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Sample records for atp hydrolysis mechanism

  1. [Mechanism of coupling of ion transport and ATP hydrolysis in the Na-pump].

    PubMed

    Tverdislov, V A; Iakovenko, L V; Rezaeva, M N

    1979-01-01

    A generalized scheme of the reaction pathways during activation of the Na,K-ATPase by sodium and potassium ions and a relevant molecular model of the Na-pump are proposed. The model suggests light and heavy enzyme subunits possessing cavities with ion exchange sites. The cavities are of limited size and can contain only 3 sodium or 2 potassium ions. Free energy of ATP hydrolysis is expended on the formation of a special transient nonequilibrium enzyme conformation. In this conformation ion exchange between the subunit cavities becames possible. Na-pump operates as an enthropy machine: the ion movement across the membrane is provided by thermal oscillations of the subunits.

  2. Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Chen, Jiejin; Glynn, Steven E; Nager, Andrew R; Grant, Robert A; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2017-04-07

    The HslUV proteolytic machine consists of HslV, a double-ring self-compartmentalized peptidase, and one or two AAA+ HslU ring hexamers that hydrolyze ATP to power the unfolding of protein substrates and their translocation into the proteolytic chamber of HslV. Here, we use genetic tethering and disulfide bonding strategies to construct HslU pseudohexamers containing mixtures of ATPase active and inactive subunits at defined positions in the hexameric ring. Genetic tethering impairs HslV binding and degradation, even for pseudohexamers with six active subunits, but disulfide-linked pseudohexamers do not have these defects, indicating that the peptide tether interferes with HslV interactions. Importantly, pseudohexamers containing different patterns of hydrolytically active and inactive subunits retain the ability to unfold protein substrates and/or collaborate with HslV in their degradation, supporting a model in which ATP hydrolysis and linked mechanical function in the HslU ring operate by a probabilistic mechanism.

  3. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  4. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  5. Studies of the maltose transport system reveal a mechanism for coupling ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation without direct recognition of substrate.

    PubMed

    Gould, Alister D; Shilton, Brian H

    2010-04-09

    The ATPase activity of the maltose transporter (MalFGK(2)) is dependent on interactions with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). To determine whether direct interactions between the translocated sugar and MalFGK(2) are important for the regulation of ATP hydrolysis, we used an MBP mutant (sMBP) that is able to bind either maltose or sucrose. We observed that maltose- and sucrose-bound sMBP stimulate equal levels of MalFGK(2) ATPase activity. Therefore, the ATPase activity of MalFGK(2) is coupled to translocation of maltose solely by interactions between MalFGK(2) and MBP. For both maltose and sucrose, the ability of sMBP to stimulate the MalFGK(2) ATPase was greatly reduced compared with wild-type MBP, indicating that the mutations in sMBP have interfered with important interactions between MBP and MalFGK(2). High resolution crystal structure analysis of sMBP shows that in the closed conformation with bound sucrose, three of four mutations are buried, and the fourth causes only a minor change in the accessible surface. In contrast, in the open form of sMBP, all of the mutations are accessible, and the main chain of Tyr(62)-Gly(69) is destabilized and occupies an alternative conformation due to the W62Y mutation. On this basis, the compromised ability of sMBP to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by MalFGK(2) is most likely due to a disruption of interactions between MalFGK(2) and the open, rather than the closed, conformation of sMBP. Modeling the open sMBP structure bound to MalFGK(2) in the transition state for ATP hydrolysis points to an important site of interaction and suggests a mechanism for coupling ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation that is independent of the exact structure of the substrate.

  6. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites.

  7. Studies of the Maltose Transport System Reveal a Mechanism for Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Substrate Translocation without Direct Recognition of Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Alister D.; Shilton, Brian H.

    2010-10-11

    The ATPase activity of the maltose transporter (MalFGK{sub 2}) is dependent on interactions with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). To determine whether direct interactions between the translocated sugar and MalFGK{sub 2} are important for the regulation of ATP hydrolysis, we used an MBP mutant (sMBP) that is able to bind either maltose or sucrose. We observed that maltose- and sucrose-bound sMBP stimulate equal levels of MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase activity. Therefore, the ATPase activity of MalFGK{sub 2} is coupled to translocation of maltose solely by interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and MBP. For both maltose and sucrose, the ability of sMBP to stimulate the MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase was greatly reduced compared with wild-type MBP, indicating that the mutations in sMBP have interfered with important interactions between MBP and MalFGK{sub 2}. High resolution crystal structure analysis of sMBP shows that in the closed conformation with bound sucrose, three of four mutations are buried, and the fourth causes only a minor change in the accessible surface. In contrast, in the open form of sMBP, all of the mutations are accessible, and the main chain of Tyr{sup 62}-Gly{sup 69} is destabilized and occupies an alternative conformation due to the W62Y mutation. On this basis, the compromised ability of sMBP to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by MalFGK{sub 2} is most likely due to a disruption of interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and the open, rather than the closed, conformation of sMBP. Modeling the open sMBP structure bound to MalFGK{sub 2} in the transition state for ATP hydrolysis points to an important site of interaction and suggests a mechanism for coupling ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation that is independent of the exact structure of the substrate.

  8. About a switch: how P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) harnesses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to do mechanical work.

    PubMed

    Sauna, Zuben E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2007-01-01

    The efflux of drugs by the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1) is one of the principal means by which cancer cells evade chemotherapy and exhibit multidrug resistance. Mechanistic studies of Pgp-mediated transport, however, transcend the importance of this protein per se as they help us understand the transport pathway of the ATP-binding cassette proteins in general. The ATP-binding cassette proteins comprise one of the largest protein families, are central to cellular physiology, and constitute important drug targets. The functional unit of Pgp consists of two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD) and two transmembrane domains that are involved in the transport of drug substrates. Early studies postulated that conformational changes as a result of ATP hydrolysis were transmitted to the transmembrane domains bringing about drug transport. More recent structural and biochemical studies on the other hand suggested that ATP binds at the interface of the two NBDs and induces the formation of a closed dimer, and it has been hypothesized that this dimerization and subsequent ATP hydrolysis powers transport. Based on the mutational and biochemical work on Pgp and structural studies with isolated NBDs, we review proposed schemes for the catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis and the transport pathway.

  9. Cation Transport Coupled to ATP Hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase: An Integrated, Animated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Francisco A.; Furriel, Rosa P. M.; McNamara, John C.; Horisberger, Jean D.; Borin, Ivana A.

    2010-01-01

    An Adobe[R] animation is presented for use in undergraduate Biochemistry courses, illustrating the mechanism of Na[superscript +] and K[superscript +] translocation coupled to ATP hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase, a P[subscript 2c]-type ATPase, or ATP-powered ion pump that actively translocates cations across plasma membranes. The enzyme is also…

  10. Defining the Role of ATP Hydrolysis in Mitotic Segregation of Bacterial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Ah-Seng, Yoan; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysis of ATP by partition ATPases, although considered a key step in the segregation mechanism that assures stable inheritance of plasmids, is intrinsically very weak. The cognate centromere-binding protein (CBP), together with DNA, stimulates the ATPase to hydrolyse ATP and to undertake the relocation that incites plasmid movement, apparently confirming the need for hydrolysis in partition. However, ATP-binding alone changes ATPase conformation and properties, making it difficult to rigorously distinguish the substrate and cofactor roles of ATP in vivo. We had shown that mutation of arginines R36 and R42 in the F plasmid CBP, SopB, reduces stimulation of SopA-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis without changing SopA-SopB affinity, suggesting the role of hydrolysis could be analyzed using SopA with normal conformational responses to ATP. Here, we report that strongly reducing SopB-mediated stimulation of ATP hydrolysis results in only slight destabilization of mini-F, although the instability, as well as an increase in mini-F clustering, is proportional to the ATPase deficit. Unexpectedly, the reduced stimulation also increased the frequency of SopA relocation over the nucleoid. The increase was due to drastic shortening of the period spent by SopA at nucleoid ends; average speed of migration per se was unchanged. Reduced ATP hydrolysis was also associated with pronounced deviations in positioning of mini-F, though time-averaged positions changed only modestly. Thus, by specifically targeting SopB-stimulated ATP hydrolysis our study reveals that even at levels of ATPase which reduce the efficiency of splitting clusters and the constancy of plasmid positioning, SopB still activates SopA mobility and plasmid positioning, and sustains near wild type levels of plasmid stability. PMID:24367270

  11. Multiple-step kinetic mechanism of DNA-independent ATP binding and hydrolysis by Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB protein: quantitative analysis using the rapid quench-flow method.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, S; Jezewska, M J; Bujalowski, W

    2000-11-10

    The kinetic mechanism of DNA-independent binding and hydrolysis of ATP by the E. coli replicative helicase DnaB protein has been quantitatively examined using the rapid quench-flow technique. Single-turnover studies of ATP hydrolysis, in a non-interacting active site of the helicase, indicate that bimolecular association of ATP with the site is followed by the reversible hydrolysis of nucleotide triphosphate and subsequent conformational transition of the enzyme-product complex. The simplest mechanism, which describes the data, is a three-step sequential process defined by:¿eqalign¿¿¿rm Helicase+ATP¿&¿mathop¿¿rightleftharpoons¿ ¿k_1¿_¿k_¿-1¿¿¿¿rm (H-ATP)¿¿mathop¿¿rightleftharpoons¿ ¿k_2¿_¿k_¿-2¿¿¿¿rm (H-ADP¿cdot Pi)¿¿cr &¿mathop¿¿rightleftharpoons¿ ¿k_3¿_¿k_¿-3¿¿¿¿rm (H-ADP¿cdot Pi)¿ *¿The sequential character of the mechanism excludes conformational transitions of the DnaB helicase prior to ATP binding. Analysis of relaxation times and amplitudes of the reaction allowed us to estimate all rate and equilibrium constants of partial steps of the proposed mechanism. The intrinsic binding constant for the formation of the (H-ATP) complex is K(ATP)=(1.3+/-0.5)x10(5) M(-1). The analysis of the data indicates that a part of the ATP binding energy originates from induced structural changes of the DnaB protein-ATP complex prior to ATP hydrolysis. The equilibrium constant of the chemical interconversion is K(H)=k(2)/k(-2) approximately 2 while the subsequent conformational transition is characterized by K(3)=k(3)/k(-3) approximately 30. The low value of K(H) and the presence of the subsequent energetically favorable conformational step(s) strongly suggest that free energy is released from the enzyme-product complex in the conformational transitions following the chemical step and before the product release.The combined application of single and multiple-turnover approaches show that all six nucleotide-binding sites of the Dna

  12. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  13. Vx-770 potentiates CFTR function by promoting decoupling between the gating cycle and ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Jih, Kang-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2013-03-12

    Vx-770 (Ivacaftor), a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug for clinical application to patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), shifts the paradigm from conventional symptomatic treatments to therapeutics directly tackling the root of the disease: functional defects of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel caused by pathogenic mutations. The underlying mechanism for the action of Vx-770 remains elusive partly because this compound not only increases the activity of wild-type (WT) channels whose gating is primarily controlled by ATP binding/hydrolysis, but also improves the function of G551D-CFTR, a disease-associated mutation that abolishes CFTR's responsiveness to ATP. Here we provide a unified theory to account for this dual effect of Vx-770. We found that Vx-770 enhances spontaneous, ATP-independent activity of WT-CFTR to a similar magnitude as its effects on G551D channels, a result essentially explaining Vx-770's effect on G551D-CFTR. Furthermore, Vx-770 increases the open time of WT-CFTR in an [ATP]-dependent manner. This distinct kinetic effect is accountable with a newly proposed CFTR gating model depicting an [ATP]-dependent "reentry" mechanism that allows CFTR shuffling among different open states by undergoing multiple rounds of ATP hydrolysis. We further examined the effect of Vx-770 on R352C-CFTR, a unique mutant that allows direct observation of hydrolysis-triggered gating events. Our data corroborate that Vx-770 increases the open time of WT-CFTR by stabilizing a posthydrolytic open state and thereby fosters decoupling between the gating cycle and ATP hydrolysis cycle. The current study also suggests that this unique mechanism of drug action can be further exploited to develop strategies that enhance the function of CFTR.

  14. Catalytic Mechanism of the Maltose Transporter Hydrolyzing ATP.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenting; Liao, Jie-Lou

    2016-01-12

    We use quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations to study ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the maltose transporter. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family that consists of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The ABC proteins catalyze ATP hydrolysis to perform a variety of biological functions. Despite extensive research efforts, the precise molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the ABC enzymes remains elusive. In this work, the reaction pathway for ATP hydrolysis in the maltose transporter is evaluated using a QM/MM implementation of the nudged elastic band method without presuming reaction coordinates. The potential of mean force along the reaction pathway is obtained with an activation free energy of 19.2 kcal/mol in agreement with experiments. The results demonstrate that the reaction proceeds via a dissociative-like pathway with a trigonal bipyramidal transition state in which the cleavage of the γ-phosphate P-O bond occurs and the O-H bond of the lytic water molecule is not yet broken. Our calculations clearly show that the Walker B glutamate as well as the switch histidine stabilizes the transition state via electrostatic interactions rather than serving as a catalytic base. The results are consistent with biochemical and structural experiments, providing novel insight into the molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis in the ABC proteins.

  15. ATP Hydrolysis Induced Conformational Changes in the Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD Revealed by MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chao; Weng, Jingwei; Wang, Wenning

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to uni-directionally transport substrates across cell membrane. ATP hydrolysis occurs at the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) dimer interface of ABC transporters, whereas substrate translocation takes place at the translocation pathway between the transmembrane domains (TMDs), which is more than 30 angstroms away from the NBD dimer interface. This raises the question of how the hydrolysis energy released at NBDs is “transmitted” to trigger the conformational changes at TMDs. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the post-hydrolysis state of the vitamin B12 importer BtuCD. Totally 3-μs MD trajectories demonstrate a predominantly asymmetric arrangement of the NBD dimer interface, with the ADP-bound site disrupted and the ATP-bound site preserved in most of the trajectories. TMDs response to ATP hydrolysis by separation of the L-loops and opening of the cytoplasmic gate II, indicating that hydrolysis of one ATP could facilitate substrate translocation by opening the cytoplasmic end of translocation pathway. It was also found that motions of the L-loops and the cytoplasmic gate II are coupled with each other through a contiguous interaction network involving a conserved Asn83 on the extended stretch preceding TM3 helix plus the cytoplasmic end of TM2/6/7 helix bundle. These findings entail a TMD-NBD communication mechanism for type II ABC importers. PMID:27870912

  16. Cooperative DnaA Binding to the Negatively Supercoiled datA Locus Stimulates DnaA-ATP Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kasho, Kazutoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Ryuji; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2017-01-27

    Timely initiation of replication in Escherichia coli requires functional regulation of the replication initiator, ATP-DnaA. The cellular level of ATP-DnaA increases just before initiation, after which its level decreases through hydrolysis of DnaA-bound ATP, yielding initiation-inactive ADP-DnaA. Previously, we reported a novel DnaA-ATP hydrolysis system involving the chromosomal locus datA and named it datA-dependent DnaA-ATP hydrolysis (DDAH). The datA locus contains a binding site for a nucleoid-associating factor integration host factor (IHF) and a cluster of three known DnaA-binding sites, which are important for DDAH. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation and regulation of the datA-IHF·DnaA complex remain unclear. We now demonstrate that a novel DnaA box within datA is essential for ATP-DnaA complex formation and DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Specific DnaA residues, which are important for interaction with bound ATP and for head-to-tail inter-DnaA interaction, were also required for ATP-DnaA-specific oligomer formation on datA Furthermore, we show that negative DNA supercoiling of datA stabilizes ATP-DnaA oligomers, and stimulates datA-IHF interaction and DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Relaxation of DNA supercoiling by the addition of novobiocin, a DNA gyrase inhibitor, inhibits datA function in cells. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanistic model of datA-IHF·DnaA complex formation and DNA supercoiling-dependent regulation for DDAH.

  17. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems.

  18. ATP formation and ATP hydrolysis during fatiguing, intermittent stimulation of different types of single muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Nagesser, A S; Van der Laarse, W J; Elzinga, G

    1993-12-01

    This report describes changes of the rate of ATP hydrolysis in single, intact muscle fibres during the development of fatigue induced by intermittent tetanic stimulation. High (type 3) and low (type 1) oxidative muscle fibres dissected from the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis were studied at 20 degrees C. The rate of ATP hydrolysis was calculated during different time intervals from changes in the content of nucleotides, creatine compounds and lactate, as well as lactate efflux and oxygen uptake. During the first phase of intermittent stimulation, phosphocreatine is fully reduced while the rate of oxygen consumption increases to its maximum, the lactate content increases to a maximum level, and a small amount of IMP is formed; the rate of ATP hydrolysis in type 3 fibres is constant while force decreases, whereas the rate decreases approximately in proportion to force in type 1 fibres. After the first phase, the rate of ATP hydrolysis in type 3 fibres decreases slightly and the fibres reach a steady metabolic state in which the rates of ATP formation and hydrolysis are equal; in type 1 fibres a drastic change of the rate of ATP hydrolysis occurs and a steady metabolic state is not reached. On the basis of the time courses of the metabolic changes, it is concluded that the rate of ATP hydrolysis in type 3 fibres is reduced by acidification and/or a reduced calcium efflux from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, whereas in type 1 fibres inorganic phosphate and/or acidification inhibit the rate initially and ADP is a likely candidate to explain the drastic fall of the rate of ATP hydrolysis during late phases of fatiguing stimulation.

  19. Functionally Important ATP Binding and Hydrolysis Sites in Escherichia coli MsbA †

    PubMed Central

    Westfahl, Kathryn M.; Merten, Jacqueline A.; Buchaklian, Adam H.; Klug, Candice S.

    2009-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters make up one of the largest classes of proteins found in nature, and their ability to move a variety of substrates across the membrane using energy from the binding or hydrolysis of ATP is essential to an array of human pathologies and to bacterial viability. MsbA is an essential ABC transporter that specifically transports lipid A across the inner membranes of Gram-negative organisms such as Escherichia coli. The exact mechanisms of function during the binding and hydrolysis of ATP at the molecular level remain unclear. The studies presented and summarized in this work directly address the role and local dynamics of specific residues within the conserved ABC motifs in E. coli MsbA using in vivo growth and biochemical activity assays coupled with site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy motional and accessibility analysis. This first comprehensive analysis of the specific residues in these motifs within MsbA indicates that closure of the dimer interface does not occur upon ATP binding in this transporter. PMID:19053284

  20. Sulfite stimulates the ATP hydrolysis activity of but not proton translocation by the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus and interferes with its activation by delta muH+.

    PubMed

    Cappellini, P; Turina, P; Fregni, V; Melandri, B A

    1997-09-01

    Sulfite stimulates the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the ATP synthase in chromatophores of Rhodobacter capsulatus. The stimulated activity is inhibited by oligomycin. The activation takes place also in uncoupled chromatophores. The activation consists in an increase of about 12-15-fold of the Vmax for the ATP hydrolysis reaction, while the Km for MgATP is unaffected at 0.16+/-0.03 mM. The dependence of Vmax on the sulfite concentration follows a hyperbolic pattern with half maximum effect at 12 mM. Sulfite affects the ability of the enzyme in translocating protons. Concomitant measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis and of ATP-induced protonic flows demonstrate that at sulfite concentrations of greater than 10 mM the hydrolytic reaction becomes progressively uncoupled from the process of proton translocation. This is accompanied by an inhibition of ATP synthesis, either driven by light or by artificially induced ionic gradients. ATP synthesis is totally inhibited at concentrations of at least 80 mM. Sulfite interferes with the mechanism of activation by delta muH+. Low concentrations of this anion (< or = 2 mM) prevent the activation by delta muH+. At higher concentrations a marked stimulation of the activity prevails, regardless of the occurrence of a delta muH+ across the membrane. Phosphate at millimolar concentrations can reverse the inhibition by sulfite. These experimental results can be simulated by a model assuming multiple and competitive equilibria for phosphate or sulfite binding with two binding sites for the two ligands (for sulfite K1S = 0.26 and K2S = 37 mM, and for phosphate K1P = 0.06 and K2P = 4.22 mM), and in which the state bound only to one sulfite molecule is totally inactive in hydrolysis. The competition between phosphate and sulfite is consistent with the molecular structures of the two ligands and of the enzyme.

  1. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-01-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion. Images Scheme 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:8789082

  2. Efficient coupling of ATP hydrolysis to translocation by RecQ helicase.

    PubMed

    Rad, Behzad; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-01-31

    Helicases are ubiquitous enzymes that unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to reveal single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during essential processes such as replication, transcription, or repair. The Escherichia coli RecQ protein is a 3' to 5' helicase, which functions in the processes of homologous recombination and replication fork restart. Here, we analyzed the relationship between ATP hydrolysis by RecQ and its translocation on ssDNA. We monitored a single round of RecQ translocation on ssDNA by measuring the rates of inorganic phosphate release during translocation, and the dissociation of RecQ from ssDNA. We find that RecQ translocates with a rate of 16( ± 4) nucleotides/s and moves on average only 36( ± 2) nucleotides before dissociating. Fitting to an n-step kinetic model suggests that the helicase displays a nonuniform translocation mechanism in which it moves approximately five nucleotides rapidly before undergoing a rate-limiting kinetic slow step. Unexpectedly, RecQ requires a length of 34( ± 3) nucleotides to bind and translocate on ssDNA. This large site size suggests that several monomers are required to bind DNA prior to translocation. Energetically, the RecQ helicase couples the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule to the translocation of more than one nucleotide (1.6 ± 0.3). Thus, our data show that RecQ translocates on ssDNA by efficiently coupling the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule into structural alterations that result in movement of approximately two nucleotides, presumably by an inchworm mechanism. These attributes are consistent with the function of RecQ in recombination and replication.

  3. H-loop histidine catalyzes ATP hydrolysis in the E. coli ABC-transporter HlyB.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ojeda-May, Pedro; Pu, Jingzhi

    2013-10-14

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a family of molecular motor proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation across cell membranes. Each nucleotide binding domain of ABC-transporters contains a highly conserved H-loop histidine residue, whose precise mechanistic role in motor functions has remained elusive. By using combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations, we showed that the conserved H-loop residue H662 in E. coli HlyB, a bacterial ABC-transporter, can act first as a general acid and then as a general base to facilitate proton transfer in ATP hydrolysis. Without the assistance of H662, direct proton transfer from the lytic water to ATP results in a substantially higher barrier height. Our findings suggest that the essential function of the H-loop residue H662 is to provide a "chemical linchpin" that shuttles protons between reactants through a relay mechanism, thereby catalyzing ATP hydrolysis in HlyB.

  4. Extracellular ATP Hydrolysis Inhibits Synaptic Transmission by Increasing pH Buffering in the Synaptic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Howlett, Marcus H.C.; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca2+ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic modulation

  5. An aromatic-rich loop couples DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis in the PriA DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Windgassen, Tricia A; Keck, James L

    2016-11-16

    Helicases couple ATP hydrolysis to nucleic acid binding and unwinding via molecular mechanisms that remain poorly defined for most enzyme subfamilies within the superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase group. A crystal structure of the PriA SF2 DNA helicase, which governs restart of prematurely terminated replication processes in bacteria, revealed the presence of an aromatic-rich loop (ARL) on the presumptive DNA-binding surface of the enzyme. The position and sequence of the ARL was similar to loops known to couple ATP hydrolysis with DNA binding in a subset of other SF2 enzymes, however, the roles of the ARL in PriA had not been investigated. Here, we show that changes within the ARL sequence uncouple PriA ATPase activity from DNA binding. In vitro protein-DNA crosslinking experiments define a residue- and nucleotide-specific interaction map for PriA, showing that the ARL binds replication fork junctions whereas other sites bind the leading or lagging strands. We propose that DNA binding to the ARL allosterically triggers ATP hydrolysis in PriA. Additional SF2 helicases with similarly positioned loops may also couple DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis using related mechanisms.

  6. An aromatic-rich loop couples DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis in the PriA DNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Windgassen, Tricia A.; Keck, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Helicases couple ATP hydrolysis to nucleic acid binding and unwinding via molecular mechanisms that remain poorly defined for most enzyme subfamilies within the superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase group. A crystal structure of the PriA SF2 DNA helicase, which governs restart of prematurely terminated replication processes in bacteria, revealed the presence of an aromatic-rich loop (ARL) on the presumptive DNA-binding surface of the enzyme. The position and sequence of the ARL was similar to loops known to couple ATP hydrolysis with DNA binding in a subset of other SF2 enzymes, however, the roles of the ARL in PriA had not been investigated. Here, we show that changes within the ARL sequence uncouple PriA ATPase activity from DNA binding. In vitro protein-DNA crosslinking experiments define a residue- and nucleotide-specific interaction map for PriA, showing that the ARL binds replication fork junctions whereas other sites bind the leading or lagging strands. We propose that DNA binding to the ARL allosterically triggers ATP hydrolysis in PriA. Additional SF2 helicases with similarly positioned loops may also couple DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis using related mechanisms. PMID:27484483

  7. Effects of iodide on the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and motile activity in axonemal dynein.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Izumi; Fujiwara, Rin; Wada, Mikiyo; Shingyoji, Chikako

    2011-05-01

    Dynein transduces the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work through conformational changes. To identify the factors governing the coupling between the ATPase activity and the motile activity of the dynein molecule, we examined the effects of potassium iodide, which can unfold protein tertiary structures, on dynein activity in reactivated sea urchin sperm flagella. The presence of low concentrations of KI (0.05-0.1 M) in the reactivating solution did not influence the stable beating of demembranated flagella at 0.02-1 mM ATP, when the total concentration of potassium was kept at 0.15 M by adding K-acetate. However, double-reciprocal plots of ATP concentration and beat frequency showed a mixed type of inhibition by KI, indicating the possibility that KI inhibits the ATP hydrolysis and decreases the maximum sliding velocity. The ATPase activity of 21S dynein with or without microtubules did not decrease with the KI concentration. In the elastase-treated axonemes, KI decreased the velocity of sliding disintegration, while it increased the frequency of occurrence of axonemes showing no sliding. This may be related to some defect in the coordination of dynein activities. On 21S dynein adsorbed on a glass surface, however, the velocity of microtubule sliding was increased by KI, while KI lowered the dynein-microtubule affinity. The velocity further increased under lower salt conditions enhancing the dynein-microtubule interactions. The results suggest the importance of organized regulation of the dynamic states of dynein-microtubule interactions through the stalk for the coupling between the ATPase activity and the motile activity of dynein in beating flagella.

  8. Standard Gibbs energy of metabolic reactions: II. Glucose-6-phosphatase reaction and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Florian; Do, Hoang Tam; Sadowski, Gabriele; Held, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a key reaction for metabolism. Tools from systems biology require standard reaction data in order to predict metabolic pathways accurately. However, literature values for standard Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis are highly uncertain and differ strongly from each other. Further, such data usually neglect the activity coefficients of reacting agents, and published data like this is apparent (condition-dependent) data instead of activity-based standard data. In this work a consistent value for the standard Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis was determined. The activity coefficients of reacting agents were modeled with electrolyte Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (ePC-SAFT). The Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis was calculated by combining the standard Gibbs energies of hexokinase reaction and of glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis. While the standard Gibbs energy of hexokinase reaction was taken from previous work, standard Gibbs energy of glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis reaction was determined in this work. For this purpose, reaction equilibrium molalities of reacting agents were measured at pH7 and pH8 at 298.15K at varying initial reacting agent molalities. The corresponding activity coefficients at experimental equilibrium molalities were predicted with ePC-SAFT yielding the Gibbs energy of glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis of -13.72±0.75kJ·mol(-1). Combined with the value for hexokinase, the standard Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis was finally found to be -31.55±1.27kJ·mol(-1). For both, ATP hydrolysis and glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis, a good agreement with own and literature values were obtained when influences of pH, temperature, and activity coefficients were explicitly taken into account in order to calculate standard Gibbs energy at pH7, 298.15K and standard state.

  9. ATP hydrolysis by the viral RNA sensor RIG-I prevents unintentional recognition of self-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lässig, Charlotte; Matheisl, Sarah; Sparrer, Konstantin MJ; de Oliveira Mann, Carina C; Moldt, Manuela; Patel, Jenish R; Goldeck, Marion; Hartmann, Gunther; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Hornung, Veit; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Beckmann, Roland; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cytosolic antiviral innate immune sensor RIG-I distinguishes 5′ tri- or diphosphate containing viral double-stranded (ds) RNA from self-RNA by an incompletely understood mechanism that involves ATP hydrolysis by RIG-I's RNA translocase domain. Recently discovered mutations in ATPase motifs can lead to the multi-system disorder Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS) and increased interferon levels, suggesting misregulated signaling by RIG-I. Here we report that SMS mutations phenocopy a mutation that allows ATP binding but prevents hydrolysis. ATPase deficient RIG-I constitutively signals through endogenous RNA and co-purifies with self-RNA even from virus infected cells. Biochemical studies and cryo-electron microscopy identify a 60S ribosomal expansion segment as a dominant self-RNA that is stably bound by ATPase deficient RIG-I. ATP hydrolysis displaces wild-type RIG-I from this self-RNA but not from 5' triphosphate dsRNA. Our results indicate that ATP-hydrolysis prevents recognition of self-RNA and suggest that SMS mutations lead to unintentional signaling through prolonged RNA binding. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10859.001 PMID:26609812

  10. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-12-22

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI(6)FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α(3)β(3)γ complex of F(O)F(1)-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI(6)FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly.

  11. Histidine 114 Is Critical for ATP Hydrolysis by the Universally Conserved ATPase YchF.

    PubMed

    Rosler, Kirsten S; Mercier, Evan; Andrews, Ian C; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-24

    GTPases perform a wide range of functions, ranging from protein synthesis to cell signaling. Of all known GTPases, only eight are conserved across all three domains of life. YchF is one of these eight universally conserved GTPases; however, its cellular function and enzymatic properties are poorly understood. YchF differs from the classical GTPases in that it has a higher affinity for ATP than for GTP and is a functional ATPase. As a hydrophobic amino acid-substituted ATPase, YchF does not possess the canonical catalytic Gln required for nucleotide hydrolysis. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by YchF, we have taken a two-pronged approach combining classical biochemical and in silico techniques. The use of molecular dynamics simulations allowed us to complement our biochemical findings with information about the structural dynamics of YchF. We have thereby identified the highly conserved His-114 as critical for the ATPase activity of YchF from Escherichia coli. His-114 is located in a flexible loop of the G-domain, which undergoes nucleotide-dependent conformational changes. The use of a catalytic His is also observed in the hydrophobic amino acid-substituted GTPase RbgA and is an identifier of the translational GTPase family.

  12. Histidine 114 Is Critical for ATP Hydrolysis by the Universally Conserved ATPase YchF*

    PubMed Central

    Rosler, Kirsten S.; Mercier, Evan; Andrews, Ian C.; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    GTPases perform a wide range of functions, ranging from protein synthesis to cell signaling. Of all known GTPases, only eight are conserved across all three domains of life. YchF is one of these eight universally conserved GTPases; however, its cellular function and enzymatic properties are poorly understood. YchF differs from the classical GTPases in that it has a higher affinity for ATP than for GTP and is a functional ATPase. As a hydrophobic amino acid-substituted ATPase, YchF does not possess the canonical catalytic Gln required for nucleotide hydrolysis. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by YchF, we have taken a two-pronged approach combining classical biochemical and in silico techniques. The use of molecular dynamics simulations allowed us to complement our biochemical findings with information about the structural dynamics of YchF. We have thereby identified the highly conserved His-114 as critical for the ATPase activity of YchF from Escherichia coli. His-114 is located in a flexible loop of the G-domain, which undergoes nucleotide-dependent conformational changes. The use of a catalytic His is also observed in the hydrophobic amino acid-substituted GTPase RbgA and is an identifier of the translational GTPase family. PMID:26018081

  13. The effect of medium viscosity on kinetics of ATP hydrolysis by the chloroplast coupling factor CF1.

    PubMed

    Malyan, Alexander N

    2016-05-01

    The coupling factor CF1 is a catalytic part of chloroplast ATP synthase which is exposed to stroma whose viscosity is many-fold higher than that of reaction mixtures commonly used to measure kinetics of CF1-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. This study is focused on the effect of medium viscosity modulated by sucrose or bovine serum albumin (BSA) on kinetics of Ca(2+)- and Mg(2+)-dependent ATP hydrolysis by CF1. These agents were shown to reduce the maximal rate of Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase without changing the apparent Michaelis constant (К m), thus supporting the hypothesis on viscosity dependence of CF1 activity. For the sulfite- and ethanol-stimulated Mg(2+)-dependent reaction, the presence of sucrose increased К m without changing the maximal rate that is many-fold as high as that of Ca(2+)-dependent hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction was shown to be stimulated by low concentrations of BSA and inhibited by its higher concentrations, with the increasing maximal reaction rate estimated by extrapolation. Sucrose- or BSA-induced inhibition of the Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase reaction is believed to result from diffusion-caused deceleration, while its BSA-induced stimulation is probably caused by optimization of the enzyme structure. Molecular mechanisms of the inhibitory effect of viscosity are discussed. Taking into account high protein concentrations in the chloroplast stroma, it was suggested that kinetic parameters of ATP hydrolysis, and probably those of ATP synthesis in vivo as well, must be quite different from measurements taken at a viscosity level close to that of water.

  14. ATP binding and hydrolysis-driven rate-determining events in the RFC-catalyzed PCNA clamp loading reaction.

    PubMed

    Sakato, Miho; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M

    2012-02-17

    The multi-subunit replication factor C (RFC) complex loads circular proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamps onto DNA where they serve as mobile tethers for polymerases and coordinate the functions of many other DNA metabolic proteins. The clamp loading reaction is complex, involving multiple components (RFC, PCNA, DNA, and ATP) and events (minimally: PCNA opening/closing, DNA binding/release, and ATP binding/hydrolysis) that yield a topologically linked clamp·DNA product in less than a second. Here, we report pre-steady-state measurements of several steps in the reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFC and present a comprehensive kinetic model based on global analysis of the data. Highlights of the reaction mechanism are that ATP binding to RFC initiates slow activation of the clamp loader, enabling it to open PCNA (at ~2 s(-1)) and bind primer-template DNA (ptDNA). Rapid binding of ptDNA leads to formation of the RFC·ATP·PCNA(open)·ptDNA complex, which catalyzes a burst of ATP hydrolysis. Another slow step in the reaction follows ATP hydrolysis and is associated with PCNA closure around ptDNA (8 s(-1)). Dissociation of PCNA·ptDNA from RFC leads to catalytic turnover. We propose that these early and late rate-determining events are intramolecular conformational changes in RFC and PCNA that control clamp opening and closure, and that ATP binding and hydrolysis switch RFC between conformations with high and low affinities, respectively, for open PCNA and ptDNA, and thus bookend the clamp loading reaction.

  15. Cation transport coupled to ATP hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase: An integrated, animated model.

    PubMed

    Leone, Francisco A; Furriel, Rosa P M; McNamara, John C; Horisberger, Jean D; Borin, Ivana A

    2010-07-01

    An Adobe® animation is presented for use in undergraduate Biochemistry courses, illustrating the mechanism of Na(+) and K(+) translocation coupled to ATP hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase, a P(2c) -type ATPase, or ATP-powered ion pump that actively translocates cations across plasma membranes. The enzyme is also known as an E(1) /E(2) -ATPase as it undergoes conformational changes between the E(1) and E(2) forms during the pumping cycle, altering the affinity and accessibility of the transmembrane ion-binding sites. The animation is based on Horisberger's scheme that incorporates the most recent significant findings to have improved our understanding of the (Na, K)-ATPase structure-function relationship. The movements of the various domains within the (Na, K)-ATPase α-subunit illustrate the conformational changes that occur during Na(+) and K(+) translocation across the membrane and emphasize involvement of the actuator, nucleotide, and phosphorylation domains, that is, the "core engine" of the pump, with respect to ATP binding, cation transport, and ADP and P(i) release.

  16. Structural changes during ATP hydrolysis activity of the ATP synthase from Escherichia coli as revealed by fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Turina, P

    2000-08-01

    F1F0-ATPase complexes undergo several changes in their tertiary and quaternary structure during their functioning. As a possible way to detect some of these different conformations during their activity, an environment-sensitive fluorescence probe was bound to cysteine residues, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis, in the gamma subunit of the Escherichia coli enzyme. Fluorescence changes and ATP hydrolysis rates were compared under various conditions in F1 and in reconstituted F1F0. The results are discussed in terms of possible modes of operation of the ATP synthases.

  17. Differential effects of Mg(ii) and N(alpha)-4-tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride on the recognition and catalysis in ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanqing; Lu, Gongxuan

    2008-02-28

    The supramolecular interactions of Mg(ii) and N(alpha)-4-tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (TAME) with ATP have been investigated using (1)H and (31)P NMR spectra. Furthermore, the hydrolysis of ATP catalyzed by Mg(ii) and TAME has been studied at 60 degrees C and pH 7 using (31)P NMR spectra. In the Mg(ii)-ATP-TAME ternary system, the binding interaction of Mg(2+) with ATP involves not only N1 and N7 in the adenine ring but also beta- and gamma-phosphate of ATP. The binding forces are mainly electrostatic interaction and cation (Mg(2+))-pi interaction. The guanidinium group and the aromatic ring of TAME interacts with ATP by beta and gamma phosphate and the adenine ring of ATP. The binding forces are mainly electrostatic interactions and pi-pi stacking. A significant difference between the binary and the ternary system indicates that TAME is essential to the stablization of the intermediate. Kinetic studies show that the hydrolysis rate constant of ATP is 2.16 x 10(-2) h(-1) at pH 7 in the Mg(ii)-TAME-ATP ternary system. The Mg(ii) ion and TAME can accelerate the ATP hydrolysis process. A possible mechanism has been proposed that the hydrolysis occurs through an addition-elimination, in which the phosphoramidate intermediate was observed at 3.21 ppm in the (31)P NMR of the ternary system. These results provide further information concerning the effect of the key amino acid residue and metal ions as cofactors of ATPase on ATP synthesis/hydrolysis at the molecular level.

  18. Purification and characterization of a mutant DnaB protein specifically defective in ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Shrimankar, P; Stordal, L; Maurer, R

    1992-01-01

    The dnaB gene of Escherichia coli encodes an essential DNA replication enzyme. Fueled by the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP+P(i), this enzyme unwinds double-stranded DNA in advance of the DNA polymerase. While doing so, it intermittently stimulates primase to synthesize an RNA primer for an Okazaki fragment. To better understand the structural basis of these and other aspects of DnaB function, we have initiated a study of mutant DnaB proteins. Here, we report the purification and characterization of a mutant DnaB protein (RC231) containing cysteine in place of arginine at residue 231. The mutant protein attains a stable, properly folded structure that allows association of six promoters to form a hexamer, as is also true for wild-type DnaB. Further, the mutant protein interacts with ATP, the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog adenosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S), ADP, and poly(dT), and it stimulates primase action. It is, however, profoundly deficient in ATP hydrolysis, helicase activity, and replication activity at the chromosomal origin of replication. In addition, while general priming reactions with wild-type DnaB and ATP elicited the synthesis of short primers, reactions with DnaB and ATP gamma S or with RC231 and either ATP or ATP gamma S stimulated the synthesis of significantly longer primers. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that primase interacts directly with DnaB throughout primer synthesis during general priming, until dissociation of DnaB from DNA or ATP hydrolysis by DnaB disrupts the interaction and leads to primer termination. Images PMID:1332941

  19. Coordination of substrate binding and ATP hydrolysis in Vps4-mediated ESCRT-III disassembly.

    PubMed

    Davies, Brian A; Azmi, Ishara F; Payne, Johanna; Shestakova, Anna; Horazdovsky, Bruce F; Babst, Markus; Katzmann, David J

    2010-10-01

    ESCRT-III undergoes dynamic assembly and disassembly to facilitate membrane exvagination processes including multivesicular body (MVB) formation, enveloped virus budding, and membrane abscission during cytokinesis. The AAA-ATPase Vps4 is required for ESCRT-III disassembly, however the coordination of Vps4 ATP hydrolysis with ESCRT-III binding and disassembly is not understood. Vps4 ATP hydrolysis has been proposed to execute ESCRT-III disassembly as either a stable oligomer or an unstable oligomer whose dissociation drives ESCRT-III disassembly. An in vitro ESCRT-III disassembly assay was developed to analyze Vps4 function during this process. The studies presented here support a model in which Vps4 acts as a stable oligomer during ATP hydrolysis and ESCRT-III disassembly. Moreover, Vps4 oligomer binding to ESCRT-III induces coordination of ATP hydrolysis at the level of individual Vps4 subunits. These results suggest that Vps4 functions as a stable oligomer that acts upon individual ESCRT-III subunits to facilitate ESCRT-III disassembly.

  20. ATP hydrolysis Promotes Duplex DNA Release by the RecA Presynaptic Complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Yil; Qi, Zhi; Greene, Eric C

    2016-10-14

    Homologous recombination is an important DNA repair pathway that plays key roles in maintaining genome stability. Escherichia coli RecA is an ATP-dependent DNA-binding protein that catalyzes the DNA strand exchange reactions in homologous recombination. RecA assembles into long helical filaments on single-stranded DNA, and these presynaptic complexes are responsible for locating and pairing with a homologous duplex DNA. Recent single molecule studies have provided new insights into RecA behavior, but the potential influence of ATP in the reactions remains poorly understood. Here we examine how ATP influences the ability of the RecA presynaptic complex to interact with homologous dsDNA. We demonstrate that over short time regimes, RecA presynaptic complexes sample heterologous dsDNA similarly in the presence of either ATP or ATPγS, suggesting that initial interactions do not depend on ATP hydrolysis. In addition, RecA stabilizes pairing intermediates in three-base steps, and stepping energetics is seemingly unaltered in the presence of ATP. However, the overall dissociation rate of these paired intermediates with ATP is ∼4-fold higher than with ATPγS. These experiments suggest that ATP plays an unanticipated role in promoting the turnover of captured duplex DNA intermediates as RecA attempts to align homologous sequences during the early stages of recombination.

  1. Relationship between L-glutamate-regulated intracellular Na+ dynamics and ATP hydrolysis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Magistretti, P J; Chatton, J-Y

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate uptake into astrocytes and the resulting increase in intracellular Na+ (Na+(i)) have been identified as a key signal coupling excitatory neuronal activity to increased glucose utilization. Arguments based mostly on mathematical modeling led to the conclusion that physiological concentrations of glutamate more than double astrocytic Na+/K+-ATPase activity, which should proportionally increase its ATP hydrolysis rate. This hypothesis was tested in the present study by fluorescence monitoring of free Mg2+ (Mg2+(i)), a parameter that inversely correlates with ATP levels. Glutamate application measurably increased Mg2+(i) (i.e. decreased ATP), which was reversible after glutamate washout. Na+(i) and ATP changes were then directly compared by simultaneous Na+(i) and Mg2+ imaging. Glutamate increased both parameters with different rates and blocking the Na+/K+-ATPase during the glutamate-evoked Na+(i) response, resulted in a drop of Mg2+(i) levels (i.e. increased ATP). Taken together, this study demonstrates the tight correlation between glutamate transport, Na+ homeostasis and ATP levels in astrocytes.

  2. An ATP-binding cassette transporter-like complex governs cell-wall hydrolysis at the bacterial cytokinetic ring.

    PubMed

    Yang, Desirée C; Peters, Nick T; Parzych, Katherine R; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Markovski, Monica; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2011-11-08

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are ubiquitous membrane protein complexes that move substrates across membranes. They do so using ATP-induced conformational changes in their nucleotide-binding domains to alter the conformation of the transport cavity formed by their transmembrane domains. In Escherichia coli, an ATP-binding cassette transporter-like complex composed of FtsE (nucleotide-binding domain) and FtsX (transmembrane domain) has long been known to be important for cytokinesis, but its role in the process has remained mysterious. Here we identify FtsEX as a regulator of cell-wall hydrolysis at the division site. Cell-wall material synthesized by the division machinery is shared initially by daughter cells and must be split by hydrolytic enzymes called "amidases" to drive daughter-cell separation. We recently showed that the amidases require activation at the cytokinetic ring by proteins with LytM domains, of which EnvC is the most critical. In this report, we demonstrate that FtsEX directly recruits EnvC to the septum via an interaction between EnvC and a periplasmic loop of FtsX. Importantly, we also show that FtsEX variants predicted to be ATPase defective still recruit EnvC to the septum but fail to promote cell separation. Our results thus suggest that amidase activation via EnvC in the periplasm is regulated by conformational changes in the FtsEX complex mediated by ATP hydrolysis in the cytoplasm. Since FtsE has been reported to interact with the tubulin-like FtsZ protein, our model provides a potential mechanism for coupling amidase activity with the contraction of the FtsZ cytoskeletal ring.

  3. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Defective function of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in Caucasian populations. The disease is manifested in defective chloride transport across the epithelial cells in various tissues. To date, more than 1400 different mutations have been identified as CF-associated. CFTR is regulated by phosphorylation in its regulatory (R) domain, and gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF.

  4. ATP hydrolysis by UPF1 is required for efficient translation termination at premature stop codons

    PubMed Central

    Serdar, Lucas D.; Whiteside, DaJuan L.; Baker, Kristian E.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) represents a eukaryotic quality control pathway that recognizes and rapidly degrades transcripts harbouring nonsense mutations to limit accumulation of non-functional and potentially toxic truncated polypeptides. A critical component of the NMD machinery is UPF1, an RNA helicase whose ATPase activity is essential for NMD, but for which the precise function and site of action remain unclear. We provide evidence that ATP hydrolysis by UPF1 is required for efficient translation termination and ribosome release at a premature termination codon. UPF1 ATPase mutants accumulate 3′ RNA decay fragments harbouring a ribosome stalled during premature termination that impedes complete degradation of the mRNA. The ability of UPF1 to impinge on premature termination, moreover, requires ATP-binding, RNA-binding and NMD cofactors UPF2 and UPF3. Our results reveal that ATP hydrolysis by UPF1 modulates a functional interaction between the NMD machinery and terminating ribosomes necessary for targeting substrates to accelerated degradation. PMID:28008922

  5. Methods for detecting ATP hydrolysis and nucleic acid unwinding of Japanese encephalitis virus NS3 helicase.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jin'e; Li, Huan; Peng, Guiqing; Cao, Shengbo; Zhen, F Fu; Chen, Huanchun; Song, Yunfeng

    2013-12-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that is prevalent in south-east Asia. Because there is no specific antiviral agent, JEV still causes a high rate of neurologic sequelae and mortality in humans. The helicase encoded by the NS3 gene of JEV has emerged recently as a novel antiviral target for treatment. In this study, a soluble recombinant JEV helicase protein was expressed and purified. Methods for detecting the ATP hydrolysis and nucleic acid unwinding activity were developed by luminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The concentrations of enzyme, substrate, capture strand, ATP, and divalent ions were optimised in the ATPase and helicase reactions. The feasibility of using these two methods for high-throughput screening of NS3 helicase inhibitors is discussed.

  6. Asp-52 in combination with Asp-398 plays a critical role in ATP hydrolysis of chaperonin GroEL.

    PubMed

    Koike-Takeshita, Ayumi; Mitsuoka, Kaoru; Taguchi, Hideki

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin GroEL is a double-ring chaperone that assists protein folding with the aid of GroES and ATP. Asp-398 in GroEL is known as one of the critical residues on ATP hydrolysis because GroEL(D398A) mutant is deficient in ATP hydrolysis (<2% of the wild type) but not in ATP binding. In the archaeal Group II chaperonin, another aspartate residue, Asp-52 in the corresponding E. coli GroEL, in addition to Asp-398 is also important for ATP hydrolysis. We investigated the role of Asp-52 in GroEL and found that ATPase activity of GroEL(D52A) and GroEL(D52A/D398A) mutants was ∼ 20% and <0.01% of wild-type GroEL, respectively, indicating that Asp-52 in E. coli GroEL is also involved in the ATP hydrolysis. GroEL(D52A/D398A) formed a symmetric football-shaped GroEL-GroES complex in the presence of ATP, again confirming the importance of the symmetric complex during the GroEL ATPase cycle. Notably, the symmetric complex of GroEL(D52A/D398A) was extremely stable, with a half-time of ∼ 150 h (∼ 6 days), providing a good model to characterize the football-shaped complex.

  7. Drastic Compensation of Electronic and Solvation Effects on ATP Hydrolysis Revealed through Large-Scale QM/MM Simulations Combined with a Theory of Solutions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Umino, Satoru; Miki, Yuji; Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Maeda, Shu; Morita, Akihiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-16

    Hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the "energy source" for a variety of biochemical processes. In the present work, we address key features of ATP hydrolysis: the relatively moderate value (about -10 kcal/mol) of the standard free energy, ΔGhyd, of reaction and the insensitivity of ΔGhyd to the number of excess electrons on ATP. We conducted quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation combined with the energy-representation theory of solutions to analyze the electronic-state and solvation contributions to ΔGhyd. It was revealed that the electronic-state contribution in ΔGhyd is largely negative (favorable) upon hydrolysis, due to the reduction of electrostatic repulsion accompanying the breakage of the P-O bond. In contrast, the solvation effect was found to be strongly more favorable on the reactant side. Thus, we showed that a drastic compensation of the two opposite effects takes place, leading to the modest value of ΔGhyd at each number of excess electrons examined. The computational analyses were also conducted for pyrophosphate ions (PPi), and the parallelism between the ATP and PPi hydrolyses was confirmed. Classical molecular dynamics simulation was further carried out to discuss the effect of the solvent environment; the insensitivity of ΔGhyd to the number of excess electrons was seen to hold in solvent water and ethanol.

  8. ATP requirement for chloroplast protein import is set by the Km for ATP hydrolysis of stromal Hsp70 in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; McNeilage, Robert T; Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    The 70-kD family of heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) is involved in a number of seemingly disparate cellular functions, including folding of nascent proteins, breakup of misfolded protein aggregates, and translocation of proteins across membranes. They act through the binding and release of substrate proteins, accompanied by hydrolysis of ATP. Chloroplast stromal Hsp70 plays a crucial role in the import of proteins into plastids. Mutations of an ATP binding domain Thr were previously reported to result in an increase in the Km for ATP and a decrease in the enzyme's kcat. To ask which chloroplast stromal chaperone, Hsp70 or Hsp93, both of which are ATPases, dominates the energetics of the motor responsible for protein import, we made transgenic moss (Physcomitrella patens) harboring the Km-altering mutation in the essential stromal Hsp70-2 and measured the effect on the amount of ATP required for protein import into chloroplasts. Here, we report that increasing the Km for ATP hydrolysis of Hsp70 translated into an increased Km for ATP usage by chloroplasts for protein import. This thus directly demonstrates that the ATP-derived energy long known to be required for chloroplast protein import is delivered via the Hsp70 chaperones and that the chaperone's ATPase activity dominates the energetics of the reaction.

  9. Unidirectional Transport Mechanism in an ATP Dependent Exporter

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters use the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to move a large variety of compounds across biological membranes. P-glycoprotein, involved in multidrug resistance, is the most investigated eukaryotic family member. Although a large number of biochemical and structural approaches have provided important information, the conformational dynamics underlying the coupling between ATP binding/hydrolysis and allocrite transport remains elusive. To tackle this issue, we performed molecular dynamic simulations for different nucleotide occupancy states of Sav1866, a prokaryotic P-glycoprotein homologue. The simulations reveal an outward-closed conformation of the transmembrane domain that is stabilized by the binding of two ATP molecules. The hydrolysis of a single ATP leads the X-loop, a key motif of the ATP binding cassette, to interfere with the transmembrane domain and favor its outward-open conformation. Our findings provide a structural basis for the unidirectionality of transport in ABC exporters and suggest a ratio of one ATP hydrolyzed per transport cycle. PMID:28386603

  10. Characterization of fhlA mutations resulting in ligand-independent transcriptional activation and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Korsa, I; Böck, A

    1997-01-01

    The FhlA protein belongs to the NtrC family of transcriptional regulators. It induces transcription from the -12/-24 promoters of the genes of the formate regulon by sigma54 RNA polymerase. FhlA is activated by binding of the ligand formate and does not require phosphorylation. A mutational analysis of the fhLA gene portion coding for the A and C domains was conducted with the aim of gaining information on the interaction between formate binding and ATP hydrolysis plus transcription activation. Four mutations were identified, all located in the A domain; one of them rendered transcription completely independent from the presence of formate, and the others conferred a semiconstitutive phenotype. The FhlA protein of one of the semiconstitutive variants was purified. Catalytic efficiency of ATP hydrolysis of the mutant FhlA was increased in the absence of formate in the same manner as formate influences the activity of wild-type FhlA. Moreover, in vitro transcription occurred at much lower threshold concentrations of the mutant protein and of nucleoside triphosphates than with the wild-type FhlA. PMID:8981978

  11. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Melkani, Girish C; Bernstein, Sanford I; Geeves, Michael A

    2016-01-22

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25-30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  12. Coupling DNA-binding and ATP hydrolysis in Escherichia coli RecQ: role of a highly conserved aromatic-rich sequence.

    PubMed

    Zittel, Morgan C; Keck, James L

    2005-01-01

    RecQ enzymes are broadly conserved Superfamily-2 (SF-2) DNA helicases that play critical roles in DNA metabolism. RecQ proteins use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive DNA unwinding; however, the mechanisms by which RecQ links ATPase activity to DNA-binding/unwinding are unknown. In many Superfamily-1 (SF-1) DNA helicases, helicase sequence motif III links these activities by binding both single-stranded (ss) DNA and ATP. However, the ssDNA-binding aromatic-rich element in motif III present in these enzymes is missing from SF-2 helicases, raising the question of how these enzymes link ATP hydrolysis to DNA-binding/unwinding. We show that Escherichia coli RecQ contains a conserved aromatic-rich loop in its helicase domain between motifs II and III. Although placement of the RecQ aromatic-rich loop is topologically distinct relative to the SF-1 enzymes, both loops map to similar tertiary structural positions. We examined the functions of the E.coli RecQ aromatic-rich loop using RecQ variants with single amino acid substitutions within the segment. Our results indicate that the aromatic-rich loop in RecQ is critical for coupling ATPase and DNA-binding/unwinding activities. Our studies also suggest that RecQ's aromatic-rich loop might couple ATP hydrolysis to DNA-binding in a mechanistically distinct manner from SF-1 helicases.

  13. Structural basis unifying diverse GTP hydrolysis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anand, Baskaran; Majumdar, Soneya; Prakash, Balaji

    2013-02-12

    Central to biological processes is the regulation rendered by GTPases. Until recently, the GTP hydrolysis mechanism, exemplified by Ras-family (and G-α) GTPases, was thought to be universal. This mechanism utilizes a conserved catalytic Gln supplied "in cis" from the GTPase and an arginine finger "in trans" from a GAP (GTPase activating protein) to stabilize the transition state. However, intriguingly different mechanisms are operative in structurally similar GTPases. MnmE and dynamin like cation-dependent GTPases lack the catalytic Gln and instead employ a Glu/Asp/Ser situated elsewhere and in place of the arginine finger use a K(+) or Na(+) ion. In contrast, Rab33 possesses the Gln but does not utilize it for catalysis; instead, the GAP supplies both a catalytic Gln and an arginine finger in trans. Deciphering the underlying principles that unify seemingly unrelated mechanisms is central to understanding how diverse mechanisms evolve. Here, we recognize that steric hindrance between active site residues is a criterion governing the mechanism employed by a given GTPase. The Arf-ArfGAP structure is testimony to this concept of spatial (in)compatibility of active site residues. This understanding allows us to predict an as yet unreported hydrolysis mechanism and clarifies unexplained observations about catalysis by Rab11 and the need for HAS-GTPases to employ a different mechanism. This understanding would be valuable for experiments in which abolishing GTP hydrolysis or generating constitutively active forms of a GTPase is important.

  14. Sequential Action of MalE and Maltose Allows Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Translocation in the MalFGK2 Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Cytrynbaum, Eric; Duong, Franck

    2015-10-16

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have evolved an ATP-dependent alternating-access mechanism to transport substrates across membranes. Despite important progress, especially in their structural analysis, it is still unknown how the substrate stimulates ATP hydrolysis, the hallmark of ABC transporters. In this study, we measure the ATP turnover cycle of MalFGK2 in steady and pre-steady state conditions. We show that (i) the basal ATPase activity of MalFGK2 is very low because the cleavage of ATP is rate-limiting, (ii) the binding of open-state MalE to the transporter induces ATP cleavage but leaves release of Pi limiting, and (iii) the additional presence of maltose stimulates release of Pi, and therefore increases the overall ATP turnover cycle. We conclude that open-state MalE stabilizes MalFGK2 in the outward-facing conformation until maltose triggers return to the inward-facing state for substrate and Pi release. This concerted action explains why ATPase activity of MalFGK2 depends on maltose, and why MalE is essential for transport.

  15. ATP-Binding Cassette Proteins: Towards a Computational View of Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jielou

    2004-03-01

    Many large machine proteins can generate mechanical force and undergo large-scale conformational changes (LSCC) to perform varying biological tasks in living cells by utilizing ATP. Important examples include ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. They are membrane proteins that couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the translocation of substrates across membranes [1]. To interpret how the mechanical force generated by ATP binding and hydrolysis is propagated, a coarse-grained ATP-dependent harmonic network model (HNM) [2,3] is applied to the ABC protein, BtuCD. This protein machine transports vitamin B12 across membranes. The analysis shows that subunits of the protein move against each other in a concerted manner. The lowest-frequency modes of the BtuCD protein are found to link the functionally critical domains, and are suggested to be responsible for large-scale ATP-coupled conformational changes. [1] K. P. Locher, A. T. Lee and D. C. Rees. Science 296, 1091-1098 (2002). [2] Atilgan, A. R., S. R. Durell, R. L. Jernigan, M. C. Demirel, O. Keskin, and I. Bahar. Biophys. J. 80, 505-515(2002); M. M Tirion, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1905-1908 (1996). [3] J. -L. Liao and D. N. Beratan, 2003, to be published.

  16. The mechanism of ATP-dependent RNA unwinding by DEAD box proteins.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Manuel; Karow, Anne R; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2009-12-01

    DEAD box proteins catalyze the ATP-dependent unwinding of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). In addition, they facilitate protein displacement and remodeling of RNA or RNA/protein complexes. Their hallmark feature is local destabilization of RNA duplexes. Here, we summarize current data on the DEAD box protein mechanism and present a model for RNA unwinding that integrates recent data on the effect of ATP analogs and mutations on DEAD box protein activity. DEAD box proteins share a conserved helicase core with two flexibly linked RecA-like domains that contain all helicase signature motifs. Variable flanking regions contribute to substrate binding and modulate activity. In the presence of ATP and RNA, the helicase core adopts a compact, closed conformation with extensive interdomain contacts and high affinity for RNA. In the closed conformation, the RecA-like domains form a catalytic site for ATP hydrolysis and a continuous RNA binding site. A kink in the backbone of the bound RNA locally destabilizes the duplex. Rearrangement of this initial complex generates a hydrolysis- and unwinding-competent state. From this complex, the first RNA strand can dissociate. After ATP hydrolysis and phosphate release, the DEAD box protein returns to a low-affinity state for RNA. Dissociation of the second RNA strand and reopening of the cleft in the helicase core allow for further catalytic cycles.

  17. RHAU helicase stabilizes G4 in its nucleotide-free state and destabilizes G4 upon ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    You, Huijuan; Lattmann, Simon; Rhodes, Daniela; Yan, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The DEAH-box ATP-dependent RHAU helicases specifically unfold RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes (G4s). However, it remains unclear how the RHAU's G4 unfolding activity is coupled to different stages of the ATPase cycle. Here, using a single-molecule manipulation approach, we show that binding of Drosophila RHAU stabilizes an intramolecularly folded parallel DNA G4 against mechanical unfolding in its nucleotide-free and in its AMP-PNP or ADP bound states, while it destabilizes the G4 when coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Importantly, our results show that the ADP·AlF\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$_4^-$\\end{document}-bound RHAU does not stabilize the G4. We also found that both a single-stranded 3′ DNA tail and the RSM domain of RHAU that binds specifically to the G4 structure, are dispensable for the stabilization of the G4, but both are required for G4 destabilization. Our study provides the first evidence that the unfolding kinetics of a G-quadruplex can be modulated by different nucleotide-bound states of the helicase. PMID:28069994

  18. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-15

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This 'DNA sliding' is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding.

  19. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This ‘DNA sliding’ is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding. PMID:26538601

  20. Mechanism of ATP-driven PCNA clamp loading by S. cerevisiae RFC.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siying; Levin, Mikhail K; Sakato, Miho; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M

    2009-05-08

    Circular clamps tether polymerases to DNA, serving as essential processivity factors in genome replication, and function in other critical cellular processes as well. Clamp loaders catalyze clamp assembly onto DNA, and the question of how these proteins construct a topological link between a clamp and DNA, especially the mechanism by which ATP is utilized for the task, remains open. Here we describe pre-steady-state analysis of ATP hydrolysis, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp opening, and DNA binding by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C (RFC), and present the first kinetic model of a eukaryotic clamp-loading reaction validated by global data analysis. ATP binding to multiple RFC subunits initiates a slow conformational change in the clamp loader, enabling it to bind and open PCNA and to bind DNA as well. PCNA opening locks RFC into an active state, and the resulting RFC.ATP.PCNA((open)) intermediate is ready for the entry of DNA into the clamp. DNA binding commits RFC to ATP hydrolysis, which is followed by PCNA closure and PCNA.DNA release. This model enables quantitative understanding of the multistep mechanism of a eukaryotic clamp loader and furthermore facilitates comparative analysis of loaders from diverse organisms.

  1. The ancestral role of ATP hydrolysis in type II topoisomerases: prevention of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Andrew D.; Berger, James M.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos) catalyse changes in DNA topology by passing one double-stranded DNA segment through another. This reaction is essential to processes such as replication and transcription, but carries with it the inherent danger of permanent double-strand break (DSB) formation. All type II topos hydrolyse ATP during their reactions; however, only DNA gyrase is able to harness the free energy of hydrolysis to drive DNA supercoiling, an energetically unfavourable process. A long-standing puzzle has been to understand why the majority of type II enzymes consume ATP to support reactions that do not require a net energy input. While certain type II topos are known to ‘simplify’ distributions of DNA topoisomers below thermodynamic equilibrium levels, the energy required for this process is very low, suggesting that this behaviour is not the principal reason for ATP hydrolysis. Instead, we propose that the energy of ATP hydrolysis is needed to control the separation of protein–protein interfaces and prevent the accidental formation of potentially mutagenic or cytotoxic DSBs. This interpretation has parallels with the actions of a variety of molecular machines that catalyse the conformational rearrangement of biological macromolecules. PMID:21525132

  2. A reconsideration of the link between the energetics of water and of ATP hydrolysis energy in the power strokes of molecular motors in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Widdas, Wilfred F

    2008-09-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick's work, energetics were revised by Joule's experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration.

  3. A Reconsideration of the Link between the Energetics of Water and of ATP Hydrolysis Energy in the Power Strokes of Molecular Motors in Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Widdas, Wilfred F.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick’s work, energetics were revised by Joule’s experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration. PMID:19325829

  4. Mechanisms of ATP Dependent Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gangaraju, Vamsi K.; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2007-01-01

    The inter-relationship between DNA repair and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling has begun to become very apparent with recent discoveries. ATP dependent remodeling complexes mobilize nucleosomes along DNA, promote the exchange of histones, or completely displace nucleosomes from DNA. These remodeling complexes are often categorized based on the domain organization of their catalytic subunit. The biochemical properties and structural information of several of these remodeling complexes are reviewed. The different models for how these complexes are able to mobilize nucleosomes and alter nucleosome structure are presented incorporating several recent findings. Finally the role of histone tails and their respective modifications in ATP-dependent remodeling are discussed. PMID:17306844

  5. Mutations in the NB-ARC Domain of I-2 That Impair ATP Hydrolysis Cause Autoactivation1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Tameling, Wladimir I.L.; Vossen, Jack H.; Albrecht, Mario; Lengauer, Thomas; Berden, Jan A.; Haring, Michel A.; Cornelissen, Ben J.C.; Takken, Frank L.W.

    2006-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants confer specificity to the innate immune system. Most R proteins have a centrally located NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4) domain. For two tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) R proteins, I-2 and Mi-1, we have previously shown that this domain acts as an ATPase module that can hydrolyze ATP in vitro. To investigate the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the function of I-2 in planta, specific mutations were introduced in conserved motifs of the NB-ARC domain. Two mutations resulted in autoactivating proteins that induce a pathogen-independent hypersensitive response upon expression in planta. These mutant forms of I-2 were found to be impaired in ATP hydrolysis, but not in ATP binding, suggesting that the ATP- rather than the ADP-bound state of I-2 is the active form that triggers defense signaling. In addition, upon ADP binding, the protein displayed an increased affinity for ADP suggestive of a change of conformation. Based on these data, we propose that the NB-ARC domain of I-2, and likely of related R proteins, functions as a molecular switch whose state (on/off) depends on the nucleotide bound (ATP/ADP). PMID:16489136

  6. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, M. E.; Altenberg, G. A.

    2013-10-15

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation.

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles but not SERCA ATP hydrolysis activity.

    PubMed

    Jardim-Messeder, Douglas; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Galina, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BrPA) is an antitumor agent that alkylates the thiol groups of enzymes and has been proposed as a treatment for neoplasias because of its specific reactivity with metabolic energy transducing enzymes in tumor cells. In this study, we show that the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) ATPase (SERCA) type 1 is one of the target enzymes of 3BrPA activity. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum vesicles (SRV) were incubated in the presence of 1mM 3BrPA, which was unable to inhibit the ATPase activity of SERCA. However, Ca(2+)-uptake activity was significantly inhibited by 80% with 150 μM 3BrPA. These results indicate that 3BrPA has the ability to uncouple the ATP hydrolysis from the calcium transport activities. In addition, we observed that the inclusion of 2mM reduced glutathione (GSH) in the reaction medium with different 3BrPA concentrations promoted an increase in 40% in ATPase activity and protects the inhibition promoted by 3BrPA in calcium uptake activity. This derivatization is accompanied by a decrease of reduced cysteine (Cys), suggesting that GSH and 3BrPA increases SERCA activity and transport by pyruvylation and/or S-glutathiolation mediated by GSH at a critical Cys residues of the SERCA.

  8. ATP hydrolysis by a domain related to translation factor GTPases drives polymerization of a static bacterial morphogenetic protein.

    PubMed

    Castaing, Jean-Philippe; Nagy, Attila; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2013-01-08

    The assembly of static supramolecular structures is a culminating event of developmental programs. One such structure, the proteinaceous shell (called the coat) that surrounds spores of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, is composed of about 70 different proteins and represents one of the most durable biological structures known. The coat is built atop a basement layer that contains an ATPase (SpoIVA) that forms a platform required for coat assembly. Here, we show that SpoIVA belongs to the translation factors class of P-loop GTPases and has evolutionarily lost the ability to bind GTP; instead, it uses ATP hydrolysis to drive its self-assembly into static filaments. We demonstrate that ATP hydrolysis is required by every subunit for incorporation into the growing polymer by inducing a conformational change that drives polymerization of a nucleotide-free filament. SpoIVA therefore differs from other self-organizing polymers (dynamic cytoskeletal structures and static intermediate filaments) in that it uses ATP hydrolysis to self-assemble, not disassemble, into a static polymer. We further show that polymerization requires a critical concentration that we propose is only achieved once SpoIVA is recruited to the surface of the developing spore, thereby ensuring that SpoIVA polymerization only occurs at the correct subcellular location during spore morphogenesis.

  9. ATP binding and hydrolysis steps of the uni-site catalysis by the mitochondrial F(1)-ATPase are affected by inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Yakov M

    2010-10-01

    The effect of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) on uni-site ATP binding and hydrolysis by the nucleotide-depleted F(1)-ATPase from beef heart mitochondria (ndMF(1)) has been investigated. It is shown for the first time that P(i) decreases the apparent rate constant of uni-site ATP binding by ndMF(1) 3-fold with the K(d) of 0.38+/-0.14mM. During uni-site ATP hydrolysis, P(i) also shifts equilibrium between bound ATP and ADP+P(i) in the direction of ATP synthesis with the K(d) of 0.17+/-0.03mM. However, 10mM P(i) does not significantly affect ATP binding during multi-site catalysis.

  10. Mechanically driven ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Akira; Adachi, Kengo; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ryohei; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    ATP, the main biological energy currency, is synthesized from ADP and inorganic phosphate by ATP synthase in an energy-requiring reaction. The F1 portion of ATP synthase, also known as F1-ATPase, functions as a rotary molecular motor: in vitro its γ-subunit rotates against the surrounding α3β3 subunits, hydrolysing ATP in three separate catalytic sites on the β-subunits. It is widely believed that reverse rotation of the γ-subunit, driven by proton flow through the associated Fo portion of ATP synthase, leads to ATP synthesis in biological systems. Here we present direct evidence for the chemical synthesis of ATP driven by mechanical energy. We attached a magnetic bead to the γ-subunit of isolated F1 on a glass surface, and rotated the bead using electrical magnets. Rotation in the appropriate direction resulted in the appearance of ATP in the medium as detected by the luciferase-luciferin reaction. This shows that a vectorial force (torque) working at one particular point on a protein machine can influence a chemical reaction occurring in physically remote catalytic sites, driving the reaction far from equilibrium.

  11. Mutagenesis and modeling of the peroxiredoxin (Prx) complex with the NMR structure of ATP-bound human sulfiredoxin implicate aspartate 187 of Prx I as the catalytic residue in ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck-Yeon; Park, Sung Jun; Jeong, Woojin; Sung, Ho Jin; Oho, Taena; Wu, Xiongwu; Rhee, Sue Goo; Gruschus, James M

    2006-12-26

    The catalytic cysteine of certain members of the peroxiredoxin (Prx) family can be hyperoxidized to cysteinesulfinic acid during reduction of peroxides. Sulfiredoxin is responsible for the ATP-dependent reduction of cysteinesulfinic acid (SO2H) of hyperoxidized Prx. Here we report the NMR solution structure of human sulfiredoxin (hSrx), both with and without bound ATP, and we model the complex of ATP-bound hSrx with Prx. Binding ATP causes only small changes in the NMR structure of hSrx, and the bound ATP conformation is quite similar to that seen for the previously reported X-ray structure of the ADP-hSrx complex. Although hSrx binds ATP, it does not catalyze hydrolysis by itself and has no catalytic acid residue typical of most ATPase and kinase family proteins. For modeling the complex, the ATP-bound hSrx was docked to hyperoxidized Prx II using EMAP of CHARMM. In the model complex, Asn186 of Prx II (Asp187 of Prx I) is in contact with the hSrx-bound ATP beta- and gamma-phosphate groups. Asp187 of Prx I was mutated to alanine and asparagine, and binding and activity of the mutants with hSrx were compared to those of the wild type. For the D187N mutant, both binding and hydrolysis and reduction activities were comparable to those of the wild type, whereas for D187A, binding was unimpaired but ATP hydrolysis and reduction did not occur. The modeling and mutagenesis analyses strongly implicate Asp187 of Prx I as the catalytic residue responsible for ATP hydrolysis in the cysteinesulfinic acid reduction of Prx by hSrx.

  12. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by mismatch and double-strand break repair DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M; Bianco, Piero R; Surtees, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3' non-homologous tail removal (3'NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3'NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype.

  13. The periplasmic membrane proximal domain of MacA acts as a switch in stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by MacB transporter.

    PubMed

    Modali, Sita D; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2011-08-01

    Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC is a tripartite macrolide efflux transporter driven by hydrolysis of ATP. In this complex, MacA is the periplasmic membrane fusion protein that stimulates the activity of MacB transporter and establishes the link with the outer membrane channel TolC. The molecular mechanism by which MacA stimulates MacB remains unknown. Here, we report that the periplasmic membrane proximal domain of MacA plays a critical role in functional MacA-MacB interactions and stimulation of MacB ATPase activity. Binding of MacA to MacB stabilizes the ATP-bound conformation of MacB, whereas interactions with both MacB and TolC affect the conformation of MacA. A single G353A substitution in the C-terminus of MacA inactivates MacAB-TolC function by changing the conformation of the membrane proximal domain of MacA and disrupting the proper assembly of the MacA-MacB complex. We propose that MacA acts in transport by promoting MacB transition into the closed ATP-bound conformation and in this respect, is similar to the periplasmic solute-binding proteins.

  14. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Myosin Mutation R453C Alters ATP Binding and Hydrolysis of Human Cardiac β-Myosin*

    PubMed Central

    Bloemink, Marieke; Deacon, John; Langer, Stephen; Vera, Carlos; Combs, Ariana; Leinwand, Leslie; Geeves, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R453C results in one of the more severe forms of the myopathy. Arg-453 is found in a conserved surface loop of the upper 50-kDa domain of the myosin motor domain and lies between the nucleotide binding pocket and the actin binding site. It connects to the cardiomyopathy loop via a long α-helix, helix O, and to Switch-2 via the fifth strand of the central β-sheet. The mutation is, therefore, in a position to perturb a wide range of myosin molecular activities. We report here the first detailed biochemical kinetic analysis of the motor domain of the human β-cardiac myosin carrying the R453C mutation. A recent report of the same mutation (Sommese, R. F., Sung, J., Nag, S., Sutton, S., Deacon, J. C., Choe, E., Leinwand, L. A., Ruppel, K., and Spudich, J. A. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 12607–12612) found reduced ATPase and in vitro motility but increased force production using an optical trap. Surprisingly, our results show that the mutation alters few biochemical kinetic parameters significantly. The exceptions are the rate constants for ATP binding to the motor domain (reduced by 35%) and the ATP hydrolysis step/recovery stroke (slowed 3-fold), which could be the rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle. Effects of the mutation on the recovery stroke are consistent with a perturbation of Switch-2 closure, which is required for the recovery stroke and the subsequent ATP hydrolysis. PMID:24344137

  15. Altered extracellular ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum of sedentary individuals after an acute, aerobic, moderate exercise session.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Cesar Eduardo Jacintho; Teixeira, Bruno Costa; Rockenbach, Liliana; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro; Casali, Emerson André; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2017-02-01

    Nucleotidases participate in the regulation of physiological and pathological events, such as inflammation and coagulation. Exercise promotes distinct adaptations, and can influence purinergic signaling. In the present study, we investigated soluble nucleotidase activities in the blood serum of sedentary young male adults at pre- and post-acute moderate aerobic exercise. In addition, we evaluated how this kind of exercise could influence adenine nucleotide concentrations in the blood serum. Sedentary individuals were submitted to moderate aerobic exercise on a treadmill; blood samples were collected pre- and post-exercise, and serum was separated for analysis. Results showed increases in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise values. The ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase was also evaluated, showing an increased activity post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise. Purine levels were analyzed by HPLC in the blood serum, pre- and post-exercise. Decreased levels of ATP and ADP were found post-exercise, in contrast with pre-exercise values. Conversely, post-exercise levels of adenosine and inosine increased compared to pre-exercise levels. Our results indicate an influence of acute exercise on ATP metabolism, modifying enzymatic behavior to promote a protective biological environment.

  16. How do type II topoisomerases use ATP hydrolysis to simplify DNA topology beyond equilibrium? Investigating the relaxation reaction of nonsupercoiling type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Stuchinskaya, Tanya; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Corbett, Kevin D; Berger, James M; Bates, Andrew D; Maxwell, Anthony

    2009-02-06

    DNA topoisomerases control the topology of DNA (e.g., the level of supercoiling) in all cells. Type IIA topoisomerases are ATP-dependent enzymes that have been shown to simplify the topology of their DNA substrates to a level beyond that expected at equilibrium (i.e., more relaxed than the product of relaxation by ATP-independent enzymes, such as type I topoisomerases, or a lower-than-equilibrium level of catenation). The mechanism of this effect is currently unknown, although several models have been suggested. We have analyzed the DNA relaxation reactions of type II topoisomerases to further explore this phenomenon. We find that all type IIA topoisomerases tested exhibit the effect to a similar degree and that it is not dependent on the supercoil-sensing C-terminal domains of the enzymes. As recently reported, the type IIB topoisomerase, topoisomerase VI (which is only distantly related to type IIA enzymes), does not exhibit topology simplification. We find that topology simplification is not significantly dependent on circle size in the range approximately 2-9 kbp and is not altered by reducing the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis by varying the ADP:ATP ratio. A direct test of one model (DNA tracking; i.e., sliding of a protein clamp along DNA to trap supercoils) suggests that this is unlikely to be the explanation for the effect. We conclude that geometric selection of DNA segments by the enzymes is likely to be a primary source of the effect, but that it is possible that other kinetic factors contribute. We also speculate whether topology simplification might simply be an evolutionary relic, with no adaptive significance.

  17. How do type II topoisomerases use ATP hydrolysis to simplify DNA topology beyond equilibrium? Investigating the relaxation reaction of non-supercoiling type II topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Stuchinskaya, Tanya; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Corbett, Kevin D.; Berger, James M.; Bates, Andrew D.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases control the topology of DNA (e.g. the level of supercoiling) in all cells. Type IIA topoisomerases are ATP-dependent enzymes that have been shown to simplify the topology of their DNA substrates to a level beyond that expected at equilibrium (i.e. more relaxed than the product of relaxation by ATP-independent enzymes, such as type I topoisomerases, or a lower than equilibrium level of catenation). The mechanism of this effect is currently unknown, although several models have been suggested. We have analysed the DNA relaxation reactions of type II topoisomerases to further explore this phenomenon. We find that all type IIA topoisomerases tested exhibit the effect to a similar degree and that it is not dependent on the C-terminal domains of the enzymes. As recently reported, the type IIB topoisomerase, topo VI (which is only distantly related to the type IIA enzymes), does not exhibit topology simplification. We find that topology simplification is not significantly dependent on circle size in the range ~2–9 kbp, and is not altered by reducing the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis by varying the ATP:ADP ratio. A direct test of one model (DNA tracking, i.e. sliding of a protein clamp along DNA to trap supercoils) suggests that this is unlikely to be the explanation for the effect. We conclude that geometric selection of DNA segments by the enzymes is likely to be a primary source of the effect but that it is possible that other factors contribute. We also speculate whether topology simplification might simply be an evolutionary relic, with no adaptive significance. PMID:19094994

  18. The mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction during enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Thybring, Emil E; Johansen, Katja S; Felby, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry, particularly when it comes to up-scaling of processes based on insoluble feed stocks.

  19. Superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake supported by hydrolysis of endogenous ATP in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1975-10-10

    The nature of the energy store causing rapid superstoichiometric leads to H+/2e minus ejection and leads to Ca2+/2e minus uptake ratios in rat liver mitochondria pulsed with Ca2+ has been investigated. The extent and the rate of the initial fast superstoichiometric phase of H plus ejection were greatly reduced by oligomycin and other ATPase inhibitors; the subsequent shoichiometric phase was unaffected. No such inhibition was seen with atractyloside. Similarly, the initial fast phase of Ca2+ uptake was reduced in extent by oligomycin, whereas the slower stoichiometric phase was unaffected. Moreover, the ATP content of mitochondria previously incubated with succinate decreased by about 80% within 5 s after pulsing with Ca2+. The energy store for superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake and H plus injection is thus identified as endogenous ATP.

  20. Kinetics of the acid pump in the stomach. Proton transport and hydrolysis of ATP and p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the gastric H,K-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungstroem, M.M.; Mardh, S.

    1985-05-10

    Hydrolysis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the hydrogen ion-transporting potassium-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase (H,K-ATPase) was investigated. Hydrolysis of ATP was studied at pH 7.4 in vesicles treated with the ionophore nigericin. The kinetic analysis showed negative cooperativity with one high affinity and one low affinity site for ATP. The rate of hydrolysis decreased at 2000 microM ATP indicating a third site for ATP. When the pH was decreased to 6.5 the experimental results followed Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics with one low affinity site. Higher concentrations than 750 microM ATP were inhibitory. Proton transport was measured as accumulation of acridine orange in vesicles equilibrated with 150 mM KCl. The transport at various concentrations of ATP in the pH interval from 6.0 to 8.0 correlated well with the Hill equation with a Hill coefficient between 1.5-1.9. The concentration of ATP resulting in half-maximal transport rate increased from 5 microM at pH 6.0 to 420 microM at pH 8.0. At acidic pH the rate of proton transport decreased at 1000 microM ATP. The K+-stimulated p-nitrophenylphosphatase (pNPPase) activity resulted in a Hill coefficient close to 2 indicating cooperative binding of substrate. These kinetic results are used for a further development of the reaction scheme of the H,K-ATPase.

  1. Evidence for a requirement for ATP hydrolysis at two distinct steps during a single turnover of the catalytic cycle of human P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sauna, Zuben E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2000-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATP-dependent hydrophobic natural product anticancer drug efflux pump whose overexpression confers multidrug resistance to tumor cells. The work reported here deals with the elucidation of the energy requirement for substrate interaction with Pgp during the catalytic cycle. We show that the Kd (412 nM) of the substrate analogue [125I]iodoarylazidoprazoin for Pgp is not altered by the presence of the nonhydrolyzable nucleotide 5′-adenylylimididiphosphate and vanadate (Kd = 403 nM). Though binding of nucleotide per se does not affect interactions with the substrate, ATP hydrolysis results in a dramatic conformational change where the affinity of [125I]iodoarylazidoprazoin for Pgp trapped in transition-state conformation (Pgp⋅ADP⋅vanadate) is reduced >30-fold. To transform Pgp from this intermediate state of low affinity for substrate to the next catalytic cycle, i.e., a conformation that binds substrate with high affinity, requires conditions that permit ATP hydrolysis. Additionally, there is an inverse correlation (R2 = 0.96) between 8AzidoADP (or ADP) release and the recovery of substrate binding. These results suggest that the release of nucleotide is necessary for reactivation but not sufficient. The hydrolysis of additional molecule(s) of ATP (or 8AzidoATP) is obligatory for the catalytic cycle to advance to completion. These data are consistent with the observed stoichiometry of two ATP molecules hydrolyzed for the transport of every substrate molecule. Our data demonstrate two distinct roles for ATP hydrolysis in a single turnover of the catalytic cycle of Pgp, one in the transport of substrate and the other in effecting conformational changes to reset the pump for the next catalytic cycle. PMID:10716986

  2. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-07

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone.

  3. Self-Assembled Tb(3+) Complex Probe for Quantitative Analysis of ATP during Its Enzymatic Hydrolysis via Time-Resolved Luminescence in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Ho; Kim, Ka Young; Lee, Ji Ha; Moon, Cheol Joo; Han, Noh Soo; Park, Su-Jin; Kang, Dongmin; Song, Jae Kyu; Lee, Shim Sung; Choi, Myong Yong; Jaworski, Justyn; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2017-01-11

    To more accurately assess the pathways of biological systems, a probe is needed that may respond selectively to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for both in vitro and in vivo detection modes. We have developed a luminescence probe that can provide real-time information on the extent of ATP, ADP, and AMP by virtue of the luminescence and luminescence lifetime observed from a supramolecular polymer based on a C3 symmetrical terpyridine complex with Tb(3+) (S1-Tb). The probe shows remarkable selective luminescence enhancement in the presence of ATP compared to other phosphate-displaying nucleotides including adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), thymidine triphosphate (TTP), H2PO4(-) (Pi), and pyrophosphate (PPi). In addition, the time-resolved luminescence lifetime and luminescence spectrum of S1-Tb could facilitate the quantitative measurement of the exact amount of ATP and similarly ADP and AMP within living cells. The time-resolved luminescence lifetime of S1-Tb could also be used to quantitatively monitor the amount of ATP, ADP, and AMP in vitro following the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP. The long luminescence lifetime, which was observed into the millisecond range, makes this S1-Tb-based probe particularly attractive for monitoring biological ATP levels in vivo, because any short lifetime background fluorescence arising from the complex molecular environment may be easily eliminated.

  4. Dependence of RIG-I Nucleic Acid-Binding and ATP Hydrolysis on Activation of Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yu Mi; Yoon, Soojin; Hwang, Yeo Eun

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous nucleic acids induce an innate immune response in mammalian host cells through activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We evaluated RIG-I protein for RNA binding and ATPase stimulation with RNA ligands to investigate the correlation with the extent of immune response through RIG-I activation in cells. RIG-I protein favored blunt-ended, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) ligands over sticky-ended dsRNA. Moreover, the presence of the 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) moiety in dsRNA further enhanced binding affinity to RIG-I. Two structural motifs in RNA, blunt ends in dsRNA and 5'-ppp, stimulated the ATP hydrolysis activity of RIG-I. These structural motifs also strongly induced IFN expression as an innate immune response in cells. Therefore, we suggest that IFN induction through RIG-I activation is mainly determined by structural motifs in dsRNA that increase its affinity for RIG-I protein and stimulate ATPase activity in RIG-I. PMID:27574504

  5. Highly Dynamic Interactions Maintain Kinetic Stability of the ClpXP Protease During the ATP-Fueled Mechanical Cycle.

    PubMed

    Amor, Alvaro J; Schmitz, Karl R; Sello, Jason K; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2016-06-17

    The ClpXP protease assembles in a reaction in which an ATP-bound ring hexamer of ClpX binds to one or both heptameric rings of the ClpP peptidase. Contacts between ClpX IGF-loops and clefts on a ClpP ring stabilize the complex. How ClpXP stability is maintained during the ATP-hydrolysis cycle that powers mechanical unfolding and translocation of protein substrates is poorly understood. Here, we use a real-time kinetic assay to monitor the effects of nucleotides on the assembly and disassembly of ClpXP. When ATP is present, complexes containing single-chain ClpX assemble via an intermediate and remain intact until transferred into buffers containing ADP or no nucleotides. ATP binding to high-affinity subunits of the ClpX hexamer prevents rapid dissociation, but additional subunits must be occupied to promote assembly. Small-molecule acyldepsipeptides, which compete with the IGF loops of ClpX for ClpP-cleft binding, cause exceptionally rapid dissociation of otherwise stable ClpXP complexes, suggesting that the IGF-loop interactions with ClpP must be highly dynamic. Our results indicate that the ClpX hexamer spends almost no time in an ATP-free state during the ATPase cycle, allowing highly processive degradation of protein substrates.

  6. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  7. Fundamental Reaction Mechanism for Cocaine Hydrolysis in Human Butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang; Landry, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-cocaine binding and the fundamental pathway for BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of cocaine have been studied by molecular modelling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and ab initio calculations. Modelling and simulations indicate that the structures of the prereactive BChE-substrate complexes for (−)-cocaine and (+)-cocaine are all similar to that of the corresponding prereactive BChE-butyrylcholine (BCh) complex. The overall binding of BChE with (−)-cocaine and (+)-cocaine is also similar to that proposed with butyrylthiocholine and succinyldithiocholine, i.e. (−)-cocaine/(+)-cocaine first slides down the substrate-binding gorge to bind to Trp-82 and stands vertically in the gorge between Asp-70 and Trp-82 (non-prereactive complex) and then rotates to a position in the catalytic site within a favorable distance for nucleophilic attack and hydrolysis by Ser-198 (prereactive complex). In the prereactive complex, cocaine lies horizontally at the bottom of the gorge. The fundamental catalytic hydrolysis pathway, consisting of acylation and deacylation stages similar to those for ester hydrolysis by other serine hydrolases, was proposed based on the simulated prereactive complex and confirmed theoretically by ab initio reaction coordinate calculations. Both the acylation and deacylation follow a double-proton-transfer mechanism. The calculated energetic results show that within the chemical reaction process the highest energy barrier and Gibbs free energy barrier are all associated with the first step of deacylation. The calculated ratio of the rate constant (kcat) for the catalytic hydrolysis to that (k0) for the spontaneous hydrolysis is ~ 9.0 × 107. The estimated kcat/k0 value of ~ 9.0 × 107 is in excellent agreement with the experimentally-derived kcat/k0 value of ~ 7.2 × 107 for (+)-cocaine, whereas it is ~ 2000 times larger than the experimentally-derived kcat/k0 value of ~ 4.4 × 104 for (−)-cocaine. All of the results

  8. Change of Na+ pump current reversal potential in sheep cardiac Purkinje cells with varying free energy of ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Glitsch, H G; Tappe, A

    1995-01-01

    1. The Na(+)-K+ pump current, Ip, of cardioballs from isolated sheep cardiac Purkinje cells was measured at 30-34 degrees C by means of whole-cell recording. 2. Under physiological conditions Ip is an outward current. Experimental conditions which cause a less negative free energy of intracellular ATP hydrolysis (delta GATP) and steeper sarcolemmal gradients for the pumped Na+ and Cs+ ions evoked an Ip in the inward direction over a wide range of membrane potentials. The reversal of the Ip direction was reversible. 3. The inwardly directed Ip increased with increasingly negative membrane potentials and amounted to -0.13 +/- 0.03 microA cm-2 (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 6) at -95 mV. 4. The reversal potential (Erev) of Ip was studied as a function of delta GATP at constant sarcolemmal gradients of the pumped cations. 5. In order to vary delta GATP the cell interior was dialysed with patch pipette solutions containing 10 mM ATP and different concentrations of ADP and inorganic phosphate. The media were composed to produce delta GATP levels of about -58, -49 and -39 kJ mol-1. 6. A less negative delta GATP shifted Erev to more positive membrane potentials. From measurements of Ip as a function of membrane potential Erev was estimated to be -195, -115 and -60 mV at delta GATP levels of approximately -58, -49 and -39 kJ mol-1, respectively. The calculated Erev amounted to -224 mV at delta GATP approximately -58 kJ mol-1, -126 mV at delta GATP approximately 49 kJ mol-1 and -24 mV at delta GATP approximately -39 kJ mol-1. 7. Possible reasons for the discrepancy between estimated and calculated Erev values are discussed. 8. Shifting delta GATP to less negative values not only altered Erev but also diminished Ip at each membrane potential tested. The maximal Ip (Ip,max), which can be activated by external Cs+ (Cs+o), decreased under these conditions, whereas [Cs+]o causing half-maximal Ip activation remained unchanged. Similarly, the voltage dependence of Ip activation by Cs+o was

  9. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle

    PubMed Central

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-01-01

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  10. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle.

    PubMed

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-04-15

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  11. The Competing Mechanisms of Phosphate Monoester Dianion Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical studies on phosphate monoester hydrolysis, significant questions remain concerning the mechanistic details of these biologically critical reactions. In the present work we construct a linear free energy relationship for phosphate monoester hydrolysis to explore the effect of modulating leaving group pKa on the competition between solvent- and substrate-assisted pathways for the hydrolysis of these compounds. Through detailed comparative electronic-structure studies of methyl phosphate and a series of substituted aryl phosphate monoesters, we demonstrate that the preferred mechanism is dependent on the nature of the leaving group. For good leaving groups, a strong preference is observed for a more dissociative solvent-assisted pathway. However, the energy difference between the two pathways gradually reduces as the leaving group pKa increases and creates mechanistic ambiguity for reactions involving relatively poor alkoxy leaving groups. Our calculations show that the transition-state structures vary smoothly across the range of pKas studied and that the pathways remain discrete mechanistic alternatives. Therefore, while not impossible, a biological catalyst would have to surmount a significantly higher activation barrier to facilitate a substrate-assisted pathway than for the solvent-assisted pathway when phosphate is bonded to good leaving groups. For poor leaving groups, this intrinsic preference disappears. PMID:27471914

  12. A mechanism of catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by Ras protein through magnesium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Nassar, Nicolas; Wang, Jin

    2011-11-01

    The hydrolysis by Ras plays pivotal roles in the activation of signaling pathways that lead to cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Despite their significant role in human cancer, the hydrolysis mechanism remains unclear. In the present Letter, we propose a GTP hydrolysis mechanism in which the γ phosphate is cut off primarily by magnesium ion. We studied both normal and mutated Ras and the cause of the malfunction of these mutants, compared the effect of Mg2+ and Mn2+. The simulation results are consistent with the experiments and support the new hydrolysis mechanism. This work will benefit both GTPases and ATPases hydrolysis studies.

  13. Effects of fibrillation on the wood fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced by mechanical refining.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Hou, Qingxi; Chen, Wei; Wu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The hardwood bleached kraft pulp (HBKP) fibers were pretreated by PFI mill to obtain the substrates, the effects of fibrillation on HBKP fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis was studied. The results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was enhanced obviously by mechanical refining. The mechanical refining alterated the fibers' characteristics such as fibrillation degree, specific surface area, swelling ability, crystallinity, fiber length and fines content. All these factors correlating to the enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated through mathematical analysis. Among these factors, the fibrillation degree has the profoundest impact on the enzymatic hydrolysis of wood fibers. Consequently, the mechanical refining aiming for a high fibrillation degree was feasible to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

  14. ATP binding and hydrolysis and autophosphorylation of CbbQ encoded by the gene located downstream of RubisCO genes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobuhiro R; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2002-02-08

    CbbQ is encoded by the gene located downstream of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes (cbbLS) in the thermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus. The protein possesses two nucleotide-binding motifs in its amino acid sequence, and it posttranslationally activates RubisCO. We present ATP hydrolysis and binding of CbbQ. CbbQ releases P(i) from ATP only in the presence of Mg(2+). CbbQ interacts with an 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate in the presence or absence of Mg(2+). The interaction with Mg(2+) and/or a nucleotide induces a conformational change in CbbQ. Autophosphorylation of CbbQ occurs only in the absence of Mg(2+).

  15. Prokineticin 2 facilitates mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-methylene ATP in rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Gan, Xiong; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Rao, Zhiguo; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-11-15

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2), a new chemokine, causes mechanical hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw, but little is known about the molecular mechanism. Here, we have found that ionotropic P2X receptor is essential to mechanical allodynia induced by PK2. First, intraplantar injection of high dose (3 or 10 pmol) of PK2 significantly increased paw withdrawal response frequency (%) to innocuous mechanical stimuli (mechanical allodynia). And the mechanical allodynia induced by PK2 was prevented by co-administration of TNP-ATP, a selective P2X receptor antagonist. Second, although low dose (0.3 or 1 pmol) of PK2 itself did not produce an allodynic response, it significantly facilitated the mechanical allodynia evoked by intraplantar injection of α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP). Third, PK2 concentration-dependently potentiated α,β-meATP-activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Finally, PK2 receptors and intracellular signal transduction were involved in PK2 potentiation of α,β-meATP-induced mechanical allodynia and α,β-meATP-activated currents, since the potentiation were blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist PKRA and selective PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. These results suggested that PK2 facilitated mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-meATP through a mechanism involved in sensitization of cutaneous P2X receptors expressed by nociceptive nerve endings.

  16. Mechanisms of ATP release and signalling in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has classically been considered the cell's primary energy currency. Importantly, a novel role for ATP as an extracellular autocrine and/or paracrine signalling molecule has evolved over the past century and extensive work has been conducted to characterize the ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors expressed on almost all cell types in the body. Extracellular ATP elicits potent effects on vascular cells to regulate blood vessel tone but can also be involved in vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. While the effects of purinergic signalling in the vasculature have been well documented, the mechanism(s) mediating the regulated release of ATP from cells in the blood vessel wall and circulation are now a key target of investigation. The aim of this review is to examine the current proposed mechanisms of ATP release from vascular cells, with a special emphasis on the transporters and channels involved in ATP release from vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, circulating red blood cells, and perivascular sympathetic nerves, including vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane F1/F0-ATP synthase, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, connexin hemichannels, and pannexin channels. PMID:22678409

  17. The Role of ATP in Mechanically Stimulated Rapid Closure of the Venus's Flytrap.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M J

    1973-01-01

    When the midribs of untreated traps of Dionaea muscipula are frozen in liquid nitrogen after rapid closure, they contain significantly less ATP than those frozen before closure. Exogenous ATP causes a significant increase in the rate of mechanically stimulated trap closure. Illuminated traps close faster than those kept in the dark. The traps of plants placed in 100% O(2) close much faster than do air controls, while 100% CO(2) inhibits closure. It is concluded that ATP is probably the native source of potential energy for contraction of the trap's midrib, and that if the endogenous ATP titer is increased by oxidative phosphorylation or an exogenous source, the trap will close faster.

  18. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Richards, Jennifer C; Dinenno, Frank A

    2013-04-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP](venous) and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP](v) (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP](v)) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP](v) increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144-161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP](v) increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans.

  19. Sensitivity of small myosin II ensembles from different isoforms to mechanical load and ATP concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on a detailed crossbridge model for individual myosin II motors, we systematically study the influence of mechanical load and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on small myosin II ensembles made from different isoforms. For skeletal and smooth muscle myosin II, which are often used in actomyosin gels that reconstitute cell contractility, fast forward movement is restricted to a small region of phase space with low mechanical load and high ATP concentration, which is also characterized by frequent ensemble detachment. At high load, these ensembles are stalled or move backwards, but forward motion can be restored by decreasing ATP concentration. In contrast, small ensembles of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which are found in the cytoskeleton of nonmuscle cells, are hardly affected by ATP concentration due to the slow kinetics of the bound states. For all isoforms, the thermodynamic efficiency of ensemble movement increases with decreasing ATP concentration, but this effect is weaker for the nonmuscle myosin II isoforms.

  20. Small Substrate Transport and Mechanism of a Molybdate ATP Binding Cassette Transporter in a Lipid Environment*

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Austin J.; Harrison, Alistair; Alvarez, Frances J. D.; Davidson, Amy L.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2014-01-01

    Embedded in the plasma membrane of all bacteria, ATP binding cassette (ABC) importers facilitate the uptake of several vital nutrients and cofactors. The ABC transporter, MolBC-A, imports molybdate by passing substrate from the binding protein MolA to a membrane-spanning translocation pathway of MolB. To understand the mechanism of transport in the biological membrane as a whole, the effects of the lipid bilayer on transport needed to be addressed. Continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and in vivo molybdate uptake studies were used to test the impact of the lipid environment on the mechanism and function of MolBC-A. Working with the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae, we found that MolBC-A functions as a low affinity molybdate transporter in its native environment. In periods of high extracellular molybdate concentration, H. influenzae makes use of parallel molybdate transport systems (MolBC-A and ModBC-A) to take up a greater amount of molybdate than a strain with ModBC-A alone. In addition, the movement of the translocation pathway in response to nucleotide binding and hydrolysis in a lipid environment is conserved when compared with in-detergent analysis. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that a lipid environment restricts the flexibility of the MolBC translocation pathway. By combining continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and substrate uptake studies, we reveal details of molybdate transport and the logistics of uptake systems that employ multiple transporters for the same substrate, offering insight into the mechanisms of nutrient uptake in bacteria. PMID:24722984

  1. Calcium induced ATP synthesis: Isotope effect, magnetic parameters and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Kuznetsov, D. A.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Shchegoleva, L. N.; Arkhangelsky, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    ATP synthesis by creatine kinase with calcium ions is accompanied by 43Ca/ 40Ca isotope effect: the enzyme with 43Ca 2+ was found to be 2.0 ± 0.3 times more active than enzymes, in which Ca 2+ ions have nonmagnetic nuclei 40Ca. The effect demonstrates that primary reaction in ATP synthesis is electron transfer between reaction partners, Сa( HO)n2+ ( n ⩽ 3) and Ca 2+(ADP) 3-. It generates ion-radical pair, in which spin conversion results in the isotope effect. Magnetic parameters (g-factors and HFC constants a( 43Ca) and a( 31P)) confirm that namely terminal oxygen atom of the ADP ligand in the complex Ca 2+(ADP) 3- donates electron to the Ca( HO)n2+ ion.

  2. Structure and Mechanism of Soybean ATP Sulfurylase and the Committed Step in Plant Sulfur Assimilation*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; McKinney, Samuel E.; Westfall, Corey S.; Lee, Soon Goo; Baraniecka, Patrycja; Giovannetti, Marco; Kopriva, Stanislav; Krishnan, Hari B.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes of the sulfur assimilation pathway are potential targets for improving nutrient content and environmental stress responses in plants. The committed step in this pathway is catalyzed by ATP sulfurylase, which synthesizes adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) from sulfate and ATP. To better understand the molecular basis of this energetically unfavorable reaction, the x-ray crystal structure of ATP sulfurylase isoform 1 from soybean (Glycine max ATP sulfurylase) in complex with APS was determined. This structure revealed several highly conserved substrate-binding motifs in the active site and a distinct dimerization interface compared with other ATP sulfurylases but was similar to mammalian 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate synthetase. Steady-state kinetic analysis of 20 G. max ATP sulfurylase point mutants suggests a reaction mechanism in which nucleophilic attack by sulfate on the α-phosphate of ATP involves transition state stabilization by Arg-248, Asn-249, His-255, and Arg-349. The structure and kinetic analysis suggest that ATP sulfurylase overcomes the energetic barrier of APS synthesis by distorting nucleotide structure and identifies critical residues for catalysis. Mutations that alter sulfate assimilation in Arabidopsis were mapped to the structure, which provides a molecular basis for understanding their effects on the sulfur assimilation pathway. PMID:24584934

  3. Spectroscopic investigation of the reaction mechanism of CopB-B, the catalytic fragment from an archaeal thermophilic ATP-driven heavy metal transporter.

    PubMed

    Völlmecke, Christian; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus; Lübben, Mathias

    2009-11-01

    The mechanism of ATP hydrolysis of a shortened variant of the heavy metal-translocating P-type ATPase CopB of Sulfolobus solfataricus was studied. The catalytic fragment, named CopB-B, comprises the nucleotide binding and phosphorylation domains. We demonstrated stoichiometric high-affinity binding of one nucleotide to the protein (K(diss) 1-20 microm). Mg is not necessary for nucleotide association but is essential for the phosphatase activity. Binding and hydrolysis of ATP released photolytically from the caged precursor nitrophenylethyl-ATP was measured at 30 degrees C by infrared spectroscopy, demonstrating that phosphate groups are not involved in nucleotide binding. The hydrolytic kinetics was biphasic, and provides evidence for at least one reaction intermediate. Modelling of the forward reaction gave rise to three kinetic states connected by two intrinsic rate constants. The lower kinetic constant (k(1) = 4.7 x 10(-3) s(-1) at 30 degrees C) represents the first and rate-limiting reaction, probably reflecting the transition between the open and closed conformations of the domain pair. The subsequent step has a faster rate (k(2) = 17 x 10(-3) s(-1) at 30 degrees C), leading to product formation. Although the latter appears to be a single step, it probably comprises several reactions with presently unresolved intermediates. Based on these data, we suggest a model of the hydrolytic mechanism.

  4. Hydrolysis mechanism of methyl parathion evidenced by Q-Exactive mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Caixiang; Liao, Xiaoping; Luo, Yinwen; Wu, Sisi; Wang, Jianwei

    2015-12-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), a kind of widely used pesticides, are currently attracting great attention due to their adverse effects on human central nervous systems, particularly in children. Although the hydrolysis behavior of OPPs has been studied well, its hydrolysis mechanism remained controversial, especially at various pH conditions, partly due to their relatively complex structures and abundant moieties that were prone to be attacked by nucleophiles. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer, part of those hybrid high-resolution mass spectrometers (HRMS), was used to determine hydrolysis products of methyl parathion (MP), a kind of OPPs in situ buffer aqueous solution with pH ranging from 1 to 13 in this study. Most of the complex hydrolysis products of MP were identified due to the high sensitivity and accuracy of HRMS. The results demonstrated that the hydrolysis rate and pathway of MP were strong pH dependent. With the increase of pH, the hydrolysis rate of MP increased, and two different reaction mechanisms were identified: SN (2)@P pathway dominated the hydrolysis process at high pH (e.g., pH ≥ 11) while SN (2)@C was the main behavior at low pH (e.g., pH ≤ 9). This study helps understand the hydrolysis mechanism of OPPs at various pH and extends the use of Q-Exactive mass spectrometry in identifying organic pollutants and their degradation products in environmental matrices.

  5. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  6. Catalytic and mechanical cycles in F-ATP synthases: Fourth in the Cycles Review Series

    PubMed Central

    Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Meier, T

    2006-01-01

    Cycles have a profound role in cellular life at all levels of organization. Well-known cycles in cell metabolism include the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycle, in which a specific carrier substrate undergoes a sequence of chemical transformations and is regenerated at the end. Other examples include the interconversions of cofactors, such as NADH or ATP, which are present in the cell in limiting amounts and have to be recycled effectively for metabolism to continue. Every living cell performs a rapid turnover of ATP to ADP to fulfil various energetic demands and effectively regenerates the ATP from ADP in an energy-consuming process. The turnover of the ATP cycle is impressive; a human uses about its body weight in ATP per day. Enzymes perform catalytic reaction cycles in which they undergo several chemical and physical transformations before they are converted back to their original states. The ubiquitous F1Fo ATP synthase is of particular interest not only because of its biological importance, but also owing to its unique rotational mechanism. Here, we give an overview of the membrane-embedded Fo sector, particularly with respect to the recent crystal structure of the c ring from Ilyobacter tartaricus, and summarize current hypotheses for the mechanism by which rotation of the c ring is generated. PMID:16607397

  7. The Acid Hydrolysis Mechanism of Acetals Catalyzed by a Supramolecular Assembly in Basic Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-09-24

    A self-assembled supramolecular host catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetals in basic aqueous solution. The mechanism of hydrolysis is consistent with the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model. Further investigation of the rate limiting step of the reaction revealed a negative entropy of activation ({Delta}S{double_dagger} = -9 cal mol{sup -1}K{sup -1}) and an inverse solvent isotope effect (k(H{sub 2}O)/k(D{sub 2}O) = 0.62). These data suggest that the mechanism of hydrolysis that takes place inside the assembly proceeds through an A-2 mechanism, in contrast to the A-1 mechanism operating in the uncatalyzed reaction. Comparison of the rates of acetal hydrolysis in the assembly with the rate of the reaction of unencapsulated substrates reveals rate accelerations of up to 980 over the background reaction for the substrate diethoxymethane.

  8. ATP7A trafficking and mechanisms underlying the distal motor neuropathy induced by mutations in ATP7A

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ling; Kaler, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Diverse mutations in the gene encoding the copper transporter ATP7A lead to X-linked recessive Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome. Recently, two unique ATP7A mutations, T994I and P1386S, were shown to cause isolated adult-onset distal motor neuropathy. These mutations induce subtle defects in ATP7A intracellular trafficking resulting in preferential accumulation at the plasma membrane compared to wild-type ATP7A. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed abnormal interaction between ATP7AT994I and p97/VCP, a protein mutated in two autosomal dominant forms of motor neuron disease. Small-interfering RNA knockdown of p97/VCP corrected ATP7AT994I mislocalization. For ATP7AP1386S, flow cytometry documented that non-permeabilized fibroblasts bound a C-terminal ATP7A antibody, suggesting unstable insertion of the 8th transmembrane segment due to a helix-breaker effect of the amino acid substitution. This could sabotage interaction of ATP7AP1386S with adaptor protein complexes. These molecular events appear to selectively disturb normal motor neuron function and lead to neurologic illness that takes years and sometimes decades to develop. PMID:24754450

  9. Effects and mechanism of acid rain on plant chloroplast ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwen; Hu, Huiqing; Li, Yueli; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Acid rain can directly or indirectly affect plant physiological functions, especially photosynthesis. The enzyme ATP synthase is the key in photosynthetic energy conversion, and thus, it affects plant photosynthesis. To clarify the mechanism by which acid rain affects photosynthesis, we studied the effects of acid rain on plant growth, photosynthesis, chloroplast ATP synthase activity and gene expression, chloroplast ultrastructure, intracellular H(+) level, and water content of rice seedlings. Acid rain at pH 4.5 remained the chloroplast structure unchanged but increased the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, promoted chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and increased photosynthesis and plant growth. Acid rain at pH 4.0 or less decreased leaf water content, destroyed chloroplast structure, inhibited the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, decreased chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and reduced photosynthesis and plant growth. In conclusion, acid rain affected the chloroplast ultrastructure, chloroplast ATPase transcription and activity, and P n by changing the acidity in the cells, and thus influencing the plant growth and development. Finally, the effects of simulated acid rain on the test indices were found to be dose-dependent.

  10. Conversion between two conformational states of KaiC is induced by ATP hydrolysis as a trigger for cyanobacterial circadian oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Katsuaki; Azai, Chihiro; Nakamura, Kaori; Tanaka, Syun; Terauchi, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro by mixing three clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC, with ATP. KaiC is the only protein with circadian rhythmic activities. In the present study, we tracked the complex formation of the three Kai proteins over time using blue native (BN) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), in which proteins are charged with the anionic dye Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB). KaiC was separated as three bands: the KaiABC complex, KaiC hexamer and KaiC monomer. However, no KaiC monomer was observed using gel filtration chromatography and CBB-free native PAGE. These data indicate two conformational states of KaiC hexamer and show that the ground-state KaiC (gs-KaiC) is stable and competent-state KaiC (cs-KaiC) is labile and degraded into monomers by the binding of CBB. Repeated conversions from gs-KaiC to cs-KaiC were observed over 24 h using an in vitro reconstitution system. Phosphorylation of KaiC promoted the conversion from gs-KaiC to cs-KaiC. KaiA sustained the gs-KaiC state, and KaiB bound only cs-KaiC. An E77Q/E78Q-KaiC variant that lacked N-terminal ATPase activity remained in the gs-KaiC state. Taken together, ATP hydrolysis induces the formation of cs-KaiC and promotes the binding of KaiB, which is a trigger for circadian oscillations. PMID:27580682

  11. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-10-14

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain.

  12. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  13. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  14. Trapping the transition state of an ATP-binding cassette transporter: Evidence for a concerted mechanism of maltose transport

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jue; Sharma, Susan; Quiocho, Florante A.; Davidson, Amy L.

    2001-01-01

    High-affinity uptake into bacterial cells is mediated by a large class of periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport systems, members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily. In the maltose transport system of Escherichia coli, the periplasmic maltose-binding protein binds its substrate maltose with high affinity and, in addition, stimulates the ATPase activity of the membrane-associated transporter when maltose is present. Vanadate inhibits maltose transport by trapping ADP in one of the two nucleotide-binding sites of the membrane transporter immediately after ATP hydrolysis, consistent with its ability to mimic the transition state of the γ-phosphate of ATP during hydrolysis. Here we report that the maltose-binding protein becomes tightly associated with the membrane transporter in the presence of vanadate and simultaneously loses its high affinity for maltose. These results suggest a general model explaining how ATP hydrolysis is coupled to substrate transport in which a binding protein stimulates the ATPase activity of its cognate transporter by stabilizing the transition state. PMID:11171984

  15. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano‐chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide‐dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly‐ stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin‐related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head‐to‐head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P‐) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization‐dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin‐like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P‐loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano‐chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580–593, 2016. PMID:27062152

  16. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Oliver; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2016-08-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano-chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly- stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin-related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head-to-head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P-) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization-dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin-like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P-loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano-chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580-593, 2016.

  17. Mechanisms of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Motors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Coral Y; Johnson, Stephanie L; Gamarra, Nathan I; Narlikar, Geeta J

    2016-07-05

    Chromatin remodeling motors play essential roles in all DNA-based processes. These motors catalyze diverse outcomes ranging from sliding the smallest units of chromatin, known as nucleosomes, to completely disassembling chromatin. The broad range of actions carried out by these motors on the complex template presented by chromatin raises many stimulating mechanistic questions. Other well-studied nucleic acid motors provide examples of the depth of mechanistic understanding that is achievable from detailed biophysical studies. We use these studies as a guiding framework to discuss the current state of knowledge of chromatin remodeling mechanisms and highlight exciting open questions that would continue to benefit from biophysical analyses.

  18. The aptamer DNA-templated fluorescence silver nanoclusters: ATP detection and preliminary mechanism investigation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaona; Wei, Chunying

    2017-01-15

    Two general and reliable fluorescence sensors were proposed in this work utilizing aptamer DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). Both DNA-AgNCs could be used for label-free detecting of ATP with the limits of detection of 0.44 and 0.65mM. One of them was further applied to monitor the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA). In our effort to elucidate the light-up mechanism, we studied a total of six Ag NCs prepared by different DNA sequences, and found that they showed different sensitivity to ATP. Both BT3T3- and BT3T3(R)-templated Ag NCs were chose to make particular studies by UV-vis, TEM, fluorescence, and TCSPC methods. The results showed that when DNA-Ag NCs was kept for 1.5h and presented a strong fluorescence, the addition of ATP failed to cause a large change of fluorescence intensity; on the contrary, after Ag NCs was kept for 24h and emitted a weak fluorescence, adding ATP was able to result in the large fluorescence enhanced of 43 and 33 times for BT3T3- and BT3T3(R)-templated Ag NCs, respectively. The possible mechanism was also suggested that ATP binding to aptamer segment of template induced the change of the DNA secondary structure, which made the aggregated Ag nanoparticles disperse into Ag NCs with an average diameter of about 2nm that were responsible for the large fluorescence increase. Moreover, ATP could protect the fluorescence intensity of BT3T3(R)-templated Ag NCs from quenching for at least 9h.

  19. Ca2+ influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10-30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca(2+)]i transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca(2+)]i. The stretch-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation was attenuated in Ca(2+)-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca(2+)]i by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd(3+), ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca(2+) influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  20. On the mechanism of ATP-induced shape changes in the human erythrocyte membranes: the role of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Birchmeier, W; Singer, SJ

    1977-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Sheetz, M. and S.J. Singer. 1977. J Cell Biol. 73:638-646) it was shown that erythrocyte ghosts undergo pronounced shape changes in the presence of mg-ATP. The biochemical effects of the action of ATP are herein examined. The biochemical effects of the action of ATP are herein examined. Phosphorylation by ATP of spectrin component 2 of the erythrocyte membrane is known to occur. We have shown that it is only membrane protein that is significantly phosphorylated under the conditions where the shape changes are produced. The extent of this phosphorylation rises with increasing ATP concentration, reaching nearly 1 mol phosphoryle group per mole of component 2 at 8mM ATP. Most of this phosphorylation appears to occur at a single site on the protein molecule, according to cyanogen bromide peptide cleavage experiments. The degree of phosphorylation of component 2 is apparently also regulated by a membrane-bound protein phosphatase. This activity can be demonstrated in erythrocyte ghosts prepared from intact cells prelabeled with [(32)P]phosphate. In addition to the phosphorylation of component 2, some phosphorylation of lipids, mainly of phosphatidylinositol, is also known to occur. The ghost shape changes are, however, shown to be correlated with the degree of phosphorylation of component 2. In such experiment, the incorporation of exogenous phosphatases into ghosts reversed the shape changes produced by ATP, or by the membrane-intercalating drug chlorpromazine. The results obtained in this and the preceding paper are consistent with the proposal that the erythrocyte membrane possesses kinase and phosphates activities which produce phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of a specific site on spectrin component 2 molecules; the steady-state level of this phosphorylation regulates the structural state of the spectrin complex on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane, which in turn exerts an important control on the shape of the cell. PMID:194904

  1. Structural and Enzymatic Insights into the ATP Binding and Autophosphorylation Mechanism of a Sensor Histidine Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Trajtenberg, Felipe; Graña, Martin; Ruétalo, Natalia; Botti, Horacio; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    DesK is a sensor histidine kinase (HK) that allows Bacillus subtilis to respond to cold shock, triggering the adaptation of membrane fluidity via transcriptional control of a fatty acid desaturase. It belongs to the HK family HPK7, which includes the nitrogen metabolism regulators NarX/Q and the antibiotic sensor LiaS among other important sensor kinases. Structural information on different HK families is still scarce and several questions remain, particularly concerning the molecular features that determine HK specificity during its catalytic autophosphorylation and subsequent response-regulator phosphotransfer reactions. To analyze the ATP-binding features of HPK7 HKs and dissect their mechanism of autophosphorylation at the molecular level, we have studied DesK in complex with ATP using high resolution structural approaches in combination with biochemical studies. We report the first crystal structure of an HK in complex with its natural nucleotidic substrate. The general fold of the ATP-binding domain of DesK is conserved, compared with well studied members of other families. Yet, DesK displays a far more compact structure at the ATP-binding pocket: the ATP lid loop is much shorter with no secondary structural organization and becomes ordered upon ATP loading. Sequence conservation mapping onto the molecular surface, semi-flexible protein-protein docking simulations, and structure-based point mutagenesis allow us to propose a specific domain-domain geometry during autophosphorylation catalysis. Supporting our hypotheses, we have been able to trap an autophosphorylating intermediate state, by protein engineering at the predicted domain-domain interaction surface. PMID:20507988

  2. Replication factor C from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi does not need ATP hydrolysis for clamp-loading and contains a functionally conserved RFC PCNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Henneke, Ghislaine; Gueguen, Yannick; Flament, Didier; Azam, Philippe; Querellou, Joël; Dietrich, Jacques; Hübscher, Ulrich; Raffin, Jean-Paul

    2002-11-08

    The molecular organization of the replication complex in archaea is similar to that in eukaryotes. Only two proteins homologous to subunits of eukaryotic replication factor C (RFC) have been detected in Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab). The genes encoding these two proteins are arranged in tandem. We cloned these two genes and co-expressed the corresponding recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Two inteins present in the gene encoding the small subunit (PabRFC-small) were removed during cloning. The recombinant protein complex was purified by anion-exchange and hydroxyapatite chromatography. Also, the PabRFC-small subunit could be purified, while the large subunit (PabRFC-large) alone was completely insoluble. The highly purified PabRFC complex possessed an ATPase activity, which was not enhanced by DNA. The Pab proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) activated the PabRFC complex in a DNA-dependent manner, but the PabRFC-small ATPase activity was neither DNA-dependent nor PCNA-dependent. The PabRFC complex was able to stimulate PabPCNA-dependent DNA synthesis by the Pabfamily D heterodimeric DNA polymerase. Finally, (i) the PabRFC-large fraction cross-reacted with anti-human-RFC PCNA-binding domain antibody, corroborating the conservation of the protein sequence, (ii) the human PCNA stimulated the PabRFC complex ATPase activity in a DNA-dependent way and (iii) the PabRFC complex could load human PCNA onto primed single-stranded circular DNA, suggesting that the PCNA-binding domain of RFC has been functionally conserved during evolution. In addition, ATP hydrolysis was not required either for DNA polymerase stimulation or PCNA-loading in vitro.

  3. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway.

  4. Preparations and mechanism of hydrolysis of ((8)annulene)actinide compounds. [Uranocene

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.M. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    The mechanism of hydrolysis for bis(8)annulene actinide and lanthanide complexes has been studied in detail. The uranium complex, uranocene, decomposes with good pseudo-first order kinetics (in uranocene) in 1 M degassed solutions of H/sub 2/O in THF. Decomposition of a series of aryl-substituted uranocenes demonstrates that the hydrolysis rate is dependent on the electronic nature of the substituent (Hammett rho value = 2.1, r/sup 2/ = 0.999), with electron-withdrawing groups increasing the rate. When D/sub 2/O is substituted for H/sub 2/O, kinetic isotope effects of 8 to 14 are found for a variety of substituted uranocenes. These results suggest a pre-equilibrium involving approach of a water molecule to the central metal, followed by rate determining proton transfer to the eight membered ring and rapid decomposition to products. Each of the four protonations of the complex has a significant isotope effect. The product ratio of cyclooctatriene isomers formed in the hydrolysis varies, depending on the central metal of the complex. However, the general mechanism of hydrolysis, established for uranocene, can be extended to the hydrolysis and alcoholysis of all the (8)annulene complexes of the lanthanides and actinides.

  5. An altered mechanism of hydrolysis for a metal-complexed phosphate diester.

    PubMed

    Humphry, Tim; Forconi, Marcello; Williams, Nicholas H; Hengge, Alvan C

    2002-12-18

    Isotope effects in the nucleophile and in the leaving group were measured to gain information about the mechanism and transition state of the hydrolysis of methyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate complexed to a dinuclear cobalt complex. The complexed diester undergoes hydrolysis about 1011 times faster than the corresponding uncomplexed diester. The kinetic isotope effects indicate that this rate acceleration is accompanied by a change in mechanism. A large inverse 18O isotope effect in the bridging hydroxide nucleophile (0.937 +/- 0.002) suggests that nucleophilic attack occurs before the rate-determining step. Large isotope effects in the nitrophenyl leaving group (18Olg = 1.029 +/- 0.002, 15N = 1.0026 +/- 0.0002) indicate significant fission of the P-O ester bond in the transition state of the rate-determining step. The data indicate that in contrast to uncomplexed diesters, which undergo hydrolysis by a concerted mechanism, the reaction of the complexed diester likely proceeds via an addition-elimination mechanism. The rate-limiting step is expulsion of the p-nitrophenyl leaving group from the intermediate, which proceeds by a late transition state with extensive bond fission to the leaving group. This represents a substantial change in mechanism from the hydrolysis of uncomplexed aryl phosphate diesters.

  6. ATP signalling is crucial for the response of human keratinocytes to mechanical stimulation by hypo-osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Azorin, Nathalie; Raoux, Matthieu; Rodat-Despoix, Lise; Merrot, Thierry; Delmas, Patrick; Crest, Marcel

    2011-05-01

    Touch is detected through receptors located in the skin and the activation of channels in sensory nerve fibres. Epidermal keratinocytes themselves, however, may sense mechanical stimulus and contribute to skin sensation. Here, we showed that the mechanical stimulation of human keratinocytes by hypo-osmotic shock releases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and increases intracellular calcium. We demonstrated that the release of ATP was found to be calcium independent because emptying the intracellular calcium stores did not cause ATP release; ATP release was still observed in the absence of external calcium and it persisted on chelating cytosolic calcium. On the other hand, the released ATP activated purinergic receptors and mobilized intracellular calcium stores. The resulting depletion of stored calcium led to the activation of capacitative calcium entry. Increase in cytosolic calcium concentration was blocked by the purinergic receptor blocker suramin, phospholipase C inhibitor and apyrase, which hydrolyses ATP. Collectively, our data demonstrate that human keratinocytes are mechanically activated by hypo-osmotic shock, leading first to the release of ATP, which in turn stimulates purinergic receptors, resulting in the mobilization of intracellular calcium and capacitative calcium entry. These results emphasize the crucial role of ATP signalling in the transduction of mechanical stimuli in human keratinocytes.

  7. A reciprocating motion-driven rotation mechanism for the ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiafeng; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2016-01-01

    The ATP synthase (having a typical subunit composition of α3β3γδεab2c8-15) employs an intriguing rotary mechanism for the generation of ATP from ADP and Pi, using energy stored in a transmembrane proton gradient. The conventional rotary model, although being generally accepted, remains difficult to explain certain experimental observations. Here we propose an alternative rotary model for the ATP synthase such that what rotates is the catalytic α3β3 cylinder rather than the central stalk and the membrane-embedded c-ring. Specifically, the membrane translocation of protons would induce a cycled conformational change in the c-ring, leading to a reciprocating motion of the attached central stalk, which in turn drives the unidirectional rotation of the α3β3 cylinder. Such a reciprocating motion-driven rotation mechanism is somehow analogous to the working mechanism of a retractable click ballpoint pen. Our new model not only explains the experimental observations that have been difficult to reconcile with the conventional model but also avoids its theoretical illogicality.

  8. Phosphate monoester hydrolysis by trinuclear alkaline phosphatase; DFT study of transition States and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Lu; Liao, Rong-Zhen

    2014-08-04

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a trinuclear metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a broad range of phosphate monoesters to form inorganic phosphate and alcohol (or phenol). In this paper, by using density functional theory with a model based on a crystal structure, the AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is investigated by calculating two substrates, that is, methyl and p-nitrophenyl phosphates, which represent alkyl and aryl phosphates, respectively. The calculations confirm that the AP reaction employs a "ping-pong" mechanism involving two chemical displacement steps, that is, the displacement of the substrate leaving group by a Ser102 alkoxide and the hydrolysis of the phosphoseryl intermediate by a Zn2-bound hydroxide. Both displacement steps proceed via a concerted associative pathway no matter which substrate is used. Other mechanistic aspects are also studied. Comparison of our calculations with linear free energy relationships experiments shows good agreement.

  9. Microglial cell migration stimulated by ATP and C5a involve distinct molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron M.; Stella, Nephi

    2009-01-01

    Microglial cells, the macrophages of the brain, play an essential role in the propagation of neuroinflammation. Increased microglial cell migration in response to specific chemoattractants has been documented, but less is known about the differences between these stimuli and the signal transduction pathways that mediate their effects. Current methods to measure cell migration are often labor-intensive and rely on the manual counting of cell number, so more efficient and objective methods are needed. Here we present an improved and higher-throughput Boyden Chamber technique that measures microglial cell migration by using DRAQ5, a nuclear dye that emits in the near-infrared. Out of a panel of chemoattractants tested, we found that ATP and C5a potently stimulate the migration of mouse primary microglial cells. The stimulatory effects of ATP and C5a displayed significant additivity, suggesting that each chemoattractant stimulated migration through independent molecular mechanisms. Accordingly, we found key differences in these responses: ATP stimulated a combination of both chemokinesis and chemotaxis, and this response was mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway; whereas C5a stimulated only chemotaxis and this response was mediated by the Rac1 signaling pathway. Finally, we found that functional PI3-kinase is only required for random basal microglial cell migration. Thus, our results show that distinct non-overlapping signal transduction pathways control different modes of microglial cell migration and suggest that the targeting of these distinct molecular mechanisms should modulate different aspects of neuroinflammation propagation. PMID:19053059

  10. Molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiu-bao

    2010-01-01

    Millions of new cancer patients are diagnosed each year and over half of these patients die from this devastating disease. Thus, cancer causes a major public health problem worldwide. Chemotherapy remains the principal mode to treat many metastatic cancers. However, occurrence of cellular multidrug resistance (MDR) prevents efficient killing of cancer cells, leading to chemotherapeutic treatment failure. Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein and/or multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), confers an acquired MDR due to their capabilities of transporting a broad range of chemically diverse anticancer drugs across the cell membrane barrier. In this review, the molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by MRP1 will be addressed.

  11. Simulation of proton movement in FoF1-ATP synthase by quantum-mechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivontsin, L. A.; Mashkovtseva, E. V.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical approach is applied to the description of proton transport through FoF1-ATP synthase which is the crucial process in ATP synthesis. Proton was described as a particle located in potential wells formed by charged centers along the half-channels. Energy spectra of bounded states were calculated using Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization, and the initial population of each quantum level was determined by Boltzman distribution. Water molecules were stochastically distributed in an inlet half-channel taking into account atomic radii. Characteristic time of proton transition between the charged centers (amino acid or water molecule) was estimated and it revealed the critical areas needed to be full with water. All possible pathways were analyzed in Monte-Carlo simulation which allows calculating of a mean time of proton transfer trough the inlet half-channel (23 ms).

  12. Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of the blue crab, Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda, Brachyura): modulation of ATP hydrolysis by the biogenic amines spermidine and spermine.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Daniela P; Lucena, Malson N; França, Juliana L; McNamara, John C; Fontes, Carlos F L; Leone, Francisco A

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the effect of the exogenous polyamines spermine, spermidine and putrescine on modulation by ATP, K⁺, Na⁺, NH₄⁺ and Mg²⁺ and on inhibition by ouabain of posterior gill microsomal Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity in the blue crab, Callinectes ornatus, acclimated to a dilute medium (21‰ salinity). This is the first kinetic demonstration of competition between spermine and spermidine for the cation sites of a crustacean Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase. Polyamine inhibition is enhanced at low cation concentrations: spermidine almost completely inhibited total ATPase activity, while spermine inhibition attained 58%; putrescine had a negligible effect on Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity. Spermine and spermidine affected both V and K for ATP hydrolysis but did not affect ouabain-insensitive ATPase activity. ATP hydrolysis in the absence of spermine and spermidine obeyed Michaelis-Menten behavior, in contrast to the cooperative kinetics seen for both polyamines. Modulation of V and K by K⁺, Na⁺, NH₄⁺ and Mg²⁺ varied considerably in the presence of spermine and spermidine. These findings suggest that polyamine inhibition of Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity may be of physiological relevance to crustaceans that occupy habitats of variable salinity.

  13. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.

    2014-10-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P{sub i} (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  14. The switching mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier explored by free-energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Klingenberg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) of mitochondria has been an early example for elucidating the transport mechanism alternating between the external (c-) and internal (m-) states (M. Klingenberg, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1778 (2008) 1978-2021). An atomic resolution crystal structure of AAC is available only for the c-state featuring a three repeat transmembrane domain structure. Modeling of transport mechanism remained hypothetical for want of an atomic structure of the m-state. Previous molecular dynamics studies simulated the binding of ADP or ATP to the AAC remaining in the c-state. Here, a full description of the AAC switching from the c- to the m-state is reported using well-tempered metadynamics simulations. Free-energy landscapes of the entire translocation from the c- to the m-state, based on the gyration radii of the c- and m-gates and of the center of mass, were generated. The simulations revealed three free-energy basins attributed to the c-, intermediate- and m-states separated by activation barriers. These simulations were performed with the empty and with the ADP- and ATP-loaded AAC as well as with the poorly transported AMP and guanine nucleotides, showing in the free energy landscapes that ADP and ATP lowered the activation free-energy barriers more than the other substrates. Upon binding AMP and guanine nucleotides a deeper free-energy level stabilized the intermediate-state of the AAC2 hampering the transition to the m-state. The structures of the substrate binding sites in the different states are described producing a full picture of the translocation events in the AAC.

  15. Solvents effects on the mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis: A QM/MM study.

    PubMed

    Loerbroks, Claudia; Heimermann, Andreas; Thiel, Walter

    2015-06-05

    This article reports a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) investigation on the acid hydrolysis of cellulose in water using two different models, cellobiose and a 40-unit cellulose chain. The explicitly treated solvent molecules strongly influence the conformations, intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exoanomeric effects in these models. As these features are largely responsible for the barrier to cellulose hydrolysis, the present QM/MM results for the pathways and reaction intermediates in water are expected to be more realistic than those from a former density functional theory (DFT) study with implicit solvent (CPCM). However, in a qualitative sense, there is reasonable agreement between the DFT/CPCM and QM/MM predictions for the reaction mechanism. Differences arise mainly from specific solute-solvent hydrogen bonds that are only captured by QM/MM and not by DFT/CPCM.

  16. Analysis of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate hydrolysis by Bacillus phytase: indication of a novel reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kerovuo, J; Rouvinen, J; Hatzack, F

    2000-12-15

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP(6)) hydrolysis by Bacillus phytase (PhyC) was studied. The enzyme hydrolyses only three phosphates from phytic acid. Moreover, the enzyme seems to prefer the hydrolysis of every second phosphate over that of adjacent ones. Furthermore, it is very likely that the enzyme has two alternative pathways for the hydrolysis of phytic acid, resulting in two different myo-inositol trisphosphate end products: Ins(2,4,6)P(3) and Ins(1,3,5)P(3). These results, together with inhibition studies with fluoride, vanadate, substrate and a substrate analogue, indicate a reaction mechanism different from that of other phytases. By combining the data presented in this study with (1) structural information obtained from the crystal structure of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens phytase [Ha, Oh, Shin, Kim, Oh, Kim, Choi and Oh (2000) Nat. Struct. Biol. 7, 147-153], and (2) computer-modelling analyses of enzyme-substrate complexes, a novel mode of phytic acid hydrolysis is proposed.

  17. Application of the luciferin-luciferase enzyme system for determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to studies on the mechanisms of herbicide action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.john, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The luciferin-luciferase enzyme system for determination of ATP is valuable for studies on the mechanisms of herbicide action. Investigations using this system have shown that certain herbicides may act by interfering with ATP production or by blocking ATP use, or by both mechanisms.

  18. Mechanism of initial rapid rate retardation in cellobiohydrolase catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jalak, Jürgen; Väljamäe, Priit

    2010-08-15

    Despite intensive research, the mechanism of the rapid retardation in the rates of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis is still not clear. Interpretation of the hydrolysis data has been complicated by the inability to measure the catalytic constants for CBH-s acting on cellulose. We developed a method for measuring the observed catalytic constant (k(obs)) for CBH catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis. It relies on in situ measurement of the concentration of CBH with the active site occupied by the cellulose chain. For that we followed the specific inhibition of the hydrolysis of para-nitrophenyl-beta-D-lactoside by cellulose. The method was applied to CBH-s TrCel7A from Trichoderma reesei and PcCel7D from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and their isolated catalytic domains. Bacterial microcrystalline cellulose, Avicel, amorphous cellulose, and lignocellulose were used as substrates. A rapid decrease of k(obs) in time was observed on all substrates. The k(obs) values for PcCel7D were about 1.5 times higher than those for TrCel7A. In case of both TrCel7A and PcCel7D, the k(obs) values for catalytic domains were similar to those for intact enzymes. A model where CBH action is limited by the average length of obstacle-free way on cellulose chain is proposed. Once formed, productive CBH-cellulose complex proceeds with a constant rate determined by the true catalytic constant. After encountering an obstacle CBH will "get stuck" and the rate of further cellulose hydrolysis will be governed by the dissociation rate constant (k(off)), which is low for processive CBH-s.

  19. Fundamental reaction mechanism and free energy profile for (-)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by cocaine esterase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junjun; Hamza, Adel; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2009-08-26

    The fundamental reaction mechanism of cocaine esterase (CocE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine and the corresponding free energy profile have been studied by performing pseudobond first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy (QM/MM-FE) calculations. On the basis of the QM/MM-FE results, the entire hydrolysis reaction consists of four reaction steps, including the nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of (-)-cocaine benzoyl ester by the hydroxyl group of Ser117, dissociation of (-)-cocaine benzoyl ester, nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of (-)-cocaine benzoyl ester by water, and finally dissociation between the (-)-cocaine benzoyl group and Ser117 of CocE. The third reaction step involving the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule was found to be rate-determining, which is remarkably different from (-)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by wild-type butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; where the formation of the prereactive BChE-(-)-cocaine complex is rate-determining) or its mutants containing Tyr332Gly or Tyr332Ala mutation (where the first chemical reaction step is rate-determining). Besides, the role of Asp259 in the catalytic triad of CocE does not follow the general concept of the "charge-relay system" for all serine esterases. The free energy barrier calculated for the rate-determining step of CocE-catalyzed hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine is 17.9 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energy of 16.2 kcal/mol. In the present study, where many sodium ions are present, the effects of counterions are found to be significant in determining the free energy barrier. The finding of the significant effects of counterions on the free energy barrier may also be valuable in guiding future mechanistic studies on other charged enzymes.

  20. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or ‘bathing solution’ ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r2 = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature. PMID:22227202

  1. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-03-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or 'bathing solution' ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature.

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate- and ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinases: covalent substrate-binding and kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alles, Luis F; Siebold, Christian; Nyffeler, Therese Lüthi; Flükiger-Brühwiler, Karin; Schneider, Philipp; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Baumann, Ulrich; Erni, Bernhard

    2004-10-19

    Dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinases are a sequence-conserved family of enzymes, which utilize two different phosphoryldonors, ATP in animals, plants, and some bacteria, and a multiphosphoprotein of the phosphoenolpyruvate carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) in most bacteria. Here, we compare the PTS-dependent kinase of Escherichia coli and the ATP-dependent kinase of Citrobacter freundii. They display 30% sequence identity. The binding constants of the E. coli kinase for eleven short-chain carbonyl compounds were determined by acetone precipitation of the enzyme-substrate complexes. They are 3.4 microM for Dha, 780 microM for Dha-phosphate (DhaP), 50 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde (GA), and 90 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. The k(cat) for Dha of the PTS-dependent kinase is 290 min(-1), and that of the ATP-dependent kinase is 1050 min(-1). The Km for Dha of both kinases is <6 microM. The X-ray structures of the enzyme-GA and the enzyme-DhaP complex show that substrates as well as products are bound in hemiaminal linkage to an active-site histidine. Quantum-mechanical calculations offer no indication for activation of the reacting hydroxyl group by the formation of the hemiaminal. However, the formation of the hemiaminal bond allows selection for short-chain carbonyl compounds and discrimination against structurally similar polyols. The Dha kinase remains fully active in the presence of 2 M glycerol, and phosphorylates trace impurities of carbonyl compounds present in glycerol.

  3. Protein phosphorylation and prevention of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by ATP: coupled mechanisms of energy metabolism regulation

    PubMed Central

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Gatti, Domenico L.; Bai, Yidong; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Summary Rapid regulation of oxidative phosphorylation is crucial for mitochondrial adaptation to swift changes in fuels availability and energy demands. An intra-mitochondrial signaling pathway regulates cytochrome oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, through reversible phosphorylation. We find that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of a COX subunit dictates mammalian mitochondrial energy fluxes, and identify the specific residue (S58) of COX subunit IV-1 (COXIV-1) that is involved in this mechanism of metabolic regulation. Using protein mutagenesis, molecular dynamics simulations, and induced fit docking, we show that mitochondrial energy metabolism regulation by phosphorylation of COXIV-1 is coupled with prevention of COX allosteric inhibition by ATP. This regulatory mechanism is essential for efficient oxidative metabolism and cell survival. We propose that S58 COXIV-1 phosphorylation has evolved as a metabolic switch that allows mammalian mitochondria to rapidly toggle between energy utilization and energy storage. PMID:21641552

  4. Mechanisms of ATP Release by Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells, the Enabling Step in Purinergic Regulation of Aqueous Humor Outflow

    PubMed Central

    LI, ANG; LEUNG, CHI TING; PETERSON-YANTORNO, KIM; STAMER, W. DANIEL; MITCHELL, CLAIRE H.; CIVAN, MORTIMER M.

    2011-01-01

    Our guiding hypothesis is that ecto-enzymatic conversion of extracellular ATP to adenosine activates A1 adenosine receptors, reducing resistance to aqueous humor outflow and intraocular pressure. The initial step in this purinergic regulation is ATP release from outflow-pathway cells by mechanisms unknown. We measured similar ATP release from human explant-derived primary trabecular meshwork (TM) cells (HTM) and a human TM cell line (TM5). Responses to 21 inhibitors indicated that pannexin-1 (PX1) and connexin (Cx) hemichannels and P2X7 receptors (P2RX7) were comparably important in modulating ATP release induced by hypotonic swelling, whereas vesicular release was insignificant. Consistent with prior studies of PX1 activity in certain other cells, ATP release was lowered by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Overexpressing PX1 in HEK293T cells promoted, while partial knockdown (KD) in both HEK293T and TM5 cells inhibited hypotonicity-activated ATP release. Additionally, KD reduced the pharmacologically-defined contribution of PX1 and enhanced those of Cx and P2RX7. ATP release was also triggered by raising intracellular Ca2+ activity with ionomycin after a prolonged lag time and was unaffected by the PX1 blocker probenecid, but nearly abolished by P2RX7 antagonists. We conclude that swelling-stimulated ATP release from human TM cells is physiologically mediated by PX1 and Cx hemichannels and P2X7 receptors, but not by vesicular release. PX1 appears not to be stimulated by intracellular Ca2+ in TM cells, but can be modulated by oxidation-reduction state. The P2RX7-dependent component of swelling-activated release may be mediated by PX1 hemichannels or reflect apoptotic magnification of ATP release, either through itself and/or hemichannels. PMID:21381023

  5. Revisiting the mechanism of neutral hydrolysis of esters: water autoionization mechanisms with acid or base initiation pathways.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Poliana Lima; Guimarães, Luciana; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2013-05-30

    The mechanism of neutral hydrolysis of ester has long been explored by theoretical studies. However, reliable theoretical calculations show that the usual bifunctional catalysis mechanism reported by different authors cannot explain the experimental kinetics. An important advance was recently reported by Gunaydin and Houk, suggesting that ions are involved in the mechanism and the process initiates by water autoionization followed by protonation of the ester (W(AI)A mechanism). However, this mechanism does not explain the hydrolysis of activated esters. In this work, we have used ab initio calculations, continuum solvation models, and intrinsic reaction coordinate method to support the W(AI)A mechanism for normal ester. In the case of activated esters, the process can also be viewed as water autoionization with formation of hydroxide ion aided by a second water molecule acting as a general base (W(AI)B mechanism). This is the mechanism that was proposed by Jencks and Carriuolo 50 years ago. Our analysis point out that the usual method for exploring mechanisms, searching for saddle points, may not work for problems like the present one, since there are no saddle points on the reaction pathway. Rather, the formation of a pair of ions from a neutral species may have an asymptotic barrier. The approach used in this paper allows the calculation of the free energy profile and enable us to explain the mechanism and kinetics of the neutral hydrolysis of normal (methyl acetate) and activated (methyl trifluoroacetate) esters. In addition, the present study suggests that formation of a pair of ions should always be considered in reactions in aqueous solution.

  6. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  7. Extracellular ATP a New Player in Cancer Metabolism: NSCLC Cells Internalize ATP In Vitro and In Vivo Using Multiple Endocytic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yanrong; Wang, Xuan; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Yanyang; Chen, Xiaozhuo

    2016-11-01

    Intratumoral extracellular ATP concentrations are 1000 times higher than those in normal tissues of the same cell origin. However, whether or not cancer cells use the abundant extracellular ATP was unknown until we recently reported that cancer cells internalize ATP. The internalized ATP was found to substantially increase intracellular ATP concentration and promote cell proliferation and drug resistance in cancer cells. Here, using a nonhydrolyzable fluorescent ATP (NHF-ATP), radioactive and regular ATP, coupled with high and low molecular weight dextrans as endocytosis tracers and fluorescence microscopy and ATP assays, cultured human NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells as well as A549 tumor xenografts were found to internalize extracellular ATP at concentrations within the reported intratumoral extracellular ATP concentration range. In addition to macropinocytosis, both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis significantly contribute to the ATP internalization, which led to an approximately 30% (within 45 minutes) or more than 50% (within 4 hours) increase in intracellular ATP levels after ATP incubation. This increase could not be accounted for by either purinergic receptor signaling or increased intracellular ATP synthesis rates in the ATP-treated cancer cells. These new findings significantly deepen our understanding of the Warburg effect by shedding light on how cancer cells in tumors, which are heterogeneous for oxygen and nutrition supplies, take up extracellular ATP and use the internalized ATP to perform multiple previously unrecognized functions of biological importance. They strongly suggest the existence of ATP sharing among cancer and stromal cells in tumors and simultaneously identify multiple new anticancer targets.

  8. Mechanism of hydrolysis of native and cooked starches from different botanical sources in the presence of tea extracts.

    PubMed

    Guzar, Igor; Ragaee, Sanaa; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2012-11-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to highlight the mechanism of inhibition of hydrolysis and differences in hydrolysis among starches from different sources in the presence of green or black tea extract. The first experiment showed that black tea extract was more effective at reducing final viscosity for all starches. The second experiment showed that black tea was more effective at inhibiting starch hydrolysis compared to green tea when starch, tea extract, and pancreatin were added at the beginning of pasting. The third experiment, when starches were pretreated with tea extracts, showed that both treatments reduced starch hydrolysis. Analysis of supernatant free phenolic content and of soluble dextrins showed that amyloglucosidase activity was affected, with exceptions for potato starch. These observations suggest that starch hydrolysis is affected by interactions and also by the impact on specific enzymes based on starch structure.

  9. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures.

  10. Amine-Promoted Organosilicate Hydrolysis Mechanism at Near-Neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delak, K. M.; Sahai, N.

    2006-12-01

    Proteins bearing polylysine moeities and histidine and serine amino-aicd residues, isolated from diatoms and sponges, are known to promote biological nanoporous silica formation [1, 2]. Using 29Si NMR, we have shown quantitatively that monoamines and small polyamines can chemically accelerate the hydrolysis and condensation rates of organosilicate starting materials, in biomimetic silica synthesis pathways, at circum- neutral pHs and room temperature [3, 4]. The present study is focused on understanding the mechanistic role of these amines in catalyzing the hydrolysis step that precedes condensation [5]. We conducted 29Si NMR experimental studies over a range of temperature and pHs for the hydrolysis rates of trimethylethoxysilane (TMES), a model compound with only one hydrolyzable bond. Experimental results were combined with quantum mechanical hybrid Density Functional Theory calculations of putative intermediate and transition state structures for TMES and tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) which has four hydrolyzable bonds. Comparison of calculated energies with experimentally-determined activation energies indicated that amines promote TMES hydrolysis mainly due to the amine's acidity at neutral pH. The proton released by the amine is transferred to the organosilicate, producing a protonated, ethoxy leaving group that can be displaced by water in an SN2 reaction. For TMOS, the activation energy of proton-transfer coupled with SN2 substitution is comparable to that for Corriu's nucleophile-activated nucleophilic displacement mechanism [6], such that the mechanism of amine-catalyzed hydrolysis is mostly dependent on the ambient pH conditions as well as the type of amine. The molecular mechanisms of hydrolysis and aggregation are reflected, ultimately, on the larger scale in the silica morphology where amines promoting faster hydrolysis result in glassy products compared to slower hydrolyzing amines forming particulate silica [7, 8]. REFERENCES [1] Kroger N

  11. Phentolamine relaxes human corpus cavernosum by a nonadrenergic mechanism activating ATP-sensitive K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Silva, L F G; Nascimento, N R F; Fonteles, M C; de Nucci, G; Moraes, M E; Vasconcelos, P R L; Moraes, M O

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the pharmacodynamics of phentolamine in human corpus cavernosum (HCC) with special attention to the role of the K+ channels. Strips of HCC precontracted with nonadrenergic stimuli and kept in isometric organ bath immersed in a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution enriched with guanethidine and indomethacine were used in order to study the mechanism of the phentolamine-induced relaxation. Phentolamine caused relaxation (approximately 50%) in HCC strips precontracted with K+ 40 mM. This effect was not blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 microM) (54.6+/-4.6 vs 48.9+/-6.4%) or (atropine (10 microM) (52.7+/-6.5 vs 58.6+/-5.6%). However, this relaxation was significantly attenuated by L-NAME (100 microM) (59.7+/-5.8 vs 27.8+/-7.1%; P<0.05; n = 8) and ODQ (100 microM) (62.7+/-5.1 vs 26.8+/-3.9%; P<0.05; n = 8). Charybdotoxin and apamin (K(Ca)-channel blockers) did not affect the phentolamine relaxations (54.6+/-4.6 vs 59.3+/-5.2%). Glibenclamide (100 microM), an inhibitor of K(ATP)-channel, caused a significant inhibition (56.7+/-6.3 vs 11.3+/-2.3%; P<0.05; n = 8) of the phentolamine-induced relaxation. In addition, the association of glibenclamide and L-NAME almost abolished the phentolamine-mediated relaxation (54.6+/-5.6 vs 5.7+/-1.4%; P<0.05; n = 8). The results suggest that phentolamine relaxes HCC by a nonadrenergic-noncholinergic mechanism dependent on nitric oxide synthase activity and activation of K(ATP)-channel.

  12. Understanding the hydrolysis mechanism of ethyl acetate catalyzed by an aqueous molybdocene: a computational chemistry investigation.

    PubMed

    Tílvez, Elkin; Cárdenas-Jirón, Gloria I; Menéndez, María I; López, Ramón

    2015-02-16

    A thoroughly mechanistic investigation on the [Cp2Mo(OH)(OH2)](+)-catalyzed hydrolysis of ethyl acetate has been performed using density functional theory methodology together with continuum and discrete-continuum solvation models. The use of explicit water molecules in the PCM-B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ (aug-cc-pVTZ-PP for Mo)//PCM-B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ (aug-cc-pVDZ-PP for Mo) computations is crucial to show that the intramolecular hydroxo ligand attack is the preferred mechanism in agreement with experimental suggestions. Besides, the most stable intermediate located along this mechanism is analogous to that experimentally reported for the norbornenyl acetate hydrolysis catalyzed by molybdocenes. The three most relevant steps are the formation and cleavage of the tetrahedral intermediate immediately formed after the hydroxo ligand attack and the acetic acid formation, with the second one being the rate-determining step with a Gibbs energy barrier of 36.7 kcal/mol. Among several functionals checked, B3LYP-D3 and M06 give the best agreement with experiment as the rate-determining Gibbs energy barrier obtained only differs 0.2 and 0.7 kcal/mol, respectively, from that derived from the experimental kinetic constant measured at 296.15 K. In both cases, the acetic acid elimination becomes now the rate-determining step of the overall process as it is 0.4 kcal/mol less stable than the tetrahedral intermediate cleavage. Apart from clarifying the identity of the cyclic intermediate and discarding the tetrahedral intermediate formation as the rate-determining step for the mechanism of the acetyl acetate hydrolysis catalyzed by molybdocenes, the small difference in the Gibbs energy barrier found between the acetic acid formation and the tetrahedral intermediate cleavage also uncovers that the rate-determining step could change when studying the reactivity of carboxylic esters other than ethyl acetate substrate specific toward molybdocenes or other transition metal complexes. Therefore

  13. Structure-guided simulations illuminate the mechanism of ATP transport through VDAC1.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Om P; Paz, Aviv; Adelman, Joshua L; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Abramson, Jeff; Grabe, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) mediates the flow of metabolites and ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane of all eukaryotic cells. The open channel passes millions of ATP molecules per second, whereas the closed state exhibits no detectable ATP flux. High-resolution structures of VDAC1 revealed a 19-stranded β-barrel with an α-helix partially occupying the central pore. To understand ATP permeation through VDAC, we solved the crystal structure of mouse VDAC1 (mVDAC1) in the presence of ATP, revealing a low-affinity binding site. Guided by these coordinates, we initiated hundreds of molecular dynamics simulations to construct a Markov state model of ATP permeation. These simulations indicate that ATP flows through VDAC through multiple pathways, in agreement with our structural data and experimentally determined physiological rates.

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Golankiewicz, B; Zielonacka-Lis, E; Folkman, W

    1985-01-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside, wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate were determined at various pH, temperature and buffer concentrations. The results show that despite distinct differences in structure and the glycosyl bond stability, the hydrolysis of wyosine proceeds via cleavage of the C-N bond by A-1 mechanism, analogously to simple nucleosides. Unlike majority of other monophosphates studied so far, wyosine 5'-monophosphate is not more stable than respective nucleoside. PMID:4000960

  15. An ecto-enzyme from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain 7 which catalyzes hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate, ATP, and ADP: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Wakagi, T; Oshima, T

    1993-09-01

    Membranes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium, show novel enzymatic activities to hydrolyze PPi, ATP, and ADP at an optimal pH of 3, equal to the growth optimum. The activity increased by about 2-fold on addition of PPi and/or Pi to the growth medium, when yeast extract and casamino acids were removed. The enzyme which hydrolyzes PPi at pH 3 was solubilized and purified by successive chromatographies. The final preparation showed a 26 kDa single band on SDS-PAGE, and a molecular mass of 35 kDa on gel permeation chromatography. The Km and Vmax for PPi were 0.16 mM and 33 mumol Pi released/min/mg at 55 degrees C. ATP and ADP were also good substrates. Divalent cations were not essential for activity. Substrate inhibition at more than 5 mM PPi, ATP or ADP was observed. AMP, glucose-6-phosphate, and p-nitrophenyl phosphate were not hydrolyzed at all. The activity was 4-fold stimulated by addition of the lipid fraction extracted from the organism.

  16. Structure and mechanism of soybean ATP sulfurylase and the committed step in plant sulfur assimilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymes of the sulfur assimilation pathway are potential targets for improving nutrient content and environmental stress responses in plants. The committed step in this pathway is catalyzed by ATP sulfurylase, which synthesizes adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) from sulfate and ATP. To better unde...

  17. The bioremediator glycerophosphodiesterase employs a non-processive mechanism for hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hadler, Kieran S; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Schenk, Gerhard

    2010-02-01

    Glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes is a binuclear metallohydrolase that catalyzes the breakdown of a broad range of phosphate ester substrates, and it is of interest for its potential application in the destruction of organophosphate nerve agents and pesticides. The reaction mechanism of GpdQ has been proposed to involve a nucleophilic attack by a terminally bound hydroxide molecule. The hydroxide species bridging the two metal ions is suggested to activate the nucleophile, thus favoring a sequential rather than a processive mechanism of action. Here, the hydrolysis of the two ester bonds in the substrate bis(para-nitrophenyl) phosphate (bpNPP) is probed using (31)P NMR. The kinetic rates measured compare well with those determined spectrophotometrically. Furthermore, the data indicate that the diester bonds are cleaved in two separate (non-processive) reactions, indicating that only a single nucleophile (the terminal hydroxide molecule) is likely to be employed as a nucleophile for GpdQ.

  18. Atomic structure of the apoptosome: mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mengying; Li, Yini; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-chen; Huang, Weiyun; Yan, Chuangye; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Shi, Yigong

    2015-01-01

    The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) controls the onset of many known forms of intrinsic apoptosis in mammals. Apaf-1 exists in normal cells as an autoinhibited monomer. Upon binding to cytochrome c and dATP, Apaf-1 oligomerizes into a heptameric complex known as the apoptosome, which recruits and activates cell-killing caspases. Here we present an atomic structure of an intact mammalian apoptosome at 3.8 Å resolution, determined by single-particle, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural analysis, together with structure-guided biochemical characterization, uncovered how cytochrome c releases the autoinhibition of Apaf-1 through specific interactions with the WD40 repeats. Structural comparison with autoinhibited Apaf-1 revealed how dATP binding triggers a set of conformational changes that results in the formation of the apoptosome. Together, these results constitute the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1. PMID:26543158

  19. Atomic structure of the apoptosome: mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mengying; Li, Yini; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Huang, Weiyun; Yan, Chuangye; Scheres, Sjors H W; Shi, Yigong

    2015-11-15

    The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) controls the onset of many known forms of intrinsic apoptosis in mammals. Apaf-1 exists in normal cells as an autoinhibited monomer. Upon binding to cytochrome c and dATP, Apaf-1 oligomerizes into a heptameric complex known as the apoptosome, which recruits and activates cell-killing caspases. Here we present an atomic structure of an intact mammalian apoptosome at 3.8 Å resolution, determined by single-particle, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural analysis, together with structure-guided biochemical characterization, uncovered how cytochrome c releases the autoinhibition of Apaf-1 through specific interactions with the WD40 repeats. Structural comparison with autoinhibited Apaf-1 revealed how dATP binding triggers a set of conformational changes that results in the formation of the apoptosome. Together, these results constitute the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

  20. Production of fermentable sugars from sugarcane bagasse by enzymatic hydrolysis after autohydrolysis and mechanical refining.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Larisse Aparecida Ribas; Han, Qiang; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min; Colodette, Jorge Luiz; Borges Gomes, Fernando José

    2015-03-01

    The autohydrolysis process has been considered a simple, low-cost and environmental friendly technology for generation of sugars from biomass. In order to improve accessibility of enzymes during enzymatic hydrolysis as well as to allow the recovery of hemicellulose in the filtrate, the sugarcane bagasse was pretreated using autohydrolysis followed by a mechanical refining process. The autohydrolysis was carried out in three different conditions. Autohydrolysis at 190°C for 10min provided the highest overall sugar (19.2/100g raw bagasse) in prehydrolyzate. The enzymatic hydrolysis step was performed for all the post-treated solids with and without refining at enzyme loadings of 5 and 10FPU/g for 96h. A total of 84.4% of sugar can be recovered from sugarcane bagasse at 180°C for 20min with 5 FPU/g enzyme charge. The economic analysis for the proposed method showed that the bioethanol production can have a financial return larger than 12%.

  1. Diminution in adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by platelets and serum from rats submitted to Walker 256 tumour.

    PubMed

    Buffon, Andréia; Ribeiro, Vanessa B; Schanoski, Alessandra S; Sarkis, João J F

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in the circulation is mediated by the action of an NTPDase (CD39, apyrase) and of a 5'-nucleotidase (CD73), presenting as a final product, adenosine. Among other properties described for adenine nucleotides, an anti-cancer activity is suggested, since ATP is considered a cytotoxic molecule in several tumour cell systems. Conversely, some studies demonstrate that adenosine presents a tumour-promoting activity. In this study, we evaluated the pattern of adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by serum and platelets from rats submitted to the Walker 256 tumour model. Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by blood serum and platelets obtained from rats at, 6, 10 and 15 days after the subcutaneous Walker 256 tumour inoculation, was evaluated. Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in ATP, ADP and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum at 6, 10 and 15 days after tumour induction. In platelets, a significant reduction in ATP and AMP hydrolysis was observed at 10 and 15 days after tumour induction, while an inhibition of ADP hydrolysis was observed at all times studied. Based on these results, it is possible to suggest a physiologic protection mechanism against the tumoral process in circulation. The inhibition in nucleotide hydrolysis observed probably maintains ATP levels elevated (cytotoxic compound) and, at the same time, reduces the adenosine production (tumour-promoting molecule) in the circulation.

  2. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Bind ATP: A putative Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J.; Soloveichick, L.; Shavit, S.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Korczyn, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) generated in experimental animals cross-react with ATP. We therefore examined the possibility that aPL IgG from human subjects bind to ATP by affinity column and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sera with high levels of aPL IgG were collected from 12 patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). IgG fractions from 10 of 12 APS patients contained aPL that could be affinity-bound to an ATP column and completely eluted with NaCl 0.5 M. A significant (>50%) inhibition of aPL IgG binding by ATP 5 mM was found in the majority. Similar inhibition was obtained with ADP but not with AMP or cAMP. All the affinity purified anti-ATP antibodies also bound β2-glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI, also known as apolipoprotein H) suggesting that, similar to most pathogenic aPL, their binding depends on this serum cofactor. We further investigated this possibility and found that the binding of β2-GPI to the ATP column was similar to that of aPL IgG in that most was reversed by NaCl 0.5 M. Furthermore, addition of β2-GPI to aPL IgG significantly increased the amount of aPL binding to an ATP column. We conclude that aPL IgG bind ATP, probably through β2-GPI. This binding could interfere with the normal extracellular function of ATP and similar neurotransmitters. PMID:16295522

  3. Conserved Asp327 of Walker B motif in the N-terminal Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD-1) of Cdr1p of Candida albicans has acquired a new role in ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Versha; Gaur, Manisha; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Shukla, Suneet; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2008-01-01

    The Walker A and B motifs of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Cdr1p though almost identical to all ABC transporters, has unique substitutions. We have in the past shown that Trp326 of Walker B and Cys193 of Walker A motifs of N-terminal NBD of Cdr1p have distinct roles in ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. In the present study, we have examined the role of a well conserved Asp327 in the Walker B motif of the N-terminal NBD which is preceded (Trp326) and followed (Asn328) by atypical amino acid substitutions and compared it with its equivalent well conserved Asp1026 of the C-terminal NBD of Cdr1p. We observed that the removal of the negative charge by D327N, D327A, D1026N, D1026A and D327N/D1026N substitutions, resulted in Cdr1p mutant variants that were severely impaired in ATPase activity and drug efflux. Importantly, all the mutant variants showed characteristics similar to those of wild type with respect to cell surface expression and photoaffinity drug analogue [125I] IAAP and [3H] azidopine labeling. While Cdr1p D327N mutant variant showed comparable binding with [α-32P] 8-azido ATP, Cdr1p D1026N and Cdr1p D327N/D1026N mutant variants were crippled in nucleotide binding. That the two conserved carboxylate residues Asp327 and Asp1026 are functionally different was further evident from the pH profile of ATPase activity. Cdr1p D327N mutant variant showed ∼40% enhancement of its residual ATPase activity at acidic pH while no such pH effect was seen with Cdr1p D1026N mutant variant. Our experimental data suggest that Asp327 of N-terminal NBD has acquired a new role to act as a catalytic base in ATP hydrolysis, a role normally conserved for Glu present adjacent to the conserved Asp in the Walker B motif of all the non-fungal transporters. PMID:17144665

  4. Visualizing the Mechanism of Epoxide Hydrolysis by the Bacterial Virulence Enzyme Cif.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Morisseau, Christophe; Gerber, Scott A; Madden, Dean R

    2016-02-09

    The CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif) is an epoxide hydrolase (EH) virulence factor secreted by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Sequence alignments reveal a pattern of Cif-like substitutions that proved to be characteristic of a new subfamily of bacterial EHs. At the same time, crystallographic and mutagenetic data suggest that EH activity is required for virulence and that Cif's active site remains generally compatible with a canonical two-step EH mechanism. A hallmark of this mechanism is the formation of a covalent hydroxyalkyl-enzyme intermediate by nucleophilic attack. In several well-studied EHs, this intermediate has been captured at near stoichiometric levels, presumably reflecting rate-limiting hydrolysis. Here we show by mass spectrometry that only minimal levels of the expected intermediate can be trapped with WT Cif. In contrast, substantial amounts of intermediate are recovered from an active-site mutant (Cif-E153Q) that selectively targets the second, hydrolytic release step. Utilizing Cif-E153Q and a previously reported nucleophile mutant (Cif-D129S), we then captured Cif in the substrate-bound, hydroxyalkyl-intermediate, and product-bound states for 1,2-epoxyhexane, yielding the first crystallographic snapshots of an EH at these key stages along the reaction coordinate. Taken together, our data illuminate the proposed two-step hydrolytic mechanism of a new class of bacterial virulence factor. They also suggest that the failure of WT Cif to accumulate a covalent hydroxyalkyl-enzyme intermediate reflects an active-site chemistry in which hydrolysis is no longer the rate-limiting step, a noncanonical kinetic regime that may explain similar observations with a number of other EHs.

  5. The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate: kinetics, products, reaction mechanisms, and atmospheric impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindelaub, Joel D.; Borca, Carlos H.; Hostetler, Matthew A.; Slade, Jonathan H.; Lipton, Mark A.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2016-12-01

    The production of atmospheric organic nitrates (RONO2) has a large impact on air quality and climate due to their contribution to secondary organic aerosol and influence on tropospheric ozone concentrations. Since organic nitrates control the fate of gas phase NOx (NO + NO2), a byproduct of anthropogenic combustion processes, their atmospheric production and reactivity is of great interest. While the atmospheric reactivity of many relevant organic nitrates is still uncertain, one significant reactive pathway, condensed phase hydrolysis, has recently been identified as a potential sink for organic nitrate species. The partitioning of gas phase organic nitrates to aerosol particles and subsequent hydrolysis likely removes the oxidized nitrogen from further atmospheric processing, due to large organic nitrate uptake to aerosols and proposed hydrolysis lifetimes, which may impact long-range transport of NOx, a tropospheric ozone precursor. Despite the atmospheric importance, the hydrolysis rates and reaction mechanisms for atmospherically derived organic nitrates are almost completely unknown, including those derived from α-pinene, a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) that is one of the most significant precursors to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). To better understand the chemistry that governs the fate of particle phase organic nitrates, the hydrolysis mechanism and rate constants were elucidated for several organic nitrates, including an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate (APN). A positive trend in hydrolysis rate constants was observed with increasing solution acidity for all organic nitrates studied, with the tertiary APN lifetime ranging from 8.3 min at acidic pH (0.25) to 8.8 h at neutral pH (6.9). Since ambient fine aerosol pH values are observed to be acidic, the reported lifetimes, which are much shorter than that of atmospheric fine aerosol, provide important insight into the fate of particle phase organic nitrates. Along with rate constant

  6. A Novel Mechanism of Antagonism between ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Complexes Regulates RNR3 Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Raghuvir S.; Psathas, James N.; Zhang, Hesheng; Zhang, Zhengjian; Reese, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression depends upon the antagonistic actions of chromatin remodeling complexes. While this has been studied extensively for the enzymes that covalently modify the tails of histones, the mechanism of how ATP-dependent remodeling complexes antagonize each other to maintain the proper level of gene activity is not known. The gene encoding a large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, RNR3, is regulated by ISW2 and SWI/SNF, complexes that repress and activate transcription, respectively. Here, we studied the functional interactions of these two complexes at RNR3. Deletion of ISW2 causes constitutive recruitment of SWI/SNF, and conditional reexpression of ISW2 causes the repositioning of nucleosomes and reduced SWI/SNF occupancy at RNR3. Thus, ISW2 is required for restriction of access of SWI/SNF to the RNR3 promoter under the uninduced condition. Interestingly, the binding of sequence-specific DNA binding factors and the general transcription machinery are unaffected by the status of ISW2, suggesting that disruption of nucleosome positioning does not cause a nonspecific increase in cross-linking of all factors to RNR3. We provide evidence that ISW2 does not act on SWI/SNF directly but excludes its occupancy by positioning nucleosomes over the promoter. Genetic disruption of nucleosome positioning by other means led to a similar phenotype, linking repressed chromatin structure to SWI/SNF exclusion. Thus, incorporation of promoters into a repressive chromatin structure is essential for prevention of the opportunistic actions of nucleosome-disrupting activities in vivo, providing a novel mechanism for maintaining tight control of gene expression. PMID:19349301

  7. Insight into the Mechanism of Hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23 Serine-β-lactamase Gained by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Grazioso, Giovanni; De Amici, Marco

    2016-09-13

    The fast and constant development of drug resistant bacteria represents a serious medical emergency. To overcome this problem, the development of drugs with new structures and modes of action is urgently needed. In this work, we investigated, at the atomistic level, the mechanisms of hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23, a class D β-lactamase, combining unbiased classical molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations with classical force field-based and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potentials. Our calculations provide a detailed structural and dynamic picture of the molecular steps leading to the formation of the Meropenem-OXA-23 covalent adduct, the subsequent hydrolysis, and the final release of the inactive antibiotic. In this mechanistic framework, the predicted activation energy is in good agreement with experimental kinetic measurements, validating the expected reaction path.

  8. A density functional theory model of mechanically activated silyl ester hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pill, Michael F.; Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Beyer, Martin K.; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Kersch, Alfred

    2014-01-28

    To elucidate the mechanism of the mechanically activated dissociation of chemical bonds between carboxymethylated amylose (CMA) and silane functionalized silicon dioxide, we have investigated the dissociation kinetics of the bonds connecting CMA to silicon oxide surfaces with density functional calculations including the effects of force, solvent polarizability, and pH. We have determined the activation energies, the pre-exponential factors, and the reaction rate constants of candidate reactions. The weakest bond was found to be the silyl ester bond between the silicon and the alkoxy oxygen atom. Under acidic conditions, spontaneous proton addition occurs close to the silyl ester such that neutral reactions become insignificant. Upon proton addition at the most favored position, the activation energy for bond hydrolysis becomes 31 kJ mol{sup −1}, which agrees very well with experimental observation. Heterolytic bond scission in the protonated molecule has a much higher activation energy. The experimentally observed bi-exponential rupture kinetics can be explained by different side groups attached to the silicon atom of the silyl ester. The fact that different side groups lead to different dissociation kinetics provides an opportunity to deliberately modify and tune the kinetic parameters of mechanically activated bond dissociation of silyl esters.

  9. Influence of protein hydrolysis on the mechanical properties of natural rubber composites reinforced with soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For natural rubber applications, the reinforcing fillers are used to improve the mechanical properties of the rubber. Soy protein particles have been shown to reinforce natural rubber. The hydrolysis conditions of soy protein are studied to understand its effect on the particle size and size distrib...

  10. A model of the quaternary structure of the Escherichia coli F1 ATPase from X-ray solution scattering and evidence for structural changes in the delta subunit during ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Svergun, D I; Aldag, I; Sieck, T; Altendorf, K; Koch, M H; Kane, D J; Kozin, M B; Grüber, G

    1998-01-01

    The shape and subunit arrangement of the Escherichia coli F1 ATPase (ECF1 ATPase) was investigated by synchrotron radiation x-ray solution scattering. The radius of gyration and the maximum dimension of the enzyme complex are 4.61 +/- 0.03 nm and 15.5 +/- 0.05 nm, respectively. The shape of the complex was determined ab initio from the scattering data at a resolution of 3 nm, which allowed unequivocal identification of the volume occupied by the alpha3beta3 subassembly and further positioning of the atomic models of the smaller subunits. The delta subunit was positioned near the bottom of the alpha3beta3 hexamer in a location consistent with a beta-delta disulfide formation in the mutant ECF1 ATPase, betaY331W:betaY381C:epsilonS108C, when MgADP is bound to the enzyme. The position and orientation of the epsilon subunit were found by interactively fitting the solution scattering data to maintain connection of the two-helix hairpin with the alpha3beta3 complex and binding of the beta-sandwich domain to the gamma subunit. Nucleotide-dependent changes of the delta subunit were investigated by stopped-flow fluorescence technique at 12 degrees C using N-[4-[7-(dimethylamino)-4-methyl]coumarin-3-yl]maleimide (CM) as a label. Fluorescence quenching monitored after addition of MgATP was rapid [k = 6.6 s-1] and then remained constant. Binding of MgADP and the noncleavable nucleotide analog AMP . PNP caused an initial fluorescent quenching followed by a slower decay back to the original level. This suggests that the delta subunit undergoes conformational changes and/or rearrangements in the ECF1 ATPase during ATP hydrolysis. PMID:9788916

  11. Theoretical study of phosphodiester hydrolysis in nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase. Environmental effects on the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    López-Canut, Violeta; Roca, Maite; Bertrán, Juan; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2010-05-26

    We here present a theoretical study of the alkaline hydrolysis of methyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (MpNPP(-)) in aqueous solution and in the active site of nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP). The analysis of our simulations, carried out by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, shows that the reaction takes place through different reaction mechanisms depending on the environment. Thus, while in aqueous solution the reaction occurs by means of an A(N)D(N) mechanism, the enzymatic process takes place through a D(N)A(N) mechanism. In the first case, we found associative transition-state (TS) structures, while in the enzyme TS structures have dissociative character. The reason for this change is rationalized in terms of the very different nature of the electrostatic interactions established in each of the environments: while the aqueous solution reduces the repulsion between the negatively charged reacting fragments, assisting their approach, the NPP active site stabilizes the charge distribution of dissociative TS structures, allowing the reaction to proceed with a significantly reduced free energy cost. Interestingly, the NPP active site is able to accommodate different substrates, and it seems that the nature of the TSs depends on their electronic characteristics. So, in the case of the MpNPP(-) substrate, the nitro group establishes hydrogen-bond interactions with water molecules and residues found in the outer part of the catalytic site, while the leaving group oxygen atom does not coordinate directly with any of the zinc atoms of the active site. If methyl phenyl phosphate is used as substrate, then the charge on the leaving group is supported to larger extent by the oxygen atom and the phenolate anion can be then coordinated to one of the two zinc atoms present in the active site.

  12. Acetylcholine and ATP are coreleased from the electromotor nerve terminals of Narcine brasiliensis by an exocytotic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, C D; Johnson, R G

    1990-01-01

    Although the exocytotic mechanism for quantal acetylcholine (ACh) release has been widely accepted for many years, it has repeatedly been challenged by reports that ACh released upon stimulation originates from the cytosol rather than synaptic vesicles. In this report, two independent experimental approaches were taken to establish the source of ACh released from the electromotor system of Narcine brasiliensis. Since ATP is colocalized with ACh in the cholinergic vesicle, the exocytotic theory predicts the corelease of these two components with a stoichiometry identical to that of the vesicle contents. The stimulated release of ATP from isolated synaptosomes could be accurately quantitated in the presence of the ATPase inhibitor adenosine 5'-[alpha, beta-methylene]triphosphate (500 microM), which prevented degradation of the released ATP. Various concentrations of elevated extracellular potassium (25-75 mM), veratridine (100 microM), and the calcium ionophore ionomycin (5 microM) all induced the corelease of ACh and ATP in a constant molar ratio of 5-6:1 (ACh/ATP), a stoichiometry consistent with that established for the vesicle content. In parallel to these stoichiometry studies, the compound 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183) was used to inhibit specifically the vesicular accumulation of newly synthesized (radiolabeled) ACh without affecting cytosolic levels of newly synthesized ACh in cholinergic nerve terminals. Treatment with AH5183 (10 microM) was shown to inhibit the release of newly synthesized ACh without markedly affecting total ACh release; thus, the entry of newly synthesized ACh into the synaptic vesicle is essential for its release. We conclude that ACh released upon stimulation originates exclusively from the vesicular pool and is coreleased stoichiometrically with other soluble vesicle contents.

  13. Lignin hydrolysis and phosphorylation mechanism during phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wu; Wu, Lingnan; Zheng, Zongming; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2014-12-18

    The study focused on the structural sensitivity of lignin during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process and the resulting hydrolysis and phosphorylation reaction mechanisms using density functional theory calculations. The chemical stabilities of the seven most common linkages (β-O-4, β-β, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5, α-O-4, and β-5) of lignin in H3PO4, CH3COCH3, and H2O solutions were detected, which shows that α-O-4 linkage and β-O-4 linkage tend to break during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process. Then α-O-4 phosphorylation and β-O-4 phosphorylation follow a two-step reaction mechanism in the acid treatment step, respectively. However, since phosphorylation of α-O-4 is more energetically accessible than phosphorylation of β-O-4 in phosphoric acid, the phosphorylation of α-O-4 could be controllably realized under certain operational conditions, which could tune the electron and hole transfer on the right side of β-O-4 in the H2PO4- functionalized lignin. The results provide a fundamental understanding for process-controlled modification of lignin and the potential novel applications in lignin-based imprinted polymers, sensors, and molecular devices.

  14. Behaviors and mechanism of acid dyes sorption onto diethylenetriamine-modified native and enzymatic hydrolysis starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuohua; Xiang, Bo; Cheng, Rumei; Li, Yijiu

    2010-11-15

    In this paper, different starches were modified by diethylenetriamine. The native starch reacted with diethylenetriamine giving CAS, whereas the enzymatic hydrolysis starch was modified by diethylenetriamine producing CAES. Adsorption capacities of CAES for four acid dyes, namely, Acid orange 7 (AO7), Acid orange 10 (AO10), Acid green 25 (AG25) and Acid red 18 (AR18) have been determined to be 2.521, 1.242, 1.798 and 1.570 mmol g(-1), respectively. In all cases, CAES has exhibited higher sorption ability than CAS, and the increment for these dyes took the sequence of AO7 (0.944 mmol g(-1))>AO10 (0.592 mmol g(-1))>AR18 (0.411 mmol g(-1))>AG25 (0.047 mmol g(-1)). Sorption kinetics and isotherms analysis showed that these sorption processes were better fitted to pseudo-second-order equation and Langmuir equation. Chemical sorption mechanisms were confirmed by studying the effects of pH, ionic strength and hydrogen bonding. Thermodynamic parameters of these dyes onto CAES and CAS were also observed and it indicated that these sorption processes were exothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  15. ATP-Dependent Interactions between Escherichia coli Min Proteins and the Phospholipid Membrane In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Laura L.; Raskin, David M.; de Boer, Piet A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Proper placement of the division apparatus in Escherichia coli requires pole-to-pole oscillation of the MinC division inhibitor. MinC dynamics involves a membrane association-dissociation cycle that is driven by the activities of the MinD ATPase and the MinE topological specificity factor, which themselves undergo coupled oscillatory localization cycles. To understand the biochemical mechanisms underlying Min protein dynamics, we studied the interactions of purified Min proteins with phospholipid vesicles and the role of ATP in these interactions. We show that (i) the ATP-bound form of MinD (MinD.ATP) readily associates with phospholipid vesicles in the presence of Mg2+, whereas the ADP-bound form (MinD.ADP) does not; (ii) MinD.ATP binds membrane in a self-enhancing fashion; (iii) both MinC and MinE can be recruited to MinD.ATP-decorated vesicles; (iv) MinE stimulates dissociation of MinD.ATP from the membrane in a process requiring hydrolysis of the nucleotide; and (v) MinE stimulates dissociation of MinC from MinD.ATP-membrane complexes, even when ATP hydrolysis is blocked. The results support and extend recent work by Z. Hu et al. (Z. Hu, E. P. Gogol, and J. Lutkenhaus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:6761-6766, 2002) and support models of protein oscillation wherein MinE induces Min protein dynamics by stimulating the conversion of the membrane-bound form of MinD (MinD.ATP) to the cytoplasmic form (MinD.ADP). The results also indicate that MinE-stimulated dissociation of MinC from the MinC-MinD.ATP-membrane complex can, and may, occur prior to hydrolysis of the nucleotide. PMID:12533449

  16. Structural basis of PP2A activation by PTPA, an ATP-dependent activation chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng; Stanevich, Vitali; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Sengupta, Rituparna; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Xing, Yongna

    2013-10-08

    Proper activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit is central for the complex PP2A regulation and is crucial for broad aspects of cellular function. The crystal structure of PP2A bound to PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) and ATPγS reveals that PTPA makes broad contacts with the structural elements surrounding the PP2A active site and the adenine moiety of ATP. PTPA-binding stabilizes the protein fold of apo-PP2A required for activation, and orients ATP phosphoryl groups to bind directly to the PP2A active site. This allows ATP to modulate the metal-binding preferences of the PP2A active site and utilize the PP2A active site for ATP hydrolysis. In vitro, ATP selectively and drastically enhances binding of endogenous catalytic metal ions, which requires ATP hydrolysis and is crucial for acquisition of pSer/Thr-specific phosphatase activity. Furthermore, both PP2A- and ATP-binding are required for PTPA function in cell proliferation and survival. Our results suggest novel mechanisms of PTPA in PP2A activation with structural economy and a unique ATP-binding pocket that could potentially serve as a specific therapeutic target.

  17. Mechanisms for the control of local tissue blood flow during thermal interventions: influence of temperature‐dependent ATP release from human blood and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.; Ali, Leena; Lotlikar, Makrand D.; González‐Alonso, José

    2017-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Skin and muscle blood flow increases with heating and decreases with cooling, but the temperature‐sensitive mechanisms underlying these responses are not fully elucidated. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that local tissue hyperaemia was related to elevations in ATP release from erythrocytes. Increasing intravascular ATP augmented skin and tissue perfusion to levels equal or above thermal hyperaemia. ATP release from isolated erythrocytes was altered by heating and cooling. Our findings suggest that erythrocytes are involved in thermal regulation of blood flow via modulation of ATP release. Local tissue perfusion changes with alterations in temperature during heating and cooling, but the thermosensitivity of the vascular ATP signalling mechanisms for control of blood flow during thermal interventions remains unknown. Here, we tested the hypotheses that the release of the vasodilator mediator ATP from human erythrocytes, but not from endothelial cells or other blood constituents, is sensitive to both increases and reductions in temperature and that increasing intravascular ATP availability with ATP infusion would potentiate thermal hyperaemia in limb tissues. We first measured blood temperature, brachial artery blood flow and plasma [ATP] during passive arm heating and cooling in healthy men and found that they increased by 3.0 ± 1.2°C, 105 ± 25 ml min−1 °C−1 and twofold, respectively, (all P < 0.05) with heating, but decreased or remained unchanged with cooling. In additional men, infusion of ATP into the brachial artery increased skin and deep tissue perfusion to levels equal or above thermal hyperaemia. In isolated erythrocyte samples exposed to different temperatures, ATP release increased 1.9‐fold from 33 to 39°C (P < 0.05) and declined by ∼50% at 20°C (P < 0.05), but no changes were observed in cultured human endothelial cells, plasma or serum samples. In

  18. Cryo-EM structure of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel illuminates mechanisms of assembly and gating

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory M; Yoshioka, Craig; Rex, Emily A; Fay, Jonathan F; Xie, Qing; Whorton, Matthew R; Chen, James Z; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2017-01-01

    KATP channels are metabolic sensors that couple cell energetics to membrane excitability. In pancreatic β-cells, channels formed by SUR1 and Kir6.2 regulate insulin secretion and are the targets of antidiabetic sulfonylureas. Here, we used cryo-EM to elucidate structural basis of channel assembly and gating. The structure, determined in the presence of ATP and the sulfonylurea glibenclamide, at ~6 Å resolution reveals a closed Kir6.2 tetrameric core with four peripheral SUR1s each anchored to a Kir6.2 by its N-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD0). Intricate interactions between TMD0, the loop following TMD0, and Kir6.2 near the proposed PIP2 binding site, and where ATP density is observed, suggest SUR1 may contribute to ATP and PIP2 binding to enhance Kir6.2 sensitivity to both. The SUR1-ABC core is found in an unusual inward-facing conformation whereby the two nucleotide binding domains are misaligned along a two-fold symmetry axis, revealing a possible mechanism by which glibenclamide inhibits channel activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24149.001 PMID:28092267

  19. Intragenic Deletions in ATP7B as an Unusual Molecular Genetics Mechanism of Wilson’s Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Savov, Alexey; Socha, Piotr; Schmidt, Hartmut H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Wilson’s disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ATP7B resulting in copper overload in the liver and brain. Direct sequencing is routinely used to confirm WD diagnosis; however, partial and whole gene deletions in the heterozygous state cannot be detected by exon amplification since the normal allele will mask its presence. The aim of the present work was to search for unusual mutational events in the unexplained WD cases and to provide insight into the mechanisms. Out of 1420 clinically and biochemically confirmed WD samples received between 2000 and 2014 for routine mutation analysis, we were unable to detect mutant alleles in 142 samples, after extensive sequencing analysis. We used selective amplification and MLPA to identify the partial gene deletions and identified three different partial gene deletions in seven different families. All three deletions were fully characterized at the DNA sequence level. We report the first hemizygous case with WD due to intragenic deletion in the ATP7B (c.3134_3556+689del). This novel deletion resulted from an excision event mediated by consensus sequences in an AluSq2 repeat element and could be traced to micro homologous end joining (MMEJ). Finally, we determined the prevalence of the three deletions in DNA samples from a multinational group of WD patients. Our results emphasize the need for searching mutant alleles beyond routine methods and highlight that large ATP7B deletions are rare, but account for a detectable proportion in some WD patients. Screening for gene aberrations will further improve mutation detection in patients with unidentified ATP7B mutations presenting with clinical manifestations of WD. PMID:27992490

  20. Fluctuations of the Red Blood Cell Membrane: Relation to Mechanical Properties and Lack of ATP Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Evans, James; Gratzer, Walter; Mohandas, Narla; Parker, Kim; Sleep, John

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed the fluctuations of the red blood cell membrane in both the temporal ((ω(s−1)) and spatial (q(m−1)) frequency domains. The cells were examined over a range of osmolarities leading to cell volumes from 50% to 170% of that in the isotonic state. The fluctuations of the isotonic cell showed an ∼q−3-dependence, indicative of a motion dominated by bending, with an inferred bending modulus of ∼9 × 10−19J. When the cells were osmotically swollen to just below the point of lysis (166% of physiological volume), a q−1-dependence of the fluctuations supervened, implying that the motion was now dominated by membrane tension; estimated as ∼1.3 × 10−4 nm−1. When, on the other hand, the cells were osmotically dehydrated, the fluctuation amplitude progressively decreased. This was caused by a rise in internal viscosity, as shown by measurements on resealed ghosts containing a reduced hemoglobin concentration, which displayed no such effect. We examined, in addition, cells depleted of ATP, before the onset of echinocytosis, and could observe no change in fluctuation amplitude. We conclude that the membrane fluctuations of the red cell are governed by bending modulus, membrane tension, and cytosolic viscosity, with little or no dependence on the presence or absence of ATP. PMID:18234829

  1. Understanding the fundamental mechanism behind accumulation of oligosaccharides during high solids loading enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass, polysaccharides are cleaved by glycosyl hydrolases to soluble oligosaccharides and further hydrolyzed by ß-glucosidase, ß-xylosidase and other enzymes to monomeric sugars. However, commercial enzyme mixtures do not hydrolyze all of these oligosaccharides and v...

  2. Synthesis, Spectroscopic, Structural and Quantum Chemical Studies of a New Imine Oxime and Its Palladium(II) Complex: Hydrolysis Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yunus; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we report synthesis, crystallographic, spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of a new imine oxime, namely (4-nitro-phenyl)-(1-phenyl-ethylimino)-acetaldehyde oxime (nppeieoH). Spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction studies showed that nppeieoH is hydrolyzed in aqueous solution, forming nitroisonitrosoacetophenone (ninap) and the hydrolysis product binds to Pd(II) to yield [Pd(nppeieo)(ninap)]. The mechanism of the hydrolysis reaction has been theoretically investigated in detail, using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method. The vibrational and the electronic spectra of nppeieoH and its Pd(II) complex, the HOMO and LUMO analysis, Mulliken atomic charges and molecular electrostatic potential were also performed. The predicted nonlinear optical properties of both compounds are higher than those of urea.

  3. ATP synthase: two motors, two fuels.

    PubMed

    Oster, G; Wang, H

    1999-04-15

    FoF1 ATPase is the universal protein responsible for ATP synthesis. The enzyme comprises two reversible rotary motors: Fo is either an ion 'turbine' or an ion pump, and F1 is either a hydrolysis motor or an ATP synthesizer. Recent biophysical and biochemical studies have helped to elucidate the operating principles for both motors.

  4. Mitochondrial ADP/ATP exchange inhibition: a novel off-target mechanism underlying ibipinabant-induced myotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schirris, Tom J. J.; Ritschel, Tina; Herma Renkema, G.; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Russel, Frans G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) antagonists appear to be promising drugs for the treatment of obesity, however, serious side effects have hampered their clinical application. Rimonabant, the first in class CB1R antagonist, was withdrawn from the market because of psychiatric side effects. This has led to the search for more peripherally restricted CB1R antagonists, one of which is ibipinabant. However, this 3,4-diarylpyrazoline derivative showed muscle toxicity in a pre-clinical dog study with mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism by which ibipinabant induces mitochondrial toxicity. We observed a strong cytotoxic potency of ibipinabant in C2C12 myoblasts. Functional characterization of mitochondria revealed increased cellular reactive oxygen species generation and a decreased ATP production capacity, without effects on the catalytic activities of mitochondrial enzyme complexes I–V or the complex specific-driven oxygen consumption. Using in silico off-target prediction modelling, combined with in vitro validation in isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts, we identified adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT)-dependent mitochondrial ADP/ATP exchange as a novel molecular mechanism underlying ibipinabant-induced toxicity. Minor structural modification of ibipinabant could abolish ANT inhibition leading to a decreased cytotoxic potency, as observed with the ibipinabant derivative CB23. Our results will be instrumental in the development of new types of safer CB1R antagonists. PMID:26416158

  5. Mechanism of pain relief by low-power infrared irradiation: ATP is an IR-target molecule in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Yachnev, Igor L; Plakhova, Vera B; Podzorova, Svetlana A; Shelykh, Tatiana N; Rogachevsky, Ilya V; Krylov, Boris V

    2012-01-01

    Effects of infrared (IR) radiation generated by a low-power CO2-laser on the membrane of cultured dissociated nociceptive neurons of newborn rat spinal ganglia were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Low-power IR radiation diminished the voltage sensitivity of activation gating machinery of slow sodium channels (Na(v)1.8). Ouabain known to block both transducer and pumping functions of Na+,K+-ATPase eliminated IR irradiation effects. The molecular mechanism of interaction of CO2-laser radiation with sensory membrane was proposed. The primary event of this interaction is the process of energy absorption by ATP molecules. The transfer of vibrational energy from Na+,K+- ATPase-bound and vibrationally excited ATP molecules to Na+,K+-ATPase activates this enzyme and converts it into a signal transducer. This effect leads to a decrease in the voltage sensitivity of Na(v)1.8 channels. The effect of IR-radiation was elucidated by the combined application of a very sensitive patch-clamp method and an optical facility with a controlled CO2-laser. As a result, the mechanism of interaction of non-thermal low-power IR radiation with the nociceptive neuron membrane is suggested.

  6. Neuroglial ATP release through innexin channels controls microglial cell movement to a nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lipitz, Jeffrey B.; Dahl, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the immune cells of the central nervous system, are attracted to sites of injury. The injury releases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into the extracellular space, activating the microglia, but the full mechanism of release is not known. In glial cells, a family of physiologically regulated unpaired gap junction channels called innexons (invertebrates) or pannexons (vertebrates) located in the cell membrane is permeable to ATP. Innexons, but not pannexons, also pair to make gap junctions. Glial calcium waves, triggered by injury or mechanical stimulation, open pannexon/innexon channels and cause the release of ATP. It has been hypothesized that a glial calcium wave that triggers the release of ATP causes rapid microglial migration to distant lesions. In the present study in the leech, in which a single giant glial cell ensheathes each connective, hydrolysis of ATP with 10 U/ml apyrase or block of innexons with 10 µM carbenoxolone (CBX), which decreased injury-induced ATP release, reduced both movement of microglia and their accumulation at lesions. Directed movement and accumulation were restored in CBX by adding ATP, consistent with separate actions of ATP and nitric oxide, which is required for directed movement but does not activate glia. Injection of glia with innexin2 (Hminx2) RNAi inhibited release of carboxyfluorescein dye and microglial migration, whereas injection of innexin1 (Hminx1) RNAi did not when measured 2 days after injection, indicating that glial cells’ ATP release through innexons was required for microglial migration after nerve injury. Focal stimulation either mechanically or with ATP generated a calcium wave in the glial cell; injury caused a large, persistent intracellular calcium response. Neither the calcium wave nor the persistent response required ATP or its release. Thus, in the leech, innexin membrane channels releasing ATP from glia are required for migration and accumulation of microglia after nerve injury. PMID:20876360

  7. A monoclonal antibody (Mc178-Ab) targeted to the ecto-ATP synthase β-subunit-induced cell apoptosis via a mechanism involving the MAPKase and Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Juan; Ma, Zhan; Liu, Yi-Wen; He, Yi-Qing; Wang, Ying-Zhi; Yang, Cui-Xia; Du, Yan; Zhou, Mu-Qing; Gao, Feng

    2012-03-01

    Ecto-ATP synthase has been considered to be an effective target for cancer recently. As inhibitors of ecto-ATP synthase were found to be cytotoxic for tumor cells, a monoclonal antibody (Mc178-Ab) against ecto-ATP synthase was generated in our previous study that exhibited both anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic effects. However, the mechanism of action of Mc178-Ab and its downstream pathways for anti-tumor effects remain unclear. In this research, we intended to investigate the mechanism of the anti-tumor action of Mc178-Ab. The expressions of cell surface ATP synthase on A549 and CHO cells were confirmed by flow cytometry and confocal microscope. Proliferation and apoptosis were examined after the treatment with Mc178-Ab. In order to examine the activity of ecto-ATP synthase changed by Mc178-Ab, extracellular ATP generation and intracellular pH levels were assessed. The phosphorylation of the signaling molecules, MAPKase and Akt, was analyzed by western blot. Cell proliferation was blocked, and apoptosis was induced in A549 cells treated with Mc178-Ab, as determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis of Annexin-V/PI staining separately. The intracellular pH level and extracellular ATP generation were also decreased after Mc178-Ab treatment. Finally, western blot data revealed that the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased, while the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt was decreased in A549 cells treated with Mc178-Ab. Compared with A549 cells, Mc178-Ab had less effect on CHO cells. The decreased intracellular pH levels and the altered concentration of extracellular ATP may contribute to the mechanisms of the effect of Mc178-Ab on A549 and CHO cells. The results also suggested that the anti-tumor effect of Mc178-Ab was associated with MAPKase and Akt pathways.

  8. Vacuolar Acid Hydrolysis as a Physiological Mechanism for Sucrose Breakdown 1

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, Ed; Burns, Jacqueline K.

    1989-01-01

    Sucrose breakdown in mature acidic `Persian' limes (Citrus aurantifolia [Christm.] Swing.) occurred at a rate of 30.6 picomoles per milliliter per day during 9 weeks storage at 15°C. Neither enzyme of sucrose catabolism (sucrose synthase or acid/alkaline invertase) was present in extracts of mature storage tissue. The average vacuolar pH, estimated by direct measurement of sap from isolated vacuoles and by the methylamine method, was about 2.0 to 2.2. In vitro acid hydrolysis of sucrose at physiological concentrations in a buffered solution (pH 2.2) occurred at identical rates as in matured limes. The results indicate that sucrose breakdown in stored mature acidic limes occurs by acid hydrolysis. PMID:16666803

  9. Lack of myostatin impairs mechanical performance and ATP cost of contraction in exercising mouse gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Giannesini, Benoît; Vilmen, Christophe; Amthor, Helge; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David

    2013-07-01

    Although it is well established that the lack of myostatin (Mstn) promotes skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the corresponding changes regarding force generation have been studied mainly in vitro and remain conflicting. Furthermore, the metabolic underpinnings of these changes are very poorly documented. To clarify this issue, we have investigated strictly noninvasively in vivo the impact of the lack of Mstn on gastrocnemius muscle function and energetics in Mstn-targeted knockout (Mstn-/-) mice using ¹H-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ³¹P-MR spectroscopy during maximal repeated isometric contractions induced by transcutaneous electrostimulation. In Mstn-/- animals, although body weight, gastrocnemius muscle volume, and absolute force were larger (+38, +118, and +34%, respectively) compared with wild-type (Mstn+/+) mice, specific force (calculated from MR imaging measurements) was significantly lower (-36%), and resistance to fatigue was decreased. Besides, Mstn deficiency did not affect phosphorylated compound concentrations and intracellular pH at rest but caused a large increase in ATP cost of contraction (up to +206% compared with Mstn+/+) throughout the stimulation period. Further, Mstn deficiency limits the shift toward oxidative metabolism during muscle activity despite the fact that oxidative ATP synthesis capacity was not altered. Our data demonstrate in vivo that the absence of Mstn impairs both mechanical performance and energy cost of contraction in hypertrophic muscle. These findings must be kept in mind when considering Mstn as a potential therapeutic target for increasing muscle mass in patients suffering from muscle-wasting disorders.

  10. Mechanism of local anesthetic effect. Involvement of F0 in the inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthase by phenothiazines.

    PubMed

    Dabbeni-Sala, F; Palatini, P

    1990-02-02

    The mechanism whereby tertiary amine local anesthetics affect the activity of membrane proteins was investigated by studying the interaction of phenothiazines with mitochondrial ATP synthase. These drugs caused inhibition of the activity of the membrane-bound enzyme at concentrations that do not perturb the phospholipid bilayer. The inhibitory effect appeared consequent to interaction with multiple sites located on both the F1 and the F0 components of the enzyme complex, since: (a) Dixon plots were parabolic; (b) the membrane-bound enzyme was more sensitive to the drug effect than the isolated F1 component; (c) conditions that decreased oligomycin sensitivity also decreased the sensitivity to phenothiazines; (d) irreversible binding of photochemically activated phenothiazines to the ATP synthase complex, followed by detachment of the F1 moiety and reconstitution with purified F1 resulted in an inhibited enzyme complex. These data are interpreted as indicating that tertiary amine local anesthetics affect the activity of membrane proteins by interacting with hydrophobic sites located on both their integral and peripheral domains.

  11. A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the hydrolysis mechanism of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kongkai; Lu, Junyan; Liang, Zhongjie; Kong, Xiangqian; Ye, Fei; Jin, Lu; Geng, Heji; Chen, Yong; Zheng, Mingyue; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun-Qian; Luo, Cheng

    2013-03-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) has emerged as a major global threat to human health for its rapid rate of dissemination and ability to make pathogenic microbes resistant to almost all known β-lactam antibiotics. In addition, effective NDM-1 inhibitors have not been identified to date. In spite of the plethora of structural and kinetic data available, the accurate molecular characteristics of and details on the enzymatic reaction of NDM-1 hydrolyzing β-lactam antibiotics remain incompletely understood. In this study, a combined computational approach including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations was performed to characterize the catalytic mechanism of meropenem catalyzed by NDM-1. The quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics results indicate that the ionized D124 is beneficial to the cleavage of the C-N bond within the β-lactam ring. Meanwhile, it is energetically favorable to form an intermediate if no water molecule coordinates to Zn2. Moreover, according to the molecular dynamics results, the conserved residue K211 plays a pivotal role in substrate binding and catalysis, which is quite consistent with previous mutagenesis data. Our study provides detailed insights into the catalytic mechanism of NDM-1 hydrolyzing meropenem β-lactam antibiotics and offers clues for the discovery of new antibiotics against NDM-1 positive strains in clinical studies.

  12. A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the hydrolysis mechanism of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kongkai; Lu, Junyan; Liang, Zhongjie; Kong, Xiangqian; Ye, Fei; Jin, Lu; Geng, Heji; Chen, Yong; Zheng, Mingyue; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun-Qian; Luo, Cheng

    2013-03-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) has emerged as a major global threat to human health for its rapid rate of dissemination and ability to make pathogenic microbes resistant to almost all known β-lactam antibiotics. In addition, effective NDM-1 inhibitors have not been identified to date. In spite of the plethora of structural and kinetic data available, the accurate molecular characteristics of and details on the enzymatic reaction of NDM-1 hydrolyzing β-lactam antibiotics remain incompletely understood. In this study, a combined computational approach including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations was performed to characterize the catalytic mechanism of meropenem catalyzed by NDM-1. The quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics results indicate that the ionized D124 is beneficial to the cleavage of the C-N bond within the β-lactam ring. Meanwhile, it is energetically favorable to form an intermediate if no water molecule coordinates to Zn2. Moreover, according to the molecular dynamics results, the conserved residue K211 plays a pivotal role in substrate binding and catalysis, which is quite consistent with previous mutagenesis data. Our study provides detailed insights into the catalytic mechanism of NDM-1 hydrolyzing meropenem β-lactam antibiotics and offers clues for the discovery of new antibiotics against NDM-1 positive strains in clinical studies.

  13. Cryo-EM structure of a group II chaperonin in the prehydrolysis ATP-bound state leading to lid closure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Ma, Boxue; DiMaio, Frank; Douglas, Nicholai R; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Baker, David; Frydman, Judith; Levitt, Michael; Chiu, Wah

    2011-05-11

    Chaperonins are large ATP-driven molecular machines that mediate cellular protein folding. Group II chaperonins use their "built-in lid" to close their central folding chamber. Here we report the structure of an archaeal group II chaperonin in its prehydrolysis ATP-bound state at subnanometer resolution using single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural comparison of Mm-cpn in ATP-free, ATP-bound, and ATP-hydrolysis states reveals that ATP binding alone causes the chaperonin to close slightly with a ∼45° counterclockwise rotation of the apical domain. The subsequent ATP hydrolysis drives each subunit to rock toward the folding chamber and to close the lid completely. These motions are attributable to the local interactions of specific active site residues with the nucleotide, the tight couplings between the apical and intermediate domains within the subunit, and the aligned interactions between two subunits across the rings. This mechanism of structural changes in response to ATP is entirely different from those found in group I chaperonins.

  14. Functional asymmetry of the F(0) motor in bacterial ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Alexander; Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    F(1)F(0) ATP synthases use the electrochemical potential of H(+) or Na(+) across biological membranes to synthesize ATP by a rotary mechanism. In bacteria, the enzymes can act in reverse as ATP-driven ion pumps creating the indispensable membrane potential. Here, we demonstrate that the F(0) parts of a Na(+)- and H(+)-dependent enzyme display major asymmetries with respect to their mode of operation, reflected by the requirement of approximately 100 times higher Na(+) or H(+) concentrations for the synthesis compared with the hydrolysis of ATP. A similar asymmetry is observed during ion transport through isolated F(0) parts, indicating different affinities for the binding sites in the a/c interface. Together with further data, we propose a model that provides a rationale for a differential usage of membrane potential and ion gradient during ATP synthesis as observed experimentally. The functional asymmetry might also reflect an important property of the ATP synthesis mechanism in vivo. In Escherichia coli, we observed respiratory chain-driven ATP production at pH 7-8, while P-site pH values < 6.5 were required for ATP synthesis in vitro. This discrepancy is discussed with respect to the hypothesis that during respiration lateral proton diffusion could lead to significant acidification at the membrane surface.

  15. Hydrolysis mechanism of anticancer drug lobaplatin in aqueous medium under neutral and acidic conditions: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy B., Venkata P.; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Mitra, Ishani; Mahata, Sujay; Linert, Wolfgang; Moi, Sankar Ch.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the hydrolysis mechanism of lobaplatin in aqueous medium under neutral and acidic conditions using density functional theory combining with CPCM model. The stationary states located on potential energy surface were fully optimized and characterised. The rate limiting step in neutral conditions, ring opening reaction with an activation energy of 110.21 kJ mol-1. The completely hydrolysed complex is expected to be the reactive species towards the DNA purine bases. In acidic conditions, ligand detachment is the rate limiting step with an activation energy of 113.82 kJ mol-1. Consequently, monohydrated complex is expected to be the species reacting with DNA.

  16. Enzymatic hydrolysis combined with mechanical shearing and high-pressure homogenization for nanoscale cellulose fibrils and strong gels.

    PubMed

    Pääkkö, M; Ankerfors, M; Kosonen, H; Nykänen, A; Ahola, S; Osterberg, M; Ruokolainen, J; Laine, J; Larsson, P T; Ikkala, O; Lindström, T

    2007-06-01

    Toward exploiting the attractive mechanical properties of cellulose I nanoelements, a novel route is demonstrated, which combines enzymatic hydrolysis and mechanical shearing. Previously, an aggressive acid hydrolysis and sonication of cellulose I containing fibers was shown to lead to a network of weakly hydrogen-bonded rodlike cellulose elements typically with a low aspect ratio. On the other hand, high mechanical shearing resulted in longer and entangled nanoscale cellulose elements leading to stronger networks and gels. Nevertheless, a widespread use of the latter concept has been hindered because of lack of feasible methods of preparation, suggesting a combination of mild hydrolysis and shearing to disintegrate cellulose I containing fibers into high aspect ratio cellulose I nanoscale elements. In this work, mild enzymatic hydrolysis has been introduced and combined with mechanical shearing and a high-pressure homogenization, leading to a controlled fibrillation down to nanoscale and a network of long and highly entangled cellulose I elements. The resulting strong aqueous gels exhibit more than 5 orders of magnitude tunable storage modulus G' upon changing the concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C NMR suggest that the cellulose I structural elements obtained are dominated by two fractions, one with lateral dimension of 5-6 nm and one with lateral dimensions of about 10-20 nm. The thicker diameter regions may act as the junction zones for the networks. The resulting material will herein be referred to as MFC (microfibrillated cellulose). Dynamical rheology showed that the aqueous suspensions behaved as gels in the whole investigated concentration range 0.125-5.9% w/w, G' ranging from 1.5 Pa to 105 Pa. The maximum G' was high, about 2 orders of magnitude larger than typically observed for the corresponding nonentangled low aspect ratio cellulose I gels, and G' scales

  17. Fluorescent ATP analog mant-ATP reports dynein activity in the isolated Chlamydomonas axoneme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilova, Maria; Howard, Jonathon

    Eukaryotic flagella are long rod-like extensions of cells, which play a fundamental role in single cell movement, as well as in fluid transport. Flagella contain a highly evolutionary conserved mechanical structure called the axoneme. The motion of the flagellum is generated by dynein motor proteins located all along the length of the axoneme. How the force production of motors is controlled spatially and temporally is still an open question. Therefore, monitoring dynein activity in the axonemal structure is expected to provide novel insights in regulation of the beat. We use high sensitivity fluorescence microscopy to monitor the binding and hydrolysis kinetics of the fluorescently labeled ATP analogue mant-ATP (2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate), which is known to support dynein activity. By studying the kinetics of mant-ATP fluorescence, we identified distinct mant-ATP binding sites in the axoneme. The application of this method to axonemes with reduced amounts of dynein, showed evidence that one of the sites is associated with binding to dynein. In the future, we would like to use this method to find the spatial distribution of dynein activity in the axoneme.

  18. ATP sensitivity of preBötzinger complex neurones in neonatal rat in vitro: mechanism underlying a P2 receptor-mediated increase in inspiratory frequency

    PubMed Central

    Lorier, A R; Lipski, J; Housley, G D; Greer, J J; Funk, G D

    2008-01-01

    P2 receptor (R) signalling plays an important role in the central ventilatory response to hypoxia. The frequency increase that results from activation of P2Y1Rs in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC; putative site of inspiratory rhythm generation) may contribute, but neither the cellular nor ionic mechanism(s) underlying these effects are known. We applied whole-cell recording to rhythmically-active medullary slices from neonatal rat to define, in preBötC neurones, the candidate cellular and ionic mechanisms through which ATP influences rhythm, and tested the hypothesis that putative rhythmogenic preBötC neurones are uniquely sensitive to ATP. ATP (1 mm) evoked inward currents in all non-respiratory neurones and the majority of respiratory neurons, which included inspiratory, expiratory and putative rhythmogenic inspiratory neurones identified by sensitivity to substance P (1 μm) and DAMGO (50 μm) or by voltage-dependent pacemaker-like activity. ATP current densities were similar in all classes of preBötC respiratory neurone. Reversal potentials and input resistance changes for ATP currents in respiratory neurones suggested they resulted from either inhibition of a K+ channel or activation of a mixed cationic conductance. The P2YR agonist 2MeSADP (1 mm) evoked only the latter type of current in inspiratory and pacemaker-like neurones. In summary, putative rhythmogenic preBötC neurones were sensitive to ATP. However, this sensitivity was not unique; ATP evoked similar currents in all types of preBötC respiratory neurone. The P2Y1R-mediated frequency increase is therefore more likely to reflect activation of a mixed cationic conductance in multiple types of preBötC neurone than excitation of one, highly sensitive group. PMID:18174215

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the base-catalyzed rearrangement and hydrolysis of ezetimibe.

    PubMed

    Baťová, Jana; Imramovský, Aleš; HájÍček, Josef; Hejtmánková, Ludmila; Hanusek, Jiří

    2014-08-01

    The pH-rate profile of the pseudo-first-order rate constants for the rearrangement and hydrolysis of Ezetimibe giving (2R,3R,6S)-N,6-bis(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-carboxamide (2) as the main product at pH of less than 12.5 and the mixture of 2 and 5-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2-[(4-fluorophenylamino)-(4-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]-pentanoic acid (3) at pH of more than 12.5 in aqueous tertiary amine buffers and in sodium hydroxide solutions at ionic strength I = 0.1 mol L(-1) (KCl) and at 39 °C is reported. No buffer catalysis was observed and only specific base catalysis is involved. The pH-rate profile is more complex than the pH-rate profiles for the hydrolysis of simple β-lactams and it contains several breaks. Up to pH 9, the log k(obs) linearly increases with pH, but between pH 9 and 11 a distinct break downwards occurs and the values of log k(obs) slightly decrease with increasing pH of the medium. At pH of approximately 13, another break upwards occurs that corresponds to the formation of compound 3 that is slowly converted to (2R,3R,6S)-6-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-carboxylic acid (4). The kinetics of base-catalyzed hydrolysis of structurally similar azetidinone is also discussed.

  20. The malaria parasite cation ATPase PfATP4 and its role in the mechanism of action of a new arsenal of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Spillman, Natalie Jane; Kirk, Kiaran

    2015-12-01

    The intraerythrocytic malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, maintains a low cytosolic Na(+) concentration and the plasma membrane P-type cation translocating ATPase 'PfATP4' has been implicated as playing a key role in this process. PfATP4 has been the subject of significant attention in recent years as mutations in this protein confer resistance to a growing number of new antimalarial compounds, including the spiroindolones, the pyrazoles, the dihydroisoquinolones, and a number of the antimalarial agents in the Medicines for Malaria Venture's 'Malaria Box'. On exposure of parasites to these compounds there is a rapid disruption of cytosolic Na(+). Whether, and if so how, such chemically distinct compounds interact with PfATP4, and how such interactions lead to parasite death, is not yet clear. The fact that multiple different chemical classes have converged upon PfATP4 highlights its significance as a potential target for new generation antimalarial agents. A spiroindolone (KAE609, now known as cipargamin) has progressed through Phase I and IIa clinical trials with favourable results. In this review we consider the physiological role of PfATP4, summarise the current repertoire of antimalarial compounds for which PfATP4 is implicated in their mechanism of action, and provide an outlook on translation from target identification in the laboratory to patient treatment in the field.

  1. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C. S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C1) and cellobiase comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was bjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C1) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo-and endo-glucanases are coinduced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes.

  2. ATP Induces IL-1β Secretion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Infected Human Macrophages by a Mechanism Not Related to the NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    García, Killen; Escobar, Gisselle; Mendoza, Pablo; Beltran, Caroll; Perez, Claudio; Vernal, Rolando; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) has developed multiple immune evasion mechanisms involving the innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent findings have reported that Ngo reduces the IL-1β secretion of infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Here, we investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in production and release of IL-1β in Ngo-infected MDM. We found that the exposure of Ngo-infected MDM to ATP increases IL-1β levels about ten times compared with unexposed Ngo-infected MDM (P < 0.01). However, we did not observe any changes in inflammasome transcriptional activation of speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (CARD) (ASC, P > 0.05) and caspase-1 (CASP1, P > 0.05). In addition, ATP was not able to modify caspase-1 activity in Ngo-infected MDM but was able to increase pyroptosis (P > 0.01). Notably ATP treatment defined an increase of positive staining for IL-1β with a distinctive intracellular pattern of distribution. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP induces IL-1β secretion by a mechanism not related to the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 axis and likely is acting at the level of vesicle trafficking or pore formation. PMID:27803513

  3. The kinesin-14 Klp2 organizes microtubules into parallel bundles by an ATP-dependent sorting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcus; Drummond, Douglas R; Cross, Robert A; McAinsh, Andrew D

    2009-06-01

    The dynamic organization of microtubules into parallel arrays allows interphase cells to set up multi-lane highways for intracellular transport and M-phase cells to build the mitotic and meiotic spindles. Here we show that a minimally reconstituted system composed of Klp2, a kinesin-14 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, together with microtubules assembled from purified S. pombe tubulin, autonomously assembles bundles of parallel microtubules. Bundles form by an ATP-dependent sorting mechanism that requires the full-length Klp2 motor. By this mechanism, antiparallel-overlapped microtubules slide over one another until they dissociate from the bundles, whereas parallel-overlapped microtubules are selectively trapped by an energy-dissipating force-balance mechanism. Klp2-driven microtubule sorting provides a robust pathway for the organization of microtubules into parallel arrays. In vivo evidence indicates that Klp2 is required for the proper organization of S. pombe interphase microtubules into bipolar arrays of parallel-overlapped microtubules, suggesting that kinesin-14-dependent microtubule sorting may have wide biological importance.

  4. Interaction of ATP with a small heat shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae: effect on its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Panda, Alok Kumar; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is an important phosphate metabolite abundantly found in Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. This pathogen does not derive ATP from its host but has its own mechanism for the generation of ATP. Interestingly, this molecule as well as several antigenic proteins act as bio-markers for the detection of leprosy. One such bio-marker is the 18 kDa antigen. This 18 kDa antigen is a small heat shock protein (HSP18) whose molecular chaperone function is believed to help in the growth and survival of the pathogen. But, no evidences of interaction of ATP with HSP18 and its effect on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are available in the literature. Here, we report for the first time evidences of "HSP18-ATP" interaction and its consequences on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18. TNP-ATP binding experiment and surface plasmon resonance measurement showed that HSP18 interacts with ATP with a sub-micromolar binding affinity. Comparative sequence alignment between M. leprae HSP18 and αB-crystallin identified the sequence 49KADSLDIDIE58 of HSP18 as the Walker-B ATP binding motif. Molecular docking studies revealed that β4-β8 groove/strands as an ATP interactive region in M. leprae HSP18. ATP perturbs the tertiary structure of HSP18 mildly and makes it less susceptible towards tryptic cleavage. ATP triggers exposure of additional hydrophobic patches at the surface of HSP18 and induces more stability against chemical and thermal denaturation. In vitro aggregation and thermal inactivation assays clearly revealed that ATP enhances the chaperone function of HSP18. Our studies also revealed that the alteration in the chaperone function of HSP18 is reversible and is independent of ATP hydrolysis. As the availability and binding of ATP to HSP18 regulates its chaperone function, this functional inflection may play an important role in the survival of M. leprae in hosts.

  5. Invited review: Activation of G proteins by GTP and the mechanism of Gα-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sprang, Stephen R

    2016-08-01

    This review addresses the regulatory consequences of the binding of GTP to the alpha subunits (Gα) of heterotrimeric G proteins, the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by Gα and the means by which GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) stimulate the GTPase activity of Gα. The high energy of GTP binding is used to restrain and stabilize the conformation of the Gα switch segments, particularly switch II, to afford stable complementary to the surfaces of Gα effectors, while excluding interaction with Gβγ, the regulatory binding partner of GDP-bound Gα. Upon GTP hydrolysis, the energy of these conformational restraints is dissipated and the two switch segments, particularly switch II, become flexible and are able to adopt a conformation suitable for tight binding to Gβγ. Catalytic site pre-organization presents a significant activation energy barrier to Gα GTPase activity. The glutamine residue near the N-terminus of switch II (Glncat ) must adopt a conformation in which it orients and stabilizes the γ phosphate and the water nucleophile for an in-line attack. The transition state is probably loose with dissociative character; phosphoryl transfer may be concerted. The catalytic arginine in switch I (Argcat ), together with amide hydrogen bonds from the phosphate binding loop, stabilize charge at the β-γ bridge oxygen of the leaving group. GAPs that harbor "regulator of protein signaling" (RGS) domains, or structurally unrelated domains within G protein effectors that function as GAPs, accelerate catalysis by stabilizing the pre-transition state for Gα-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis, primarily by restraining Argcat and Glncat to their catalytic conformations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 449-462, 2016.

  6. Theoretical Proposal for the Whole Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis Mechanism Promoted by a Catalytic Promiscuous Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Lucas F; Rey, Nicolás A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; Costa, Luiz Antônio S

    2016-03-21

    The catalytic mechanism that involves the cleavage of the phosphate diester model BDNPP (bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed through a dinuclear copper complex is investigated in the current study. The metal complex was originally designed to catalyze catechol oxidation, and it showed an interesting catalytic promiscuity case in biomimetic systems. The current study investigates two different reaction mechanisms through quantum mechanics calculations in the gas phase, and it also includes the solvent effect through PCM (polarizable continuum model) single-point calculations using water as solvent. Two mechanisms are presented in order to fully describe the phosphate diester hydrolysis. Mechanism 1 is of the S(N)2 type, which involves the direct attack of the μ-OH bridge between the two copper(II) ions toward the phosphorus center, whereas mechanism 2 is the process in which hydrolysis takes place through proton transfer between the oxygen atom in the bridging hydroxo ligand and the other oxygen atom in the phosphate model. Actually, the present theoretical study shows two possible reaction paths in mechanism 1. Its first reaction path (p1) involves a proton transfer that occurs immediately after the hydrolytic cleavage, so that the proton transfer is the rate-determining step, which is followed by the entry of two water molecules. Its second reaction path (p2) consists of the entry of two water molecules right after the hydrolytic cleavage, but with no proton transfer; thus, hydrolytic cleavage is the rate-limiting step. The most likely catalytic path occurs in mechanism 1, following the second reaction path (p2), since it involves the lowest free energy activation barrier (ΔG(⧧) = 23.7 kcal mol(-1), in aqueous solution). A kinetic analysis showed that the experimental k(obs) value of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) agrees with the calculated value k1 = 2.6 × 10(-5) s(-1); the concerted mechanism is kinetically favorable. The KIE (kinetic isotope effect) analysis

  7. A Computational Analysis of ATP Binding of SV40 Large Tumor Antigen Helicase Motor

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yemin; Liu, Hanbin; Gai, Dahai; Ma, Jianpeng; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2009-01-01

    Simian Virus 40 Large Tumor Antigen (LTag) is an efficient helicase motor that unwinds and translocates DNA. The DNA unwinding and translocation of LTag is powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide pocket between two adjacent subunits of an LTag hexamer. Based on the set of high-resolution hexameric structures of LTag helicase in different nucleotide binding states, we simulated a conformational transition pathway of the ATP binding process using the targeted molecular dynamics method and calculated the corresponding energy profile using the linear response approximation (LRA) version of the semi-macroscopic Protein Dipoles Langevin Dipoles method (PDLD/S). The simulation results suggest a three-step process for the ATP binding from the initial interaction to the final tight binding at the nucleotide pocket, in which ATP is eventually “locked” by three pairs of charge-charge interactions across the pocket. Such a “cross-locking” ATP binding process is similar to the binding zipper model reported for the F1-ATPase hexameric motor. The simulation also shows a transition mechanism of Mg2+ coordination to form the Mg-ATP complex during ATP binding, which is accompanied by the large conformational changes of LTag. This simulation study of the ATP binding process to an LTag and the accompanying conformational changes in the context of a hexamer leads to a refined cooperative iris model that has been proposed previously. PMID:19779548

  8. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access and other possible mechanisms suggest that, when the ratio of protons transported per ATP hydrolyzed exceeds one, the one-at-a-time proton transport by the rotary mechanism is faster than other possible mechanisms across a wide range of driving conditions. When the ratio is one, there is no intrinsic difference in the free energy landscape between mechanisms, and therefore all mechanisms can exhibit the same kinetic performance. To our knowledge all known rotary pumps have an H+:ATP ratio greater than one, and all known alternating access ATP-driven proton pumps have a ratio of one. Our analysis suggests a possible explanation for this apparent relationship between coupling ratio and mechanism. When the conditions under which the pump must operate permit a coupling ratio greater than one, the rotary mechanism may have been selected for its kinetic advantage. On the other hand, when conditions require a coupling ratio of one or less, the alternating access mechanism may have been selected for other possible advantages resulting from its structural and functional simplicity.

  9. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access and other possible mechanisms suggest that, when the ratio of protons transported per ATP hydrolyzed exceeds one, the one-at-a-time proton transport by the rotary mechanism is faster than other possible mechanisms across a wide range of driving conditions. When the ratio is one, there is no intrinsic difference in the free energy landscape between mechanisms, and therefore all mechanisms can exhibit the same kinetic performance. To our knowledge all known rotary pumps have an H+:ATP ratio greater than one, and all known alternating access ATP-driven proton pumps have a ratio of one. Our analysis suggests a possible explanation for this apparent relationship between coupling ratio and mechanism. When the conditions under which the pump must operate permit a coupling ratio greater than one, the rotary mechanism may have been selected for its kinetic advantage. On the other hand, when conditions require a coupling ratio of one or less, the alternating access mechanism may have been selected for other possible advantages resulting from its structural and functional simplicity. PMID:28319179

  10. Mechanisms of C-peptide-mediated rescue of low O2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer P; Bowles, Elizabeth A; Gordon, Weston R; Ellsworth, Mary L; Stephenson, Alan H; Sprague, Randy S

    2015-03-01

    The circulating erythrocyte, by virtue of the regulated release of ATP in response to reduced oxygen (O2) tension, plays a key role in maintaining appropriate perfusion distribution to meet tissue needs. Erythrocytes from individuals with Type 2 diabetes (DM2) fail to release ATP in response to this stimulus. However, the administration of C-peptide and insulin at a 1:1 ratio was shown to restore this important physiological response in humans with DM2. To begin to investigate the mechanisms by which C-peptide influences low O2-induced ATP release, erythrocytes from healthy humans and humans with DM2 were exposed to reduced O2 in a thin-film tonometer, and ATP release under these conditions was compared with release during normoxia. We determined that 1) low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes is rescued by C-peptide in the presence and absence of insulin, 2) the signaling pathway activated by C-peptide in human erythrocytes involves PKC, as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and 3) inhibitors of cGMP degradation rescue low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes. These results provide support for the hypothesis that both PKC and sGC are components of a signaling pathway activated by C-peptide in human erythrocytes. In addition, since both C-peptide and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors rescue low O2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with DM2, their administration to humans with DM2 could aid in the treatment and/or prevention of the vascular disease associated with this condition.

  11. Investigation of lignin deposition on cellulose during hydrothermal pretreatment, its effect on cellulose hydrolysis, and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjia; Pu, Yunqiao; Kumar, Rajeev; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Wyman, Charles E

    2014-03-01

    In dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, lignin has been shown to form droplets that deposit on the cellulose surface and retard enzymatic digestion of cellulose (Donohoe et al., 2008; Selig et al., 2007). However, studies of this nature are limited for hydrothermal pretreatment, with the result that the corresponding mechanisms that inhibit cellulosic enzymes are not well understood. In this study, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and wet chemical analysis of solids formed by hydrothermal pretreatment of a mixture of Avicel cellulose and poplar wood showed that lignin droplets from poplar wood relocated onto the Avicel surface. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed higher S/G ratios in deposited lignin than the initial lignin in poplar wood. Furthermore, the lignin droplets deposited on Avicel significantly impeded cellulose hydrolysis. A series of tests confirmed that blockage of the cellulose surface by lignin droplets was the main cause of cellulase inhibition. The results give new insights into the fate of lignin in hydrothermal pretreatment and its effects on enzymatic hydrolysis.

  12. Stable nuclear expression of ATP8 and ATP6 genes rescues a mtDNA Complex V null mutant

    PubMed Central

    Boominathan, Amutha; Vanhoozer, Shon; Basisty, Nathan; Powers, Kathleen; Crampton, Alexandra L.; Wang, Xiaobin; Friedricks, Natalie; Schilling, Birgit; Brand, Martin D.; O'Connor, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of re-engineering mitochondrial genes and expressing them from the nucleus as an approach to rescue defects arising from mitochondrial DNA mutations. We have used a patient cybrid cell line with a single point mutation in the overlap region of the ATP8 and ATP6 genes of the human mitochondrial genome. These cells are null for the ATP8 protein, have significantly lowered ATP6 protein levels and no Complex V function. Nuclear expression of only the ATP8 gene with the ATP5G1 mitochondrial targeting sequence appended restored viability on Krebs cycle substrates and ATP synthesis capabilities but, failed to restore ATP hydrolysis and was insensitive to various inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Co-expressing both ATP8 and ATP6 genes under similar conditions resulted in stable protein expression leading to successful integration into Complex V of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Tests for ATP hydrolysis / synthesis, oxygen consumption, glycolytic metabolism and viability all indicate a significant functional rescue of the mutant phenotype (including re-assembly of Complex V) following stable co-expression of ATP8 and ATP6. Thus, we report the stable allotopic expression, import and function of two mitochondria encoded genes, ATP8 and ATP6, resulting in simultaneous rescue of the loss of both mitochondrial proteins. PMID:27596602

  13. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  14. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms.

  15. Mechanism of phosphoglycolate phosphatase. Studies of hydrolysis and transphosphorylation, substrate analogs, and sulfhydryl inhibition.

    PubMed

    Christeller, J T; Tolbert, N E

    1978-03-25

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of phosphoglycolate proceeds through O-P bond cleavage as determined by reaction in H218O and analysis of the trimethylsilyl derivatives of the reaction products by mass spectrometry. No phosphate, hydroxyl, or carboxyl exchange occurred. End product inhibition was consistent with an ordered release of products, first the alcoholic product, glycolate, then phosphate. Analysis of the data indicated that the phosphate.enzyme complex dissociated very rapidly, and this was confirmed by use of alternative phosphomonoester substrates. Maximum velocity with these alternate substrates was found to be proportional to the pKa of of the corresponding alcoholic product, indicating the rate-limiting step in the reaction was protonation of the bridge oxygen. The use of substrate analogs further suggested that enzymatic specificity residues in exacting steric requirements for binding, and that large alkyl groups were excluded on this basis. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase catalyzed transphorylation to a wide range of acceptors and was inhibited at the active site by diisopropyl-fluorophosphate. The data suggest that the reaction sequence proceeds via a phosphoenzyme intermediate. N-Ethylmaleimide slowly inactivated the enzyme, the rate being greatly increased by P-glycolate, but not by magnesium or phosphate ions. The data suggest a conformational change is necessary to induce the transition state complex and phosphoenzyme formation. This may account for the phosphate acceptor specificity and is consistent with the failure to observe an enzyme-mediated H2O-phosphate oxygen exchange.

  16. Modeling of tRNA-assisted mechanism of Arg activation based on a structure of Arg-tRNA synthetase, tRNA, and an ATP analog (ANP).

    PubMed

    Konno, Michiko; Sumida, Tomomi; Uchikawa, Emiko; Mori, Yukie; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeuki

    2009-09-01

    The ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction catalyzed by Arg-tRNA, Gln-tRNA and Glu-tRNA synthetases requires the assistance of the cognate tRNA. tRNA also assists Arg-tRNA synthetase in catalyzing the pyrophosphorolysis of synthetic Arg-AMP at low pH. The mechanism by which the 3'-end A76, and in particular its hydroxyl group, of the cognate tRNA is involved with the exchange reaction catalyzed by those enzymes has yet to be established. We determined a crystal structure of a complex of Arg-tRNA synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii, tRNA(Arg)(CCU) and an ATP analog with Rfactor = 0.213 (Rfree = 0.253) at 2.0 A resolution. On the basis of newly obtained structural information about the position of ATP bound on the enzyme, we constructed a structural model for a mechanism in which the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 2'-OH group of A76 of tRNA and the carboxyl group of Arg induces both formation of Arg-AMP (Arg + ATP --> Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate) and pyrophosphorolysis of Arg-AMP (Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate --> Arg + ATP) at low pH. Furthermore, we obtained a structural model of the molecular mechanism for the Arg-tRNA synthetase-catalyzed deacylation of Arg-tRNA (Arg-tRNA + AMP --> Arg-AMP + tRNA at high pH), in which the deacylation of aminoacyl-tRNA bound on Arg-tRNA synthetase and Glu-tRNA synthetase is catalyzed by a quite similar mechanism, whereby the proton-donating group (-NH-C+(NH2)2 or -COOH) of Arg and Glu assists the aminoacyl transfer from the 2'-OH group of tRNA to the phosphate group of AMP at high pH.

  17. Calcium regulation of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier SLC25A24 uses a locking pin mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Harborne, Steven P. D.; King, Martin S.; Crichton, Paul G.; Kunji, Edmund R. S.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carriers import adenine nucleotides into the mitochondrial matrix and export phosphate to the cytosol. They are calcium-regulated to control the size of the matrix adenine nucleotide pool in response to cellular energetic demands. They consist of three domains: an N-terminal regulatory domain containing four calcium-binding EF-hands, a linker loop domain with an amphipathic α-helix and a C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain for the transport of substrates. Here, we use thermostability assays to demonstrate that the carrier is regulated by calcium via a locking pin mechanism involving the amphipathic α-helix. When calcium levels in the intermembrane space are high, the N-terminus of the amphipathic α-helix is bound to a cleft in the regulatory domain, leading to substrate transport by the carrier domain. When calcium levels drop, the cleft closes, and the amphipathic α-helix is released to bind to the carrier domain via its C-terminus, locking the carrier in an inhibited state. PMID:28350015

  18. Perturbed equilibria of myosin binding in airway smooth muscle: bond-length distributions, mechanics, and ATP metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mijailovich, S M; Butler, J P; Fredberg, J J

    2000-01-01

    We carried out a detailed mathematical analysis of the effects of length fluctuations on the dynamically evolving cross-bridge distributions, simulating those that occur in airway smooth muscle during breathing. We used the latch regulation scheme of Hai and Murphy (Am. J. Physiol. Cell Physiol. 255:C86-C94, 1988) integrated with Huxley's sliding filament theory of muscle contraction. This analysis showed that imposed length fluctuations decrease the mean number of attached bridges, depress muscle force and stiffness, and increase force-length hysteresis. At frequencies >0.1 Hz, the bond-length distribution of slowly cycling latch bridges changed little over the stretch cycle and contributed almost elastically to muscle force, but the rapidly cycling cross-bridge distribution changed substantially and dominated the hysteresis. By contrast, at frequencies <0.033 Hz this behavior was reversed: the rapid cycling cross-bridge distribution changed little, effectively functioning as a constant force generator, while the latch bridge bond distribution changed substantially and dominated the stiffness and hysteresis. The analysis showed the dissociation of force/length hysteresis and cross-bridge cycling rates when strain amplitude exceeds 3%; that is, there is only a weak coupling between net external mechanical work and the ATP consumption required for cycling cross-bridges during the oscillatory steady state. Although these results are specific to airway smooth muscle, the approach generalizes to other smooth muscles subjected to cyclic length fluctuations. PMID:11053139

  19. ATP release through pannexon channels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed ‘pannexon’. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  20. Analysis on mechanism of ATP-sensitive K+ channel opener natakalim improving congestive heart failure after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The action mechanism of natakalim, a novel ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, was studied in ameliorating the congestive heart failure (CHF) after myocardial infarction. A total of 25 healthy Wistar male rats (age, 10 weeks; average weight, 300 g) were selected, and the CHF models after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were prepared by ligation of left anterior descending branch. They were randomly divided into the sham operation group, the model group and the groups of 1, 3 and 9 mg/kg/day natakalims. Each group had 5 mice that were sacrificed after 8 weeks. We compared left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), left ventricular mass index, myocardial cell cross-sectional area, myocardial collagen content, plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels. Compared with the sham operation, the LVEDD and NT-proBNP in the model group and each natakalim group were elevated. LVEF decreased significantly, while the left ventricular mass index, myocardial cell cross-sectional area, myocardial collagen content, plasma ET-1 and eNOS levels increased. Natakalim intervention improved the above changes and the improvement effect of 3 mg/kg/day group was the highest. The mechanism of natakalim against the endothelin system can be explained by the fact that inhibiting ET-1 synthesis can reduce the ET-1 levels in circulation leading to the release of NO and PGI2. Inhibition of the vasoconstriction effect of ET-1 can improve the hemodynamics of high-load status and ameliorate the cardiac systolic and diastolic functions. In conclusion, natakalim can improve the ventricular remodeling of CHF after AMI, and 3 mg/kg/day was the most effective dose. PMID:28101177

  1. Three-dimensional Structure of Nylon Hydrolase and Mechanism of Nylon-6 Hydrolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Negoro, Seiji; Shibata, Naoki; Tanaka, Yusuke; Yasuhira, Kengo; Shibata, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Haruka; Lee, Young-Ho; Oshima, Shohei; Santa, Ryuji; Oshima, Shohei; Mochiji, Kozo; Goto, Yuji; Ikegami, Takahisa; Nagai, Keisuke; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    We performed x-ray crystallographic analyses of the 6-aminohexanoate oligomer hydrolase (NylC) from Agromyces sp. at 2.0 Å-resolution. This enzyme is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily that is responsible for the degradation of the nylon-6 industry byproduct. We observed four identical heterodimers (27 kDa + 9 kDa), which resulted from the autoprocessing of the precursor protein (36 kDa) and which constitute the doughnut-shaped quaternary structure. The catalytic residue of NylC was identified as the N-terminal Thr-267 of the 9-kDa subunit. Furthermore, each heterodimer is folded into a single domain, generating a stacked αββα core structure. Amino acid mutations at subunit interfaces of the tetramer were observed to drastically alter the thermostability of the protein. In particular, four mutations (D122G/H130Y/D36A/E263Q) of wild-type NylC from Arthrobacter sp. (plasmid pOAD2-encoding enzyme), with a heat denaturation temperature of Tm = 52 °C, enhanced the protein thermostability by 36 °C (Tm = 88 °C), whereas a single mutation (G111S or L137A) decreased the stability by ∼10 °C. We examined the enzymatic hydrolysis of nylon-6 by the thermostable NylC mutant. Argon cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses of the reaction products revealed that the major peak of nylon-6 (m/z 10,000–25,000) shifted to a smaller range, producing a new peak corresponding to m/z 1500–3000 after the enzyme treatment at 60 °C. In addition, smaller fragments in the soluble fraction were successively hydrolyzed to dimers and monomers. Based on these data, we propose that NylC should be designated as nylon hydrolase (or nylonase). Three potential uses of NylC for industrial and environmental applications are also discussed. PMID:22187439

  2. Reversible transport by the ATP-binding cassette multidrug export pump LmrA: ATP synthesis at the expense of downhill ethidium uptake.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Lekshmy; Venter, Henrietta; Shilling, Richard A; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2004-03-19

    The ATP dependence of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters has led to the widespread acceptance that these systems are unidirectional. Interestingly, in the presence of an inwardly directed ethidium concentration gradient in ATP-depleted cells of Lactococcus lactis, the ABC multidrug transporter LmrA mediated the reverse transport (or uptake) of ethidium with an apparent K(t) of 2.0 microm. This uptake reaction was competitively inhibited by the LmrA substrate vinblastine and was significantly reduced by an E314A substitution in the membrane domain of the transporter. Similar to efflux, LmrA-mediated ethidium uptake was inhibited by the E512Q replacement in the Walker B region of the nucleotide-binding domain of the protein, which strongly reduced its drug-stimulated ATPase activity, consistent with published observations for other ABC transporters. The notion that ethidium uptake is coupled to the catalytic cycle in LmrA was further corroborated by studies in LmrA-containing cells and proteoliposomes in which reverse transport of ethidium was associated with the net synthesis of ATP. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the conformational changes required for drug transport by LmrA are (i) not too far from equilibrium under ATP-depleted conditions to be reversed by appropriate changes in ligand concentrations and (ii) not necessarily coupled to ATP hydrolysis, but associated with a reversible catalytic cycle. These findings and their thermodynamic implications shed new light on the mechanism of energy coupling in ABC transporters and have implications for the development of new modulators that could enable reverse transport-associated drug delivery in cells through their ability to uncouple ATP binding/hydrolysis from multidrug efflux.

  3. ATP-dependent interplay between local and global conformational changes in the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    The ATPase active site of myosin is located at the core of the motor head. During the Lymn-Taylor actomyosin contractile cycle, small conformational changes in the active site upon ATP binding, ATP hydrolysis and ADP/Pi release are accompanied by large conformational transitions of the motor domains, such as opening and closing of the actin binding cleft and the movement of lever arm. Here, our previous computational studies of myosin are summarized in a comprehensive model at the level of atomic detail. Molecular movies show how the successive domain motions during the ATP induced actin dissociation and the recovery stroke are coupled with the precise positioning of the key catalytic groups in the active site. This leads to a precise timing of the activation of the ATPase function: it allows ATP hydrolysis only after unbinding from actin and the priming of the lever arm, both pre-requisites for an efficient functioning of the motor during the subsequent power stroke. These coupling mechanisms constitute essential principles of every myosin motor, of which the ATP-site can be seen as the central allosteric control unit. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient.

  5. F1 rotary motor of ATP synthase is driven by the torsionally-asymmetric drive shaft

    PubMed Central

    Kulish, O.; Wright, A. D.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    F1F0 ATP synthase (ATPase) either facilitates the synthesis of ATP in a process driven by the proton moving force (pmf), or uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pump protons against the concentration gradient across the membrane. ATPase is composed of two rotary motors, F0 and F1, which compete for control of their shared γ -shaft. We present a self-consistent physical model of F1 motor as a simplified two-state Brownian ratchet using the asymmetry of torsional elastic energy of the coiled-coil γ -shaft. This stochastic model unifies the physical concepts of linear and rotary motors, and explains the stepped unidirectional rotary motion. Substituting the model parameters, all independently known from recent experiments, our model quantitatively reproduces the ATPase operation, e.g. the ‘no-load’ angular velocity is ca. 400 rad/s anticlockwise at 4 mM ATP. Increasing the pmf torque exerted by F0 can slow, stop and overcome the torque generated by F1, switching from ATP hydrolysis to synthesis at a very low value of ‘stall torque’. We discuss the motor efficiency, which is very low if calculated from the useful mechanical work it produces - but is quite high when the ‘useful outcome’ is measured in the number of H+ pushed against the chemical gradient. PMID:27321713

  6. Mechanism of natural organic matter removal by polyaluminum chloride: effect of coagulant particle size and hydrolysis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Ni, Jinren; Qu, Jiuhui; Chow, Christopher W K; Liu, Hailong

    2008-07-01

    The mechanism of natural organic matter (NOM) removal by AlCl(3) and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was investigated through bench-scale tests. The fraction distributions of NOM and residual Al after coagulation in solution, colloid and sediment were analyzed as changes of coagulant dosage and pH. The influence of NOM, coagulant dose and pH on coagulation kinetics of AlCl(3) was investigated using photometric dispersion analyzer compared with PACl. Monomeric Al species (Al(a)) shows high ability to satisfy some unsaturated coordinate bonds of NOM to facilitate particle and NOM removal, while most of the flocs formed by Al(a) are small and difficult to settle. Medium polymerized Al species (Al(b)) can destabilize particle and NOM efficiently, while some flocs formed by Al(b) are not large and not easy to precipitate as compared to those formed by colloidal or solid Al species (Al(c)). Thus, Al(c) could adsorb and remove NOM efficiently. The removal of contaminant by species of Al(a), Al(b) and Al(c) follows mechanisms of complexation, neutralization and adsorption, respectively. Unlike preformed Al(b) in PACl, in-situ-formed Al(b) can remove NOM and particle more efficiently via the mechanism of further hydrolysis and transfer into Al(c) during coagulation. While the presence of NOM would reduce Al(b) formed in-situ due to the complexation of NOM and Al(a).

  7. [Mechanisms and regulation of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in filamentous fungi: classical cases and new models].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Ivonne; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia; Montoya, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable carbon source on earth. However, this polymer structure comprises a physical and chemical barrier for carbon access, which has limited its exploitation. In nature, only a few percentage of microorganisms may degrade this polymer by cellulase expression. Filamentous fungi are one of the most active and efficient groups among these microorganisms. This review describes similarities and differences between cellulase activity mechanisms and regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression for 3 of the most studied cellulolytic filamentous fungi models: Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans, and the recently described model Neurospora crassa. Unlike gene expression mechanisms, it was found that enzymatic activity mechanisms are similar for all the studied models. Understanding the distinctive elements of each system is essential for the development of strategies for the improvement of cellulase production, either by providing the optimum environment (fermentation conditions) or increasing gene expression in these microorganisms by genetic engineering.

  8. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    N, Nagasundaram; C, George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V, Karthick; D, Thirumal Kumar; V, Balaji; R, Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-07-29

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs.

  9. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    PubMed Central

    N., Nagasundaram; C., George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V., Karthick; D., Thirumal Kumar; V., Balaji; R., Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:27471101

  10. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasundaram, N.; George Priya Doss, C.; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Karthick, V.; Thirumal Kumar, D.; Balaji, V.; Siva, R.; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-07-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs.

  11. Mechanism of the discrepancy in the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency between defatted peanut flour and peanut protein isolate by Flavorzyme.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Zhao, Yijun; Xiao, Chuqiao; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhao, Mouming; Su, Guowan

    2015-02-01

    Both defatted peanut flour (DPF) and peanut protein isolate (PPI) are widely used to prepare peanut protein hydrolysates. To compare their enzymatic hydrolysis efficiencies, DPF and PPI were hydrolysed by Alcalase, Neutrase, Papain, Protamex and Flavorzyme. Alcalase and Flavorzyme were found to be the most efficient proteases to hydrolyse both DPF and PPI. The efficiency was comparable to each other when using Alcalase, while PPI was hydrolysed less efficiently than DPF when using Flavorzyme. Analysis of changes in the protein solubility, subunit and conformation, and amino acid composition of DPF, PPI and their Flavorzyme hydrolysis residues indicated that the PPI preparation process had minimal effect on it, but peptide aggregation via non-covalent bonding (including hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds) during hydrolysis and/or thermal treatment after hydrolysis were likely responsible for the reduced hydrolysis efficiency of PPI by Flavorzyme.

  12. Hydrolysis mechanisms for the organopalladium complex [Pd(CNN)P(OMe)3]BF4 in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    García, Begoña; Hoyuelos, Francisco J; Ibeas, Saturnino; Muñoz, María S; Peñacoba, Indalecio; Leal, José M

    2009-08-13

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the organopalladium complex [Pd(CNN)P(OMe)3]BF4 species was monitored spectrophotometrically at different sulfuric acid concentrations (3.9 and 11.0 M) in 10% v:v ethanol-water over the 25-45 degrees C temperature range and in 30% and 50% (v/v) ethanol-water at 25 degrees C. Two acidity regions (I and II) could be differentiated. In each of the two regions the kinetic data pairs yielded two different rate constants, k(1obs) and k(2obs), the former being faster. These constants were fitted by an Excess Acidity analysis to different hydrolyses mechanisms: A-1, A-2, and A-SE2. In region I ([H2SO4] < 7.0 M), the k(1obs) values remained constant k(1obs)(av) = 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1) and the set of k(2obs) values nicely matched an A-SE2 mechanism, yielding a rate-determining constant k(0,ASE2) = 2.4 x 10(-7) M(-1) s(-1). In region II ([H2SO4] > 7.0 M), a switchover was observed from an A-1 mechanism (k(0,A1) = 1.3 x 10(-4) s(-1)) to an A-2 mechanism (k(0,A2) = 3.6 x 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1)). The temperature effect on the rate constants in 10% (v/v) ethanol-water yielded positive DeltaH and negative DeltaS values, except for the A-1 mechanism, where DeltaS adopted positive values throughout. The solvent permittivity effect, epsilonr, revealed that k(1obs)(av) and k(0,A2) dropped with a fall in epsilonr, whereas the k(0,ASE2) value remained unaffected. The set of results deduced is in line with the schemes put forward.

  13. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  14. Mechanisms and kinetics of alkaline hydrolysis of the energetic nitroaromatic compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN).

    PubMed

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J; Bylaska, Eric J; Ritchie, Julia J; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2013-07-02

    The environmental impacts of energetic compounds can be minimized through the design and selection of new energetic materials with favorable fate properties. Building predictive models to inform this process, however, is difficult because of uncertainties and complexities in some major fate-determining transformation reactions such as the alkaline hydrolysis of energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs). Prior work on the mechanisms of the reaction between NACs and OH(-) has yielded inconsistent results. In this study, the alkaline hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) was investigated with coordinated experimental kinetic measurements and molecular modeling calculations. For TNT, the results suggest reversible formation of an initial product, which is likely either a Meisenheimer complex or a TNT anion formed by abstraction of a methyl proton by OH(-). For DNAN, the results suggest that a Meisenheimer complex is an intermediate in the formation of 2,4-dinitrophenolate. Despite these advances, the remaining uncertainties in the mechanisms of these reactions-and potential variability between the hydrolysis mechanisms for different NACs-mean that it is not yet possible to generalize the results into predictive models (e.g., quantitative structure-activity relationships, QSARs) for hydrolysis of other NACs.

  15. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Alkaline Hydrolysis of the Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN)

    SciTech Connect

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Ritchie, Julia J.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2013-07-02

    The environmental impacts of energetic compounds can be minimized through the design and selection of new energetic materials with favorable fate properties. Building predictive models to inform this process, however, is difficult because of uncertainties and complexities in some major fate-determining transformation reactions such as the alkaline hydrolysis of energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs). Prior work on the mechanisms of the reaction between NACs and OH– has yielded inconsistent results. In this study, the alkaline hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) was investigated with coordinated experimental kinetic measurements and molecular modeling calculations. For TNT, the results suggest reversible formation of an initial product, which is likely either a Meisenheimer complex or a TNT anion formed by abstraction of a methyl proton by OH–. For DNAN, the results suggest that a Meisenheimer complex is an intermediate in the formation of 2,4-dinitrophenolate. Despite these advances, the remaining uncertainties in the mechanisms of these reactions—and potential variability between the hydrolysis mechanisms for different NACs—mean that it is not yet possible to generalize the results into predictive models (e.g., quantitative structure–activity relationships, QSARs) for hydrolysis of other NACs.

  16. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  17. Crystal structures of the ATP-binding and ADP-release dwells of the V1 rotary motor

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kano; Mizutani, Kenji; Maruyama, Shintaro; Shimono, Kazumi; Imai, Fabiana L.; Muneyuki, Eiro; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamato, Ichiro; Murata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    V1-ATPases are highly conserved ATP-driven rotary molecular motors found in various membrane systems. We recently reported the crystal structures for the Enterococcus hirae A3B3DF (V1) complex, corresponding to the catalytic dwell state waiting for ATP hydrolysis. Here we present the crystal structures for two other dwell states obtained by soaking nucleotide-free V1 crystals in ADP. In the presence of 20 μM ADP, two ADP molecules bind to two of three binding sites and cooperatively induce conformational changes of the third site to an ATP-binding mode, corresponding to the ATP-binding dwell. In the presence of 2 mM ADP, all nucleotide-binding sites are occupied by ADP to induce conformational changes corresponding to the ADP-release dwell. Based on these and previous findings, we propose a V1-ATPase rotational mechanism model. PMID:27807367

  18. The mechanism of hydrolysis of beta-glycerophosphate by kidney alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, J

    1975-09-01

    1. To identify the functional groups that are involved in the conversion of beta-glycerophosphate by alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) from pig kidney, the kinetics of alkaline phosphatase were investigated in the pH range 6.6-10.3 at substrate concentrations of 3 muM-30 mM. From the plots of log VH+ against pH and log VH+/KH+m against pH one functional group with pK = 7.0 and two functional groups with pK = 9.1 were identified. These groups are involved in substrate binding. Another group with pK = 8.8 was found, which in its unprotonated form catalyses substrate conversion. 2. GSH inhibits the alkaline phosphatase reversibly and non-competitively by attacking the bound Zn(II). 3. The influence of the H+ concentration on the activation by Mg2+ ions of alkaline pig kidney phosphate was investigated between pH 8.4 and 10.0. The binding of substrate and activating Mg2+ ions occurs independently at all pH values between 8.4 and 10.0. The activation mechanism is not affected by the H+ concentration. The Mg2+ ions are bound by a functional group with a pK of 10.15. 4. A scheme is proposed for the reaction between enzyme, substrate, Mg2+ and H+ and the overall rate equation is derived. 5. The mechanism of substrate binding and splitting by the functional groups of the active centre is discussed on the basis of a model. Mg2+ seems to play a role as an autosteric effector.

  19. The mechanism of hydrolysis of beta-glycerophosphate by kidney alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Ahlers, J

    1975-01-01

    1. To identify the functional groups that are involved in the conversion of beta-glycerophosphate by alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) from pig kidney, the kinetics of alkaline phosphatase were investigated in the pH range 6.6-10.3 at substrate concentrations of 3 muM-30 mM. From the plots of log VH+ against pH and log VH+/KH+m against pH one functional group with pK = 7.0 and two functional groups with pK = 9.1 were identified. These groups are involved in substrate binding. Another group with pK = 8.8 was found, which in its unprotonated form catalyses substrate conversion. 2. GSH inhibits the alkaline phosphatase reversibly and non-competitively by attacking the bound Zn(II). 3. The influence of the H+ concentration on the activation by Mg2+ ions of alkaline pig kidney phosphate was investigated between pH 8.4 and 10.0. The binding of substrate and activating Mg2+ ions occurs independently at all pH values between 8.4 and 10.0. The activation mechanism is not affected by the H+ concentration. The Mg2+ ions are bound by a functional group with a pK of 10.15. 4. A scheme is proposed for the reaction between enzyme, substrate, Mg2+ and H+ and the overall rate equation is derived. 5. The mechanism of substrate binding and splitting by the functional groups of the active centre is discussed on the basis of a model. Mg2+ seems to play a role as an autosteric effector. PMID:995

  20. Formic acid catalyzed hydrolysis of SO3 in the gas phase: a barrierless mechanism for sulfuric acid production of potential atmospheric importance.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Montu K; Sinha, Amitabha

    2011-11-02

    Computational studies at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and MP2/6-311++G(3df,3pd) levels are performed to explore the changes in reaction barrier height for the gas phase hydrolysis of SO(3) to form H(2)SO(4) in the presence of a single formic acid (FA) molecule. For comparison, we have also performed calculations for the reference reaction involving water assisted hydrolysis of SO(3) at the same level. Our results show that the FA assisted hydrolysis of SO(3) to form H(2)SO(4) is effectively a barrierless process. The barrier heights for the isomerization of the SO(3)···H(2)O···FA prereactive collision complex, which is the rate limiting step in the FA assisted hydrolysis, are found to be respectively 0.59 and 0.08 kcal/mol at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and MP2/6-311++G(3df,3pd) levels. This is substantially lower than the ~7 kcal/mol barrier for the corresponding step in the hydrolysis of SO(3) by two water molecules--which is currently the accepted mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid production. Simple kinetic analysis of the relative rates suggests that the reduction in barrier height facilitated by FA, combined with the greater stability of the prereactive SO(3)···H(2)O···FA collision complex compared to SO(3)···H(2)O···H(2)O and the rather plentiful atmospheric abundance of FA, makes the formic acid mediated hydrolysis reaction a potentially important pathway for atmospheric sulfuric acid production.

  1. The Methanolic Extract from Murraya koenigii L. Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Pain and Involves ATP-Sensitive K+ Channel as Antinociceptive Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin Ani, Nushrat; Chakraborty, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Murraya koenigii L. is a perennial shrub, belonging to the family Rutaceae. Traditionally, the leaves of this plant are extensively used in treatment of a wide range of diseases and disorders including pain and inflammation. Although researchers have revealed the antinociceptive effects of this plant's leaves during past few years, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated some antinociceptive mechanisms of the methanolic extract of M. koenigii (MEMK) leaves along with its antinociceptive potential using several animal models. The antinociceptive effects of MEMK were evaluated using formalin-induced licking and acetic acid-induced writhing tests at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. In addition, we also justified the possible participations of glutamatergic system and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the observed activities. Our results demonstrated that MEMK significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited the pain thresholds induced by formalin and acetic acid in a dose-dependent manner. MEMK also significantly (p < 0.01) suppressed glutamate-induced pain. Moreover, pretreatment with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker) at 10 mg/kg significantly (p < 0.05) reversed the MEMK-mediated antinociception. These revealed that MEMK might have the potential to interact with glutamatergic system and the ATP-sensitive potassium channels to exhibit its antinociceptive activities. Therefore, our results strongly support the antinociceptive effects of M. koenigii leaves and provide scientific basis of their analgesic uses in the traditional medicine. PMID:27812367

  2. High-resolution structure and mechanism of an F/V-hybrid rotor ring in a Na+-coupled ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthies, Doreen; Zhou, Wenchang; Klyszejko, Adriana L.; Anselmi, Claudio; Yildiz, Özkan; Brandt, Karsten; Müller, Volker; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Meier, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    All rotary ATPases catalyse the interconversion of ATP and ADP-Pi through a mechanism that is coupled to the transmembrane flow of H+ or Na+. Physiologically, however, F/A-type enzymes specialize in ATP synthesis driven by downhill ion diffusion, while eukaryotic V-type ATPases function as ion pumps. To begin to rationalize the molecular basis for this functional differentiation, we solved the crystal structure of the Na+-driven membrane rotor of the Acetobacterium woodii ATP synthase, at 2.1 Å resolution. Unlike known structures, this rotor ring is a 9:1 heteromer of F- and V-type c-subunits and therefore features a hybrid configuration of ion-binding sites along its circumference. Molecular and kinetic simulations are used to dissect the mechanisms of Na+ recognition and rotation of this c-ring, and to explain the functional implications of the V-type c-subunit. These structural and mechanistic insights indicate an evolutionary path between synthases and pumps involving adaptations in the rotor ring.

  3. New insights into the mechanism of the Schiff base hydrolysis catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase from S. enterica: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2012-09-21

    The reaction pathway of Schiff base hydrolysis catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) from S. enterica has been studied by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations and the corresponding potential energy profile has also been identified. On the basis of the results, the catalytic hydrolysis process for the wild-type enzyme consists of three major reaction steps, including nucleophilic attack on the carbon atom involved in the carbon-nitrogen double bond of the Schiff base intermediate by a water molecule, deprotonation of the His143 residue, and dissociation between the product and the Lys170 residue of the enzyme. The remarkable difference between this and the previously proposed reaction mechanism is that the second step here, absent in the previously proposed reaction mechanism, plays an important role in facilitating the reaction through a key proton transfer by the His143 residue, resulting in a lower energy barrier. Comparison with our recently reported results on the Schiff base formation and dehydration processes clearly shows that the Schiff base hydrolysis is rate-determining in the overall reaction catalyzed by type I DHQD, consistent with the experimental prediction, and the calculated energy barrier of ∼16.0 kcal mol(-1) is in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energy of ∼14.3 kcal mol(-1). When the imidazole group of His143 residue is missing, the Schiff base hydrolysis is initiated by a hydroxide ion in the solution, rather than a water molecule, and both the reaction mechanism and the kinetics of Schiff base hydrolysis have been remarkably changed, clearly elucidating the catalytic role of the His143 residue in the reaction. The new mechanistic insights obtained here will be valuable for the rational design of high-activity inhibitors of type I DHQD as non-toxic antimicrobials, anti-fungals, and herbicides.

  4. Structural insights into a unique cellulase fold and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Brás, Joana L A; Cartmell, Alan; Carvalho, Ana Luísa M; Verzé, Genny; Bayer, Edward A; Vazana, Yael; Correia, Márcia A S; Prates, José A M; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Boraston, Alisdair B; Romão, Maria J; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Gilbert, Harry J

    2011-03-29

    Clostridium thermocellum is a well-characterized cellulose-degrading microorganism. The genome sequence of C. thermocellum encodes a number of proteins that contain type I dockerin domains, which implies that they are components of the cellulose-degrading apparatus, but display no significant sequence similarity to known plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. Here, we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of one of these proteins, designated CtCel124. The protein was shown to be an endo-acting cellulase that displays a single displacement mechanism and acts in synergy with Cel48S, the major cellulosomal exo-cellulase. The crystal structure of CtCel124 in complex with two cellotriose molecules, determined to 1.5 Å, displays a superhelical fold in which a constellation of α-helices encircle a central helix that houses the catalytic apparatus. The catalytic acid, Glu96, is located at the C-terminus of the central helix, but there is no candidate catalytic base. The substrate-binding cleft can be divided into two discrete topographical domains in which the bound cellotriose molecules display twisted and linear conformations, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme may target the interface between crystalline and disordered regions of cellulose.

  5. Structural insights into a unique cellulase fold and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Cartmell, Alan; Carvalho, Ana Luísa M.; Verzé, Genny; Bayer, Edward A.; Vazana, Yael; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Prates, José A. M.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Boraston, Alisdair B.; Romão, Maria J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a well-characterized cellulose-degrading microorganism. The genome sequence of C. thermocellum encodes a number of proteins that contain type I dockerin domains, which implies that they are components of the cellulose-degrading apparatus, but display no significant sequence similarity to known plant cell wall–degrading enzymes. Here, we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of one of these proteins, designated CtCel124. The protein was shown to be an endo-acting cellulase that displays a single displacement mechanism and acts in synergy with Cel48S, the major cellulosomal exo-cellulase. The crystal structure of CtCel124 in complex with two cellotriose molecules, determined to 1.5 Å, displays a superhelical fold in which a constellation of α-helices encircle a central helix that houses the catalytic apparatus. The catalytic acid, Glu96, is located at the C-terminus of the central helix, but there is no candidate catalytic base. The substrate-binding cleft can be divided into two discrete topographical domains in which the bound cellotriose molecules display twisted and linear conformations, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme may target the interface between crystalline and disordered regions of cellulose. PMID:21393568

  6. In situ lignocellulosic unlocking mechanism for carbohydrate hydrolysis in termites: crucial lignin modification

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Termites are highly effective at degrading lignocelluloses, and thus can be used as a model for studying plant cell-wall degradation in biological systems. However, the process of lignin deconstruction and/or degradation in termites is still not well understood. Methods We investigated the associated structural modification caused by termites in the lignin biomolecular assembly in softwood tissues crucial for cell-wall degradation. We conducted comparative studies on the termite-digested (i.e. termite feces) and native (control) softwood tissues with the aid of advanced analytical techniques: 13C crosspolarization magic angle spinning and nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS-NMR) spectroscopy, flash pyrolysis with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), and Py-GC-MS in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (Py-TMAH)-GC/MS. Results The 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopic analysis revealed an increased level of guaiacyl-derived (G unit) polymeric framework in the termite-digested softwood (feces), while providing specific evidence of cellulose degradation. The Py-GC/MS data were in agreement with the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopic studies, thus indicating dehydroxylation and modification of selective intermonomer side-chain linkages in the lignin in the termite feces. Moreover, Py-TMAH-GC/MS analysis showed significant differences in the product distribution between control and termite feces. This strongly suggests that the structural modification in lignin could be associated with the formation of additional condensed interunit linkages. Conclusion Collectively, these data further establish: 1) that the major β-O-4' (β-aryl ether) was conserved, albeit with substructure degeneracy, and 2) that the nature of the resulting polymer in termite feces retained most of its original aromatic moieties (G unit-derived). Overall, these results provide insight into lignin-unlocking mechanisms for understanding plant cell-wall deconstruction, which could be

  7. Establishing the role of ATP for the function of the RIG-I innate immune sensor

    PubMed Central

    Rawling, David C; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) initiates a rapid innate immune response upon detection and binding to viral ribonucleic acid (RNA). This signal activation occurs only when pathogenic RNA is identified, despite the ability of RIG-I to bind endogenous RNA while surveying the cytoplasm. Here we show that ATP binding and hydrolysis by RIG-I play a key role in the identification of viral targets and the activation of signaling. Using biochemical and cell-based assays together with mutagenesis, we show that ATP binding, and not hydrolysis, is required for RIG-I signaling on viral RNA. However, we show that ATP hydrolysis does provide an important function by recycling RIG-I and promoting its dissociation from non-pathogenic RNA. This activity provides a valuable proof-reading mechanism that enhances specificity and prevents an antiviral response upon encounter with host RNA molecules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09391.001 PMID:26371557

  8. Deltapsi and DeltapH are equivalent driving forces for proton transport through isolated F(0) complexes of ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Alexander; Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2008-10-01

    The membrane-embedded F(0) part of ATP synthases is responsible for ion translocation during ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. Here, we describe an in vitro system for measuring proton fluxes through F(0) complexes by fluorescence changes of the entrapped fluorophore pyranine. Starting from purified enzyme, the F(0) part was incorporated unidirectionally into phospholipid vesicles. This allowed analysis of proton transport in either synthesis or hydrolysis direction with Deltapsi or DeltapH as driving forces. The system displayed a high signal-to-noise ratio and can be accurately quantified. In contrast to ATP synthesis in the Escherichia coli F(1)F(0) holoenzyme, no significant difference was observed in the efficiency of DeltapH or Deltapsi as driving forces for H(+)-transport through F(0). Transport rates showed linear dependency on the driving force. Proton transport in hydrolysis direction was about 2400 H(+)/(s x F(0)) at Deltapsi of 120 mV, which is approximately twice as fast as in synthesis direction. The chloroplast enzyme was faster and catalyzed H(+)-transport at initial rates of 6300 H(+)/(s x F(0)) under similar conditions. The new method is an ideal tool for detailed kinetic investigations of the ion transport mechanism of ATP synthases from various organisms.

  9. The role of Ca2+ signaling in the coordination of mitochondrial ATP production with cardiac work

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    The heart is capable of balancing the rate of mitochondrial ATP production with utilization continuously over a wide range of activity. This results in a constant phosphorylation potential despite a large change in metabolite turnover. The molecular mechanisms responsible for generating this energy homeostasis are poorly understood. The best candidate for a cytosolic signaling molecule reflecting ATP hydrolysis is Ca2+. Since Ca2+ initiates and powers muscle contraction as well as serves as the primary substrate for SERCA, Ca2+ is an ideal feed-forward signal for priming ATP production. With the sarcoplasmic reticulum to cytosolic Ca2+ gradient near equilibrium with the free energy of ATP, cytosolic Ca2+ release is exquisitely sensitive to the cellular energy state providing a feedback signal. Thus, Ca2+ can serve as a feed-forward and feedback regulator of ATP production. Consistent with this notion is the correlation of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ with work in numerous preparations as well as the localization of mitochondria near Ca2+ release sites. How cytosolic Ca2+ signaling might regulate oxidative phosphorylation is a focus of this review. The relevant Ca2+ sensitive sites include several dehydrogenases and substrate transporters together with a post-translational modification of F1-FO-ATPase and cytochrome oxidase. Thus, Ca2+ apparently activates both the generation of the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as utilization to produce ATP. This balanced activation extends the energy homeostasis observed in the cytosol into the mitochondria matrix in the never resting heart. PMID:19481532

  10. Different mechanisms of hydroxyl radical production susceptible to purine P2 receptor antagonists between carbon monoxide poisoning and exogenous ATP in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Hara, S; Kobayashi, M; Kuriiwa, F; Mukai, T; Mizukami, H

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning stimulates cAMP production via purine P2Y11-like receptors in the rat striatum, activating cAMP signaling pathways, resulting in hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) production. Extracellular ATP was thought likely to trigger the cascade, but the present study has failed to demonstrate a clear increase in the extracellular ATP due to CO poisoning. The CO-induced (•)OH production was attenuated by the P2Y11 receptor antagonist NF157, in parallel with its abilities to suppress the CO-induced cAMP production. The (•)OH production was more strongly suppressed by a non-selective P2 receptor antagonist, PPADS, which had no effect on cAMP production. More selective antagonists toward the respective P2 receptors susceptible to PPADS, including NF279, had little or no effect on the CO-induced (•)OH production. The intrastriatal administration of exogenous ATP dose-dependently stimulated (•)OH production, which was dose-dependently antagonized by PPADS and NF279 but not by NF157. Exogenous GTP and CTP dose-dependently stimulated (•)OH production, though less potently. The GTP-induced (•)OH production was susceptible to both of NF279 and PPADS, but the CTP-induced (•)OH production was resistant to PPADS. The mechanism of (•)OH production may differ between CO poisoning and exogenous ATP, while multiple P2 receptors could participate in (•)OH production. The CO-induced (•)OH production was susceptible to the inhibition of NADPH oxidase, but not xanthine oxidase. Also, the NADPH oxidase inhibition suppressed (•)OH production induced by forskolin, a stimulator of intracellular cAMP formation. It is likely that (•)OH is produced by NADPH oxidase activation via cAMP signaling pathways during CO poisoning.

  11. Dynamic regulation of extracellular ATP in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Cora Lilia; Corradi, Gerardo; Lauri, Natalia; Marginedas-Freixa, Irene; Leal Denis, María Florencia; Enrique, Nicolás; Mate, Sabina María; Milesi, Verónica; Ostuni, Mariano Anibal; Herlax, Vanesa; Schwarzbaum, Pablo Julio

    2017-04-04

    We studied the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in Escherichia coli and their outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) stimulated with amphipatic peptides melittin (MEL) and mastoparan 7 (MST7). Real-time luminometry was used to measure ATPe kinetics, ATP release, and ATPase activity. The latter was also determined by following [(32)P]Pi released from [γ-(32)P]ATP. E. coli was studied alone, co-incubated with Caco-2 cells, or in rat jejunum segments. In E. coli, the addition of [γ-(32)P]ATP led to the uptake and subsequent hydrolysis of ATPe. Exposure to peptides caused an acute 3-fold (MST7) and 7-fold (MEL) increase in [ATPe]. In OMVs, ATPase activity increased linearly with [ATPe] (0.1-1 µM). Exposure to MST7 and MEL enhanced ATP release by 3-7 fold, with similar kinetics to that of bacteria. In Caco-2 cells, the addition of ATP to the apical domain led to a steep [ATPe] increase to a maximum, with subsequent ATPase activity. The addition of bacterial suspensions led to a 6-7 fold increase in [ATPe], followed by an acute decrease. In perfused jejunum segments, exposure to E. coli increased luminal ATP 2 fold. ATPe regulation of E. coli depends on the balance between ATPase activity and ATP release. This balance can be altered by OMVs, which display their own capacity to regulate ATPe. E. coli can activate ATP release from Caco-2 cells and intestinal segments, a response which in vivo might lead to intestinal release of ATP from the gut lumen.

  12. Extracellular ATP released by osteoblasts is a key local inhibitor of bone mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Key, Michelle L; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Arnett, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous ATP (>1 µM) prevents bone formation in vitro by blocking mineralisation of the collagenous matrix. This effect is thought to be mediated via both P2 receptor-dependent pathways and a receptor-independent mechanism (hydrolysis of ATP to produce the mineralisation inhibitor pyrophosphate, PP(i)). Osteoblasts are also known to release ATP constitutively. To determine whether this endogenous ATP might exert significant biological effects, bone-forming primary rat osteoblasts were cultured with 0.5-2.5 U/ml apyrase (which sequentially hydrolyses ATP to ADP to AMP + 2 P(i)). Addition of 0.5 U/ml apyrase to osteoblast culture medium degraded extracellular ATP to <1% of control levels within 2 minutes; continuous exposure to apyrase maintained this inhibition for up to 14 days. Apyrase treatment for the first 72 hours of culture caused small decreases (≤25%) in osteoblast number, suggesting a role for endogenous ATP in stimulating cell proliferation. Continuous apyrase treatment for 14 days (≥0.5 U/ml) increased mineralisation of bone nodules by up to 3-fold. Increases in bone mineralisation were also seen when osteoblasts were cultured with the ATP release inhibitors, NEM and brefeldin A, as well as with P2X1 and P2X7 receptor antagonists. Apyrase decreased alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity by up to 60%, whilst increasing the activity of the PP(i)-generating ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterases (NPPs) up to 2.7-fold. Both collagen production and adipocyte formation were unaffected. These data suggest that nucleotides released by osteoblasts in bone could act locally, via multiple mechanisms, to limit mineralisation.

  13. ATP in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Braber, Saskia; Nazary, Maiwand; Givi, Masoumh Ezzati; Nijkamp, Frans P; Folkerts, Gert

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular ATP is a signaling molecule that often serves as a danger signal to alert the immune system of tissue damage. This molecule activates P2 nucleotide receptors, that include the ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. Recently, it has been reported that ATP accumulates in the airways of both asthmatic patients and sensitized mice after allergen challenge. The role and function of ATP in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are not well understood. In this study we investigated the effect of cigarette smoke on purinergic receptors and ATP release by neutrophils. Neutrophils and their mediators are key players in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema. Here we demonstrated that in an in vivo model of cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema, the amount of ATP was increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, activation of neutrophils with cigarette smoke extract induced ATP release. Treatment of neutrophils with apyrase (catalyses the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP) and suramin (P2-receptor antagonist) abrogated the release of CXCL8 and elastase induced by cigarette smoke extract and exogenous ATP. These observations indicate that activation of purinergic signaling by cigarette smoke may take part in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

  14. New insights on the mechanism of palladium-catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride from 11B NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Guella, G; Zanchetta, C; Patton, B; Miotello, A

    2006-08-31

    To gain insight on the mechanistic aspects of the palladium-catalyzed hydrolysis of NaBH(4) in alkaline media, the kinetics of the reaction has been investigated by (11)B NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements taken at different times during the reaction course. Working with BH(4)(-) concentration in the range 0.05-0.1 M and with a [substrate]/[catalyst] molar ratio of 0.03-0.11, hydrolysis has been found to follow a first-order kinetic dependence from concentration of both the substrate and the catalyst (Pd/C 10 wt %). We followed the reaction of NaBH(4) and its perdeuterated analogue NaBD(4) in H(2)O, in D(2)O and H(2)O/D(2)O mixtures. When the process was carried out in D(2)O, deuterium incorporation in BH(4)(-) afforded BH(4)(-)(n)D(n)(-) (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) species, and a competition between hydrolysis and hydrogen/deuterium exchange processes was observed. By fitting the kinetics NMR data by nonlinear least-squares regression techniques, the rate constants of the elementary steps involved in the palladium-catalyzed borohydride hydrolysis have been evaluated. Such a regression analysis was performed on a reaction scheme wherein the starting reactant BH(4)(-) is allowed both to reversibly exchange hydrogen with deuterium atoms of D(2)O and to irreversibly hydrolyze into borohydroxy species B(OD)(4)(-). In contrast to acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, our results indicate that in the palladium-catalyzed process the rate constants of the exchange processes are higher than those of the corresponding hydrolysis reactions.

  15. Pathway of ATP utilization and duplex rRNA unwinding by the DEAD-box helicase, DbpA.

    PubMed

    Henn, Arnon; Cao, Wenxiang; Licciardello, Nicholas; Heitkamp, Sara E; Hackney, David D; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2010-03-02

    DEAD-box RNA helicase proteins use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive the unwinding of duplex RNA. However, the mechanism that couples ATP utilization to duplex RNA unwinding is unknown. We measured ATP utilization and duplex RNA unwinding by DbpA, a non-processive bacterial DEAD-box RNA helicase specifically activated by the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of 23S rRNA. Consumption of a single ATP molecule is sufficient to unwind and displace an 8 base pair rRNA strand annealed to a 32 base pair PTC-RNA "mother strand" fragment. Strand displacement occurs after ATP binding and hydrolysis but before P(i) product release. P(i) release weakens binding to rRNA, thereby facilitating the release of the unwound rRNA mother strand and the recycling of DbpA for additional rounds of unwinding. This work explains how ATPase activity of DEAD-box helicases is linked to RNA unwinding.

  16. Mechanism of mitochondrial permeability transition pore induction and damage in the pancreas: inhibition prevents acute pancreatitis by protecting production of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Mareninova, Olga A; Odinokova, Irina V; Huang, Wei; Murphy, John; Chvanov, Michael; Javed, Muhammad A; Wen, Li; Booth, David M; Cane, Matthew C; Awais, Muhammad; Gavillet, Bruno; Pruss, Rebecca M; Schaller, Sophie; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Tepikin, Alexei V; Petersen, Ole H; Pandol, Stephen J; Gukovsky, Ilya; Criddle, David N; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute pancreatitis is caused by toxins that induce acinar cell calcium overload, zymogen activation, cytokine release and cell death, yet is without specific drug therapy. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated but the mechanism not established. Design We investigated the mechanism of induction and consequences of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the pancreas using cell biological methods including confocal microscopy, patch clamp technology and multiple clinically representative disease models. Effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the MPTP were examined in isolated murine and human pancreatic acinar cells, and in hyperstimulation, bile acid, alcoholic and choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented acute pancreatitis. Results MPTP opening was mediated by toxin-induced inositol trisphosphate and ryanodine receptor calcium channel release, and resulted in diminished ATP production, leading to impaired calcium clearance, defective autophagy, zymogen activation, cytokine production, phosphoglycerate mutase 5 activation and necrosis, which was prevented by intracellular ATP supplementation. When MPTP opening was inhibited genetically or pharmacologically, all biochemical, immunological and histopathological responses of acute pancreatitis in all four models were reduced or abolished. Conclusions This work demonstrates the mechanism and consequences of MPTP opening to be fundamental to multiple forms of acute pancreatitis and validates the MPTP as a drug target for this disease. PMID:26071131

  17. Structures of the Multidrug Transporter P-glycoprotein Reveal Asymmetric ATP Binding and the Mechanism of Polyspecificity.

    PubMed

    Esser, Lothar; Zhou, Fei; Pluchino, Kristen M; Shiloach, Joseph; Ma, Jichun; Tang, Wai-Kwan; Gutierrez, Camilo; Zhang, Alex; Shukla, Suneet; Madigan, James P; Zhou, Tongqing; Kwong, Peter D; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Gottesman, Michael M; Xia, Di

    2017-01-13

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancer; it plays important roles in determining the pharmacokinetics of many drugs. Understanding the structural basis of P-gp, substrate polyspecificity has been hampered by its intrinsic flexibility, which is facilitated by a 75-residue linker that connects the two halves of P-gp. Here we constructed a mutant murine P-gp with a shortened linker to facilitate structural determination. Despite dramatic reduction in rhodamine 123 and calcein-AM transport, the linker-shortened mutant P-gp possesses basal ATPase activity and binds ATP only in its N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain. Nine independently determined structures of wild type, the linker mutant, and a methylated P-gp at up to 3.3 Å resolution display significant movements of individual transmembrane domain helices, which correlated with the opening and closing motion of the two halves of P-gp. The open-and-close motion alters the surface topology of P-gp within the drug-binding pocket, providing a mechanistic explanation for the polyspecificity of P-gp in substrate interactions.

  18. Structures of the Multidrug Transporter P-glycoprotein Reveal Asymmetric ATP Binding and the Mechanism of Polyspecificity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Lothar; Zhou, Fei; Pluchino, Kristen M.; Shiloach, Joseph; Ma, Jichun; Tang, Wai-kwan; Gutierrez, Camilo; Zhang, Alex; Shukla, Suneet; Madigan, James P.; Zhou, Tongqing; Kwong, Peter D.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Xia, Di

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancer; it plays important roles in determining the pharmacokinetics of many drugs. Understanding the structural basis of P-gp, substrate polyspecificity has been hampered by its intrinsic flexibility, which is facilitated by a 75-residue linker that connects the two halves of P-gp. Here we constructed a mutant murine P-gp with a shortened linker to facilitate structural determination. Despite dramatic reduction in rhodamine 123 and calcein-AM transport, the linker-shortened mutant P-gp possesses basal ATPase activity and binds ATP only in its N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain. Nine independently determined structures of wild type, the linker mutant, and a methylated P-gp at up to 3.3 Å resolution display significant movements of individual transmembrane domain helices, which correlated with the opening and closing motion of the two halves of P-gp. The open-and-close motion alters the surface topology of P-gp within the drug-binding pocket, providing a mechanistic explanation for the polyspecificity of P-gp in substrate interactions. PMID:27864369

  19. Surface lignin change pertaining to the integrated process of dilute acid pre-extraction and mechanical refining of poplar wood chips and its impact on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wei; Hou, Qingxi; Zhang, Jinping; Wang, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Dilute acid pre-extraction enhanced the mechanically refined poplar pulp substrates' enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency obviously. The results showed that the surface lignin distribution was changed significantly in residual wood chips and pulp substrates, and the surface lignin distribution showed important impact on the following enzymatic hydrolysis. Acid pre-extraction can lead to a redistribution of lignin in fiber cell walls, i.e., the lignin was degraded and migrated to fiber surface in the form of re-deposited lignin and pseudo-lignin. However, higher pre-extraction intensity was not desired due to the formation of redeposited lignin and pseudo-lignin. This study will help to reach a deeper understanding on the lignin distribution in the view of molecular and ultrastructure, and promote the development of a cost-efficient pretreatment strategy for biomass processing.

  20. Formation versus hydrolysis of the peptide bond from a quantum-mechanical viewpoint: The role of mineral surfaces and implications for the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Albert; Ugliengo, Piero; Sodupe, Mariona

    2009-03-01

    The condensation (polymerization by water elimination) of molecular building blocks to yield the first active biopolymers (e.g. of amino acids to form peptides) during primitive Earth is an intriguing question that nowadays still remains open since these processes are thermodynamically disfavoured in highly dilute water solutions. In the present contribution, formation and hydrolysis of glycine oligopeptides occurring on a cluster model of sanidine feldspar (001) surface have been simulated by quantum mechanical methods. Results indicate that the catalytic interplay between Lewis and Brønsted sites both present at the sanidine surface, in cooperation with the London forces acting between the biomolecules and the inorganic surface, plays a crucial role to: i) favour the condensation of glycine to yield oligopeptides as reaction products; ii) inhibit the hydrolysis of the newly formed oligopeptides. Both facts suggest that mineral surfaces may have helped in catalyzing, stabilizing and protecting from hydration the oligopeptides formed in the prebiotic era.

  1. Formation versus Hydrolysis of the Peptide Bond from a Quantum-mechanical Viewpoint: The Role of Mineral Surfaces and Implications for the Origin of Life

    PubMed Central

    Rimola, Albert; Ugliengo, Piero; Sodupe, Mariona

    2009-01-01

    The condensation (polymerization by water elimination) of molecular building blocks to yield the first active biopolymers (e.g. of amino acids to form peptides) during primitive Earth is an intriguing question that nowadays still remains open since these processes are thermodynamically disfavoured in highly dilute water solutions. In the present contribution, formation and hydrolysis of glycine oligopeptides occurring on a cluster model of sanidine feldspar (001) surface have been simulated by quantum mechanical methods. Results indicate that the catalytic interplay between Lewis and Brønsted sites both present at the sanidine surface, in cooperation with the London forces acting between the biomolecules and the inorganic surface, plays a crucial role to: i) favour the condensation of glycine to yield oligopeptides as reaction products; ii) inhibit the hydrolysis of the newly formed oligopeptides. Both facts suggest that mineral surfaces may have helped in catalyzing, stabilizing and protecting from hydration the oligopeptides formed in the prebiotic era. PMID:19399219

  2. In vitro reassembly of the ribose ATP-binding cassette transporter reveals a distinct set of transport complexes.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew C; Simon, Michael J; Erramilli, Satchal K; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A; Stauffacher, Cynthia V

    2015-02-27

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg(2+). We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg(2+), and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg(2+); and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters.

  3. Pyrazinoic acid decreases the proton motive force, respiratory ATP synthesis activity, and cellular ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Haagsma, Anna C; Pham, Hoang; Maaskant, Janneke J; Mol, Selena; Lill, Holger; Bald, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  4. Ab Initio QM/MM Study Shows a Highly Dissociated SN2 Hydrolysis Mechanism for the cGMP-Specific Phosphodiesterase-5.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Wu, Yinuo; Feng, Ling-Jun; Wu, Ruibo; Luo, Hai-Bin

    2014-12-09

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are the sole enzymes hydrolyzing the important second messengers cGMP and cAMP and have been identified as therapeutic targets for several diseases. The most successful examples are PDE5 inhibitors (i.e., sildenafil and tadalafil), which have been approved for the treatment of male erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. However, the side effects mostly due to nonselective inhibition toward other PDE isoforms, set back the clinical usage of PDE5 inhibitors. Until now, the exact catalytic mechanism of the substrate cGMP by PDE5 is still unclear. Herein, the first computational study on the catalytic hydrolysis mechanism of cGMP for PDE5 (catalytic domain) is performed by employing the state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our simulations show a SN2 type reaction procedure via a highly dissociated transition state with a reaction barrier of 8.88 kcal/mol, which is quite different from the previously suggested hydrolysis mechanism of cAMP for PDE4. Furthermore, the subsequent ligand exchange and the release of the product GMP have also been investigated by binding energy analysis and MD simulations. It is deduced that ligand exchange would be the rate-determining step of the whole reaction, which is consistent with many previous experimental results. The obtained mechanistic insights should be valuable for not only the rational design of more specific inhibitors toward PDE5 but also understanding the general hydrolysis mechanism of cGMP-specific PDEs.

  5. Multinuclear diffusion NMR spectroscopy and DFT modeling: a powerful combination for unraveling the mechanism of phosphoester bond hydrolysis catalyzed by metal-substituted polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Luong, Thi Kim Nga; Shestakova, Pavletta; Mihaylov, Tzvetan T; Absillis, Gregory; Pierloot, Kristine; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-03-09

    A detailed reaction mechanism is proposed for the hydrolysis of the phosphoester bonds in the DNA model substrate bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) in the presence of the Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin type polyoxometalate (Et2NH2)8[{α-PW11O39Zr(μ-OH)(H2O)}2]⋅7 H2O (ZrK 2:2) at pD 6.4. Low-temperature (31)P DOSY spectra at pD 6.4 gave the first experimental evidence for the presence of ZrK 1:1 in fast equilibrium with ZrK 2:2 in purely aqueous solution. Moreover, theoretical calculations identified the ZrK 1:1 form as the potentially active species in solution. The reaction intermediates involved in the hydrolysis were identified by means of (1)H/(31)P NMR studies, including EXSY and DOSY NMR spectroscopy, which were supported by DFT calculations. This experimental/theoretical approach enabled the determination of the structures of four intermediate species in which the starting compound BNPP, nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP), or the end product phosphate (P) is coordinated to ZrK 1:1. In the proposed reaction mechanism, BNPP initially coordinates to ZrK 1:1 in a monodentate fashion, which results in hydrolysis of the first phosphoester bond in BNPP and formation of NPP. EXSY NMR studies showed that the bidentate complex between NPP and ZrK 1:1 is in equilibrium with monobound and free NPP. Subsequently, hydrolysis of NPP results in P, which is in equilibrium with its monobound form.

  6. Distance of myofilament sliding per ATP molecule in skeletal muscle fibers studied using laser flash photolysis of caged ATP.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Abe, O; Kobayashi, T; Sugi, H

    1993-01-01

    We studied the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule by recording shortening of single glycerinated muscle fibers induced by laser flash photolysis of caged ATP, diffusion of photochemically released ATP out of the fiber being prevented by surrounding the fiber with silicone oil. With 75 microM ATP released (one half of the total myosin head concentration within the fiber), the fiber showed the minimum shortening (10 +/- 2 nm/half sarcomere, n = 10) taking place uniformly in each sarcomere in the fiber. Comparison of the initial flash-induced shortening velocity with the force-velocity relation of maximally Ca(2+)-activated fibers indicated that the above minimum fiber shortening took place under an internal load nearly equal to Po. These results may be taken to indicate that, under a nearly isometric condition, the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule is of the order of 10 nm.

  7. Structural flexibility enhances the reactivity of the bioremediator glycerophosphodiesterase by fine-tuning its mechanism of hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hadler, Kieran S; Mitić, Natasa; Ely, Fernanda; Hanson, Graeme R; Gahan, Lawrence R; Larrabee, James A; Ollis, David L; Schenk, Gerhard

    2009-08-26

    The glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ) belongs to the family of binuclear metallohydrolases and has attracted recent attention due to its potential in bioremediation. Formation of a catalytically competent binuclear center is promoted by the substrate (Hadler et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 14129). Using the paramagnetic properties of Mn(II), we estimated the K(d) values for the metal ions in the alpha and beta sites to be 29 and 344 microM, respectively, in the absence of a substrate analogue. In its presence, the affinity of the beta site increases substantially (K(d) = 56 microM), while that of the alpha site is not greatly affected (K(d) = 17 microM). Stopped-flow fluorescence measurements identified three distinct phases in the catalytic turnover, associated with the initial binding of substrate to the active site (k(obs1)), the assembly of a catalytically active binuclear center (k(obs2)), and subsequent slower structural rearrangements to optimize catalysis (k(obs3)). These three phases depend on the concentration of substrate ([S]), with k(obs1) and k(obs2) reaching maximum values at high [S] (354 and 38 s(-1), respectively), whereas k(obs3) is reduced as [S] is increased. The k(cat) for the hydrolysis of the substrate bis(para-nitrophenyl) phosphate (approximately 1 s(-1)) gradually increases from the moment of initiating the reaction, reaching a maximum when the structural change associated with k(obs3) is complete. This structural change is mediated via an extensive hydrogen-bond network that connects the coordination sphere with the substrate binding pocket, as demonstrated by mutation of two residues in this network (His81 and His217). The identities of both the substrate and the metal ion also affect interactions within this H-bond network, thus leading to some mechanistic variations. Overall, the mechanism employed by GpdQ is a paradigm of a substrate- and metal-ion-induced fit to optimize catalysis.

  8. Emergence of flagellar beating from the collective behavior of individual ATP-powered dyneins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdeo, S.; Onck, P. R.

    2016-10-01

    Flagella are hair-like projections from the surface of eukaryotic cells, and they play an important role in many cellular functions, such as cell-motility. The beating of flagella is enabled by their internal architecture, the axoneme, and is powered by a dense distribution of motor proteins, dyneins. The dyneins deliver the required mechanical work through the hydrolysis of ATP. Although the dynein-ATP cycle, the axoneme microstructure, and the flagellar-beating kinematics are well studied, their integration into a coherent picture of ATP-powered flagellar beating is still lacking. Here we show that a time-delayed negative-work-based switching mechanism is able to convert the individual sliding action of hundreds of dyneins into a regular overall beating pattern leading to propulsion. We developed a computational model based on a minimal representation of the axoneme consisting of two representative doublet microtubules connected by nexin links. The relative sliding of the microtubules is incorporated by modeling two groups of ATP-powered dyneins, each responsible for sliding in opposite directions. A time-delayed switching mechanism is postulated, which is key in converting the local individual sliding action of multiple dyneins into global beating. Our results demonstrate that an overall nonreciprocal beating pattern can emerge with time due to the spatial and temporal coordination of the individual dyneins. These findings provide insights in the fundamental working mechanism of axonemal dyneins and could possibly open new research directions in the field of flagellar motility.

  9. Phosphorylation Hypothesis: A Fourth Sink of ATP for Cellular Information Processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule is used in living cells as a universal ``energy currency.'' The Gibbs free energy liberated from hydrolysis reaction of ATP to ADP + Pi is used for (a) biosynthesis, (b) ionic and neutral molecular pumping, and (c) mechanical movement. They are known collectively as the three major energy sinks at the cellular level. Using biochemical activities of various enzymes, a cell carries out information processing, known as signal transduction. Essentially all signal transduction reactions also require ATP (or GTP) hydrolysis. In the past, such energy dissipative reactions are considered as ``futile.'' However, it is clear that the free energy derived from a futile cycle is used to correct errors in biomolecular recognition, improve robustness in cell development, overcome Boltzmann's equilibrium law of probability, and drive Maxwell's demons (one notes that Gibbs' chemical potential is a thermodynamic force without mechanical interpretation). The free energy involved in processing information will be explained in terms of stochastic entropy production -- the central concept in irreversible and nonequilibrium steady-state (NESS) thermodynamics.

  10. Efficient phagocytosis requires triacylglycerol hydrolysis by adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Chandak, Prakash G; Radovic, Branislav; Aflaki, Elma; Kolb, Dagmar; Buchebner, Marlene; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Magnes, Christoph; Sinner, Frank; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Tabas, Ira; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-06-25

    Macrophage phagocytosis is an essential biological process in host defense and requires large amounts of energy. To date, glucose is believed to represent the prime substrate for ATP production in macrophages. To investigate the relative contribution of free fatty acids (FFAs) in this process, we determined the phagocytosis rates in normal mouse macrophages and macrophages of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-deficient mice. ATGL was shown to be the rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of lipid droplet-associated triacylglycerol (TG) in many tissues. Here, we demonstrate that Atgl(-/-) macrophages fail to efficiently hydrolyze cellular TG stores leading to decreased cellular FFA concentrations and concomitant accumulation of lipid droplets, even in the absence of exogenous lipid loading. The reduced availability of FFAs results in decreased cellular ATP concentrations and impaired phagocytosis suggesting that fatty acids must first go through a cycle of esterification and re-hydrolysis before they are available as energy substrate. Exogenously added glucose cannot fully compensate for the phagocytotic defect in Atgl(-/-) macrophages. Hence, phagocytosis was also decreased in vivo when Atgl(-/-) mice were challenged with bacterial particles. These findings imply that phagocytosis in macrophages depends on the availability of FFAs and that ATGL is required for their hydrolytic release from cellular TG stores. This novel mechanism links ATGL-mediated lipolysis to macrophage function in host defense and opens the way to explore possible roles of ATGL in immune response, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  11. Red Wine Inhibits Aggregation and Increases ATP-diphosphohydrolase (CD39) Activity of Rat Platelets in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Tedesco, Idolo; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-06-01

    Moderate consumption of red wine has been shown to exert a peculiar cardioprotective effect compared with other alcoholic beverages; inhibition of platelet aggregation seems to be one of the mechanisms underlying this beneficial effect. CD39/ATP-diphosphohydrolase is an integral membrane glycoprotein metabolizing ATP and ADP to AMP; in concert with CD73/ecto-5'-nucleotidase, it contributes to extracellular adenosine accumulation. CD39 is considered a key modulator of thrombus formation; it inhibits platelet aggregation by promoting ADP hydrolysis. There is evidence that red wine consumption increases CD39 activity in platelets from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Here we show that two kinds of Aglianico red wines inhibit aggregation and increase ATP--and ADPase activity in rat platelets.

  12. Gas-phase mechanisms of degradation of hazardous organophosphorus compounds: do they follow a common pattern of alkaline hydrolysis reaction as in phosphotriesterase?

    PubMed

    Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Sokalski, W Andrzej; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-08-14

    A comprehensive ab initio analysis of the gas-phase mechanisms of alkaline hydrolysis for a number of phosphotriesterase substrates--O,O-diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP), O-isopropyl methyl phosphonofluoridate, O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (paraoxon), O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl thiophosphate (parathion), N-acetyl phosphoramidothioate (acephate), O,O-diethyl S-2-ethylthioethyl phosphorothioate (demeton-S) and O-ethyl N,N-dimethyl phosphoramidocyanidate--has been presented herein. The results indicate that, although an associative mechanism of alkaline hydrolysis is followed by all these compounds, P-F and P-CN bonds are cleaved according to the multistep addition-elimination scheme, whereas the breakage of P-O and P-S bonds appears to be consistent with the one-step direct-displacement mechanism. Of the two alternative reaction pathways present in all those cases (except of acephate), the most probable one involves the proton from a nucleophilic hydroxide experiencing an additional stabilization by the phosphoryl oxygen atom.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of the processive endocellulase Cel48F from Clostridium cellulolyticum: a novel "water-control mechanism" in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ji-long; Sun, Lu; Niu, Xiao-di; Wang, Song; Shan, Ya-ming

    2014-07-01

    Glycoside hydrolase of Cel48F from Clostridium cellulolyticum is an important processive cellulose, which can hydrolyze cellulose into cellobiose. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the hydrolysis mechanism of cellulose. The two conformations of the Cel48F-cellotetrose complex in which the cellotetroses are bound at different sites (known as the sliding conformation and the hydrolyzing conformation) were simulated. By comparing these two conformations, a water-control mechanism is proposed, in which the hydrolysis proceeds by providing a water molecule for every other glucosidic linkage. The roles of certain key residues are determined: Glu55 and Asp230 are the most probable candidates for acid and base, respectively, in the mechanism of inverting anomeric carbon. Met414 and Trp417 constitute the water-control system. Glu44 might keep the substrate at a certain location within the active site or help the substrate chain to move from the sliding conformation to the hydrolyzing conformation. The other hydrophobic residues around the substrate can decrease the sliding energy barrier or provide a hydrophobic environment to resist entry of the surrounding water molecules into the active site, except for those coming from a specific water channel.

  14. Phenazine redox cycling enhances anaerobic survival in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by facilitating generation of ATP and a proton-motive force

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Nathaniel R.; Kern, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary While many studies have explored the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, comparatively few have focused on its survival. Previously, we reported that endogenous phenazines support the anaerobic survival of P. aeruginosa, yet the physiological mechanism underpinning survival was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that phenazine redox cycling enables P. aeruginosa to oxidize glucose and pyruvate into acetate, which promotes survival by coupling acetate and ATP synthesis through the activity of acetate kinase. By measuring intracellular NAD(H) and ATP concentrations, we show that survival is correlated with ATP synthesis, which is tightly coupled to redox homeostasis during pyruvate fermentation but not during arginine fermentation. We also show that ATP hydrolysis is required to generate a proton-motive force using the ATP synthase complex during fermentation. Together, our results suggest that phenazines enable maintenance of the proton-motive force by promoting redox homeostasis and ATP synthesis. This work demonstrates the more general principle that extracellular redox-active molecules, such as phenazines, can broaden the metabolic versatility of microorganisms by facilitating energy generation. PMID:24612454

  15. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter.

    PubMed

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-07-03

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [(3)H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment.

  16. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [3H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment. PMID:25991724

  17. Embryopathic effects of thalidomide and its hydrolysis products in rabbit embryo culture: evidence for a prostaglandin H synthase (PHS)-dependent, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Crystal J J; Gonçalves, Luisa L; Wells, Peter G

    2011-07-01

    Thalidomide (TD) causes birth defects in humans and rabbits via several potential mechanisms, including bioactivation by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) enzymes to a reactive intermediate that enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We show herein that TD in rabbit embryo culture produces relevant embryopathies, including decreases in head/brain development by 28% and limb bud growth by 71% (P<0.05). Two TD hydrolysis products, 2-phthalimidoglutaramic acid (PGMA) and 2-phthalimidoglutaric acid (PGA), were similarly embryopathic, attenuating otic vesicle (ear) and limb bud formation by up to 36 and 77%, respectively (P<0.05). TD, PGMA, and PGA all increased embryonic DNA oxidation measured as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) by up to 2-fold (P<0.05). Co- or pretreatment with the PHS inhibitors eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), or the free-radical spin trap phenylbutylnitrone (PBN), completely blocked embryonic 8-oxoG formation and/or embryopathies initiated by TD, PGMA, and PGA. This is the first demonstration of limb bud embryopathies initiated by TD, as well as its hydrolysis products, in a mammalian embryo culture model of a species susceptible to TD in vivo, indicating that all likely contribute to TD teratogenicity in vivo, in part through PHS-dependent, ROS-mediated mechanisms.

  18. Interaction of ATP with a Small Heat Shock Protein from Mycobacterium leprae: Effect on Its Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Panda, Alok Kumar; Sinha Ray, Sougata; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is an important phosphate metabolite abundantly found in Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. This pathogen does not derive ATP from its host but has its own mechanism for the generation of ATP. Interestingly, this molecule as well as several antigenic proteins act as bio-markers for the detection of leprosy. One such bio-marker is the 18 kDa antigen. This 18 kDa antigen is a small heat shock protein (HSP18) whose molecular chaperone function is believed to help in the growth and survival of the pathogen. But, no evidences of interaction of ATP with HSP18 and its effect on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are available in the literature. Here, we report for the first time evidences of “HSP18-ATP” interaction and its consequences on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18. TNP-ATP binding experiment and surface plasmon resonance measurement showed that HSP18 interacts with ATP with a sub-micromolar binding affinity. Comparative sequence alignment between M. leprae HSP18 and αB-crystallin identified the sequence 49KADSLDIDIE58 of HSP18 as the Walker-B ATP binding motif. Molecular docking studies revealed that β4-β8 groove/strands as an ATP interactive region in M. leprae HSP18. ATP perturbs the tertiary structure of HSP18 mildly and makes it less susceptible towards tryptic cleavage. ATP triggers exposure of additional hydrophobic patches at the surface of HSP18 and induces more stability against chemical and thermal denaturation. In vitro aggregation and thermal inactivation assays clearly revealed that ATP enhances the chaperone function of HSP18. Our studies also revealed that the alteration in the chaperone function of HSP18 is reversible and is independent of ATP hydrolysis. As the availability and binding of ATP to HSP18 regulates its chaperone function, this functional inflection may play an important role in the survival of M. leprae in hosts. PMID:25811190

  19. Molecular modeling of bioorganometallic compounds: thermodynamic properties of molybdocene-glutathione complexes and mechanism of Peptide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Dimas; Díaz, Natalia

    2015-06-08

    The computational study of bioinorganic complexes between transition metals and flexible ligands is still challenging, given that, besides requiring extensive conformational searches, the treatment of metal-ligand bonds demands the application of quantum chemical methods. Herein, the adducts formed between molybdocene, which exhibits antitumor activity and reacts with thiol groups to give stable water-soluble complexes, and the tripeptide glutathione, which is a major source of biological thiols, are studied. Conformational searches are performed using the semiempirical PM6 method followed by geometry optimizations and single-point calculations using density functional theory methods. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations of the molybdocene-glutathione complex involved in the regioselective hydrolysis of the Cys-Gly linkage are performed in explicit solvent. The reactive process is also studied theoretically on cluster models of both the molybdocene-bound and the free peptide.

  20. Concentration gradient effects of sodium and lithium ions and deuterium isotope effects on the activities of H+-ATP synthase from chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, M-F; Wang, J-D; Su, T-M

    2009-03-18

    We explored the concentration gradient effects of the sodium and lithium ions and the deuterium isotope's effects on the activities of H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF(0)F(1)). We found that the sodium concentration gradient can drive the ATP synthesis reaction of CF(0)F(1). In contrast, the lithium ion can be an efficient enzyme-inhibitor by blocking the entrance channel of the ion translocation pathway in CF(0). In the presence of sodium or lithium ions and with the application of a membrane potential, unexpected enzyme behaviors of CF(0)F(1) were evident. To account for these observations, we propose that both of the sodium and lithium ions could undergo localized hydrolysis reactions in the chemical environment of the ion channel of CF(0). The protons generated locally could proceed to complete the ion translocation process in the ATP synthesis reaction of CF(0)F(1). Experimental and theoretical deuterium isotope effects of the localized hydrolysis on the activities of CF(0)F(1), and the energetics of these related reactions, support this proposed mechanism. Our experimental observations could be understood in the framework of the well-established ion translocation models for the H(+)-ATP synthase from Escherichia coli, and the Na(+)-ATP synthase from Propionigenium modestum and Ilyobacter tartaricus.

  1. Sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement increase rat lymphocyte glutamine utilization and oxidation while lethal concentrations cause death by a mechanism involving ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Bacurau, R F P; O'Toole, C E; Newsholme, P; Costa Rosa, L F B P

    2002-09-01

    Nucleated cells are more resistant to complement-mediated cell death than anucleated cells such as erythrocytes. There are few reports concerning the metabolic response of nucleated cells subjected to sub-lethal complement attack. It is possible that the rate of utilization of specific metabolic fuels by the cell is increased to enhance cell defence. We have measured the maximum activity of hexokinase, citrate synthase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase in rat mesenteric lymphocytes exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement (present in zymosan-activated serum, ZAS). These enzymes were carefully selected as they indicate changes of flux in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and glutaminolysis, respectively. The only enzyme activity to change on exposure of lymphocytes to ZAS was glutaminase, which was enhanced approximately by two-fold. Although rates of both glutamine and glucose utilization were enhanced by exposure to ZAS, only the rate of oxidation of glutamine was increased. Complement kills anucleated cells by simple osmotic lysis. However, it is likely that some nucleated cells will display characteristics of an ordered death mechanism and we have demonstrated that the concentration of lymphocyte ATP is dramatically decreased by activated complement. Nevertheless, the extent of cell death could be significantly reduced by the addition of inhibitors of the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We conclude that glutamine metabolism is not only important for lymphocyte proliferative responses but is also important for cell defence from sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement. The rapid rate of complement-induced lymphocyte death reported here is suggested to be a consequence of over-activation of the nuclear enzyme PARP and ATP depletion.

  2. Fluorescent primuline derivatives inhibit hepatitis C virus NS3-catalyzed RNA unwinding, peptide hydrolysis and viral replicase formation.

    PubMed

    Ndjomou, Jean; Kolli, Rajesh; Mukherjee, Sourav; Shadrick, William R; Hanson, Alicia M; Sweeney, Noreena L; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) multifunctional nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a protease that cleaves viral and host proteins and a helicase that separates DNA and RNA structures in reactions fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Li et al. (2012) recently synthesized a series of new NS3 helicase inhibitors from the benzothiazole dimer component of the fluorescent yellow dye primuline. This study further characterizes a subset of these primuline derivatives with respect to their specificity, mechanism of action, and effect on cells harboring HCV subgenomic replicons. All compounds inhibited DNA and RNA unwinding catalyzed by NS3 from different HCV genotypes, but only some inhibited the NS3 protease function, and few had any effect on HCV NS3 catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. A different subset contained potent inhibitors of RNA stimulated ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the related NS3 protein from Dengue virus. In assays monitoring intrinsic protein fluorescence in the absence of nucleic acids, the compounds cooperatively bound NS3 with K(d)s that reflect their potency in assays. The fluorescent properties of the primuline derivatives both in vitro and in cells are also described. The primuline derivative that was the most active against subgenomic replicons in cells caused a 14-fold drop in HCV RNA levels (IC(50)=5±2μM). In cells, the most effective primuline derivative did not inhibit the cellular activity of NS3 protease but disrupted HCV replicase structures.

  3. Association of ATP6V1B2 rs1106634 with lifetime risk of depression and hippocampal neurocognitive deficits: possible novel mechanisms in the etiopathology of depression

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, X; Eszlari, N; Anderson, I M; Deakin, J F W; Bagdy, G; Juhasz, G

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding and treatment of depression is limited to the monoaminergic theory with little knowledge of the involvement of other cellular processes. Genome-wide association studies, however, implicate several novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms with weak but replicable effects and unclarified mechanisms. We investigated the effect of rs1106634 of the ATPV1B2 gene encoding the vacuolar H+ATPase on lifetime and current depression and the possible mediating role of neuroticism by logistic and linear regression in a white European general sample of 2226 subjects. Association of rs1106634 with performance on frontal (Stockings of Cambridge (SOC)) and hippocampal-dependent (paired associates learning (PAL)) cognitive tasks was investigated in multivariate general linear models in a smaller subsample. The ATP6V1B2 rs1106634 A allele had a significant effect on lifetime but not on current depression. The effect of the A allele on lifetime depression was not mediated by neuroticism. The A allele influenced performance on the PAL but not on the SOC test. We conclude that the effects of variation in the vacuolar ATPase may point to a new molecular mechanism that influences the long-term development of depression. This mechanism may involve dysfunction specifically in hippocampal circuitry and cognitive impairment that characterizes recurrent and chronic depression. PMID:27824360

  4. Analysis of solvent nucleophile isotope effects: evidence for concerted mechanisms and nucleophilic activation by metal coordination in nonenzymatic and ribozyme-catalyzed phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Adam G; Anderson, Vernon E; Harris, Michael E

    2004-08-17

    Heavy atom isotope effects are a valuable tool for probing chemical and enzymatic reaction mechanisms; yet, they are not widely applied to examine mechanisms of nucleophilic activation. We developed approaches for analyzing solvent (18)O nucleophile isotope effects ((18)k(nuc)) that allow, for the first time, their application to hydrolysis reactions of nucleotides and nucleic acids. Here, we report (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester hydrolysis catalyzed by Mg(2+) and by the Mg(2+)-dependent RNase P ribozyme and deamination by the Zn(2+)-dependent protein enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA). Because ADA incorporates a single solvent molecule into the product inosine, this reaction can be used to monitor solvent (18)O/(16)O ratios in complex reaction mixtures. This approach, combined with new methods for analysis of isotope ratios of nucleotide phosphates by whole molecule mass spectrometry, permitted determination of (18)k(nuc) for hydrolysis of thymidine 5'-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and RNA cleavage by the RNase P ribozyme. For ADA, an inverse (18)k(nuc) of 0.986 +/- 0.001 is observed, reflecting coordination of the nucleophile by an active site Zn(2+) ion and a stepwise mechanism. In contrast, the observed (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester reactions were normal: 1.027 +/- 0.013 and 1.030 +/- 0.012 for the Mg(2+)- and ribozyme-catalyzed reactions, respectively. Such normal effects indicate that nucleophilic attack occurs in the rate-limiting step for these reactions, consistent with concerted mechanisms. However, these magnitudes are significantly less than the (18)k(nuc) observed for nucleophilic attack by hydroxide (1.068 +/- 0.007), indicating a "stiffer" bonding environment for the nucleophile in the transition state. Kinetic analysis of the Mg(2+)-catalyzed reaction indicates that a Mg(2+)-hydroxide complex is the catalytic species; thus, the lower (18)k(nuc), in large part, reflects direct metal ion coordination of the nucleophilic oxygen. A similar value for the RNase P

  5. An exploration of the effect and interaction mechanism of bisphenol A on waste sludge hydrolysis with multi-spectra, isothermal titration microcalorimetry and molecule docking.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangying; Zhang, Rui; Hao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chunguang

    2017-03-10

    An increasing amount of bisphenol A (BPA) is being produced and used, then discharged into sewage treatment plants and accumulated in sludge or soil, when the sludge is used as fertilizer. Accumulation of BPA in sludge or soil causes poisoning to the enzyme, which affects the biological treatment of sludge and the circulation and conversion of materials in soil. In this research, effect of BPA on sludge hydrolysis is studied from the respect of concentration and components of soluble organic matter in sludge, using three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. In order to illuminate the interaction mechanism, toxic effect of BPA on α-Amylase (a model of hydrolase in sludge) is investigated with multi-spectra, isothermal titration microcalorimetry and molecule docking at the molecular level. Results show that the secondary structure of α-Amylase and the microenvironment of amino acid residue in α-Amylase are changed. The molecular docking study and ITC results show that hydrophobic bond and hydrogen bond exist in the interaction between BPA and α-Amylase. Based on the above analysis and enzyme activity assay, sludge hydrolysis is inhibited due to the denaturation of α-Amylase with BPA exposure.

  6. Multi-spectral and thermodynamic analysis of the interaction mechanism between Cu(2+) and α-amylase and impact on sludge hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruiqi; Liu, Hong; Hou, Guangying; Ju, Lei; Liu, Chunguang

    2017-02-24

    An increasing amount of heavy metals (e.g., Cu(2+)) is being discharged into sewage treatment plants and is accumulating in sludge, which is toxic to the enzyme in sludge or soil when the sludge is used as fertilizer, resulting in unfavorable effect on the biological treatment of sludge and the circulation and conversion of materials in soil. In this research, effect of Cu(2+) on sludge hydrolysis by α-amylase is studied from the respect of concentration and components of soluble organic matter in sludge, using three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. Results show that Cu(2+) exposure not only inhibits the hydrolysis of sludge due to the denaturation of α-amylase but also affects the components of soluble organic matter in sludge. In order to illuminate the interaction mechanism between Cu(2+) and α-amylase (a model of hydrolase in sludge), multi-spectra and isothermal titration microcalorimetry techniques are applied. Results show that the secondary structure of α-amylase is changed as that the α-helical content increases and the structure loosens. The microenvironment of amino acid residue in α-amylase is changed that the hydrophobicity decreases and the polarity increases with Cu(2+) exposure. Isothermal titration calorimetry results show that Van der Waals force and hydrogen bond exist in the interaction between Cu(2+) and α-amylase. Results from this research would favor the development of advanced process for the biological treatment of sludge containing heavy metals.

  7. Mechanism of muscarinic receptor-induced K+ channel activation as revealed by hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gk) in the coupling between muscarinic receptor activation and opening of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel [IK(M)] was examined in cardiac atrial myocytes, using hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues. In the absence of muscarinic agonist, GTP analogues produced a membrane current characteristic of IK(M). The initial rate of appearance of this receptor-independent IK(M) was measured for the various analogues in order to explore the kinetic properties of IK(M) activation. We found that IK(M) activation is controlled solely by the intracellular analogue/GTP ratio and not by the absolute concentrations of the nucleotides. Analogues competed with GTP for binding to Gk with the following relative affinities: GTP gamma S greater than GTP greater than GppNHp greater than GppCH2p. At sufficiently high intracellular concentrations, however, all GTP analogues produced the same rate of IK(M) activation. This analogue- independent limiting rate is likely to correspond to the rate of GDP release from inactive, GDP-bound Gk. Muscarinic receptor stimulation by nanomolar concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), which do not elicit IK(M) under control conditions, catalyzed IK(M) activation in the presence of GTP analogues. The rate of Gk activation by ACh (kACh) was found to be described by the simple relationship kACh = 8.4 X 10(8) min- 1 M-1.[ACh] + 0.44 min-1, the first term of which presumably reflects the agonist-catalyzed rate of GDP release from the Gk.GDP complex, while the second term corresponds to the basal rate of receptor- independent GDP release. Combined with the estimated K0.5 of the IK(M)- [ACh] dose-effect relationship, 160 nM, this result also allowed us to estimate the rate of Gk.GTP hydrolysis, kcat, to be near 135 min-1. These results provide, for the first time, a quantitative description of the salient features of G-protein function in vivo. PMID:2455765

  8. Hydrolysis of fluorosilanes: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Cypryk, Marek

    2005-12-29

    Hydrolysis and condensation of simple trifluorosilanes, HSiF3 and MeSiF3, was studied by quantum mechanical methods. Hydrolysis of fluorosilanes is highly endothermic. The Gibbs free energy of the first reaction step in the gas phase is 31.4 kJ/mol, which corresponds to an equilibrium constant of 10(-6). Hydrolysis of the subsequent fluorine atoms in trifluorosilanes is thermodynamically more unfavorable than the first step of substitution. No significant difference in thermodynamics of hydrolysis was found between HSiF3 and MeSiF3. The activation energy for hydrolysis by a water dimer is significantly lower than that for hydrolysis by a water monomer. The former reaction is also less unfavorable thermodynamically, due to a high binding energy of the HF-H2O complex formed as a product of hydrolysis. Self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations show that hydrolysis of trifluorosilanes in aqueous medium has lower activation energy than in the gas phase. It is also thermodynamically less unfavorable, due to better solvation of the products. Homofunctional condensation of HSiF2OH is thermodynamically favored. The equilibrium mixture for hydrolysis/condensation of RSiF3 in water is predicted to contain ca. 2.3% disiloxane (HF2Si)2O, if 100-fold excess of water relative to silane is assumed. Further hydrolysis of (HF2Si)2O is negligible. The thermodynamics of fluorosilane hydrolysis contrasts with that of chlorosilanes, where both hydrolysis and condensation are strongly favorable. Moreover, in the case of trichlorosilanes each subsequent hydrolysis step is more facile, leading to the product of full hydrolysis, RSi(OH)3.

  9. Effects of an ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-[α-thio]-triphosphate, on F1-ATPase rotary catalysis, torque generation, and inhibited intermediated formation.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-13

    F1-ATPase (F1), an important rotary motor protein, converts the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical energy using rotary motion with extremely high efficiency. The energy-conversion mechanism for this molecular motor has been extensively clarified by previous studies, which indicate that the interactions between the catalytic residues and the β- and γ-phosphates of ATP are indispensable for efficient catalysis and torque generation. However, the role of α-phosphate is largely unknown. In this study, we observed the rotation of F1 fuelled with an ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-[α-thio]-triphosphate (ATPαS), in which the oxygen has been substituted with a sulfur ion to perturb the α-phosphate/F1 interactions. In doing so, we have revealed that ATPαS does not appear to have any impact on the kinetic properties of the motor or on torque generation compared to ATP. On the other hand, F1 was observed to lapse into the ADP-inhibited intermediate states when in the presence of ATPαS more severely than in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the α-phosphate group of ATP contributes to the avoidance of ADP-inhibited intermediate formation.

  10. Role of ATP-bound divalent metal ion in the conformation and function of actin. Comparison of Mg-ATP, Ca-ATP, and metal ion-free ATP-actin.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Ranc, C; Carlier, M F

    1991-04-25

    The fluorescence of N-acetyl-N'-(sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (AEDANS) covalently bound to Cys-374 of actin is used as a probe for different conformational states of G-actin according to whether Ca-ATP, Mg-ATP, or unchelated ATP is bound to the nucleotide site. Upon addition of large amounts (greater than 10(2)-fold molar excess) of EDTA to G-actin, metal ion-free ATP-G-actin is obtained with EDTA bound. Metal ion free ATP-G-actin is characterized by a higher AEDANS fluorescence than Mg-ATP-G-actin, which itself has a higher fluorescence than Ca-ATP-G-actin. Evidence for EDTA binding to G-actin is shown using difference spectrophotometry. Upon binding of EDTA, the rate of dissociation of the divalent metal ion from G-actin is increased (2-fold for Ca2+, 10-fold for Mg2+) in a range of pH from 7.0 to 8.0. A model is proposed that quantitatively accounts for the kinetic data. The affinity of ATP is weakened 10(6)-fold upon removal of the metal ion. Metal ion-free ATP-G-actin is in a partially open conformation, as indicated by the greater accessibility of -SH residues, yet it retains functional properties of polymerization and ATP hydrolysis that appear almost identical to those of Ca-ATP-actin, therefore different from those of Mg-ATP-actin. These results are discussed in terms of the role of the ATP-bound metal ion in actin structure and function.

  11. Structures of apo and product-bound human L-asparaginase: Insights into the mechanism of autoproteolysis and substrate hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Nomme, Julian; Su, Ying; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-01

    Asparaginases catalyze the hydrolysis of the amino acid asparagine to aspartate and ammonia. Bacterial asparaginases are used in cancer chemotherapy to deplete asparagine from the blood, since several hematological malignancies depend on extracellular asparagine for growth. To avoid the immune response against the bacterial enzymes it would be beneficial to replace them with human asparaginases. However, unlike the bacterial asparaginases, the human enzymes have a millimolar Km value for asparagine, making them inefficient in depleting the amino acid from blood. To facilitate the development of human variants suitable for therapeutic use, we solved the structure of human L-asparaginase (hASNase3). This asparaginase is an N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) family member that requires autocleavage between Gly167 and Thr168 to become catalytically competent. For most Ntn-hydrolases this autoproteolytic activation occurs efficiently. In contrast, hASNas3 is relatively stable in its uncleaved state, and this allowed us to observe the structure of the enzyme prior to cleavage. To determine the structure of the cleaved state we exploited our discovery that the free amino acid glycine promotes complete cleavage of hASNase3. Both enzyme states were elucidated in the absence and presence of the product aspartate. Together, these structures provide insight into the conformational changes required for cleavage, and on the precise enzyme-substrate interactions. The new understanding of hASNase3 will serve to guide the design of variants that possess a decreased Km value for asparagine, making the human enzyme a suitable replacement for the bacterial asparaginases in cancer therapy. PMID:22861376

  12. ATP alone triggers the outward facing conformation of the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Duong, Franck

    2013-02-01

    The maltose transporter MalFGK(2) is a study prototype for ABC importers. During catalysis, the MalFG membrane domain alternates between inward and outward facing conformations when the MalK dimer closes and hydrolyzes ATP. Because a rapid ATP hydrolysis depends on MalE and maltose, it has been proposed that closed liganded MalE facilitates the transition to the outward facing conformation. Here we find that, in contrast to the expected, ATP is sufficient for the closure of MalK and for the conversion of MalFG to the outward facing state. The outward facing transporter binds MalE with nanomolar affinity, yet neither MalE nor maltose is necessary or facilitates the transition. Thus, the rapid hydrolysis of ATP observed in the presence of MalE and maltose is not because closed liganded MalE accelerates the formation of the outward facing conformation. These findings have fundamental implications for the description of the transport reaction.

  13. General quantum-mechanical study on the hydrolysis equilibria for a tetravalent aquaion: the extreme case of the Po(IV) in water.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Regla; Martínez, José M; Pappalardo, Rafael R; Muñoz Páez, Adela; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2009-01-15

    A systematic study of the different hydrolyzed species derived from the hydrated Po(IV) in water, [Po(H(2)O)(n)(OH)(m)]((4-m)) for 1 m 4, and 4 m + n 9, has been carried out by means of quantum mechanical computations. The effects of outer solvation shells have been included using a polarizable continuum dielectric model. For a fixed number of hydroxyl groups, the preferred hydration number for the Po(IV) can be determined in terms of Gibbs energy. It is shown that the hydration number (n) systematically decreases with the increase in the number of hydroxyl groups (m) in such a way the total coordination number (n + m) becomes smaller, being 9 in the aquocomplex and 4 in the neutral hydroxo-complex. Free energies for the hydrolysis processes involving Po(IV) complexes and a different number of hydroxyl groups have been computed, revealing the strong tendency toward hydrolysis exhibited by these complexes. The predominant species of Po(IV) in aqueous solutions are ruled by a dynamical equilibrium involving aggregates containing in the first coordination shell OH(-) groups and water molecules. Although there is not experimental information to check the theoretical predictions, theoretical computations in solution seem to suggest that the most likely clusters are [Po(H(2)O)(5)(OH)(2)](2+) and [Po(H(2)O)(4)(OH)(2)](2+). The geometry of the different clusters is ruled by the trend of hydroxyl groups to be mutually orthogonal and to promote a strong perturbation of the water molecule in trans-position by lengthening the Po-H(2)O distances and tilting the corresponding bond angle. A general thermodynamic cycle is defined to compute the Gibbs free energy associated to the formation of the different hydrolyzed forms in solution. From it, the estimates of pK(a) values associated to the different protolytic equilibria are provided and discussed. Comparison of the relative values of pK(a) along a hydrolysis series with the experimental values for other tetravalent cations

  14. Mechanisms of DNA Motor Proteins (Helicases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    1996-03-01

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous motor proteins that couple the binding and hydrolysis of NTP to the unwinding of duplex (ds) DNA to form the single stranded (ss) DNA intermediates that are required for replication, recombination and repair. We are studying the DNA unwinding mechanisms catalyzed by two helicases from E. coli: Rep and Helicase II (UvrD) by examining the linkage of DNA binding, protein dimerization and nucleotide binding using both thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. A dimer of the Rep protein is the active form of the helicase; however, the dimer forms only upon binding either ss or ds DNA. There are significant cooperative interactions between the two DNA binding sites on the dimer and nucleotides (ATP, ADP) allosterically control the stabilities of the DNA ligation states of the Rep dimer. Based on these studies we have proposed an "active, rolling" mechanism for the Rep dimer unwinding of duplex DNA. An essential intermediate is a complex, in which ss- and ds-DNA bind simultaneously to each subunit of a Rep dimer. This model predicts that Rep helicase translocation along DNA is coupled to ATP binding, whereas ATP hydrolysis drives unwinding of multiple DNA base pairs for each catalytic event. Rapid chemical quench-flow and stopped-flow fluorescence studies of Rep and UvrD- catalyzed DNA unwinding of a series of non-natural DNA substrates support the "active, rolling" mechanism and rule out a strictly "passive" mechanism of unwinding. Kinetic studies of DNA and nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis by wild type and mutant Rep proteins will be discussed that bear on the coupling of ATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation along DNA and DNA unwinding.

  15. The stimulating role of subunit F in ATPase activity inside the A1-complex of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1AO ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhirendra; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Bhushan, Shashi; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    A1AO ATP synthases couple ion-transport of the AO sector and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis of the A3B3-headpiece via their stalk subunits D and F. Here, we produced and purified stable A3B3D- and A3B3DF-complexes of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase as confirmed by electron microscopy. Enzymatic studies with these complexes showed that the M. mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase subunit F is an ATPase activating subunit. The maximum ATP hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of A3B3D and A3B3DF were determined by substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis experiments resulting in a Vmax of 7.9 s(-1) and 30.4 s(-1), respectively, while the KM is the same for both. Deletions of the N- or C-termini of subunit F abolished the effect of ATP hydrolysis activation. We generated subunit F mutant proteins with single amino acid substitutions and demonstrated that the subunit F residues S84 and R88 are important in stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Hybrid formation of the A3B3D-complex with subunit F of the related eukaryotic V-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or subunit ε of the F-ATP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed that subunit F of the archaea and eukaryotic enzymes are important in ATP hydrolysis.

  16. ATP regulation of calcium transport in back-inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

    PubMed

    de Meis, L; Sorenson, M M

    1989-09-18

    At high concentrations of ATP, ATP hydrolysis and Ca2+ transport by the (Ca2+ + MG2+)-ATPase of intact sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles exhibit a secondary activation that varies with the extent of back-inhibition by Ca2+ accumulated within the vesicles. When the internal ionized Ca2+ is clamped at low and intermediate levels by the use of Ca-precipitating anions, the apparent Km values for activation by ATP are lower than in fully back-inhibited vesicles (high internal Ca2+). In leaky vesicles unable to accumulate Ca2+, raising Ca2+ in the assay medium from 20-30 microM to 5 mM abolishes the activation of hydrolysis by high concentrations of ATP. The level of [32P]phosphoenzyme formed during ATP hydrolysis from [32P]phosphate added to the medium also varies with the extent of back-inhibition; it is highest when Ca2+ is raised to a level that saturates the internal, low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites. In intact vesicles, increasing the ATP concentration from 10 to 400 microM competitively inhibits the reaction of inorganic phosphate with the enzyme but does not change the rate of hydrolysis. In a previous report (De Meis, L., Gomez-Puyou, M.T. and Gomez-Puyou, A. (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 171, 343-349), it has been shown that the hydrophobic molecules trifluoperazine and iron bathophenanthroline compete for the catalytic site of the Pi-reactive form of the enzyme. Here it is shown that inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by these compounds is reduced or abolished when Ca2+ binds to the low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites of the enzyme. Since inhibition by these agents is indifferent to activation of hydrolysis by high concentrations of ATP, it is suggested that the second Km for ATP and the inhibition by hydrophobic molecules involve two different Ca-free forms of the enzyme.

  17. Long-term ritonavir exposure increases fatty acid and glycerol recycling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compensatory mechanisms for increased triacylglycerol hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Adler-Wailes, Diane C; Guiney, Evan L; Wolins, Nathan E; Yanovski, Jack A

    2010-05-01

    Lipodystrophy with high nonesterified fatty acid (FA) efflux is reported in humans receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat HIV infection. Ritonavir, a common component of HAART, alters adipocyte FA efflux, but the mechanism for this effect is not established. To investigate ritonavir-induced changes in FA flux and recycling through acylglycerols, we exposed differentiated murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes to ritonavir for 14 d. FA efflux, uptake, and incorporation into acylglycerols were measured. To identify a mediator of FA efflux, we measured adipocyte triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) transcript and protein. To determine whether ritonavir-treated adipocytes increased glycerol backbone synthesis for FA reesterification, we measured labeled glycerol and pyruvate incorporation into triacylglycerol (TAG). Ritonavir-treated cells had increased FA efflux, uptake, and incorporation into TAG (all P < 0.01). Ritonavir increased FA efflux without consistently increasing glycerol release or changing TAG mass, suggesting increased partial TAG hydrolysis. Ritonavir-treated adipocytes expressed significantly more ATGL mRNA (P < 0.05) and protein (P < 0.05). Ritonavir increased glycerol (P < 0.01) but not pyruvate (P = 0.41), utilization for TAG backbone synthesis. Consistent with this substrate utilization, glycerol kinase transcript (required for glycerol incorporation into TAG backbone) was up-regulated (P < 0.01), whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript (required for pyruvate utilization) was down-regulated (P < 0.001). In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, long-term ritonavir exposure perturbs FA metabolism by increasing ATGL-mediated partial TAG hydrolysis, thus increasing FA efflux, and leads to compensatory increases in FA reesterification with glycerol and acylglycerols. These changes in FA metabolism may, in part, explain the increased FA efflux observed in ritonavir-associated lipodystrophy.

  18. The DEAH-box protein PRP22 is an ATPase that mediates ATP-dependent mRNA release from the spliceosome and unwinds RNA duplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J D; Jankowsky, E; Company, M; Pyle, A M; Abelson, J N

    1998-01-01

    Of the proteins required for pre-mRNA splicing, at least four, the DEAH-box proteins, are closely related due to the presence of a central 'RNA helicase-like' region, and extended homology through a large portion of the protein. A major unresolved question is the function of these proteins. Indirect evidence suggests that several of these proteins are catalysts for important structural rearrangements in the spliceosome. However, the mechanism for the proposed alterations is presently unknown. We present evidence that PRP22, a DEAH-box protein required for mRNA release from the spliceosome, unwinds RNA duplexes in a concentration- and ATP-dependent manner. This demonstrates that PRP22 can modify RNA structure directly. We also show that the PRP22-dependent release of mRNA from the spliceosome is an ATP-dependent process and that recombinant PRP22 is an ATPase. Non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs did not substitute for ATP in the RNA-unwinding reaction, suggesting that ATP hydrolysis is required for this reaction. Specific mutation of a putative ATP phosphate-binding motif in the recombinant protein eliminated the ATPase and RNA-unwinding capacity. Significantly, these data suggest that the DEAH-box proteins act directly on RNA substrates within the spliceosome. PMID:9582286

  19. Time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of the Nucleotide-binding Domain from the ATP-binding Cassette Transporter MsbA

    PubMed Central

    Syberg, Falk; Suveyzdis, Yan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    MsbA is an essential Escherichia coli ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter involved in the flipping of lipid A across the cytoplasmic membrane. It is a close homologue of human P-glycoprotein involved in multidrug resistance, and it similarly accepts a variety of small hydrophobic xenobiotics as transport substrates. X-ray structures of three full-length ABC multidrug exporters (including MsbA) have been published recently and reveal large conformational changes during the transport cycle. However, how ATP hydrolysis couples to these conformational changes and finally the transport is still an open question. We employed time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy, a powerful method to elucidate molecular reaction mechanisms of soluble and membrane proteins, to address this question with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we monitored the hydrolysis reaction in the nucleotide-binding domain of MsbA at the atomic level. The isolated MsbA nucleotide-binding domain hydrolyzed ATP with Vmax = 45 nmol mg−1 min−1, similar to the full-length transporter. A Hill coefficient of 1.49 demonstrates positive cooperativity between the two catalytic sites formed upon dimerization. Global fit analysis of time-resolved FTIR data revealed two apparent rate constants of ∼1 and 0.01 s−1, which were assigned to formation of the catalytic site and hydrolysis, respectively. Using isotopically labeled ATP, we identified specific marker bands for protein-bound ATP (1245 cm−1), ADP (1101 and 1205 cm−1), and free phosphate (1078 cm−1). Cleavage of the β-phosphate–γ-phosphate bond was found to be the rate-limiting step; no protein-bound phosphate intermediate was resolved. PMID:22593573

  20. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  1. Evidence for the Synthesis of ATP by an F0F1 ATP Synthase in Membrane Vesicles from Halorubrum Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faguy, David; Lawson, Darion; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vesicles prepared in a buffer containing ADP, Mg(2+) and Pi synthesized ATP at an initial rate of 2 nmols/min/mg protein after acidification of the bulk medium (pH 8 (right arrow) 4). The intravesicular ATP concentration reached a steady state after about 30 seconds and slowly declined thereafter. ATP synthesis was inhibited by low concentrations of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and m-chlorophenylhydrazone indicating that synthesis took place in response to the proton gradient. NEM and PCMS, which inhibit vacuolar ATPases and the vacuolar-like ATPases of extreme halophiles, did not affect ATP synthesis, and, in fact, produced higher steady state levels of ATP. This suggested that two ATPase activities were present, one which catalyzed ATP synthesis and one that caused its hydrolysis. Azide, a specific inhibitor of F0F1 ATP Synthases, inhibited halobacterial ATP synthesis. The distribution of acridine orange as imposed by a delta pH demonstrated that azide inhibition was not due to the collapse of the proton gradient due to azide acting as a protonophore. Such an effect was observed, but only at azide concentrations higher than those that inhibited ATP synthesis. These results confirm the earler observations with cells of H. saccharovorum and other extreme halophiles that ATP synthesis is inconsistent with the operation of a vacuolar-like ATPase. Therefore, the observation that a vacuolar-like enzyme is responsible for ATP synthesis (and which serves as the basis for imputing ATP synthesis to the vacuolar-like ATPases of the extreme halophiles, and the Archaea in general) should be taken with some degree of caution.

  2. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain.

  3. Bulk hydrolysis and solid-liquid sorption of heavy metals in multi-component aqueous suspensions containing porous inorganic solids: are these mechanisms competitive or cooperative?

    PubMed

    Prelot, Benedicte; Einhorn, Valery; Marchandeau, Franck; Douillard, Jean-Marc; Zajac, Jerzy

    2012-11-15

    Fundamental aspects of the removal of heavy metals from aqueous streams under conditions of competition among the various species have been studied between pH 3 and 9 on Spherosil XO75LS, ordered mesoporous MCM-41 and MCF silicas, as well as a MCF sample grafted with (3-aminopropyl)methoxydimethylsilane (AMPS-MCF). Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II), or Sr(II) nitrate solutions were used to determine the percentage of metal uptake by each solid at 298 K as a function of the pH of the equilibrium solution, at an initial metal concentration of 0.0001 mol L(-1) and the ionic strength being fixed with 0.01 mol L(-1) NaNO(3). Almost complete retention of the heavy metals on the four solid samples was observed, with the process beginning at pH values smaller than those marking the onset of "bulk" precipitation of a given metal in "free" solution. The heavy metal-uptake mechanism was regarded as hydrolysis-like phenomenon in metal-containing solid suspensions. Weak adsorption of metal species from slightly acidic and neutral solutions was a kind of nucleation step. Adding cadmium to an equimolar solution containing cobalt, lead, or strontium showed no significant effect on the retention of the main metal component. This indicated the great independence of the retention mechanisms.

  4. Mechanisms of the inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of waste pulp fibers by calcium carbonate and the influence of nonionic surfactant for mitigation.

    PubMed

    Min, Byeong Cheol; Ramarao, Bandaru V

    2017-02-14

    Recycled paper mills produce large quantities of fibrous rejects and fines which are usually sent to landfills as solid waste. These cellulosic materials can be enzymatically hydrolyzed into sugars for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Paper mill wastes also contain large amounts of calcium carbonate which inhibits cellulase activity. The calcium carbonate (30%, w/w) decreased 40-60% of sugar yield of unbleached softwood kraft pulp. The prime mechanisms for this are by pH variation, competitive and non-productive binding, and aggregation effect. Addition of acetic acid (pH adjustment) increased the sugar production from 19 to 22 g/L of paper mill waste fibers. Strong affinity of enzyme-calcium carbonate decreased free enzyme in solution and hindered sugar production. Electrostatic and hydrogen bond interactions are mainly possible mechanism of enzyme-calcium carbonate adsorption. The application of the nonionic surfactant Tween 80 alleviated the non-productive binding of enzyme with the higher affinity on calcium carbonate. Dissociated calcium ion also inhibited the hydrolysis by aggregation of enzyme.

  5. Hydrolysis mechanisms of BNPP mediated by facial copper(II) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants: cooperation between the metal centers and the guanidine pendants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Liu, Xueping; Phillips, David Lee; Zhao, Cunyuan

    2016-01-28

    The hydrolysis mechanisms of DNA dinucleotide analogue BNPP(-) (bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed by mononuclear/dinuclear facial copper(ii) complexes bearing single alkyl guanidine pendants were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Active catalyst forms have been investigated and four different reaction modes are proposed accordingly. The [Cu2(L(1))2(μ-OH)](3+) (L(1) is 1-(2-guanidinoethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) complex features a strong μ-hydroxo mediated antiferromagnetic coupling between the bimetallic centers and the corresponding more stable open-shell singlet state. Three different reaction modes involving two catalysts and a substrate were proposed for L(1) entries and the mode 1 in which an inter-complex nucleophilic attack by a metal bound hydroxide was found to be more favorable. In the L(3)-involved reactions (L(3) is 1-(4-guanidinobutyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane), the reaction mode in which an in-plane intracomplex scissoring-like nucleophilic attack by a Cu(ii)-bound hydroxide was found to be more competitive. The protonated guanidine pendants in each proposed mechanism were found to play crucial roles in stabilizing the reaction structures via hydrogen bonds and in facilitating the departure of the leaving group via electrostatic attraction. The calculated results are consistent with the experimental observations that the Cu(ii)-L(3) complexes are hydrolytically more favorable than their L(1)-involved counterparts.

  6. Mechanism of peptide hydrolysis by co-catalytic metal centers containing leucine aminopeptidase enzyme: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Barman, Arghya; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Shanghao; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2012-02-01

    In this density functional theory study, reaction mechanisms of a co-catalytic binuclear metal center (Zn1-Zn2) containing enzyme leucine aminopeptidase for two different metal bridging nucleophiles (H(2)O and -OH) have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the substrate (L-leucine-p-nitroanilide → L-leucyl-p-anisidine) and metal (Zn1 → Mg and Zn2 → Co, i.e., Mg1-Zn2 and Mg1-Co2 variants) substitutions on the energetics of the mechanism have been investigated. The general acid/base mechanism utilizing a bicarbonate ion followed by this enzyme is divided into two steps: (1) the formation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and (2) the cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol, the mechanism utilizing a hydroxyl nucleophile was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 18.7 kcal/mol. The rate-limiting step for reaction with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide is the cleavage of the peptide bond with a barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol. However, for L-leucyl-p-anisidine all steps of the mechanism were found to occur with similar barriers (18.0-19.0 kcal/mol). For the metallovariants, cleavage of the peptide bond occurs in the rate-limiting step with barriers of 17.8, 18.0, and 24.2 kcal/mol for the Zn1-Zn2, Mg1-Zn2, and Mg1-Co2 enzymes, respectively. The nature of the metal ion was found to affect only the creation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and after that all three enzymes follow essentially the same energetics. The results reported in this study have elucidated specific roles of both metal centers, the nucleophile, indirect ligands, and substrates in the catalytic functioning of this important class of binuclear metallopeptidases.

  7. Vacuolar Transport of Abscisic Acid Glucosyl Ester Is Mediated by ATP-Binding Cassette and Proton-Antiport Mechanisms in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Bo; Pfrunder, Stefanie; Nagy, Réka; Francisco, Rita Maria; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key plant hormone involved in diverse physiological and developmental processes, including abiotic stress responses and the regulation of stomatal aperture and seed germination. Abscisic acid glucosyl ester (ABA-GE) is a hydrolyzable ABA conjugate that accumulates in the vacuole and presumably also in the endoplasmic reticulum. Deconjugation of ABA-GE by the endoplasmic reticulum and vacuolar β-glucosidases allows the rapid formation of free ABA in response to abiotic stress conditions such as dehydration and salt stress. ABA-GE further contributes to the maintenance of ABA homeostasis, as it is the major ABA catabolite exported from the cytosol. In this work, we identified that the import of ABA-GE into vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mesophyll cells is mediated by two distinct membrane transport mechanisms: proton gradient-driven and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Both systems have similar Km values of approximately 1 mm. According to our estimations, this low affinity appears nevertheless to be sufficient for the continuous vacuolar sequestration of ABA-GE produced in the cytosol. We further demonstrate that two tested multispecific vacuolar ABCC-type ABC transporters from Arabidopsis exhibit ABA-GE transport activity when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which also supports the involvement of ABC transporters in ABA-GE uptake. Our findings suggest that the vacuolar ABA-GE uptake is not mediated by specific, but rather by several, possibly multispecific, transporters that are involved in the general vacuolar sequestration of conjugated metabolites. PMID:24028845

  8. ATP Sensitive Potassium Channels in the Skeletal Muscle Function: Involvement of the KCNJ11(Kir6.2) Gene in the Determination of Mechanical Warner Bratzer Shear Force

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Domenico; Selvaggi, Maria; Passantino, Giuseppe; De Palo, Pasquale; Dario, Cataldo; Centoducati, Pasquale; Tateo, Alessandra; Curci, Angela; Maqoud, Fatima; Mele, Antonietta; Camerino, Giulia M.; Liantonio, Antonella; Imbrici, Paola; Zizzo, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+-channels (KATP) are distributed in the tissues coupling metabolism with K+ ions efflux. KATP subunits are encoded by KCNJ8 (Kir6.1), KCNJ11 (Kir6.2), ABCC8 (SUR1), and ABCC9 (SUR2) genes, alternative RNA splicing give rise to SUR variants that confer distinct physiological properties on the channel. An high expression/activity of the sarco-KATP channel is observed in various rat fast-twitch muscles, characterized by elevated muscle strength, while a low expression/activity is observed in the slow-twitch muscles characterized by reduced strength and frailty. Down-regulation of the KATP subunits of fast-twitch fibers is found in conditions characterized by weakness and frailty. KCNJ11 gene knockout mice have reduced glycogen, lean phenotype, lower body fat, and weakness. KATP channel is also a sensor of muscle atrophy. The KCNJ11 gene is located on BTA15, close to a QTL for meat tenderness, it has also a role in glycogen storage, a key mechanism of the postmortem transformation of muscle into meat. The role of KCNJ11 gene in muscle function may underlie an effect of KCNJ11 genotypes on meat tenderness, as recently reported. The fiber phenotype and genotype are important in livestock production science. Quantitative traits including meat production and quality are influenced both by environment and genes. Molecular markers can play an important role in the genetic improvement of animals through breeding strategies. Many factors influence the muscle Warner-Bratzler shear force including breed, age, feeding, the biochemical, and functional parameters. The role of KCNJ11gene and related genes on muscle tenderness will be discussed in the present review. PMID:27242541

  9. In Vitro Reassembly of the Ribose ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Reveals a Distinct Set of Transport Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Matthew C.; Simon, Michael J.; Erramilli, Satchal K.; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg2+. We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg2+, and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg2+; and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters. PMID:25533465

  10. Continuous intravenous infusion of ATP in humans yields large expansions of erythrocyte ATP pools but extracellular ATP pools are elevated only at the start followed by rapid declines.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Eliezer; Salikhova, Anna; Abraham, Edward H

    2015-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was investigated in a clinical trial that included 15 patients with advanced malignancies (solid tumors). ATP was administered by continuous intravenous infusions of 8 h once weekly for 8 weeks. Three values of blood ATP levels were determined. These were total blood (erythrocyte) and blood plasma (extracellular) ATP pools along with the initial rate of release of ATP into the blood plasma. We found that values related to erythrocyte ATP pools showed great variability (diversity) among individuals (standard deviation of about 30-40% of mean at baseline). It was discovered that erythrocyte baseline ATP pool sizes are unique to each individual and that they fall within a narrow range in each individual. At the end of an 8 h continuous intravenous infusion of ATP, intracellular erythrocyte ATP pools were increased in the range of 40-60% and extracellular ATP declined from elevated levels achieved at the beginning and middle of the infusion, to baseline levels. The ability of erythrocytes to sequester exogenously administered ATP to this degree, after its initial conversion to adenosine in the blood plasma is unexpected, considering that some of the adenosine is likely to have been degraded by in vivo catabolic activities or taken up by organs. The data suggest that administration of ATP by short-term intravenous infusions, of up to 4 h, may be a favorable way for elevating extracellular ATP pools. A large fraction of the total exogenously administered ATP is sequestered into the intracellular compartments of the erythrocytes after an 8 h intravenous infusion. Erythrocytes loaded with ATP are known to release their ATP pools by the application of previously established agents or conditions applied locally or globally to circulating erythrocytes. Rapid degradation of intravenously administered ATP to adenosine and subsequent accumulation of ATP inside erythrocytes indicate the existence of very effective mechanisms

  11. Customized ATP towpreg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  12. The effect of harvest time, dry matter content and mechanical pretreatments on anaerobic digestion and enzymatic hydrolysis of miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Frydendal-Nielsen, Susanne; Hjorth, Maibritt; Baby, Sanmohan; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Uffe; Gislum, René

    2016-10-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus was harvested as both green and mature biomass and the dry matter content of the driest harvest was artificially decreased by adding water in two subsamples, giving a total of five dry matter contents. All five biomass types were mechanically pretreated by roller-milling, extrusion or grinding and accumulated methane production and enzymatically-accessible sugars were measured. Accumulated methane production was studied using sigmoid curves that allowed comparison among the treatments of the rate of the methane production and ultimate methane yield. The green biomass gave the highest methane yield and highest levels of enzymatically-accessible cellulose. The driest biomass gave the best effect from extrusion but with the highest energy consumption, whereas roller-milling was most efficient on wet biomass. The addition of water to the last harvest improved the effect of roller-milling and equalled extrusion of the samples in efficiency.

  13. Study on the supramolecular multirecognition mechanism of beta-naphthol/beta-cyclodextrin/anionic surfactant in a tolnaftate hydrolysis system.

    PubMed

    Bo, Tang; Xu, Wang; Jing, Wang; Chengguang, Yu; Zhenzhen, Chen; Yi, Ding

    2006-05-04

    Based on the fact that tolnaftate degrade to beta-naphthol sodium (RONa) at 5.00 mol/L NaOH solution and RO(-) was protonated to ROH after being acidified and adjusted to the pH 4.50 by acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer solution, we studied and discussed the mechanism of the supramolecular multirecognition interaction among the anionic surfactants sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), and beta-naphthol (ROH) by means of fluorescence spectrum, surface tension of the solution, infrared spectrograms, and (1)HNMR spectroscopy. The apparent formation constant of the ternary inclusion complex was determined to be (5.48 +/- 0.13) x 10(3) L(2)/mol(2). The thermodynamic parameters (DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, DeltaS degrees ) for the formation of the inclusion complexes were obtained from the van't Hoff equation. It was indicated that the multiple and synergistic protection effect of SLS and beta-CD on the excited singlet state ROH played very important roles in the enhancement of the fluorescence of ROH. Results showed that, at room temperature, the naphthalene ring of ROH and the hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain of SLS were included into the cavity of beta-CD to form a ROH/SLS/beta-CD ternary inclusion complex with stoichiometry of 1:1:1, which provided effective protection for the excited state of ROH and increased the fluorescent intensity of ROH obviously.

  14. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C.; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.; Damschroder, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  15. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p.

    PubMed

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-03-15

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the monomer. Affinity purification of tagged Smt1p followed by reverse transcription of the associated RNA and PCR amplification of the resultant cDNA with gene-specific primers demonstrated the presence in mitochondria of Smt1p-ATP8/ATP6 and Smt1p-COB mRNA complexes. These results indicate that Smt1p is likely to be involved in translational regulation of both mRNAs. Applying Occam's principle, we favor a mechanistic model in which translation of the ATP8/ATP6 bicistronic mRNA is coupled to the availability of F1 for subsequent assembly of the Atp6p and Atp8p products into the ATP synthase. The mechanism of this regulatory pathway is proposed to entail a displacement of the repressor from the translationally mute Smt1-ATP8/ATP6 complex by F1, thereby permitting the Atp22p activator to interact with and promote translation of the mRNA.

  16. The structural domains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase cooperate in substrate hydrolysis: 3D structure and enzymatic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Infantes, Lourdes; Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Beassoni, Paola Rita; Boetsch, Cristhian; Lisa, Angela Teresita; Domenech, Carlos Eduardo; Albert, Armando

    2012-11-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen. It colonizes different tissues by the utilization of diverse mechanisms. One of these may involve the breakdown of the host cell membrane through the sequential action of hemolytic phospholipase C and phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP). The action of hemolytic phospholipase C on phosphatidylcholine produces phosphorylcholine, which is hydrolyzed to choline (Cho) and inorganic phosphate by PchP. The available biochemical data on this enzyme demonstrate the involvement of two Cho-binding sites in the catalytic cycle and in enzyme regulation. The crystal structure of P. aeruginosa PchP has been determined. It folds into three structural domains. The first domain harbors all the residues involved in catalysis and is well conserved among the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily of proteins. The second domain is characteristic of PchP and is involved in the recognition of the Cho moiety of the substrate. The third domain stabilizes the relative position of the other two. Fortuitously, the crystal structure of PchP captures molecules of Bistris (2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol) at the active site and at an additional site. This represents two catalytically relevant complexes with just one or two inhibitory Bistris molecules and provides the basis of the PchP function and regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis along with biochemical experiments corroborates the structural observations and demonstrates the interplay between different sites for Cho recognition and inhibition. The structural comparison of PchP with other phosphatases of the haloacid dehalogenase family provides a three-dimensional picture of the conserved catalytic cycle and the structural basis for the recognition of the diverse substrate molecules.

  17. The hydrolysis of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoagland, P. D.; Fox, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal polymerization of aspartic acid produces a polysuccinimide (I), a chain of aspartoyl residues. An investigation was made of the alkaline hydrolysis of the imide rings of (I) which converts the polyimide to a polypeptide. The alkaline hydrolysis of polyimides can be expected to be kinetically complex due to increasing negative charge generated by carboxylate groups. For this reason, a diimide, phthaloyl-DL-aspartoyl-beta-alanine (IIA) was synthesized for a progressive study of the hydrolysis of polyimides. In addition, this diimide (IIA) can be related to thalidomide and might be expected to exhibit similar reactivity during hydrolysis of the phthalimide ring.

  18. Electrophysiology of autonomic neuromuscular transmission involving ATP.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, P

    2000-07-03

    Electrophysiological investigations of autonomic neuromuscular transmission have provided great insights into the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter. Burnstock and Holman made the first recordings of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) produced by sympathetic nerves innervating the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. This led to the identification of ATP as the mediator of e.j.p.s in this tissue, where ATP acts as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline. The e.j.p.s are mediated solely by ATP acting on P2X(1) receptors leading to action potentials and a rapid phasic contraction, whilst noradrenaline mediates a slower, tonic contraction which is not dependent on membrane depolarisation. Subsequent electrophysiological studies of the autonomic innervation of smooth muscles of the urogenital, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems have revealed a similar pattern of response, where ATP mediates a fast electrical and mechanical response, whilst another transmitter such as noradrenaline, acetylcholine, nitric oxide or a peptide mediates a slower response. The modulation of junction potentials by a variety of pre-junctional receptors and the mechanism of inactivation of ATP as a neurotransmitter will also be described.

  19. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  20. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the Fe-S cluster of spinach ferredoxin. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Fujita, Yuichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of ({sup 35}S)sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. ({sup 35}S)Sulfide was liberated from ({sup 35}S)cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of ({sup 35}S)cysteine occurred before the formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in ({sup 35}S)sulfide was greater than that in {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) inhibited competitively formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of ({sup 35}S)sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation are discussed.

  1. [Protective effect of tiacalix[4]arene-tetrasulphonate on heavy metal inhibition of myometrium myosin subfragment-1 ATP-hydrolase activity].

    PubMed

    Labyntseva, R D; Bevza, O V; Bevza, A A; Liul'ko, A O; Kharchenko, S H; Kal'chenko, V I; Kosterin, S O

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals have a negative effect on the contractility of uterine smooth muscles (myometrium), these effects can lead to various pathologies of a women reproductive system. To overcome these effects the methods for correcting the myometrium contractile activity are to be developed. Catalyzed by myosin ATPase ATP hydrolysis is the most important reaction in the molecular mechanism of myometrium contraction. We have found an inhibitory effect of 0.03-0.3 mM Ni2+, Pb2+ and Cd2+ on enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP by myosin subfragment-1 obtained from swine uterine smooth muscles. We have demonstrated that 100 μM thiacalix[4]arene-tetrasulphonate (C-798) recovered to the control level of ATPase activity of myosin subfragment-1 in the presence of heavy metal cations. One of the most probable mechanisms of C-798 corrective activity is based on its ability to chelate heavy metals, thus cations Pb, Cd and Ni can be removed from the incubation medium. Computer simulation has demonstrated that the protective effect of C-798 may also be the result of weakening the interaction of heavy metal ions with amino acid residues of the myosin molecule near the active site of ATP hydrolase. The obtained results can be used for further research aimed at assessing the prospects of thiacalix[4]arene-tetrasulfonate as pharmacological compounds.

  2. Phosphoester Hydrolysis and Intramolecular Transesterification of Ribonucleoside 2'- and 3'-Phosphoromonothioate Triesters: Kinetics and Mechanisms for the Reactions of 5'-O-Methyluridine 2'- and 3'-Dimethylphosphoromonothioates.

    PubMed

    Ora, Mikko; Oivanen, Mikko; Lönnberg, Harri

    1997-05-16

    The hydrolytic reactions of the monothioate analogs of 5'-O-methyluridine 2'- and 3'-dimethylphosphates have been followed over a wide acidity range, H(0) = -1.7 ([HCl] = 5 mol L(-)(1)) to pH 9. Two reactions were found to compete: mutual interconversion of the 2'- and 3'-isomers and phosphoester hydrolysis to a mixture of phosphorothioate diesters, viz., the R(P) and S(P) diastereomers of 2',3'-cyclic thiophosphate and 2'/3'-monomethylthiophosphates (i.e., three pairs of diastereomers). No marked desulfurization could be observed. The interconversion and hydrolysis both show first-order dependence of rate on acidity at pH < 0, the isomerization being 3-4 times as fast as the phosphoester hydrolysis. Under less acidic conditions, the hydrolysis remains pH-independent up to pH 7, while the isomerization becomes hydroxide-ion-catalyzed (first-order in [OH(-)]) already at pH 2. The hydrolysis is susceptible to general base catalysis in carboxylic acid buffers, the Brönsted beta value being 0.8. In contrast, no conclusive evidence for buffer-catalyzed isomerization could be obtained. All these reactions are suggested to proceed via a pentacoordinated thiophosphorane intermediate, obtained at pH < 1 by an attack of the neighboring hydroxy function on a protonated (monocationic) thiophosphate group and at pH > 2 by an attack of a deprotonated hydroxy function (oxyanion) on a neutral thiophosphate. The monocationic intermediate (pH < 1) may collapse to hydrolysis and isomerization products without further catalysis (departure of alcohol). The monoanionic thiophosphorane (pH > 2) also gives isomerization products without catalysis (departure of 2'/3'-oxyanion), whereas breakdown to the hydrolysis products needs either a specific or a general acid catalysis process (departure of methanol). Accordingly, the observed general-base-catalyzed hydrolysis most likely consists of consecutive specific base/general acid catalysis. The phosphorothioate triesters studied are, under

  3. Mechanism of nucleotide sensing in group II chaperonins

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose H; Ralston, Corie Y; Douglas, Nicholai R; Kumar, Ramya; Lopez, Tom; McAndrew, Ryan P; Knee, Kelly M; King, Jonathan A; Frydman, Judith; Adams, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    Group II chaperonins mediate protein folding in an ATP-dependent manner in eukaryotes and archaea. The binding of ATP and subsequent hydrolysis promotes the closure of the multi-subunit rings where protein folding occurs. The mechanism by which local changes in the nucleotide-binding site are communicated between individual subunits is unknown. The crystal structure of the archaeal chaperonin from Methanococcus maripaludis in several nucleotides bound states reveals the local conformational changes associated with ATP hydrolysis. Residue Lys-161, which is extremely conserved among group II chaperonins, forms interactions with the γ-phosphate of ATP but shows a different orientation in the presence of ADP. The loss of the ATP γ-phosphate interaction with Lys-161 in the ADP state promotes a significant rearrangement of a loop consisting of residues 160–169. We propose that Lys-161 functions as an ATP sensor and that 160–169 constitutes a nucleotide-sensing loop (NSL) that monitors the presence of the γ-phosphate. Functional analysis using NSL mutants shows a significant decrease in ATPase activity, suggesting that the NSL is involved in timing of the protein folding cycle. PMID:22193720

  4. Family 46 Carbohydrate-binding Modules Contribute to the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Xyloglucan and β-1,3–1,4-Glucans through Distinct Mechanisms*♦

    PubMed Central

    Venditto, Immacolata; Najmudin, Shabir; Luís, Ana S.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Sakka, Kazuo; Knox, J. Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Structural carbohydrates comprise an extraordinary source of energy that remains poorly utilized by the biofuel sector as enzymes have restricted access to their substrates within the intricacy of plant cell walls. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZYmes) that target recalcitrant polysaccharides are modular enzymes containing noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that direct enzymes to their cognate substrate, thus potentiating catalysis. In general, CBMs are functionally and structurally autonomous from their associated catalytic domains from which they are separated through flexible linker sequences. Here, we show that a C-terminal CBM46 derived from BhCel5B, a Bacillus halodurans endoglucanase, does not interact with β-glucans independently but, uniquely, acts cooperatively with the catalytic domain of the enzyme in substrate recognition. The structure of BhCBM46 revealed a β-sandwich fold that abuts onto the region of the substrate binding cleft upstream of the active site. BhCBM46 as a discrete entity is unable to bind to β-glucans. Removal of BhCBM46 from BhCel5B, however, abrogates binding to β-1,3–1,4-glucans while substantially decreasing the affinity for decorated β-1,4-glucan homopolymers such as xyloglucan. The CBM46 was shown to contribute to xyloglucan hydrolysis only in the context of intact plant cell walls, but it potentiates enzymatic activity against purified β-1,3–1,4-glucans in solution or within the cell wall. This report reveals the mechanism by which a CBM can promote enzyme activity through direct interaction with the substrate or by targeting regions of the plant cell wall where the target glucan is abundant. PMID:25713075

  5. Family 46 Carbohydrate-binding Modules Contribute to the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Xyloglucan and β-1,3-1,4-Glucans through Distinct Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Venditto, Immacolata; Najmudin, Shabir; Luís, Ana S; Ferreira, Luís M A; Sakka, Kazuo; Knox, J Paul; Gilbert, Harry J; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2015-04-24

    Structural carbohydrates comprise an extraordinary source of energy that remains poorly utilized by the biofuel sector as enzymes have restricted access to their substrates within the intricacy of plant cell walls. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZYmes) that target recalcitrant polysaccharides are modular enzymes containing noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that direct enzymes to their cognate substrate, thus potentiating catalysis. In general, CBMs are functionally and structurally autonomous from their associated catalytic domains from which they are separated through flexible linker sequences. Here, we show that a C-terminal CBM46 derived from BhCel5B, a Bacillus halodurans endoglucanase, does not interact with β-glucans independently but, uniquely, acts cooperatively with the catalytic domain of the enzyme in substrate recognition. The structure of BhCBM46 revealed a β-sandwich fold that abuts onto the region of the substrate binding cleft upstream of the active site. BhCBM46 as a discrete entity is unable to bind to β-glucans. Removal of BhCBM46 from BhCel5B, however, abrogates binding to β-1,3-1,4-glucans while substantially decreasing the affinity for decorated β-1,4-glucan homopolymers such as xyloglucan. The CBM46 was shown to contribute to xyloglucan hydrolysis only in the context of intact plant cell walls, but it potentiates enzymatic activity against purified β-1,3-1,4-glucans in solution or within the cell wall. This report reveals the mechanism by which a CBM can promote enzyme activity through direct interaction with the substrate or by targeting regions of the plant cell wall where the target glucan is abundant.

  6. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  7. Mechanisms of nicotine-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating in young adults: roles for KCa, KATP, and KV channels, nitric oxide, and prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Louie, Jeffrey C; McNeely, Brendan D; Amano, Tatsuro; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-01-10

    We evaluated the influence of K+ channels [i.e., Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa), ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP), and voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels] and key enzymes [(nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)] on nicotine-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Using intradermal microdialysis, we evaluated forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate in two separate protocols. In protocol 1 (n=10), four separate sites were infused with 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 50mM tetraethylammonium (KCa channel blocker), 3) 5mM glybenclamide (KATP channel blocker), and 4) 10mM 4-aminopyridine (KV channel blocker). In protocol 2 (n=10), four sites were infused with 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 10mM Nω-nitro-L-arginine (NOS inhibitor), 3) 10mM ketorolac (COX inhibitor), or 4) a combination of NOS+COX inhibitors. At all sites, nicotine was infused in a dose-dependent manner (1.2, 3.6, 11, 33, and 100mM; each for 25 min). Nicotine-induced increase in CVC was attenuated by the KCa, KATP, and KV channel blockers, whereas nicotine-induced increase in sweat rate was reduced by the KCa and KV channel blockers (P≤0.05). COX inhibitor augmented nicotine-induced increase in CVC (P≤0.05), which was absent when NOS inhibitor was co-administered (P>0.05). In addition, our secondrary experiment (n=7) demonstrated that muscarinic receptor blockade with 58μM atropine sulfate salt monohydrate abolished nicotine-induced increases in CVC (1.2-11mM) and sweating (all doses). We show that under a normothermic resting state: 1) KCa, KATP, and KV channels contribute to nicotinic cutaneous vasodilation, 2) inhibition of COX augments nicotinic cutaneous vasodilation likely through NOS-dependent mechanism(s), and 3) KCa and K

  8. Fungal ammonia fermentation, a novel metabolic mechanism that couples the dissimilatory and assimilatory pathways of both nitrate and ethanol. Role of acetyl CoA synthetase in anaerobic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Kazuto; Shoun, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takeo, Kanji; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2004-03-26

    Fungal ammonia fermentation is a novel dissimilatory metabolic mechanism that supplies energy under anoxic conditions. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum reduces nitrate to ammonium and simultaneously oxidizes ethanol to acetate to generate ATP (Zhou, Z., Takaya, N., Nakamura, A., Yamaguchi, M., Takeo, K., and Shoun, H. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 1892-1896). We identified the Aspergillus nidulans genes involved in ammonia fermentation by analyzing fungal mutants. The results showed that assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases (the gene products of niaD and niiA) were essential for reducing nitrate and for anaerobic cell growth during ammonia fermentation. We also found that ethanol oxidation is coupled with nitrate reduction and catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, and acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs). This is similar to the mechanism suggested in F. oxysporum except A. nidulans uses Acs to produce ATP instead of the ADP-dependent acetate kinase of F. oxysporum. The production of Acs requires a functional facA gene that encodes Acs and that is involved in ethanol assimilation and other metabolic processes. We purified the gene product of facA (FacA) from the fungus to show that the fungus acetylates FacA on its lysine residue(s) specifically under conditions of ammonia fermentation to regulate its substrate affinity. Acetylated FacA had higher affinity for acetyl-CoA than for acetate, whereas non-acetylated FacA had more affinity for acetate. Thus, the acetylated variant of the FacA protein is responsible for ATP synthesis during fungal ammonia fermentation. These results showed that the fungus ferments ammonium via coupled dissimilatory and assimilatory mechanisms.

  9. Copper binding triggers compaction in N-terminal tail of human copper pump ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Tanumoy; Åden, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-02-12

    Protein conformational changes are fundamental to biological reactions. For copper ion transport, the multi-domain protein ATP7B in the Golgi network receives copper from the cytoplasmic copper chaperone Atox1 and, with energy from ATP hydrolysis, moves the metal to the lumen for loading of copper-dependent enzymes. Although anticipated, conformational changes involved in ATP7B's functional cycle remain elusive. Using spectroscopic methods we here demonstrate that the four most N-terminal metal-binding domains in ATP7B, upon stoichiometric copper addition, adopt a more compact arrangement which has a higher thermal stability than in the absence of copper. In contrast to previous reports, no stable complex was found in solution between the metal-binding domains and the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B. Metal-dependent movement of the first four metal-binding domains in ATP7B may be a trigger that initiates the overall catalytic cycle.

  10. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Estelita Pereira; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Rolim, Modesto Leite

    2014-01-01

    The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM). The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM), which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated.

  11. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenhagen, Jason Alan

    2003-01-01

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca2+ imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca2+ signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K+ and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol

  12. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  13. Medium-chain versus long-chain triacylglycerol emulsion hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase: Implications for the mechanisms of lipase action

    SciTech Connect

    Deckelbaum, R.J. ); Hamilton, J.A.; Butbul, E.; Gutman, A. ); Moser, A. ); Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.; Olivecrona, T. ); Carpentier, Y.A. )

    1990-02-06

    To explore how enzyme affinities and enzyme activities regulate hydrolysis of water-insoluble substrates, the authors compared hydrolysis of phospholipid-stabilized emulsions of medium-chain (MCT) versus long-chain triacylglycerols (LCT). Because substrate solubility at the emulsion surface might modulate rates of hydrolysis, the ability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine to solubilize MCT was examined by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift measurements showed that 11 mol % of ({sup 13}C)carbonyl enriched trioctanoin was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles as a surface component. Line widths of trioctanoin surface peaks were half that of LCT, and relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were also shorter for trioctanoin, showing greater mobility for MCT in phospholipid. In assessing the effects of these differences in solubility on lipolysis, they found that both purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase and human hepatic lipase hydrolyzed MCT at rates at least 2-fold higher than for LCT. Differences in affinity were also demonstrated in mixed incubations where increasing amounts of LCT emulsion resulted in decreased hydrolysis of MCT emulsions. These results suggest that despite lower enzyme affinity for MCT emulsions, shorter chain triacylglycerols are more readily hydrolyzed by lipoprotein and hepatic lipases than long-chain triacylglycerols because of greater MCT solubility and mobility at the emulsion-water interface.

  14. Uncoupling nitrogenase: catalytic reduction of hydrazine to ammonia by a MoFe protein in the absence of Fe protein-ATP.

    PubMed

    Danyal, Karamatullah; Inglet, Boyd S; Vincent, Kylie A; Barney, Brett M; Hoffman, Brian M; Armstrong, Fraser A; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2010-09-29

    The catalytic reduction of hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) to ammonia by a β-98(Tyr→His) MoFe protein in the absence of the Fe protein or ATP is reported. The reduction of N(2) or other substrates (e.g., hydrazine, protons, acetylene) by nitrogenase normally requires the transient association of the two nitrogenase component proteins, the Fe protein and the MoFe protein. The Fe protein, with two bound MgATP molecules, transfers one electron to the MoFe protein during each association, coupled to the hydrolysis of two MgATP. All substrate reduction reactions catalyzed by nitrogenase require delivery of electrons by the Fe protein coupled to the hydrolysis of MgATP. We report that when a single amino acid within the MoFe protein (β-98(Tyr)) is substituted by His, the resulting MoFe protein supports catalytic reduction of the nitrogenous substrate hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) to two ammonia molecules when provided with a low potential reductant, polyaminocarboxylate ligated Eu(II) (E(m) -1.1 V vs NHE). The wild-type and a number of other MoFe proteins with amino acid substitutions do not show significant rates of hydrazine reduction under these conditions, whereas the β-98(His) MoFe protein catalyzes hydrazine reduction at rates up to 170 nmol NH(3)/min/mg MoFe protein. This rate of hydrazine reduction is 94% of the rate catalyzed by the β-98(His) or wild-type MoFe protein when combined with the Fe protein, ATP, and reductant under comparable conditions. The β-98(His) MoFe protein reduction of hydrazine in the absence of the Fe protein showed saturation kinetics for the concentration of reductant and substrate. The implications of these results in understanding the nitrogenase mechanism are discussed.

  15. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO4 (2-)), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO4 (2-)-activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5(')-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S(2-)) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes.

  16. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  17. Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    Activities in this project are aimed at overcoming barriers associated with high capital and operating costs and sub-optimal sugar yields resulting from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

  18. The ATP hydrolyzing transcription activator phage shock protein F of Escherichia coli: identifying a surface that binds sigma 54.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Patricia; Wigneshweraraj, Siva R; Schumacher, Jörg; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chaney, Matthew; Buck, Martin

    2003-03-04

    Members of the protein family called ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA(+)) play a crucial role in transforming chemical energy into biological events. AAA(+) proteins are complex molecular machines and typically form ring-shaped oligomeric complexes that are crucial for ATPase activity and mechanism of action. The Escherichia coli transcription activator phage shock protein F (PspF) is an AAA(+) mechanochemical enzyme that functions to sense and relay the energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to catalyze transcription by the sigma(54)-RNA polymerase. Closed promoter complexes formed by the sigma(54)-RNA polymerase are substrates for the action of PspF. By using a protein fragmentation approach, we identify here at least one sigma(54)-binding surface in the PspF AAA(+) domain. Results suggest that ATP hydrolysis by PspF is coupled to the exposure of at least one sigma(54)-binding surface. This nucleotide hydrolysis-dependent presentation of a substrate binding surface can explain why complexes that form between sigma(54) and PspF are transient and could be part of a mechanism used generally by other AAA(+) proteins to regulate activity.

  19. Curtains for ATP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The administration's efforts to keep various technology-transfer programs afloat in the budget process appear to be stalled. House Science Committee chair Robert Walker (R-Pa.) advised in early April that the Republican agenda for the pending budget process entails zeroing out the Commerce Department's Advanced Technology Program (ATP), which was funded at 431 million in fiscal year 1995. The ATP would lose about 90 million from its FY 95 budget. Although Walker says that the Republican leadership has no intention to dictate to the subcommittees how cuts should be made, they will be held to the "fairly severe caps" established by the House Budget Committee. In other words, Walker says, if ATP stays, something else will have to go in its place. In addition, a bill to rescind about 223 million from the FY 1995 budget of the Technology Reinvestment Project and another 77 million from TRP's FY 1994 budget, which has not been spent, is heading for the president's signature. Yet Walker says while he supports the merits of technology transfer, "the question is do you have to create government programs to get the technology out?"

  20. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, Howard G. . E-mail: shertzhg@ucmail.uc.edu; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2006-12-15

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels.

  1. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    PubMed Central

    Shertzer, Howard G.; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner-membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly-synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox-cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels. PMID:17109908

  2. DMR (deacetylation and mechanical refining) processing of corn stover achieves high monomeric sugar concentrations (230 g L-1) during enzymatic hydrolysis and high ethanol concentrations (>10% v/v) during fermentation without hydrolysate purification or concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaowen; Kuhn, Erik; Jennings, Edward W.; Nelson, Robert; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Min; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2016-04-01

    Distilling and purifying ethanol and other products from second generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating costs to biofuel production. The energy usage associated with distillation negatively affects plant gate costs and causes environmental and life-cycle impacts, and the lower titers in fermentation caused by lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis increase energy and water usage and ethanol production costs. In addition, lower ethanol titers increase the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels increase capital expenditure (CAPEX). Therefore, increasing biofuel titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuel production for several decades. In this work, we achieved approximately 230 g L-1 of monomeric sugars after high solid enzymatic hydrolysis using deacetylation and mechanical refining (DMR) processed corn stover substrates produced at the 100 kg per day scale. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations achieved by the DMR process allowed fermentation to ethanol with titers as high as 86 g L-1, which translates into approximately 10.9% v/v ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that titers greater than 10% v/v ethanol in fermentations derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps have been reported. As a result, the potential cost savings from high sugar and ethanol titers achieved by the DMR process are also reported using TEA analysis.

  3. DMR (deacetylation and mechanical refining) processing of corn stover achieves high monomeric sugar concentrations (230 g L-1) during enzymatic hydrolysis and high ethanol concentrations (>10% v/v) during fermentation without hydrolysate purification or concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xiaowen; Kuhn, Erik; Jennings, Edward W.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Distilling and purifying ethanol and other products from second generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating costs to biofuel production. The energy usage associated with distillation negatively affects plant gate costs and causes environmental and life-cycle impacts, and the lower titers in fermentation caused by lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis increase energy and water usage and ethanol production costs. In addition, lower ethanol titers increase the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels increase capital expenditure (CAPEX). Therefore, increasing biofuel titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuel production for several decades. In thismore » work, we achieved approximately 230 g L-1 of monomeric sugars after high solid enzymatic hydrolysis using deacetylation and mechanical refining (DMR) processed corn stover substrates produced at the 100 kg per day scale. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations achieved by the DMR process allowed fermentation to ethanol with titers as high as 86 g L-1, which translates into approximately 10.9% v/v ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that titers greater than 10% v/v ethanol in fermentations derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps have been reported. As a result, the potential cost savings from high sugar and ethanol titers achieved by the DMR process are also reported using TEA analysis.« less

  4. ATP binding by NLRP7 is required for inflammasome activation in response to bacterial lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; Khare, Sonal; Chu, Lan H; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in innate immune responses. NLRs encode a central nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) consisting of the NAIP, CIITA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain and the NACHT associated domain (NAD), which facilitates receptor oligomerization and downstream inflammasome signaling. The NBD contains highly conserved regions, known as Walker motifs, that are required for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. The NLR containing a PYRIN domain (PYD) 7 (NLRP7) has been recently shown to assemble an ASC and caspase-1-containing high molecular weight inflammasome complex in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides and Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for NLRP7 inflammasome activation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate that the NBD of NLRP7 is an ATP binding domain and has ATPase activity. We further show that an intact nucleotide-binding Walker A motif is required for NBD-mediated nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, oligomerization, and NLRP7 inflammasome formation and activity. Accordingly, THP-1 cells expressing a mutated Walker A motif display defective NLRP7 inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1β release and pyroptosis in response to acylated lipopeptides and S. aureus infection. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanism of NLRP7 inflammasome assembly.

  5. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes. Final report, June 1, 1978-January 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes (e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C/sub 1/) and cellobiase) comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The enzymes exhibited different mode of actions in respect to the hydrolysis of cellulose and cellulose derived oligosaccharides. In combination, these enzymes complimented each other to hydrolyze cellulose to its basic constituent, glucose. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was subjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C/sub 1/) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x/) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo- and endo-glucanases are co-induced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes. The multiplicity of cellulase enzymes are the end results of post-translational modification during and/or after the secretion of enzymes into growth environment.

  6. Conformational Transitions of Subunit ɛ in ATP Synthase from Thermophilic Bacillus PS3

    PubMed Central

    Feniouk, Boris A.; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Masasuke; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Subunit ɛ of bacterial and chloroplast FOF1-ATP synthase is responsible for inhibition of ATPase activity. In Bacillus PS3 enzyme, subunit ɛ can adopt two conformations. In the “extended”, inhibitory conformation, its two C-terminal α-helices are stretched along subunit γ. In the “contracted”, noninhibitory conformation, these helices form a hairpin. The transition of subunit ɛ from an extended to a contracted state was studied in ATP synthase incorporated in Bacillus PS3 membranes at 59°C. Fluorescence energy resonance transfer between fluorophores introduced in the C-terminus of subunit ɛ and in the N-terminus of subunit γ was used to follow the conformational transition in real time. It was found that ATP induced the conformational transition from the extended to the contracted state (half-maximum transition extent at 140 μM ATP). ADP could neither prevent nor reverse the ATP-induced conformational change, but it did slow it down. Acid residues in the DELSEED region of subunit β were found to stabilize the extended conformation of ɛ. Binding of ATP directly to ɛ was not essential for the ATP-induced conformational change. The ATP concentration necessary for the half-maximal transition (140 μM) suggests that subunit ɛ probably adopts the extended state and strongly inhibits ATP hydrolysis only when the intracellular ATP level drops significantly below the normal value. PMID:20141757

  7. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  8. Mechanism(s) of SWI/SNF-induced nucleosome mobilization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Balliano, Angela; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-24

    Impediments to DNA access due to assembly of the eukaryotic genome into chromatin are in part overcome by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. These complexes employ energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to destabilize histone-DNA interactions and alter nucleosome positions, thereby increasing the accessibility of DNA-binding factors to their targets. However, the mechanism by which theses complexes accomplish this task remains unresolved. We review aspects of nucleosome alteration by the SWI/SNF complex, the archetypal remodeling enzyme. We focus on experiments that provide insights into how SWI/SNF induces nucleosome movement along DNA. Numerous biochemical activities have been characterized for this complex, all likely providing clues as to the molecular mechanism of translocation.

  9. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  10. Template Supercoiling during ATP-Dependent DNA Helix Tracking: Studies with Simian Virus 40 Large Tumor Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Jessee, C. Bret; Lau, Kawai; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Leroy F.

    1989-08-01

    Incubation of topologically relaxed plasmid DNA with simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (T antigen), ATP, and eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I resulted in the formation of highly positively supercoiled DNA. Eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I could not substitute for eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I in this reaction. Furthermore, the addition of eukaryotic topoisomerase I to a preincubated reaction mixture containing both T antigen and eubacterial topoisomerase I caused rapid relaxation of the positively supercoiled DNA. These results suggest that SV40 T antigen can introduce topoisomerase-relaxable supercoils into DNA in a reaction coupled to ATP hydrolysis. We interpret the observed T antigen supercoiling reaction in terms of a recently proposed twin-supercoiled-domain model that describes the mechanics of DNA helix-tracking processes. According to this model, positive and negative supercoils are generated ahead of and behind the moving SV40 T antigen, respectively. The preferential relaxation of negative supercoils by eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I explains the accumulation of positive supercoils in the DNA template. The supercoiling assay using DNA conformation-specific eubacterial DNA topoisomerase I may be of general use for the detection of ATP-dependent DNA helix-tracking proteins.

  11. p31comet promotes disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex in an ATP-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Teichner, Adar; Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Dumin, Elena; Gromis, Jonathan; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes in mitosis is ensured by a surveillance mechanism called the mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint. It prevents sister chromatid separation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle through their kinetochores. The checkpoint acts by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets for degradation securin, an inhibitor of anaphase initiation. The activity of APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 bound to the checkpoint proteins MAD2, BubR1, and Bub3. When all kinetochores acquire bipolar attachment the checkpoint is inactivated, but the mechanisms of checkpoint inactivation are not understood. We have previously observed that hydrolyzable ATP is required for exit from checkpoint-arrested state. In this investigation we examined the possibility that ATP hydrolysis in exit from checkpoint is linked to the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet in this process. It is known that p31comet prevents the formation of a Mad2 dimer that it thought to be important for turning on the mitotic checkpoint. This explains how p31comet blocks the activation of the checkpoint but not how it promotes its inactivation. Using extracts from checkpoint-arrested cells and MCC isolated from such extracts, we now show that p31comet causes the disassembly of MCC and that this process requires β,γ-hydrolyzable ATP. Although p31comet binds to Mad2, it promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC. PMID:21300909

  12. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  13. Photo-excitation of electrons in cytochrome c oxidase as a theory of the mechanism of the increase of ATP production in mitochondria by laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Andrzej

    2014-02-01

    The hypothesis explains the molecular basis for restoring mitochondrial function by laser therapy. It also explains how laser therapy reverses both excessive oxidation (lack of NADH/FADH2) and excessive reduction (lack of O2) states of cytochrome c oxidase complex. It is proposed that photons interact with heme molecules of cytochrome c oxidase. A molecule of heme contains a porphyrin ring and an atom of iron in the center. The iron atom (Fe) can switch oxidation states back and forth between ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) by accepting or releasing an electron. The porphyrin ring is a complex aromatic molecule that has 26 pi electrons which are "delocalized", spinning in the carbon rings creating a resonating electromagnetic cloud. Photons with similar wavelengths are absorbed by the cloud increasing its energy. The energy is then passed on to the centrally located atom of iron existing in a reduced state (Fe2+). The electrons on the orbits of the iron atom accept this electromagnetic energy, and change orbitals to a higher energetic level. If the energy is sufficient, electrons leave the atom entirely. If this occurs, Fe2+ become oxidized to Fe3+ releasing electrons, thus restoring electron flow and the production of ATP. At the same time, electrons freed from complex IV may have sufficient energy to be picked by NAD+/FADH and re-enter the chain at the complex I or II amplifying the flow of electrons.

  14. Mechanisms and kinetics of noncatalytic ether reaction in supercritical water. 2. Proton-transferred fragmentation of dimethyl ether to formaldehyde in competition with hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yasuharu; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Nakahara, Masaru

    2005-04-28

    Noncatalytic reaction pathways and rates of dimethyl ether (DME) in supercritical water are determined in a tube reactor made of quartz according to liquid- and gas-phase 1H and 13C NMR observations. The reaction is studied at two concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 M) in supercritical water at 400 degrees C and over a water-density range of 0.1-0.6 g/cm3. The supercritical water reaction is compared with the neat one (in the absence of solvent) at 0.1 M and 400 degrees C. DME is found to decompose through (i) the proton-transferred fragmentation to methane and formaldehyde and (ii) the hydrolysis to methanol. Formaldehyde from reaction (i) is consecutively subjected to four types of redox reactions. Two of them proceed even without solvent: (iii) the unimolecular proton-transferred decarbonylation forming hydrogen and carbon monoxide and (iv) the bimolecular self-disproportionation generating methanol and carbon monoxide. When the solvent water is present, two additional paths are open: (v) the bimolecular self-disproportionation of formaldehyde with reactant water, producing methanol and formic acid, and (vi) the bimolecular cross-disproportionation between formaldehyde and formic acid, yielding methanol and carbonic acid. Methanol is produced through the three types of disproportionations (iv)-(vi) as well as the hydrolysis (ii). The presence of solvent water decelerates the proton-transferred fragmentation of DME; the rate constant is reduced by 40% at 0.5 g/cm3. This is caused by the suppression of low-frequency concerted motion corresponding to the reaction coordinate for the simultaneous C-O bond scission and proton transfer from one methyl carbon to the other. In contrast to the proton-transferred fragmentation, the hydrolysis of DME is markedly accelerated by increasing the water density. The latter becomes more important than the former in supercritical water at densities greater than 0.5 g/cm3.

  15. Integration of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Steady-state Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gαi1 Distinguishes between the GTP Hydrolysis and GDP Release Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Grit; Mann, Daniel; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-07-10

    Gα subunits are central molecular switches in cells. They are activated by G protein-coupled receptors that exchange GDP for GTP, similar to small GTPase activation mechanisms. Gα subunits are turned off by GTP hydrolysis. For the first time we employed time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy to investigate the molecular reaction mechanisms of Gαi1. FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful tool that monitors reactions label free with high spatio-temporal resolution. In contrast to common multiple turnover assays, FTIR spectroscopy depicts the single turnover GTPase reaction without nucleotide exchange/Mg(2+) binding bias. Global fit analysis resulted in one apparent rate constant of 0.02 s(-1) at 15 °C. Isotopic labeling was applied to assign the individual phosphate vibrations for α-, β-, and γ-GTP (1243, 1224, and 1156 cm(-1), respectively), α- and β-GDP (1214 and 1134/1103 cm(-1), respectively), and free phosphate (1078/991 cm(-1)). In contrast to Ras · GAP catalysis, the bond breakage of the β-γ-phosphate but not the Pi release is rate-limiting in the GTPase reaction. Complementary common GTPase assays were used. Reversed phase HPLC provided multiple turnover rates and tryptophan fluorescence provided nucleotide exchange rates. Experiments were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations. This broad approach provided detailed insights at atomic resolution and allows now to identify key residues of Gαi1 in GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange. Mutants of the intrinsic arginine finger (Gαi1-R178S) affected exclusively the hydrolysis reaction. The effect of nucleotide binding (Gαi1-D272N) and Ras-like/all-α interface coordination (Gαi1-D229N/Gαi1-D231N) on the nucleotide exchange reaction was furthermore elucidated.

  16. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15598.001 PMID:27183269

  17. Ring Separation Highlights the Protein-Folding Mechanism Used by the Phage EL-Encoded Chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Morgan, David Gene; Sherman, Michael B; He, Lilin; Georgopoulos, Costa; Sernova, Natalia V; Kurochkina, Lidia P; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2016-04-05

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous, ATP-dependent protein-folding molecular machines that are essential for all forms of life. Bacteriophage φEL encodes its own chaperonin to presumably fold exceedingly large viral proteins via profoundly different nucleotide-binding conformations. Our structural investigations indicate that ATP likely binds to both rings simultaneously and that a misfolded substrate acts as the trigger for ATP hydrolysis. More importantly, the φEL complex dissociates into two single rings resulting from an evolutionarily altered residue in the highly conserved ATP-binding pocket. Conformational changes also more than double the volume of the single-ring internal chamber such that larger viral proteins are accommodated. This is illustrated by the fact that φEL is capable of folding β-galactosidase, a 116-kDa protein. Collectively, the architecture and protein-folding mechanism of the φEL chaperonin are significantly different from those observed in group I and II chaperonins.

  18. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path–Force Matching QM/MM Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Ojeda-May, P.; Nagaraju, M.; Pu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path–force matching (RP–FM) has been developed. In RP–FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP–FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  19. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho—a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity—is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal ‘RNA binding’ domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal ‘motor’ domain. We also show that the ‘motor’ domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors. PMID:25999346

  20. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  1. Ultrasound enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of Parthenium hysterophorus: A mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shuchi; Agarwal, Mayank; Bhatt, Aditya; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-09-01

    This study has attempted to establish the mechanism of the ultrasound-induced enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated and delignified biomass of Parthenium hysterophorus. A dual approach of statistical optimization of hydrolysis followed by application of sonication at optimum conditions has been adopted. The kinetics of hydrolysis shows a marked 6× increase with sonication, while net sugar yield shows marginal rise of ∼ 20%. The statistical experimental design reveals the hydrolysis process to be enzyme limited. Profile of sugar yield in ultrasound-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis has been analyzed using HCH-1 model coupled with Genetic Algorithm optimization. The trends in the kinetic and physiological parameters of HCH-1 model reveal that sonication enhances enzyme/substrate affinity and reaction velocity of hydrolysis. The product inhibition of enzyme in all forms (free, adsorbed, complexed) also reduces with ultrasound. These effects are attributed to intense micro-convection induced by ultrasound and cavitation in the liquid medium.

  2. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  3. Compound- and enzyme-specific phosphodiester hydrolysis mechanisms revealed by δ18O of dissolved inorganic phosphate: Implications for marine P cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuhong; Blake, Ruth E.

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the oxygen isotope signature of inorganic phosphate (P i) generated by hydrolysis of nucleic acid phosphodiester (P-diester) compounds by cell-free enzymes (Deoxyribonuclease 1, Phosphodiesterase 1, Alkaline phosphatase) and microbial cultures at natural isotopic abundances. We demonstrate that the diesterase-catalyzed hydrolytic step leads to incorporation of at least one water O into released P i for a total of two O atoms from water incorporated into P i released from P-diesters. In the presence of Phosphodiesterase 1, 16O is preferentially incorporated into nucleotides released from DNA; whereas 18O is preferentially incorporated into nucleotides released from RNA. A strong consistency between predicted O-isotope regeneration signatures based on results of cell-free enzyme experiments and measured isotopic signatures from independent experiments with E. coli cultures was observed and confirms proposed models for phosphoester hydrolysis. Results from these studies made at natural 18O abundance levels provide a new tool, enzyme-specific O-isotope fractionation, for investigations of organophosphate metabolism and phosphorus cycling pathways in natural aquatic systems.

  4. A Bacterial Virulence Protein Promotes Pathogenicity by Inhibiting the Bacterium's Own F1Fo ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Pontes, Mauricio H.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Several intracellular pathogens including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis require the virulence protein MgtC to survive within macrophages and to cause a lethal infection in mice. We now report that, unlike secreted virulence factors that target the host vacuolar ATPase to withstand phagosomal acidity, the MgtC protein acts on Salmonella's own F1Fo ATP synthase. This complex couples proton translocation to ATP synthesis/ hydrolysis and is required for virulence. We establish that MgtC interacts with the a subunit of the F1Fo ATP synthase, hindering ATP-driven proton translocation and NADH-driven ATP synthesis in inverted vesicles. An mgtC null mutant displays heightened ATP levels and an acidic cytoplasm whereas mgtC overexpression decreases ATP levels. A single amino acid substitution in MgtC that prevents binding to the F1Fo ATP synthase abolishes control of ATP levels and attenuates pathogenicity. MgtC provides a singular example of a virulence protein that promotes pathogenicity by interfering with another virulence protein. PMID:23827679

  5. Microglial migration mediated by ATP-induced ATP release from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ying; Wu, Hang-jun; Li, Hui-quan; Qin, Song; Wang, Yin-er; Li, Jing; Lou, Hui-fang; Chen, Zhong; Li, Xiao-ming; Luo, Qing-ming; Duan, Shumin

    2012-06-01

    Microglia are highly motile cells that act as the main form of active immune defense in the central nervous system. Attracted by factors released from damaged cells, microglia are recruited towards the damaged or infected site, where they are involved in degenerative and regenerative responses and phagocytotic clearance of cell debris. ATP release from damaged neural tissues has been suggested to mediate the rapid extension of microglial process towards the site of injury. However, the mechanisms of the long-range migration of microglia remain to be clarified. Here, we found that lysosomes in microglia contain abundant ATP and exhibit Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli. By establishing an efficient in vitro chemotaxis assay, we demonstrated that endogenously-released ATP from microglia triggered by local microinjection of ATPγS is critical for the long-range chemotaxis of microglia, a response that was significantly inhibited in microglia treated with an agent inducing lysosome osmodialysis or in cells derived from mice deficient in Rab 27a (ashen mice), a small GTPase required for the trafficking and exocytosis of secretory lysosomes. These results suggest that microglia respond to extracellular ATP by releasing ATP themselves through lysosomal exocytosis, thereby providing a positive feedback mechanism to generate a long-range extracellular signal for attracting distant microglia to migrate towards and accumulate at the site of injury.

  6. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

  7. ATP binding by the P-loop NTPase OsYchF1 (an unconventional G protein) contributes to biotic but not abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Li, Xiaorong; Miao, Rui; Fong, Yu-Hang; Li, Kwan-Pok; Yung, Yuk-Lin; Yu, Mei-Hui; Wong, Kam-Bo; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are involved in almost all aspects of the cellular regulatory pathways through their ability to bind and hydrolyze GTP. The YchF subfamily, interestingly, possesses the unique ability to bind both ATP and GTP, and is possibly an ancestral form of G proteins based on phylogenetic studies and is present in all kingdoms of life. However, the biological significance of such a relaxed ligand specificity has long eluded researchers. Here, we have elucidated the different conformational changes caused by the binding of a YchF homolog in rice (OsYchF1) to ATP versus GTP by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, by comparing the 3D relationships of the ligand position and the various amino acid residues at the binding sites in the crystal structures of the apo-bound and ligand-bound versions, a mechanism for the protein’s ability to bind both ligands is revealed. Mutation of the noncanonical G4 motif of the OsYchF1 to the canonical sequence for GTP specificity precludes the binding/hydrolysis of ATP and prevents OsYchF1 from functioning as a negative regulator of plant-defense responses, while retaining its ability to bind/hydrolyze GTP and its function as a negative regulator of abiotic stress responses, demonstrating the specific role of ATP-binding/hydrolysis in disease resistance. This discovery will have a significant impact on our understanding of the structure–function relationships of the YchF subfamily of G proteins in all kingdoms of life. PMID:26912459

  8. Association of the α(2)δ(1) subunit with Ca(v)3.2 enhances membrane expression and regulates mechanically induced ATP release in MLO-Y4 osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William R; Majid, Amber S; Czymmek, Kirk J; Ruff, Albert L; García, Jesús; Duncan, Randall L; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2011-09-01

    Voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) mediate signaling events in bone cells in response to mechanical loading. Osteoblasts predominantly express L-type VSCCs composed of the α(1) pore-forming subunit and several auxiliary subunits. Osteocytes, in contrast, express T-type VSCCs and a relatively small amount of L-type α(1) subunits. Auxiliary VSCC subunits have several functions, including modulating gating kinetics, trafficking of the channel, and phosphorylation events. The influence of the α(2)δ auxiliary subunit on T-type VSCCs and the physiologic consequences of that association are incompletely understood and have yet to be investigated in bone. In this study we postulated that the auxiliary α(2) δ subunit of the VSCC complex modulates mechanically regulated ATP release in osteocytes via its association with the T-type Ca(v) 3.2 (α(1H) ) subunit. We demonstrated by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunostaining that MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells express the T-type Ca(v)3.2(α(1H)) subunit more abundantly than the L-type Ca(v)1.2 (α(1C)) subunit. We also demonstrated that the α(2) δ(1) subunit, previously described as an L-type auxiliary subunit, complexes with the T-type Ca(v)3.2 (α(1H)) subunit in MLO-Y4 cells. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of α(2) δ(1) completely abrogated ATP release in response to membrane stretch in MLO-Y4 cells. Additionally, knockdown of the α(2)δ(1) subunit resulted in reduced ERK1/2 activation. Together these data demonstrate a functional VSCC complex. Immunocytochemistry following α(2)δ(1) knockdown showed decreased membrane localization of Ca(v) 3.2 (α(1H)) at the plasma membrane, suggesting that the diminished ATP release and ERK1/2 activation in response to membrane stretch resulted from a lack of Ca(v) 3.2 (α(1H)) at the cell membrane.

  9. Quantifying the Mechanism of Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solution by Evaluating the Relevant ab initio QM/MM Free Energy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Nikolay V.; Prasad, B. Ram; Chakrabarty, Suman; Chu, Zhen T.; Warshel, Arieh

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the free energy surfaces for phosphate hydrolysis is a prerequisite for understanding the corresponding key chemical reactions in biology. Here the challenge has been to move to careful ab initio QM/MM (QM(ai)/MM) free energy calculations, where obtaining converging results is very demanding and computationally expensive. This work describes such calculations, focusing on the free energy surface for the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters, paying a special attention to the comparison between the one water (1W) and two water (2W) paths for the proton transfer (PT) step. This issue has been explored before by energy minimization with implicit solvent models and by non-systematic QM/MM energy minimization, as well as by non-systematic free energy mapping. However, no study has provided the needed reliable 2D (3D) surfaces which are necessary for reaching concrete conclusions. Our study generated in a systematic way the 2D (3D) free energy maps for several relevant systems, comparing the results of QM(ai)/MM and QM(ai)/implicit solvent surfaces, and provides an advanced description of the relevant energetics. It is found that the 1W path for the hydrolysis of methyl diphosphate (MDP) trianion is 6–9 kcal/mol higher than the 2W path. This difference becomes slightly larger in the presence of Mg2+ ion, since this ion reduces the pKa of the conjugated acid form of the phosphate oxygen that accepts the proton. Interestingly, the BLYP approach (which has been used extensively in some studies) gives much smaller difference between the 1W and 2W activation barriers. At any rate, it is worth to point out that the 2W transition state for the PT is not much higher that the common plateau that serves as the starting point of both the 1W and 2W PT paths. Thus, the calculated catalytic effects of proteins based on the 2W PT mechanistic models are not expected to be different from the catalytic effects predicted using the 1W PT mechanistic models

  10. Crystal Structure of a Type IV Pilus Assembly ATPase: Insights into the Molecular Mechanism of PilB from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Mancl, Jordan M.; Black, Wesley P.; Robinson, Howard; Yang, Zhaomin; Schubot, Florian D.

    2016-09-22

    Type IV pili (T4P) mediate bacterial motility and virulence. The PilB/GspE family ATPases power the assembly of T4P and type 2 secretion systems. We determined the structure of the ATPase region of PilB (PilBATP) in complex with ATPγS to provide a model of a T4P assembly ATPase and a view of a PilB/GspE family hexamer at better than 3-Å resolution. Spatial positioning and conformations of the protomers suggest a mechanism of force generation. All six PilBATP protomers contain bound ATPγS. Two protomers form a closed conformation poised for ATP hydrolysis. The other four molecules assume an open conformation but separate into two pairs with distinct active-site accessibilities. We propose that one pair represents the post-hydrolysis phase while the other pair appears poised for ADP/ATP exchange. In conclusion, collectively, the data suggest that T4P assembly is powered by coordinating concurrent substrate binding with ATP hydrolysis across the PilB hexamer.

  11. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  12. Mitochondrial ATP-Pi exchange complex and the site of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hatefi, Y; Hanstein, W G; Galante, Y; Stiggall, D L

    1975-07-01

    Five enzyme complexes, which are concerned with electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, have been isolated from beef heart mitochondria. Enzyme complexes I, II, III and IV are the electron transfer complexes discovered in 1961. Complex V is an energy-conserving complex. It catalyzes ATP-Pi exchange and ATP hydrolysis. The exchange reaction is sensitive to uncouplers, rutamycin, valinomycin plus K-+, dicyclorexylcarboditmide, arsenate, azide, and adenylyl imidodiphosphate. It is also specific for ATP; ITP, GTP and UTP are essentially ineffective. Studies with the photoaffinity labeling uncoupler, 2-azido-4-nitrophenol (NPA), have shown that the mitochondrial uncoupler-binding sites are located exclusively in complex V. Complexes I, III and IV, which carry the three coupling sites of the respiratory chain, had negligible capacity for the binding of NPA, whereas the uncoupler-binding capacity of complex V appeared to be increased two- to threefold as compared to mitochondria. Complexes I, II, III, IV and V are obtained from the same batch of mitochondria by a simple fractionation procedure, which employs cholate, deoxycholate, ammonium acetate and ammonium sulfate. Studies with NPA have shown that mitochondria contain per milligram protein about 0.6 nmole of uniformly reacting uncoupler binding site. All of the uncouplers tested appeared to interact competitively with this site. Photoaffinity labeling with tritiated NPA has shown that a major portion of NPA binds to a polypeptide of molecular weight between 26,000 and 30,000. Other studies on the mechanism of uncoupling have shown that picrate is a membrane-impermeable uncoupler. It cannot uncouple mitochondria. However, it is an effective uncoupler of ATP synthesis and ATP-induced transhydrogenation or reverse electron transfer when used in conjunction with sonicated submitochondrial particles, which have an inside-out orientation of the inner membrane with respect to the medium. In these particles, picrate

  13. The dark side of extracellular ATP in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Solini, Anna; Usuelli, Vera; Fiorina, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Intracellular ATP is the most vital source of cellular energy for biologic systems, whereas extracellular ATP is a multifaceted mediator of several cell functions via its interaction, in an autocrine or paracrine manner, with P2 purinergic receptors expressed on the cell surface. These ionotropic and metabotropic P2 purinergic receptors modulate a variety of physiologic events upon the maintenance of a highly sensitive "set point," the derangement of which may lead to the development of key pathogenic mechanisms during acute and chronic diseases. Growing evidence suggests that extracellular ATP signaling via P2 purinergic receptors may be involved in different renal pathologic conditions. For these reasons, investigators and pharmaceutical companies are actively exploring novel strategies to antagonize or block these receptors with the goal of reducing extracellular ATP production or accelerating extracellular ATP clearance. Targeting extracellular ATP signaling, particularly through the P2X7 receptor, has considerable translational potential, given that novel P2X7-receptor inhibitors are already available for clinical use (e.g., CE224,535, AZD9056, and GSK1482160). This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the involvement of extracellular ATP and its P2 purinergic receptor-mediated signaling in physiologic and pathologic processes in the kidney; potential therapeutic options targeting extracellular ATP purinergic receptors are analyzed as well.

  14. Conservation in the mechanism of glucuronoxylan hydrolysis revealed by the structure of glucuronoxylan xylanohydrolase (CtXyn30A) from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Freire, Filipe; Verma, Anil; Bule, Pedro; Alves, Victor D; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Goyal, Arun; Najmudin, Shabir

    2016-11-01

    Glucuronoxylan endo-β-1,4-xylanases cleave the xylan chain specifically at sites containing 4-O-methylglucuronic acid substitutions. These enzymes have recently received considerable attention owing to their importance in the cooperative hydrolysis of heteropolysaccharides. However, little is known about the hydrolysis of glucuronoxylans in extreme environments. Here, the structure of a thermostable family 30 glucuronoxylan endo-β-1,4-xylanase (CtXyn30A) from Clostridium thermocellum is reported. CtXyn30A is part of the cellulosome, a highly elaborate multi-enzyme complex secreted by the bacterium to efficiently deconstruct plant cell-wall carbohydrates. CtXyn30A preferably hydrolyses glucuronoxylans and displays maximum activity at pH 6.0 and 70°C. The structure of CtXyn30A displays a (β/α)8 TIM-barrel core with a side-associated β-sheet domain. Structural analysis of the CtXyn30A mutant E225A, solved in the presence of xylotetraose, revealed xylotetraose-cleavage oligosaccharides partially occupying subsites -3 to +2. The sugar ring at the +1 subsite is held in place by hydrophobic stacking interactions between Tyr139 and Tyr200 and hydrogen bonds to the OH group of Tyr227. Although family 30 glycoside hydrolases are retaining enzymes, the xylopyranosyl ring at the -1 subsite of CtXyn30A-E225A appears in the α-anomeric configuration. A set of residues were found to be strictly conserved in glucuronoxylan endo-β-1,4-xylanases and constitute the molecular determinants of the restricted specificity displayed by these enzymes. CtXyn30A is the first thermostable glucuronoxylan endo-β-1,4-xylanase described to date. This work reveals that substrate recognition by both thermophilic and mesophilic glucuronoxylan endo-β-1,4-xylanases is modulated by a conserved set of residues.

  15. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  16. Structural mechanisms of DNA binding and unwinding in bacterial RecQ helicases.

    PubMed

    Manthei, Kelly A; Hill, Morgan C; Burke, Jordan E; Butcher, Samuel E; Keck, James L

    2015-04-07

    RecQ helicases unwind remarkably diverse DNA structures as key components of many cellular processes. How RecQ enzymes accommodate different substrates in a unified mechanism that couples ATP hydrolysis to DNA unwinding is unknown. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of the Cronobacter sakazakii RecQ catalytic core domain bound to duplex DNA with a 3' single-stranded extension identifies two DNA-dependent conformational rearrangements: a winged-helix domain pivots ∼90° to close onto duplex DNA, and a conserved aromatic-rich loop is remodeled to bind ssDNA. These changes coincide with a restructuring of the RecQ ATPase active site that positions catalytic residues for ATP hydrolysis. Complex formation also induces a tight bend in the DNA and melts a portion of the duplex. This bending, coupled with translocation, could provide RecQ with a mechanism for unwinding duplex and other DNA structures.

  17. Structural mechanisms of DNA binding and unwinding in bacterial RecQ helicases

    PubMed Central

    Manthei, Kelly A.; Hill, Morgan C.; Burke, Jordan E.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Keck, James L.

    2015-01-01

    RecQ helicases unwind remarkably diverse DNA structures as key components of many cellular processes. How RecQ enzymes accommodate different substrates in a unified mechanism that couples ATP hydrolysis to DNA unwinding is unknown. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of the Cronobacter sakazakii RecQ catalytic core domain bound to duplex DNA with a 3′ single-stranded extension identifies two DNA-dependent conformational rearrangements: a winged-helix domain pivots ∼90° to close onto duplex DNA, and a conserved aromatic-rich loop is remodeled to bind ssDNA. These changes coincide with a restructuring of the RecQ ATPase active site that positions catalytic residues for ATP hydrolysis. Complex formation also induces a tight bend in the DNA and melts a portion of the duplex. This bending, coupled with translocation, could provide RecQ with a mechanism for unwinding duplex and other DNA structures. PMID:25831501

  18. Structural mechanisms of DNA binding and unwinding in bacterial RecQ helicases

    SciTech Connect

    Manthei, Kelly A.; Hill, Morgan C.; Burke, Jordan E.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Keck, James L.

    2015-03-23

    RecQ helicases unwind remarkably diverse DNA structures as key components of many cellular processes. How RecQ enzymes accommodate different substrates in a unified mechanism that couples ATP hydrolysis to DNA unwinding is unknown. In this paper, the X-ray crystal structure of the Cronobacter sakazakii RecQ catalytic core domain bound to duplex DNA with a 3' single-stranded extension identifies two DNA-dependent conformational rearrangements: a winged-helix domain pivots ~90° to close onto duplex DNA, and a conserved aromatic-rich loop is remodeled to bind ssDNA. These changes coincide with a restructuring of the RecQ ATPase active site that positions catalytic residues for ATP hydrolysis. Complex formation also induces a tight bend in the DNA and melts a portion of the duplex. Finally, this bending, coupled with translocation, could provide RecQ with a mechanism for unwinding duplex and other DNA structures.

  19. Effect of the ATPase inhibitor protein IF{sub 1} on H{sup +} translocation in the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio; Mangiullo, Roberto; Papa, Sergio

    2009-06-19

    The H{sup +} F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase complex of coupling membranes converts the proton-motive force into rotatory mechanical energy to drive ATP synthesis. The F{sub 1} moiety of the complex protrudes at the inner side of the membrane, the F{sub o} sector spans the membrane reaching the outer side. The IF{sub 1} component of the mitochondrial complex is a basic 10 kDa protein, which inhibits the F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP hydrolase activity. The mitochondrial matrix pH is the critical factor for the inhibitory binding of the central segment of IF{sub 1} (residue 42-58) to the F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits. We have analyzed the effect of native purified IF{sub 1} the IF{sub 1}-(42-58) synthetic peptide and its mutants on proton conduction, driven by ATP hydrolysis or by [K{sup +}] gradients, in bovine heart inside-out submitochondrial particles and in liposome-reconstituted F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex. The results show that IF{sub 1}, and in particular its central 42-58 segment, displays different inhibitory affinity for proton conduction from the F{sub 1} to the F{sub o} side and in the opposite direction. Cross-linking of IF{sub 1} to F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits inhibits the ATP-driven H{sup +} translocation but enhances H{sup +} conduction in the reverse direction. These observation are discussed in terms of the rotary mechanism of the F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex.

  20. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  1. Phosphorylation at Ser²⁶ in the ATP-binding site of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II as a mechanism for switching off the kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehtap; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Leavis, Paul; Grabarek, Zenon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2013-02-07

    CaMKII (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) is a serine/threonine phosphotransferase that is capable of long-term retention of activity due to autophosphorylation at a specific threonine residue within each subunit of its oligomeric structure. The γ isoform of CaMKII is a significant regulator of vascular contractility. Here, we show that phosphorylation of CaMKII γ at Ser²⁶, a residue located within the ATP-binding site, terminates the sustained activity of the enzyme. To test the physiological importance of phosphorylation at Ser²⁶, we generated a phosphospecific Ser²⁶ antibody and demonstrated an increase in Ser²⁶ phosphorylation upon depolarization and contraction of blood vessels. To determine if the phosphorylation of Ser²⁶ affects the kinase activity, we mutated Ser²⁶ to alanine or aspartic acid. The S26D mutation mimicking the phosphorylated state of CaMKII causes a dramatic decrease in Thr²⁸⁷ autophosphorylation levels and greatly reduces the catalytic activity towards an exogenous substrate (autocamtide-3), whereas the S26A mutation has no effect. These data combined with molecular modelling indicate that a negative charge at Ser²⁶ of CaMKII γ inhibits the catalytic activity of the enzyme towards its autophosphorylation site at Thr²⁸⁷ most probably by blocking ATP binding. We propose that Ser²⁶ phosphorylation constitutes an important mechanism for switching off CaMKII activity.

  2. A green and efficient technology for the degradation of cellulosic materials: structure changes and enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of natural cellulose pretreated by synergistic interaction of mechanical activation and metal salt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjuan; Li, Qian; Su, Jianmei; Lin, Ye; Huang, Zuqiang; Lu, Yinghua; Sun, Guosong; Yang, Mei; Huang, Aimin; Hu, Huayu; Zhu, Yuanqin

    2015-02-01

    A new technology for the pretreatment of natural cellulose was developed, which combined mechanical activation (MA) and metal salt treatments in a stirring ball mill. Different valent metal nitrates were used to investigate the changes in degree of polymerization (DP) and crystallinity index (CrI) of cellulose after MA+metal salt (MAMS) pretreatment, and Al(NO3)3 showed better pretreatment effect than NaNO3 and Zn(NO3)2. The destruction of morphological structure of cellulose was mainly resulted from intense ball milling, and the comparative studies on the changes of DP and crystal structure of MA and MA+Al(NO3)3 pretreated cellulose samples showed a synergistic interaction of MA and Al(NO3)3 treatments with more effective changes of structural characteristics of MA+Al(NO3)3 pretreated cellulose and substantial increase of reducing sugar yield in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. In addition, the results indicated that the presence of Al(NO3)3 had significant enhancement for the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

  3. Transport mechanism of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase pump.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Sørensen, Thomas L-M; le Maire, Marc

    2005-08-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1a) belongs to the group of P-type ATPases, which actively transport inorganic cations across membranes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Three-dimensional structures of several transport intermediates of SERCA1a, stabilized by structural analogues of ATP and phosphoryl groups, are now available at atomic resolution. This has enabled the transport cycle of the protein to be described, including the coupling of Ca(2+) occlusion and phosphorylation by ATP, and of proton counter-transport and dephosphorylation. From these structures, Ca(2+)-ATPase gradually emerges as a molecular mechanical device in which some of the transmembrane segments perform Ca(2+) transport by piston-like movements and by the transmission of reciprocating movements that affect the chemical reactivity of the cytosolic globular domains.

  4. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naser A.; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO42-), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO42--activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S2-) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  5. Creatine supplementation enhances anaerobic ATP synthesis during a single 10 sec maximal handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Kuwamori, Masasuke; Kimura, Naoto; Sako, Takayuki; Chance, Britton

    2003-02-01

    Forearm muscles of twelve healthy male subjects (age = 22.3 +/- 1.1 years (mean +/- S.E.)) were examined during a 10 sec maximal dynamic handgrip exercise (Ex10) using 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after ingestion with 30 g creatine (Cr) monohydrate or placebo per day for 14 days. Cr supplementation produced a 11.5 +/- 4.6% increase in the resting muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) concentration and a 65.0 +/- 4.2% increase in the PCr degradation during Ex10. ATP synthesis rate through PCr hydrolysis and total anaerobic ATP synthesis rate during Ex10 increased from 0.64 +/- 0.08 (pre-value) to 0.86 +/- 0.14 mmol/kg ww/sec (post-value, p < 0.05) and from 0.97 +/- 0.16 (pre-value) to 1.33 +/- 0.27 mmol/kg ww/sec (post-value, p < 0.05), respectively. An increase in total anaerobic ATP synthesis during Ex10 after Cr supplementation positively correlated with the increase in ATP synthesis through PCr hydrolysis. Cr supplementation produced a 15.1 +/- 3.8% increase in the mean power output during Ex10. There was no significant difference in the mean power output per unit of total anaerobic ATP synthesis during Ex10 between before and after Cr supplementation. ATP synthesis rate through PCr hydrolysis positively correlated with mean power output during Ex10 in all twelve subjects after treatment (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). The results suggest that Cr supplementation enhanced PCr degradation during Ex10. It is strongly indicated that an improvement in performance during Ex10 was associated with the increased PCr availability for the synthesis of ATP.

  6. Accelerated hydrolysis of substituted cellulose for potential biofuel production: kinetic study and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bingnan; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, kinetics of substitution accelerated cellulose hydrolysis with multiple reaction stages was investigated to lay foundation for mechanism study and molecular design of substituting compounds. High-efficiency hydrolysis of cellulose is critical for cellulose-based bioethanol production. It is known that, substitution could substantially decrease activation energy and increase reaction rate of acidic hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cellulose. However, reaction kinetics and mechanism of the accelerated hydrolysis were not fully revealed. In this research, it was proved that substitution therefore accelerated hydrolysis only occurred in amorphous regions of cellulose fibers, and was a process with multiple reaction stages. With molar ratio of substitution less than 1%, the overall hydrolysis rate could be increased for around 10 times. We also quantified the relationship between the hydrolysis rate of individual reaction stage and its major influences, including molar ratio of substitution, activation energy of acidic hydrolysis, pH and temperature.

  7. Vacuolar ATPases, like F1,F0-ATPases, show a strong dependence of the reaction velocity on the binding of more than one ATP per enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kasho, V N; Boyer, P D

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies with vacuolar ATPases have shown that multiple copies catalytic subunits are present and that these have definite sequence homology with catalytic subunits of the F1,F0-ATPases. Experiments are reported that assess whether the vacuolar ATPases may have the unusual catalytic cooperativity with sequential catalytic site participation as in the binding change mechanism for the F1,F0-ATPases. The extent of reversal of bound ATP hydrolysis to bound ADP and Pi as medium ATP concentration was lowered was determined by 18O-exchange measurements for yeast and neurospora vacuolar ATPases. The results show a pronounced increase in the extent of water oxygen incorporation into the Pi formed as ATP concentration is decreased to the micromolar range. The F1,F0-ATPase from neurospora mitochondria showed an even more pronounced modulation, similar to that of other F1-type ATPases. The vacuolar ATPases thus appear to have a catalytic mechanism quite analogous to that of the F1,F0-ATPases. PMID:2530585

  8. An autoinhibitory conformation of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat protein SpoIVA prevents its premature ATP-independent aggregation.

    PubMed

    Castaing, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Scarlett; Anantharaman, Vivek; Ravilious, Geoffrey E; Aravind, L; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2014-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis are dormant cell types that are formed when the bacterium encounters starvation conditions. Spores are encased in a shell, termed the coat, which is composed of approximately seventy different proteins and protects the spore's genetic material from environmental insults. The structural component of the basement layer of the coat is an exceptional cytoskeletal protein, termed SpoIVA, which binds and hydrolyzes ATP. ATP hydrolysis is utilized to drive a conformational change in SpoIVA that leads to its irreversible self-assembly into a static polymer in vitro. Here, we characterize the middle domain of SpoIVA, the predicted secondary structure of which resembles the chemotaxis protein CheX but, unlike CheX, does not harbor residues required for phosphatase activity. Disruptions in this domain did not abolish ATP hydrolysis, but resulted in mislocalization of the protein and reduction in sporulation efficiency in vivo. In vitro, disruptions in this domain prevented the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational change in SpoIVA required for polymerization and led to the aggregation of SpoIVA into particles that did not form filaments. We propose a model in which SpoIVA initially assumes a conformation in which it inhibits its own aggregation into particles, and that ATP hydrolysis remodels the protein so that it assumes a polymerization-competent conformation.

  9. Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David B

    2011-06-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose, probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely diverse possibly because their natural substrates, plant cell walls, are very diverse. At this time the microbial ecology of cellulose degradation in any environment is still not clearly understood even though there is a great deal of information available about the bovine rumen. Two major problems that limit our understanding of this area are the vast diversity of organisms present in most cellulose degrading environments and the inability to culture most of them.

  10. Extracellular ATP signaling via P2X(4) receptor and cAMP/PKA signaling mediate ATP oscillations essential for prechondrogenic condensation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon

    2012-09-01

    Prechondrogenic condensation is the most critical process in skeletal patterning. A previous study demonstrated that ATP oscillations driven by Ca(2+) oscillations play a critical role in prechondrogenic condensation by inducing oscillatory secretion. However, it remains unknown what mechanisms initiate the Ca(2+)-driven ATP oscillations, mediate the link between Ca(2+) and ATP oscillations, and then result in oscillatory secretion in chondrogenesis. This study has shown that extracellular ATP signaling was required for both ATP oscillations and prechondrogenic condensation. Among P2 receptors, the P2X(4) receptor revealed the strongest expression level and mediated ATP oscillations in chondrogenesis. Moreover, blockage of P2X(4) activity abrogated not only chondrogenic differentiation but also prechondrogenic condensation. In addition, both ATP oscillations and secretion activity depended on cAMP/PKA signaling but not on K(ATP) channel activity and PKC or PKG signaling. This study proposes that Ca(2+)-driven ATP oscillations essential for prechondrogenic condensation is initiated by extracellular ATP signaling via P2X(4) receptor and is mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling and that cAMP/PKA signaling induces oscillatory secretion to underlie prechondrogenic condensation, in cooperation with Ca(2+) and ATP oscillations.

  11. Andrographolide activates the canonical Wnt signalling pathway by a mechanism that implicates the non-ATP competitive inhibition of GSK-3β: autoregulation of GSK-3β in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Schüller, Andreas; Lindsay, Carolina B; Ureta, Roxana C; Mejías-Reyes, Cristóbal; Hancke, Juan; Melo, Francisco; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-03-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling is an important pathway that regulates multiple biological processes, including cell adhesion and determination of cell fate during animal development; in the adult nervous system it regulates the structure and function of synapses. Wnt-signalling dysfunction is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The use of natural compounds is an interesting strategy in the search for drugs with the therapeutic potential to activate this signalling pathway. In the present study, we report that andrographolide (ANDRO), a component of Andrographis paniculata, is a potent activator of Wnt signalling. Our results indicate that ANDRO activates this pathway, inducing the transcription of Wnt target genes by a mechanism that bypasses Wnt ligand binding to its receptor. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that ANDRO inhibits glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β by a non-ATP-competitive, substrate-competitive mode of action. In silico analyses suggest that ANDRO interacts with the substrate-binding site of GSK-3β. Finally, we demonstrated that the increase seen in the levels of GSK-3β phosphorylated at Ser⁹ is the result of an autoregulatory mechanism of the kinase in vivo, although not through activation of protein phosphatase type 1. Our results suggest that ANDRO could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for disorders caused by Wnt-signalling dysfunction such as neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Interacting cytoplasmic loops of subunits a and c of Escherichia coli F1F0 ATP synthase gate H+ transport to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Steed, P Ryan; Kraft, Kaitlin A; Fillingame, Robert H

    2014-11-25

    H(+)-transporting F1F0 ATP synthase catalyzes the synthesis of ATP via coupled rotary motors within F0 and F1. H(+) transport at the subunit a-c interface in transmembranous F0 drives rotation of a cylindrical c10 oligomer within the membrane, which is coupled to rotation of subunit γ within the α3β3 sector of F1 to mechanically drive ATP synthesis. F1F0 functions in a reversible manner, with ATP hydrolysis driving H(+) transport. ATP-driven H(+) transport in a select group of cysteine mutants in subunits a and c is inhibited after chelation of Ag(+) and/or Cd(+2) with the substituted sulfhydryl groups. The H(+) transport pathway mapped via these Ag(+)(Cd(+2))-sensitive Cys extends from the transmembrane helices (TMHs) of subunits a and c into cytoplasmic loops connecting the TMHs, suggesting these loop regions could be involved in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm. Here, using select loop-region Cys from the single cytoplasmic loop of subunit c and multiple cytoplasmic loops of subunit a, we show that Cd(+2) directly inhibits passive H(+) transport mediated by F0 reconstituted in liposomes. Further, in extensions of previous studies, we show that the regions mediating passive H(+) transport can be cross-linked to each other. We conclude that the loop-regions in subunits a and c that are implicated in H(+) transport likely interact in a single structural domain, which then functions in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm.

  13. ATP and potassium ions: a deadly combination for astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David G.; Wang, Junjie; Keane, Robert W.; Scemes, Eliana; Dahl, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    The ATP release channel Pannexin1 (Panx1) is self-regulated, i.e. the permeant ATP inhibits the channel from the extracellular space. The affinity of the ATP binding site is lower than that of the purinergic P2X7 receptor allowing a transient activation of Panx1 by ATP through P2X7R. Here we show that the inhibition of Panx1 by ATP is abrogated by increased extracellular potassium ion concentration ([K+]o) in a dose-dependent manner. Since increased [K+]o is also a stimulus for Panx1 channels, it can be expected that a combination of ATP and increased [K+]o would be deadly for cells. Indeed, astrocytes did not survive exposure to these combined stimuli. The death mechanism, although involving P2X7R, does not appear to strictly follow a pyroptotic pathway. Instead, caspase-3 was activated, a process inhibited by Panx1 inhibitors. These data suggest that Panx1 plays an early role in the cell death signaling pathway involving ATP and K+ ions. Additionally, Panx1 may play a second role once cells are committed to apoptosis, since Panx1 is also a substrate of caspase-3.

  14. Intrarenal localization of the plasma membrane ATP channel pannexin1.

    PubMed

    Hanner, Fiona; Lam, Lisa; Nguyen, Mien T X; Yu, Alan; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2012-11-15

    In the renal tubules, ATP released from epithelial cells stimulates purinergic receptors, regulating salt and water reabsorption. However, the mechanisms by which ATP is released into the tubular lumen are multifaceted. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is a newly identified. ubiquitously expressed protein that forms connexin-like channels in the plasma membrane, which have been demonstrated to function as a mechanosensitive ATP conduit. Here, we report on the localization of Panx1 in the mouse kidney. Using immunofluorescence, strong Panx1 expression was observed in renal tubules, including proximal tubules, thin descending limbs, and collecting ducts, along their apical cell membranes. In the renal vasculature, Panx1 expression was localized to vascular smooth muscle cells in renal arteries, including the afferent and efferent arterioles. Additionally, we tested whether Panx1 channels expressed in renal epithelial cells facilitate luminal ATP release by measuring the ATP content of urine samples freshly collected from wild-type and Panx1(-/-) mice. Urinary ATP levels were reduced by 30% in Panx1(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that Panx1 channels in the kidney may regulate ATP release and via purinergic signaling may participate in the control of renal epithelial fluid and electrolyte transport and vascular functions.

  15. Intrarenal localization of the plasma membrane ATP channel pannexin1

    PubMed Central

    Hanner, Fiona; Lam, Lisa; Nguyen, Mien T. X.; Yu, Alan

    2012-01-01

    In the renal tubules, ATP released from epithelial cells stimulates purinergic receptors, regulating salt and water reabsorption. However, the mechanisms by which ATP is released into the tubular lumen are multifaceted. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is a newly identified. ubiquitously expressed protein that forms connexin-like channels in the plasma membrane, which have been demonstrated to function as a mechanosensitive ATP conduit. Here, we report on the localization of Panx1 in the mouse kidney. Using immunofluorescence, strong Panx1 expression was observed in renal tubules, including proximal tubules, thin descending limbs, and collecting ducts, along their apical cell membranes. In the renal vasculature, Panx1 expression was localized to vascular smooth muscle cells in renal arteries, including the afferent and efferent arterioles. Additionally, we tested whether Panx1 channels expressed in renal epithelial cells facilitate luminal ATP release by measuring the ATP content of urine samples freshly collected from wild-type and Panx1−/− mice. Urinary ATP levels were reduced by 30% in Panx1−/− compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that Panx1 channels in the kidney may regulate ATP release and via purinergic signaling may participate in the control of renal epithelial fluid and electrolyte transport and vascular functions. PMID:22952282

  16. ATP Synthase and the Actions of Inhibitors Utilized To Study Its Roles in Human Health, Disease, and Other Scientific Areas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sangjin; Pedersen, Peter L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: ATP synthase, a double-motor enzyme, plays various roles in the cell, participating not only in ATP synthesis but in ATP hydrolysis-dependent processes and in the regulation of a proton gradient across some membrane-dependent systems. Recent studies of ATP synthase as a potential molecular target for the treatment of some human diseases have displayed promising results, and this enzyme is now emerging as an attractive molecular target for the development of new therapies for a variety of diseases. Significantly, ATP synthase, because of its complex structure, is inhibited by a number of different inhibitors and provides diverse possibilities in the development of new ATP synthase-directed agents. In this review, we classify over 250 natural and synthetic inhibitors of ATP synthase reported to date and present their inhibitory sites and their known or proposed modes of action. The rich source of ATP synthase inhibitors and their known or purported sites of action presented in this review should provide valuable insights into their applications as potential scaffolds for new therapeutics for human and animal diseases as well as for the discovery of new pesticides and herbicides to help protect the world's food supply. Finally, as ATP synthase is now known to consist of two unique nanomotors involved in making ATP from ADP and Pi, the information provided in this review may greatly assist those investigators entering the emerging field of nanotechnology. PMID:19052322

  17. Epidemic based modeling of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Arellano, Maria G; Keshwani, Deepak R

    2014-01-01

    An epidemic based model was developed to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass, dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover. The process of substrate getting adsorbed and digested by enzyme was simulated as susceptibles getting infected by viruses and becoming removed and recovered. This model simplified the dynamic enzyme "infection" process and the catalysis of cellulose into a two-parameter controlled, enzyme behavior guided mechanism. Furthermore, the model incorporates the adsorption block by lignin and inhibition effects on cellulose catalysis. The model satisfactorily predicted the enzyme adsorption and hydrolysis, negative role of lignin, and inhibition effects over hydrolysis for a broad range of substrate and enzyme loadings. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the incorporation of lignin and other inhibition effects. Our model will be a useful tool for evaluating the effects of parameters during hydrolysis and guide a design strategy for continuous hydrolysis and the associated process control.

  18. Modeling of autocatalytic hydrolysis of adefovir dipivoxil in solid formulations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Xiang, Bingren; Deng, Haishan; Wu, Jingfang

    2011-04-01

    The stability and hydrolysis kinetics of a phosphate prodrug, adefovir dipivoxil, in solid formulations were studied. The stability relationship between five solid formulations was explored. An autocatalytic mechanism for hydrolysis could be proposed according to the kinetic behavior which fits the Prout-Tompkins model well. For the classical kinetic models could hardly describe and predict the hydrolysis kinetics of adefovir dipivoxil in solid formulations accurately when the temperature is high, a feedforward multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network was constructed to model the hydrolysis kinetics. The build-in approaches in Weka, such as lazy classifiers and rule-based learners (IBk, KStar, DecisionTable and M5Rules), were used to verify the performance of MLP. The predictability of the models was evaluated by 10-fold cross-validation and an external test set. It reveals that MLP should be of general applicability proposing an alternative efficient way to model and predict autocatalytic hydrolysis kinetics for phosphate prodrugs.

  19. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Rotation and Hydrolysis Activities of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sakaki, Naoyoshi; Shimo-Kon, Rieko; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Muneyuki, Eiro; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    F1-ATPase, a water-soluble portion of the enzyme ATP synthase, is a rotary molecular motor driven by ATP hydrolysis. To learn how the kinetics of rotation are regulated, we have investigated the rotational characteristics of a thermophilic F1-ATPase over the temperature range 4–50°C by attaching a polystyrene bead (or bead duplex) to the rotor subunit and observing its rotation under a microscope. The apparent rate of ATP binding estimated at low ATP concentrations increased from 1.2 × 106 M−1 s−1 at 4°C to 4.3 × 107 M−1 s−1 at 40°C, whereas the torque estimated at 2 mM ATP remained around 40 pN·nm over 4–50°C. The rotation was stepwise at 4°C, even at the saturating ATP concentration of 2 mM, indicating the presence of a hitherto unresolved rate-limiting reaction that occurs at ATP-waiting angles. We also measured the ATP hydrolysis activity in bulk solution at 4–65°C. F1-ATPase tends to be inactivated by binding ADP tightly. Both the inactivation and reactivation rates were found to rise sharply with temperature, and above 30°C, equilibrium between the active and inactive forms was reached within 2 s, the majority being inactive. Rapid inactivation at high temperatures is consistent with the physiological role of this enzyme, ATP synthesis, in the thermophile. PMID:18375515

  1. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  2. Full engagement of liganded maltose-binding protein stabilizes a semi-open ATP-binding cassette dimer in the maltose transporter

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Frances Joan D.; Orelle, Cédric; Huang, Yan; Bajaj, Ruchika; Everly, R. Michael; Klug, Candice S.; Davidson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary MalFGK2 is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that mediates the uptake of maltose/maltodextrins into Escherichia coli. A periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) delivers maltose to the transmembrane subunits (MalFG) and stimulates the ATPase activity of the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding subunits (MalK dimer). This MBP-stimulated ATPase activity is independent of maltose for purified transporter in detergent micelles. However, when the transporter is reconstituted in membrane bilayers, only the liganded form of MBP efficiently stimulates its activity. To investigate the mechanism of maltose stimulation, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to study the interactions between the transporter and MBP in nanodiscs and in detergent. We found that full engagement of both lobes of maltose-bound MBP unto MalFGK2 is facilitated by nucleotides and stabilizes a semi-open MalK dimer. Maltose-bound MBP promotes the transition to the semi-open state of MalK when the transporter is in the membrane, whereas such regulation does not require maltose in detergent. We suggest that stabilization of the semi-open MalK2 conformation by maltose-bound MBP is key to the coupling of maltose transport to ATP hydrolysis in vivo, because it facilitates the progression of the MalK dimer from the open to the semi-open conformation, from which it can proceed to hydrolyze ATP. PMID:26268698

  3. Full engagement of liganded maltose-binding protein stabilizes a semi-open ATP-binding cassette dimer in the maltose transporter.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Frances Joan D; Orelle, Cédric; Huang, Yan; Bajaj, Ruchika; Everly, R Michael; Klug, Candice S; Davidson, Amy L

    2015-12-01

    MalFGK2 is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that mediates the uptake of maltose/maltodextrins into Escherichia coli. A periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) delivers maltose to the transmembrane subunits (MalFG) and stimulates the ATPase activity of the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding subunits (MalK dimer). This MBP-stimulated ATPase activity is independent of maltose for purified transporter in detergent micelles. However, when the transporter is reconstituted in membrane bilayers, only the liganded form of MBP efficiently stimulates its activity. To investigate the mechanism of maltose stimulation, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study the interactions between the transporter and MBP in nanodiscs and in detergent. We found that full engagement of both lobes of maltose-bound MBP unto MalFGK2 is facilitated by nucleotides and stabilizes a semi-open MalK dimer. Maltose-bound MBP promotes the transition to the semi-open state of MalK when the transporter is in the membrane, whereas such regulation does not require maltose in detergent. We suggest that stabilization of the semi-open MalK2 conformation by maltose-bound MBP is key to the coupling of maltose transport to ATP hydrolysis in vivo, because it facilitates the progression of the MalK dimer from the open to the semi-open conformation, from which it can proceed to hydrolyze ATP.

  4. Neuronal NTPDase3 Mediates Extracellular ATP Degradation in Trigeminal Nociceptive Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihua; Trinh, Thu; Ren, Yanfang; Dirksen, Robert T.; Liu, Xiuxin

    2016-01-01

    ATP induces pain via activation of purinergic receptors in nociceptive sensory nerves. ATP signaling is terminated by ATP hydrolysis mediated by cell surface-localized ecto-nucleotidases. Using enzymatic histochemical staining, we show that ecto-ATPase activity is present in mouse trigeminal nerves. Using immunofluorescence staining, we found that ecto-NTPDase3 is expressed in trigeminal nociceptive neurons and their projections to the brainstem. In addition, ecto-ATPase activity and ecto-NTPDase3 are also detected in the nociceptive outermost layer of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that incubation with anti-NTPDase3 serum reduces extracellular ATP degradation in the nociceptive lamina of both the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and the spinal cord dorsal horn. These results are consistent with neuronal NTPDase3 activity modulating pain signal transduction and transmission by affecting extracellular ATP hydrolysis within the trigeminal nociceptive pathway. Thus, disruption of trigeminal neuronal NTPDase3 expression and localization to presynaptic terminals during chronic inflammation, local constriction and injury may contribute to the pathogenesis of orofacial neuropathic pain. PMID:27706204

  5. Motility, ATP levels and metabolic enzyme activity of sperm from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus).

    PubMed

    Burness, Gary; Moyes, Christopher D; Montgomerie, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Male bluegill displays one of two life history tactics. Some males (termed "parentals") delay reproduction until ca. 7 years of age, at which time they build nests and actively courts females. Others mature precociously (sneakers) and obtain fertilizations by cuckolding parental males. In the current study, we studied the relations among sperm motility, ATP levels, and metabolic enzyme activity in parental and sneaker bluegill. In both reproductive tactics, sperm swimming speed and ATP levels declined in parallel over the first 60 s of motility. Although sneaker sperm initially had higher ATP levels than parental sperm, by approximately 30 s postactivation, no differences existed between tactics. No differences were noted between tactics in swimming speed, percent motility, or the activities of key metabolic enzymes, although sperm from parentals had a higher ratio of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) to citrate synthase (CS). In both tactics, with increasing CPK and CS activity, sperm ATP levels increased at 20 s postactivation, suggesting that capacities for phosphocreatine hydrolysis and aerobic metabolism may influence interindividual variation in rates of ATP depletion. Nonetheless, there was no relation between sperm ATP levels and either swimming speed or percent of sperm that were motile. This suggests that interindividual variation in ATP levels may not be the primary determinant of variation in sperm swimming performance in bluegill.

  6. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-02-25

    Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  7. DNA-Catalyzed Amide Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cong; Avins, Joshua L.; Klauser, Paul C.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.; Lee, Yujeong; Silverman, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    DNA catalysts (deoxyribozymes) for a variety of reactions have been identified by in vitro selection. However, for certain reactions this identification has not been achieved. One important example is DNA-catalyzed amide hydrolysis, for which a previous selection experiment instead led to DNA-catalyzed DNA phosphodiester hydrolysis. Subsequent efforts in which the selection strategy deliberately avoided phosphodiester hydrolysis led to DNA-catalyzed ester and aromatic amide hydrolysis, but aliphatic amide hydrolysis has been elusive. In the present study, we show that including modified nucleotides that bear protein-like functional groups (any one of primary amino, carboxyl, or primary hydroxyl) enables identification of amide-hydrolyzing deoxyribozymes. In one case, the same deoxyribozyme sequence without the modifications still retains substantial catalytic activity. Overall, these findings establish the utility of introducing protein-like functional groups into deoxyribozymes for identifying new catalytic function. The results also suggest the longer-term feasibility of deoxyribozymes as artificial proteases. PMID:26854515

  8. Inhibition of Multidrug Resistance-Linked P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1) Function by 5′-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5′-Adenosine: Evidence for an ATP Analog That Interacts With Both Drug-Substrate- and Nucleotide-Binding Sites†

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Shinobu; Chufan, Eduardo; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Ettore; Sauna, Zuben E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2011-01-01

    5′-fluorosulfonylbenzonyl 5′-adenosine (FSBA) is an ATP analog that covalently modifies several residues in the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of several ATPases, kinases and other proteins. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of amphipathic anticancer agents from cancer cells. We investigated the interactions of FSBA with P-gp to study the catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis. Incubation of P-gp with FSBA inhibited ATP hydrolysis (IC50= 0.21 mM) and the binding of 8-azido[α–32P]ATP (IC50= 0.68 mM). In addition, 14C-FSBA crosslinks to P-gp, suggesting that FSBA-mediated inhibition of ATP hydrolysis is irreversible due to covalent modification of P-gp. However, when the NBDs were occupied with a saturating concentration of ATP prior to treatment, FSBA stimulated ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Furthermore, FSBA inhibited the photocrosslinking of P-gp with [125I]-Iodoaryl-azidoprazosin (IAAP; IC50 = 0.17 mM). As IAAP is a transport substrate for P-gp, this suggests that FSBA affects not only the NBDs, but also the transport-substrate site in the transmembrane domains. Consistent with these results, FSBA blocked efflux of rhodamine 123 from P-gp-expressing cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis identified FSBA crosslinks to residues within or nearby the NBDs but not in the transmembrane domains and docking of FSBA in a homology model of human P-gp NBDs supports the biochemical studies. Thus, FSBA is an ATP analog that interacts with both the drug-binding and ATP-binding sites of P-gp, but fluorosulfonyl-mediated crosslinking is observed only at the NBDs. PMID:21452853

  9. Analysis of the Isolated SecA DEAD Motor Suggests a Mechanism for Chemical-Mechanical Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Shilton, Brian H

    2011-09-28

    The preprotein cross-linking domain and C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli SecA were removed to create a minimal DEAD motor, SecA-DM. SecA-DM hydrolyzes ATP and has the same affinity for ADP as full-length SecA. The crystal structure of SecA-DM in complex with ADP was solved and shows the DEAD motor in a closed conformation. Comparison with the structure of the E. coli DEAD motor in an open conformation (Protein Data Bank ID 2FSI) indicates main-chain conformational changes in two critical sequences corresponding to Motif III and Motif V of the DEAD helicase family. The structures that the Motif III and Motif V sequences adopt in the DEAD motor open conformation are incompatible with the closed conformation. Therefore, when the DEAD motor makes the transition from open to closed, Motif III and Motif V are forced to change their conformations, which likely functions to regulate passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis. The transition state for ATP hydrolysis for the SecA DEAD motor was modeled based on the conformation of the Vasa helicase in complex with adenylyl imidodiphosphate and RNA (Protein Data Bank ID 2DB3). A mechanism for chemical-mechanical coupling emerges, where passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis is hindered by the conformational changes required in Motif III and Motif V, and may be promoted by binding interactions with the preprotein substrate and/or other translocase domains and subunits.

  10. Analysis of the Isolated SecA DEAD Motor Suggests a Mechanism for Chemical-Mechanical Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Shilton, Brian H

    2010-09-20

    The preprotein cross-linking domain and C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli SecA were removed to create a minimal DEAD motor, SecA-DM. SecA-DM hydrolyzes ATP and has the same affinity for ADP as full-length SecA. The crystal structure of SecA-DM in complex with ADP was solved and shows the DEAD motor in a closed conformation. Comparison with the structure of the E. coli DEAD motor in an open conformation (Protein Data Bank ID 2FSI) indicates main-chain conformational changes in two critical sequences corresponding to Motif III and Motif V of the DEAD helicase family. The structures that the Motif III and Motif V sequences adopt in the DEAD motor open conformation are incompatible with the closed conformation. Therefore, when the DEAD motor makes the transition from open to closed, Motif III and Motif V are forced to change their conformations, which likely functions to regulate passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis. The transition state for ATP hydrolysis for the SecA DEAD motor was modeled based on the conformation of the Vasa helicase in complex with adenylyl imidodiphosphate and RNA (Protein Data Bank ID 2DB3). A mechanism for chemical-mechanical coupling emerges, where passage through the transition state for ATP hydrolysis is hindered by the conformational changes required in Motif III and Motif V, and may be promoted by binding interactions with the preprotein substrate and/or other translocase domains and subunits.

  11. Activation of ATP binding for the autophosphorylation of DosS, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine kinase lacking an ATP lid motif.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ha Yeon; Lee, Young-Hoon; Bae, Young-Seuk; Kim, Eungbin; Kang, Beom Sik

    2013-05-03

    The sensor histidine kinases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, DosS and DosT, are responsible for sensing hypoxic conditions and consist of sensor and kinase cores responsible for accepting signals and phosphorylation activity, respectively. The kinase core contains a dimerization and histidine phosphate-accepting (DHp) domain and an ATP binding domain (ABD). The 13 histidine kinase genes of M. tuberculosis can be grouped based on the presence or absence of the ATP lid motif and F box (elements known to play roles in ATP binding) in their ABDs; DosS and DosT have ABDs lacking both these elements, and the crystal structures of their ABDs indicated that they were unsuitable for ATP binding, as a short loop covers the putative ATP binding site. Although the ABD alone cannot bind ATP, the kinase core is functional in autophosphorylation. Appropriate spatial arrangement of the ABD and DHp domain within the kinase core is required for both autophosphorylation and ATP binding. An ionic interaction between Arg(440) in the DHp domain and Glu(537) in the short loop of the ABD is available and may open the ATP binding site, by repositioning the short loop away from the site. Mutations at Arg(440) and Glu(537) reduce autophosphorylation activity. Unlike other histidine kinases containing an ATP lid, which protects bound ATP, DosS is unable to accept ATP until the ABD is properly positioned relative to the histidine; this may prevent unexpected ATP reactions. ATP binding can, therefore, function as a control mechanism for histidine kinase activity.

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor) opens the defective channel gate of mutant CFTR in a phosphorylation-dependent but ATP-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Bear, Christine E

    2012-10-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a channel on the apical membrane of epithelia. Disease-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene can lead to CFTR protein misfolding as in the case of the F508del mutation and/or channel dysfunction. Recently, a small molecule, VX-770 (ivacaftor), has shown efficacy in restoring lung function in patients bearing the G551D mutation, and this has been linked to repair of its channel gating defect. However, these studies did not reveal the mechanism of action of VX-770 in detail. Normally, CFTR channel activity is regulated by phosphorylation, ATP binding, and hydrolysis. Hence, it has been hypothesized that VX-770 modifies one or more of these metabolic events. In this study, we examined VX-770 activity using a reconstitution system for purified CFTR protein, a system that enables control of known regulatory factors. We studied the consequences of VX-770 interaction with CFTR incorporated in planar lipid bilayers and in proteoliposomes, using a novel flux-based assay. We found that purified and phosphorylated CFTR was potentiated in the presence of Mg-ATP, suggesting that VX-770 bound directly to the CFTR protein, rather than associated kinases or phosphatases. Interestingly, we also found that VX-770 enhanced the channel activity of purified and mutant CFTR in the nominal absence of Mg-ATP. These findings suggest that VX-770 can cause CFTR channel opening through a nonconventional ATP-independent mechanism. This work sets the stage for future studies of the structural properties that mediate CFTR gating using VX-770 as a probe.

  13. Insights into the molecular mechanism of allostery in Hsp70s

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Matthias P.; Kityk, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70s chaperone an amazing number and variety of cellular protein folding processes. Key to their versatility is the recognition of a short degenerate sequence motif, present in practically all polypeptides, and a bidirectional allosteric intramolecular regulation mechanism linking their N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD) and their C-terminal polypeptide substrate binding domain (SBD). Through this interdomain communication ATP binding to the NBD and ATP hydrolysis control the affinity of the SBD for polypeptide substrates and substrate binding to the SBD triggers ATP hydrolysis. Genetic screens for defective variants of Hsp70s and systematic analysis of available structures of the isolated domains revealed some residues involved in allosteric control. Recent elucidation of the crystal structure of the Hsp70 homolog DnaK in the ATP bound open conformation as well as numerous NMR and mutagenesis studies bring us closer to an understanding of the communication between NBD and SBD. In this review we will discuss our current view of the allosteric control mechanism of Hsp70 chaperones. PMID:26539440

  14. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  15. ATP and heat production in human skeletal muscle during dynamic exercise: higher efficiency of anaerobic than aerobic ATP resynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krustrup, Peter; Ferguson, Richard A; Kjær, Michael; Bangsbo, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to simultaneously examine skeletal muscle heat production and ATP turnover in humans during dynamic exercise with marked differences in aerobic metabolism. This was done to test the hypothesis that efficiency is higher in anaerobic than aerobic ATP resynthesis. Six healthy male subjects performed 90 s of low intensity knee-extensor exercise with (OCC) and without thigh occlusion (CON-LI) as well as 90 s of high intensity exercise (CON-HI) that continued from the CON-LI bout. Muscle heat production was determined by continuous measurements of muscle heat accumulation and heat release to the blood. Muscle ATP production was quantified by repeated measurements of thigh oxygen uptake as well as blood and muscle metabolite changes. All temperatures of the thigh were equalized to ≈37 °C prior to exercise by a water-perfused heating cuff. Oxygen uptake accounted for 80 ± 2 and 59 ± 4 %, respectively, of the total ATP resynthesis in CON-LI and CON-HI, whereas it was negligible in OCC. The rise in muscle temperature was lower (P < 0.05) in OCC than CON-LI (0.32 ± 0.04 vs. 0.37 ± 0.03 °C). The mean rate of heat production was also lower (P < 0.05) in OCC than CON-LI (36 ± 4 vs. 57 ± 4 J s−1). Mechanical efficiency was 52 ± 4 % after 15 s of OCC and remained constant, whereas it decreased (P < 0.05) from 56 ± 5 to 32 ± 3 % during CON-LI. During CON-HI, mechanical efficiency transiently increased (P < 0.05) to 47 ± 4 %, after which it decreased (P < 0.05) to 36 ± 3 % at the end of CON-HI. Assuming a fully coupled mitochondrial respiration, the ATP turnover per unit of work was calculated to be unaltered during OCC (≈20 mmol ATP kJ−1), whereas it increased (P < 0.05) from 21 ± 4 to 29 ± 3 mmol ATP kJ−1 during CON-LI and further (P < 0.05) to 37 ± 3 mmol ATP kJ−1 during CON-HI. The present data confirm the hypothesis that heat loss is lower in anaerobic ATP resynthesis than in oxidative phosphorylation and can in part

  16. Elevated Pressure Triggers a Physiological Release of ATP from the Retina: Possible Role for Pannexin Hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Reigada, David; Lu, Wennan; Zhang, May; Mitchell, Claire H.

    2008-01-01

    Increased hydrostatic pressure can damage neurons, although the mechanisms linking pressure to neurochemical imbalance or cell injury are not fully established. Throughout the body, mechanical perturbations such as shear stress, cell stretching, or changes in pressure can lead to excessive release of ATP. It is thus possible that increased pressure across neural tissues triggers an elevated release of ATP into extracellular space. As stimulation of the P2X7 receptor for ATP on retinal ganglion cells leads to elevation of intracellular calcium and excitotoxic death, we asked whether increased levels of extracellular ATP accompanied an elevation in pressure across the retina. The hydrostatic pressure surrounding bovine retinal eyecups was increased and the ATP content of the vitreal compartment adjacent to the retina was determined. A step increase of only 20 mmHg induced a three-fold increase in the vitreal ATP concentration. The ATP levels correlated closely with the degree of pressure increase over 20–100 mmHg range. The increase was transient at lower pressures but sustained at higher pressures. The rise in vitreal ATP was the same regardless of whether nitrogen or air was used to increase pressure, implying changes in oxygen partial pressure did not contribute. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was not affected by pressure, ruling out a substantial contribution from cell lysis. The ATP increase was largely inhibited by either 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) or carbenoxolone (CBX). While this is consistent with physiological release of ATP through pannexins hemichannels, a contribution from anion channels, vesicular release or other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. In conclusion, a step elevation in pressure leads to a physiologic increase in the levels of extracellular ATP bathing retinal neurons. This excess extracellular ATP may link increased pressure to the death of ganglion cells in acute glaucoma, and suggests a role for ATP in the

  17. Follow the ATP: tumor energy production: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Oronsky, Neil; Fanger, Gary R; Parker, Christopher W; Caroen, Scott Z; Lybeck, Michelle; Scicinski, Jan J

    2014-01-01

    As early as the 1920s, the eminent physician and chemist, Otto Warburg, nominated for a second Nobel Prize for his work on fermentation, observed that the core metabolic signature of cancer cells is a high glycolytic flux. Warburg averred that the prime mover of cancer is defective mitochondrial respiration, which drives a switch to an alternative energy source, aerobic glycolysis in lieu of Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS), in an attempt to maintain cellular viability and support critical macromolecular needs. The cell, deprived of mitochondrial ATP production, must reprogram its metabolism as a secondary survival mechanism to maintain sufficient ATP and NADH levels for macromolecule production, membrane integrity and DNA synthesis as well as maintenance of membrane ionic gradients. A time-tested method to identify and disrupt criminal activity is to "follow the money" since the illicit proceeds from crime are required to underwrite it. By analogy, strategies to target cancer involve following and disrupting the flow of ATP and NADH, the energetic and redox "currencies" of the cell, respectively, since the tumor requires high levels of ATP and NADH, not only for metastasis and proliferation, but also, on a more basic level, for survival. Accordingly, four broad ATP reduction strategies to impact and potentially derail cancer energy production are highlighted herein: 1) small molecule energy-restriction mimetic agents (ERMAs) that target various aspects of energy metabolism, 2) reduction of energy 'subsidization' with autophagy inhibitors, 3) acceleration of ATP turnover to increase energy inefficiency, and 4) dietary energy restriction to limit the energy supply.

  18. Rho signaling regulates pannexin 1-mediated ATP release from airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Okada, Seiko F; Sesma, Juliana I; Kreda, Silvia M; van Heusden, Catharina A; Zhu, Yunxiang; Jones, Lisa C; O'Neal, Wanda K; Penuela, Silvia; Laird, Dale W; Boucher, Richard C; Lazarowski, Eduardo R

    2011-07-29

    ATP released from airway epithelial cells promotes purinergic receptor-regulated mucociliary clearance activities necessary for innate lung defense. Cell swelling-induced membrane stretch/strain is a common stimulus that promotes airway epithelial ATP release, but the mechanisms transducing cell swelling into ATP release are incompletely understood. Using knockdown and knockout approaches, we tested the hypothesis that pannexin 1 mediates ATP release from hypotonically swollen airway epithelia and investigated mechanisms regulating this activity. Well differentiated primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells subjected to hypotonic challenge exhibited enhanced ATP release, which was paralleled by the uptake of the pannexin probe propidium iodide. Both responses were reduced by pannexin 1 inhibitors and by knocking down pannexin 1. Importantly, hypotonicity-evoked ATP release from freshly excised tracheas and dye uptake in primary tracheal epithelial cells were impaired in pannexin 1 knockout mice. Hypotonicity-promoted ATP release and dye uptake in primary well differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells was accompanied by RhoA activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation and was reduced by the RhoA dominant negative mutant RhoA(T19N) and Rho and myosin light chain kinase inhibitors. ATP release and Rho activation were reduced by highly selective inhibitors of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4). Lastly, knocking down TRPV4 impaired hypotonicity-evoked airway epithelial ATP release. Our data suggest that TRPV4 and Rho transduce cell membrane stretch/strain into pannexin 1-mediated ATP release in airway epithelia.

  19. Rho Signaling Regulates Pannexin 1-mediated ATP Release from Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Okada, Seiko F.; Sesma, Juliana I.; Kreda, Silvia M.; van Heusden, Catharina A.; Zhu, Yunxiang; Jones, Lisa C.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Penuela, Silvia; Laird, Dale W.; Boucher, Richard C.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.

    2011-01-01

    ATP released from airway epithelial cells promotes purinergic receptor-regulated mucociliary clearance activities necessary for innate lung defense. Cell swelling-induced membrane stretch/strain is a common stimulus that promotes airway epithelial ATP release, but the mechanisms transducing cell swelling into ATP release are incompletely understood. Using knockdown and knockout approaches, we tested the hypothesis that pannexin 1 mediates ATP release from hypotonically swollen airway epithelia and investigated mechanisms regulating this activity. Well differentiated primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells subjected to hypotonic challenge exhibited enhanced ATP release, which was paralleled by the uptake of the pannexin probe propidium iodide. Both responses were reduced by pannexin 1 inhibitors and by knocking down pannexin 1. Importantly, hypotonicity-evoked ATP release from freshly excised tracheas and dye uptake in primary tracheal epithelial cells were impaired in pannexin 1 knockout mice. Hypotonicity-promoted ATP release and dye uptake in primary well differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells was accompanied by RhoA activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation and was reduced by the RhoA dominant negative mutant RhoA(T19N) and Rho and myosin light chain kinase inhibitors. ATP release and Rho activation were reduced by highly selective inhibitors of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4). Lastly, knocking down TRPV4 impaired hypotonicity-evoked airway epithelial ATP release. Our data suggest that TRPV4 and Rho transduce cell membrane stretch/strain into pannexin 1-mediated ATP release in airway epithelia. PMID:21606493

  20. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  1. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  2. Coupling between ATP Binding and DNA Cleavage by DNA Topoisomerase II

    PubMed Central

    Mueller-Planitz, Felix; Herschlag, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a molecular machine that couples ATP hydrolysis to the transport of one DNA segment through a transient break in another segment. To learn about the energetic connectivity that underlies this coupling, we investigated how the ATPase domains exert control over DNA cleavage. We dissected the DNA cleavage reaction by measuring rate and equilibrium constants for the individual reaction steps utilizing defined DNA duplexes in the presence and absence of the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog 5′-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMPPNP). Our results revealed the existence of two enzyme conformations whose relative abundance is sensitive to the presence of nucleotides. The predominant species in the absence of nucleotides binds DNA at a diffusion limited rate but cannot efficiently cleave DNA. In the presence of AMPPNP, most of the enzyme is converted to a state in which DNA binding and release is extremely slow but which allows DNA cleavage. A minimal kinetic and thermodynamic framework is established that accounts for the cooperativity of cleavage of the two DNA strands in the presence and absence of bound AMPPNP and includes conformational steps revealed in the kinetic studies. The model unifies available kinetic, thermodynamic, and structural data to provide a description for the reaction in terms of the order and rate of individual reaction steps and the physical nature of the species on the reaction path. Furthermore, this reaction framework provides a foundation for a future in-depth analysis of energy transduction by topoisomerase II, for guiding and interpreting future structural studies, and for analyzing the mechanism of drugs that convert topoisomerase into a cellular poison. PMID:18403371

  3. Conformational Changes Produced by ATP Binding to the Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump*

    PubMed Central

    Mangialavori, Irene C.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela S.; Saffioti, Nicolás A.; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M.; Rossi, Rolando C.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA) reaction cycle by characterizing conformational changes associated with calcium, ATP, and vanadate binding to purified PMCA. This was accomplished by studying the exposure of PMCA to surrounding phospholipids by measuring the incorporation of the photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine analog 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine to the protein. ATP could bind to the different vanadate-bound states of the enzyme either in the presence or in the absence of Ca2+ with high apparent affinity. Conformational movements of the ATP binding domain were determined using the fluorescent analog 2′(3′)-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5′-triphosphate. To assess the conformational behavior of the Ca2+ binding domain, we also studied the occlusion of Ca2+, both in the presence and in the absence of ATP and with or without vanadate. Results show the existence of occluded species in the presence of vanadate and/or ATP. This allowed the development of a model that describes the transport of Ca2+ and its relation with ATP hydrolysis. This is the first approach that uses a conformational study to describe the PMCA P-type ATPase reaction cycle, adding important features to the classical E1-E2 model devised using kinetics methodology only. PMID:24025327

  4. Conformational changes produced by ATP binding to the plasma membrane calcium pump.

    PubMed

    Mangialavori, Irene C; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela S; Saffioti, Nicolás A; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M; Rossi, Rolando C; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2013-10-25

    The aim of this work was to study the plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA) reaction cycle by characterizing conformational changes associated with calcium, ATP, and vanadate binding to purified PMCA. This was accomplished by studying the exposure of PMCA to surrounding phospholipids by measuring the incorporation of the photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine analog 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[(125)I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine to the protein. ATP could bind to the different vanadate-bound states of the enzyme either in the presence or in the absence of Ca(2+) with high apparent affinity. Conformational movements of the ATP binding domain were determined using the fluorescent analog 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate. To assess the conformational behavior of the Ca(2+) binding domain, we also studied the occlusion of Ca(2+), both in the presence and in the absence of ATP and with or without vanadate. Results show the existence of occluded species in the presence of vanadate and/or ATP. This allowed the development of a model that describes the transport of Ca(2+) and its relation with ATP hydrolysis. This is the first approach that uses a conformational study to describe the PMCA P-type ATPase reaction cycle, adding important features to the classical E1-E2 model devised using kinetics methodology only.

  5. Cardiac Metabolism in Heart Failure - Implications beyond ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Doenst, Torsten; Nguyen, T. Dung; Abel, E. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The heart has a high rate of ATP production and turnover which is required to maintain its continuous mechanical work. Perturbations in ATP generating processes may therefore affect contractile function directly. Characterizing cardiac metabolism in heart failure revealed several metabolic alterations termed metabolic remodeling, ranging from changes in substrate utilization to mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in ATP deficiency and impaired contractility. However, ATP depletion is not the only relevant consequence of metabolic remodeling during heart failure. By providing cellular building blocks and signaling molecules, metabolic pathways control essential processes such as cell growth and regeneration. Thus, alterations in cardiac metabolism may also affect the progression to heart failure by mechanisms beyond ATP supply. Our aim is therefore to highlight that metabolic remodeling in heart failure not only results in impaired cardiac energetics, but also induces other processes implicated in the development of heart failure such as structural remodeling and oxidative stress. Accordingly, modulating cardiac metabolism in heart failure may have significant therapeutic relevance that goes beyond the energetic aspect. PMID:23989714

  6. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  7. Reaction Pathway for Cocaine Hydrolase-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of (+)-Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuan; Liu, Junjun; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2017-01-01

    A recently designed and discovered cocaine hydrolase (CocH), engineered from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), has been proven promising as a novel enzyme therapy for treatment of cocaine overdose and addiction because it is highly efficient in catalyzing hydrolysis of naturally occurring (−)-cocaine. It has been known that the CocH also has a high catalytic efficiency against (+)-cocaine, a synthetic enantiomer of cocaine. Reaction pathway and the corresponding free energy profile for the CocH-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine have been determined, in the present study, by performing first-principles pseudobond quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM)-free energy (FE) calculations. Acordingt to the QM/MM-FE results, the catalytic hydrolysis process is initiated by the nucleophilic attack on carbonyl carbon of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester via hydroxyl oxygen of S198 side chain, and the second reaction step (i.e. dissociation of benzoyl ester) is rate-determining. This finding for CocH-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine is remarkably different from that for the (+)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by bacterial cocaine esterase in which the first reaction step of the deacylation is associated with the highest free energy barrier (~17.9 kcal/mol). The overall free energy barrier (~16.0 kcal/mol) calculated for the acylation stage of CocH-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine is in good agreement with the experimental free energy barrier of ~14.5 kcal/mol derivated from the experimental kinetic data.

  8. Critical role of ATP-induced ATP release for Ca2+ signaling in nonsensory cell networks of the developing cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Ceriani, Federico; Pozzan, Tullio; Mammano, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Spatially and temporally coordinated variations of the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c) play a crucial role in a variety of tissues. In the developing sensory epithelium of the mammalian cochlea, elevation of extracellular adenosine trisphosphate concentration ([ATP]e) triggers [Ca2+]c oscillations and propagation of intercellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ waves. What remains uncertain is the relative contribution of gap junction channels and connexin hemichannels to these fundamental mechanisms, defects in which impair hearing acquisition. Another related open question is whether [Ca2+]c oscillations require oscillations of the cytosolic IP3 concentration ([IP3]c) in this system. To address these issues, we performed Ca2+ imaging experiments in the lesser epithelial ridge of the mouse cochlea around postnatal day 5 and constructed a computational model in quantitative adherence to experimental data. Our results indicate that [Ca2+]c oscillations are governed by Hopf-type bifurcations within the experimental range of [ATP]e and do not require [IP3]c oscillations. The model replicates accurately the spatial extent and propagation speed of intercellular Ca2+ waves and predicts that ATP-induced ATP release is the primary mechanism underlying intercellular propagation of Ca2+ signals. The model also uncovers a discontinuous transition from propagating regimes (intercellular Ca2+ wave speed > 11 μm⋅s−1) to propagation failure (speed = 0), which occurs upon lowering the maximal ATP release rate below a minimal threshold value. The approach presented here overcomes major limitations due to lack of specific connexin channel inhibitors and can be extended to other coupled cellular systems. PMID:27807138

  9. The influence of lignin on steam pretreatment and mechanical pulping of poplar to achieve high sugar recovery and ease of enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Richard P; Chu, QiuLu; Hu, Jinguang; Zhong, Na; Lin, Mandy; Lee, Jin-Suk; Saddler, Jack

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of enhancing overall carbohydrate recovery and reducing enzyme loading refiner mechanical pulping and steam pretreatment (210°C, 5 min) were used to pretreat poplar wood chips. Neutral sulphonation post-treatment indicated that, although the lignin present in the steam pretreated substrate was less reactive, the cellulose-rich, water insoluble component was more accessible to cellulases and Simons stain. This was likely due to lignin relocation as the relative surface lignin measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy increased from 0.4 to 0.8. The integration of sulphite directly into steam pretreatment resulted in the solubilisation of 60% of the lignin while more than 80% of the carbohydrate present in the original substrate was recovered in the water insoluble fraction after Na2CO3 addition. More than 80% of the sugars present in the original cellulose and xylan could be recovered after 48 h using an enzyme loading of 20 mg protein/g cellulose at a 10% substrate concentration.

  10. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:26930489

  11. Air-stimulated ATP release from keratinocytes occurs through connexin hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Barr, Travis P; Albrecht, Phillip J; Hou, Quanzhi; Mongin, Alexander A; Strichartz, Gary R; Rice, Frank L

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous ATP release plays an important role in both epidermal stratification and chronic pain, but little is known about ATP release mechanisms in keratinocytes that comprise the epidermis. In this study, we analyzed ATP release from cultured human neonatal keratinocytes briefly exposed to air, a process previously demonstrated to trigger ATP release from these cells. We show that exposing keratinocytes to air by removing media for 15 seconds causes a robust, long-lasting ATP release. This air-stimulated ATP release was increased in calcium differentiated cultures which showed a corresponding increase in connexin 43 mRNA, a major component of keratinocyte hemichannels. The known connexin hemichannel inhibitors 1-octanol and carbenoxolone both significantly reduced air-stimulated ATP release, as did two drugs traditionally used as ABC transporter inhibitors (glibenclamide and verapamil). These same 4 inhibitors also prevented an increase in the uptake of a connexin permeable dye induced by air exposure, confirming that connexin hemichannels are open during air-stimulated ATP release. In contrast, activity of the MDR1 ABC transporter was reduced by air exposure and the drugs that inhibited air-stimulated ATP release had differential effects on this transporter. These results indicate that air exposure elicits non-vesicular release of ATP from keratinocytes through connexin hemichannels and that drugs used to target connexin hemichannels and ABC transporters may cross-inhibit. Connexins represent a novel, peripheral target for the treatment of chronic pain and dermatological disease.

  12. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function.

  13. Actomyosin Interaction: Mechanical and Energetic Properties in Different Nucleotide Binding States

    PubMed Central

    Aprodu, Iuliana; Redaelli, Alberto; Soncini, Monica

    2008-01-01

    The mechanics of the actomyosin interaction is central in muscle contraction and intracellular trafficking. A better understanding of the events occurring in the actomyosin complex requires the examination of all nucleotide-dependent states and of the energetic features associated with the dynamics of the cross-bridge cycle. The aim of the present study is to estimate the interaction strength between myosin in nucleotide-free, ATP, ADP·Pi and ADP states and actin monomer. The molecular models of the complexes were constructed based on cryo-electron microscopy maps and the interaction properties were estimated by means of a molecular dynamics approach, which simulate the unbinding of the complex applying a virtual spring to the core of myosin protein. Our results suggest that during an ATP hydrolysis cycle the affinity of myosin for actin is modulated by the presence and nature of the nucleotide in the active site of the myosin motor domain. When performing unbinding simulations with a pulling rate of 0.001 nm/ps, the maximum pulling force applied to the myosin during the experiment is about 1nN. Under these conditions the interaction force between myosin and actin monomer decreases from 0.83 nN in the nucleotide-free state to 0.27 nN in the ATP state, and increases to 0.60 nN after ATP hydrolysis and Pi release from the complex (ADP state). PMID:19325727

  14. The Lipid Bilayer Modulates the Structure and Function of an ATP-binding Cassette Exporter.

    PubMed

    Zoghbi, Maria E; Cooper, Rebecca S; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2016-02-26

    ATP-binding cassette exporters use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport substrates across membranes by switching between inward- and outward-facing conformations. Essentially all structural studies of these proteins have been performed with the proteins in detergent micelles, locked in specific conformations and/or at low temperature. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy to study the prototypical ATP-binding cassette exporter MsbA reconstituted in nanodiscs at 37 °C while it performs ATP hydrolysis. We found major differences when comparing MsbA in these native-like conditions with double electron-electron resonance data and the crystal structure of MsbA in the open inward-facing conformation. The most striking differences include a significantly smaller separation between the nucleotide-binding domains and a larger fraction of molecules with associated nucleotide-binding domains in the nucleotide-free apo state. These studies stress the importance of studying membrane proteins in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.

  15. Structural Dynamics of the Heterodimeric ABC Transporter TM287/288 Induced by ATP and Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Tadaomi; Sato, Yukiko; Sakurai, Minoru

    2016-12-06

    TM287/288 is a heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, which harnesses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to transport a wide variety of molecules through the transmembrane domains (TMDs) by alternating inward- and outward-facing conformations. Here, we conducted multiple 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations of TM287/288 in different ATP- and substrate-bound states to elucidate the effects of ATP and substrate binding. As a result, the binding of two ATP molecules to the NBDs induced the formation of the consensus ATP-binding pocket (ABP2) or the NBD dimerization, whereas these processes did not occur in the presence of a single ATP molecule or when the protein was in its apo state. Moreover, binding of the substrate to the TMDs enhanced the formation of ABP2 through allosteric TMD-NBD communication. Furthermore, in the apo state, α-helical subdomains of the NBDs approached each other, acquiring a conformation with core half-pockets exposed to the solvent, appropriate for ATP binding. We propose a "core-exposed" model for this novel conformation found in the apo state of ABC transporters. These findings provide important insights into the structural dynamics of ABC transporters.

  16. The induction of an ATP-sensitive K(+) current in cardiac myocytes of air- and water-breathing vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Paajanen, Vesa; Vornanen, Matti

    2002-09-01

    Opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) is an effective cardioprotective mechanism in mammals. The amplitude of the ATP-sensitive K(+) current (I(K,ATP)) and the opening sensitivity of K(ATP) channels are, however, poorly known in ectotherms. As O(2)-sensing mechanisms and reactions to O(2) deficiency differ in aquatic and terrestrial animals, we hypothesised that the response of K(ATP) channels to metabolic inhibition would be different between air- and water-breathers. We therefore compared I(K,ATP) in ventricular myocytes of an anoxia-sensitive (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an anoxia-tolerant fish (Carassius carassius), two amphibians (Xenopus laevis and Rana temporaria) and a terrestrial reptile (Lacerta vivipara) using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. I(K,ATP) was induced by preventing mitochondrial and/or glycolytic ATP production and perfusing myocytes with an ATP-free pipette solution. All species had a glibenclamide-sensitive I(K,ATP), but the current amplitude was much greater in air-breathers than in water-breathers. Furthermore, the I(K,ATP) in air-breathers was more sensitive to intracellular ATP depletion than in water-breathing animals. These findings indicate that I(K,ATP) is larger and more easily induced in air- than water-breathers. In all ectotherms, the first response to complete metabolic inhibition was the induction of a large inward current, the amplitude of which exceeded that of I(K,ATP). Thus, the protective effect of the I(K,ATP) may be physiologically significant only during partial metabolic blockade.

  17. Aerobic Growth of Escherichia coli Is Reduced, and ATP Synthesis Is Selectively Inhibited when Five C-terminal Residues Are Deleted from the ϵ Subunit of ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Shah, Naman B; Duncan, Thomas M

    2015-08-21

    F-type ATP synthases are rotary nanomotor enzymes involved in cellular energy metabolism in eukaryotes and eubacteria. The ATP synthase from Gram-positive and -negative model bacteria can be autoinhibited by the C-terminal domain of its ϵ subunit (ϵCTD), but the importance of ϵ inhibition in vivo is unclear. Functional rotation is thought to be blocked by insertion of the latter half of the ϵCTD into the central cavity of the catalytic complex (F1). In the inhibited state of the Escherichia coli enzyme, the final segment of ϵCTD is deeply buried but has few specific interactions with other subunits. This region of the ϵCTD is variable or absent in other bacteria that exhibit strong ϵ-inhibition in vitro. Here, genetically deleting the last five residues of the ϵCTD (ϵΔ5) caused a greater defect in respiratory growth than did the complete absence of the ϵCTD. Isolated membranes with ϵΔ5 generated proton-motive force by respiration as effectively as with wild-type ϵ but showed a nearly 3-fold decrease in ATP synthesis rate. In contrast, the ϵΔ5 truncation did not change the intrinsic rate of ATP hydrolysis with membranes. Further, the ϵΔ5 subunit retained high affinity for isolated F1 but reduced the maximal inhibition of F1-ATPase by ϵ from >90% to ∼20%. The results suggest that the ϵCTD has distinct regulatory interactions with F1 when rotary catalysis operates in opposite directions for the hydrolysis or synthesis of ATP.

  18. A gating mechanism for Pi release governs the mRNA unwinding by eIF4AI during translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Jiang, Chenxiao; Li, Xiaojing; Jiang, Lizhi; Li, Zengxia; Schneider-Poetsch, Tilman; Liu, Jianwei; Yu, Kunqian; Liu, Jun O; Jiang, Hualiang; Luo, Cheng; Dang, Yongjun

    2015-12-02

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4AI, the founding member of DEAD-box helicases, undergoes ATP hydrolysis-coupled conformational changes to unwind mRNA secondary structures during translation initiation. However, the mechanism of its coupled enzymatic activities remains unclear. Here we report that a gating mechanism for Pi release controlled by the inter-domain linker of eIF4AI regulates the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. Molecular dynamic simulations and experimental results revealed that, through forming a hydrophobic core with the conserved SAT motif of the N-terminal domain and I357 from the C-terminal domain, the linker gated the release of Pi from the hydrolysis site, which avoided futile hydrolysis cycles of eIF4AI. Further mutagenesis studies suggested this linker also plays an auto-inhibitory role in the enzymatic activity of eIF4AI, which may be essential for its function during translation initiation. Overall, our results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism that controls eIF4AI-mediated mRNA unwinding and can guide further mechanistic studies on other DEAD-box helicases.

  19. A gating mechanism for Pi release governs the mRNA unwinding by eIF4AI during translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junyan; Jiang, Chenxiao; Li, Xiaojing; Jiang, Lizhi; Li, Zengxia; Schneider-Poetsch, Tilman; Liu, Jianwei; Yu, Kunqian; Liu, Jun O.; Jiang, Hualiang; Luo, Cheng; Dang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4AI, the founding member of DEAD-box helicases, undergoes ATP hydrolysis-coupled conformational changes to unwind mRNA secondary structures during translation initiation. However, the mechanism of its coupled enzymatic activities remains unclear. Here we report that a gating mechanism for Pi release controlled by the inter-domain linker of eIF4AI regulates the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. Molecular dynamic simulations and experimental results revealed that, through forming a hydrophobic core with the conserved SAT motif of the N-terminal domain and I357 from the C-terminal domain, the linker gated the release of Pi from the hydrolysis site, which avoided futile hydrolysis cycles of eIF4AI. Further mutagenesis studies suggested this linker also plays an auto-inhibitory role in the enzymatic activity of eIF4AI, which may be essential for its function during translation initiation. Overall, our results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism that controls eIF4AI-mediated mRNA unwinding and can guide further mechanistic studies on other DEAD-box helicases. PMID:26464436

  20. Novel phosphate-activated macrophages prevent ectopic calcification by increasing extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Hamczyk, Magda R.; Andrés, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus is an essential nutrient involved in many pathobiological processes. Less than 1% of phosphorus is found in extracellular fluids as inorganic phosphate ion (Pi) in solution. High serum Pi level promotes ectopic calcification in many tissues, including blood vessels. Here, we studied the effect of elevated Pi concentration on macrophage polarization and calcification. Macrophages, present in virtually all tissues, play key roles in health and disease and display remarkable plasticity, being able to change their physiology in response to environmental cues. Methods and results High-throughput transcriptomic analysis and functional studies demonstrated that Pi induces unpolarized macrophages to adopt a phenotype closely resembling that of alternatively-activated M2 macrophages, as revealed by arginine hydrolysis and energetic and antioxidant profiles. Pi-induced macrophages showed an anti-calcifying action mediated by increased availability of extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate. Conclusion We conclude that the ability of Pi-activated macrophages to prevent calcium-phosphate deposition is a compensatory mechanism protecting tissues from hyperphosphatemia-induced pathologic calcification. PMID:28362852

  1. Adenosine uptake is the major effector of extracellular ATP toxicity in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Paola de Andrade; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Nascimento, Jéssica; Beckenkamp, Aline; Santana, Danielle Bertodo; Kipper, Franciele; Casali, Emerson André; Nejar Bruno, Alessandra; Paccez, Juliano Domiraci; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Wink, Marcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Buffon, Andréia

    2014-01-01

    In cervical cancer, HPV infection and disruption of mechanisms involving cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis are strictly linked with tumor progression and invasion. Tumor microenvironment is ATP and adenosine rich, suggesting a role for purinergic signaling in cancer cell growth and death. Here we investigate the effect of extracellular ATP on human cervical cancer cells. We find that extracellular ATP itself has a small cytotoxic effect, whereas adenosine formed from ATP degradation by ectonucleotidases is the main factor responsible for apoptosis induction. The level of P2×7 receptor seemed to define the main cytotoxic mechanism triggered by ATP, since ATP itself eliminated a small subpopulation of cells that express high P2×7 levels, probably through its activation. Corroborating these data, blockage or knockdown of P2×7 only slightly reduced ATP cytotoxicity. On the other hand, cell viability was almost totally recovered with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor. Moreover, ATP-induced apoptosis and signaling—p53 increase, AMPK activation, and PARP cleavage—as well as autophagy induction were also inhibited by dipyridamole. In addition, inhibition of adenosine conversion into AMP also blocked cell death, indicating that metabolization of intracellular adenosine originating from extracellular ATP is responsible for the main effects of the latter in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103241

  2. Modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase activity by cyclophilin D regulates matrix adenine nucleotide levels

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Konràd, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Metelkin, Eugeniy; Töröcsik, Beata; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclophilin D was recently shown to bind to and decrease the activity of F0F1-ATP synthase in submitochondrial particles and permeabilized mitochondria (Giorgio et al. 2009, J Biol Chem, 284:33982). Cyclophilin D binding decreased both the ATP synthesis and hydrolysis rates. Here, we reaffirm these findings by demonstrating that in intact mouse liver mitochondria energized by ATP, absence of cyclophilin D or presence of cyclosporin A led to a decrease in the extent of uncoupler-induced depolarization. Accordingly, in substrate-energized mitochondria an increase in F0F1-ATP synthase activity mediated by a relief of inhibition by cyclophilin D was evident as slightly increased respiration rates during arsenolysis. However, the modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase by cyclophilin D did not increase the ANT-mediated ATP efflux rate in energized mitochondria or the ATP influx rate in de-energized mitochondria. The lack of effect of cyclophilin D on the ANT-mediated adenine nucleotide exchange rate was attributed to the ~2.2 times lower flux control coefficient of the F0F1-ATP synthase than that of ANT, deduced from measurements of adenine nucleotide flux rates in intact mitochondria. These findings were further supported by a recent kinetic model of the mitochondrial phosphorylation system, suggesting that a ~30% change in F0F1-ATP synthase activity in fully energized or fully deenergized mitochondria affects ADP-ATP exchange rate mediated by the ANT in the range of 1.38-1.7%. We conclude that in mitochondria exhibitin