism, the torque of the rotor has to be converted into conformational rearrangements of the catalytic binding sites on the stator to allow synthesis and release of ATP. The gamma subunit of the rotor, which plays a central role in the energy conversion, consists of two long helices inside the central cavity of the stator cylinder plus a globular portion outside the cylinder. Here, we show that the N-terminal helix alone is able to fulfill the function of full-length gamma in ATP synthesis as long as it connects to the rest of the rotor. This connection can occur via the epsilon subunit. No direct contact between gamma and the c ring seems to be required. In addition, the results indicate that the epsilon subunit of the rotor exists in two different conformations during ATP synthesis and ATP hydrolysis.

  1. Stepwise motion of a microcantilever driven by the hydrolysis of viral ATPases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Johann; Daudén, María I.; Carrascosa, José L.; Tamayo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The biomolecular machines involved in DNA packaging by viruses generate one of the highest mechanical powers observed in nature. One component of the DNA packaging machinery, called the terminase, has been proposed as the molecular motor that converts chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis into mechanical movement of DNA during bacteriophage morphogenesis. However, the conformational changes involved in this energy conversion have never been observed. Here we report a real-time measurement of ATP-induced conformational changes in the terminase of bacteriophage T7 (gp19). The recording of the cantilever bending during its functionalization shows the existence of a gp19 monolayer arrangement confirmed by atomic force microscopy of the immobilized proteins. The ATP hydrolysis of the gp19 terminase generates a stepped motion of the cantilever and points to a mechanical cooperative effect among gp19 oligomers. Furthermore, the effect of ATP can be counteracted by non-hydrolyzable nucleotide analogs.

  2. Rotation and structure of FoF1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Daichi; Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2011-06-01

    F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase is one of the most ubiquitous enzymes; it is found widely in the biological world, including the plasma membrane of bacteria, inner membrane of mitochondria and thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. However, this enzyme has a unique mechanism of action: it is composed of two mechanical rotary motors, each driven by ATP hydrolysis or proton flux down the membrane potential of protons. The two molecular motors interconvert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis and proton electrochemical potential via the mechanical rotation of the rotary shaft. This unique energy transmission mechanism is not found in other biological systems. Although there are other similar man-made systems like hydroelectric generators, F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase operates on the nanometre scale and works with extremely high efficiency. Therefore, this enzyme has attracted significant attention in a wide variety of fields from bioenergetics and biophysics to chemistry, physics and nanoscience. This review summarizes the latest findings about the two motors of F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase as well as a brief historical background.

  3. Signaling mechanism for modulation by ATP of glycine receptors on rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Gong; Zhou, Wei; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    ATP modulates voltage- and ligand-gated channels in the CNS via the activation of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors. While P2Y receptors are expressed in retinal neurons, the function of these receptors in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we demonstrated that ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated currents of OFF type ganglion cells (OFF-GCs) dose-dependently, and the effect was in part mediated by P2Y1 and P2Y11, but not by P2X. The ATP effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of a Gq/11 protein inhibitor and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, but not phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor. The ATP effect was accompanied by an increase in [Ca2+]i through the IP3-sensitive pathway and was blocked by intracellular Ca2+-free solution. Furthermore, the ATP effect was eliminated in the presence of PKC inhibitors. Neither PKA nor PKG system was involved. These results suggest that the ATP-induced suppression may be mediated by a distinct Gq/11/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca2+/PKC signaling pathway, following the activation of P2Y1,11 and other P2Y subtypes. Consistently, ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents of OFF-GCs. These results suggest that ATP may modify the ON-to-OFF crossover inhibition, thus changing action potential patterns of OFF-GCs. PMID:27357477

  4. Insight into the Mechanism of Hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23 Serine-β-lactamase Gained by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Grazioso, Giovanni; De Amici, Marco

    2016-09-13

    The fast and constant development of drug resistant bacteria represents a serious medical emergency. To overcome this problem, the development of drugs with new structures and modes of action is urgently needed. In this work, we investigated, at the atomistic level, the mechanisms of hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23, a class D β-lactamase, combining unbiased classical molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations with classical force field-based and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potentials. Our calculations provide a detailed structural and dynamic picture of the molecular steps leading to the formation of the Meropenem-OXA-23 covalent adduct, the subsequent hydrolysis, and the final release of the inactive antibiotic. In this mechanistic framework, the predicted activation energy is in good agreement with experimental kinetic measurements, validating the expected reaction path.

  5. Insight into the Mechanism of Hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23 Serine-β-lactamase Gained by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Grazioso, Giovanni; De Amici, Marco

    2016-09-13

    The fast and constant development of drug resistant bacteria represents a serious medical emergency. To overcome this problem, the development of drugs with new structures and modes of action is urgently needed. In this work, we investigated, at the atomistic level, the mechanisms of hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23, a class D β-lactamase, combining unbiased classical molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations with classical force field-based and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potentials. Our calculations provide a detailed structural and dynamic picture of the molecular steps leading to the formation of the Meropenem-OXA-23 covalent adduct, the subsequent hydrolysis, and the final release of the inactive antibiotic. In this mechanistic framework, the predicted activation energy is in good agreement with experimental kinetic measurements, validating the expected reaction path. PMID:27534275

  6. Shadows of an absent partner: ATP hydrolysis and phosphoenzyme turnover of the Spf1 (sensitivity to Pichia farinosa killer toxin) P5-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Gerardo R; de Tezanos Pinto, Felicitas; Mazzitelli, Luciana R; Adamo, Hugo P

    2012-08-31

    The P5-ATPases are important components of eukaryotic cells. They have been shown to influence protein biogenesis, folding, and transport. The knowledge of their biochemical properties is, however, limited, and the transported ions are still unknown. We expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the yeast Spf1 P5A-ATPase containing the GFP fused at the N-terminal end. The GFP-Spf1 protein was localized in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum. Purified preparations of GFP-Spf1 hydrolyzed ATP at a rate of ~0.3-1 μmol of P(i)/mg/min and formed a phosphoenzyme in a simple reaction medium containing no added metal ions except Mg(2+). No significant differences were found between the ATPase activity of GFP-Spf1 and recombinant Spf1. Omission of protease inhibitors from the purification buffers resulted in a high level of endogenous proteolysis at the C-terminal portion of the GFP-Spf1 molecule that abolished phosphoenzyme formation. The Mg(2+) dependence of the GFP-Spf1 ATPase was similar to that of other P-ATPases where Mg(2+) acts as a cofactor. The addition of Mn(2+) to the reaction medium decreased the ATPase activity. The enzyme manifested optimal activity at a near neutral pH. When chased by the addition of cold ATP, 90% of the phosphoenzyme remained stable after 5 s. In contrast, the phosphoenzyme rapidly decayed to less than 20% when chased for 3 s by the addition of ADP. The greater effect of ADP accelerating the disappearance of EP suggests that GFP-Spf1 accumulated the E1~P phosphoenzyme. This behavior may reflect a limiting countertransported substrate needed to promote turnover or a missing regulatory factor. PMID:22745129

  7. Analysis of catalytic carboxylate mutants E552Q and E1197Q suggests asymmetric ATP hydrolysis by the two nucleotide-binding domains of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Isabelle; Julien, Michel; Gros, Philippe

    2003-11-11

    In the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters, such as mouse Mdr3 P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an invariant carboxylate residue (E552 in NBD1; E1197 in NBD2) immediately follows the Walker B motif (hyd(4)DE/D). Removal of the negative charge in mutants E552Q and E1197Q abolishes drug-stimulated ATPase activity measured by P(i) release. Surprisingly, drug-stimulated trapping of 8-azido-[alpha-(32)P]ATP is still observed in the mutants in both the presence and absence of the transition-state analogue vanadate (V(i)), and ADP can be recovered from the trapped enzymes. The E552Q and E1197Q mutants show characteristics similar to those of the wild-type (WT) enzyme with respect to 8-azido-[alpha-(32)P]ATP binding and 8-azido-[alpha-(32)P]nucleotide trapping, with the latter being both Mg(2+) and temperature dependent. Importantly, drug-stimulated nucleotide trapping in E552Q is stimulated by V(i) and resembles the WT enzyme, while it is almost completely V(i) insensitive in E1197Q. Similar nucleotide trapping properties are observed when aluminum fluoride or beryllium fluoride is used as an alternate transition-state analogue. Partial proteolytic cleavage of photolabeled enzymes indicates that, in the absence of V(i), nucleotide trapping occurs exclusively at the mutant NBD, whereas in the presence of V(i), nucleotide trapping occurs at both NBDs. Together, these results suggest that there is single-site turnover occurring in the E552Q and E1197Q mutants and that ADP release from the mutant site, or another catalytic step, is impaired in these mutants. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the two NBDs of P-gp are not functionally equivalent.

  8. Protease La from Escherichia coli Hydrolyzes ATP and Proteins in a Linked Fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Lloyd; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1982-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli results from an ATP requirement for the function of protease La, the product of the lon gene. This novel serine protease contains an ATPase activity that is essential for proteolysis. ATP and protein hydrolysis show the same Km for ATP (30-40 μ M) and are affected similarly by various inhibitors, activators, and ATP analogs. Vanadate inhibited ATP cleavage and caused a proportionate reduction in casein hydrolysis, and inhibitors of serine proteases reduced ATP cleavage. Thus, ATP and protein hydrolysis appear to be linked stoichiometrically. Furthermore, ATP hydrolysis is stimulated two- to threefold by polypeptides that are substrates for the protease (casein, glucagon) but not by nonhydrolyzed polypeptides (insulin, RNase). Unlike hemoglobin or native albumin, globin and denatured albumin stimulated ATP hydrolysis and were substrates for proteolysis. It is suggested that the stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by potential substrates triggers activation of the proteolytic function.

  9. Beyond the chemiosmotic theory: analysis of key fundamental aspects of energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation in the light of a torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis--invited review part 2.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sunil

    2010-08-01

    The core of this second article shows how logical errors and inconsistencies in previous theories of energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation are overcome by use of a torsional mechanism and the unified theory of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis. The torsional mechanism is shown to satisfy the pioneering and verified features of previous mechanisms. A considerable amount of data is identified that is incompatible with older theories but is now explained in a logically consistent and unified way. Key deficiencies in older theories are pinpointed and their resolution elucidated. Finally, major differences between old and new approaches are tabulated. The new theory now provides the elusive details of energy coupling and transduction, and allows several novel and experimentally verifiable predictions to be made and a considerable number of applications in nanotechnology, energy conversion, systems biology, and in health and disease are foreseen.

  10. A density functional theory model of mechanically activated silyl ester hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pill, Michael F.; Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Beyer, Martin K.; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Kersch, Alfred

    2014-01-28

    To elucidate the mechanism of the mechanically activated dissociation of chemical bonds between carboxymethylated amylose (CMA) and silane functionalized silicon dioxide, we have investigated the dissociation kinetics of the bonds connecting CMA to silicon oxide surfaces with density functional calculations including the effects of force, solvent polarizability, and pH. We have determined the activation energies, the pre-exponential factors, and the reaction rate constants of candidate reactions. The weakest bond was found to be the silyl ester bond between the silicon and the alkoxy oxygen atom. Under acidic conditions, spontaneous proton addition occurs close to the silyl ester such that neutral reactions become insignificant. Upon proton addition at the most favored position, the activation energy for bond hydrolysis becomes 31 kJ mol{sup −1}, which agrees very well with experimental observation. Heterolytic bond scission in the protonated molecule has a much higher activation energy. The experimentally observed bi-exponential rupture kinetics can be explained by different side groups attached to the silicon atom of the silyl ester. The fact that different side groups lead to different dissociation kinetics provides an opportunity to deliberately modify and tune the kinetic parameters of mechanically activated bond dissociation of silyl esters.

  11. Mechanism of membrane redistribution of protein kinase C by its ATP-competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Namiki, Hideo

    2007-07-15

    ATP-competitive inhibitors of PKC (protein kinase C) such as the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X, which interact with the ATP-binding site in the PKC molecule, have also been shown to affect several redistribution events of PKC. However, the reason why these inhibitors affect the redistribution is still controversial. In the present study, using immunoblot analysis and GFP (green fluorescent protein)-tagged PKC, we showed that, at commonly used concentrations, these ATP-competitive inhibitors alone induced redistribution of DAG (diacylglycerol)-sensitive PKCalpha, PKCbetaII, PKCdelta and PKCepsilon, but not atypical PKCzeta, to the endomembrane or the plasma membrane. Studies with deletion and point mutants showed that the DAG-sensitive C1 domain of PKC was required for membrane redistribution by these inhibitors. Furthermore, membrane redistribution was prevented by the aminosteroid PLC (phospholipase C) inhibitor U-73122, although an ATP-competitive inhibitor had no significant effect on acute DAG generation. Immunoblot analysis showed that an ATP-competitive inhibitor enhanced cell-permeable DAG analogue- or phorbol-ester-induced translocation of endogenous PKC. Furthermore, these inhibitors also enhanced [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding to the cytosolic fractions from PKCalpha-GFP-overexpressing cells. These results clearly demonstrate that ATP-competitive inhibitors cause redistribution of DAG-sensitive PKCs to membranes containing endogenous DAG by altering the DAG sensitivity of PKC and support the idea that the inhibitors destabilize the closed conformation of PKC and make the C1 domain accessible to DAG. Most importantly, our findings provide novel insights for the interpretation of studies using ATP-competitive inhibitors, and, especially, suggest caution about the interpretation of the relationship between the redistribution and kinase activity of PKC.

  12. Influence of protein hydrolysis on the mechanical properties of natural rubber composites reinforced with soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For natural rubber applications, the reinforcing fillers are used to improve the mechanical properties of the rubber. Soy protein particles have been shown to reinforce natural rubber. The hydrolysis conditions of soy protein are studied to understand its effect on the particle size and size distrib...

  13. Mechanism and applicability of hydrolysis of peptides and proteins utilizing Pt(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, I.E.

    1990-06-13

    The hydrolysis of amino acid esters and amides has been achieved by using organic reagents, strongly acidic and basic solutions, and transition metal complexes. However, enzymes have always been able to surpass these methods in terms of speed of the hydrolysis and the mild conditions necessary to observe hydrolysis. In order to understand how enzymes undergo their reactions with such remarkable speed and efficiency, researchers are studying and developing inorganic reagents which can facilitate the hydrolysis of peptide bonds. The treatment of the tripetide {gamma}-glutamyl-cyteinylglycine with one equivalent of PtCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} results in hydrolysis of the cysteinyl-glycine bond. The reaction is strongly dependent on the amount of chloride ion in solution and also shows a lesser dependence on ionic strength and pH. Hydrolysis is promoted through a chelate interaction of the platinum with the sulfur of cysteine and the carbonyl oxygen of the amide bond. The hydrolysis of proteins was then undertaken. Yeast cytochrome c and the subunits of hemoglobin were examined to determine if PtCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} or Pt(en)Cl{sub 2} could promote cleavage of the peptide bond next to a cysteine residue. It appears that hydrolysis of the peptide bond to the right of the cysteinly side chain has been realized. 51 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Metabolic and humoral mechanisms of feeding and genesis of the ATP/ADP/AMP concept.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Stylianos

    2011-07-25

    The organization of the regulatory system of feeding and of the parallel metabolic changes is schematized by a cyclical cartoon depicting the 8 phases of regulation. As I proposed in 1974, the cycle starts with the detection by hypothalamic sensors of decrease of the ATP/ADP/AMP turnover that reflects the post-prandial slow decline of general metabolic rate. That detection is translated into a signal of hunger. Experimental evidence is provided. Once initiated, this 'basic' signal follows the 7 remaining steps of the cycle, particularly the steps 2 and 4, where it receives multiple 'modulating' positive and negative signals (particularly peptides) that inform the central regulator, on the state of peripheral organs such as the adipocytes, stomach, intestine, and liver, on the outside world like day/light and on the available foods. Particular attention is given to the homeostatic and "homeoreutic" (see definition in the text) regulation of adipose reserves that are announced to brain specialized glio-neuronal "lipo-counters". The role of insulin alongside leptin is shown. The conception of a part of the above mechanisms postulates and shows that some specialized glio-neuronal populations in the antero-ventral hypothalamus share metabolic properties along with somatic cells. Finally, the signal resulting from the algebraic sum of the main (the metabolic) signal and of the modulating pluses and minuses (peptides) leaves the integrative units and reaches the efferent phases (steps 5 and 6) that finish by inducing both metabolic adjustments and consequently food intake. The last steps (4 to 8) are only shortly commented. PMID:21550354

  15. Beryllium(II) binding to ATP and ADP: potentiometric determination of the thermodynamic constants and implications for in vivo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boukhalfa, Hakim; Lewis, James G; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2004-04-01

    Highly toxic beryllium(II) is divalent metal ion with a high charge density, making it a potential target for binding to bio-molecules rich in O donor groups. In aqueous solution Be2+ binds to ATP and ADP to form 1:1 Be2+:ATP and Be2+:ADP complexes in relatively acidic media. At neutral pH the complex formed undergoes hydrolysis. Be2+ binding to ATP and ADP is much stronger than Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding. The high affinity of Be2+ toward ATP and ADP binding suggests a mechanism relevant to understanding the in vivo chemical toxicity of this metal.

  16. A Tetrahymena Hsp90 co-chaperone promotes siRNA loading by ATP-dependent and ATP-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Woehrer, Sophie L; Aronica, Lucia; Suhren, Jan H; Busch, Clara Jana-Lui; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2015-02-12

    The loading of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs into Argonaute proteins is enhanced by Hsp90 and ATP in diverse eukaryotes. However, whether this loading also occurs independently of Hsp90 and ATP remains unclear. We show that the Tetrahymena Hsp90 co-chaperone Coi12p promotes siRNA loading into the Argonaute protein Twi1p in both ATP-dependent and ATP-independent manners in vitro. The ATP-dependent activity requires Hsp90 and the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of Coi12p, whereas these factors are dispensable for the ATP-independent activity. Both activities facilitate siRNA loading by counteracting the Twi1p-binding protein Giw1p, which is important to specifically sort the 26- to 32-nt siRNAs to Twi1p. Although Coi12p lacking its TPR domain does not bind to Hsp90, it can partially restore the siRNA loading and DNA elimination defects of COI12 knockout cells, suggesting that Hsp90- and ATP-independent loading of siRNA occurs in vivo and plays a physiological role in Tetrahymena.

  17. Structural Insight into the Mechanism of c-di-GMP hydrolysis by EAL domain phosphodiesterases.

    SciTech Connect

    Tchigvintsev, A.; Xu, X.; Singer, A.; Chang, C.; Brown, G.; Proudfoot, M.; Cui, H.; Flick, R.; Anderson, W.; Joachimiak, A.; Galperin, M.; Savchenko, A.; Yakunin, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Northwestern Univ.; NIH

    2010-08-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (or bis-(3'-5') cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate; c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular functions, including motility, biofilm formation, cell cycle progression, and virulence in bacteria. In the cell, degradation of c-di-GMP is catalyzed by highly specific EAL domain phosphodiesterases whose catalytic mechanism is still unclear. Here, we purified 13 EAL domain proteins from various organisms and demonstrated that their catalytic activity is associated with the presence of 10 conserved EAL domain residues. The crystal structure of the TBD1265 EAL domain was determined in free state (1.8 {angstrom}) and in complex with c-di-GMP (2.35 {angstrom}), and unveiled the role of conserved residues in substrate binding and catalysis. The structure revealed the presence of two metal ions directly coordinated by six conserved residues, two oxygens of c-di-GMP phosphate, and potential catalytic water molecule. Our results support a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism of c-di-GMP hydrolysis by EAL domain phosphodiesterases.

  18. Lignin hydrolysis and phosphorylation mechanism during phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wu; Wu, Lingnan; Zheng, Zongming; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2014-12-18

    The study focused on the structural sensitivity of lignin during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process and the resulting hydrolysis and phosphorylation reaction mechanisms using density functional theory calculations. The chemical stabilities of the seven most common linkages (β-O-4, β-β, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5, α-O-4, and β-5) of lignin in H3PO4, CH3COCH3, and H2O solutions were detected, which shows that α-O-4 linkage and β-O-4 linkage tend to break during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process. Then α-O-4 phosphorylation and β-O-4 phosphorylation follow a two-step reaction mechanism in the acid treatment step, respectively. However, since phosphorylation of α-O-4 is more energetically accessible than phosphorylation of β-O-4 in phosphoric acid, the phosphorylation of α-O-4 could be controllably realized under certain operational conditions, which could tune the electron and hole transfer on the right side of β-O-4 in the H2PO4- functionalized lignin. The results provide a fundamental understanding for process-controlled modification of lignin and the potential novel applications in lignin-based imprinted polymers, sensors, and molecular devices.

  19. A dash of protons: A theoretical study on the hydrolysis mechanism of 1-substitued silatranes and their protonated analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Sok, Sarom; Gordon, Mark

    2011-08-17

    Ab initio calculations were carried out to study the hydrolysis mechanism of 1-substituted silatranes in the presence of an acid (acid-catalyzed) and an additional water (water-assisted). Compared with the neutral hydrolysis mechanism involving one water, use of an acid catalyst reduces the barrier associated with the rate-limiting step by approximate to 14 kcal/mol. A modest decrease of approximate to 5 kcal/mol is predicted when an additional water molecule is added to the neutral hydrolysis mechanism involving one water. The combination of an acid catalyst and an additional water molecule reduces the barrier by approximate to 27 kcal/mol. Bond order analysis suggests ring cleavage involving the bond breaking of a siloxane and silanol group during the neutral and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-substituted silatranes. respectively. Solvent effects, represented by the PCM continuum model, do not qualitatively alter computational gas-phase results. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structures of yeast mitochondrial ADP/ATP carriers support a domain-based alternating-access transport mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Jonathan J; Hellawell, Alex M; Harding, Marilyn; Crichton, Paul G; McCoy, Airlie J; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2014-01-28

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier imports ADP from the cytosol and exports ATP from the mitochondrial matrix. The carrier cycles by an unresolved mechanism between the cytoplasmic state, in which the carrier accepts ADP from the cytoplasm, and the matrix state, in which it accepts ATP from the mitochondrial matrix. Here we present the structures of the yeast ADP/ATP carriers Aac2p and Aac3p in the cytoplasmic state. The carriers have three domains and are closed at the matrix side by three interdomain salt-bridge interactions, one of which is braced by a glutamine residue. Glutamine braces are conserved in mitochondrial carriers and contribute to an energy barrier, preventing the conversion to the matrix state unless substrate binding occurs. At the cytoplasmic side a second salt-bridge network forms during the transport cycle, as demonstrated by functional analysis of mutants with charge-reversed networks. Analyses of the domain structures and properties of the interdomain interfaces indicate that interconversion between states involves movement of the even-numbered α-helices across the surfaces of the odd-numbered α-helices by rotation of the domains. The odd-numbered α-helices have an L-shape, with proline or serine residues at the kinks, which functions as a lever-arm, coupling the substrate-induced disruption of the matrix network to the formation of the cytoplasmic network. The simultaneous movement of three domains around a central translocation pathway constitutes a unique mechanism among transport proteins. These findings provide a structural description of transport by mitochondrial carrier proteins, consistent with an alternating-access mechanism.

  1. Structural basis of PP2A activation by PTPA, an ATP-dependent activation chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng; Stanevich, Vitali; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Sengupta, Rituparna; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Xing, Yongna

    2013-10-08

    Proper activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit is central for the complex PP2A regulation and is crucial for broad aspects of cellular function. The crystal structure of PP2A bound to PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) and ATPγS reveals that PTPA makes broad contacts with the structural elements surrounding the PP2A active site and the adenine moiety of ATP. PTPA-binding stabilizes the protein fold of apo-PP2A required for activation, and orients ATP phosphoryl groups to bind directly to the PP2A active site. This allows ATP to modulate the metal-binding preferences of the PP2A active site and utilize the PP2A active site for ATP hydrolysis. In vitro, ATP selectively and drastically enhances binding of endogenous catalytic metal ions, which requires ATP hydrolysis and is crucial for acquisition of pSer/Thr-specific phosphatase activity. Furthermore, both PP2A- and ATP-binding are required for PTPA function in cell proliferation and survival. Our results suggest novel mechanisms of PTPA in PP2A activation with structural economy and a unique ATP-binding pocket that could potentially serve as a specific therapeutic target.

  2. Glucose-stimulated oscillations in free cytosolic ATP concentration imaged in single islet beta-cells: evidence for a Ca2+-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-02-01

    Normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is pulsatile, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this pulsatility are poorly understood. Oscillations in the intracellular free [ATP]/[ADP] ratio represent one possible mechanism because they would be expected to cause fluctuations in ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activity and hence oscillatory Ca(2+) influx. After imaging recombinant firefly luciferase, expressed via an adenoviral vector in single human or mouse islet beta-cells, we report here that cytosolic free ATP concentrations oscillate and that these oscillations are affected by glucose. In human beta-cells, oscillations were observed at both 3 and 15 mmol/l glucose, but the oscillations were of a longer wavelength at the higher glucose concentration (167 vs. 66 s). Mouse beta-cells displayed oscillations in both cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] only at elevated glucose concentrations, both with a period of 120 s. To explore the causal relationship between [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] oscillations, the regulation of each was further investigated in populations of MIN6 beta-cells. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free medium lowered cytosolic [Ca(2+)] but increased [ATP] in MIN6 cells at both 3 and 30 mmol/l glucose. Removal of external Ca(2+) increased [ATP], possibly by decreasing ATP consumption by endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases. These results allow a model to be constructed of the beta-cell metabolic oscillator that drives nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

  3. Mechanisms of Vascular Damage by Hemorrhagic Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: Tissue Distribution and In Situ Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Cristiani; Jamora, Colin; Yamanouye, Norma; Zorn, Telma M.; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Envenoming by viper snakes constitutes an important public health problem in Brazil and other developing countries. Local hemorrhage is an important symptom of these accidents and is correlated with the action of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The degradation of vascular basement membrane has been proposed as a key event for the capillary vessel disruption. However, SVMPs that present similar catalytic activity towards extracellular matrix proteins differ in their hemorrhagic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms might be contributing to the accumulation of SVMPs at the snakebite area allowing capillary disruption. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we compared the tissue distribution and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins induced by jararhagin (highly hemorrhagic SVMP) and BnP1 (weakly hemorrhagic SVMP) using the mouse skin as experimental model. Jararhagin induced strong hemorrhage accompanied by hydrolysis of collagen fibers in the hypodermis and a marked degradation of type IV collagen at the vascular basement membrane. In contrast, BnP1 induced only a mild hemorrhage and did not disrupt collagen fibers or type IV collagen. Injection of Alexa488-labeled jararhagin revealed fluorescent staining around capillary vessels and co-localization with basement membrane type IV collagen. The same distribution pattern was detected with jararhagin-C (disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich domains of jararhagin). In opposition, BnP1 did not accumulate in the tissues. Conclusions/Significance These results show a particular tissue distribution of hemorrhagic toxins accumulating at the basement membrane. This probably occurs through binding to collagens, which are drastically hydrolyzed at the sites of hemorrhagic lesions. Toxin accumulation near blood vessels explains enhanced catalysis of basement membrane components, resulting in the strong hemorrhagic activity of SVMPs. This is a novel mechanism that underlies the difference between

  4. On the mechanism of enhanced ATP formation in hypoxic myocardium caused by glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Pisarenko, O I; Solomatina, E S; Ivanov, V E; Studneva, I M; Kapelko, V I; Smirnov, V N

    1985-01-01

    The effect of glutamic acid on the cardiac contractile function and sources of anaerobic ATP formation in hypoxic myocardium was studied in isovolumic rat hearts. The presence of glutamic acid (5 mM) in the perfusate significantly diminished an increment in diastolic pressure caused by 60 min hypoxia, and facilitated its complete recovery during 30 min reoxygenation. This effect was combined with the maintenance of a higher ATP level during hypoxia and reoxygenation. The total content of lactate in the heart-perfusate system rose exactly as during hypoxia without glutamic acid, while pyruvate content decreased due to increased alanine formation. Restoration of tissue content of glutamate and aspartate in the presence of exogenous glutamic acid was accompanied by a more than 2-fold increase in succinate formation, the end-product of the Krebs' cycle under anaerobic conditions. The products of glutamic acid transamination with oxaloacetic acid, aspartic and alpha-ketoglutaric acids (5mM each), induced the same functional and metabolic alterations as glutamic acid. Amino-oxyacetic acid, a tramsaminase inhibitor, eliminated the effects caused by glutamic acid. Moreover, the inhibition of transamination was accompanied by a decreased succinate and alanine synthesis as well as insignificantly increased lactate formation compared to hypoxia without additives. The results suggest that the beneficial effect of glutamic acid is due to the activation of anaerobic ATP formation in the mitochondria rather than stimulation of glycolysis.

  5. Glibenclamide attenuates the antiarrhythmic effect of endotoxin with a mechanism not involving K(ATP) channels.

    PubMed

    Iskit, Alper B; Erkent, Ulkem; Ertunc, Mert; Guc, M Oguz; Ilhan, Mustafa; Onur, Rustu

    2007-02-01

    The role of K(ATP) channels in the antiarrhythmic effect of Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was examined in an anesthetised rat model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion arrhythmia by using glibenclamide (1 mg kg(-1)), nateglinide (10 mg kg(-1)) and repaglinide (0.5 mg kg(-1)). Endotoxin (1 mg kg(-1)) was administered intraperitoneally 4 h before the occlusion of the left coronary artery and glibenclamide, nateglinide or repaglinide was administered 30 min before coronary artery occlusion. We also evaluated the effects of K(ATP) channel blockers and nonselective K(+) channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) on cardiac action potential configuration in the atria obtained from endotoxemic rats. The mean arterial blood pressure of rats receiving endotoxin was lower during both the occlusion and reperfusion periods. Endotoxin significantly reduced the total number of ectopic beats and the duration of ventricular tachycardia. Glibenclamide, but not nateglinide and repaglinide, prevented the hypotension and antiarrhythmic effects of endotoxin. Atria obtained from endotoxin-treated rats had prolonged action potential duration. This effect was abolished with pretreatment of iNOS inhibitors, l-canavanine and dexamethasone and perfusion of glibenclamide, but not with TEA and non-sulfonylurea drug, nateglinide. We demonstrated that glibenclamide inhibits the antiarrhythmic effect of endotoxin and this effect does not appear to involve K(ATP) channels.

  6. Energy transduction in the F1 motor of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyun; Oster, George

    1998-11-01

    ATP synthase is the universal enzyme that manufactures ATP from ADP and phosphate by using the energy derived from a transmembrane protonmotive gradient. It can also reverse itself and hydrolyse ATP to pump protons against an electrochemical gradient. ATP synthase carries out both its synthetic and hydrolytic cycles by a rotary mechanism. This has been confirmed in the direction of hydrolysis, after isolation of the soluble F1 portion of the protein and visualization of the actual rotation of the central `shaft' of the enzyme with respect to the rest of the molecule, making ATP synthase the world's smallest rotary engine. Here we present a model for this engine that accounts for its mechanochemical behaviour in both the hydrolysing and synthesizing directions. We conclude that the F1 motor achieves its high mechanical torque and almost 100% efficiency because it converts the free energy of ATP binding into elastic strain, which is then released by a coordinated kinetic and tightly coupled conformational mechanism to create a rotary torque.

  7. Structure of the RNA Helicase MLE Reveals the Molecular Mechanisms for Uridine Specificity and RNA-ATP Coupling.

    PubMed

    Prabu, J Rajan; Müller, Marisa; Thomae, Andreas W; Schüssler, Steffen; Bonneau, Fabien; Becker, Peter B; Conti, Elena

    2015-11-01

    The MLE helicase remodels the roX lncRNAs, enabling the lncRNA-mediated assembly of the Drosophila dosage compensation complex. We identified a stable MLE core comprising the DExH helicase module and two auxiliary domains: a dsRBD and an OB-like fold. MLEcore is an unusual DExH helicase that can unwind blunt-ended RNA duplexes and has specificity for uridine nucleotides. We determined the 2.1 Å resolution structure of MLEcore bound to a U10 RNA and ADP-AlF4. The OB-like and dsRBD folds bind the DExH module and contribute to form the entrance of the helicase channel. Four uridine nucleotides engage in base-specific interactions, rationalizing the conservation of uridine-rich sequences in critical roX substrates. roX2 binding is orchestrated by MLE's auxiliary domains, which is prerequisite for MLE localization to the male X chromosome. The structure visualizes a transition-state mimic of the reaction and suggests how eukaryotic DEAH/RHA helicases couple ATP hydrolysis to RNA translocation.

  8. Application of rigid body mechanics to theoretical description of rotation within F0F1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Nartsissov, Yaroslav R; Mashkovtseva, Elena V

    2006-09-21

    ATP synthase catalyses the formation of ATP from ADP and P(i) and is powered by the diffusion of protons throughout membranes down the proton electrochemical gradient. The protein consists of a water-soluble F(1) and a transmembrane F(0) proton transporter part. It was previously shown that the ring of membrane subunits rotates past a fixed subunit during catalytic cycle of the enzyme. However, many parameters of this movement are still unknown. In the present study the mutual protein movement in the membrane part of F(0)F(1)-ATP syntase has been analysed within the framework of rigid body mechanics. On the base of available experimental data it was shown that electrostatic interaction of two charged amino acids residues is able to supply quite enough energy for the rotation. The initial torque, which caused the rotation, was estimated as 3.7 pN nm and for this pattern the angular movement of c subunits complex could not physically have a period less than 10(-9)s. If membrane viscosity and elastic resistance were taken into account then the time of a whole turnover could rise up to 6.3 x 10(-3)s. It is remarkable that rotation will take place only under condition when the elasticity (Young's) module of the central stalk (gamma subunit and other minor subunits) is less than 5.0 x 10(7)N/m(2). Thus, for generally accepted structural parameters of ATP synthase, two-charge electrostatic interaction model does not permit rotation of the rotor if elastic properties of the central stalk are tougher than mentioned above. In order to explain the rotation under that condition one should either suppose a shorter distance between subunit a and c subunits complex or assume interaction of more than two charged amino acids residues.

  9. Theoretical study of the hydrolysis mechanism of 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate (PDC) catalyzed by LigI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujun; Ma, Guangcai; Liu, Yongjun; Ling, Baoping

    2015-09-01

    2-Pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate lactonase (LigI) is the first identified enzyme from amidohydrolase superfamily that does not require a divalent metal ion for catalytic activity. It catalyzes the reversible hydrolysis of 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate (PDC) to 4-oxalomesaconate (OMA) and 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate (CHM) in the degradation of lignin. In this paper, a combined quantum mechanics and molecule mechanics (QM/MM) approach was employed to study the reaction mechanism of LigI from Sphingomonas paucimobilis. According to the results of our calculations, the whole catalytic reaction contains three elementary steps, including the nucleophilic attack, the cleavage of CO of lactone (substrate) and the intramolecular proton transfer. The intermediate has two intramolecular proton transfer pathways, due to which, two final hydrolysis products can be obtained. The energy profile indicates that 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate (CHM) is the main hydrolysis product, therefore, the isomerization between 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate (CHM) and 4-oxalomesaconate (OMA) is suggested to occur in solvent. During the catalytic reaction, residue Asp248 acts as a general base to activate the hydrolytic water molecule. Although His31, His33 and His180 do not directly participate in the chemical process, they play assistant roles by forming electrostatic interactions with the substrate and its involved species in activating the carbonyl group of the substrate and stabilizing the intermediates and transition states.

  10. Understanding the fundamental mechanism behind accumulation of oligosaccharides during high solids loading enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass, polysaccharides are cleaved by glycosyl hydrolases to soluble oligosaccharides and further hydrolyzed by ß-glucosidase, ß-xylosidase and other enzymes to monomeric sugars. However, commercial enzyme mixtures do not hydrolyze all of these oligosaccharides and v...

  11. Extracellular ATP

    PubMed Central

    Chivasa, Stephen; Tomé, Daniel FA; Murphy, Alex M; Hamilton, John M; Lindsey, Keith; Carr, John P

    2009-01-01

    Living organisms acquire or synthesize high energy molecules, which they frugally conserve and use to meet their cellular metabolic demands. Therefore, it is surprising that ATP, the most accessible and commonly utilized chemical energy carrier, is actively secreted to the extracellular matrix of cells. It is now becoming clear that in plants this extracellular ATP (eATP) is not wasted, but harnessed at the cell surface to signal across the plasma membrane of the secreting cell and neighboring cells to cxontrol gene expression and influence plant development. Identification of the gene/protein networks regulated by eATP-mediated signaling should provide insight into the physiological roles of eATP in plants. By disrupting eATP-mediated signaling, we have identified pathogen defense genes as part of the eATP-regulated gene circuitry, leading us to the discovery that eATP is a negative regulator of pathogen defense in plants.1 Previously, we reported that eATP is a key signal molecule that modulates programmed cell death in plants.2 A complex picture is now emerging, in which eATP-mediated signaling cross-talks with signaling mediated by the major plant defense hormone, salicylic acid, in the regulation of pathogen defense and cell death. PMID:20009563

  12. Hydrolysis of Guanosine Triphosphate (GTP) by the Ras·GAP Protein Complex: Reaction Mechanism and Kinetic Scheme.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) by the Ras·GAP protein complex are fully investigated by using modern modeling tools. The previously hypothesized stages of the cleavage of the phosphorus-oxygen bond in GTP and the formation of the imide form of catalytic Gln61 from Ras upon creation of Pi are confirmed by using the higher-level quantum-based calculations. The steps of the enzyme regeneration are modeled for the first time, providing a comprehensive description of the catalytic cycle. It is found that for the reaction Ras·GAP·GTP·H2O → Ras·GAP·GDP·Pi, the highest barriers correspond to the process of regeneration of the active site but not to the process of substrate cleavage. The specific shape of the energy profile is responsible for an interesting kinetic mechanism of the GTP hydrolysis. The analysis of the process using the first-passage approach and consideration of kinetic equations suggest that the overall reaction rate is a result of the balance between relatively fast transitions and low probability of states from which these transitions are taking place. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with available experimental observations on GTP hydrolysis rates.

  13. Mitochondrial ADP/ATP exchange inhibition: a novel off-target mechanism underlying ibipinabant-induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Schirris, Tom J J; Ritschel, Tina; Herma Renkema, G; Willems, Peter H G M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) antagonists appear to be promising drugs for the treatment of obesity, however, serious side effects have hampered their clinical application. Rimonabant, the first in class CB1R antagonist, was withdrawn from the market because of psychiatric side effects. This has led to the search for more peripherally restricted CB1R antagonists, one of which is ibipinabant. However, this 3,4-diarylpyrazoline derivative showed muscle toxicity in a pre-clinical dog study with mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism by which ibipinabant induces mitochondrial toxicity. We observed a strong cytotoxic potency of ibipinabant in C2C12 myoblasts. Functional characterization of mitochondria revealed increased cellular reactive oxygen species generation and a decreased ATP production capacity, without effects on the catalytic activities of mitochondrial enzyme complexes I-V or the complex specific-driven oxygen consumption. Using in silico off-target prediction modelling, combined with in vitro validation in isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts, we identified adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT)-dependent mitochondrial ADP/ATP exchange as a novel molecular mechanism underlying ibipinabant-induced toxicity. Minor structural modification of ibipinabant could abolish ANT inhibition leading to a decreased cytotoxic potency, as observed with the ibipinabant derivative CB23. Our results will be instrumental in the development of new types of safer CB1R antagonists.

  14. Mitochondrial ADP/ATP exchange inhibition: a novel off-target mechanism underlying ibipinabant-induced myotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schirris, Tom J. J.; Ritschel, Tina; Herma Renkema, G.; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Russel, Frans G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) antagonists appear to be promising drugs for the treatment of obesity, however, serious side effects have hampered their clinical application. Rimonabant, the first in class CB1R antagonist, was withdrawn from the market because of psychiatric side effects. This has led to the search for more peripherally restricted CB1R antagonists, one of which is ibipinabant. However, this 3,4-diarylpyrazoline derivative showed muscle toxicity in a pre-clinical dog study with mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism by which ibipinabant induces mitochondrial toxicity. We observed a strong cytotoxic potency of ibipinabant in C2C12 myoblasts. Functional characterization of mitochondria revealed increased cellular reactive oxygen species generation and a decreased ATP production capacity, without effects on the catalytic activities of mitochondrial enzyme complexes I–V or the complex specific-driven oxygen consumption. Using in silico off-target prediction modelling, combined with in vitro validation in isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts, we identified adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT)-dependent mitochondrial ADP/ATP exchange as a novel molecular mechanism underlying ibipinabant-induced toxicity. Minor structural modification of ibipinabant could abolish ANT inhibition leading to a decreased cytotoxic potency, as observed with the ibipinabant derivative CB23. Our results will be instrumental in the development of new types of safer CB1R antagonists. PMID:26416158

  15. Noncanonical Myo9b-RhoGAP Accelerates RhoA GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Arginine-Finger Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fengshuang; Kong, Ruirui; Ren, Jinqi; Zhu, Li; Lou, Jizhong; Wu, Jane Y; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-31

    The GTP hydrolysis activities of Rho GTPases are stimulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which contain a RhoGAP domain equipped with a characteristic arginine finger and an auxiliary asparagine for catalysis. However, the auxiliary asparagine is missing in the RhoGAP domain of Myo9b (Myo9b-RhoGAP), a unique motorized RhoGAP that specifically targets RhoA for controlling cell motility. Here, we determined the structure of Myo9b-RhoGAP in complex with GDP-bound RhoA and magnesium fluoride. Unexpectedly, Myo9b-RhoGAP contains two arginine fingers at its catalytic site. The first arginine finger resembles the one within the canonical RhoGAP domains and inserts into the nucleotide-binding pocket of RhoA, whereas the second arginine finger anchors the Switch I loop of RhoA and interacts with the nucleotide, stabilizing the transition state of GTP hydrolysis and compensating for the lack of the asparagine. Mutating either of the two arginine fingers impaired the catalytic activity of Myo9b-RhoGAP and affected the Myo9b-mediated cell migration. Our data indicate that Myo9b-RhoGAP accelerates RhoA GTP hydrolysis by a previously unknown dual-arginine-finger mechanism, which may be shared by other noncanonical RhoGAP domains lacking the auxiliary asparagine. PMID:27363609

  16. New soluble ATP-dependent protease, Ti, in Escherichia coli that is distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.H.; Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli must contain other ATP-requiring proteolytic systems in addition to protease La (the lon gene product). A new ATP-dependent protease was purified from lon cells which lack protease La, as shown by immuno-blotting. This enzyme hydrolyzes (TH)casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP (or dATP) and MgS . Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, other nucleoside triphosphates and AMP can not replace ATP. Therefore, ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolysis. The enzyme appears to be a serine protease, but also contains essential thiol residues. Unlike protease La, it is not inhibited by vanadate, heparin, or the defective R9 subunit of protease La. On gel filtration, this enzyme has an apparent Mr of 340,000 and is comprised of two components of 190,000D and 130,000D, which can be separated by phosphocellulose chromatography. By themselves, these components do not show ATP-dependent proteolysis, but when mixed, full activity is restored. These finding and similar ones of Maurizi and Gottesman indicate that E. coli contain two soluble ATP-dependent proteases, which function by different mechanisms. This new enzyme may contribute to the rapid breakdown of abnormal polypeptides or of normal proteins during starvation. The authors propose to name it protease Ti.

  17. A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the hydrolysis mechanism of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kongkai; Lu, Junyan; Liang, Zhongjie; Kong, Xiangqian; Ye, Fei; Jin, Lu; Geng, Heji; Chen, Yong; Zheng, Mingyue; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun-Qian; Luo, Cheng

    2013-03-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) has emerged as a major global threat to human health for its rapid rate of dissemination and ability to make pathogenic microbes resistant to almost all known β-lactam antibiotics. In addition, effective NDM-1 inhibitors have not been identified to date. In spite of the plethora of structural and kinetic data available, the accurate molecular characteristics of and details on the enzymatic reaction of NDM-1 hydrolyzing β-lactam antibiotics remain incompletely understood. In this study, a combined computational approach including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations was performed to characterize the catalytic mechanism of meropenem catalyzed by NDM-1. The quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics results indicate that the ionized D124 is beneficial to the cleavage of the C-N bond within the β-lactam ring. Meanwhile, it is energetically favorable to form an intermediate if no water molecule coordinates to Zn2. Moreover, according to the molecular dynamics results, the conserved residue K211 plays a pivotal role in substrate binding and catalysis, which is quite consistent with previous mutagenesis data. Our study provides detailed insights into the catalytic mechanism of NDM-1 hydrolyzing meropenem β-lactam antibiotics and offers clues for the discovery of new antibiotics against NDM-1 positive strains in clinical studies.

  18. On the Mg(2+) binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2015-10-01

    F-type ATP synthases, central energy conversion machines of the cell synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane and, reversely, can also hydrolyze ATP to pump ions across the membrane, depending on cellular conditions such as ATP concentration. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, mammalian and bacterial ATP synthases possess different regulatory mechanisms. In bacteria, a low ATP concentration induces a conformational change in the ε subunit from the down- to up-states, which inhibits ATP hydrolysis. Moreover, the conformational change of the ε subunit depends on Mg(2+) concentration in some bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, but not in others. This diversity makes the ε subunit a potential target for antibiotics. Here, performing molecular dynamics simulations, we identify the Mg(2+) binding site in the ε subunit from B. subtilis as E59 and E86. The free energy analysis shows that the first-sphere bi-dentate coordination of the Mg(2+) ion by the two glutamates is the most stable state. In comparison, we also clarify the reason for the absence of Mg(2+) dependency in the ε subunit from thermophilic Bacillus PS3, despite the high homology to that from B. subtilis. Sequence alignment suggests that this Mg(2+) binding motif is present in the ε subunits of some pathogenic bacteria. In addition we discuss strategies to stabilize an isolated ε subunit carrying the Mg(2+) binding motif by site directed mutagenesis, which also can be used to crystallize Mg(2+) dependent ε subunits in future.

  19. Kinetics of the Association/Dissociation Cycle of an ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Fuson, Kerry L.; Sutton, Roger B.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2012-01-01

    Most ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins are pumps that transport substrates across biological membranes using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. Functional ABC proteins have two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) that bind and hydrolyze ATP, but the molecular mechanism of nucleotide hydrolysis is unresolved. This is due in part to the limited kinetic information on NBD association and dissociation. Here, we show dimerization of a catalytically active NBD and follow in real time the association and dissociation of NBDs from the changes in fluorescence emission of a tryptophan strategically located at the center of the dimer interface. Spectroscopic and structural studies demonstrated that the tryptophan can be used as dimerization probe, and we showed that under hydrolysis conditions (millimolar MgATP), not only the dimer dissociation rate increases, but also the dimerization rate. Neither dimer formation or dissociation are clearly favored, and the end result is a dynamic equilibrium where the concentrations of monomer and dimer are very similar. We proposed that based on their variable rates of hydrolysis, the rate-limiting step of the hydrolysis cycle may differ among full-length ABC proteins. PMID:22158619

  20. A water molecule identified as a substrate of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose: A statistical-mechanics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Yasuhiro; Karita, Shuichi; Kitago, Yu; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Hirata, Fumio

    2008-11-01

    We calculated three-dimensional (3D) distribution of water molecules around and inside a complex of a cellulase, Cel44A, with a cellohexaose, based on the 3D-RISM theory. A distinct peak is observed in the 3D-distribution of water at the position within the hydrogen-bond distance from the two residues Glu186 and Glu359 in the enzyme. We identified the water molecule as a substrate of the enzymatic hydrolysis reaction. The finding provides strong support to one of the proposed mechanisms concerning the reaction, that is the retention process.

  1. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone. PMID:26619265

  2. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone.

  3. Functional mechanics of the ATP-dependent Lon protease- lessons from endogenous protein and synthetic peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Irene; Suzuki, Carolyn K

    2008-05-01

    Lon, also known as the protease La, is a homo-oligomeric ATP-dependent protease, which is highly conserved in archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria and peroxisomes. Since its discovery, studies have shown that Lon activity is essential for cellular homeostasis, mediating protein quality control and metabolic regulation. This article highlights the discoveries made over the past decade demonstrating that Lon selectively degrades abnormal as well as certain regulatory proteins and thus plays significant roles in maintaining bacterial and mitochondrial function and integrity. In addition, Lon is required in certain pathogenic bacteria, for rendering pathogenicity and host infectivity. Recent research endeavors have been directed toward elucidating the reaction mechanism of the Lon protease by different biochemical and structural biological techniques. In this mini-review, the authors survey the diverse biological roles of Lon, and also place special emphasis on recent findings that clarify the mechanistic aspects of the Lon reaction cycle.

  4. Fluorescent ATP analog mant-ATP reports dynein activity in the isolated Chlamydomonas axoneme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilova, Maria; Howard, Jonathon

    Eukaryotic flagella are long rod-like extensions of cells, which play a fundamental role in single cell movement, as well as in fluid transport. Flagella contain a highly evolutionary conserved mechanical structure called the axoneme. The motion of the flagellum is generated by dynein motor proteins located all along the length of the axoneme. How the force production of motors is controlled spatially and temporally is still an open question. Therefore, monitoring dynein activity in the axonemal structure is expected to provide novel insights in regulation of the beat. We use high sensitivity fluorescence microscopy to monitor the binding and hydrolysis kinetics of the fluorescently labeled ATP analogue mant-ATP (2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate), which is known to support dynein activity. By studying the kinetics of mant-ATP fluorescence, we identified distinct mant-ATP binding sites in the axoneme. The application of this method to axonemes with reduced amounts of dynein, showed evidence that one of the sites is associated with binding to dynein. In the future, we would like to use this method to find the spatial distribution of dynein activity in the axoneme.

  5. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C. S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C1) and cellobiase comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was bjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C1) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo-and endo-glucanases are coinduced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes.

  6. Review: The ATPase mechanism of myosin and actomyosin.

    PubMed

    Geeves, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Myosins are a large family of molecular motors that use the common P-loop, Switch 1 and Switch 2 nucleotide binding motifs to recognize ATP, to create a catalytic site than can efficiently hydrolyze ATP and to communicate the state of the nucleotide pocket to other allosteric binding sites on myosin. The energy of ATP hydrolysis is used to do work against an external load. In this short review I will outline current thinking on the mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and how the energy of ATP hydrolysis is coupled to a series of protein conformational changes that allow a myosin, with the cytoskeleton track actin, to operate as a molecular motor of distinct types; fast movers, processive motors or strain sensors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 483-491, 2016. PMID:27061920

  7. KCl -Permeabilized Pancreatic Islets: An Experimental Model to Explore the Messenger Role of ATP in the Mechanism of Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Deeney, Jude T.; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that islet depolarization with KCl opens connexin36 hemichannels in β-cells of mouse pancreatic islets allowing the exchange of small metabolites with the extracellular medium. In this study, the opening of these hemichannels has been further characterized in rat islets and INS–1 cells. Taking advantage of hemicannels’opening, the uptake of extracellular ATP and its effect on insulin release were investigated. 70 mM KCl stimulated light emission by luciferin in dispersed rat islets cells transduced with the fire-fly luciferase gene: it was suppressed by 20 mM glucose and 50 μM mefloquine, a specific connexin36 inhibitor. Extracellular ATP was taken up or released by islets depolarized with 70 mM KCl at 5 mM glucose, depending on the external ATP concentration. 1 mM ATP restored the loss of ATP induced by the depolarization itself. ATP concentrations above 5 mM increased islet ATP content and the ATP/ADP ratio. No ATP uptake occurred in non-depolarized or KCl-depolarized islets simultaneously incubated with 50 μM mefloquine or 20 mM glucose. Extracellular ATP potentiated the secretory response induced by 70 mM KCl at 5 mM glucose in perifused rat islets: 5 mM ATP triggered a second phase of insulin release after the initial peak triggered by KCl-depolarization itself; at 10 mM, it increased both the initial, KCl-dependent, peak and stimulated a greater second phase of secretion than at 5 mM. These stimulatory effects of extracellular ATP were almost completely suppressed by 50 μM mefloquine. The magnitude of the second phase of insulin release due to 5 mM extracellular ATP was decreased by addition of 5 mM ADP (extracellular ATP/ADP ratio = 1). ATP acts independently of KATP channels closure and its intracellular concentration and its ATP/ADP ratio seems to regulate the magnitude of both the first (triggering) and second (amplifying) phases of glucose-induced insulin secretion. PMID:26444014

  8. Theoretical Proposal for the Whole Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis Mechanism Promoted by a Catalytic Promiscuous Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Lucas F; Rey, Nicolás A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; Costa, Luiz Antônio S

    2016-03-21

    The catalytic mechanism that involves the cleavage of the phosphate diester model BDNPP (bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed through a dinuclear copper complex is investigated in the current study. The metal complex was originally designed to catalyze catechol oxidation, and it showed an interesting catalytic promiscuity case in biomimetic systems. The current study investigates two different reaction mechanisms through quantum mechanics calculations in the gas phase, and it also includes the solvent effect through PCM (polarizable continuum model) single-point calculations using water as solvent. Two mechanisms are presented in order to fully describe the phosphate diester hydrolysis. Mechanism 1 is of the S(N)2 type, which involves the direct attack of the μ-OH bridge between the two copper(II) ions toward the phosphorus center, whereas mechanism 2 is the process in which hydrolysis takes place through proton transfer between the oxygen atom in the bridging hydroxo ligand and the other oxygen atom in the phosphate model. Actually, the present theoretical study shows two possible reaction paths in mechanism 1. Its first reaction path (p1) involves a proton transfer that occurs immediately after the hydrolytic cleavage, so that the proton transfer is the rate-determining step, which is followed by the entry of two water molecules. Its second reaction path (p2) consists of the entry of two water molecules right after the hydrolytic cleavage, but with no proton transfer; thus, hydrolytic cleavage is the rate-limiting step. The most likely catalytic path occurs in mechanism 1, following the second reaction path (p2), since it involves the lowest free energy activation barrier (ΔG(⧧) = 23.7 kcal mol(-1), in aqueous solution). A kinetic analysis showed that the experimental k(obs) value of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) agrees with the calculated value k1 = 2.6 × 10(-5) s(-1); the concerted mechanism is kinetically favorable. The KIE (kinetic isotope effect) analysis

  9. Theoretical Proposal for the Whole Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis Mechanism Promoted by a Catalytic Promiscuous Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Lucas F; Rey, Nicolás A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; Costa, Luiz Antônio S

    2016-03-21

    The catalytic mechanism that involves the cleavage of the phosphate diester model BDNPP (bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed through a dinuclear copper complex is investigated in the current study. The metal complex was originally designed to catalyze catechol oxidation, and it showed an interesting catalytic promiscuity case in biomimetic systems. The current study investigates two different reaction mechanisms through quantum mechanics calculations in the gas phase, and it also includes the solvent effect through PCM (polarizable continuum model) single-point calculations using water as solvent. Two mechanisms are presented in order to fully describe the phosphate diester hydrolysis. Mechanism 1 is of the S(N)2 type, which involves the direct attack of the μ-OH bridge between the two copper(II) ions toward the phosphorus center, whereas mechanism 2 is the process in which hydrolysis takes place through proton transfer between the oxygen atom in the bridging hydroxo ligand and the other oxygen atom in the phosphate model. Actually, the present theoretical study shows two possible reaction paths in mechanism 1. Its first reaction path (p1) involves a proton transfer that occurs immediately after the hydrolytic cleavage, so that the proton transfer is the rate-determining step, which is followed by the entry of two water molecules. Its second reaction path (p2) consists of the entry of two water molecules right after the hydrolytic cleavage, but with no proton transfer; thus, hydrolytic cleavage is the rate-limiting step. The most likely catalytic path occurs in mechanism 1, following the second reaction path (p2), since it involves the lowest free energy activation barrier (ΔG(⧧) = 23.7 kcal mol(-1), in aqueous solution). A kinetic analysis showed that the experimental k(obs) value of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) agrees with the calculated value k1 = 2.6 × 10(-5) s(-1); the concerted mechanism is kinetically favorable. The KIE (kinetic isotope effect) analysis

  10. Interaction of ATP with a small heat shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae: effect on its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Panda, Alok Kumar; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is an important phosphate metabolite abundantly found in Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. This pathogen does not derive ATP from its host but has its own mechanism for the generation of ATP. Interestingly, this molecule as well as several antigenic proteins act as bio-markers for the detection of leprosy. One such bio-marker is the 18 kDa antigen. This 18 kDa antigen is a small heat shock protein (HSP18) whose molecular chaperone function is believed to help in the growth and survival of the pathogen. But, no evidences of interaction of ATP with HSP18 and its effect on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are available in the literature. Here, we report for the first time evidences of "HSP18-ATP" interaction and its consequences on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18. TNP-ATP binding experiment and surface plasmon resonance measurement showed that HSP18 interacts with ATP with a sub-micromolar binding affinity. Comparative sequence alignment between M. leprae HSP18 and αB-crystallin identified the sequence 49KADSLDIDIE58 of HSP18 as the Walker-B ATP binding motif. Molecular docking studies revealed that β4-β8 groove/strands as an ATP interactive region in M. leprae HSP18. ATP perturbs the tertiary structure of HSP18 mildly and makes it less susceptible towards tryptic cleavage. ATP triggers exposure of additional hydrophobic patches at the surface of HSP18 and induces more stability against chemical and thermal denaturation. In vitro aggregation and thermal inactivation assays clearly revealed that ATP enhances the chaperone function of HSP18. Our studies also revealed that the alteration in the chaperone function of HSP18 is reversible and is independent of ATP hydrolysis. As the availability and binding of ATP to HSP18 regulates its chaperone function, this functional inflection may play an important role in the survival of M. leprae in hosts.

  11. ATP Induces IL-1β Secretion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Infected Human Macrophages by a Mechanism Not Related to the NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    García, Killen; Escobar, Gisselle; Mendoza, Pablo; Beltran, Caroll; Perez, Claudio; Vernal, Rolando; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) has developed multiple immune evasion mechanisms involving the innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent findings have reported that Ngo reduces the IL-1β secretion of infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Here, we investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in production and release of IL-1β in Ngo-infected MDM. We found that the exposure of Ngo-infected MDM to ATP increases IL-1β levels about ten times compared with unexposed Ngo-infected MDM (P < 0.01). However, we did not observe any changes in inflammasome transcriptional activation of speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (CARD) (ASC, P > 0.05) and caspase-1 (CASP1, P > 0.05). In addition, ATP was not able to modify caspase-1 activity in Ngo-infected MDM but was able to increase pyroptosis (P > 0.01). Notably ATP treatment defined an increase of positive staining for IL-1β with a distinctive intracellular pattern of distribution. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP induces IL-1β secretion by a mechanism not related to the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 axis and likely is acting at the level of vesicle trafficking or pore formation. PMID:27803513

  12. Mechanism of ischemic contracture in ferret hearts: relative roles of [Ca2+]i elevation and ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Koretsune, Y; Marban, E

    1990-01-01

    When coronary perfusion is interrupted, the diastolic force generated by the myocardium first falls but eventually increases. The delayed rise in force, ischemic contracture, has been attributed either to ATP depletion or to elevation of the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). To distinguish between these possibilities, we measured [Ca2+]i and ATP concentration [( ATP]) in ferret hearts using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Mean time-average [Ca2+]i and [ATP] equaled 0.25 microM and 2.7 mumol/g wet wt, respectively, under control perfusion conditions. [Ca2+]i increased and [ATP] fell during total global ischemia. Although [Ca2+]i exceeded the usual systolic levels of 1.7 microM within 20-25 min of ischemia and reached a steady level between 2 and 3 microM by 30-35 min, force only began to rise after 40 min. In contrast, the time required for [ATP] to fall to less than 10% of control levels coincided closely with the onset of contracture. Ischemia in the presence of iodoacetate, an inhibitor of glycolysis, led to a precipitous fall in [ATP] and a concomitant rise in force, both of which preceded any elevation of [Ca2+]i. Thus changes in [Ca2+]i are neither sufficient nor necessary for the initiation of ischemic contracture. We conclude that ATP depletion is primary and that the rise in resting force reflects the formation of rigor cross bridges.

  13. Theoretical insights into the mechanism of selective Peptide bond hydrolysis catalyzed by [Pd(H(2)O)(4)](2+).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walsh, Kathryn; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    In this study, mechanisms for the hydrolysis of the Gly-Pro bond in Gly-Pro-Met and Gly-Pro-His, the Gly-Sar bond in Gly-Sar-Met, and the Gly-Gly bond in the Gly-Gly-Met peptide catalyzed by [Pd(H(2)O)(4)](2+) (I) have been investigated at the DFT level. In all cases, the optimized structure of the active bidentate complex, formed by the reaction of I with the substrate [Pd(H(2)O)(2){(Gly)-(Pro)-(Met-kappaS,kappaN)}](1+) complex for the Gly-Pro-Met peptide, was found to exist in the trans conformation. This structure is in agreement with the experimentally measured TOCSY and ROESY (1)H NMR spectra. After the formation of this complex, the following two mechanisms have been proposed experimentally: (1) external attack mechanism and (2) internal delivery mechanism. The DFT calculations suggest that in the external attack mechanism the calculated barriers are prohibitively high (i.e., 50-70 kcal/mol) for the cleavage of all the peptide bonds, and therefore, this mechanism is ruled out. However, in the internal delivery mechanism, the bidentate complex is first transformed from the trans to the cis conformation. Here, the overall barriers for the hydrolysis of the Gly-Pro-Met, Gly-Pro-His, Gly-Sar-Met, and Gly-Gly-Met peptide bonds are 38.3, 41.4, 39.8, and 39.2 kcal/mol, respectively. These barriers are in much better agreement with the experimentally measured rate constants at pH 2.0 and at 60 degrees C. The substitution of Pd(II) with Pt(II) was found to make a negligibly small difference (0.53 kcal/mol) on the barrier for the cleavage of the Gly-Pro-His bond. These calculations indicate that after the creation of the active bidentate complex in the trans conformation the internal delivery mechanism is the most energetically feasible.

  14. Effect of Hydrolysis on Mechanical Behavior of TCP/PLLA Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamaji, Shusaku

    2014-03-01

    Bioactive ceramics/poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) composites have been expected as a material for the bone fracture fixations which have more biocompatibility than monolithic PLLA. In this study, hydrolysis behavior of tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/PLLA composites containing three different TCP contents (5, 10, 15 wt%) in simulated body environment were characterized. These specimens were immersed in phosphate buffered solution. Tensile tests were conducted on the specimen after immersion in various strain rates. In order to predict stress-strain behavior after immersion, damage micromechanical analysis proposed by the authors were conducted. In this model, nonlinear behavior in stress strain relationship were simulated considering interfacial debonding between TCP particle and PLLA matrix. For the purpose of deciding the interfacial strength, such as critical energy release rate, curve fitting was conducted on the result of 15wt% composites under three types of strain rates. Theoretical results using the interfacial strength obtained on 5wt% and 10wt% composites were in good agreement with experimental results. This result indicated that interfacial strength was dependent only on strain rate and was independent from TCP fraction.

  15. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Bacterial ATP-Binding Cassette Systems

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Amy L.; Dassa, Elie; Orelle, Cedric; Chen, Jue

    2008-01-01

    Summary: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems are universally distributed among living organisms and function in many different aspects of bacterial physiology. ABC transporters are best known for their role in the import of essential nutrients and the export of toxic molecules, but they can also mediate the transport of many other physiological substrates. In a classical transport reaction, two highly conserved ATP-binding domains or subunits couple the binding/hydrolysis of ATP to the translocation of particular substrates across the membrane, through interactions with membrane-spanning domains of the transporter. Variations on this basic theme involve soluble ABC ATP-binding proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis to nontransport processes, such as DNA repair and gene expression regulation. Insights into the structure, function, and mechanism of action of bacterial ABC proteins are reported, based on phylogenetic comparisons as well as classic biochemical and genetic approaches. The availability of an increasing number of high-resolution structures has provided a valuable framework for interpretation of recent studies, and realistic models have been proposed to explain how these fascinating molecular machines use complex dynamic processes to fulfill their numerous biological functions. These advances are also important for elucidating the mechanism of action of eukaryotic ABC proteins, because functional defects in many of them are responsible for severe human inherited diseases. PMID:18535149

  16. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  17. Impaired skeletal muscle blood flow control with advancing age in humans: attenuated ATP release and local vasodilation during erythrocyte deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S.; Crecelius, Anne R.; Voyles, Wyatt F.; Dinenno, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Skeletal muscle blood flow is coupled with the oxygenation state of hemoglobin in young adults, whereby the erythrocyte functions as an oxygen sensor and releases ATP during deoxygenation to evoke vasodilation. Whether this function is impaired in humans of advanced age is unknown. Objective To test the hypothesis that older adults demonstrate impaired muscle blood flow and lower intravascular ATP during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation. Methods and Results We show impaired forearm blood flow (FBF) responses during two conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation (systemic hypoxia and graded handgrip exercise) with age, and this is due to reduced local vasodilation. In young adults, both hypoxia and exercise significantly increased venous [ATP] and ATP effluent (FBF × [ATP]) draining skeletal muscle. In contrast, hypoxia and exercise did not increase [ATP]v in older adults, and both [ATP]v and ATP effluent were substantially reduced compared with young despite similar levels of deoxygenation. Next, we demonstrate that this cannot be explained by augmented extracellular ATP hydrolysis in whole blood with age. Finally, we found that deoxygenation-mediated ATP release from isolated erythrocytes is essentially non-existent in older adults. Conclusions Skeletal muscle blood flow during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation is markedly reduced in aging humans, and reductions in plasma ATP and erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may be a novel mechanism underlying impaired vasodilation and oxygen delivery during hypoxemia with advancing age. Because aging is associated with elevated risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease and exercise intolerance, interventions targeting erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may offer therapeutic potential. PMID:22647875

  18. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells.

  19. Theoretical study of the neutral hydrolysis of hydrogen isocyanate in aqueous solution via assisted-concerted mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tolosa Arroyo, S; Hidalgo Garcia, A; Sansón Martín, J A

    2009-03-01

    A procedure is described for the theoretical study of chemical reactions in solution by means of molecular dynamics simulation, with solute-solvent interaction potentials derived from ab initio quantum calculations. We apply the procedure to the case of neutral hydrogen isocyanate hydrolysis, HNCO + 2 H(2)O --> H(2)NCOOH + H(2)O, in aqueous solution, via the assisted-concerted mechanisms and the two-water model. We used the solvent as a reaction coordinate and the free-energy curves for the calculation of the properties related to the reaction mechanisms, with a particular focus on the reaction and activation energies. The results showed that the mechanism with two water molecules attacking the C=N bond is preferred to the mechanism with three waters forming a ring of eight members. In addition, the aqueous medium significantly reduces the activation barrier (DeltaG(double dagger) = 13.9 kcal/mol) and makes the process more exothermic (DeltaG = -11.1 kcal/mol) relative to the gas-phase reaction, increasing the rate constant of the process to k = 4.25 x 10(5) s(-1). PMID:19209882

  20. Selectivity Mechanism of ATP-Competitive Inhibitors for PKB and PKA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Pang, Jingzhi; Song, Dong; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Congwen; Shao, Tianqu; Chen, Haifeng

    2015-07-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB) acts as a central node on the PI3K kinase pathway. Constitutive activation and overexpression of PKB have been identified to involve in various cancers. However, protein kinase A (PKA) sharing high homology with PKB is essential for metabolic regulation. Therefore, specific targeting on PKB is crucial strategy in drug design and development for antitumor. Here, we had revealed the selectivity mechanism for PKB inhibitors with molecular dynamics simulation and 3D-QSAR methods. Selective inhibitors of PKB could form more hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts with PKB than those with PKA. This could explain that selective inhibitor M128 is more potent to PKB than to PKA. Then, 3D-QSAR models were constructed for these selective inhibitors and evaluated by test set compounds. 3D-QSAR model comparison of PKB inhibitors and PKA inhibitors reveals possible methods to improve the selectivity of inhibitors. These models can be used to design new chemical entities and make quantitative prediction of the specific selective inhibitors before resorting to in vitro and in vivo experiment.

  1. ATP release through pannexon channels.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed 'pannexon'. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  2. Energy transduction in ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elston, Timothy; Wang, Hongyun; Oster, George

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondria, bacteria and chloroplasts use the free energy stored in transmembrane ion gradients to manufacture ATP by the action of ATP synthase. This enzyme consists of two principal domains. The asymmetric membrane-spanning Fo portion contains the proton channel, and the soluble F1 portion contains three catalytic sites which cooperate in the synthetic reactions. The flow of protons through Fo is thought to generate a torque which is transmitted to F1 by an asymmetric shaft, the coiled-coil γ-subunit. This acts as a rotating `cam' within F1, sequentially releasing ATPs from the three active sites. The free-energy difference across the inner membrane of mitochondria and bacteria is sufficient to produce three ATPs per twelve protons passing through the motor. It has been suggested that this protonmotive force biases the rotor's diffusion so that Fo constitutes a rotary motor turning the γ shaft. Here we show that biased diffusion, augmented by electrostatic forces, does indeed generate sufficient torque to account for ATP production. Moreover, the motor's reversibility - supplying torque from ATP hydrolysis in F1 converts the motor into an efficient proton pump - can also be explained by our model.

  3. Three-dimensional Structure of Nylon Hydrolase and Mechanism of Nylon-6 Hydrolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Negoro, Seiji; Shibata, Naoki; Tanaka, Yusuke; Yasuhira, Kengo; Shibata, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Haruka; Lee, Young-Ho; Oshima, Shohei; Santa, Ryuji; Oshima, Shohei; Mochiji, Kozo; Goto, Yuji; Ikegami, Takahisa; Nagai, Keisuke; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    We performed x-ray crystallographic analyses of the 6-aminohexanoate oligomer hydrolase (NylC) from Agromyces sp. at 2.0 Å-resolution. This enzyme is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily that is responsible for the degradation of the nylon-6 industry byproduct. We observed four identical heterodimers (27 kDa + 9 kDa), which resulted from the autoprocessing of the precursor protein (36 kDa) and which constitute the doughnut-shaped quaternary structure. The catalytic residue of NylC was identified as the N-terminal Thr-267 of the 9-kDa subunit. Furthermore, each heterodimer is folded into a single domain, generating a stacked αββα core structure. Amino acid mutations at subunit interfaces of the tetramer were observed to drastically alter the thermostability of the protein. In particular, four mutations (D122G/H130Y/D36A/E263Q) of wild-type NylC from Arthrobacter sp. (plasmid pOAD2-encoding enzyme), with a heat denaturation temperature of Tm = 52 °C, enhanced the protein thermostability by 36 °C (Tm = 88 °C), whereas a single mutation (G111S or L137A) decreased the stability by ∼10 °C. We examined the enzymatic hydrolysis of nylon-6 by the thermostable NylC mutant. Argon cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses of the reaction products revealed that the major peak of nylon-6 (m/z 10,000–25,000) shifted to a smaller range, producing a new peak corresponding to m/z 1500–3000 after the enzyme treatment at 60 °C. In addition, smaller fragments in the soluble fraction were successively hydrolyzed to dimers and monomers. Based on these data, we propose that NylC should be designated as nylon hydrolase (or nylonase). Three potential uses of NylC for industrial and environmental applications are also discussed. PMID:22187439

  4. Mechanism of natural organic matter removal by polyaluminum chloride: effect of coagulant particle size and hydrolysis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Ni, Jinren; Qu, Jiuhui; Chow, Christopher W K; Liu, Hailong

    2008-07-01

    The mechanism of natural organic matter (NOM) removal by AlCl(3) and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was investigated through bench-scale tests. The fraction distributions of NOM and residual Al after coagulation in solution, colloid and sediment were analyzed as changes of coagulant dosage and pH. The influence of NOM, coagulant dose and pH on coagulation kinetics of AlCl(3) was investigated using photometric dispersion analyzer compared with PACl. Monomeric Al species (Al(a)) shows high ability to satisfy some unsaturated coordinate bonds of NOM to facilitate particle and NOM removal, while most of the flocs formed by Al(a) are small and difficult to settle. Medium polymerized Al species (Al(b)) can destabilize particle and NOM efficiently, while some flocs formed by Al(b) are not large and not easy to precipitate as compared to those formed by colloidal or solid Al species (Al(c)). Thus, Al(c) could adsorb and remove NOM efficiently. The removal of contaminant by species of Al(a), Al(b) and Al(c) follows mechanisms of complexation, neutralization and adsorption, respectively. Unlike preformed Al(b) in PACl, in-situ-formed Al(b) can remove NOM and particle more efficiently via the mechanism of further hydrolysis and transfer into Al(c) during coagulation. While the presence of NOM would reduce Al(b) formed in-situ due to the complexation of NOM and Al(a).

  5. [Mechanisms and regulation of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in filamentous fungi: classical cases and new models].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Ivonne; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia; Montoya, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable carbon source on earth. However, this polymer structure comprises a physical and chemical barrier for carbon access, which has limited its exploitation. In nature, only a few percentage of microorganisms may degrade this polymer by cellulase expression. Filamentous fungi are one of the most active and efficient groups among these microorganisms. This review describes similarities and differences between cellulase activity mechanisms and regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression for 3 of the most studied cellulolytic filamentous fungi models: Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans, and the recently described model Neurospora crassa. Unlike gene expression mechanisms, it was found that enzymatic activity mechanisms are similar for all the studied models. Understanding the distinctive elements of each system is essential for the development of strategies for the improvement of cellulase production, either by providing the optimum environment (fermentation conditions) or increasing gene expression in these microorganisms by genetic engineering.

  6. [Effects of Medium Viscosity Increasing Agents on ATP Synthesis in Chloroplast Thylakoids].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, I M; Opanasenko, V K; Malyan, A N

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an increase in the medium viscosity on cyclic photophosphorylation in chloroplast thylakoids and on Ca2+ -dependent ATP hydrolysis by the chloroplast coupling factor CF, was studied. With 0.1-0.2 mM ADP used it was found that the rate of ATP synthesis decreases after addition of various agents that increase the medium viscosity (sucrose, dextran 40 or polyethylene glycol 6000 provided that these agents cause neither uncoupling nor electron transport inhibition in the absence of ADP. Dextran and polyethylene glycol inhibited ATP synthesis by 50% when their concentrations were much lower (6-10%) than that of sucrose (30-40%), while 50% inhibition of Ca2+ -dependent ATP hydrolysis by CFI-ATPase was observed at higher concentrations of dextran and polyethylene glycol (9-13%) and lower concentrations of sucrose (about 20%). For ADP, the effective Michaelis constant (KM) was shown to increase 2-3-fold with the increasing viscosity; meanwhile the maximal rate of cyclic photophosphorylation remained virtually unchanged. The dependence of K(M) on the medium viscosity can serve as a criterion for the process of diffusion-controlled photophosphorylation. Possible mechanisms of ADP and ATP diffusion are discussed.

  7. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient.

  8. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    PubMed Central

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient. PMID:27321713

  9. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft.

    PubMed

    Kulish, O; Wright, A D; Terentjev, E M

    2016-01-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the 'no-load' angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of 'stall torque'. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the 'useful outcome' is measured in the number of H(+) pushed against the chemical gradient. PMID:27321713

  10. Mechanism of the discrepancy in the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency between defatted peanut flour and peanut protein isolate by Flavorzyme.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Zhao, Yijun; Xiao, Chuqiao; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhao, Mouming; Su, Guowan

    2015-02-01

    Both defatted peanut flour (DPF) and peanut protein isolate (PPI) are widely used to prepare peanut protein hydrolysates. To compare their enzymatic hydrolysis efficiencies, DPF and PPI were hydrolysed by Alcalase, Neutrase, Papain, Protamex and Flavorzyme. Alcalase and Flavorzyme were found to be the most efficient proteases to hydrolyse both DPF and PPI. The efficiency was comparable to each other when using Alcalase, while PPI was hydrolysed less efficiently than DPF when using Flavorzyme. Analysis of changes in the protein solubility, subunit and conformation, and amino acid composition of DPF, PPI and their Flavorzyme hydrolysis residues indicated that the PPI preparation process had minimal effect on it, but peptide aggregation via non-covalent bonding (including hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds) during hydrolysis and/or thermal treatment after hydrolysis were likely responsible for the reduced hydrolysis efficiency of PPI by Flavorzyme.

  11. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  12. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasundaram, N.; George Priya Doss, C.; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Karthick, V.; Thirumal Kumar, D.; Balaji, V.; Siva, R.; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-07-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs.

  13. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    N, Nagasundaram; C, George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V, Karthick; D, Thirumal Kumar; V, Balaji; R, Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:27471101

  14. Mechanical study of rat soleus muscle using caged ATP and X-ray diffraction: high ADP affinity of slow cross-bridges.

    PubMed Central

    Horiuti, K; Yagi, N; Takemori, S

    1997-01-01

    1. The cross-bridges in slow- and fast-twitch fibres (taken, respectively, from soleus and psoas muscles of rats) were examined in mechanical experiments using caged ATP and X-ray diffraction, to compare their binding of ATP and ADP. 2. Caged ATP was photolysed in rigor fibres. When ADP was removed from pre-photolysis fibres, the initial relaxation (+/- Ca2+) in soleus was as fast as that in psoas fibres, whereas the subsequent contraction (+Ca2+) was slower in soleus than in psoas. The ATPase rate during the steady-state contraction was also slower in soleus fibres. 3. When ADP was added to pre-photolysis fibres (+/- Ca2+), tension developed even in the initial phase, the overall tension development being biphasic. Both initial and late components of the Ca(2+)-free contraction were enhanced when ADP was added before photolysis, although pre-photolysis ADP was not a prerequisite for the late component. The effect of ADP was greater in soleus than in psoas fibres. Static experiments on rigor fibres revealed a higher ADP affinity in soleus fibres. 4. The intensity of the actin layer-line from ADP rigor soleus fibres decreased rapidly on photorelease of ATP. We conclude that, despite the tight ADP binding of the soleus cross-bridge, its isometric reaction is not rate limited by the 'off' rate of ADP. PMID:9263922

  15. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    PubMed Central

    N., Nagasundaram; C., George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V., Karthick; D., Thirumal Kumar; V., Balaji; R., Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:27471101

  16. Mechanism of product inhibition for cellobiohydrolase Cel7A during hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Johan P; Alasepp, Kadri; Kari, Jeppe; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The cellobiohydrolase cellulase Cel7A is extensively utilized in industrial treatment of lignocellulosic biomass under conditions of high product concentrations, and better understanding of inhibition mechanisms appears central in attempts to improve the efficiency of this process. We have implemented an electrochemical biosensor assay for product inhibition studies of cellulases acting on their natural substrate, cellulose. Using this method we measured the hydrolytic rate of Cel7A as a function of both product (inhibitor) concentration and substrate load. This data enabled analyses along the lines of conventional enzyme kinetic theory. We found that the product cellobiose lowered the maximal rate without affecting the Michaelis constant, and this kinetic pattern could be rationalized by two fundamentally distinct molecular mechanisms. One was simple reversibility, that is, an increasing rate of the reverse reaction, lowering the net hydrolytic velocity as product concentrations increase. Strictly this is not a case of inhibition, as no catalytically inactive is formed. The other mechanism that matched the kinetic data was noncompetitive inhibition with an inhibition constant of 490 ± 40 μM. Noncompetitive inhibition implies that the inhibitor binds with comparable strength to either free enzyme or an enzymesubstrate complex, that is, that association between enzyme and substrate has no effect on the binding of the inhibitor. This mechanism is rarely observed, but we argue, that the special architecture of Cel7A with numerous subsites for binding of both substrate and product could give rise to a true noncompetitive inhibition mechanism. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1178-1186. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mechanism of product inhibition for cellobiohydrolase Cel7A during hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Johan P; Alasepp, Kadri; Kari, Jeppe; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The cellobiohydrolase cellulase Cel7A is extensively utilized in industrial treatment of lignocellulosic biomass under conditions of high product concentrations, and better understanding of inhibition mechanisms appears central in attempts to improve the efficiency of this process. We have implemented an electrochemical biosensor assay for product inhibition studies of cellulases acting on their natural substrate, cellulose. Using this method we measured the hydrolytic rate of Cel7A as a function of both product (inhibitor) concentration and substrate load. This data enabled analyses along the lines of conventional enzyme kinetic theory. We found that the product cellobiose lowered the maximal rate without affecting the Michaelis constant, and this kinetic pattern could be rationalized by two fundamentally distinct molecular mechanisms. One was simple reversibility, that is, an increasing rate of the reverse reaction, lowering the net hydrolytic velocity as product concentrations increase. Strictly this is not a case of inhibition, as no catalytically inactive is formed. The other mechanism that matched the kinetic data was noncompetitive inhibition with an inhibition constant of 490 ± 40 μM. Noncompetitive inhibition implies that the inhibitor binds with comparable strength to either free enzyme or an enzymesubstrate complex, that is, that association between enzyme and substrate has no effect on the binding of the inhibitor. This mechanism is rarely observed, but we argue, that the special architecture of Cel7A with numerous subsites for binding of both substrate and product could give rise to a true noncompetitive inhibition mechanism. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1178-1186. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26636743

  18. Mechanisms and kinetics of alkaline hydrolysis of the energetic nitroaromatic compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN).

    PubMed

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J; Bylaska, Eric J; Ritchie, Julia J; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2013-07-01

    The environmental impacts of energetic compounds can be minimized through the design and selection of new energetic materials with favorable fate properties. Building predictive models to inform this process, however, is difficult because of uncertainties and complexities in some major fate-determining transformation reactions such as the alkaline hydrolysis of energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs). Prior work on the mechanisms of the reaction between NACs and OH(-) has yielded inconsistent results. In this study, the alkaline hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) was investigated with coordinated experimental kinetic measurements and molecular modeling calculations. For TNT, the results suggest reversible formation of an initial product, which is likely either a Meisenheimer complex or a TNT anion formed by abstraction of a methyl proton by OH(-). For DNAN, the results suggest that a Meisenheimer complex is an intermediate in the formation of 2,4-dinitrophenolate. Despite these advances, the remaining uncertainties in the mechanisms of these reactions-and potential variability between the hydrolysis mechanisms for different NACs-mean that it is not yet possible to generalize the results into predictive models (e.g., quantitative structure-activity relationships, QSARs) for hydrolysis of other NACs.

  19. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Alkaline Hydrolysis of the Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN)

    SciTech Connect

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Ritchie, Julia J.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2013-07-02

    The environmental impacts of energetic compounds can be minimized through the design and selection of new energetic materials with favorable fate properties. Building predictive models to inform this process, however, is difficult because of uncertainties and complexities in some major fate-determining transformation reactions such as the alkaline hydrolysis of energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs). Prior work on the mechanisms of the reaction between NACs and OH– has yielded inconsistent results. In this study, the alkaline hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) was investigated with coordinated experimental kinetic measurements and molecular modeling calculations. For TNT, the results suggest reversible formation of an initial product, which is likely either a Meisenheimer complex or a TNT anion formed by abstraction of a methyl proton by OH–. For DNAN, the results suggest that a Meisenheimer complex is an intermediate in the formation of 2,4-dinitrophenolate. Despite these advances, the remaining uncertainties in the mechanisms of these reactions—and potential variability between the hydrolysis mechanisms for different NACs—mean that it is not yet possible to generalize the results into predictive models (e.g., quantitative structure–activity relationships, QSARs) for hydrolysis of other NACs.

  20. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  1. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Joji Grace; Kaschani, Farnusch; Colby, Tom; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Zhao, David; Kaiser, Markus; Patricelli, Matthew P.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding proteins. Our search for labeled peptides upon in-gel digest led to the discovery that the biotin moiety of the labeled peptides is oxidized. The in-gel analysis displayed kinase domains of two receptor-like kinases (RLKs) at a lower than expected molecular weight, indicating that these RLKs lost the extracellular domain, possibly as a result of receptor shedding. Analysis of modified peptides using a gel-free platform identified 242 different labeling sites for AcATP in the Arabidopsis proteome. Examination of each individual labeling site revealed a preference of labeling in ATP binding pockets for a broad diversity of ATP binding proteins. Of these, 24 labeled peptides were from a diverse range of protein kinases, including RLKs, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and calcium-dependent kinases. A significant portion of the labeling sites could not be assigned to known nucleotide binding sites. However, the fact that labeling could be competed with ATP indicates that these labeling sites might represent previously uncharacterized nucleotide binding sites. A plot of spectral counts against expression levels illustrates the high specificity of AcATP probes for protein kinases and known ATP binding proteins. This work introduces profiling of ATP binding activities of a large diversity of proteins in plant proteomes. The data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000188. PMID:23722185

  2. ATP-driven Rad50 conformations regulate DNA tethering, end resection, and ATM checkpoint signaling.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Rajashree A; Williams, Gareth J; Limbo, Oliver; Williams, R Scott; Kuhnlein, Jeff; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Classen, Scott; Guenther, Grant; Russell, Paul; Tainer, John A; Paull, Tanya T

    2014-03-01

    The Mre11-Rad50 complex is highly conserved, yet the mechanisms by which Rad50 ATP-driven states regulate the sensing, processing and signaling of DNA double-strand breaks are largely unknown. Here we design structure-based mutations in Pyrococcus furiosus Rad50 to alter protein core plasticity and residues undergoing ATP-driven movements within the catalytic domains. With this strategy we identify Rad50 separation-of-function mutants that either promote or destabilize the ATP-bound state. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, biochemical assays, and functional analyses of mutant PfRad50 complexes show that the ATP-induced 'closed' conformation promotes DNA end binding and end tethering, while hydrolysis-induced opening is essential for DNA resection. Reducing the stability of the ATP-bound state impairs DNA repair and Tel1 (ATM) checkpoint signaling in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, double-strand break resection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and ATM activation by human Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 in vitro, supporting the generality of the P. furiosus Rad50 structure-based mutational analyses. These collective results suggest that ATP-dependent Rad50 conformations switch the Mre11-Rad50 complex between DNA tethering, ATM signaling, and 5' strand resection, revealing molecular mechanisms regulating responses to DNA double-strand breaks.

  3. New insights into the mechanism of the Schiff base hydrolysis catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase from S. enterica: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2012-09-21

    The reaction pathway of Schiff base hydrolysis catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) from S. enterica has been studied by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations and the corresponding potential energy profile has also been identified. On the basis of the results, the catalytic hydrolysis process for the wild-type enzyme consists of three major reaction steps, including nucleophilic attack on the carbon atom involved in the carbon-nitrogen double bond of the Schiff base intermediate by a water molecule, deprotonation of the His143 residue, and dissociation between the product and the Lys170 residue of the enzyme. The remarkable difference between this and the previously proposed reaction mechanism is that the second step here, absent in the previously proposed reaction mechanism, plays an important role in facilitating the reaction through a key proton transfer by the His143 residue, resulting in a lower energy barrier. Comparison with our recently reported results on the Schiff base formation and dehydration processes clearly shows that the Schiff base hydrolysis is rate-determining in the overall reaction catalyzed by type I DHQD, consistent with the experimental prediction, and the calculated energy barrier of ∼16.0 kcal mol(-1) is in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energy of ∼14.3 kcal mol(-1). When the imidazole group of His143 residue is missing, the Schiff base hydrolysis is initiated by a hydroxide ion in the solution, rather than a water molecule, and both the reaction mechanism and the kinetics of Schiff base hydrolysis have been remarkably changed, clearly elucidating the catalytic role of the His143 residue in the reaction. The new mechanistic insights obtained here will be valuable for the rational design of high-activity inhibitors of type I DHQD as non-toxic antimicrobials, anti-fungals, and herbicides.

  4. Structural insights into a unique cellulase fold and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Cartmell, Alan; Carvalho, Ana Luísa M.; Verzé, Genny; Bayer, Edward A.; Vazana, Yael; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Prates, José A. M.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Boraston, Alisdair B.; Romão, Maria J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a well-characterized cellulose-degrading microorganism. The genome sequence of C. thermocellum encodes a number of proteins that contain type I dockerin domains, which implies that they are components of the cellulose-degrading apparatus, but display no significant sequence similarity to known plant cell wall–degrading enzymes. Here, we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of one of these proteins, designated CtCel124. The protein was shown to be an endo-acting cellulase that displays a single displacement mechanism and acts in synergy with Cel48S, the major cellulosomal exo-cellulase. The crystal structure of CtCel124 in complex with two cellotriose molecules, determined to 1.5 Å, displays a superhelical fold in which a constellation of α-helices encircle a central helix that houses the catalytic apparatus. The catalytic acid, Glu96, is located at the C-terminus of the central helix, but there is no candidate catalytic base. The substrate-binding cleft can be divided into two discrete topographical domains in which the bound cellotriose molecules display twisted and linear conformations, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme may target the interface between crystalline and disordered regions of cellulose. PMID:21393568

  5. High-Resolution Structure and Mechanism of an F/V-Hybrid Rotor Ring in a Na+-coupled ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Matthies, Doreen; Zhou, Wenchang; Klyszejko, Adriana L.; Anselmi, Claudio; Yildiz, Özkan; Brandt, Karsten; Müller, Volker; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Meier, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    All rotary ATPases catalyze the interconversion of ATP and ADP-Pi through a mechanism that is coupled to the transmembrane flow of H+ or Na+. Physiologically, however, F/A-type enzymes specialize in ATP synthesis driven by downhill ion diffusion, while eukaryotic V-type ATPases function as ion pumps. To begin to rationalize the molecular basis for this functional differentiation, we solved the crystal structure of the Na+-driven membrane rotor of the Acetobacterium woodii ATP synthase, at 2.1 Å resolution. Unlike known structures, this rotor ring is a 9:1 heteromer of F- and V-type c-subunits, and therefore features a hybrid configuration of ion-binding sites along its circumference. Molecular and kinetic simulations are used to dissect the mechanisms of Na+ recognition and rotation of this c-ring, and to explain the functional implications of the V-type c-subunit. These structural and mechanistic insights indicate an evolutionary path between synthases and pumps involving adaptations in the rotor ring. PMID:25381992

  6. The Methanolic Extract from Murraya koenigii L. Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Pain and Involves ATP-Sensitive K+ Channel as Antinociceptive Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin Ani, Nushrat; Chakraborty, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Murraya koenigii L. is a perennial shrub, belonging to the family Rutaceae. Traditionally, the leaves of this plant are extensively used in treatment of a wide range of diseases and disorders including pain and inflammation. Although researchers have revealed the antinociceptive effects of this plant's leaves during past few years, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated some antinociceptive mechanisms of the methanolic extract of M. koenigii (MEMK) leaves along with its antinociceptive potential using several animal models. The antinociceptive effects of MEMK were evaluated using formalin-induced licking and acetic acid-induced writhing tests at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. In addition, we also justified the possible participations of glutamatergic system and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the observed activities. Our results demonstrated that MEMK significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited the pain thresholds induced by formalin and acetic acid in a dose-dependent manner. MEMK also significantly (p < 0.01) suppressed glutamate-induced pain. Moreover, pretreatment with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker) at 10 mg/kg significantly (p < 0.05) reversed the MEMK-mediated antinociception. These revealed that MEMK might have the potential to interact with glutamatergic system and the ATP-sensitive potassium channels to exhibit its antinociceptive activities. Therefore, our results strongly support the antinociceptive effects of M. koenigii leaves and provide scientific basis of their analgesic uses in the traditional medicine. PMID:27812367

  7. In situ lignocellulosic unlocking mechanism for carbohydrate hydrolysis in termites: crucial lignin modification

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Termites are highly effective at degrading lignocelluloses, and thus can be used as a model for studying plant cell-wall degradation in biological systems. However, the process of lignin deconstruction and/or degradation in termites is still not well understood. Methods We investigated the associated structural modification caused by termites in the lignin biomolecular assembly in softwood tissues crucial for cell-wall degradation. We conducted comparative studies on the termite-digested (i.e. termite feces) and native (control) softwood tissues with the aid of advanced analytical techniques: 13C crosspolarization magic angle spinning and nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS-NMR) spectroscopy, flash pyrolysis with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), and Py-GC-MS in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (Py-TMAH)-GC/MS. Results The 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopic analysis revealed an increased level of guaiacyl-derived (G unit) polymeric framework in the termite-digested softwood (feces), while providing specific evidence of cellulose degradation. The Py-GC/MS data were in agreement with the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopic studies, thus indicating dehydroxylation and modification of selective intermonomer side-chain linkages in the lignin in the termite feces. Moreover, Py-TMAH-GC/MS analysis showed significant differences in the product distribution between control and termite feces. This strongly suggests that the structural modification in lignin could be associated with the formation of additional condensed interunit linkages. Conclusion Collectively, these data further establish: 1) that the major β-O-4' (β-aryl ether) was conserved, albeit with substructure degeneracy, and 2) that the nature of the resulting polymer in termite feces retained most of its original aromatic moieties (G unit-derived). Overall, these results provide insight into lignin-unlocking mechanisms for understanding plant cell-wall deconstruction, which could be

  8. Time-dependent FRET with single enzymes: domain motions and catalysis in H(+)-ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Roland; Zimmermann, Boris; Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Gräber, Peter

    2011-02-25

    H(+)-ATP synthases are molecular machines which couple transmembrane proton transport with ATP synthesis from ADP and inorganic phosphate by a rotational mechanism. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) in single molecules is a powerful tool to analyse conformational changes. It is used to investigate subunit movements in H(+)-ATP synthases from E. coli (EF(0)F(1)) and from spinach chloroplasts (CF(0)F(1)) during catalysis. The enzymes are incorporated into liposome membranes, and this allows the generation of a transmembrane pH difference, which is necessary for ATP synthesis. After labelling of appropriate sites on different subunits with fluorescence donor and acceptor, the kinetics of spFRET are measured. Analysis of the E(FRET) traces reveals rotational movement of the ε and γ subunits in 120° steps with opposite directions during ATP synthesis and ATP hydrolysis. The stepped movement is characterized by a 120° step faster than 1 ms followed by a rest period with an average dwell time of 15 ms, which is in accordance with the turnover time of the enzyme. In addition to the three conformational states during catalysis, also an inactive conformation is found, which is observed after catalysis.

  9. Formation of a cytoplasmic salt bridge network in the matrix state is a fundamental step in the transport mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier

    PubMed Central

    King, Martin S.; Kerr, Matthew; Crichton, Paul G.; Springett, Roger; Kunji, Edmund R.S.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ADP/ATP carriers catalyze the equimolar exchange of ADP and ATP across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Structurally, they consist of three homologous domains with a single substrate binding site. They alternate between a cytoplasmic and matrix state in which the binding site is accessible to these compartments for binding of ADP or ATP. It has been proposed that cycling between states occurs by disruption and formation of a matrix and cytoplasmic salt bridge network in an alternating way, but formation of the latter has not been shown experimentally. Here, we show that state-dependent formation of the cytoplasmic salt bridge network can be demonstrated by measuring the effect of mutations on the thermal stability of detergent-solubilized carriers locked in a specific state. For this purpose, mutations were made to increase or decrease the overall interaction energy of the cytoplasmic network. When locked in the cytoplasmic state by the inhibitor carboxyatractyloside, the thermostabilities of the mutant and wild-type carriers were similar, but when locked in the matrix state by the inhibitor bongkrekic acid, they correlated with the predicted interaction energy of the cytoplasmic network, demonstrating its formation. Changing the interaction energy of the cytoplasmic network also had a profound effect on the kinetics of transport, indicating that formation of the network is a key step in the transport cycle. These results are consistent with a unique alternating access mechanism that involves the simultaneous rotation of the three domains around a central translocation pathway. PMID:26453935

  10. Extracellular ATP released by osteoblasts is a key local inhibitor of bone mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Key, Michelle L; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Arnett, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous ATP (>1 µM) prevents bone formation in vitro by blocking mineralisation of the collagenous matrix. This effect is thought to be mediated via both P2 receptor-dependent pathways and a receptor-independent mechanism (hydrolysis of ATP to produce the mineralisation inhibitor pyrophosphate, PP(i)). Osteoblasts are also known to release ATP constitutively. To determine whether this endogenous ATP might exert significant biological effects, bone-forming primary rat osteoblasts were cultured with 0.5-2.5 U/ml apyrase (which sequentially hydrolyses ATP to ADP to AMP + 2 P(i)). Addition of 0.5 U/ml apyrase to osteoblast culture medium degraded extracellular ATP to <1% of control levels within 2 minutes; continuous exposure to apyrase maintained this inhibition for up to 14 days. Apyrase treatment for the first 72 hours of culture caused small decreases (≤25%) in osteoblast number, suggesting a role for endogenous ATP in stimulating cell proliferation. Continuous apyrase treatment for 14 days (≥0.5 U/ml) increased mineralisation of bone nodules by up to 3-fold. Increases in bone mineralisation were also seen when osteoblasts were cultured with the ATP release inhibitors, NEM and brefeldin A, as well as with P2X1 and P2X7 receptor antagonists. Apyrase decreased alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity by up to 60%, whilst increasing the activity of the PP(i)-generating ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterases (NPPs) up to 2.7-fold. Both collagen production and adipocyte formation were unaffected. These data suggest that nucleotides released by osteoblasts in bone could act locally, via multiple mechanisms, to limit mineralisation.

  11. Substrate binding stabilizes a pre-translocation intermediate in the ATP-binding cassette transport protein MsbA.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2013-07-26

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to one of the largest protein superfamilies that expands from prokaryotes to man. Recent x-ray crystal structures of bacterial and mammalian ABC exporters suggest a common alternating access mechanism of substrate transport, which has also been biochemically substantiated. However, the current model does not yet explain the coupling between substrate binding and ATP hydrolysis that underlies ATP-dependent substrate transport. In our studies on the homodimeric multidrug/lipid A ABC exporter MsbA from Escherichia coli, we performed cysteine cross-linking, fluorescence energy transfer, and cysteine accessibility studies on two reporter positions, near the nucleotide-binding domains and in the membrane domains, for transporter embedded in a biological membrane. Our results suggest for the first time that substrate binding by MsbA stimulates the maximum rate of ATP hydrolysis by facilitating the dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains in a state, which is markedly distinct from the previously described nucleotide-free, inward-facing and nucleotide-bound, outward-facing conformations of ABC exporters and which binds ATP. PMID:23766512

  12. Chemomechanical coupling mechanism of F(1)-ATPase: catalysis and torque generation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-17

    F1-ATPase (F1), a rotary motor protein driven by ATP hydrolysis, is unique with respect to its high efficiency and reversibility in converting chemical energy into mechanical work. Single-molecule studies have improved our understanding about the energy-conversion mechanism of F1 and the chemomechanical-coupling scheme under ATP hydrolysis conditions. A novel single-molecule technique was recently established to estimate the free-energy change of F1 during catalysis at elementary-step resolution, advancing our understanding about the energy-conversion mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and synthesis. The energy conversion mechanism of F1 elucidated from single-molecule studies provides us with important insights into the operating principles underlying molecular motors.

  13. Formation versus Hydrolysis of the Peptide Bond from a Quantum-mechanical Viewpoint: The Role of Mineral Surfaces and Implications for the Origin of Life

    PubMed Central

    Rimola, Albert; Ugliengo, Piero; Sodupe, Mariona

    2009-01-01

    The condensation (polymerization by water elimination) of molecular building blocks to yield the first active biopolymers (e.g. of amino acids to form peptides) during primitive Earth is an intriguing question that nowadays still remains open since these processes are thermodynamically disfavoured in highly dilute water solutions. In the present contribution, formation and hydrolysis of glycine oligopeptides occurring on a cluster model of sanidine feldspar (001) surface have been simulated by quantum mechanical methods. Results indicate that the catalytic interplay between Lewis and Brønsted sites both present at the sanidine surface, in cooperation with the London forces acting between the biomolecules and the inorganic surface, plays a crucial role to: i) favour the condensation of glycine to yield oligopeptides as reaction products; ii) inhibit the hydrolysis of the newly formed oligopeptides. Both facts suggest that mineral surfaces may have helped in catalyzing, stabilizing and protecting from hydration the oligopeptides formed in the prebiotic era. PMID:19399219

  14. Atomic-resolution dissection of the energetics and mechanism of isomerization of hydrated ATP-Mg(2+) through the SOMA string method.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Davide; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2016-03-01

    The atomic mechanisms of isomerization of ATP-Mg(2+) in solution are characterized using the recently developed String Method with Optimal Molecular Alignment (SOMA) and molecular-dynamics simulations. Bias-Exchange Metadynamics simulations are first performed to identify the primary conformers of the ATP-Mg(2+) complex and their connectivity. SOMA is then used to elucidate the minimum free-energy path (MFEP) for each transition, in a 48-dimensional space. Analysis of the per-atom contributions to the global free-energy profiles reveals that the mechanism of these transitions is controlled by the Mg(2+) ion and its coordinating oxygen atoms in the triphosphate moiety, as well as by the ion-hydration shell. Metadynamics simulations in path collective variables based on the MFEP demonstrate these isomerizations proceed across a narrow channel of configurational space, thus validating the premise underlying SOMA. This study provides a roadmap for the examination of conformational changes in biomolecules, based on complementary enhanced-sampling techniques with different strengths. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Emergence of flagellar beating from the collective behavior of individual ATP-powered dyneins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdeo, S.; Onck, P. R.

    2016-10-01

    Flagella are hair-like projections from the surface of eukaryotic cells, and they play an important role in many cellular functions, such as cell-motility. The beating of flagella is enabled by their internal architecture, the axoneme, and is powered by a dense distribution of motor proteins, dyneins. The dyneins deliver the required mechanical work through the hydrolysis of ATP. Although the dynein-ATP cycle, the axoneme microstructure, and the flagellar-beating kinematics are well studied, their integration into a coherent picture of ATP-powered flagellar beating is still lacking. Here we show that a time-delayed negative-work-based switching mechanism is able to convert the individual sliding action of hundreds of dyneins into a regular overall beating pattern leading to propulsion. We developed a computational model based on a minimal representation of the axoneme consisting of two representative doublet microtubules connected by nexin links. The relative sliding of the microtubules is incorporated by modeling two groups of ATP-powered dyneins, each responsible for sliding in opposite directions. A time-delayed switching mechanism is postulated, which is key in converting the local individual sliding action of multiple dyneins into global beating. Our results demonstrate that an overall nonreciprocal beating pattern can emerge with time due to the spatial and temporal coordination of the individual dyneins. These findings provide insights in the fundamental working mechanism of axonemal dyneins and could possibly open new research directions in the field of flagellar motility.

  16. Efficient phagocytosis requires triacylglycerol hydrolysis by adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Chandak, Prakash G; Radovic, Branislav; Aflaki, Elma; Kolb, Dagmar; Buchebner, Marlene; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Magnes, Christoph; Sinner, Frank; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Tabas, Ira; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-06-25

    Macrophage phagocytosis is an essential biological process in host defense and requires large amounts of energy. To date, glucose is believed to represent the prime substrate for ATP production in macrophages. To investigate the relative contribution of free fatty acids (FFAs) in this process, we determined the phagocytosis rates in normal mouse macrophages and macrophages of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-deficient mice. ATGL was shown to be the rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of lipid droplet-associated triacylglycerol (TG) in many tissues. Here, we demonstrate that Atgl(-/-) macrophages fail to efficiently hydrolyze cellular TG stores leading to decreased cellular FFA concentrations and concomitant accumulation of lipid droplets, even in the absence of exogenous lipid loading. The reduced availability of FFAs results in decreased cellular ATP concentrations and impaired phagocytosis suggesting that fatty acids must first go through a cycle of esterification and re-hydrolysis before they are available as energy substrate. Exogenously added glucose cannot fully compensate for the phagocytotic defect in Atgl(-/-) macrophages. Hence, phagocytosis was also decreased in vivo when Atgl(-/-) mice were challenged with bacterial particles. These findings imply that phagocytosis in macrophages depends on the availability of FFAs and that ATGL is required for their hydrolytic release from cellular TG stores. This novel mechanism links ATGL-mediated lipolysis to macrophage function in host defense and opens the way to explore possible roles of ATGL in immune response, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  17. Phosphorylation Hypothesis: A Fourth Sink of ATP for Cellular Information Processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule is used in living cells as a universal ``energy currency.'' The Gibbs free energy liberated from hydrolysis reaction of ATP to ADP + Pi is used for (a) biosynthesis, (b) ionic and neutral molecular pumping, and (c) mechanical movement. They are known collectively as the three major energy sinks at the cellular level. Using biochemical activities of various enzymes, a cell carries out information processing, known as signal transduction. Essentially all signal transduction reactions also require ATP (or GTP) hydrolysis. In the past, such energy dissipative reactions are considered as ``futile.'' However, it is clear that the free energy derived from a futile cycle is used to correct errors in biomolecular recognition, improve robustness in cell development, overcome Boltzmann's equilibrium law of probability, and drive Maxwell's demons (one notes that Gibbs' chemical potential is a thermodynamic force without mechanical interpretation). The free energy involved in processing information will be explained in terms of stochastic entropy production -- the central concept in irreversible and nonequilibrium steady-state (NESS) thermodynamics.

  18. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  19. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum–classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO42− state, but in the H2PγO4− state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3−) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes. PMID:25006262

  20. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-05-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanism are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output ((.)Q) during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n=10), (4)femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n=6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n=7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (DeltaLBF 7.4 +/- 0.7 l min(-1)), cardiac output (Delta (.)Q 8.7 +/- 0.7 l min(-1)), mean arterial pressure (DeltaMAP 51 +/- 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and (.)VO2 . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in (.)Q , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast,femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, (.)Q or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.7 +/- 0.1 l min(-1)), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for approximately 5% of peak exercise hyperaemia.Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.5-0.7 l min(-1)) without altering (.)Q, MAP or (.)VO2. These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure,stroke volume and (.)Q or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans.Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  1. Calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase: complex kinetic mechanism, hydrolysis of 7-methylguanosine, and oligomeric state in solution.

    PubMed

    Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2002-04-29

    The active enzyme form was found to be a homotrimer, no active monomers were observed. Only in the presence of an extremely high orthophosphate concentration (0.5 M) or at a low enzyme concentration (0.2 microg/ml) with no ligands present a small fraction of the enzyme is probably in a dissociated and/or non-active form. The specific activity is invariant over a broad enzyme concentration range (0.017 microg/ml-0.29 mg/ml). At concentrations below 0.9 microg/ml and in the absence of ligands the enzyme tends to loose its catalytic activity, while in the presence of any substrate or at higher concentrations it was found to be active as a trimer. In the absence of phosphate the enzyme catalyses the hydrolysis of 7-methylguanosine (m7Guo) with a catalytic rate constant 1.3x10(-3) x s(-1) as compared with the rate of 38 s(-1) for the phosphorolysis of this nucleoside. The initial pre-steady-state phase of the phosphorolysis of m7Guo, 70 s(-1), is almost twice faster than the steady-state rate and indicates that the rate-limiting step is subsequent to the glycosidic bond cleavage. Complex kinetic behaviour with substrates of phosphorolytic direction (various nucleosides and orthophosphate) was observed; data for phosphate as the variable substrate with inosine and guanosine, but not with their 7-methyl counterparts, might be interpreted as two binding sites with different affinities, or as a negative cooperativity. However, the titration of the enzyme intrinsic fluorescence with 0.2 microM-30 mM phosphate is consistent with only one dissociation constant for phosphate, K(d)=220+/-120 microM. Protective effects of ligands on the thermal inactivation of the enzyme indicate that all substrates of the phosphorolytic and the synthetic reactions are able to form binary complexes with the calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The purine bases, guanine and hypoxanthine, bind strongly with dissociation constants of about 0.1 microM, while all other ligands studied

  2. Kinetics and thermochemistry of hydrolysis mechanism of a novel anticancer agent trans-[PtCl2(dimethylamine)(isopropylamine)]: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Iftikar; Gour, N. K.; Deka, Ramesh Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical investigation has been made on the hydrolysis mechanism of a novel transplatin anticancer agent trans-[PtCl2(dimethylamine)(isopropylamine)] in gas as well as aqueous phases using DFT method. The transition state geometries along with other stationary points on potential energy surface are optimized and characterized. The calculated activation barrier and the predicted relative free energies for the two successive steps are in good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. The rate constants are calculated using Eyring equation and results show that the second step is the rate-limiting process having higher activation energy compared to that of the first step.

  3. [The role of adenosine Al receptors and mitochondrial K+ATP channels in the mechanism of increasing the resistance to acute hypoxia in the combined effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia].

    PubMed

    Tregub, P P; Kulikov, V P; Stepanova, L A; Zabrodina, A S; Nagibaeva, M E

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of the role of mitoK+ATp channels and Al-adenosine receptor in the mechanism of increasing the resistance to acute hypoxia after hypoxic, hypercapnic and hypercapnic-hypoxic preconditioning. It is shown that mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels and Al-adenosine receptors, an important mechanism of preconditioning have a high value to increase the resistance to acute hypoxia/ischemia in the combined effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia. However, with regard to the adenosine receptor, this mechanism is realized without the participation hypercapnic component, which apparently starts neuroprotection without activation of the adenosine Al receptors. PMID:25980226

  4. Red Wine Inhibits Aggregation and Increases ATP-diphosphohydrolase (CD39) Activity of Rat Platelets in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Tedesco, Idolo; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-06-01

    Moderate consumption of red wine has been shown to exert a peculiar cardioprotective effect compared with other alcoholic beverages; inhibition of platelet aggregation seems to be one of the mechanisms underlying this beneficial effect. CD39/ATP-diphosphohydrolase is an integral membrane glycoprotein metabolizing ATP and ADP to AMP; in concert with CD73/ecto-5'-nucleotidase, it contributes to extracellular adenosine accumulation. CD39 is considered a key modulator of thrombus formation; it inhibits platelet aggregation by promoting ADP hydrolysis. There is evidence that red wine consumption increases CD39 activity in platelets from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Here we show that two kinds of Aglianico red wines inhibit aggregation and increase ATP--and ADPase activity in rat platelets. PMID:27534113

  5. ATP regulation in bioproduction.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-12-10

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is consumed as a biological energy source by many intracellular reactions. Thus, the intracellular ATP supply is required to maintain cellular homeostasis. The dependence on the intracellular ATP supply is a critical factor in bioproduction by cell factories. Recent studies have shown that changing the ATP supply is critical for improving product yields. In this review, we summarize the recent challenges faced by researchers engaged in the development of engineered cell factories, including the maintenance of a large ATP supply and the production of cell factories. The strategies used to enhance ATP supply are categorized as follows: addition of energy substrates, controlling pH, metabolic engineering of ATP-generating or ATP-consuming pathways, and controlling reactions of the respiratory chain. An enhanced ATP supply generated using these strategies improves target production through increases in resource uptake, cell growth, biosynthesis, export of products, and tolerance to toxic compounds.

  6. Phenazine redox cycling enhances anaerobic survival in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by facilitating generation of ATP and a proton-motive force

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Nathaniel R.; Kern, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary While many studies have explored the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, comparatively few have focused on its survival. Previously, we reported that endogenous phenazines support the anaerobic survival of P. aeruginosa, yet the physiological mechanism underpinning survival was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that phenazine redox cycling enables P. aeruginosa to oxidize glucose and pyruvate into acetate, which promotes survival by coupling acetate and ATP synthesis through the activity of acetate kinase. By measuring intracellular NAD(H) and ATP concentrations, we show that survival is correlated with ATP synthesis, which is tightly coupled to redox homeostasis during pyruvate fermentation but not during arginine fermentation. We also show that ATP hydrolysis is required to generate a proton-motive force using the ATP synthase complex during fermentation. Together, our results suggest that phenazines enable maintenance of the proton-motive force by promoting redox homeostasis and ATP synthesis. This work demonstrates the more general principle that extracellular redox-active molecules, such as phenazines, can broaden the metabolic versatility of microorganisms by facilitating energy generation. PMID:24612454

  7. Nerve growth factor stimulates the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol in PC-12 cells: A mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, B.L.; Saltiel, A.R. ); Chao, M.V. )

    1989-03-01

    Treatment of PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) results in the differentiation of these cells into a sympathetic neuron-like phenotype. Although the initial intracellular signals elicited by NGF remain unknown, some of the cellular effects of NGF are similar to those of other growth factors, such as insulin. The authors have investigated the involvement of a newly identified inositol-containing glycolipid in signal transduction for the actions of NGF. NGF stimulates the rapid generation of a species of diacylglycerol that is labeled with ({sup 3}H)myristate but not with ({sup 3}H)arachidonate. NGF stimulates ({sup 3}H)myristate- or ({sup 32}P)phosphate-labeled phosphatidic acid production over the same time course. Although NGF alone has no effect on the turnover of inositol phospholipids, it does stimulate the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The NGF-dependent cleavage of this lipid is accompanied by an increase in the accumulation of its polar head group, an inositol phosphate glycan, which is generated within 30-60 sec of NGF treatment. In an unresponsive PC-12 mutant cell line, neither the diacylglycerol nor inositol phosphate glycan response is detected. A possible role for the NGF-stimulated diacylglycerol is suggested by the inhibition of NGF-dependent c-fos induction by staurosporin, a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C. These results suggest that, like insulin, some of the cellular effects of NGF may be mediated by the phospholipase C-catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol.

  8. Extracellular ATP protects endothelial cells against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Aho, Joonas; Helenius, Mikko; Vattulainen-Collanus, Sanna; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Koskenvuo, Juha

    2016-09-01

    Cell damage can lead to rapid release of ATP to extracellular space resulting in dramatic change in local ATP concentration. Evolutionary, this has been considered as a danger signal leading to adaptive responses in adjacent cells. Our aim was to demonstrate that elevated extracellular ATP or inhibition of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1/CD39) activity could be used to increase tolerance against DNA-damaging conditions. Human endothelial cells, with increased extracellular ATP concentration in cell proximity, were more resistant to irradiation or chemically induced DNA damage evaluated with the DNA damage markers γH2AX and phosphorylated p53. In our rat models of DNA damage, inhibiting CD39-driven ATP hydrolysis with POM-1 protected the heart and lung tissues against chemically induced DNA damage. Interestingly, the phenomenon could not be replicated in cancer cells. Our results show that transient increase in extracellular ATP can promote resistance to DNA damage.

  9. Embryopathic effects of thalidomide and its hydrolysis products in rabbit embryo culture: evidence for a prostaglandin H synthase (PHS)-dependent, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Crystal J J; Gonçalves, Luisa L; Wells, Peter G

    2011-07-01

    Thalidomide (TD) causes birth defects in humans and rabbits via several potential mechanisms, including bioactivation by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) enzymes to a reactive intermediate that enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We show herein that TD in rabbit embryo culture produces relevant embryopathies, including decreases in head/brain development by 28% and limb bud growth by 71% (P<0.05). Two TD hydrolysis products, 2-phthalimidoglutaramic acid (PGMA) and 2-phthalimidoglutaric acid (PGA), were similarly embryopathic, attenuating otic vesicle (ear) and limb bud formation by up to 36 and 77%, respectively (P<0.05). TD, PGMA, and PGA all increased embryonic DNA oxidation measured as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) by up to 2-fold (P<0.05). Co- or pretreatment with the PHS inhibitors eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), or the free-radical spin trap phenylbutylnitrone (PBN), completely blocked embryonic 8-oxoG formation and/or embryopathies initiated by TD, PGMA, and PGA. This is the first demonstration of limb bud embryopathies initiated by TD, as well as its hydrolysis products, in a mammalian embryo culture model of a species susceptible to TD in vivo, indicating that all likely contribute to TD teratogenicity in vivo, in part through PHS-dependent, ROS-mediated mechanisms.

  10. Interaction of ATP with a Small Heat Shock Protein from Mycobacterium leprae: Effect on Its Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Panda, Alok Kumar; Sinha Ray, Sougata; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is an important phosphate metabolite abundantly found in Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. This pathogen does not derive ATP from its host but has its own mechanism for the generation of ATP. Interestingly, this molecule as well as several antigenic proteins act as bio-markers for the detection of leprosy. One such bio-marker is the 18 kDa antigen. This 18 kDa antigen is a small heat shock protein (HSP18) whose molecular chaperone function is believed to help in the growth and survival of the pathogen. But, no evidences of interaction of ATP with HSP18 and its effect on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are available in the literature. Here, we report for the first time evidences of “HSP18-ATP” interaction and its consequences on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18. TNP-ATP binding experiment and surface plasmon resonance measurement showed that HSP18 interacts with ATP with a sub-micromolar binding affinity. Comparative sequence alignment between M. leprae HSP18 and αB-crystallin identified the sequence 49KADSLDIDIE58 of HSP18 as the Walker-B ATP binding motif. Molecular docking studies revealed that β4-β8 groove/strands as an ATP interactive region in M. leprae HSP18. ATP perturbs the tertiary structure of HSP18 mildly and makes it less susceptible towards tryptic cleavage. ATP triggers exposure of additional hydrophobic patches at the surface of HSP18 and induces more stability against chemical and thermal denaturation. In vitro aggregation and thermal inactivation assays clearly revealed that ATP enhances the chaperone function of HSP18. Our studies also revealed that the alteration in the chaperone function of HSP18 is reversible and is independent of ATP hydrolysis. As the availability and binding of ATP to HSP18 regulates its chaperone function, this functional inflection may play an important role in the survival of M. leprae in hosts. PMID:25811190

  11. Mechanism of the positive effect of poly(ethylene glycol) addition in enzymatic hydrolysis of steam pretreated lignocelluloses.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Bálint; Szilágyi, Mátyás; Sebestyén, Zoltán; Perazzini, Raffaella; Dienes, Dóra; Jakab, Emma; Crestini, Claudia; Réczey, Kati

    2011-11-01

    The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulses can be increased by addition of surfactants and polymers, such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The effect of PEG addition on the cellulase adsorption was tested on various steam pretreated lignocellulose substrates (spruce, willow, hemp, corn stover, wheat straw, sweet sorghum bagasse). A positive effect of PEG addition was observed, as protein adsorption has decreased and free enzyme activities (FP, β-glucosidase) have increased due to the additive. However, the degree of enhancement differed among the substrates, being highest on steam pretreated spruce. Results of lignin analysis (pyrolysis-GC/MS, (31)P NMR) suggest that the effect of PEG addition is in connection with the amount of unsubstituted phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin in the substrate. Adsorption experiments using two commercial enzyme preparations, Celluclast 1.5L (Trichoderma reesei cellulase) and Novozym 188 (Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase) suggested that enzyme origins affected on the adsorptivity of β-glucosidases.

  12. Concentration gradient effects of sodium and lithium ions and deuterium isotope effects on the activities of H+-ATP synthase from chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, M-F; Wang, J-D; Su, T-M

    2009-03-18

    We explored the concentration gradient effects of the sodium and lithium ions and the deuterium isotope's effects on the activities of H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF(0)F(1)). We found that the sodium concentration gradient can drive the ATP synthesis reaction of CF(0)F(1). In contrast, the lithium ion can be an efficient enzyme-inhibitor by blocking the entrance channel of the ion translocation pathway in CF(0). In the presence of sodium or lithium ions and with the application of a membrane potential, unexpected enzyme behaviors of CF(0)F(1) were evident. To account for these observations, we propose that both of the sodium and lithium ions could undergo localized hydrolysis reactions in the chemical environment of the ion channel of CF(0). The protons generated locally could proceed to complete the ion translocation process in the ATP synthesis reaction of CF(0)F(1). Experimental and theoretical deuterium isotope effects of the localized hydrolysis on the activities of CF(0)F(1), and the energetics of these related reactions, support this proposed mechanism. Our experimental observations could be understood in the framework of the well-established ion translocation models for the H(+)-ATP synthase from Escherichia coli, and the Na(+)-ATP synthase from Propionigenium modestum and Ilyobacter tartaricus.

  13. Analysis of solvent nucleophile isotope effects: evidence for concerted mechanisms and nucleophilic activation by metal coordination in nonenzymatic and ribozyme-catalyzed phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Adam G; Anderson, Vernon E; Harris, Michael E

    2004-08-17

    Heavy atom isotope effects are a valuable tool for probing chemical and enzymatic reaction mechanisms; yet, they are not widely applied to examine mechanisms of nucleophilic activation. We developed approaches for analyzing solvent (18)O nucleophile isotope effects ((18)k(nuc)) that allow, for the first time, their application to hydrolysis reactions of nucleotides and nucleic acids. Here, we report (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester hydrolysis catalyzed by Mg(2+) and by the Mg(2+)-dependent RNase P ribozyme and deamination by the Zn(2+)-dependent protein enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA). Because ADA incorporates a single solvent molecule into the product inosine, this reaction can be used to monitor solvent (18)O/(16)O ratios in complex reaction mixtures. This approach, combined with new methods for analysis of isotope ratios of nucleotide phosphates by whole molecule mass spectrometry, permitted determination of (18)k(nuc) for hydrolysis of thymidine 5'-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and RNA cleavage by the RNase P ribozyme. For ADA, an inverse (18)k(nuc) of 0.986 +/- 0.001 is observed, reflecting coordination of the nucleophile by an active site Zn(2+) ion and a stepwise mechanism. In contrast, the observed (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester reactions were normal: 1.027 +/- 0.013 and 1.030 +/- 0.012 for the Mg(2+)- and ribozyme-catalyzed reactions, respectively. Such normal effects indicate that nucleophilic attack occurs in the rate-limiting step for these reactions, consistent with concerted mechanisms. However, these magnitudes are significantly less than the (18)k(nuc) observed for nucleophilic attack by hydroxide (1.068 +/- 0.007), indicating a "stiffer" bonding environment for the nucleophile in the transition state. Kinetic analysis of the Mg(2+)-catalyzed reaction indicates that a Mg(2+)-hydroxide complex is the catalytic species; thus, the lower (18)k(nuc), in large part, reflects direct metal ion coordination of the nucleophilic oxygen. A similar value for the RNase P

  14. An inkjet-printed bioactive paper sensor that reports ATP through odour generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuyuan; Wang, Jingyun; Ng, Robin; Li, Yingfu; Wu, Zaisheng; Leung, Vincent; Imbrogno, Spencer; Pelton, Robert; Brennan, John D; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2014-10-01

    We describe an inkjet printed paper-based sensor that reports ATP by the enzyme catalysed hydrolysis of S-methyl-L-cysteine generating an odour (methyl mercaptan) that is easily detectable by the human nose.

  15. Mechanism of muscarinic receptor-induced K+ channel activation as revealed by hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gk) in the coupling between muscarinic receptor activation and opening of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel [IK(M)] was examined in cardiac atrial myocytes, using hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues. In the absence of muscarinic agonist, GTP analogues produced a membrane current characteristic of IK(M). The initial rate of appearance of this receptor-independent IK(M) was measured for the various analogues in order to explore the kinetic properties of IK(M) activation. We found that IK(M) activation is controlled solely by the intracellular analogue/GTP ratio and not by the absolute concentrations of the nucleotides. Analogues competed with GTP for binding to Gk with the following relative affinities: GTP gamma S greater than GTP greater than GppNHp greater than GppCH2p. At sufficiently high intracellular concentrations, however, all GTP analogues produced the same rate of IK(M) activation. This analogue- independent limiting rate is likely to correspond to the rate of GDP release from inactive, GDP-bound Gk. Muscarinic receptor stimulation by nanomolar concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), which do not elicit IK(M) under control conditions, catalyzed IK(M) activation in the presence of GTP analogues. The rate of Gk activation by ACh (kACh) was found to be described by the simple relationship kACh = 8.4 X 10(8) min- 1 M-1.[ACh] + 0.44 min-1, the first term of which presumably reflects the agonist-catalyzed rate of GDP release from the Gk.GDP complex, while the second term corresponds to the basal rate of receptor- independent GDP release. Combined with the estimated K0.5 of the IK(M)- [ACh] dose-effect relationship, 160 nM, this result also allowed us to estimate the rate of Gk.GTP hydrolysis, kcat, to be near 135 min-1. These results provide, for the first time, a quantitative description of the salient features of G-protein function in vivo. PMID:2455765

  16. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity. PMID:26717941

  17. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity.

  18. Energy Conversion by Molecular Motors Coupled to Nucleotide Hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Liepelt, Steffen; Valleriani, Angelo

    2009-06-01

    Recent theoretical work on the energy conversion by molecular motors coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis is reviewed. The most abundant nucleotide is provided by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which is cleaved into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. The motors have several catalytic domains (or active sites), each of which can be empty or occupied by ATP or ADP. The chemical composition of all catalytic domains defines distinct nucleotide states of the motor which form a discrete state space. Each of these motor states is connected to several other states via chemical transitions. For stepping motors such as kinesin, which walk along cytoskeletal filaments, some motor states are also connected by mechanical transitions, during which the motor is displaced along the filament and able to perform mechanical work. The different motor states together with the possible chemical and mechanical transitions provide a network representation for the chemomechanical coupling of the motor molecule. The stochastic motor dynamics on these networks exhibits several distinct motor cycles, which represent the dominant pathways for different regimes of nucleotide concentrations and load force. For the kinesin motor, the competition of two such cycles determines the stall force, at which the motor velocity vanishes and the motor reverses its direction of motion. In general, kinesin is found to be governed by the competition of three distinct chemomechanical cycles. The corresponding network representation provides a unified description for all motor properties that have been determined by single molecule experiments.

  19. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-15

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP](c)) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of K(ATP) channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mM) caused no detectable increase in [ATP](c), monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25-luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mM) with a significant increase in [ATP](c). Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mM glucose with increases in [ATP](c). Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of K(ATP) channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mM) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mM) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mM lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP](c). High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed K(ATP) channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells.

  20. Nuclear genetic defects of mitochondrial ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Hejzlarová, K; Mráček, T; Vrbacký, M; Kaplanová, V; Karbanová, V; Nůsková, H; Pecina, P; Houštěk, J

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of ATP synthase, the key enzyme of mitochondrial energy provision belong to the most severe metabolic diseases presenting as early-onset mitochondrial encephalo-cardiomyopathies. Up to now, mutations in four nuclear genes were associated with isolated deficiency of ATP synthase. Two of them, ATP5A1 and ATP5E encode enzyme's structural subunits alpha and epsilon, respectively, while the other two ATPAF2 and TMEM70 encode specific ancillary factors that facilitate the biogenesis of ATP synthase. All these defects share a similar biochemical phenotype with pronounced decrease in the content of fully assembled and functional ATP synthase complex. However, substantial differences can be found in their frequency, molecular mechanism of pathogenesis, clinical manifestation as well as the course of the disease progression. While for TMEM70 the number of reported patients as well as spectrum of the mutations is steadily increasing, mutations in ATP5A1, ATP5E and ATPAF2 genes are very rare. Apparently, TMEM70 gene is highly prone to mutagenesis and this type of a rare mitochondrial disease has a rather frequent incidence. Here we present overview of individual reported cases of nuclear mutations in ATP synthase and discuss, how their analysis can improve our understanding of the enzyme biogenesis.

  1. Empirical valence bond simulations of the chemical mechanism of ATP to cAMP conversion by anthrax edema factor.

    PubMed

    Mones, Letif; Tang, Wei-Jen; Florián, Jan

    2013-04-16

    The two-metal catalysis by the adenylyl cyclase domain of the anthrax edema factor toxin was simulated using the empirical valence bond (EVB) quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical approach. These calculations considered the energetics of the nucleophile deprotonation and the formation of a new P-O bond in aqueous solution and in the enzyme-substrate complex present in the crystal structure models of the reactant and product states of the reaction. Our calculations support a reaction pathway that involves metal-assisted transfer of a proton from the nucleophile to the bulk aqueous solution followed by subsequent formation of an unstable pentavalent intermediate that decomposes into cAMP and pyrophosphate (PPi). This pathway involves ligand exchange in the first solvation sphere of the catalytic metal. At 12.9 kcal/mol, the barrier for the last step of the reaction, the cleavage of the P-O bond to PPi, corresponds to the highest point on the free energy profile for this reaction pathway. However, this energy is too close to the value of 11.4 kcal/mol calculated for the barrier of the nucleophilic attack step to reach a definitive conclusion about the rate-limiting step. The calculated reaction mechanism is supported by reasonable agreement between the experimental and calculated catalytic rate constant decrease caused by the mutation of the active site lysine 346 to arginine.

  2. Regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase in cardiac pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Long, Qinqiang; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Qinglin

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is paramount to energy homeostasis, metabolism, signaling, and apoptosis in cells. Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase), a molecular motor, is the ultimate ATP generator and a key determinant of mitochondrial function. ATP synthase catalyzes the final coupling step of oxidative phosphorylation to supply energy in the form of ATP. Alterations at this step will crucially impact mitochondrial respiration and hence cardiac performance. It is well established that cardiac contractility is strongly dependent on the mitochondria, and that myocardial ATP depletion is a key feature of heart failure. ATP synthase dysfunction can cause and exacerbate human diseases, such as cardiomyopathy and heart failure. While ATP synthase has been extensively studied, essential questions related to how the regulation of ATP synthase determines energy metabolism in the heart linger and therapies targeting this important mechanism remain scarce. This review will visit the main findings, identify unsolved issues and provide insights into potential future perspectives related to the regulation of ATP synthase and cardiac pathophysiology.

  3. Effects of an ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-[α-thio]-triphosphate, on F1-ATPase rotary catalysis, torque generation, and inhibited intermediated formation.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-13

    F1-ATPase (F1), an important rotary motor protein, converts the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical energy using rotary motion with extremely high efficiency. The energy-conversion mechanism for this molecular motor has been extensively clarified by previous studies, which indicate that the interactions between the catalytic residues and the β- and γ-phosphates of ATP are indispensable for efficient catalysis and torque generation. However, the role of α-phosphate is largely unknown. In this study, we observed the rotation of F1 fuelled with an ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-[α-thio]-triphosphate (ATPαS), in which the oxygen has been substituted with a sulfur ion to perturb the α-phosphate/F1 interactions. In doing so, we have revealed that ATPαS does not appear to have any impact on the kinetic properties of the motor or on torque generation compared to ATP. On the other hand, F1 was observed to lapse into the ADP-inhibited intermediate states when in the presence of ATPαS more severely than in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the α-phosphate group of ATP contributes to the avoidance of ADP-inhibited intermediate formation.

  4. Structural characterization of weakly attached cross-bridges in the A*M*ATP state in permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Gu, J; Melvin, G; Yu, L C

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that in a skeletal muscle under relaxing conditions, cross-bridges exist in a mixture of four weak binding states in equilibrium (A*M*ATP, A*M*ADP*P(i), M*ATP, and M*ADP*P(i)). It has been shown that these four weak binding states are in the pathway to force generation. In the past their structural, biochemical, and mechanical properties have been characterized as a group. However, it was shown that the myosin heads in the M*ATP state exhibited a disordered distribution along the thick filament, while in the M*ADP*P(i) state they were well ordered. It follows that the structures of the weakly attached states of A*M*ATP and A*M*ADP*P(i) could well be different. Individual structures of the two attached states could not be assigned because protocol for isolating the two states has not been available until recently. In the present study, muscle fibers are reacted with N-phenylmaleimide such that ATP hydrolysis is inhibited, i.e., the cross-bridge population under relaxing conditions is distributed only between the two states of M*ATP and A*M*ATP. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction was applied to determine the structural characteristics of the attached A*M*ATP state. Because the detached state of M*ATP is disordered and does not contribute to layer line intensities, changes as a result of increasing attachment in the A*M*ATP state are attributable to that state alone. The equilibrium toward the attached state was achieved by lowering the ionic strength. The results show that upon attachment, both the myosin and the first actin associated layer lines increased intensities, while the sixth actin layer line was not significantly affected. However, the intensities remain weak despite substantial attachment. The results, together with modeling (see J. Gu, S. Xu and L. C. Yu, 2002, Biophys. J. 82:2123-2133), suggest that there is a wide range of orientation of the attached A*M*ATP cross-bridges while the myosin heads maintain some degree of helical

  5. A theoretical investigation on hydrolysis mechanism of biologically relevant Pt(II)/Pd(II) complexes with σ-donor and π-acceptor carrier ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy B., Venkata P.; Mitra, Ishani; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Sengupta, P. S.; Dodda, Subba Reddy; Moi, Sankar Ch.

    2016-07-01

    The hydrolysis mechanism of cytotoxic agents complex 1 cis-[Pt(pic)Cl2] and complex 2 cis-[Pd(pic)Cl2] (where pic = 2-aminomethylpyridine) have been studied in solvent phase using DFT. The stationary states on potential energy surfaces were fully optimized and characterized. The rate constants and activation parameters of both the substitution processes has been calculated in CPCM model and the values were found to be k1 = 3.29 × 10-4 s-1, k2 = 8.88 × 10-9 s-1 for complex 1 and k1 = 0.13 × 10-1 s-1, k2 = 2.0 × 10-10 s-1 for complex 2 respectively. The second step is the rate-limiting process having higher activation energy compared to that of the first step for both the complexes.

  6. Cooperative binding of ATP and RNA induces a closed conformation in a DEAD box RNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Theissen, Bettina; Karow, Anne R; Köhler, Jürgen; Gubaev, Airat; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2008-01-15

    RNA helicases couple the energy from ATP hydrolysis with structural changes of their RNA substrates. DEAD box helicases form the largest class of RNA helicases and share a helicase core comprising two RecA-like domains. An opening and closing of the interdomain cleft during RNA unwinding has been postulated but not shown experimentally. Single-molecule FRET experiments with the Bacillus subtilis DEAD box helicase YxiN carrying donor and acceptor fluorophores on different sides of the interdomain cleft reveal an open helicase conformation in the absence of nucleotides, or in the presence of ATP, or ADP, or RNA. In the presence of ADP and RNA, the open conformation is retained. By contrast, cooperative binding of ATP and RNA leads to a compact helicase structure, proving that the ATP- and ADP-bound states of RNA helicases display substantially different structures only when the RNA substrate is bound. These results establish a closure of the interdomain cleft in the helicase core at the beginning of the unwinding reaction, and suggest a conserved mechanism of energy conversion among DEAD box helicases across kingdoms.

  7. Mechanics of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Koen

    2001-03-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy into work by mechanisms that researchers are just starting to uncover. We have studied the coupling of chemistry to mechanics for kinesin, a motor protein that moves in a stepwise fashion along microtubules and is energized by the hydrolysis of ATP. Velocities of individual kinesin molecules at varying ATP concentrations and loads were recorded using a molecular force cl& a feedback-driven optical trap, which maintains constant loads on individual moving motor molecules. These measurements showed that kinesin requires only a single ATP molecule per mechanical step, and revealed the load-dependant biochemical transitions in the kinesin cycle where conformational changes are likely to occur. Modeling of the velocity data showed that kinesin mechanochemistry can be characterized by a mechanism that involves a thermally-activated and load-dependent isomerization directly following ATP binding. The model quantitatively accounts for velocity data over a wide range of loads and ATP concentrations, and indicates that movement may be accomplished through two sequential, non-identical, 4-nm sized substeps.

  8. Mot1 regulates the DNA binding activity of free TATA-binding protein in an ATP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Darst, Russell P; Dasgupta, Arindam; Zhu, Chunming; Hsu, Jer-Yuan; Vroom, Amy; Muldrow, Tamara; Auble, David T

    2003-04-11

    Mot1 is an essential Snf2/Swi2-related Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein that binds the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and removes TBP from DNA using ATP hydrolysis. Mot1 functions in vivo both as a repressor and as an activator of transcription. Mot1 catalysis of TBP.DNA disruption is consistent with its function as a repressor, but the Mot1 mechanism of activation is unknown. To better understand the physiologic role of Mot1 and its enzymatic mechanism, MOT1 mutants were generated and tested for activity in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrate a close correlation between the TBP.DNA disruption activity of Mot1 and its essential in vivo function. Previous results demonstrated a large overlap in the gene sets controlled by Mot1 and NC2. Mot1 and NC2 can co-occupy TBP.DNA in vitro, and NC2 binding does not impair Mot1-catalyzed disruption of the complex. Residues on the DNA-binding surface of TBP are important for Mot1 binding and the Mot1.TBP binary complex binds very poorly to DNA and does not dissociate in the presence of ATP. However, the binary complex binds DNA well in the presence of the transition state analog ADP-AlF(4). A model for Mot1 action is proposed in which ATP hydrolysis causes the Mot1 N terminus to displace the TATA box, leading to ejection of Mot1 and TBP from DNA. PMID:12571241

  9. Transmembrane gate movements in the type II ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importer BtuCD-F during nucleotide cycle.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Benesh; Jeschke, Gunnar; Goetz, Birke A; Locher, Kaspar P; Bordignon, Enrica

    2011-11-25

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous integral membrane proteins that translocate substrates across cell membranes. The alternating access of their transmembrane domains to opposite sides of the membrane powered by the closure and reopening of the nucleotide binding domains is proposed to drive the translocation events. Despite clear structural similarities, evidence for considerable mechanistic diversity starts to accumulate within the importers subfamily. We present here a detailed study of the gating mechanism of a type II ABC importer, the BtuCD-F vitamin B(12) importer from Escherichia coli, elucidated by EPR spectroscopy. Distance changes at key positions in the translocation gates in the nucleotide-free, ATP- and ADP-bound conformations of the transporter were measured in detergent micelles and liposomes. The translocation gates of the BtuCD-F complex undergo conformational changes in line with a "two-state" alternating access model. We provide the first direct evidence that binding of ATP drives the gates to an inward-facing conformation, in contrast to type I importers specific for maltose, molybdate, or methionine. Following ATP hydrolysis, the translocation gates restore to an apo-like conformation. In the presence of ATP, an excess of vitamin B(12) promotes the reopening of the gates toward the periplasm and the dislodgment of BtuF from the transporter. The EPR data allow a productive translocation cycle of the vitamin B(12) transporter to be modeled.

  10. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities. PMID:27638696

  11. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities.

  12. General quantum-mechanical study on the hydrolysis equilibria for a tetravalent aquaion: the extreme case of the Po(IV) in water.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Regla; Martínez, José M; Pappalardo, Rafael R; Muñoz Páez, Adela; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2009-01-15

    A systematic study of the different hydrolyzed species derived from the hydrated Po(IV) in water, [Po(H(2)O)(n)(OH)(m)]((4-m)) for 1 m 4, and 4 m + n 9, has been carried out by means of quantum mechanical computations. The effects of outer solvation shells have been included using a polarizable continuum dielectric model. For a fixed number of hydroxyl groups, the preferred hydration number for the Po(IV) can be determined in terms of Gibbs energy. It is shown that the hydration number (n) systematically decreases with the increase in the number of hydroxyl groups (m) in such a way the total coordination number (n + m) becomes smaller, being 9 in the aquocomplex and 4 in the neutral hydroxo-complex. Free energies for the hydrolysis processes involving Po(IV) complexes and a different number of hydroxyl groups have been computed, revealing the strong tendency toward hydrolysis exhibited by these complexes. The predominant species of Po(IV) in aqueous solutions are ruled by a dynamical equilibrium involving aggregates containing in the first coordination shell OH(-) groups and water molecules. Although there is not experimental information to check the theoretical predictions, theoretical computations in solution seem to suggest that the most likely clusters are [Po(H(2)O)(5)(OH)(2)](2+) and [Po(H(2)O)(4)(OH)(2)](2+). The geometry of the different clusters is ruled by the trend of hydroxyl groups to be mutually orthogonal and to promote a strong perturbation of the water molecule in trans-position by lengthening the Po-H(2)O distances and tilting the corresponding bond angle. A general thermodynamic cycle is defined to compute the Gibbs free energy associated to the formation of the different hydrolyzed forms in solution. From it, the estimates of pK(a) values associated to the different protolytic equilibria are provided and discussed. Comparison of the relative values of pK(a) along a hydrolysis series with the experimental values for other tetravalent cations

  13. The molecular mechanisms of sodium metabisulfite on the expression of K ATP and L-Ca2+ channels in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanxi; Bai, Yunlong; Yang, Zhenhua; Tian, Jingjing; Meng, Ziqiang

    2015-08-01

    Sodium metabisulfite (SMB) is used as an antioxidant and antimicrobial agent in a variety of drugs and foods. However, there are few reported studies about its side effects. This study is to investigate the SMB effects on the expression of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) and L-type calcium (L-Ca(2+)) channels in rat hearts. The results show that the mRNA and protein levels of the KATP channel subunits Kir6.2 and SUR2A were increased by SMB; on the contrary, SMB at 520 mg/kg significantly decreased the expression of the L-Ca(2+) channel subunits Cav1.2 and Cav1.3. This suggests that SMB can activate the expression of KATP channel by increasing the mRNA and protein levels of Kir6.2 and SUR2A, while it inhibits the expression of L-Ca(2+) channels by decreasing the mRNA and protein levels of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 in rat hearts. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of the SMB effect on rat hearts might be related to the increased expression of KATP channels and the decreased expression of L-Ca(2+) channels.

  14. The molecular mechanisms of sodium metabisulfite on the expression of K ATP and L-Ca2+ channels in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanxi; Bai, Yunlong; Yang, Zhenhua; Tian, Jingjing; Meng, Ziqiang

    2015-08-01

    Sodium metabisulfite (SMB) is used as an antioxidant and antimicrobial agent in a variety of drugs and foods. However, there are few reported studies about its side effects. This study is to investigate the SMB effects on the expression of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) and L-type calcium (L-Ca(2+)) channels in rat hearts. The results show that the mRNA and protein levels of the KATP channel subunits Kir6.2 and SUR2A were increased by SMB; on the contrary, SMB at 520 mg/kg significantly decreased the expression of the L-Ca(2+) channel subunits Cav1.2 and Cav1.3. This suggests that SMB can activate the expression of KATP channel by increasing the mRNA and protein levels of Kir6.2 and SUR2A, while it inhibits the expression of L-Ca(2+) channels by decreasing the mRNA and protein levels of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 in rat hearts. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of the SMB effect on rat hearts might be related to the increased expression of KATP channels and the decreased expression of L-Ca(2+) channels. PMID:26015265

  15. Long-term ritonavir exposure increases fatty acid and glycerol recycling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compensatory mechanisms for increased triacylglycerol hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Adler-Wailes, Diane C; Guiney, Evan L; Wolins, Nathan E; Yanovski, Jack A

    2010-05-01

    Lipodystrophy with high nonesterified fatty acid (FA) efflux is reported in humans receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat HIV infection. Ritonavir, a common component of HAART, alters adipocyte FA efflux, but the mechanism for this effect is not established. To investigate ritonavir-induced changes in FA flux and recycling through acylglycerols, we exposed differentiated murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes to ritonavir for 14 d. FA efflux, uptake, and incorporation into acylglycerols were measured. To identify a mediator of FA efflux, we measured adipocyte triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) transcript and protein. To determine whether ritonavir-treated adipocytes increased glycerol backbone synthesis for FA reesterification, we measured labeled glycerol and pyruvate incorporation into triacylglycerol (TAG). Ritonavir-treated cells had increased FA efflux, uptake, and incorporation into TAG (all P < 0.01). Ritonavir increased FA efflux without consistently increasing glycerol release or changing TAG mass, suggesting increased partial TAG hydrolysis. Ritonavir-treated adipocytes expressed significantly more ATGL mRNA (P < 0.05) and protein (P < 0.05). Ritonavir increased glycerol (P < 0.01) but not pyruvate (P = 0.41), utilization for TAG backbone synthesis. Consistent with this substrate utilization, glycerol kinase transcript (required for glycerol incorporation into TAG backbone) was up-regulated (P < 0.01), whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript (required for pyruvate utilization) was down-regulated (P < 0.001). In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, long-term ritonavir exposure perturbs FA metabolism by increasing ATGL-mediated partial TAG hydrolysis, thus increasing FA efflux, and leads to compensatory increases in FA reesterification with glycerol and acylglycerols. These changes in FA metabolism may, in part, explain the increased FA efflux observed in ritonavir-associated lipodystrophy.

  16. The stimulating role of subunit F in ATPase activity inside the A1-complex of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1AO ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhirendra; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Bhushan, Shashi; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    A1AO ATP synthases couple ion-transport of the AO sector and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis of the A3B3-headpiece via their stalk subunits D and F. Here, we produced and purified stable A3B3D- and A3B3DF-complexes of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase as confirmed by electron microscopy. Enzymatic studies with these complexes showed that the M. mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase subunit F is an ATPase activating subunit. The maximum ATP hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of A3B3D and A3B3DF were determined by substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis experiments resulting in a Vmax of 7.9 s(-1) and 30.4 s(-1), respectively, while the KM is the same for both. Deletions of the N- or C-termini of subunit F abolished the effect of ATP hydrolysis activation. We generated subunit F mutant proteins with single amino acid substitutions and demonstrated that the subunit F residues S84 and R88 are important in stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Hybrid formation of the A3B3D-complex with subunit F of the related eukaryotic V-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or subunit ε of the F-ATP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed that subunit F of the archaea and eukaryotic enzymes are important in ATP hydrolysis.

  17. Genomic Analysis of ATP Efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peters, Theodore W; Miller, Aaron W; Tourette, Cendrine; Agren, Hannah; Hubbard, Alan; Hughes, Robert E

    2015-11-19

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays an important role as a primary molecule for the transfer of chemical energy to drive biological processes. ATP also functions as an extracellular signaling molecule in a diverse array of eukaryotic taxa in a conserved process known as purinergic signaling. Given the important roles of extracellular ATP in cell signaling, we sought to comprehensively elucidate the pathways and mechanisms governing ATP efflux from eukaryotic cells. Here, we present results of a genomic analysis of ATP efflux from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring extracellular ATP levels in cultures of 4609 deletion mutants. This screen revealed key cellular processes that regulate extracellular ATP levels, including mitochondrial translation and vesicle sorting in the late endosome, indicating that ATP production and transport through vesicles are required for efflux. We also observed evidence for altered ATP efflux in strains deleted for genes involved in amino acid signaling, and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the retrograde signaling pathway potentiates amino acid signaling to promote mitochondrial respiration. This study advances our understanding of the mechanism of ATP secretion in eukaryotes and implicates TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and nutrient signaling pathways in the regulation of ATP efflux. These results will facilitate analysis of ATP efflux mechanisms in higher eukaryotes.

  18. ATP binding to two sites is necessary for dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains of ABC proteins.

    PubMed

    Zoghbi, Maria E; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2014-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters have a functional unit formed by two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). ATP-bound NBDs dimerize in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides sandwiched at the dimer interface. Both NBDs contribute residues to each of the two nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs) in the dimer. In previous studies, we showed that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii forms ATP-bound dimers that dissociate completely following hydrolysis of one of the two bound ATP molecules. Since hydrolysis of ATP at one NBS is sufficient to drive dimer dissociation, it is unclear why all ABC proteins contain two NBSs. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) to study ATP-induced formation of NBD homodimers containing two NBSs competent for ATP binding, and NBD heterodimers with one active NBS and one binding-defective NBS. The results showed that binding of two ATP molecules is necessary for NBD dimerization. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dissociation, but two binding sites are required to form the ATP-sandwich NBD dimer necessary for hydrolysis.

  19. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  20. Bulk hydrolysis and solid-liquid sorption of heavy metals in multi-component aqueous suspensions containing porous inorganic solids: are these mechanisms competitive or cooperative?

    PubMed

    Prelot, Benedicte; Einhorn, Valery; Marchandeau, Franck; Douillard, Jean-Marc; Zajac, Jerzy

    2012-11-15

    Fundamental aspects of the removal of heavy metals from aqueous streams under conditions of competition among the various species have been studied between pH 3 and 9 on Spherosil XO75LS, ordered mesoporous MCM-41 and MCF silicas, as well as a MCF sample grafted with (3-aminopropyl)methoxydimethylsilane (AMPS-MCF). Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II), or Sr(II) nitrate solutions were used to determine the percentage of metal uptake by each solid at 298 K as a function of the pH of the equilibrium solution, at an initial metal concentration of 0.0001 mol L(-1) and the ionic strength being fixed with 0.01 mol L(-1) NaNO(3). Almost complete retention of the heavy metals on the four solid samples was observed, with the process beginning at pH values smaller than those marking the onset of "bulk" precipitation of a given metal in "free" solution. The heavy metal-uptake mechanism was regarded as hydrolysis-like phenomenon in metal-containing solid suspensions. Weak adsorption of metal species from slightly acidic and neutral solutions was a kind of nucleation step. Adding cadmium to an equimolar solution containing cobalt, lead, or strontium showed no significant effect on the retention of the main metal component. This indicated the great independence of the retention mechanisms.

  1. Hydrolysis mechanisms of BNPP mediated by facial copper(II) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants: cooperation between the metal centers and the guanidine pendants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Liu, Xueping; Phillips, David Lee; Zhao, Cunyuan

    2016-01-28

    The hydrolysis mechanisms of DNA dinucleotide analogue BNPP(-) (bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed by mononuclear/dinuclear facial copper(ii) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Active catalyst forms have been investigated and four different reaction modes are proposed accordingly. The [Cu2(L(1))2(μ-OH)](3+) (L(1) is 1-(2-guanidinoethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) complex features a strong μ-hydroxo mediated antiferromagnetic coupling between the bimetallic centers and the corresponding more stable open-shell singlet state. Three different reaction modes involving two catalysts and a substrate were proposed for L(1) entries and the mode 1 in which an inter-complex nucleophilic attack by a metal bound hydroxide was found to be more favorable. In the L(3)-involved reactions (L(3) is 1-(4-guanidinobutyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane), the reaction mode in which an in-plane intracomplex scissoring-like nucleophilic attack by a Cu(ii)-bound hydroxide was found to be more competitive. The protonated guanidine pendants in each proposed mechanism were found to play crucial roles in stabilizing the reaction structures via hydrogen bonds and in facilitating the departure of the leaving group via electrostatic attraction. The calculated results are consistent with the experimental observations that the Cu(ii)-L(3) complexes are hydrolytically more favorable than their L(1)-involved counterparts. PMID:26688285

  2. Physicochemical factors controlling the activity and energy coupling of an ionic strength-gated ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Akira; Swier, Lotteke J Y M; Stuart, Marc C A; Brouwers, Jos; Helms, Bernd; Poolman, Bert

    2013-10-11

    Cells control their volume through the accumulation of compatible solutes. The bacterial ATP-binding cassette transporter OpuA couples compatible solute uptake to ATP hydrolysis. Here, we study the gating mechanism and energy coupling of OpuA reconstituted in lipid nanodiscs. We show that anionic lipids are essential both for the gating and the energy coupling. The tight coupling between substrate binding on extracellular domains and ATP hydrolysis by cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains allows the study of transmembrane signaling in nanodiscs. From the tight coupling between processes at opposite sides of the membrane, we infer that the ATPase activity of OpuA in nanodiscs reflects solute translocation. Intriguingly, the substrate-dependent, ionic strength-gated ATPase activity of OpuA in nanodiscs is at least an order of magnitude higher than in lipid vesicles (i.e. with identical membrane lipid composition, ionic strength, and nucleotide and substrate concentrations). Even with the chemical components the same, the lateral pressure (profile) of the nanodiscs will differ from that of the vesicles. We thus propose that membrane tension limits translocation in vesicular systems. Increased macromolecular crowding does not activate OpuA but acts synergistically with ionic strength, presumably by favoring gating interactions of like-charged surfaces via excluded volume effects.

  3. Mitochondrial ATP synthasome: Expression and structural interaction of its components.

    PubMed

    Nůsková, Hana; Mráček, Tomáš; Mikulová, Tereza; Vrbacký, Marek; Kovářová, Nikola; Kovalčíková, Jana; Pecina, Petr; Houštěk, Josef

    2015-08-28

    Mitochondrial ATP synthase, ADP/ATP translocase (ANT), and inorganic phosphate carrier (PiC) are supposed to form a supercomplex called ATP synthasome. Our protein and transcript analysis of rat tissues indicates that the expression of ANT and PiC is transcriptionally controlled in accordance with the biogenesis of ATP synthase. In contrast, the content of ANT and PiC is increased in ATP synthase deficient patients' fibroblasts, likely due to a post-transcriptional adaptive mechanism. A structural analysis of rat heart mitochondria by immunoprecipitation, blue native/SDS electrophoresis, immunodetection and MS analysis revealed the presence of ATP synthasome. However, the majority of PiC and especially ANT did not associate with ATP synthase, suggesting that most of PiC, ANT and ATP synthase exist as separate entities.

  4. Mechanism of peptide hydrolysis by co-catalytic metal centers containing leucine aminopeptidase enzyme: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Barman, Arghya; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Shanghao; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2012-02-01

    In this density functional theory study, reaction mechanisms of a co-catalytic binuclear metal center (Zn1-Zn2) containing enzyme leucine aminopeptidase for two different metal bridging nucleophiles (H(2)O and -OH) have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the substrate (L-leucine-p-nitroanilide → L-leucyl-p-anisidine) and metal (Zn1 → Mg and Zn2 → Co, i.e., Mg1-Zn2 and Mg1-Co2 variants) substitutions on the energetics of the mechanism have been investigated. The general acid/base mechanism utilizing a bicarbonate ion followed by this enzyme is divided into two steps: (1) the formation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and (2) the cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol, the mechanism utilizing a hydroxyl nucleophile was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 18.7 kcal/mol. The rate-limiting step for reaction with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide is the cleavage of the peptide bond with a barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol. However, for L-leucyl-p-anisidine all steps of the mechanism were found to occur with similar barriers (18.0-19.0 kcal/mol). For the metallovariants, cleavage of the peptide bond occurs in the rate-limiting step with barriers of 17.8, 18.0, and 24.2 kcal/mol for the Zn1-Zn2, Mg1-Zn2, and Mg1-Co2 enzymes, respectively. The nature of the metal ion was found to affect only the creation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and after that all three enzymes follow essentially the same energetics. The results reported in this study have elucidated specific roles of both metal centers, the nucleophile, indirect ligands, and substrates in the catalytic functioning of this important class of binuclear metallopeptidases.

  5. Evidence for the Synthesis of ATP by an F0F1 ATP Synthase in Membrane Vesicles from Halorubrum Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faguy, David; Lawson, Darion; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vesicles prepared in a buffer containing ADP, Mg(2+) and Pi synthesized ATP at an initial rate of 2 nmols/min/mg protein after acidification of the bulk medium (pH 8 (right arrow) 4). The intravesicular ATP concentration reached a steady state after about 30 seconds and slowly declined thereafter. ATP synthesis was inhibited by low concentrations of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and m-chlorophenylhydrazone indicating that synthesis took place in response to the proton gradient. NEM and PCMS, which inhibit vacuolar ATPases and the vacuolar-like ATPases of extreme halophiles, did not affect ATP synthesis, and, in fact, produced higher steady state levels of ATP. This suggested that two ATPase activities were present, one which catalyzed ATP synthesis and one that caused its hydrolysis. Azide, a specific inhibitor of F0F1 ATP Synthases, inhibited halobacterial ATP synthesis. The distribution of acridine orange as imposed by a delta pH demonstrated that azide inhibition was not due to the collapse of the proton gradient due to azide acting as a protonophore. Such an effect was observed, but only at azide concentrations higher than those that inhibited ATP synthesis. These results confirm the earler observations with cells of H. saccharovorum and other extreme halophiles that ATP synthesis is inconsistent with the operation of a vacuolar-like ATPase. Therefore, the observation that a vacuolar-like enzyme is responsible for ATP synthesis (and which serves as the basis for imputing ATP synthesis to the vacuolar-like ATPases of the extreme halophiles, and the Archaea in general) should be taken with some degree of caution.

  6. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  7. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Fujita, T.; Malmstrom, H.S.; Nedergaard, M.; Ren, Y.F.; Dirksen, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  8. In Vitro Reassembly of the Ribose ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Reveals a Distinct Set of Transport Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Matthew C.; Simon, Michael J.; Erramilli, Satchal K.; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg2+. We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg2+, and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg2+; and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters. PMID:25533465

  9. Vacuolar Transport of Abscisic Acid Glucosyl Ester Is Mediated by ATP-Binding Cassette and Proton-Antiport Mechanisms in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Bo; Pfrunder, Stefanie; Nagy, Réka; Francisco, Rita Maria; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key plant hormone involved in diverse physiological and developmental processes, including abiotic stress responses and the regulation of stomatal aperture and seed germination. Abscisic acid glucosyl ester (ABA-GE) is a hydrolyzable ABA conjugate that accumulates in the vacuole and presumably also in the endoplasmic reticulum. Deconjugation of ABA-GE by the endoplasmic reticulum and vacuolar β-glucosidases allows the rapid formation of free ABA in response to abiotic stress conditions such as dehydration and salt stress. ABA-GE further contributes to the maintenance of ABA homeostasis, as it is the major ABA catabolite exported from the cytosol. In this work, we identified that the import of ABA-GE into vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mesophyll cells is mediated by two distinct membrane transport mechanisms: proton gradient-driven and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Both systems have similar Km values of approximately 1 mm. According to our estimations, this low affinity appears nevertheless to be sufficient for the continuous vacuolar sequestration of ABA-GE produced in the cytosol. We further demonstrate that two tested multispecific vacuolar ABCC-type ABC transporters from Arabidopsis exhibit ABA-GE transport activity when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which also supports the involvement of ABC transporters in ABA-GE uptake. Our findings suggest that the vacuolar ABA-GE uptake is not mediated by specific, but rather by several, possibly multispecific, transporters that are involved in the general vacuolar sequestration of conjugated metabolites. PMID:24028845

  10. ATP Sensitive Potassium Channels in the Skeletal Muscle Function: Involvement of the KCNJ11(Kir6.2) Gene in the Determination of Mechanical Warner Bratzer Shear Force

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Domenico; Selvaggi, Maria; Passantino, Giuseppe; De Palo, Pasquale; Dario, Cataldo; Centoducati, Pasquale; Tateo, Alessandra; Curci, Angela; Maqoud, Fatima; Mele, Antonietta; Camerino, Giulia M.; Liantonio, Antonella; Imbrici, Paola; Zizzo, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+-channels (KATP) are distributed in the tissues coupling metabolism with K+ ions efflux. KATP subunits are encoded by KCNJ8 (Kir6.1), KCNJ11 (Kir6.2), ABCC8 (SUR1), and ABCC9 (SUR2) genes, alternative RNA splicing give rise to SUR variants that confer distinct physiological properties on the channel. An high expression/activity of the sarco-KATP channel is observed in various rat fast-twitch muscles, characterized by elevated muscle strength, while a low expression/activity is observed in the slow-twitch muscles characterized by reduced strength and frailty. Down-regulation of the KATP subunits of fast-twitch fibers is found in conditions characterized by weakness and frailty. KCNJ11 gene knockout mice have reduced glycogen, lean phenotype, lower body fat, and weakness. KATP channel is also a sensor of muscle atrophy. The KCNJ11 gene is located on BTA15, close to a QTL for meat tenderness, it has also a role in glycogen storage, a key mechanism of the postmortem transformation of muscle into meat. The role of KCNJ11 gene in muscle function may underlie an effect of KCNJ11 genotypes on meat tenderness, as recently reported. The fiber phenotype and genotype are important in livestock production science. Quantitative traits including meat production and quality are influenced both by environment and genes. Molecular markers can play an important role in the genetic improvement of animals through breeding strategies. Many factors influence the muscle Warner-Bratzler shear force including breed, age, feeding, the biochemical, and functional parameters. The role of KCNJ11gene and related genes on muscle tenderness will be discussed in the present review. PMID:27242541

  11. Energy-dependent transformation of the catalytic activities of the mitochondrial F0 x F1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Galkin, M A; Vinogradov, A D

    1999-04-01

    The ADP(Mg2+)-deactivated, azide-trapped F0 x F1-ATPase of coupled submitochondrial particles is capable of ATP synthesis being incapable of ATP hydrolysis and ATP-dependent delta muH+ generation [FEBS Lett. (1995) 366, 29-32]. This puzzling phenomenon was studied further. No ATPase activity of the submitochondrial particles catalyzing succinate-supported oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of azide was observed when ATP was added to the assay mixture after an uncoupler. Rapid ATP hydrolysis was detected in the same system when ATP followed by an uncoupler was added. Less than 5% of the original ATPase activity was seen when the reaction (assayed with ATP-regenerating system) was initiated by the addition of ATP to the azide-trapped coupled particles oxidizing succinate either in the presence or in the absence of the uncoupler. High ATP hydrolytic activity was revealed when the reaction was started by the simultaneous addition of the ATP plus uncoupler to the particles generating delta muH+. The energy-dependent conversion of the enzyme into latent uncoupler-activated ATPase was prevented by free ADP (Ki approximately 20 microM) and was greatly enhanced after multiple turnovers in oxidative phosphorylation. The results suggest that the catalytic properties of F0 x F1 are delta muH+-dependent which is in accord with our hypothesis on different conformational states of the enzyme participating in ATP synthesis or hydrolysis.

  12. The effect of harvest time, dry matter content and mechanical pretreatments on anaerobic digestion and enzymatic hydrolysis of miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Frydendal-Nielsen, Susanne; Hjorth, Maibritt; Baby, Sanmohan; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Uffe; Gislum, René

    2016-10-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus was harvested as both green and mature biomass and the dry matter content of the driest harvest was artificially decreased by adding water in two subsamples, giving a total of five dry matter contents. All five biomass types were mechanically pretreated by roller-milling, extrusion or grinding and accumulated methane production and enzymatically-accessible sugars were measured. Accumulated methane production was studied using sigmoid curves that allowed comparison among the treatments of the rate of the methane production and ultimate methane yield. The green biomass gave the highest methane yield and highest levels of enzymatically-accessible cellulose. The driest biomass gave the best effect from extrusion but with the highest energy consumption, whereas roller-milling was most efficient on wet biomass. The addition of water to the last harvest improved the effect of roller-milling and equalled extrusion of the samples in efficiency. PMID:27455125

  13. Muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine concentrations in the human leg during exercise and ATP infusion.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Nielsen, Jens-Jung; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2009-12-01

    ATP has been proposed to play multiple roles in local skeletal muscle blood flow regulation by inducing vasodilation and modulating sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we evaluated the effects of arterial ATP infusion and exercise on leg muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations to gain insight into the interstitial and intravascular mechanisms by which ATP causes muscle vasodilation and sympatholysis. Leg hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotide and NE concentrations were measured during 1) femoral arterial ATP infusion (0.42 +/- 0.04 and 2.26 +/- 0.52 micromol/min; mean +/- SE) and 2) one-leg knee-extensor exercise (18 +/- 0 and 37 +/- 2 W) in 10 healthy men. Arterial ATP infusion and exercise increased leg blood flow (LBF) in the experimental leg from approximately 0.3 l/min at baseline to 4.2 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 l/min, respectively, whereas it was reduced or unchanged in the control leg. During arterial ATP infusion, muscle interstitial ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine concentrations remained unchanged in both legs, but muscle interstitial NE increased from approximately 5.9 nmol/l at baseline to 8.3 +/- 1.2 and 8.7 +/- 0.7 nmol/l in the experimental and control leg, respectively (P < 0.05), in parallel to a reduction in arterial pressure (P < 0.05). During exercise, however, interstitial ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine concentrations increased in the contracting muscle (P < 0.05), but not in inactive muscle, whereas interstitial NE concentrations increased similarly in both active and inactive muscles. These results suggest that the vasodilatory and sympatholytic effects of intraluminal ATP are mainly mediated via endothelial purinergic receptors. Intraluminal ATP and muscle contractions appear to modulate sympathetic nerve activity by inhibiting the effect of NE rather than blunting its local concentration. PMID:19797688

  14. Proton-in-Flight Mechanism for the Spontaneous Hydrolysis of N-Methyl O-Phenyl Sulfamate: Implications for the Design of Steroid Sulfatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, David R.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of N-methyl O-phenyl sulfamate (1) has been studied as a model for steroid sulfatase inhibitors such as Coumate, 667 Coumate and EMATE. At neutral pH, simulating physiological conditions, hydrolysis of 1 involves an intramolecular proton transfer from nitrogen to the bridging oxygen atom of the leaving group. Remarkably, this proton transfer is estimated to accelerate the decomposition of 1 by a factor of 1011. Examination of existing kinetic data reveals that the sulfatase PaAstA catalyzes the hydrolysis of sulfamate esters with moderate efficiencies of ~104; whereas, the catalytic rate acceleration generated by the enzyme for its cognate substrate is on the order of ~1015. Rate constants for hydrolysis of a wide range of sulfuryl esters, ArOSO2X−, are shown to be correlated by a two parameter equation based on pKaArOH and pKaArOSO2XH. PMID:22486328

  15. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states.

  16. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C.; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.; Damschroder, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  17. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  18. Hydrolysis Mechanism of the NAMI-A-type Antitumor Complex (HL)[trans-RuCl4L(dmso-S)] (L=1-methyl-1,2,4-triazole)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan-mei; Chen, Jin-can; Liao, Si-yan; Liu, Jiang-qin; Luo, Hui; Zheng, Kang-cheng

    2011-08-01

    The hydrolysis process of Ru(III) complex (HL)[trans-RuCl4L(dmso-S)] (L=1-methyl-1,2,4-triazole and dmso-S=S-dimethyl sulfoxide) (1), a potential antitumor complex similar to the well-known antitumor agent (Him)[trans-RuCl4(dmso-S)(im)] (NAMI-A, im=imidazole), was investigated using density functional theory combined with the conductor-like polarizable continuum model approach. The structural characteristics and the detailed energy profiles for the hydrolysis processes of this complex were obtained. For the first hydrolysis step, complex 1 has slightly higher barrier energies than the reported anticancer drug NAMI-A, and the result is in accordance with the experimental evidence indicating larger half-life for complex 1. For the second hydrolysis step, the formation of cis-diaqua species is thermodynamic preferred to that of trans isomers. In addition, on the basis of the analysis of electronic characteristics of species in the hydrolysis process, the trend in nucleophilic attack abilities of hydrolysis products by pertinent biomolecules is revealed and predicted.

  19. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  20. Catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli ribonuclease III: kinetic and inhibitor evidence for the involvement of two magnesium ions in RNA phosphodiester hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weimei; Pertzev, Alexandre; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribonuclease III (RNase III; EC 3.1.24) is a double-stranded(ds)-RNA-specific endonuclease with key roles in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. E.coli RNase III is a member of a structurally distinct superfamily that includes Dicer, a central enzyme in the mechanism of RNA interference. E.coli RNase III requires a divalent metal ion for activity, with Mg2+ as the preferred species. However, neither the function(s) nor the number of metal ions involved in catalysis is known. To gain information on metal ion involvement in catalysis, the rate of cleavage of the model substrate R1.1 RNA was determined as a function of Mg2+ concentration. Single-turnover conditions were applied, wherein phosphodiester cleavage was the rate-limiting event. The measured Hill coefficient (nH) is 2.0 ± 0.1, indicative of the involvement of two Mg2+ ions in phosphodiester hydrolysis. It is also shown that 2-hydroxy-4H-isoquinoline-1,3-dione—an inhibitor of ribonucleases that employ two divalent metal ions in their catalytic sites—inhibits E.coli RNase III cleavage of R1.1 RNA. The IC50 for the compound is 14 μM for the Mg2+-supported reaction, and 8 μM for the Mn2+-supported reaction. The compound exhibits noncompetitive inhibitory kinetics, indicating that it does not perturb substrate binding. Neither the O-methylated version of the compound nor the unsubstituted imide inhibit substrate cleavage, which is consistent with a specific interaction of the N-hydroxyimide with two closely positioned divalent metal ions. A preliminary model is presented for functional roles of two divalent metal ions in the RNase III catalytic mechanism. PMID:15699182

  1. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the monomer. Affinity purification of tagged Smt1p followed by reverse transcription of the associated RNA and PCR amplification of the resultant cDNA with gene-specific primers demonstrated the presence in mitochondria of Smt1p-ATP8/ATP6 and Smt1p-COB mRNA complexes. These results indicate that Smt1p is likely to be involved in translational regulation of both mRNAs. Applying Occam’s principle, we favor a mechanistic model in which translation of the ATP8/ATP6 bicistronic mRNA is coupled to the availability of F1 for subsequent assembly of the Atp6p and Atp8p products into the ATP synthase. The mechanism of this regulatory pathway is proposed to entail a displacement of the repressor from the translationally mute Smt1-ATP8/ATP6 complex by F1, thereby permitting the Atp22p activator to interact with and promote translation of the mRNA. PMID:26823015

  2. The hydrolysis of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoagland, P. D.; Fox, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal polymerization of aspartic acid produces a polysuccinimide (I), a chain of aspartoyl residues. An investigation was made of the alkaline hydrolysis of the imide rings of (I) which converts the polyimide to a polypeptide. The alkaline hydrolysis of polyimides can be expected to be kinetically complex due to increasing negative charge generated by carboxylate groups. For this reason, a diimide, phthaloyl-DL-aspartoyl-beta-alanine (IIA) was synthesized for a progressive study of the hydrolysis of polyimides. In addition, this diimide (IIA) can be related to thalidomide and might be expected to exhibit similar reactivity during hydrolysis of the phthalimide ring.

  3. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  4. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  5. Steady-state kinetics of the glutaminase reaction of CTP synthase from Lactococcus lactis. The role of the allosteric activator GTP incoupling between glutamine hydrolysis and CTP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Willemoës, Martin; Sigurskjold, Bent W

    2002-10-01

    CTP synthase catalyzes the reaction glutamine + UTP + ATP --> glutamate + CTP + ADP + Pi. The rate of the reaction is greatly enhanced by the allosteric activator GTP. We have studied the glutaminase half-reaction of CTP synthase from Lactococcus lactis and its response to the allosteric activator GTP and nucleotides that bind to the active site. In contrast to what has been found for the Escherichia coli enzyme, GTP activation of the L. lactis enzyme did not result in similar kcat values for the glutaminase activity and glutamine hydrolysis coupled to CTP synthesis. GTP activation of the glutaminase reaction never reached the levels of GTP-activated CTP synthesis, not even when the active site was saturated with UTP and the nonhydrolyzeable ATP-binding analog adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate. Furthermore, under conditions where the rate of glutamine hydrolysis exceeded that of CTP synthesis, GTP would stimulate CTP synthesis. These results indicate that the L. lactis enzyme differs significantly from the E. coli enzyme. For the E. coli enzyme, activation by GTP was found to stimulate glutamine hydrolysis and CTP synthesis to the same extent, suggesting that the major function of GTP binding is to activate the chemical steps of glutamine hydrolysis. An alternative mechanism for the action of GTP on L. lactis CTP synthase is suggested. Here the binding of GTP to the allosteric site promotes coordination of the phosphorylation of UTP and hydrolysis of glutamine for optimal efficiency in CTP synthesis rather than just acting to increase the rate of glutamine hydrolysis itself. PMID:12354108

  6. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]c) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of KATP channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mm) caused no detectable increase in [ATP]c, monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25–luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mm) with a significant increase in [ATP]c. Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mm glucose with increases in [ATP]c. Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of KATP channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mm) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mm) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mm lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP]c. High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed KATP channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells. PMID:12381816

  7. Mechanism of nucleotide sensing in group II chaperonins

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose H; Ralston, Corie Y; Douglas, Nicholai R; Kumar, Ramya; Lopez, Tom; McAndrew, Ryan P; Knee, Kelly M; King, Jonathan A; Frydman, Judith; Adams, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    Group II chaperonins mediate protein folding in an ATP-dependent manner in eukaryotes and archaea. The binding of ATP and subsequent hydrolysis promotes the closure of the multi-subunit rings where protein folding occurs. The mechanism by which local changes in the nucleotide-binding site are communicated between individual subunits is unknown. The crystal structure of the archaeal chaperonin from Methanococcus maripaludis in several nucleotides bound states reveals the local conformational changes associated with ATP hydrolysis. Residue Lys-161, which is extremely conserved among group II chaperonins, forms interactions with the γ-phosphate of ATP but shows a different orientation in the presence of ADP. The loss of the ATP γ-phosphate interaction with Lys-161 in the ADP state promotes a significant rearrangement of a loop consisting of residues 160–169. We propose that Lys-161 functions as an ATP sensor and that 160–169 constitutes a nucleotide-sensing loop (NSL) that monitors the presence of the γ-phosphate. Functional analysis using NSL mutants shows a significant decrease in ATPase activity, suggesting that the NSL is involved in timing of the protein folding cycle. PMID:22193720

  8. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the Fe-S cluster of spinach ferredoxin. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Fujita, Yuichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of ({sup 35}S)sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. ({sup 35}S)Sulfide was liberated from ({sup 35}S)cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of ({sup 35}S)cysteine occurred before the formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in ({sup 35}S)sulfide was greater than that in {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) inhibited competitively formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of ({sup 35}S)sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation are discussed.

  9. Experimental and theoretical study of the mechanism of hydrolysis of substituted phenyl hexanoates catalysed by globin in the presence of surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Selami; Arslan, Nevin; Kocakaya, Safak Ozhan; Pirinccioglu, Necmettin; Williams, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The bimolecular rate constants for the globin- and alkali-catalysed hydrolysis of substituted phenyl hexanoates in the absence and presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) obey Brønsted equations with β(lg) = -0.53 (globin-catalysed), -0.68 (globin-catalysed in CTAB), -0.34 (in water) and -0.74 (in CTAB), respectively. The slopes indicate that the microsolvation environments associated with the transition states of the catalysed reactions are different from those that occur in aqueous medium. The slope (-0.74) for the reaction in CTAB implies that it proceeds in a less polar medium. The larger β(lg) value (-0.53) obtained for the globin-catalysed reaction compared to that for the uncatalysed one may be attributed to either the less polar microenvironments of the transition states or the involvement of one of the imidazole groups as a nucleophile. The results from a study of the effect of pH on the reactivity provide evidence for the latter assumption. All of the ligands were docked into the hydrophobic pocket of the protein, and the resulting docking scores ranged from -30.76 to -23.61 kcal mol⁻¹. Molecular dynamic simulations and MM-PBSA/GBSA calculations performed for the complexes gave insight into the binding modes of globin to the esters, which are consistent with experimental results. The calculations yielded comparable free energies of binding to the experimental ones for 4-nitrophenyl and 4-chloro-2-nitrophenyl hexanoates. In conclusion, information obtained from the linear free-energy relationship is still very useful for elucidating the mechanisms of organic reactions, including enzyme-catalysed reactions. This approach is further supported by the utilization of computational tools.

  10. Family 46 Carbohydrate-binding Modules Contribute to the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Xyloglucan and β-1,3–1,4-Glucans through Distinct Mechanisms*♦

    PubMed Central

    Venditto, Immacolata; Najmudin, Shabir; Luís, Ana S.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Sakka, Kazuo; Knox, J. Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Structural carbohydrates comprise an extraordinary source of energy that remains poorly utilized by the biofuel sector as enzymes have restricted access to their substrates within the intricacy of plant cell walls. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZYmes) that target recalcitrant polysaccharides are modular enzymes containing noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that direct enzymes to their cognate substrate, thus potentiating catalysis. In general, CBMs are functionally and structurally autonomous from their associated catalytic domains from which they are separated through flexible linker sequences. Here, we show that a C-terminal CBM46 derived from BhCel5B, a Bacillus halodurans endoglucanase, does not interact with β-glucans independently but, uniquely, acts cooperatively with the catalytic domain of the enzyme in substrate recognition. The structure of BhCBM46 revealed a β-sandwich fold that abuts onto the region of the substrate binding cleft upstream of the active site. BhCBM46 as a discrete entity is unable to bind to β-glucans. Removal of BhCBM46 from BhCel5B, however, abrogates binding to β-1,3–1,4-glucans while substantially decreasing the affinity for decorated β-1,4-glucan homopolymers such as xyloglucan. The CBM46 was shown to contribute to xyloglucan hydrolysis only in the context of intact plant cell walls, but it potentiates enzymatic activity against purified β-1,3–1,4-glucans in solution or within the cell wall. This report reveals the mechanism by which a CBM can promote enzyme activity through direct interaction with the substrate or by targeting regions of the plant cell wall where the target glucan is abundant. PMID:25713075

  11. Retrotranslocation of MHC class I heavy chain from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol is dependent on ATP supply to the ER lumen.

    PubMed

    Albring, Jörn; Koopmann, Jens-Oliver; Hämmerling, Günter J; Momburg, Frank

    2004-01-01

    MHC class I heavy chains (HC) that fail to acquire a mature conformation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a result of defective folding or assembly with beta2-microglobulin, or lack of appropriate peptide cargo are retrotranslocated through the Sec61 channel to the cytosol for degradation by proteasomes. The mechanisms involved in ER retrotranslocation of HC are as yet incompletely understood. Using a microsomal system, we characterized the molecular requirements for the release of HC into the soluble fraction. Extraction of ubiquitinated HC was facilitated by cytosol, or by addition of proteins that stabilized the membrane association of the cytoplasmic ATPase p97. Functional proteasomes were not needed for HC mobilization. ATP supply to the ER lumen was found to be an essential factor since an inhibitor of the ATP importing pump in the ER membrane blocked HC release. Also non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs delivered to the ER lumen facilitated HC export suggesting that ATP binding by ER chaperones rather than ATP hydrolysis is involved. PMID:14644099

  12. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-01-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanims are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n = 10), (4) femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n = 6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n = 7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (ΔLBF 7.4 ± 0.7 l min−1), cardiac output ( 8.7 ± 0.7 l min−1), mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP 51 ± 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast, femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.7 ± 0.1 l min−1), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for ∼5% of peak exercise hyperaemia. Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.5–0.7 l min−1) without altering , MAP or . These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure, stroke volume and or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans. Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  13. A Dianionic Phosphorane Intermediate and Transition States in an Associative AN+DN Mechanism for the RibonucleaseA Hydrolysis Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elsasser, Brigitta M; Valiev, Marat; Weare, John H

    2009-03-25

    The RNaseA enzyme efficiently cleaves phosphodiester bonds in the RNA backbone. Phosphoryl transfer plays a central role in many biochemical reactions, and this is one of the most studied enzymes. However, there remains considerable controversy about the reaction mechanism. Most of this debate centers around the roles of the conserved residues, structures of the transition state or states, the possibility of a stable intermediate, and the charge and structure of this intermediate. In this communication we report calculations of the mechanism of the hydrolysis step in this reaction using a comprehensive QM/MM theoretical approach that includes a high level calculation of the interactions in the QM region, free energy estimates along an NEB optimized reaction path, and the inclusion of the interaction of the protein surroundings and solvent. Contrary to prior calculations we find a stable pentacoordinated dianionic phosphorane intermediate in the reaction path supporting an AN+DN reaction mechanism. In the transition state in the path from the reactant to the intermediate state (with barrier of 3.96 kcal/mol and intermediate stability of 2.21 kcal/mol) a proton from the attacking water is partially transferred to the His119 residue and the PO bond only partially formed from the remaining nucleophilic OH- species (bond order (BO) 0.11). In passing from the intermediate to the product state (barrier 13.22 kcal/mol) the PO bond on the cyclic phosphorane intermediate is nearly broken (BO 0.28) and the transfer of the proton from the Lys41 is almost complete (Lys41-H BO 0.87). In the product state a proton has been transferred from Lys41 to the O2' position of the sugar. The role of Lys41 as the catalytic acid is a result of the relative positioning of the Lys41 and His12 in the catalytic site. This configuration is supported by calculations and docking studies.

  14. The mechanism of hydrothermal hydrolysis for glycyrrhizic acid into glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-mono-β-D-glucuronide in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui; Li, Nan; Xu, Honggao; Xiang, Jun; Wang, Lei; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    To improve the bioactivity and sweetness properties of glycyrrhizic acid (GL), the hydrothermal hydrolysis of GL into glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) and glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-mono-β-D-glucuronide (GAMG) in subcritical water was investigated. The effects of temperature, time and their interaction on the conversion ratios were analyzed and the reactions were elaborated with kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that GL hydrothermal hydrolysis was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by reaction time and temperature, as well as their interaction, and could be fitted into first-order kinetics. The thermodynamic analysis indicated that the hydrolysis of GL was endergonic and non-spontaneous. The hydrolytic pathways were composed of complex consecutive and parallel reactions. It was concluded that subcritical water may be a potential medium for producing GAMG and GA.

  15. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  16. Tau binds ATP and induces its aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farid, Mina; Corbo, Christopher P; Alonso, Alejandra Del C

    2014-02-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein mainly found in neurons. The protein is associated with process of microtubule assembly, which plays an important role in intracellular transport and cell structure of the neuron. Tauopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases specifically associated with tau abnormalities. While a well-defined mechanism remains unknown, most facts point to tau as a prominent culprit in neurodegeneration. In most cases of Tauopathies, aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau have been found. Two proposals are present when discussing tau toxicity, one being the aggregation of tau proteins and the other points toward a conformational change within the protein. Previous work we carried out showed tau hyperphosphorylation promotes tau to behave abnormally resulting in microtubule assembly disruption as well as a breakdown in tau self-assembly. We found that tau's N-terminal region has a putative site for ATP/GTP binding. In this paper we demonstrate that tau is able to bind ATP and not GTP, that this binding induces tau self-assembly into filaments. At 1 mM ATP the filaments are 4-7 nm in width, whereas at 10 mM ATP the filaments appeared to establish lateral interaction, bundling and twisting, forming filaments that resembled the Paired Helical Filaments (PHF) isolated from Alzheimer disease brain. ATP-induced self-assembly is not energy dependent because the nonhydrolysable analogue of the ATP induces the same assembly. PMID:24258797

  17. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  18. Valorization of cruor slaughterhouse by-product by enzymatic hydrolysis for the production of antibacterial peptides: focus on α 1-32 family peptides mechanism and kinetics modeling.

    PubMed

    Hedhili, K; Dimitrov, K; Vauchel, P; Sila, A; Chataigné, G; Dhulster, P; Nedjar, N

    2015-10-01

    Bovine hemoglobin is the major component of the cruor (slaughterhouse by-product) and can be considered as an important source of active peptides that could be obtained by pepsic hydrolysis. The kinetics of appearance and disappearance of several antibacterial peptides from α 1-32 family during hydrolysis of synthesized α 1-32 peptide, of purified bovine hemoglobin and of cruor was studied, and reaction scheme for the hydrolysis of α 1-32 family peptides from these three sources was determined. On this basis, a mathematical model was proposed to predict the concentration of each peptide of interest of this family depending on hydrolysis time, and also on temperature (in the range 15-37 °C), pH (in the range 3.5-5.5) and enzyme to substrate ratio (in the range 1/50-1/200 for the synthesized peptide and 1/5-1/20 for purified bovine hemoglobin and cruor). Apparent rate constants of reactions were determined by applying the model on a set of experimental data and it was shown that they depended on the temperature according to Arrhenius's law, that their dependence on the pH was linear, and that enzyme to substrate ratio influence was limited (in the studied range).

  19. Valorization of cruor slaughterhouse by-product by enzymatic hydrolysis for the production of antibacterial peptides: focus on α 1-32 family peptides mechanism and kinetics modeling.

    PubMed

    Hedhili, K; Dimitrov, K; Vauchel, P; Sila, A; Chataigné, G; Dhulster, P; Nedjar, N

    2015-10-01

    Bovine hemoglobin is the major component of the cruor (slaughterhouse by-product) and can be considered as an important source of active peptides that could be obtained by pepsic hydrolysis. The kinetics of appearance and disappearance of several antibacterial peptides from α 1-32 family during hydrolysis of synthesized α 1-32 peptide, of purified bovine hemoglobin and of cruor was studied, and reaction scheme for the hydrolysis of α 1-32 family peptides from these three sources was determined. On this basis, a mathematical model was proposed to predict the concentration of each peptide of interest of this family depending on hydrolysis time, and also on temperature (in the range 15-37 °C), pH (in the range 3.5-5.5) and enzyme to substrate ratio (in the range 1/50-1/200 for the synthesized peptide and 1/5-1/20 for purified bovine hemoglobin and cruor). Apparent rate constants of reactions were determined by applying the model on a set of experimental data and it was shown that they depended on the temperature according to Arrhenius's law, that their dependence on the pH was linear, and that enzyme to substrate ratio influence was limited (in the studied range). PMID:26099509

  20. Medium-chain versus long-chain triacylglycerol emulsion hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase: Implications for the mechanisms of lipase action

    SciTech Connect

    Deckelbaum, R.J. ); Hamilton, J.A.; Butbul, E.; Gutman, A. ); Moser, A. ); Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.; Olivecrona, T. ); Carpentier, Y.A. )

    1990-02-06

    To explore how enzyme affinities and enzyme activities regulate hydrolysis of water-insoluble substrates, the authors compared hydrolysis of phospholipid-stabilized emulsions of medium-chain (MCT) versus long-chain triacylglycerols (LCT). Because substrate solubility at the emulsion surface might modulate rates of hydrolysis, the ability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine to solubilize MCT was examined by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift measurements showed that 11 mol % of ({sup 13}C)carbonyl enriched trioctanoin was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles as a surface component. Line widths of trioctanoin surface peaks were half that of LCT, and relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were also shorter for trioctanoin, showing greater mobility for MCT in phospholipid. In assessing the effects of these differences in solubility on lipolysis, they found that both purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase and human hepatic lipase hydrolyzed MCT at rates at least 2-fold higher than for LCT. Differences in affinity were also demonstrated in mixed incubations where increasing amounts of LCT emulsion resulted in decreased hydrolysis of MCT emulsions. These results suggest that despite lower enzyme affinity for MCT emulsions, shorter chain triacylglycerols are more readily hydrolyzed by lipoprotein and hepatic lipases than long-chain triacylglycerols because of greater MCT solubility and mobility at the emulsion-water interface.

  1. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  2. Copper binding triggers compaction in N-terminal tail of human copper pump ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Tanumoy; Åden, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-02-12

    Protein conformational changes are fundamental to biological reactions. For copper ion transport, the multi-domain protein ATP7B in the Golgi network receives copper from the cytoplasmic copper chaperone Atox1 and, with energy from ATP hydrolysis, moves the metal to the lumen for loading of copper-dependent enzymes. Although anticipated, conformational changes involved in ATP7B's functional cycle remain elusive. Using spectroscopic methods we here demonstrate that the four most N-terminal metal-binding domains in ATP7B, upon stoichiometric copper addition, adopt a more compact arrangement which has a higher thermal stability than in the absence of copper. In contrast to previous reports, no stable complex was found in solution between the metal-binding domains and the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B. Metal-dependent movement of the first four metal-binding domains in ATP7B may be a trigger that initiates the overall catalytic cycle.

  3. Phosphorylation as a method of regulating the activity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase. I. Activation of inorganic pyrophosphatase under the action of ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Vener, A.V.; Nazarova, T.I.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-04-01

    ATP activates in a noncompetitive manner the hydrolysis of magnesium pyrophosphate catalyzed by baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase. On the other hand, ATP causes a fall in the amount of pyrophosphate bound with enzyme that is formed by synthesis from phosphate, which confirms the fact of an increase in the catalytic rate constant of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pyrophosphate. The reason for the activation of the inorganic pyrophosphatase is the phosphorylation of its regulatory center under the action of ATP with the inclusion of the ..gamma..-phosphate group of the ATP in the protein.

  4. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Alan Gruenhagen

    2003-12-12

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca{sup 2+} imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K{sup +} and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol functionalized Cd

  5. Operation mechanism of F(o) F(1)-adenosine triphosphate synthase revealed by its structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    F(o) F(1) -Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase, a complex of two rotary motor proteins, reversibly converts the electrochemical potential of protons across the cell membrane into phosphate transfer potential of ATP to provide the energy currency of the cell. The water-soluble motor is F(1) -ATPase, which possesses ATP synthesis/hydrolysis catalytic sites. Isolated F(1) hydrolyses ATP to rotate the rotary shaft against the stator ring. The membrane-embedded motor is F(o) , which is driven by proton flow down the proton electrochemical potential. In the F(o) F(1) complex, the direction of mechanical rotation, the chemical reaction, and the proton transport are determined by the relative amplitudes between the Gibbs free energy of the ATP hydrolysis reaction and the electrochemical potential of protons across the membrane. Therefore, F(o) F(1) -ATP synthase is a highly efficient molecular device in which the chemical, mechanical, and potential energies are tightly and reversibly converted. In this critical review, we summarize our latest knowledge about the operation mechanism of this sophisticated nanomachine, revealed by its structure and dynamics.

  6. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  7. The ATP hydrolyzing transcription activator phage shock protein F of Escherichia coli: Identifying a surface that binds σ54

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Patricia; Wigneshweraraj, Siva R.; Schumacher, Jörg; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chaney, Matthew; Buck, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Members of the protein family called ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) play a crucial role in transforming chemical energy into biological events. AAA+ proteins are complex molecular machines and typically form ring-shaped oligomeric complexes that are crucial for ATPase activity and mechanism of action. The Escherichia coli transcription activator phage shock protein F (PspF) is an AAA+ mechanochemical enzyme that functions to sense and relay the energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to catalyze transcription by the σ54-RNA polymerase. Closed promoter complexes formed by the σ54-RNA polymerase are substrates for the action of PspF. By using a protein fragmentation approach, we identify here at least one σ54-binding surface in the PspF AAA+ domain. Results suggest that ATP hydrolysis by PspF is coupled to the exposure of at least one σ54-binding surface. This nucleotide hydrolysis-dependent presentation of a substrate binding surface can explain why complexes that form between σ54 and PspF are transient and could be part of a mechanism used generally by other AAA+ proteins to regulate activity. PMID:12601152

  8. Beyond the chemiosmotic theory: analysis of key fundamental aspects of energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation in the light of a torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis--invited review part 1.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sunil

    2010-08-01

    In Part 1 of this invited article, we consider the fundamental aspects of energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation. The central concepts of the chemiosmotic theory are re-examined and the major problems with its experimental verification are analyzed and reassessed from first principles. Several of its assumptions and interpretations (with regard, for instance, to consideration of the membrane as an inert barrier, the occurrence of energy transduction at thermodynamic equilibrium, the completely delocalized nature of the protonmotive force, and the notion of indirect coupling) are shown to be questionable. Important biological implications of this analysis for molecular mechanisms of biological energy transduction are enumerated. A fresh molecular mechanism of the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by classical weak acid anion uncouplers and an adequate explanation for the existence of uncoupler-resistant mutants (which until now has remained a mystery) has been proposed based on novel insights arising from a new torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis.

  9. ATP-dependent nucleosome unwrapping catalyzed by human RAD51.

    PubMed

    North, Justin A; Amunugama, Ravindra; Klajner, Marcelina; Bruns, Aaron N; Poirier, Michael G; Fishel, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSB) occur in chromatin following replication fork collapse and chemical or physical damage [Symington and Gautier (Double-strand break end resection and repair pathway choice. Annu. Rev. Genet. 2011;45:247-271.)] and may be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining. Nucleosomes are the fundamental units of chromatin and must be remodeled during DSB repair by HR [Andrews and Luger (Nucleosome structure(s) and stability: variations on a theme. Annu. Rev. Biophys. 2011;40:99-117.)]. Physical initiation of HR requires RAD51, which forms a nucleoprotein filament (NPF) that catalyzes homologous pairing and strand exchange (recombinase) between DNAs that ultimately bridges the DSB gap [San Filippo, Sung and Klein. (Mechanism of eukaryotic HR. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2008;77:229-257.)]. RAD51 forms an NPF on single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Although the single-stranded DNA NPF is essential for recombinase initiation, the role of the dsDNA NPF is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that the human RAD51 (HsRAD51) dsDNA NPF disassembles nucleosomes by unwrapping the DNA from the core histones. HsRAD51 that has been constitutively or biochemically activated for recombinase functions displays significantly reduced nucleosome disassembly activity. These results suggest that HsRAD51 can perform ATP hydrolysis-dependent nucleosome disassembly in addition to its recombinase functions. PMID:23757189

  10. DMR (deacetylation and mechanical refining) processing of corn stover achieves high monomeric sugar concentrations (230 g L-1) during enzymatic hydrolysis and high ethanol concentrations (>10% v/v) during fermentation without hydrolysate purification or concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xiaowen; Kuhn, Erik; Jennings, Edward W.; Nelson, Robert; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Min; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2016-04-01

    Distilling and purifying ethanol and other products from second generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating costs to biofuel production. The energy usage associated with distillation negatively affects plant gate costs and causes environmental and life-cycle impacts, and the lower titers in fermentation caused by lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis increase energy and water usage and ethanol production costs. In addition, lower ethanol titers increase the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels increase capital expenditure (CAPEX). Therefore, increasing biofuel titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuel production for several decades. In thismore » work, we achieved approximately 230 g L-1 of monomeric sugars after high solid enzymatic hydrolysis using deacetylation and mechanical refining (DMR) processed corn stover substrates produced at the 100 kg per day scale. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations achieved by the DMR process allowed fermentation to ethanol with titers as high as 86 g L-1, which translates into approximately 10.9% v/v ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that titers greater than 10% v/v ethanol in fermentations derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps have been reported. As a result, the potential cost savings from high sugar and ethanol titers achieved by the DMR process are also reported using TEA analysis.« less

  11. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, Howard G. . E-mail: shertzhg@ucmail.uc.edu; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2006-12-15

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels.

  12. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes. Final report, June 1, 1978-January 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes (e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C/sub 1/) and cellobiase) comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The enzymes exhibited different mode of actions in respect to the hydrolysis of cellulose and cellulose derived oligosaccharides. In combination, these enzymes complimented each other to hydrolyze cellulose to its basic constituent, glucose. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was subjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C/sub 1/) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x/) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo- and endo-glucanases are co-induced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes. The multiplicity of cellulase enzymes are the end results of post-translational modification during and/or after the secretion of enzymes into growth environment.

  13. The ATP synthase: the understood, the uncertain and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Walker, John E

    2013-02-01

    The ATP synthases are multiprotein complexes found in the energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria. They employ a transmembrane protonmotive force, Δp, as a source of energy to drive a mechanical rotary mechanism that leads to the chemical synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Their overall architecture, organization and mechanistic principles are mostly well established, but other features are less well understood. For example, ATP synthases from bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts differ in the mechanisms of regulation of their activity, and the molecular bases of these different mechanisms and their physiological roles are only just beginning to emerge. Another crucial feature lacking a molecular description is how rotation driven by Δp is generated, and how rotation transmits energy into the catalytic sites of the enzyme to produce the stepping action during rotation. One surprising and incompletely explained deduction based on the symmetries of c-rings in the rotor of the enzyme is that the amount of energy required by the ATP synthase to make an ATP molecule does not have a universal value. ATP synthases from multicellular organisms require the least energy, whereas the energy required to make an ATP molecule in unicellular organisms and chloroplasts is higher, and a range of values has been calculated. Finally, evidence is growing for other roles of ATP synthases in the inner membranes of mitochondria. Here the enzymes form supermolecular complexes, possibly with specific lipids, and these complexes probably contribute to, or even determine, the formation of the cristae.

  14. Elements in nucleotide sensing and hydrolysis of the AAA+ disaggregation machine ClpB: a structure-based mechanistic dissection of a molecular motor

    SciTech Connect

    Zeymer, Cathleen Barends, Thomas R. M.; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution crystal structures together with mutational analysis and transient kinetics experiments were utilized to understand nucleotide sensing and the regulation of the ATPase cycle in an AAA+ molecular motor. ATPases of the AAA+ superfamily are large oligomeric molecular machines that remodel their substrates by converting the energy from ATP hydrolysis into mechanical force. This study focuses on the molecular chaperone ClpB, the bacterial homologue of Hsp104, which reactivates aggregated proteins under cellular stress conditions. Based on high-resolution crystal structures in different nucleotide states, mutational analysis and nucleotide-binding kinetics experiments, the ATPase cycle of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2), one of the motor subunits of this AAA+ disaggregation machine, is dissected mechanistically. The results provide insights into nucleotide sensing, explaining how the conserved sensor 2 motif contributes to the discrimination between ADP and ATP binding. Furthermore, the role of a conserved active-site arginine (Arg621), which controls binding of the essential Mg{sup 2+} ion, is described. Finally, a hypothesis is presented as to how the ATPase activity is regulated by a conformational switch that involves the essential Walker A lysine. In the proposed model, an unusual side-chain conformation of this highly conserved residue stabilizes a catalytically inactive state, thereby avoiding unnecessary ATP hydrolysis.

  15. ATP binding by NLRP7 is required for inflammasome activation in response to bacterial lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; Khare, Sonal; Chu, Lan H; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in innate immune responses. NLRs encode a central nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) consisting of the NAIP, CIITA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain and the NACHT associated domain (NAD), which facilitates receptor oligomerization and downstream inflammasome signaling. The NBD contains highly conserved regions, known as Walker motifs, that are required for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. The NLR containing a PYRIN domain (PYD) 7 (NLRP7) has been recently shown to assemble an ASC and caspase-1-containing high molecular weight inflammasome complex in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides and Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for NLRP7 inflammasome activation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate that the NBD of NLRP7 is an ATP binding domain and has ATPase activity. We further show that an intact nucleotide-binding Walker A motif is required for NBD-mediated nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, oligomerization, and NLRP7 inflammasome formation and activity. Accordingly, THP-1 cells expressing a mutated Walker A motif display defective NLRP7 inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1β release and pyroptosis in response to acylated lipopeptides and S. aureus infection. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanism of NLRP7 inflammasome assembly. PMID:26143398

  16. Curtains for ATP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The administration's efforts to keep various technology-transfer programs afloat in the budget process appear to be stalled. House Science Committee chair Robert Walker (R-Pa.) advised in early April that the Republican agenda for the pending budget process entails zeroing out the Commerce Department's Advanced Technology Program (ATP), which was funded at 431 million in fiscal year 1995. The ATP would lose about 90 million from its FY 95 budget. Although Walker says that the Republican leadership has no intention to dictate to the subcommittees how cuts should be made, they will be held to the "fairly severe caps" established by the House Budget Committee. In other words, Walker says, if ATP stays, something else will have to go in its place. In addition, a bill to rescind about 223 million from the FY 1995 budget of the Technology Reinvestment Project and another 77 million from TRP's FY 1994 budget, which has not been spent, is heading for the president's signature. Yet Walker says while he supports the merits of technology transfer, "the question is do you have to create government programs to get the technology out?"

  17. Endotoxemia alters nucleotide hydrolysis in platelets of rats.

    PubMed

    Vuaden, Fernanda Cenci; Furstenau, Cristina Ribas; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2009-03-01

    Platelets play a critical role in homeostasis and blood clotting at sites of vascular injury, and also in various ways in innate immunity and inflammation. Platelets are one of the first cells to accumulate at an injured site, and local release of their secretome at some point initiate an inflammatory cascade that attracts leukocytes, activates target cells, stimulates vessel growth and repair. The level of exogenous ATP in the body may be increased in various inflammatory and shock conditions, primarily as a consequence of nucleotide release from platelets, endothelium and blood vessel cells. An increase of ATP release has been described during inflammation and this compound presents proinflammatory properties. ADP is a nucleotide known to induce changes in platelets shape and aggregation, to promote the exposure of fibrinogen-binding sites and to inhibit the stimulation of adenylate cyclase. Adenosine, the final product of the nucleotide hydrolysis, is a vasodilator and an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. There is a group of ecto-enzymes responsible for extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis named ectonucleotidases, which includes the NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) family, the NPP (nucleoside pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase) family and an ecto-5'-nucleotidase. Therefore, we have aimed to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin from Escherichia coli on ectonucleotidases in platelets from adult rats in order to better understand the role of extracellular adenine nucleotides and nucleosides in the maintenance of blood homeostasis in inflammatory processes. LPS administered in vitro was not able to alter the ATP, ADP, AMP and rho-Nph-5'-TMP hydrolysis of platelets from untreated rats in all concentrations tested (25-100 microg/ml). There was a significant decrease in ATP, ADP, AMP and rho-Nph-5'-TMP hydrolysis in rat platelets after 48 hours of LPS exposure (2 mg/Kg, i.p.). ATP and ADP hydrolysis has been reduced about 28

  18. Skeletal muscle ATP kinetics are impaired in frail mice.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Yang, Huanle; Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, Vadappuram P; Yano, Toshiyuki; Leppo, Michelle K; Steenbergen, Charles; Walston, Jeremy; Weiss, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    The interleukin-10 knockout mouse (IL10(tm/tm)) has been proposed as a model for human frailty, a geriatric syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle (SM) weakness, because it develops an age-related decline in SM strength compared to control (C57BL/6J) mice. Compromised energy metabolism and energy deprivation appear to play a central role in muscle weakness in metabolic myopathies and muscular dystrophies. Nonetheless, it is not known whether SM energy metabolism is altered in frailty. A combination of in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and biochemical assays was used to measure high-energy phosphate concentrations, the rate of ATP synthesis via creatine kinase (CK), the primary energy reserve reaction in SM, as well as the unidirectional rates of ATP synthesis from inorganic phosphate (Pi) in hind limb SM of 92-week-old control (n = 7) and IL10(tm/tm) (n = 6) mice. SM Phosphocreatine (20.2 ± 2.3 vs. 16.8 ± 2.3 μmol/g, control vs. IL10(tm/tm), p < 0.05), ATP flux via CK (5.0 ± 0.9 vs. 3.1 ± 1.1 μmol/g/s, p < 0.01), ATP synthesis from inorganic phosphate (Pi → ATP) (0.58 ± 0.3 vs. 0.26 ± 0.2 μmol/g/s, p < 0.05) and the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis (∆G ∼ATP) were significantly lower and [Pi] (2.8 ± 1.0 vs. 5.3 ± 2.0 μmol/g, control vs. IL10(tm/tm), p < 0.05) markedly higher in IL10(tm/tm) than in control mice. These observations demonstrate that, despite normal in vitro metabolic enzyme activities, in vivo SM ATP kinetics, high-energy phosphate levels and energy release from ATP hydrolysis are reduced and inorganic phosphate is elevated in a murine model of frailty. These observations do not prove, but are consistent with the premise, that energetic abnormalities may contribute metabolically to SM weakness in this geriatric syndrome.

  19. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis in rat dental tissues. A histochemical study to differentiate the enzymes involved.

    PubMed

    Mörnstad, H; Sundström, B

    1976-07-19

    The purpose of this study was to try to differentiate histochemically between the various enzymes which may catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP in developing rat dental tissues. Freeze cut and freeze dried sections of molar and incisor teeth were incubated in lead capture-based media at pH 5.0, 7.2 or 9.4 with one of the following substrates: beta-glycerophosphate, AMP, ADP, ATP, AMP-PNP and tetrasodium pyrophosphate. To establish the enzymatic nature of the hydrolysis parallel sections were incubated after prior fixation in either formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde. By comparing the enzymatic stainings obtained with the various substrates and at the different pH:s, it was concluded that ATP can be visibly hydrolyzed in rat dental tissues by alkaline phosphatase (stratum intermedium, apical part of maturation ameloblasts, basal part of all ameloblasts, odontoblasts and subodontoblastic layer), specific ATPase (apical and basal parts of secretory ameloblasts) and ATP pyrophosphatase and/or adenylate cyclase (stratum intermedium, odontoblasts). Acid phosphatase, specific ADPase, 5'-nucleotidase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, 3':5'-cyclic-AMP-phosphodiesterase and adenylate kinase on the other hand, seem not to be engaged in the ATP hydrolysis to such a degree as to complicate the interpretation of the histochemical staining. The alkaline phosphatase part of the ATP hydrolysis appeared to be rather insensitive to aldehyde fixation, while the hydrolysis effected by specific ATPase and ATP pyrophosphatase and/or adenylate cyclase was extinguished after fixation with formaldehyde for 4 h or glutaraldehyde for 10 min.

  20. Analysis of the nucleotide-dependent conformations of kinesin-1 in the hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Ciudad, Aleix; Sancho, J M

    2009-07-01

    Kinesin-1 motion on a microtubule (MT) is still receiving a great attention due to its relevance in understanding molecular motion triggered by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Recent experimental data on kinesin-tubulin-nucleotide interactions have clarified some of the conformational details involved in the hydrolysis process [T. Mori et al., Nature (London) 450, 750 (2007)]. Specifically, fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to measure the affinity of motor domains to tubulin heterodimers. Our work is directly devoted to understand and reproduce the main output of these experiments as well as to go beyond and give a global dynamical picture of the whole hydrolysis cycle. We predict that phosphate groups have the ability to confine to the tubulin domains in order to explain the delay between ATP hydrolysis and head detaching, which seems crucial for the achievement of processivity. In our approach me make use of chemical kinetics complemented with stochastic molecular simulations of the elements involved.

  1. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  2. ATP selection in a random peptide library consisting of prebiotic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shou-Kai; Chen, Bai-Xue; Tian, Tian; Jia, Xi-Shuai; Chu, Xin-Yi; Liu, Rong; Dong, Peng-Fei; Yang, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2015-10-23

    Based upon many theoretical findings on protein evolution, we proposed a ligand-selection model for the origin of proteins, in which the most ancient proteins originated from ATP selection in a pool of random peptides. To test this ligand-selection model, we constructed a random peptide library consisting of 15 types of prebiotic amino acids and then used cDNA display to perform six rounds of in vitro selection with ATP. By means of next-generation sequencing, the most prevalent sequence was defined. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the selected peptide showed that it was stable and foldable and had ATP-hydrolysis activity as well.

  3. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  4. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  5. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  6. Acid and base hydrolysis of lipid A from Enterobacter agglomerans as monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: pertinence to detoxification mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Cole, R B

    1996-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which are endotoxins found in the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria, are common components of organic dusts that cause or contribute to symptoms associated with organic dust diseases. The lipid A subgroup within LPS is believed to be responsible for the toxicity. Acid and base treatments, which can be effective detoxification methods, were performed on lipid A from Enterobacter agglomerans (EA), a bacterium commonly found in field cotton. Negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to characterize the post-treatment structural changes to lipid A. Acid treatment (1% acetic acid, 100 degrees C) hydrolyzed the ester side-chains of lipid A. It was found that the ester-linked palmitoyl group was the most labile to acid hydrolysis. Hydrolysis of the palmitoyl moiety conformed to pseudo-first-order chemical reaction kinetics with a rate constant for decomposition of heptacyl-lipid A from Enterobacter agglomerans of approximately 3.3 x 10(-3) min-1. An order of lability of lipid A acyl side-chains to acid hydrolysis was also deduced: R4' (palmitoyl) > R1' (myristoyl or hydroxymyristoyl) > R3 (hydroxymyristoyl at position 3) > R1 (oxymyristoyl group at position 3') > R2' (lauroyl). Base treatment (0.05 M NaOH in 95% EtOH, 65 degrees C) was shown to be more effective at cleaving ester-linked side-chains. In addition, mass spectral evidence suggests that opening of the pyranose rings of the disaccharide backbone of lipid A and/or removal of the phosphoryl groups may be occurring during base treatment. This study sheds light on mechanistic aspects of treatment procedures leading to the detoxification of endotoxins.

  7. Modular organization of the PDZ domains in the human discs-large protein suggests a mechanism for coupling PDZ domain-binding proteins to ATP and the membrane cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The human homologue (hDIg) of the Drosophila discs-large tumor suppressor (DIg) is a multidomain protein consisting of a carboxyl- terminal guanylate kinase-like domain, an SH3 domain, and three slightly divergent copies of the PDZ (DHR/GLGF) domain. Here have examined the structural organization of the three PDZ domains of hDIg using a combination of protease digestion and in vitro binding measurements. Our results show that the PDZ domains are organized into two conformationally stable modules one (PDZ, consisting of PDZ domains 1 and 2, and the other (PDZ) corresponding to the third PDZ domain. Using amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry, we determined the boundaries of the PDZ domains after digestion with endoproteinase Asp- N, trypsin, and alpha-chymotrypsin. The purified PDZ1+2, but not the PDZ3 domain, contains a high affinity binding site for the cytoplasmic domain of Shaker-type K+ channels. Similarly, we demonstrate that the PDZ1+2 domain can also specifically bind to ATP. Furthermore, we provide evidence for an in vivo interaction between hDIg and protein 4.1 and show that the hDIg protein contains a single high affinity protein 4.1-binding site that is not located within the PDZ domains. The results suggest a mechanism by which PDZ domain-binding proteins may be coupled to ATP and the membrane cytoskeleton via hDlg. PMID:8909548

  8. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15598.001 PMID:27183269

  9. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Baldwin, Steve A; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-05-16

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids.

  10. Template Supercoiling during ATP-Dependent DNA Helix Tracking: Studies with Simian Virus 40 Large Tumor Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Jessee, C. Bret; Lau, Kawai; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Leroy F.

    1989-08-01

    Incubation of topologically relaxed plasmid DNA with simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (T antigen), ATP, and eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I resulted in the formation of highly positively supercoiled DNA. Eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I could not substitute for eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I in this reaction. Furthermore, the addition of eukaryotic topoisomerase I to a preincubated reaction mixture containing both T antigen and eubacterial topoisomerase I caused rapid relaxation of the positively supercoiled DNA. These results suggest that SV40 T antigen can introduce topoisomerase-relaxable supercoils into DNA in a reaction coupled to ATP hydrolysis. We interpret the observed T antigen supercoiling reaction in terms of a recently proposed twin-supercoiled-domain model that describes the mechanics of DNA helix-tracking processes. According to this model, positive and negative supercoils are generated ahead of and behind the moving SV40 T antigen, respectively. The preferential relaxation of negative supercoils by eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I explains the accumulation of positive supercoils in the DNA template. The supercoiling assay using DNA conformation-specific eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I may be of general use for the detection of ATP-dependent DNA helix-tracking proteins.

  11. p31comet promotes disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex in an ATP-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Teichner, Adar; Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Dumin, Elena; Gromis, Jonathan; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes in mitosis is ensured by a surveillance mechanism called the mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint. It prevents sister chromatid separation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle through their kinetochores. The checkpoint acts by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets for degradation securin, an inhibitor of anaphase initiation. The activity of APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 bound to the checkpoint proteins MAD2, BubR1, and Bub3. When all kinetochores acquire bipolar attachment the checkpoint is inactivated, but the mechanisms of checkpoint inactivation are not understood. We have previously observed that hydrolyzable ATP is required for exit from checkpoint-arrested state. In this investigation we examined the possibility that ATP hydrolysis in exit from checkpoint is linked to the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet in this process. It is known that p31comet prevents the formation of a Mad2 dimer that it thought to be important for turning on the mitotic checkpoint. This explains how p31comet blocks the activation of the checkpoint but not how it promotes its inactivation. Using extracts from checkpoint-arrested cells and MCC isolated from such extracts, we now show that p31comet causes the disassembly of MCC and that this process requires β,γ-hydrolyzable ATP. Although p31comet binds to Mad2, it promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC. PMID:21300909

  12. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path–Force Matching QM/MM Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Ojeda-May, P.; Nagaraju, M.; Pu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path–force matching (RP–FM) has been developed. In RP–FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP–FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  13. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path-Force Matching QM/MM Method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Ojeda-May, P; Nagaraju, M; Pu, J

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path-force matching (RP-FM) has been developed. In RP-FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP-FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  14. Integration of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Steady-state Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gαi1 Distinguishes between the GTP Hydrolysis and GDP Release Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Grit; Mann, Daniel; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-07-10

    Gα subunits are central molecular switches in cells. They are activated by G protein-coupled receptors that exchange GDP for GTP, similar to small GTPase activation mechanisms. Gα subunits are turned off by GTP hydrolysis. For the first time we employed time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy to investigate the molecular reaction mechanisms of Gαi1. FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful tool that monitors reactions label free with high spatio-temporal resolution. In contrast to common multiple turnover assays, FTIR spectroscopy depicts the single turnover GTPase reaction without nucleotide exchange/Mg(2+) binding bias. Global fit analysis resulted in one apparent rate constant of 0.02 s(-1) at 15 °C. Isotopic labeling was applied to assign the individual phosphate vibrations for α-, β-, and γ-GTP (1243, 1224, and 1156 cm(-1), respectively), α- and β-GDP (1214 and 1134/1103 cm(-1), respectively), and free phosphate (1078/991 cm(-1)). In contrast to Ras · GAP catalysis, the bond breakage of the β-γ-phosphate but not the Pi release is rate-limiting in the GTPase reaction. Complementary common GTPase assays were used. Reversed phase HPLC provided multiple turnover rates and tryptophan fluorescence provided nucleotide exchange rates. Experiments were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations. This broad approach provided detailed insights at atomic resolution and allows now to identify key residues of Gαi1 in GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange. Mutants of the intrinsic arginine finger (Gαi1-R178S) affected exclusively the hydrolysis reaction. The effect of nucleotide binding (Gαi1-D272N) and Ras-like/all-α interface coordination (Gαi1-D229N/Gαi1-D231N) on the nucleotide exchange reaction was furthermore elucidated.

  15. Photo-excitation of electrons in cytochrome c oxidase as a theory of the mechanism of the increase of ATP production in mitochondria by laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Andrzej

    2014-02-01

    The hypothesis explains the molecular basis for restoring mitochondrial function by laser therapy. It also explains how laser therapy reverses both excessive oxidation (lack of NADH/FADH2) and excessive reduction (lack of O2) states of cytochrome c oxidase complex. It is proposed that photons interact with heme molecules of cytochrome c oxidase. A molecule of heme contains a porphyrin ring and an atom of iron in the center. The iron atom (Fe) can switch oxidation states back and forth between ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) by accepting or releasing an electron. The porphyrin ring is a complex aromatic molecule that has 26 pi electrons which are "delocalized", spinning in the carbon rings creating a resonating electromagnetic cloud. Photons with similar wavelengths are absorbed by the cloud increasing its energy. The energy is then passed on to the centrally located atom of iron existing in a reduced state (Fe2+). The electrons on the orbits of the iron atom accept this electromagnetic energy, and change orbitals to a higher energetic level. If the energy is sufficient, electrons leave the atom entirely. If this occurs, Fe2+ become oxidized to Fe3+ releasing electrons, thus restoring electron flow and the production of ATP. At the same time, electrons freed from complex IV may have sufficient energy to be picked by NAD+/FADH and re-enter the chain at the complex I or II amplifying the flow of electrons.

  16. Stepwise mechanism and H2O-assisted hydrolysis in atomic layer deposition of SiO2 without a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guo-Yong; Xu, Li-Na; Wang, Lai-Guo; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful deposition technique for constructing uniform, conformal, and ultrathin films in microelectronics, photovoltaics, catalysis, energy storage, and conversion. The possible pathways for silicon dioxide (SiO2) ALD using silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and water (H2O) without a catalyst have been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations. The results show that the SiCl4 half-reaction is a rate-determining step of SiO2 ALD. It may proceed through a stepwise pathway, first forming a Si-O bond and then breaking Si-Cl/O-H bonds and forming a H-Cl bond. The H2O half-reaction may undergo hydrolysis and condensation processes, which are similar to conventional SiO2 chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In the H2O half-reaction, there are massive H2O molecules adsorbed on the surface, which can result in H2O-assisted hydrolysis of the Cl-terminated surface and accelerate the H2O half-reaction. These findings may be used to improve methods for the preparation of SiO2 ALD and H2O-based ALD of other oxides, such as Al2O3, TiO2, ZrO2, and HfO2.

  17. ATP/ADP Turnover and Import of Glycolytic ATP into Mitochondria in Cancer Cells Is Independent of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Eduardo N; DeHart, David N; Patnaik, Jyoti; Klatt, Sandra C; Gooz, Monika Beck; Lemasters, John J

    2016-09-01

    Non-proliferating cells oxidize respiratory substrates in mitochondria to generate a protonmotive force (Δp) that drives ATP synthesis. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), a component of Δp, drives release of mitochondrial ATP(4-) in exchange for cytosolic ADP(3-) via the electrogenic adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) located in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which leads to a high cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio up to >100-fold greater than matrix ATP/ADP. In rat hepatocytes, ANT inhibitors, bongkrekic acid (BA), and carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the F1FO-ATP synthase inhibitor, oligomycin (OLIG), inhibited ureagenesis-induced respiration. However, in several cancer cell lines, OLIG but not BA and CAT inhibited respiration. In hepatocytes, respiratory inhibition did not collapse ΔΨ until OLIG, BA, or CAT was added. Similarly, in cancer cells OLIG and 2-deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, depolarized mitochondria after respiratory inhibition, which showed that mitochondrial hydrolysis of glycolytic ATP maintained ΔΨ in the absence of respiration in all cell types studied. However in cancer cells, BA, CAT, and knockdown of the major ANT isoforms, ANT2 and ANT3, did not collapse ΔΨ after respiratory inhibition. These findings indicated that ANT did mediate mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchange in cancer cells. We propose that suppression of ANT contributes to low cytosolic ATP/ADP, activation of glycolysis, and a Warburg metabolic phenotype in proliferating cells.

  18. Ultrasound enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of Parthenium hysterophorus: A mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shuchi; Agarwal, Mayank; Bhatt, Aditya; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-09-01

    This study has attempted to establish the mechanism of the ultrasound-induced enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated and delignified biomass of Parthenium hysterophorus. A dual approach of statistical optimization of hydrolysis followed by application of sonication at optimum conditions has been adopted. The kinetics of hydrolysis shows a marked 6× increase with sonication, while net sugar yield shows marginal rise of ∼ 20%. The statistical experimental design reveals the hydrolysis process to be enzyme limited. Profile of sugar yield in ultrasound-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis has been analyzed using HCH-1 model coupled with Genetic Algorithm optimization. The trends in the kinetic and physiological parameters of HCH-1 model reveal that sonication enhances enzyme/substrate affinity and reaction velocity of hydrolysis. The product inhibition of enzyme in all forms (free, adsorbed, complexed) also reduces with ultrasound. These effects are attributed to intense micro-convection induced by ultrasound and cavitation in the liquid medium.

  19. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  20. The alpha-subunit of Leishmania F1 ATP synthase hydrolyzes ATP in presence of tRNA.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Srikanta; Adhya, Samit

    2006-07-14

    Import of tRNAs into the mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania requires the tRNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP leading to the generation of membrane potential through the pumping of protons. Subunit RIC1 of the inner membrane RNA import complex is a bi-functional protein that is identical to the alpha-subunit of F1F0 ATP synthase and specifically binds to a subset (Type I) of importable tRNAs. We show that recombinant, purified RIC1 is a Type I tRNA-dependent ATP hydrolase. The activity was insensitive to oligomycin, sensitive to mutations within the import signal of the tRNA, and required the cooperative interaction between the ATP-binding and C-terminal domains of RIC1. The ATPase activity of the intact complex was inhibited by anti-RIC1 antibody, while knockdown of RIC1 in Leishmania tropica resulted in deficiency of the tRNA-dependent ATPase activity of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Moreover, RIC1 knockdown extracts failed to generate a membrane potential across reconstituted proteoliposomes, as shown by a rhodamine 123 uptake assay, but activity was restored by adding back purified RIC1. These observations identify RIC1 as a novel form of the F1 ATP synthase alpha-subunit that acts as the major energy transducer for tRNA import. PMID:16735512

  1. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho—a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity—is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal ‘RNA binding’ domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal ‘motor’ domain. We also show that the ‘motor’ domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors. PMID:25999346

  2. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  3. A bacterial virulence protein promotes pathogenicity by inhibiting the bacterium's own F1Fo ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, require the virulence protein MgtC to survive within macrophages and to cause a lethal infection in mice. We now report that, unlike secreted virulence factors that target the host vacuolar ATPase to withstand phagosomal acidity, the MgtC protein acts on Salmonella's own F1Fo ATP synthase. This complex couples proton translocation to ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and is required for virulence. We establish that MgtC interacts with the a subunit of the F1Fo ATP synthase, hindering ATP-driven proton translocation and NADH-driven ATP synthesis in inverted vesicles. An mgtC null mutant displays heightened ATP levels and an acidic cytoplasm, whereas mgtC overexpression decreases ATP levels. A single amino acid substitution in MgtC that prevents binding to the F1Fo ATP synthase abolishes control of ATP levels and attenuates pathogenicity. MgtC provides a singular example of a virulence protein that promotes pathogenicity by interfering with another virulence protein.

  4. ATP binding by the P-loop NTPase OsYchF1 (an unconventional G protein) contributes to biotic but not abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Li, Xiaorong; Miao, Rui; Fong, Yu-Hang; Li, Kwan-Pok; Yung, Yuk-Lin; Yu, Mei-Hui; Wong, Kam-Bo; Chen, Zhongzhou; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-03-01

    G proteins are involved in almost all aspects of the cellular regulatory pathways through their ability to bind and hydrolyze GTP. The YchF subfamily, interestingly, possesses the unique ability to bind both ATP and GTP, and is possibly an ancestral form of G proteins based on phylogenetic studies and is present in all kingdoms of life. However, the biological significance of such a relaxed ligand specificity has long eluded researchers. Here, we have elucidated the different conformational changes caused by the binding of a YchF homolog in rice (OsYchF1) to ATP versus GTP by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, by comparing the 3D relationships of the ligand position and the various amino acid residues at the binding sites in the crystal structures of the apo-bound and ligand-bound versions, a mechanism for the protein's ability to bind both ligands is revealed. Mutation of the noncanonical G4 motif of the OsYchF1 to the canonical sequence for GTP specificity precludes the binding/hydrolysis of ATP and prevents OsYchF1 from functioning as a negative regulator of plant-defense responses, while retaining its ability to bind/hydrolyze GTP and its function as a negative regulator of abiotic stress responses, demonstrating the specific role of ATP-binding/hydrolysis in disease resistance. This discovery will have a significant impact on our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the YchF subfamily of G proteins in all kingdoms of life.

  5. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G.; King, Jerry D.; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. PMID:26330553

  6. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. PMID:26330553

  7. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

  8. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  9. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL. PMID:25130461

  10. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-04-01

    Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l(−1) at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l(−1), respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min(−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l(−1) (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l(−1). Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  11. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l−1 at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l−1, respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l−1 (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l−1. Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  12. Novel Drugs Targeting the c-Ring of the F1FO-ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Pagliarani, Alessandra; Nesci, S; Ventrella, V

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights the role of the ATP synthase/hydrolase, also known as F1FO-complex, as key molecular and enzymatic switch between cell life and death, thus increasing the enzyme attractiveness as drug target in pharmacology. Being inhibition of ATP production usually linked to antiproliferative properties, drugs targeting the enzyme complex have been mainly considered to fight pathogen parasites and cancer. In recent years, a number of natural macrolides, produced by bacterial fermentation and structurally related to the classical enzyme inhibitor oligomycin, have been shown to bind to the membrane-embedded FO sector and to inhibit the enzyme complex by an oligomycin-like mechanism, namely by interacting with the c-ring. Other than natural macrolide antibiotics, which display variegated inhibition power on different F1FO-complexes, synthetic compounds from the diarylquinoline and organotin families also target the c-ring and strongly inhibit the enzyme. Bioinformatic insights address drug design to target FO subunits. Additionally, the possible modulation of the drug inhibition power, by amino acid substitutions or post-translational modifications of c-subunits, adds further interest to the target. The present survey on compounds targeting the c-ring and bi-directionally blocking the transmembrane proton flux which drives ATP synthesis/hydrolysis, discloses new therapeutic options to fight cancer and infections sustained by therapeutically recalcitrant microorganisms. Additionally, c-ring targeting compounds may constitute new tools to eradicate undesired biofilms and to address at the molecular level the therapy of mammalian diseases linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions. In summary, studies on the only partially known molecular interactions within the c-ring of the F1FO-complex may renew hope to counteract mammalian diseases. PMID:26864551

  13. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  14. Synphilin-1 binds ATP and regulates intracellular energy status.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianxia; Liu, Jingnan; Smith, Wanli W

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that synphilin-1, a cytoplasmic protein, is involved in energy homeostasis. Overexpression of synphilin-1 in neurons results in hyperphagia and obesity in animal models. However, the mechanism by which synphilin-1 alters energy homeostasis is unknown. Here, we used cell models and biochemical approaches to investigate the cellular functions of synphilin-1 that may affect energy balance. Synphilin-1 was pulled down by ATP-agarose beads, and the addition of ATP and ADP reduced this binding, indicating that synphilin-1 bound ADP and ATP. Synphilin-1 also bound GMP, GDP, and GTP but with a lower affinity than it bound ATP. In contrast, synphilin-1 did not bind with CTP. Overexpression of synphilin-1 in HEK293T cells significantly increased cellular ATP levels. Genetic alteration to abolish predicted ATP binding motifs of synphilin-1 or knockdown of synphilin-1 by siRNA reduced cellular ATP levels. Together, these data demonstrate that synphilin-1 binds and regulates the cellular energy molecule, ATP. These findings provide a molecular basis for understanding the actions of synphilin-1 in energy homeostasis.

  15. Structure of a topoisomerase II-DNA-nucleotide complex reveals a new control mechanism for ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bryan H.; Osheroff, Neil; Berger, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Type IIA topoisomerases control DNA supercoiling and disentangle chromosomes by a complex, ATP-dependent strand passage mechanism. Although a general framework exists for type IIA topoisomerase function, the architecture of the full-length enzyme has remained undefined. Here we present the first structure of a fully-catalytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase II homodimer, complexed with DNA and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. The enzyme adopts a domain-swapped configuration wherein the ATPase domain of one protomer sits atop the nucleolytic region of its partner subunit. This organization produces an unexpected interaction between the bound DNA and a conformational transducing element in the ATPase domain, which we show is critical for both DNA-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and global topoisomerase activity. Our data indicate that the ATPase domains pivot about each other to ensure unidirectional strand passage and that this state senses bound DNA to promote ATP turnover and enzyme reset. PMID:23022727

  16. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, John H; Rajapakshe, Kimal I; Infante, Hans L; Claycomb, James R

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  17. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  18. Intensification of ciliary motility by extracellular ATP.

    PubMed

    Ovadyahu, D; Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1988-01-01

    Ciliary metachronism and motility were examined optically in tissue cultures from frog palate epithelium as a function of extracellular ATP concentration in the range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M. The main findings were: a) upon addition of ATP the metachronal wavelength increased by a factor of up to 2. b) the velocity of the metachronal wave increased by a factor of up to 5. c) the frequency of ciliary beating increased by a factor of up to 2-3, the increase being temperature insensitive in the range of 15 degrees C-25 degrees C. d) the area under the 1-second FFT spectrum decreased by a factor of up to 2.5. e) the energy of the metachronal wave is increased by a factor of up to 9.5. f) all the spectrum parameters are subject to influence by ATP, as also by ADP and AMP. However, there are pronounced differences in the various responses to them. Based on these findings, physical aspects of the rate increase of particle transport caused by addition of extracellular ATP are explained. A plausible overall chemical mechanism causing pronounced changes in ciliary motility is discussed.

  19. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, John H; Rajapakshe, Kimal I; Infante, Hans L; Claycomb, James R

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring.

  20. Effect of the ATPase inhibitor protein IF{sub 1} on H{sup +} translocation in the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio; Mangiullo, Roberto; Papa, Sergio

    2009-06-19

    The H{sup +} F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase complex of coupling membranes converts the proton-motive force into rotatory mechanical energy to drive ATP synthesis. The F{sub 1} moiety of the complex protrudes at the inner side of the membrane, the F{sub o} sector spans the membrane reaching the outer side. The IF{sub 1} component of the mitochondrial complex is a basic 10 kDa protein, which inhibits the F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP hydrolase activity. The mitochondrial matrix pH is the critical factor for the inhibitory binding of the central segment of IF{sub 1} (residue 42-58) to the F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits. We have analyzed the effect of native purified IF{sub 1} the IF{sub 1}-(42-58) synthetic peptide and its mutants on proton conduction, driven by ATP hydrolysis or by [K{sup +}] gradients, in bovine heart inside-out submitochondrial particles and in liposome-reconstituted F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex. The results show that IF{sub 1}, and in particular its central 42-58 segment, displays different inhibitory affinity for proton conduction from the F{sub 1} to the F{sub o} side and in the opposite direction. Cross-linking of IF{sub 1} to F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits inhibits the ATP-driven H{sup +} translocation but enhances H{sup +} conduction in the reverse direction. These observation are discussed in terms of the rotary mechanism of the F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex.

  1. Developmental changes in ANP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activity enhanced by ATP in rat lung membrane fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Charoonroje, P; Tokumitsu, Y; Nomura, Y

    1994-01-01

    1. ANP (atrial natriuretic peptides)- or ANP/ATP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities were compared in adult (2 month old) and neonatal (5-7 day old) rat lung membrane fractions. 2. The enzyme activities of both membranes depended on the incubation time and ATP concentration: although the activities of both membranes were similar after a short incubation time (4 min), those in adult membranes were lower than those of neonatal membranes after longer incubation times (10 and 30 min) or at lower concentrations of ATP. 3. ANP/ATP gamma S-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities, which were much higher than ANP/ATP-stimulated activities, were similar in both membranes. 4. ATPase activity of adult membranes was higher than that of neonatal membranes, suggesting that hydrolysis of ATP leads to a decrease of ANP/ATP-guanylyl cyclase activity in adult membranes. Triton X-100 enhanced and diminished ANP/ATP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities of adult and neonatal membranes, respectively, and thereby abolished the adult/neonatal difference in the membrane response to ATP. 5. ANP-stimulated activities of both membranes were much more activated by pre-incubation with ATP gamma S than those induced by simultaneous addition of ATP gamma S. The former activities were decreased to levels of the latter by Triton X-100. The latter activities were not affected by Triton X-100. 6. The present results suggested that conformation of lung plasma membranes is related to activation of the ANP receptor/guanylyl cyclase system. PMID:7834209

  2. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  3. Studies on the beef heart mitochondrial F/sub 1/-ATPase with the photoaffinity label BzATP

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The photoaffinity analog of ATP, 3'-O-(4-benzoyl) benzoyl ATP (BzATP), was used in kinetics and binding studies to investigate the mechanism of the beef heart mitochondrial F/sup 1/-ATPase. New methods were developed for the synthesis and purification of non-radioactive BzATP, /sup 3/H-BzATP, and ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-BzATP, and the molar absorption coefficient for BzATP was determined. Experimental conditions for photolysis and binding studies were defined in which the stability of both BzATP and F/sub 1/ was maintained. Initial experiments examined the kinetic interactions between F/sub 1/ and BzATP. In the absence of actinic illumination, BzATP was a slow substrate for the enzyme and behaved as a classical competitive inhibitor versus ATP. Under photolytic conditions, BzATP inactivated F/sub 1/ with pseudo first-order kinetics, and the photoinactivation reaction showed rate saturation suggesting specific, reversible binding of BzATP to F/sub 1/ prior to covalent bond formation. ATP protected against F/sub 1/ photoinactivation and F/sub 1/ preparations partially modified covalently yielded the same K/sub m/ for ATP as unmodified enzyme preparations. These results strongly suggested that BzATP was bound to catalytic sites on the enzyme.

  4. Polarized ATP distribution in urothelial mucosal and serosal space is differentially regulated by stretch and ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiqun

    2015-11-15

    Purinergic signaling is a major pathway in regulating bladder function, and mechanical force stimulates urothelial ATP release, which plays an important role in bladder mechanotransduction. Although urothelial ATP release was first reported almost 20 years ago, the way in which release is regulated by mechanical force, and the presence of ATP-converting enzymes in regulating the availability of released ATP is still not well understood. Using a set of custom-designed Ussing chambers with the ability to manipulate mechanical forces applied on the urothelial tissue, we have demonstrated that it is stretch and not hydrostatic pressure that induces urothelial ATP release. The experiments reveal that urothelial ATP release is tightly controlled by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction. We have further shown that stretch-induced urothelial ATP release is insensitive to temperature (4°C). Interestingly, stretch-induced ATP release shows polarized distribution, with the ATP concentration in mucosal chamber (nanomolar level) about 10 times higher than the ATP concentration in serosal chamber (subnanomolar level). Furthermore, we have consistently observed differential ATP lifetime kinetics in the mucosal and serosal chambers, which is consistent with our immunofluorescent localization data, showing that ATP-converting enzymes ENTPD3 and alkaline phosphatase are expressed on urothelial basal surface, but not on the apical membrane. In summary, our data indicate that urothelial ATP release is finely regulated by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction, and extracellular ATP signaling is likely to be differentially regulated by ectonucleotidase, which results in temporally and spatially distinct ATP kinetics in response to mechanical stretch. PMID:26336160

  5. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naser A.; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO42-), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO42--activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S2-) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  6. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO4 (2-)), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO4 (2-)-activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5(')-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S(2-)) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  7. Inter-domain communication mechanisms in an ABC importer: a molecular dynamics study of the MalFGK2E complex.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Sofia F; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2011-08-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are ubiquitous membrane proteins that convert the energy from ATP-binding and hydrolysis into conformational changes of the transmembrane region to allow the translocation of substrates against their concentration gradient. Despite the large amount of structural and biochemical data available for this family, it is still not clear how the energy obtained from ATP hydrolysis in the ATPase domains is "transmitted" to the transmembrane domains. In this work, we focus our attention on the consequences of hydrolysis and inorganic phosphate exit in the maltose uptake system (MalFGK(2)E) from Escherichia coli. The prime goal is to identify and map the structural changes occurring during an ATP-hydrolytic cycle. For that, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations to study three potential intermediate states (with 10 replicates each): an ATP-bound, an ADP plus inorganic phosphate-bound and an ADP-bound state. Our results show that the residues presenting major rearrangements are located in the A-loop, in the helical sub-domain, and in the "EAA motif" (especially in the "coupling helices" region). Additionally, in one of the simulations with ADP we were able to observe the opening of the NBD dimer accompanied by the dissociation of ADP from the ABC signature motif, but not from its corresponding P-loop motif. This work, together with several other MD studies, suggests a common communication mechanism both for importers and exporters, in which ATP-hydrolysis induces conformational changes in the helical sub-domain region, in turn transferred to the transmembrane domains via the "coupling helices".

  8. Validation of BKV Large T-antigen ATP-Binding Site as a Target for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gang; Bueno, Marta; Camachos, Carlos J; Randhawa, Parmjeet

    2009-01-01

    Summary BK virus large T antigen (LTA) is a hexameric protein with a helicase activity that is powered by ATP hydrolysis. A mutant virus with Lys420Ala, Arg421Ala, and Asp504Ala mutations at the ATP binding sites showed marked reduction in viral fitness. This observation indicates that high throughput screening for ATPase inhibitors will be valid strategy to discover anti-BKV drugs. PMID:19084558

  9. Deletion of the murine ATP/UTP receptor P2Y2 alters mechanical and thermal response properties in polymodal cutaneous afferents.

    PubMed

    Molliver, Derek C; Rau, Kristofer K; Jankowski, Michael P; Soneji, Deepak J; Baumbauer, Kyle M; Koerber, H Richard

    2016-09-22

    P2Y2 is a member of the P2Y family of G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors that is widely co-expressed with TRPV1 in peripheral sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. To characterize P2Y2 function in cutaneous afferents, intracellular recordings from mouse sensory neurons were made using an ex vivo preparation in which hindlimb skin, saphenous nerve, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord are dissected intact. The peripheral response properties of individual cutaneous C-fibers were analyzed using digitally controlled mechanical and thermal stimuli in male P2Y2(+/+) and P2Y2(-/-) mice. Selected sensory neurons were labeled with Neurobiotin and further characterized by immunohistochemistry. In wildtype preparations, C-fibers responding to both mechanical and thermal stimuli (CMH or CMHC) preferentially bound the lectin marker IB4 and were always immunonegative for TRPV1. Conversely, cells that fired robustly to noxious heat, but were insensitive to mechanical stimuli, were TRPV1-positive and IB4-negative. P2Y2 gene deletion resulted in reduced firing by TRPV1-negative CMH fibers to a range of heat stimuli. However, we also identified an atypical population of IB4-negative, TRPV1-positive CMH fibers. Compared to wildtype CMH fibers, these TRPV1-positive neurons exhibited lower firing rates in response to mechanical stimulation, but had increased firing to noxious heat (43-51°C). Collectively, these results demonstrate that P2Y2 contributes to response properties of cutaneous afferents, as P2Y2 deletion reduces responsiveness of conventional unmyelinated polymodal afferents to heat and appears to result in the acquisition of mechanical responsiveness in a subset of TRPV1-expressing afferents. PMID:27393251

  10. Deletion of the murine ATP/UTP receptor P2Y2 alters mechanical and thermal response properties in polymodal cutaneous afferents.

    PubMed

    Molliver, Derek C; Rau, Kristofer K; Jankowski, Michael P; Soneji, Deepak J; Baumbauer, Kyle M; Koerber, H Richard

    2016-09-22

    P2Y2 is a member of the P2Y family of G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors that is widely co-expressed with TRPV1 in peripheral sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. To characterize P2Y2 function in cutaneous afferents, intracellular recordings from mouse sensory neurons were made using an ex vivo preparation in which hindlimb skin, saphenous nerve, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord are dissected intact. The peripheral response properties of individual cutaneous C-fibers were analyzed using digitally controlled mechanical and thermal stimuli in male P2Y2(+/+) and P2Y2(-/-) mice. Selected sensory neurons were labeled with Neurobiotin and further characterized by immunohistochemistry. In wildtype preparations, C-fibers responding to both mechanical and thermal stimuli (CMH or CMHC) preferentially bound the lectin marker IB4 and were always immunonegative for TRPV1. Conversely, cells that fired robustly to noxious heat, but were insensitive to mechanical stimuli, were TRPV1-positive and IB4-negative. P2Y2 gene deletion resulted in reduced firing by TRPV1-negative CMH fibers to a range of heat stimuli. However, we also identified an atypical population of IB4-negative, TRPV1-positive CMH fibers. Compared to wildtype CMH fibers, these TRPV1-positive neurons exhibited lower firing rates in response to mechanical stimulation, but had increased firing to noxious heat (43-51°C). Collectively, these results demonstrate that P2Y2 contributes to response properties of cutaneous afferents, as P2Y2 deletion reduces responsiveness of conventional unmyelinated polymodal afferents to heat and appears to result in the acquisition of mechanical responsiveness in a subset of TRPV1-expressing afferents.

  11. Extracellular ATP signaling via P2X(4) receptor and cAMP/PKA signaling mediate ATP oscillations essential for prechondrogenic condensation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon

    2012-09-01

    Prechondrogenic condensation is the most critical process in skeletal patterning. A previous study demonstrated that ATP oscillations driven by Ca(2+) oscillations play a critical role in prechondrogenic condensation by inducing oscillatory secretion. However, it remains unknown what mechanisms initiate the Ca(2+)-driven ATP oscillations, mediate the link between Ca(2+) and ATP oscillations, and then result in oscillatory secretion in chondrogenesis. This study has shown that extracellular ATP signaling was required for both ATP oscillations and prechondrogenic condensation. Among P2 receptors, the P2X(4) receptor revealed the strongest expression level and mediated ATP oscillations in chondrogenesis. Moreover, blockage of P2X(4) activity abrogated not only chondrogenic differentiation but also prechondrogenic condensation. In addition, both ATP oscillations and secretion activity depended on cAMP/PKA signaling but not on K(ATP) channel activity and PKC or PKG signaling. This study proposes that Ca(2+)-driven ATP oscillations essential for prechondrogenic condensation is initiated by extracellular ATP signaling via P2X(4) receptor and is mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling and that cAMP/PKA signaling induces oscillatory secretion to underlie prechondrogenic condensation, in cooperation with Ca(2+) and ATP oscillations.

  12. Andrographolide activates the canonical Wnt signalling pathway by a mechanism that implicates the non-ATP competitive inhibition of GSK-3β: autoregulation of GSK-3β in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Schüller, Andreas; Lindsay, Carolina B; Ureta, Roxana C; Mejías-Reyes, Cristóbal; Hancke, Juan; Melo, Francisco; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-03-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling is an important pathway that regulates multiple biological processes, including cell adhesion and determination of cell fate during animal development; in the adult nervous system it regulates the structure and function of synapses. Wnt-signalling dysfunction is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The use of natural compounds is an interesting strategy in the search for drugs with the therapeutic potential to activate this signalling pathway. In the present study, we report that andrographolide (ANDRO), a component of Andrographis paniculata, is a potent activator of Wnt signalling. Our results indicate that ANDRO activates this pathway, inducing the transcription of Wnt target genes by a mechanism that bypasses Wnt ligand binding to its receptor. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that ANDRO inhibits glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β by a non-ATP-competitive, substrate-competitive mode of action. In silico analyses suggest that ANDRO interacts with the substrate-binding site of GSK-3β. Finally, we demonstrated that the increase seen in the levels of GSK-3β phosphorylated at Ser⁹ is the result of an autoregulatory mechanism of the kinase in vivo, although not through activation of protein phosphatase type 1. Our results suggest that ANDRO could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for disorders caused by Wnt-signalling dysfunction such as neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Structure and conformational states of the bovine mitochondrial ATP synthase by cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Anna; Rohou, Alexis; Schep, Daniel G; Bason, John V; Montgomery, Martin G; Walker, John E; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Rubinstein, John L

    2015-10-06

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical energy currency of biology, is synthesized in eukaryotic cells primarily by the mitochondrial ATP synthase. ATP synthases operate by a rotary catalytic mechanism where proton translocation through the membrane-inserted FO region is coupled to ATP synthesis in the catalytic F1 region via rotation of a central rotor subcomplex. We report here single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) analysis of the bovine mitochondrial ATP synthase. Combining cryo-EM data with bioinformatic analysis allowed us to determine the fold of the a subunit, suggesting a proton translocation path through the FO region that involves both the a and b subunits. 3D classification of images revealed seven distinct states of the enzyme that show different modes of bending and twisting in the intact ATP synthase. Rotational fluctuations of the c8-ring within the FO region support a Brownian ratchet mechanism for proton-translocation-driven rotation in ATP synthases.

  14. Interacting cytoplasmic loops of subunits a and c of Escherichia coli F1F0 ATP synthase gate H+ transport to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Steed, P Ryan; Kraft, Kaitlin A; Fillingame, Robert H

    2014-11-25

    H(+)-transporting F1F0 ATP synthase catalyzes the synthesis of ATP via coupled rotary motors within F0 and F1. H(+) transport at the subunit a-c interface in transmembranous F0 drives rotation of a cylindrical c10 oligomer within the membrane, which is coupled to rotation of subunit γ within the α3β3 sector of F1 to mechanically drive ATP synthesis. F1F0 functions in a reversible manner, with ATP hydrolysis driving H(+) transport. ATP-driven H(+) transport in a select group of cysteine mutants in subunits a and c is inhibited after chelation of Ag(+) and/or Cd(+2) with the substituted sulfhydryl groups. The H(+) transport pathway mapped via these Ag(+)(Cd(+2))-sensitive Cys extends from the transmembrane helices (TMHs) of subunits a and c into cytoplasmic loops connecting the TMHs, suggesting these loop regions could be involved in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm. Here, using select loop-region Cys from the single cytoplasmic loop of subunit c and multiple cytoplasmic loops of subunit a, we show that Cd(+2) directly inhibits passive H(+) transport mediated by F0 reconstituted in liposomes. Further, in extensions of previous studies, we show that the regions mediating passive H(+) transport can be cross-linked to each other. We conclude that the loop-regions in subunits a and c that are implicated in H(+) transport likely interact in a single structural domain, which then functions in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm.

  15. Epidemic based modeling of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Arellano, Maria G; Keshwani, Deepak R

    2014-01-01

    An epidemic based model was developed to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass, dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover. The process of substrate getting adsorbed and digested by enzyme was simulated as susceptibles getting infected by viruses and becoming removed and recovered. This model simplified the dynamic enzyme "infection" process and the catalysis of cellulose into a two-parameter controlled, enzyme behavior guided mechanism. Furthermore, the model incorporates the adsorption block by lignin and inhibition effects on cellulose catalysis. The model satisfactorily predicted the enzyme adsorption and hydrolysis, negative role of lignin, and inhibition effects over hydrolysis for a broad range of substrate and enzyme loadings. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the incorporation of lignin and other inhibition effects. Our model will be a useful tool for evaluating the effects of parameters during hydrolysis and guide a design strategy for continuous hydrolysis and the associated process control.

  16. ATP synthase: a tentative structural model.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, S; Junge, W

    1997-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate at the expense of proton- or sodium-motive force across the respective coupling membrane in Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya. Cation flow through the intrinsic membrane portion of this enzyme (Fo, subunits ab2c9-12) and substrate turnover in the headpiece (F1, subunits alpha3beta3 gammadeltaepsilon) are mechanically coupled by the rotation of subunit gamma in the center of the catalytic hexagon of subunits (alphabeta)3 in F1. ATP synthase is the smallest rotatory engine in nature. With respect to the headpiece alone, it probably operates with three steps. Partial structures of six out of its at least eight different subunits have been published and a 3-dimensional structure is available for the assembly (alphabeta)3gamma. In this article, we review the available structural data and build a tentative topological model of the holoenzyme. The rotor portion is proposed to consist of a wheel of at least nine copies of subunits c, epsilon and a portion of gamma as a spoke, and another portion of gamma as a crankshaft. The stator is made up from a, the transmembrane portion of b2, delta and the catalytic hexagon of (alphabeta)3. As an educated guess, the model may be of heuristic value for ongoing studies on this fascinating electrochemical-to-mechanical-to-chemical transducer. PMID:9323021

  17. Structure and mechanism of the ATPase that powers viral genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Brendan J; Hayes, Janelle A; Stone, Nicholas P; Duffy, Caroline M; Sankaran, Banumathi; Kelch, Brian A

    2015-07-21

    Many viruses package their genomes into procapsids using an ATPase machine that is among the most powerful known biological motors. However, how this motor couples ATP hydrolysis to DNA translocation is still unknown. Here, we introduce a model system with unique properties for studying motor structure and mechanism. We describe crystal structures of the packaging motor ATPase domain that exhibit nucleotide-dependent conformational changes involving a large rotation of an entire subdomain. We also identify the arginine finger residue that catalyzes ATP hydrolysis in a neighboring motor subunit, illustrating that previous models for motor structure need revision. Our findings allow us to derive a structural model for the motor ring, which we validate using small-angle X-ray scattering and comparisons with previously published data. We illustrate the model's predictive power by identifying the motor's DNA-binding and assembly motifs. Finally, we integrate our results to propose a mechanistic model for DNA translocation by this molecular machine. PMID:26150523

  18. ATP Synthase and the Actions of Inhibitors Utilized To Study Its Roles in Human Health, Disease, and Other Scientific Areas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sangjin; Pedersen, Peter L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: ATP synthase, a double-motor enzyme, plays various roles in the cell, participating not only in ATP synthesis but in ATP hydrolysis-dependent processes and in the regulation of a proton gradient across some membrane-dependent systems. Recent studies of ATP synthase as a potential molecular target for the treatment of some human diseases have displayed promising results, and this enzyme is now emerging as an attractive molecular target for the development of new therapies for a variety of diseases. Significantly, ATP synthase, because of its complex structure, is inhibited by a number of different inhibitors and provides diverse possibilities in the development of new ATP synthase-directed agents. In this review, we classify over 250 natural and synthetic inhibitors of ATP synthase reported to date and present their inhibitory sites and their known or proposed modes of action. The rich source of ATP synthase inhibitors and their known or purported sites of action presented in this review should provide valuable insights into their applications as potential scaffolds for new therapeutics for human and animal diseases as well as for the discovery of new pesticides and herbicides to help protect the world's food supply. Finally, as ATP synthase is now known to consist of two unique nanomotors involved in making ATP from ADP and Pi, the information provided in this review may greatly assist those investigators entering the emerging field of nanotechnology. PMID:19052322

  19. ADP-ribose-derived nuclear ATP synthesis by NUDIX5 is required for chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Roni H G; Lioutas, Antonios; Le Dily, Francois; Soronellas, Daniel; Pohl, Andy; Bonet, Jaume; Nacht, A S; Samino, Sara; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Vicent, Guillermo P; Wierer, Michael; Trabado, Miriam A; Schelhorn, Constanze; Carolis, Carlo; Macias, Maria J; Yanes, Oscar; Oliva, Baldo; Beato, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Key nuclear processes in eukaryotes, including DNA replication, repair, and gene regulation, require extensive chromatin remodeling catalyzed by energy-consuming enzymes. It remains unclear how the ATP demands of such processes are met in response to rapid stimuli. We analyzed this question in the context of the massive gene regulation changes induced by progestins in breast cancer cells and found that ATP is generated in the cell nucleus via the hydrolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) to ADP-ribose. In the presence of pyrophosphate, ADP-ribose is used by the pyrophosphatase NUDIX5 to generate nuclear ATP. The nuclear source of ATP is essential for hormone-induced chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, and cell proliferation. PMID:27257257

  20. The origin of cytosolic ATP in photosynthetic cells.

    PubMed

    Gardeström, Per; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-07-01

    In photosynthetically active cells, both chloroplasts and mitochondria have the capacity to produce ATP via photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. Thus, theoretically, both organelles could provide ATP for the cytosol, but the extent, to which they actually do this, and how the process is regulated, both remain unclear. Most of the evidence discussed comes from experiments with rapid fractionation of isolated protoplasts subjected to different treatments in combination with application of specific inhibitors. The results obtained indicate that, under conditions where ATP demand for photosynthetic CO2 fixation is sufficiently high, the mitochondria supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. In contrast, under stress conditions where CO2 fixation is severely limited, ATP will build up in chloroplasts and it can then be exported to the cytosol, by metabolite shuttle mechanisms. Thus, depending on the conditions, either mitochondria or chloroplasts can supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. This supply of ATP is discussed in relation to the idea that mitochondrial functions may be tuned to provide an optimal environment for the chloroplast. By balancing cellular redox states, mitochondria can contribute to an optimal photosynthetic capacity. PMID:27087668

  1. Function and expression study uncovered hepatocyte plasma membrane ecto-ATP synthase as a novel player in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Federica; Giannoccaro, Caterina; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; De Luca, Elisa; Santacroce, Salvatore; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    ATP synthase, canonically mitochondrially located, is reported to be ectopically expressed on the plasma membrane outer face of several cell types. We analysed, for the first time, the expression and catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase during liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was induced in rats by two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The protein level and the ATP synthase and/or hydrolase activities of the hepatocyte ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase were analysed on freshly isolated hepatocytes and mitochondria from control, sham-operated and partial hepatectomized rats. During the priming phase of liver regeneration, 3 h after partial hepatectomy, liver mitochondria showed a marked lowering of the ATP synthase protein level that was reflected in the impairment of both ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. The ecto-ATP synthase level, in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, was decreased similarly to the level of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, associated with a lowering of the ecto-ATP hydrolase activity coupled to proton influx. Noteworthily, the ecto-ATP synthase activity coupled to proton efflux was completely inhibited in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, even in the presence of a marked intracellular acidification that would sustain it as in control and sham-operated hepatocytes. At the end of the liver regeneration, 7 days after partial hepatectomy, the level and the catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase reached the control and sham-operated values. The specific modulation of hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase catalytic activities during liver regeneration priming phase may modulate the extracellular ADP/ATP levels and/or proton influx/efflux trafficking, making hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase a candidate for a novel player in the liver regeneration process. PMID:27287557

  2. Function and expression study uncovered hepatocyte plasma membrane ecto-ATP synthase as a novel player in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Federica; Giannoccaro, Caterina; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; De Luca, Elisa; Santacroce, Salvatore; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    ATP synthase, canonically mitochondrially located, is reported to be ectopically expressed on the plasma membrane outer face of several cell types. We analysed, for the first time, the expression and catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase during liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was induced in rats by two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The protein level and the ATP synthase and/or hydrolase activities of the hepatocyte ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase were analysed on freshly isolated hepatocytes and mitochondria from control, sham-operated and partial hepatectomized rats. During the priming phase of liver regeneration, 3 h after partial hepatectomy, liver mitochondria showed a marked lowering of the ATP synthase protein level that was reflected in the impairment of both ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. The ecto-ATP synthase level, in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, was decreased similarly to the level of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, associated with a lowering of the ecto-ATP hydrolase activity coupled to proton influx. Noteworthily, the ecto-ATP synthase activity coupled to proton efflux was completely inhibited in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, even in the presence of a marked intracellular acidification that would sustain it as in control and sham-operated hepatocytes. At the end of the liver regeneration, 7 days after partial hepatectomy, the level and the catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase reached the control and sham-operated values. The specific modulation of hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase catalytic activities during liver regeneration priming phase may modulate the extracellular ADP/ATP levels and/or proton influx/efflux trafficking, making hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase a candidate for a novel player in the liver regeneration process.

  3. ATP-induced cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury is mediated through the RISK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Zhe-Xun; Wang, Fang; Fu, Jun-Hua; Chen, Zuo-Yuan; Xin, Hui; Yao, Ru-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the post-infarct acute effect of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) on myocardial infarction (MI) size as well as its precise molecular mechanism. Sixty New Zealand white male rabbits were exposed to 40 min of ischemia followed by 180 min of reperfusion. The rabbits were intravenously administered 3 mg/kg of ATP (ATP group) or saline (control group) immediately after reperfusion and maintained throughout the first 30 min. The wortmannin+ATP, PD-98059+ATP, and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD) sodium salt+ATP groups were separately injected with wortmannin (0.6 mg/kg), PD-98059 (0.3 mg/kg), and 5-HD (5 mg/kg) 5 min prior to ATP administration. MI size was calculated as the percentage of the risk area in the left ventricle. Myocardial apoptosis was determined using a TUNEL assay. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the levels of protein kinase B (Akt)/p-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p-ERK in the ischemic myocardium, 180 min after reperfusion. The infarct size was significantly smaller in the ATP group than in the control group (p<0.05). The infarct size-reducing effect of ATP was completely blocked by wortmannin, PD-98059 and 5-HD. Compared with the control group, cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly reduced in the ATP group, while this did not occur in the wortmannin+ATP, PD-98059+ATP and 5-HD+ATP groups. Western blot analysis revealed a higher myocardial expression of p-Akt and p-ERK 180 min following reperfusion in the ATP versus the control group. In conclusion, cardioprotection by postischemic ATP administration is mediated through activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase (RISK) pathway and opening of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channels. PMID:27698693

  4. ATP-induced cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury is mediated through the RISK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Zhe-Xun; Wang, Fang; Fu, Jun-Hua; Chen, Zuo-Yuan; Xin, Hui; Yao, Ru-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the post-infarct acute effect of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) on myocardial infarction (MI) size as well as its precise molecular mechanism. Sixty New Zealand white male rabbits were exposed to 40 min of ischemia followed by 180 min of reperfusion. The rabbits were intravenously administered 3 mg/kg of ATP (ATP group) or saline (control group) immediately after reperfusion and maintained throughout the first 30 min. The wortmannin+ATP, PD-98059+ATP, and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD) sodium salt+ATP groups were separately injected with wortmannin (0.6 mg/kg), PD-98059 (0.3 mg/kg), and 5-HD (5 mg/kg) 5 min prior to ATP administration. MI size was calculated as the percentage of the risk area in the left ventricle. Myocardial apoptosis was determined using a TUNEL assay. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the levels of protein kinase B (Akt)/p-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p-ERK in the ischemic myocardium, 180 min after reperfusion. The infarct size was significantly smaller in the ATP group than in the control group (p<0.05). The infarct size-reducing effect of ATP was completely blocked by wortmannin, PD-98059 and 5-HD. Compared with the control group, cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly reduced in the ATP group, while this did not occur in the wortmannin+ATP, PD-98059+ATP and 5-HD+ATP groups. Western blot analysis revealed a higher myocardial expression of p-Akt and p-ERK 180 min following reperfusion in the ATP versus the control group. In conclusion, cardioprotection by postischemic ATP administration is mediated through activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase (RISK) pathway and opening of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channels.

  5. E-NTPDase 3 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) from cardiomyocytes, activity and expression are modulated by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli; Cotomacci, Guilherme; Júnior, Marconi Barbosa Coutinho; Sarkis, João José Freitas

    2006-06-01

    Degradation of adenine nucleotides by myocardial cells occurs, in part, by a cascade of surface-located enzymes converting ATP into adenosine that has important implications for the regulation of the nucleotide/nucleoside ratio modulating the cardiac functions. Thyroid hormones have profound effects on cardiovascular system, as observed in hypo- and hyperthyroidism. Combined biochemical parameters and gene expression analysis approaches were used to investigate the influence of tri-iodothyronine (T3) on ATP and ADP hydrolysis by isolated myocytes. Cultures of cardiomyocytes were submitted to increasing doses of T3 for 24h. Enzymatic activity and expression were evaluated. T3 (0.1 nM) caused an increase in ATP and ADP hydrolysis. Experiments with specific inhibitors suggest the involvement of an NTPDase, which was confirmed by an increase in NTPDase 3 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Since T3 promotes an increase in the contractile protein, leading to cardiac hypertrophy, it is tempting to postulate that the increase in ATP hydrolysis and the decrease in the extracellular levels signify an important factor for prevention of excessive contractility. PMID:16584835

  6. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  7. The analgesic effect of dipyrone in peripheral tissue involves two different mechanisms: neuronal K(ATP) channel opening and CB(1) receptor activation.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Gilson Gonçalves; Dias, Elayne Vieira; Teixeira, Juliana Maia; Athie, Maria Carolina Pedro; Bonet, Ivan José Magayewski; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera; Parada, Carlos Amilcar

    2014-10-15

    Dipyrone (metamizole) is an analgesic pro-drug used to control moderate pain. It is metabolized in two major bioactive metabolites: 4-methylaminoantipyrine (4-MAA) and 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA). The aim of this study was to investigate the participation of peripheral CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors activation in the anti-hyperalgesic effect of dipyrone, 4-MAA or 4-AA. PGE2 (100ng/50µL/paw) was locally administered in the hindpaw of male Wistar rats, and the mechanical nociceptive threshold was quantified by electronic von Frey test, before and 3h after its injection. Dipyrone, 4-MAA or 4-AA was administered 30min before the von Frey test. The selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, CB2 receptor antagonist AM630, cGMP inhibitor ODQ or KATP channel blocker glibenclamide were administered 30min before dipyrone, 4-MAA or 4-AA. The antisense-ODN against CB1 receptor expression was intrathecally administered once a day during four consecutive days. PGE2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was inhibited by dipyrone, 4-MAA, and 4-AA in a dose-response manner. AM251 or ODN anti-sense against neuronal CB1 receptor, but not AM630, reversed the anti-hyperalgesic effect mediated by 4-AA, but not by dipyrone or 4-MAA. On the other hand, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of dipyrone or 4-MAA was reversed by glibenclamide or ODQ. These results suggest that the activation of neuronal CB1, but not CB2 receptor, in peripheral tissue is involved in the anti-hyperalgesic effect of 4-aminoantipyrine. In addition, 4-methylaminoantipyrine mediates the anti-hyperalgesic effect by cGMP activation and KATP opening.

  8. ATP stimulates pannexin 1 internalization to endosomal compartments.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Kim, Michelle S; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquitous pannexin 1 (Panx1) ion- and metabolite-permeable channel mediates the release of ATP, a potent signalling molecule. In the present study, we provide striking evidence that ATP, in turn, stimulates internalization of Panx1 to intracellular membranes. These findings hold important implications for understanding the regulation of Panx1 when extracellular ATP is elevated. In the nervous system, this includes phenomena such as synaptic plasticity, pain, precursor cell development and stroke; outside of the nervous system, this includes things like skeletal and smooth muscle activity and inflammation. Within 15 min, ATP led to significant Panx1-EGFP internalization. In a series of experiments, we determined that hydrolysable ATP is the most potent stimulator of Panx1 internalization. We identified two possible mechanisms for Panx1 internalization, including activation of ionotropic purinergic (P2X) receptors and involvement of a putative ATP-sensitive residue in the first extracellular loop of Panx1 (Trp(74)). Internalization was cholesterol-dependent, but clathrin, caveolin and dynamin independent. Detailed analysis of Panx1 at specific endosome sub-compartments confirmed that Panx1 is expressed in endosome membranes of the classical degradation pathway under basal conditions and that elevation of ATP levels diverts a sub-population to recycling endosomes. This is the first report detailing endosome localization of Panx1 under basal conditions and the potential for ATP regulation of its surface expression. Given the ubiquitous expression profile of Panx1 and the importance of ATP signalling, these findings are of critical importance for understanding the role of Panx1 in health and disease. PMID:26195825

  9. ATP stimulates pannexin 1 internalization to endosomal compartments.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Kim, Michelle S; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquitous pannexin 1 (Panx1) ion- and metabolite-permeable channel mediates the release of ATP, a potent signalling molecule. In the present study, we provide striking evidence that ATP, in turn, stimulates internalization of Panx1 to intracellular membranes. These findings hold important implications for understanding the regulation of Panx1 when extracellular ATP is elevated. In the nervous system, this includes phenomena such as synaptic plasticity, pain, precursor cell development and stroke; outside of the nervous system, this includes things like skeletal and smooth muscle activity and inflammation. Within 15 min, ATP led to significant Panx1-EGFP internalization. In a series of experiments, we determined that hydrolysable ATP is the most potent stimulator of Panx1 internalization. We identified two possible mechanisms for Panx1 internalization, including activation of ionotropic purinergic (P2X) receptors and involvement of a putative ATP-sensitive residue in the first extracellular loop of Panx1 (Trp(74)). Internalization was cholesterol-dependent, but clathrin, caveolin and dynamin independent. Detailed analysis of Panx1 at specific endosome sub-compartments confirmed that Panx1 is expressed in endosome membranes of the classical degradation pathway under basal conditions and that elevation of ATP levels diverts a sub-population to recycling endosomes. This is the first report detailing endosome localization of Panx1 under basal conditions and the potential for ATP regulation of its surface expression. Given the ubiquitous expression profile of Panx1 and the importance of ATP signalling, these findings are of critical importance for understanding the role of Panx1 in health and disease.

  10. Engagement of Arginine Finger to ATP Triggers Large Conformational Changes in NtrC1 AAA+ ATPase for Remodeling Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; De Carlo, Sacha; Hanson, Jeffrey A.; Yang, Haw; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2010-11-19

    The NtrC-like AAA+ ATPases control virulence and other important bacterial activities through delivering mechanical work to {sigma}54-RNA polymerase to activate transcription from {sigma}54-dependent genes. We report the first crystal structure for such an ATPase, NtrC1 of Aquifex aeolicus, in which the catalytic arginine engages the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP. Comparing the new structure with those previously known for apo and ADP-bound states supports a rigid-body displacement model that is consistent with large-scale conformational changes observed by low-resolution methods. First, the arginine finger induces rigid-body roll, extending surface loops above the plane of the ATPase ring to bind {sigma}54. Second, ATP hydrolysis permits Pi release and retraction of the arginine with a reversed roll, remodeling {sigma}54-RNAP. This model provides a fresh perspective on how ATPase subunits interact within the ring-ensemble to promote transcription, directing attention to structural changes on the arginine-finger side of an ATP-bound interface.

  11. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  12. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Heinzen, Erin L; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H; Mikati, Mohamad A; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-05-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in-vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  13. Neuronal NTPDase3 Mediates Extracellular ATP Degradation in Trigeminal Nociceptive Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihua; Trinh, Thu; Ren, Yanfang; Dirksen, Robert T.; Liu, Xiuxin

    2016-01-01

    ATP induces pain via activation of purinergic receptors in nociceptive sensory nerves. ATP signaling is terminated by ATP hydrolysis mediated by cell surface-localized ecto-nucleotidases. Using enzymatic histochemical staining, we show that ecto-ATPase activity is present in mouse trigeminal nerves. Using immunofluorescence staining, we found that ecto-NTPDase3 is expressed in trigeminal nociceptive neurons and their projections to the brainstem. In addition, ecto-ATPase activity and ecto-NTPDase3 are also detected in the nociceptive outermost layer of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that incubation with anti-NTPDase3 serum reduces extracellular ATP degradation in the nociceptive lamina of both the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and the spinal cord dorsal horn. These results are consistent with neuronal NTPDase3 activity modulating pain signal transduction and transmission by affecting extracellular ATP hydrolysis within the trigeminal nociceptive pathway. Thus, disruption of trigeminal neuronal NTPDase3 expression and localization to presynaptic terminals during chronic inflammation, local constriction and injury may contribute to the pathogenesis of orofacial neuropathic pain. PMID:27706204

  14. Allosteric opening of the polypeptide-binding site when an Hsp70 binds ATP

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ruifeng; Sarbeng, Evans Boateng; Liu, Qun; Le, Katherine Quynh; Xu, Xinping; Xu, Hongya; Yang, Jiao; Wong, Jennifer Li; Vorvis, Christina; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Qinglian

    2013-01-01

    The 70kD heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones essential for cellular protein folding and proteostasis. Each Hsp70 has two functional domains: a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) that binds and hydrolyzes ATP, and a substrate-binding domain (SBD) that binds extended polypeptides. NBD and SBD interact little when in ADP; however, ATP binding allosterically couples the polypeptide- and ATP-binding sites. ATP binding promotes polypeptide release; polypeptide rebinding stimulates ATP hydrolysis. This allosteric coupling is poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structure of an intact Hsp70 from Escherichia coli in an ATP-bound state at 1.96 Å resolution. NBD-ATP adopts a unique conformation, forming extensive interfaces with a radically changed SBD that has its α-helical lid displaced and the polypeptide-binding channel of its β-subdomain restructured. These conformational changes together with our biochemical tests provide a long-sought structural explanation for allosteric coupling in Hsp70 activity. PMID:23708608

  15. Analysis of the Isolated SecA DEAD Motor Suggests a Mechanism for Chemical-Mechanical Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Shilton, Brian H

    2011-09-28

    The preprotein cross-linking domain and C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli SecA were removed to create a minimal DEAD motor, SecA-DM. SecA-DM hydrolyzes ATP and has the same affinity for ADP as full-length SecA. The crystal structure of SecA-DM in complex with ADP was solved and shows the DEAD motor in a closed conformation. Comparison with the structure of the E. coli DEAD motor in an open conformation (Protein Data Bank ID 2FSI) indicates main-chain conformational changes in two critical sequences corresponding to Motif III and Motif V of the DEAD helicase family. The structures that the Motif III and Motif V sequences adopt in the DEAD motor open conformation are incompatible with the closed conformation. Therefore, when the DEAD motor makes the transition from open to closed, Motif III and Motif V are forced to change their conformations, which likely functions to regulate passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis. The transition state for ATP hydrolysis for the SecA DEAD motor was modeled based on the conformation of the Vasa helicase in complex with adenylyl imidodiphosphate and RNA (Protein Data Bank ID 2DB3). A mechanism for chemical-mechanical coupling emerges, where passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis is hindered by the conformational changes required in Motif III and Motif V, and may be promoted by binding interactions with the preprotein substrate and/or other translocase domains and subunits.

  16. Analysis of the Isolated SecA DEAD Motor Suggests a Mechanism for Chemical-Mechanical Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Shilton, Brian H

    2010-09-20

    The preprotein cross-linking domain and C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli SecA were removed to create a minimal DEAD motor, SecA-DM. SecA-DM hydrolyzes ATP and has the same affinity for ADP as full-length SecA. The crystal structure of SecA-DM in complex with ADP was solved and shows the DEAD motor in a closed conformation. Comparison with the structure of the E. coli DEAD motor in an open conformation (Protein Data Bank ID 2FSI) indicates main-chain conformational changes in two critical sequences corresponding to Motif III and Motif V of the DEAD helicase family. The structures that the Motif III and Motif V sequences adopt in the DEAD motor open conformation are incompatible with the closed conformation. Therefore, when the DEAD motor makes the transition from open to closed, Motif III and Motif V are forced to change their conformations, which likely functions to regulate passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis. The transition state for ATP hydrolysis for the SecA DEAD motor was modeled based on the conformation of the Vasa helicase in complex with adenylyl imidodiphosphate and RNA (Protein Data Bank ID 2DB3). A mechanism for chemical-mechanical coupling emerges, where passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis is hindered by the conformational changes required in Motif III and Motif V, and may be promoted by binding interactions with the preprotein substrate and/or other translocase domains and subunits.

  17. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  18. Alkali hydrolysis of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Karasch, Christian; Popovic, Milan; Qasim, Mohamed; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Data for alkali hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution at pH 12.0 under static (pH-controlled) as well as dynamic (pH-uncontrolled) conditions are reported. The experiments were conducted at two different molar ratios of TNT to hydroxyl ions at room temperature. The TNT disappeared rapidly from the solution as a first-order reaction. The complete disappearance of aromatic structure from the aqueous solution within 24 h was confirmed by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the samples. Cuvet experiments in a UV-VIS spectrophotometer demonstrated the formation of Meisenheimer complex, which slowly disappeared via formation of aromatic compounds with fewer nitro groups. The known metabolites of TNT were found to accumulate only in very small quantities in the liquid phase.

  19. Inhibition of Multidrug Resistance-Linked P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1) Function by 5′-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5′-Adenosine: Evidence for an ATP Analog That Interacts With Both Drug-Substrate- and Nucleotide-Binding Sites†

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Shinobu; Chufan, Eduardo; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Ettore; Sauna, Zuben E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2011-01-01

    5′-fluorosulfonylbenzonyl 5′-adenosine (FSBA) is an ATP analog that covalently modifies several residues in the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of several ATPases, kinases and other proteins. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of amphipathic anticancer agents from cancer cells. We investigated the interactions of FSBA with P-gp to study the catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis. Incubation of P-gp with FSBA inhibited ATP hydrolysis (IC50= 0.21 mM) and the binding of 8-azido[α–32P]ATP (IC50= 0.68 mM). In addition, 14C-FSBA crosslinks to P-gp, suggesting that FSBA-mediated inhibition of ATP hydrolysis is irreversible due to covalent modification of P-gp. However, when the NBDs were occupied with a saturating concentration of ATP prior to treatment, FSBA stimulated ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Furthermore, FSBA inhibited the photocrosslinking of P-gp with [125I]-Iodoaryl-azidoprazosin (IAAP; IC50 = 0.17 mM). As IAAP is a transport substrate for P-gp, this suggests that FSBA affects not only the NBDs, but also the transport-substrate site in the transmembrane domains. Consistent with these results, FSBA blocked efflux of rhodamine 123 from P-gp-expressing cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis identified FSBA crosslinks to residues within or nearby the NBDs but not in the transmembrane domains and docking of FSBA in a homology model of human P-gp NBDs supports the biochemical studies. Thus, FSBA is an ATP analog that interacts with both the drug-binding and ATP-binding sites of P-gp, but fluorosulfonyl-mediated crosslinking is observed only at the NBDs. PMID:21452853

  20. Does ATP cross the cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Although there is an abundance of evidence which indicates that ATP is released as well as taken up by cells, the concept that ATP cannot cross the cell membrane has tended to prevail. This article reviews the evidence for the release as well as uptake of ATP by cells. The evidence presented by various investigators clearly indicates that ATP can cross the cell membrane and suggests that the release and uptake of ATP are physiological processes. PMID:7051582

  1. The Use of Metal Fluoride Compounds as Phosphate Analogs for Understanding the Structural Mechanism in P-type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Danko, Stefania J; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-bound protein family, P-type ATPases, couples ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across the membrane and forms an obligatory auto-phosphorylated intermediate in the transport cycle. The metal fluoride compounds, BeF x , AlF x , and MgF x , as phosphate analogs stabilize different enzyme structural states in the phosphoryl transfer/hydrolysis reactions, thereby fixing otherwise short-lived intermediate and transient structural states and enabling their biochemical and atomic-level crystallographic studies. The compounds thus make an essential contribution for understanding of the ATP-driven transport mechanism. Here, with a representative member of P-type ATPase, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), we describe the method for their binding and for structural and functional characterization of the bound states, and their assignments to states occurring in the transport cycle. PMID:26695034

  2. Mismatch recognition-coupled stabilization of Msh2-Msh6 in an ATP-bound state at the initiation of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Antony, Edwin; Hingorani, Manju M

    2003-07-01

    Mismatch repair proteins correct errors in DNA via an ATP-driven process. In eukaryotes, the Msh2-Msh6 complex recognizes base pair mismatches and small insertion/deletions in DNA and initiates repair. Both Msh2 and Msh6 proteins contain Walker ATP-binding motifs that are necessary for repair activity. To understand how these proteins couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to DNA binding/mismatch recognition, the ATPase activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh6 was examined under pre-steady-state conditions. Acid-quench experiments revealed that in the absence of DNA, Msh2-Msh6 hydrolyzes ATP rapidly (burst rate = 3 s(-1) at 20 degrees C) and then undergoes a slow step in the pathway that limits catalytic turnover (k(cat) = 0.1 s(-1)). ATP is hydrolyzed similarly in the presence of fully matched duplex DNA; however, in the presence of a G:T mismatch or +T insertion-containing DNA, ATP hydrolysis is severely suppressed (rate = 0.1 s(-1)). Pulse-chase experiments revealed that Msh2-Msh6 binds ATP rapidly in the absence or in the presence of DNA (rate = 0.1 microM(-1) s(-1)), indicating that for the Msh2-Msh6.mismatched DNA complex, a step after ATP binding but before or at ATP hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the pathway. Thus, mismatch recognition is coupled to a dramatic increase in the residence time of ATP on Msh2-Msh6. This mismatch-induced, stable ATP-bound state of Msh2-Msh6 likely signals downstream events in the repair pathway. PMID:12820877

  3. DNA Stimulates ATP-Dependent Proteolysis and Protein-Dependent ATPase Activity of Protease La from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chin Ha; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1982-02-01

    The product of the lon gene in Escherichia coli is an ATP-dependent protease, protease La, that also binds strongly to DNA. Addition of double-stranded or single-stranded DNA to the protease in the presence of ATP was found to stimulate the hydrolysis of casein or globin 2- to 7-fold, depending on the DNA concentration. Native DNA from several sources (plasmid pBR322, phage T7, or calf thymus) had similar effects, but after denaturation the DNA was 20-100% more effective than the native form. Although poly(rA), globin mRNA, and various tRNAs did not stimulate proteolysis, poly(rC) and poly(rU) were effective. Poly(dT) was stimulatory but (dT)10 was not. In the presence of DNA as in its absence, proteolysis required concomitant ATP hydrolysis, and the addition of DNA also enhanced ATP hydrolysis by protease La 2-fold, but only in the presence of casein. At much higher concentrations, DNA inhibited proteolysis as well as ATP cleavage. Thus, association of this enzyme with DNA may regulate the degradation of cell proteins in vivo.

  4. Follow the ATP: tumor energy production: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Oronsky, Neil; Fanger, Gary R; Parker, Christopher W; Caroen, Scott Z; Lybeck, Michelle; Scicinski, Jan J

    2014-01-01

    As early as the 1920s, the eminent physician and chemist, Otto Warburg, nominated for a second Nobel Prize for his work on fermentation, observed that the core metabolic signature of cancer cells is a high glycolytic flux. Warburg averred that the prime mover of cancer is defective mitochondrial respiration, which drives a switch to an alternative energy source, aerobic glycolysis in lieu of Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS), in an attempt to maintain cellular viability and support critical macromolecular needs. The cell, deprived of mitochondrial ATP production, must reprogram its metabolism as a secondary survival mechanism to maintain sufficient ATP and NADH levels for macromolecule production, membrane integrity and DNA synthesis as well as maintenance of membrane ionic gradients. A time-tested method to identify and disrupt criminal activity is to "follow the money" since the illicit proceeds from crime are required to underwrite it. By analogy, strategies to target cancer involve following and disrupting the flow of ATP and NADH, the energetic and redox "currencies" of the cell, respectively, since the tumor requires high levels of ATP and NADH, not only for metastasis and proliferation, but also, on a more basic level, for survival. Accordingly, four broad ATP reduction strategies to impact and potentially derail cancer energy production are highlighted herein: 1) small molecule energy-restriction mimetic agents (ERMAs) that target various aspects of energy metabolism, 2) reduction of energy 'subsidization' with autophagy inhibitors, 3) acceleration of ATP turnover to increase energy inefficiency, and 4) dietary energy restriction to limit the energy supply.

  5. Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Eyup; Zhou, Sitong; DeCourcey, James; Wang, Yixuan; Waugh, Richard E; Wan, Jiandi

    2015-09-22

    Piezo proteins (Piezo1 and Piezo2) are recently identified mechanically activated cation channels in eukaryotic cells and associated with physiological responses to touch, pressure, and stretch. In particular, human RBCs express Piezo1 on their membranes, and mutations of Piezo1 have been linked to hereditary xerocytosis. To date, however, physiological functions of Piezo1 on normal RBCs remain poorly understood. Here, we show that Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs by controlling the shear-induced calcium (Ca(2+)) influx. We find that, in human RBCs treated with Piezo1 inhibitors or having mutant Piezo1 channels, the amounts of shear-induced ATP release and Ca(2+) influx decrease significantly. Remarkably, a critical extracellular Ca(2+) concentration is required to trigger significant ATP release, but membrane-associated ATP pools in RBCs also contribute to the release of ATP. Our results show how Piezo1 channels are likely to function in normal RBCs and suggest a previously unidentified mechanotransductive pathway in ATP release. Thus, we anticipate that the study will impact broadly on the research of red cells, cellular mechanosensing, and clinical studies related to red cell disorders and vascular disease.

  6. Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Eyup; Zhou, Sitong; DeCourcey, James; Wang, Yixuan; Waugh, Richard E.; Wan, Jiandi

    2015-01-01

    Piezo proteins (Piezo1 and Piezo2) are recently identified mechanically activated cation channels in eukaryotic cells and associated with physiological responses to touch, pressure, and stretch. In particular, human RBCs express Piezo1 on their membranes, and mutations of Piezo1 have been linked to hereditary xerocytosis. To date, however, physiological functions of Piezo1 on normal RBCs remain poorly understood. Here, we show that Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs by controlling the shear-induced calcium (Ca2+) influx. We find that, in human RBCs treated with Piezo1 inhibitors or having mutant Piezo1 channels, the amounts of shear-induced ATP release and Ca2+ influx decrease significantly. Remarkably, a critical extracellular Ca2+ concentration is required to trigger significant ATP release, but membrane-associated ATP pools in RBCs also contribute to the release of ATP. Our results show how Piezo1 channels are likely to function in normal RBCs and suggest a previously unidentified mechanotransductive pathway in ATP release. Thus, we anticipate that the study will impact broadly on the research of red cells, cellular mechanosensing, and clinical studies related to red cell disorders and vascular disease. PMID:26351678

  7. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  8. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  9. Kinetic mechanism of the fastest motor protein, Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Kashiyama, Taku; Mogami, Toshifumi; Kon, Takahide; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2007-07-01

    Chara corallina class XI myosin is by far the fastest molecular motor. To investigate the molecular mechanism of this fast movement, we performed a kinetic analysis of a recombinant motor domain of Chara myosin. We estimated the time spent in the strongly bound state with actin by measuring rate constants of ADP dissociation from actin.motor domain complex and ATP-induced dissociation of the motor domain from actin. The rate constant of ADP dissociation from acto-motor domain was >2800 s(-1), and the rate constant of ATP-induced dissociation of the motor domain from actin at physiological ATP concentration was 2200 s(-1). From these data, the time spent in the strongly bound state with actin was estimated to be <0.82 ms. This value is the shortest among known values for various myosins and yields the duty ratio of <0.3 with a V(max) value of the actin-activated ATPase activity of 390 s(-1). The addition of the long neck domain of myosin Va to the Chara motor domain largely increased the velocity of the motility without increasing the ATP hydrolysis cycle rate, consistent with the swinging lever model. In addition, this study reveals some striking kinetic features of Chara myosin that are suited for the fast movement: a dramatic acceleration of ADP release by actin (1000-fold) and extremely fast ATP binding rate.

  10. Torque Generation Mechanism of F1-ATPase upon NTP Binding

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Hidenobu C.; Yukawa, Ayako; Iwatate, Ryu John; Kamiya, Mako; Watanabe, Rikiya; Urano, Yasuteru; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Molecular machines fueled by NTP play pivotal roles in a wide range of cellular activities. One common feature among NTP-driven molecular machines is that NTP binding is a major force-generating step among the elementary reaction steps comprising NTP hydrolysis. To understand the mechanism in detail,in this study, we conducted a single-molecule rotation assay of the ATP-driven rotary motor protein F1-ATPase using uridine triphosphate (UTP) and a base-free nucleotide (ribose triphosphate) to investigate the impact of a pyrimidine base or base depletion on kinetics and force generation. Although the binding rates of UTP and ribose triphosphate were 103 and 106 times, respectively, slower than that of ATP, they supported rotation, generating torque comparable to that generated by ATP. Affinity change of F1 to UTP coupled with rotation was determined, and the results again were comparable to those for ATP, suggesting that F1 exerts torque upon the affinity change to UTP via rotation similar to ATP-driven rotation. Thus, the adenine-ring significantly enhances the binding rate, although it is not directly involved in force generation. Taking into account the findings from another study on F1 with mutated phosphate-binding residues, it was proposed that progressive bond formation between the phosphate region and catalytic residues is responsible for the rotation-coupled change in affinity. PMID:24988350

  11. Torque generation mechanism of F1-ATPase upon NTP binding.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidenobu C; Yukawa, Ayako; Iwatate, Ryu John; Kamiya, Mako; Watanabe, Rikiya; Urano, Yasuteru; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    Molecular machines fueled by NTP play pivotal roles in a wide range of cellular activities. One common feature among NTP-driven molecular machines is that NTP binding is a major force-generating step among the elementary reaction steps comprising NTP hydrolysis. To understand the mechanism in detail,in this study, we conducted a single-molecule rotation assay of the ATP-driven rotary motor protein F1-ATPase using uridine triphosphate (UTP) and a base-free nucleotide (ribose triphosphate) to investigate the impact of a pyrimidine base or base depletion on kinetics and force generation. Although the binding rates of UTP and ribose triphosphate were 10(3) and 10(6) times, respectively, slower than that of ATP, they supported rotation, generating torque comparable to that generated by ATP. Affinity change of F1 to UTP coupled with rotation was determined, and the results again were comparable to those for ATP, suggesting that F1 exerts torque upon the affinity change to UTP via rotation similar to ATP-driven rotation. Thus, the adenine-ring significantly enhances the binding rate, although it is not directly involved in force generation. Taking into account the findings from another study on F1 with mutated phosphate-binding residues, it was proposed that progressive bond formation between the phosphate region and catalytic residues is responsible for the rotation-coupled change in affinity.

  12. ATP synthase: from single molecule to human bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    KAGAWA, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase (FoF1) consists of an ATP-driven motor (F1) and a H+-driven motor (Fo), which rotate in opposite directions. FoF1 reconstituted into a lipid membrane is capable of ATP synthesis driven by H+ flux. As the basic structures of F1 (α3β3γδε) and Fo (ab2c10) are ubiquitous, stable thermophilic FoF1 (TFoF1) has been used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, while human F1Fo (HF1Fo) has been used to study biomedical significance. Among F1s, only thermophilic F1 (TF1) can be analyzed simultaneously by reconstitution, crystallography, mutagenesis and nanotechnology for torque-driven ATP synthesis using elastic coupling mechanisms. In contrast to the single operon of TFoF1, HFoF1 is encoded by both nuclear DNA with introns and mitochondrial DNA. The regulatory mechanism, tissue specificity and physiopathology of HFoF1 were elucidated by proteomics, RNA interference, cytoplasts and transgenic mice. The ATP synthesized daily by HFoF1 is in the order of tens of kilograms, and is primarily controlled by the brain in response to fluctuations in activity. PMID:20689227

  13. Identification of the citrate-binding site of human ATP-citrate lyase using X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Hayakawa, Koto; Bateman, Katherine S; Fraser, Marie E

    2010-08-27

    ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) catalyzes the conversion of citrate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate, coupled with the hydrolysis of ATP. In humans, ACLY is the cytoplasmic enzyme linking energy metabolism from carbohydrates to the production of fatty acids. In situ proteolysis of full-length human ACLY gave crystals of a truncated form, revealing the conformations of residues 2-425, 487-750, and 767-820 of the 1101-amino acid protein. Residues 2-425 form three domains homologous to the beta-subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS), while residues 487-820 form two domains homologous to the alpha-subunit of SCS. The crystals were grown in the presence of tartrate or the substrate, citrate, and the structure revealed the citrate-binding site. A loop formed by residues 343-348 interacts via specific hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups on the prochiral center of citrate. Arg-379 forms a salt bridge with the pro-R carboxylate of citrate. The pro-S carboxylate is free to react, providing insight into the stereospecificity of ACLY. Because this is the first structure of any member of the acyl-CoA synthetase (NDP-forming) superfamily in complex with its organic acid substrate, locating the citrate-binding site is significant for understanding the catalytic mechanism of each member, including the prototype SCS. Comparison of the CoA-binding site of SCSs with the similar structure in ACLY showed that ACLY possesses a different CoA-binding site. Comparisons of the nucleotide-binding site of SCSs with the similar structure in ACLY indicates that this is the ATP-binding site of ACLY.

  14. A sequential mechanism for clathrin cage disassembly by 70-kDa heat-shock cognate protein (Hsc70) and auxilin.

    PubMed

    Rothnie, Alice; Clarke, Anthony R; Kuzmic, Petr; Cameron, Angus; Smith, Corinne J

    2011-04-26

    An essential stage in endocytic coated vesicle recycling is the dissociation of clathrin from the vesicle coat by the molecular chaperone, 70-kDa heat-shock cognate protein (Hsc70), and the J-domain-containing protein, auxilin, in an ATP-dependent process. We present a detailed mechanistic analysis of clathrin disassembly catalyzed by Hsc70 and auxilin, using loss of perpendicular light scattering to monitor the process. We report that a single auxilin per clathrin triskelion is required for maximal rate of disassembly, that ATP is hydrolyzed at the same rate that disassembly occurs, and that three ATP molecules are hydrolyzed per clathrin triskelion released. Stopped-flow measurements revealed a lag phase in which the scattering intensity increased owing to association of Hsc70 with clathrin cages followed by serial rounds of ATP hydrolysis prior to triskelion removal. Global fit of stopped-flow data to several physically plausible mechanisms showed the best fit to a model in which sequential hydrolysis of three separate ATP molecules is required for the eventual release of a triskelion from the clathrin-auxilin cage.

  15. ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi exchange catalyzed by plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase from kidney proximal tubules

    SciTech Connect

    Vieyra, A.; Caruso-Neves, C.; Meyer-Fernandes, J.R. )

    1991-06-05

    The Ca(2+)-stimulated adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate-orthophosphate (ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi) exchange reaction was studied using a vesicular preparation derived from plasma membrane of kidney proximal tubules. With native inside-out vesicles, ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi was stimulated by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations. Treatment of the vesicles with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 that abolished Ca2+ accumulation, strongly inhibited ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi. When Ca(2+)-ATPase was solubilized with the nonionic detergent octaethylene glycol mono n-dodecyl ether, maximal activation of ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi required millimolar Ca2+ concentrations. These Ca2+ concentrations inhibited ATP hydrolysis. ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi exhibited a Michaelian dependence on Pi and Mg2+, was stimulated by ATP, and depended on the ATP/ADP ratio. ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi was modified by the osmolytes urea, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and sucrose, which are representative of the methylamines and polyols that normally accumulate in renal tissue. These compounds did not modify the apparent affinity for Pi; they affected the response to ADP in the same fashion as the overall rate of ATP in equilibrium 32Pi, and their effects depended on medium pH. These data show that the Ca(2+)-ATPase from plasma membrane kidney proximal tubules can operate simultaneously in forward and backward directions. They also show that ATP in equilibrium with 32Pi is modulated by the ligands Ca2+, ATP, ADP, Pi, Mg2+, and H+, and by organic solutes found in renal tissue.

  16. The influence of lignin on steam pretreatment and mechanical pulping of poplar to achieve high sugar recovery and ease of enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Richard P; Chu, QiuLu; Hu, Jinguang; Zhong, Na; Lin, Mandy; Lee, Jin-Suk; Saddler, Jack

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of enhancing overall carbohydrate recovery and reducing enzyme loading refiner mechanical pulping and steam pretreatment (210°C, 5 min) were used to pretreat poplar wood chips. Neutral sulphonation post-treatment indicated that, although the lignin present in the steam pretreated substrate was less reactive, the cellulose-rich, water insoluble component was more accessible to cellulases and Simons stain. This was likely due to lignin relocation as the relative surface lignin measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy increased from 0.4 to 0.8. The integration of sulphite directly into steam pretreatment resulted in the solubilisation of 60% of the lignin while more than 80% of the carbohydrate present in the original substrate was recovered in the water insoluble fraction after Na2CO3 addition. More than 80% of the sugars present in the original cellulose and xylan could be recovered after 48 h using an enzyme loading of 20 mg protein/g cellulose at a 10% substrate concentration.

  17. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  18. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon/sup -/ cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes (/sup 3/H)methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles.

  19. Cardiac Metabolism in Heart Failure - Implications beyond ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Doenst, Torsten; Nguyen, T. Dung; Abel, E. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The heart has a high rate of ATP production and turnover which is required to maintain its continuous mechanical work. Perturbations in ATP generating processes may therefore affect contractile function directly. Characterizing cardiac metabolism in heart failure revealed several metabolic alterations termed metabolic remodeling, ranging from changes in substrate utilization to mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in ATP deficiency and impaired contractility. However, ATP depletion is not the only relevant consequence of metabolic remodeling during heart failure. By providing cellular building blocks and signaling molecules, metabolic pathways control essential processes such as cell growth and regeneration. Thus, alterations in cardiac metabolism may also affect the progression to heart failure by mechanisms beyond ATP supply. Our aim is therefore to highlight that metabolic remodeling in heart failure not only results in impaired cardiac energetics, but also induces other processes implicated in the development of heart failure such as structural remodeling and oxidative stress. Accordingly, modulating cardiac metabolism in heart failure may have significant therapeutic relevance that goes beyond the energetic aspect. PMID:23989714

  20. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function.

  1. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:26930489

  2. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:26930489

  3. ATP-binding sites in brain p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), a multifunctional AAA ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2003-01-01

    VCP (valosin-containing protein) or p97 is a member of the AAA family (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities family), a diverse group of proteins sharing a key conserved AAA module containing duplicate putative ATP-binding sites. Although the functions of the AAA family are related to their putative ATP-binding sites, the binding of ATP to these sites has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, the ATP-binding site(s) of brain VCP was characterized using the photoreactive ATP analogue, BzATP [3'- O -(4-benzoy