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Sample records for atrial appendage flow

  1. Applying non-linear dynamics to atrial appendage flow data to understand and characterize atrial arrhythmia

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Grimm, R.A.; Katz, R.; Thomas, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand and characterize left atrial appendage flow in atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation and flutter are the most common cardiac arrhythmias affecting 15% of the older population. The pulsed Doppler velocity profile data was recorded from the left atrial appendage of patients using transesophageal echocardiography. The data was analyzed using Fourier analysis and nonlinear dynamical tools. Fourier analysis showed that appendage mechanical frequency ({ital f{sub f}}) for patients in sinus rhythm was always lower (around1 Hz) than that in atrial fibrillation (5-8 Hz). Among patients with atrial fibrillation spectral power below {ital f{sub f}} was significantly different suggesting variability within this group of patients. Results that suggested the presence of nonlinear dynamics were: a) the existence of two arbitrary peak frequencies {ital f{sub 1}, f{sub 2}}, and other peak frequencies as linear combinations thereof ({ital mf{sub 1}{+-}nf{sub 2}}), and b) the similarity between the spectrum of patient data and that obtained using the Lorenz equation. Nonlinear analysis tools, including Phase plots and differential radial plots, were also generated from the velocity data using a delay of 10. In the phase plots, some patients displayed a torus-like structure, while others had a more random-like pattern. In the differential radial plots, the first set of patients (with torus-like phase plots) showed fewer values crossing an arbitrary threshold of 10 than did the second set (8 vs. 27 in one typical example). The outcome of cardioversion was different for these two set of patients. Fourier analysis helped to: differentiate between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation, understand the characteristics of the wide range of atrial fibrillation patients, and provide hints that atrial fibrillation could be a nonlinear process. Nonlinear dynamical tools helped to further characterize and sub-classify atrial fibrillation.

  2. Left Atrial Remodeling Assessed by Transthoracic Echocardiography Predicts Left Atrial Appendage Flow Velocity in Patients With Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atai; Suzuki, Shinya; Kano, Hiroto; Matsuno, Syunsuke; Takai, Hideaki; Kato, Yuko; Otsuka, Takayuki; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Oikawa, Yuji; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Kunihara, Takashi; Sagara, Koichi; Yamashita, Naohide; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yajima, Junji; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke and other thromboembolic events. Left atrial (LA) thrombus formation is closely related to LA dysfunction, particularly to decreased LA appendage flow velocity (LAA-FV) in patients with AF. We estimated LAA-FV using parameters noninvasively obtained by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in patients with paroxysmal AF.Echocardiographic and clinical parameters were assessed in 190 patients with nonvalvular paroxysmal AF showing sinus heart rhythm during transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and TTE.LAA-FV (60 ± 22 cm/s) significantly correlated with the time interval between the initiation of the P-wave on ECG and that of the A-wave of transmitral flow on TTE (PA-TMF, correlation coefficient, -0.32; P < 0.001), LA dimension (LAD, -0.31; P < 0.001), septal a' velocity of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI, 0.35; P < 0.001), E/e' ratio (-0.28, P < 0.001), E velocity of transmitral flow (-0.20, P = 0.008), E/A ratio of transmitral flow (-0.18, P = 0.02), CHA2DS2-VASc score (-0.15, P = 0.04), and BNP plasma level (-0.32, P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis revealed that PA-TMF (standardized partial regression coefficient, -0.17; P = 0.03), a' velocity (0.24, P = 0.004), and LAD (-0.20, P = 0.01) were independent predictors of LAA-FV (multiple correlation coefficient R, 0.44; P < 0.001).Parameters of atrial remodeling, ie, decreased a' velocity, increased LAD, and PA-TMF during sinus rhythm may be useful predictors of LA blood stasis in patients with nonvalvular PAF. LAA-FV can be estimated using these TTE parameters instead of TEE.

  3. Left atrial appendage occlusion.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Holmes, David

    2015-06-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion for stroke and thromboembolism prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a significant advancement in the field of cardiovascular disease. Prevention and avoidance of the devastating consequences of thromboembolic complications from AF continues to be central in the management of these patients. The role of LAA as a nidus for thrombus formation is well documented. Multiple approaches to exclude the LAA from the circulation either percutaneously or surgically have been described and are undergoing testing. Although pharmacological therapy for stroke prevention remains the cornerstone of treatment, device and surgical exclusion of the LAA have proven to be viable alternatives in carefully selected patients. Even though current evidence show that LAA occlusion is safe and effective, approval and adoption of this strategy has been quite difficult due to paucity of randomised clinical trial data on the risk and benefit ratio, cost effectiveness and the issues of procedural risk as well as longer-term outcome. This review aims to provide an update on the current status of LAA occlusion, specifically looking at interpretation of current clinical data, available techniques and devices, issues with current devices and future direction. PMID:25518846

  4. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Devices

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Perez, Irving E; Krumerman, Andrew; Garcia, Mario J; Lucariello, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk for thromboembolic stroke five-fold. The left atrial appendage (LAA) has been shown to be the main source of thrombus formation in the majority of strokes associated with AF. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin and novel anticoagulants remains the standard of care; however, it has several limitations, including bleeding and poor compliance. Occlusion of the LAA has been shown to be an alternative therapeutic approach to drug therapy. The purpose of this article is to review the different techniques and devices that have emerged for the purpose of occluding this structure, with a particular emphasis on the efficacy and safety studies published to date in the medical literature. PMID:24963274

  5. Right juxtaposition of the atrial appendages.

    PubMed

    Mathew, R; Replogle, R; Thilenius, O G; Arcilla, R A

    1975-04-01

    We present an infant with right-sided juxtaposition of atrial appendages who had open heart surgery for ventricular septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus. Of 12 cases thus far reported, ventricular d-loop was observed in nine, and normal position of great vessels in four. Contrary to previous views, this condition may not be accompanied by severe conotruncal anomalies.

  6. Successful cryoablation of an incessant atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, John; Gizurarson, Sigfus; Das, Moloy; Chauhan, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    The right atrial appendage can be the origin of focal atrial tachycardias. Their ablation can be challenging owing to the complexity of the appendage anatomy. To our knowledge, we describe the first successful solid tip cryoablation of a focal tachycardia within the right atrial appendage in a patient presenting with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26937112

  7. Recurrent syncope after left atrial appendage occlusion.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Perez-Rivera, Jose-Angel; Bethencourt, Armando

    2015-02-01

    We present the case of a 72-year-old woman with permanent atrial fibrillation and contraindication to long-term oral anticoagulant therapy who underwent left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion. A 24-mm Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (St Jude Medical) device was deployed. The inferior part of the external disc of the device appeared to be over the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve but no significant mitral stenosis or mitral regurgitation was detected before deployment. After the procedure the patient suffered several syncopes when she tried to stand up. A transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed and no significant differences on the device position were detected, it was not possible to perform the TEE in a stand-up position due to the patient symptoms (hypotension, tachycardia, dizziness, and loss of consciousness). After discussion with the surgical team, surgical removal of the device and surgical exclusion of LAA was performed. The symptoms disappeared and the patient was discharged. In the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that recurrent syncope has been described as a complication of LAA occlusion. PMID:25044597

  8. Complex anatomy making it difficult for left atrial appendage closure.

    PubMed

    Teijeiro-Mestre, Rodrigo; Alegría-Barrero, Eduardo; Ruiz-García, Juan; Oyanguren, Beatriz; Eimil, Miriam; Martín, Miguel Ángel San; García, Eulogio

    2016-03-01

    Left atrial appendage closure is a useful technique for patients at high thromboembolic risk and contraindications for oral anticoagulation therapy. However, it can be challenging when anatomical difficulties are encountered. We present a unique case of atypical appendage uptake and how we completed the procedure. PMID:26857967

  9. Comparison of tissue Doppler dynamics with Doppler flow in evaluating left atrial appendage function by transesophageal echocardiography in prehypertensive and hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Tenekecioğlu, Erhan; Karabulut, Aziz; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    Increased blood pressure (BP) is associated with an increase in cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We aimed to analyze the effect of increased BP onto the function of left atrial appendage (LAA) in early stages of hypertension. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was prospectively performed to assess LAA functions in 120 patients with increased BP, and in 58 normotensive subjects without cardiovascular disease. Patients with increased BP were divided according to Joint National Committee VII (JNC VII) report: prehypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive and stage-2 hypertensive patients. During TEE, LAA late-emptying velocities (LAAEV) were significantly reduced only in stage-2 hypertensives as compared with control group (P < 0.001). In contrast, LAA late-contracting velocity (LAA TDI-D2) was significantly reduced in prehypertensive,stage-1 hypertensive and stage-2 hypertensive patients, when compared with control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively). The LAA maximal areas were increased significantly only in stage-2 hypertensive patients when compared with control group (P < 0.05). During TEE, left atrial spontaneous echocardiographic contrast was found in 2 of 36 patients in prehypertension group, in 7 of 40 patients in stage-1 hypertension group, and in 10 of 44 patients in stage-2 hypertension group. Left atrial thrombi were observed in 3 (6.8%) patients of stage-2 hypertension group. In conclusion, in patients with untreated prehypertension and hypertension, elevation of afterload imposed on left atrium involved both left atrium and LAA, resulting in impairment of the LAA function. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) enables the detection of this functional impairment in early stages of hypertension, even in prehypertensive phase, when compared with conventional Doppler flow measurement of the LAA. Even in prehypertensive phase, BP should be decreased to normal levels to prevent the LAA dysfunction. PMID:20345441

  10. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation: new oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure].

    PubMed

    Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Bode, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Thrombo-embolic prophylaxis is a key element within the therapy of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter. Besides new oral anticoagulants the concept of left atrial appendage occlusion has approved to be a good alternative option, especially in patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:26261929

  11. Overlay Technique for Transcatheter Left Atrial Appendage Closure.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Zhu, Mengyun; Lu, Yunlan; Tang, Kai; Zhao, Dongdong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yawei

    2015-08-01

    The Overlay technique is popular in peripheral artery interventions, but not in coronary or cardiac structural procedures. We present an initial experience using three-episode overlays during a transcatheter left atrial appendage closure. The first overlay was applied to facilitate advancement of the delivery sheath into left atrium. The second overlay was used to navigate the advancement of prepped delivery system containing the compressed occluder into its optimal position in the left atrium. The third overlay facilitated the real-time deployment of the closure device. This case report demonstrates the effectiveness of the overlay technique in facilitating each step of the transcatheter left atrial appendage closure.

  12. Left atrial appendage occlusion in atrial fibrillation after intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Solveig; Zugck, Christian; Krumsdorf, Ulrike; Rizos, Timolaos; Rauch, Geraldine; Geis, Nicolas; Hardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: In an explorative, prospective, single-center, observational study, LAAO was performed in patients with previous ICH and AF using the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug device. Risks of ischemic strokes and hemorrhagic complications were estimated using the CHA2DS2Vasc score and the HAS-BLED score. Before and 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after the procedure, clinical status and complications were recorded. Major complications were predefined as periprocedural stroke, death, pericardial effusion, and device embolism. Results: LAAO was performed in 20 patients. Based on CHA2DS2Vasc score (mean 4.5 ± 1.4) and HAS-BLED score (mean 4.7 ± 1.0), annual risks of stroke and hemorrhagic complications were 4.0%–6.7% and 8.7%–12.5%, respectively. No patient had a procedure-related complication. Minor postprocedural complications were observed in 4/20 patients (2 inguinal hematoma, 1 self-limiting asystole, and 1 thrombus formation on device). No ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke occurred during a mean follow-up of 13.6 ± 8.2 months. Conclusions: In this first study of LAAO in patients with previous ICH, LAAO appears feasible and safe. A larger, controlled trial is needed to assess the efficacy and safety of the procedure compared to other preventive measures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that in patients with a history of previous ICH and AF, percutaneous LAAO is safe and feasible. PMID:24319042

  13. Calcified amorphous tumor of the left atrial appendage.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Naganuma, Toru; Nakao, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Sunao

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old female with end-stage renal dysfunction was admitted to our hospital. The echocardiogram revealed a 9mm×22mm hyperechoic mass in the left atrial appendage (LAA). The mass was extremely mobile. Considering the high risk of embolic events, we decided on a surgical resection. Microscopic examination of the mass revealed a nodular focus of calcification and fibrosis with focal chronic inflammation of the atrial endocardium. The endocardium was uniformly thickened with no evidence of neoplastic proliferation. The mass was diagnosed with a calcified amorphous tumor (CAT). This is first report of CAT of the LAA. PMID:26964029

  14. [Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage for stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Loupis, Anastasia M; Backer, Ole De; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Rosenberg, Tine S; Franzen, Olaf W; Søndergaard, Lars

    2014-09-15

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and increased risk of stroke, oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the standard treatment for stroke prevention - however, this therapy also carries a high risk of bleeding. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) has been suggested to be an alternative option for stroke prevention in AF patients with contraindication(s) for OAC treatment. In this paper, we discuss the rationale for LAA closure, the importance of a proper patient selection, as well as some pre- and post-procedural issues.

  15. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  16. Atrial Tachycardias Arising from the Atrial Appendages and Aortic Sinus of Valsalva

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Colleen M; Samardhi, Himabindu; Haqqani, Haris M

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardias arising from the atrial appendages and the aortic sinuses of Valsalva are less frequently encountered in clinical practice. This review article describes the clinical presentation, surface P wave morphology, electrophysiologic characteristics and treatment of these arrhythmias. Catheter ablation of these focal tachycardias has a high success rate. It is however important to be aware of specific anatomic considerations in these locations for optimal treatment outcomes with low complication rates. PMID:25308812

  17. Left atrial appendage closure for thromboembolism prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: advances and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Bin; Liu, Yu; Huang, He; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of stroke. More than 90% of thrombi were found in the left atrial appendage (LAA) in non-valvular AF. Transcatheter LAA closure has been developed as a novel approach to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with AF over the last decade. In this article, we review the recent advances and propose the possible challenges regarding the LAA closure for thromboembolism prevention in patients with AF. PMID:25713737

  18. Percutaneous Left Atrial Appendage Ligation for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Valderrábano, Miguel; Price, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in atrial fibrillation remains a tremendous clinical challenge. Knowledge that the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the most common anatomical origin of cardioembolic strokes1 has been the main motivation to develop clinical and procedural strategies to exclude the LAA from the circulation, either surgically or percutaneously. This review discusses the rationale behind these strategies, their relative merits, and future prospects for LAA exclusion strategies. PMID:26306126

  19. Right Atrial Appendage Aneurysm in a Newborn Diagnosed with Fetal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Yartaşı Tik, Elif; Öztarhan, Kazım; Dedeoğlu, Reyhan; Çetinkaya, Merih

    2016-01-01

    Right atrial appendage aneurysm is a very rare condition which can be asymptomatic or can cause arrhythmia or life-threatening thromboembolism. We report a case of newborn with right atrial appendage aneurysm who was diagnosed with fetal echocardiography. Anticoagulant therapy was applied to prevent thromboembolism and he is still going on follow-up without any complaint.

  20. Left Atrial Appendage Ligation and Exclusion Technology in the Incubator

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Faisal F.; Noheria, Amit; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the most feared complication of atrial fibrillation (AF). Targeting the left atrial appendage (LAA) mechanically is attractive as a means to simultaneously reduce stroke risk, the need for anticoagulation, and hemorrhagic complications in patients with non-valvular AF. The results of the PROTECT-AF and PREVAIL randomized clinical trials support this approach as a viable therapeutic alternative to warfarin in selected patients and add to accumulating evidence regarding the importance of the LAA in thromboembolism in AF. A number of devices for percutaneous LAA closure are under investigation or development. In this article, key design features of these ligation and exclusion technologies will be discussed, with a focus on aspects of LAA morphology, relational anatomy, thrombosis, and thromboembolism relevant for successful device development and deployment. PMID:27087888

  1. Partial left pericardial defect with herniation of the left atrial appendage

    PubMed Central

    Pernot, C.; Hoeffel, J C.; Henry, M.; Frisch, R.; Brauer, B.

    1972-01-01

    A case is reported of herniation of the left atrial appendage through a partial pericardial defect, probably congenital. The diagnosis was suggested by the history of chest pain and bulging of the middle segment of the left heart border on the plain chest film, without other signs. Angiography revealed a dilated left atrial appendage. An artificial left pneumothorax confirmed the presence of a pleuropericardial defect. The surgical procedure included excision of the appendage and closure of the defect. Images PMID:5034603

  2. Is percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage comparable to anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Uslar, Thomas; Anabalón, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    For most atrial fibrillation patients oral anticoagulation constitutes the standard treatment to prevent stroke. However, they carry a risk of bleeding, which is why alternative treatments have been put into practice, such as percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage. It is not clear whether this is as effective as the conventional treatment with anticoagulants. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including only one pertinent randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion may decrease stroke and mortality, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The effect on other outcomes is not clear because the certainty of the evidence is very low. PMID:26335602

  3. Is percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage comparable to anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Uslar, Thomas; Anabalón, Jaime

    2015-08-17

    For most atrial fibrillation patients oral anticoagulation constitutes the standard treatment to prevent stroke. However, they carry a risk of bleeding, which is why alternative treatments have been put into practice, such as percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage. It is not clear whether this is as effective as the conventional treatment with anticoagulants. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including only one pertinent randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion may decrease stroke and mortality, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The effect on other outcomes is not clear because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  4. Effect of ramipril therapy on abnormal left atrial appendage function.

    PubMed

    Asker, M; Timucin, O B; Asker, S; Karadag, M F

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether ramipril treatment has a beneficial effect on left atrial appendage (LAA) function in patients with systemic hypertension in sinus rhythm. Patients with untreated systemic hypertension and normal left ventricular systolic function in sinus rhythm (n = 20; six males/14 females; age 35 - 69 years, mean ± SD 52.8 ± 8.9 years) were evaluated using transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with 5 mg/day ramipril. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly after ramipril therapy. Baseline LAA emptying velocity was below the age-related reference value for this parameter, indicating abnormal LAA function. There were significant increases in the LAA filling and emptying velocities after ramipril treatment. It is concluded that the decrease in blood pressure and haemodynamic improvements brought about by ramipril therapy resulted in improved LAA function in hypertensive patients with normal left ventricular systolic function in sinus rhythm.

  5. The left atrial appendage: anatomy, function, and noninvasive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beigel, Roy; Wunderlich, Nina C; Ho, Siew Yen; Arsanjani, Reza; Siegel, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    The left atrial appendage (LAA) is a finger-like extension originating from the main body of the left atrium. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common clinically important cardiac arrhythmia, occurring in approximately 0.4% to 1% of the general population and increasing with age to >8% in those >80 years of age. In the presence of AF thrombus, formation often occurs within the LAA because of reduced contractility and stasis; thus, attention should be given to the LAA when evaluating and assessing patients with AF to determine the risk for cardioembolic complications. It is clinically important to understand LAA anatomy and function. It is also critical to choose the optimal imaging techniques to identify or exclude LAA thrombi in the setting of AF, before cardioversion, and with current and emerging transcatheter therapies, which include mitral balloon valvuloplasty, pulmonary vein isolation, MitraClip (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois) valve repair, and the implantation of LAA occlusion and exclusion devices. In this review, we present the current data regarding LAA anatomy, LAA function, and LAA imaging using the currently available noninvasive imaging modalities.

  6. Left Atrial Appendage: Physiology, Pathology, and Role as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Regazzoli, Damiano; Ancona, Francesco; Trevisi, Nicola; Guarracini, Fabrizio; Radinovic, Andrea; Oppizzi, Michele; Agricola, Eustachio; Marzi, Alessandra; Sora, Nicoleta Carmen; Della Bella, Paolo; Mazzone, Patrizio

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common clinically relevant cardiac arrhythmia. AF poses patients at increased risk of thromboembolism, in particular ischemic stroke. The CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores are useful in the assessment of thromboembolic risk in nonvalvular AF and are utilized in decision-making about treatment with oral anticoagulation (OAC). However, OAC is underutilized due to poor patient compliance and contraindications, especially major bleedings. The Virchow triad synthesizes the pathogenesis of thrombogenesis in AF: endocardial dysfunction, abnormal blood stasis, and altered hemostasis. This is especially prominent in the left atrial appendage (LAA), where the low flow reaches its minimum. The LAA is the remnant of the embryonic left atrium, with a complex and variable morphology predisposing to stasis, especially during AF. In patients with nonvalvular AF, 90% of thrombi are located in the LAA. So, left atrial appendage occlusion could be an interesting and effective procedure in thromboembolism prevention in AF. After exclusion of LAA as an embolic source, the remaining risk of thromboembolism does not longer justify the use of oral anticoagulants. Various surgical and catheter-based methods have been developed to exclude the LAA. This paper reviews the physiological and pathophysiological role of the LAA and catheter-based methods of LAA exclusion.

  7. Left atrial appendage closure for prevention of cardioembolic events.

    PubMed

    Gloekler, Steffen; Meier, Bernhard; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common atrial arrhythmia, with a prevalence of 1-2% in the general population. It increases with age, affecting approximately 7% of individuals age >65 years and 15-20% of octogenarians. The human left atrium has a blind sac-like remnant, called left atrial appendage (LAA). It originates from a primordial pulmonary vein. Due to its complicated structure, blind end and inner surface trabeculated by pectinate muscles, thrombi in nonvalvular AF form almost exclusively in the LAA and not in the smooth-walled left atrium. For the last 50 years, oral anticoagulation (OAC) with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) has been the only treatment option to prevent stroke and systemic embolism from thrombi in AF. More recently, non-vitamin K-dependant oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been shown to be noninferior or even superior to VKA with respect to efficacy and safety. In light of the limitations of indefinite OAC, particularly among patients at increased risk for bleeding and because thrombi arise predominantly from the LAA among AF patients, exclusion of the LAA with closure devices (LAAC) provides a novel treatment strategy for prevention of stroke and bleeding. Recently, LAAC has been compared with VKA therapy in prospective randomised trials with promising results. Today, the decision to provide the most appropriate treatment for a patient with AF (OAC, NOAC or LAAC) is complex and needs to be individualised. This review provides an update on the current state of LAAC in the field of stroke prevention in patients suffering from nonvalvular AF. We describe the pathophysiology of the LAA with regard to stroke. Aside from the evidence and limitations of anticoagulation as the classical treatment paradigm for stroke prevention, devices and techniques for LAAC are outlined and the current clinical evidence with regard to efficacy and safety is reviewed. Finally, contemporary recommendations for patient selection are provided. PMID:27244534

  8. Left atrial appendage dysfunction in a patient with premature ventricular contractions - a risk factor for stroke?

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandeep M; Ackerman, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old female with ventricular dysfunction and frequent ventricular arrhythmia presented with a cardioembolic stroke. Prior electrophysiology study and ablation was performed for ventricular tachycardia (VT). For remaining ventricular ectopy, the patient was maintained on carvedilol and mexiletine. After one year on this regimen, she presented with an acute stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed no evidence of an intracardiac or ventricular thrombus but demonstrated markedly decreased left atrial appendage (LAA) flow velocity worsened during frequent premature ventricular contractions (PVC). In the absence of atrial fibrillation (AF), the LAA dysfunction was considered secondary to the frequent PVCs and was thought to be the underlying cause for the stroke. We present this case to highlight a potential under recognized association between LAA dysfunction and ventricular arrhythmia, similar to that observed with atrioventricular dyssynchronous pacing. PMID:24086095

  9. Closure of Left Atrial Appendage With Persistent Distal Thrombus Using an Amplatzer Amulet Occluder.

    PubMed

    Lange, Mathias; Bültel, Helmut; Weglage, Heinrich; Löffeld, Patrick; Wichter, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A 73-year-old patient with permanent atrial fibrillation presented for left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated a thrombus in the distal LAA. This image series illustrates a "no touch" technique that was used to ensure successful implantation of an Amplatzer Amulet LAA occlusion device without the use of an embolization protection system. PMID:27591691

  10. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards.

  11. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards. PMID:27354151

  12. Efficacy of anticoagulation in resolving left atrial and left atrial appendage thrombi: A transesophageal echocardiographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaber, W. A.; Prior, D. L.; Thamilarasan, M.; Grimm, R. A.; Thomas, J. D.; Klein, A. L.; Asher, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for evaluation of the left atrium and the left atrial appendage (LAA) for the presence of thrombi. Anticoagulation is conventionally used for patients with atrial fibrillation to prevent embolization of atrial thrombi. The mechanism of benefit and effectiveness of thrombi resolution with anticoagulation is not well defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a TEE database of 9058 consecutive studies performed between January 1996 and November 1998 to identify all patients with thrombi reported in the left atrium and/or LAA. One hundred seventy-four patients with thrombi in the left atrial cavity (LAC) and LAA were identified (1.9% of transesophageal studies performed). The incidence of LAA thrombi was 6.6 times higher than LAC thrombi (151 vs 23, respectively). Almost all LAC thrombi were visualized on transthoracic echocardiography (90.5%). Mitral valve pathology was associated with LAC location of thrombi (P <.0001), whereas atrial fibrillation or flutter was present in most patients with LAA location of thrombi. Anticoagulation of 47 +/- 18 days was associated with thrombus resolution in 80.1% of the patients on follow-up TEE. Further anticoagulation resulted in limited additional benefit. CONCLUSIONS: LAC thrombi are rare and are usually associated with mitral valve pathology. Transthoracic echocardiography is effective in identifying these thrombi. LAA thrombi occur predominantly in patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter. Short-term anticoagulation achieves a high rate of resolution of LAA and LAC thrombi but does not obviate the need for follow-up TEE.

  13. Identifying Future Research Priorities Using Value of Information Analyses: Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Devices in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Micieli, Andrew; Bennell, Maria C.; Pham, Ba’; Krahn, Murray; Singh, Sheldon M.; Wijeysundera, Harindra C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Left atrial appendage occlusion devices are cost effective for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation when compared with dabigatran or warfarin. We illustrate the use of value‐of‐information analyses to quantify the degree and consequences of decisional uncertainty and to identify future research priorities. Methods and Results A microsimulation decision‐analytic model compared left atrial appendage occlusion devices to dabigatran or warfarin in atrial fibrillation. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis quantified the degree of parameter uncertainty. Expected value of perfect information analyses showed the consequences of this uncertainty. Expected value of partial perfect information analyses were done on sets of input parameters (cost, utilities, and probabilities) to identify the source of the greatest uncertainty. One‐way sensitivity analyses identified individual parameters for expected value of partial perfect information analyses. Population expected value of perfect information and expected value of partial perfect information provided an upper bound on the cost of future research. Substantial uncertainty was identified, with left atrial appendage occlusion devices being preferred in only 47% of simulations. The expected value of perfect information was $8542 per patient and $227.3 million at a population level. The expected value of partial perfect information for the set of probability parameters represented the most important source of uncertainty, at $6875. Identified in 1‐way sensitivity analyses, the expected value of partial perfect information for the odds ratio for stroke with left atrial appendage occlusion compared with warfarin was calculated at $7312 per patient or $194.5 million at a population level. Conclusion The relative efficacy of stroke reduction with left atrial appendage occlusion devices in relation to warfarin is an important source of uncertainty. Improving estimates of this parameter should be the priority

  14. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure: Technical aspects and prevention of periprocedural complications with the watchman device

    PubMed Central

    Möbius-Winkler, Sven; Majunke, Nicolas; Sandri, Marcus; Mangner, Norman; Linke, Axel; Stone, Gregg W; Dähnert, Ingo; Schuler, Gerhard; Sick, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter closure of the left atrial appendage has been developed as an alternative to chronic oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, and as a primary therapy for patients with contraindications to chronic oral anticoagulation. The promise of this new intervention compared with warfarin has been supported by several, small studies and two pivotal randomized trial with the Watchman Device. The results regarding risk reduction for stroke have been favourable although acute complications were not infrequent. Procedural complications, which are mainly related to transseptal puncture and device implantation, include air embolism, pericardial effusions/tamponade and device embolization. Knowledge of nature, management and prevention of complications should minimize the risk of complications and allow transcatheter left atrial appendage closure to emerge as a therapeutic option for patients with atrial fibrillation at risk for cardioembolic stroke. PMID:25717354

  15. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure: Technical aspects and prevention of periprocedural complications with the watchman device.

    PubMed

    Möbius-Winkler, Sven; Majunke, Nicolas; Sandri, Marcus; Mangner, Norman; Linke, Axel; Stone, Gregg W; Dähnert, Ingo; Schuler, Gerhard; Sick, Peter B

    2015-02-26

    Transcatheter closure of the left atrial appendage has been developed as an alternative to chronic oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, and as a primary therapy for patients with contraindications to chronic oral anticoagulation. The promise of this new intervention compared with warfarin has been supported by several, small studies and two pivotal randomized trial with the Watchman Device. The results regarding risk reduction for stroke have been favourable although acute complications were not infrequent. Procedural complications, which are mainly related to transseptal puncture and device implantation, include air embolism, pericardial effusions/tamponade and device embolization. Knowledge of nature, management and prevention of complications should minimize the risk of complications and allow transcatheter left atrial appendage closure to emerge as a therapeutic option for patients with atrial fibrillation at risk for cardioembolic stroke. PMID:25717354

  16. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: an update

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, O; Arnous, S; Ihlemann, N; Vejlstrup, N; Jørgensen, E; Pehrson, S; Krieger, T D W; Meier, P; Søndergaard, L; Franzen, O W

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. One of its most devastating complications is the development of thromboembolism leading to fatal or disabling stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC, warfarin) is the standard treatment for stroke prevention in patients with AF with an increased stroke risk. However, there are several obstacles to long-term OAC therapy, including the risk of serious bleeding, several drug–drug interactions and the need for frequent blood testing. Although newer oral anticoagulants have been developed, these drugs also face issues of major bleeding and non-compliance. Therefore, alternative treatment options for stroke prevention in patients with AF with a high stroke risk are needed. Percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion is an evolving therapy, which should be taken into consideration in those patients with non-valvular AF with a high stroke risk and contraindications for OAC. This article aims to discuss the rationale for LAA closure, the available LAA occlusion devices and their clinical evidence until now. Moreover, we discuss the importance of proper patient selection, the role of various imaging techniques and the need for a more tailored postprocedural antithrombotic therapy. PMID:25332785

  17. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Guided by Integrated Echocardiography and Fluoroscopy Imaging Reduces Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Jan; Eickholt, Christian; Petersen, Margot; Kehmeier, Eva; Veulemans, Verena; Kelm, Malte; Willems, Stephan; Meyer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure guided by automated real-time integration of 2D-/3D-transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and fluoroscopy imaging results in decreased radiation exposure. Methods and Results In this open-label single-center study LAA closure (AmplatzerTM Cardiac Plug) was performed in 34 consecutive patients (8 women; 73.1±8.5 years) with (n = 17, EN+) or without (n = 17, EN-) integrated echocardiography/fluoroscopy imaging guidance (EchoNavigator® [EN]; Philips Healthcare). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between both groups. Successful LAA closure was documented in all patients. Radiation dose was reduced in the EN+ group about 52% (EN+: 48.5±30.7 vs. EN-: 93.9±64.4 Gy/cm2; p = 0.01). Corresponding to the radiation dose fluoroscopy time was reduced (EN+: 16.7±7 vs. EN-: 24.0±11.4 min; p = 0.035). These advantages were not at the cost of increased procedure time (89.6±28.8 vs. 90.1±30.2 min; p = 0.96) or periprocedural complications. Contrast media amount was comparable between both groups (172.3±92.7 vs. 197.5±127.8 ml; p = 0.53). During short-term follow-up of at least 3 months (mean: 8.1±5.9 months) no device-related events occurred. Conclusions Automated real-time integration of echocardiography and fluoroscopy can be incorporated into procedural work-flow of percutaneous left atrial appendage closure without prolonging procedure time. This approach results in a relevant reduction of radiation exposure. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01262508 PMID:26465747

  18. Coherex WAVECREST I Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-13

    Non-valvular Paroxysmal, Persistent, or Permanent Atrial Fibrillation; LAA Anatomy Amenable to Treatment by Percutaneous Technique; Anticoagulation Indication for Potential Thrombus Formation in the Left Atrium

  19. Transcatheter closure of the left atrial appendage: initial experience with the WATCHMAN device

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiandong; Zhu, Jian; Lu, Jing; Ding, Xiuxia; Zhang, Xiaoli; Lu, Wenbin; Ao, Mingqiang; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly encountered clinical arrhythmia, accounting for approximately one third of hospitalizations for cardiac rhythm disturbance. In patients with non-valvular AF, approximately 90% of thrombi are thought to arise from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Anticoagulation with warfarin has been the mainstay of therapy to reduce stroke risk in these patients; however, it is not without its complications including bleeding and drug interactions. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure can be an alternative to warfarin treatment in patients with AF at high risk for thromboembolic events and/or bleeding complications. Methods: Patients with atrial fibrillation and CHADSVASc score ≥ 2, not eligible for anticoagulation, were submitted to left atrial appendage closure using the WATCHMAN device. The procedure was performed under general anaesthesia, and was guided by fluoroscopy and transoesophageal echocardiography. Results: Percutaneous LAA closure with the WATCHMAN device was performed in all patients. At 45-day follow-up no recurrent major adverse events and especially no thromboembolic events occurred. Conclusions: Transcatheter closure of the LAA with the WATCHMAN device is generally safe and feasible. Long-term follow-up will further reveal the risk and benefits of this therapy. PMID:26629008

  20. Cost effectiveness of left atrial appendage closure with the Watchman device for atrial fibrillation patients with absolute contraindications to warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vivek Y.; Akehurst, Ronald L.; Armstrong, Shannon O.; Amorosi, Stacey L.; Brereton, Nic; Hertz, Deanna S.; Holmes, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with contraindications to oral anticoagulation have had few options for stroke prevention. Recently, a novel oral anticoagulant, apixaban, and percutaneous left atrial appendage closure (LAAC) have emerged as safe and effective therapies for stroke risk reduction in these patients. This analysis assessed the cost effectiveness of LAAC with the Watchman device relative to apixaban and aspirin therapy in patients with non-valvular AF and contraindications to warfarin therapy. Methods and results A cost-effectiveness model was constructed using data from three studies on stroke prevention in patients with contraindications: the ASAP study evaluating the Watchman device, the ACTIVE A trial of aspirin and clopidogrel, and the AVERROES trial evaluating apixaban. The cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted from a German healthcare payer perspective over a 20-year time horizon. Left atrial appendage closure yielded more quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) than aspirin and apixaban by 2 and 4 years, respectively. At 5 years, LAAC was cost effective compared with aspirin with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €16 971. Left atrial appendage closure was cost effective compared with apixaban at 7 years with an ICER of €9040. Left atrial appendage closure was cost saving and more effective than aspirin and apixaban at 8 years and remained so throughout the 20-year time horizon. Conclusions This analysis demonstrates that LAAC with the Watchman device is a cost-effective and cost-saving solution for stroke risk reduction in patients with non-valvular AF who are at risk for stroke but have contraindications to warfarin. PMID:26838691

  1. Left Atrial Appendage Morphology in Patients with Suspected Cardiogenic Stroke without Known Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Miika; Muuronen, Antti; Arponen, Otso; Mustonen, Pirjo; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Vanninen, Ritva; Taina, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation. Whether LAA morphology is associated with increased stroke/TIA risk is controversial and, if it does, which morphological type most predisposes to thrombus formation. We assessed LAA morphology in stroke patients with cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology and in age- and gender-matched healthy controls. LAA morphology and volume were analyzed by cardiac computed tomography in 111 patients (74 males; mean age 60 ± 11 years) with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF). A subgroup of 40 patients was compared to an age- and gender-matched control group of 40 healthy individuals (21 males in each; mean age 54 ± 9 years). LAA was classified into four morphology types (Cactus, ChickenWing, WindSock, CauliFlower) modified with a quantitative qualifier. The proportions of LAA morphology types in the main stroke group, matched stroke subgroup, and control group were as follows: Cactus (9.0%, 5.0%, 20.0%), ChickenWing (23.4%, 37.5%, 10.0%), WindSock (47.7%, 35.0%, 67.5%), and CauliFlower (19.8%, 22.5%, 2.5%). The distribution of morphology types differed significantly (P<0.001) between the matched stroke subgroup and control group. The proportion of single-lobed LAA was significantly higher (P<0.001) in the matched stroke subgroup (55%) than the control group (6%). LAA volumes were significantly larger (P<0.001) in both stroke study groups compared to controls patients. To conclude, LAA morphology differed significantly between stroke patients and controls, and single-lobed LAAs were overrepresented and LAA volume was larger in patients with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology. PMID:25751618

  2. Early Experience Using a Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Device in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Ly; Joung, Boyoung; On, Young Keun; Shim, Chi Young; Lee, Moon Hyoung; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the major risk factors for ischemic stroke, and 90% of thromboembolisms in these patients arise from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Recently, it has been documented that an LAA occlusion device (OD) is not inferior to warfarin therapy, and that it reduces mortality and risk of stroke in patients with AF. Materials and Methods We implanted LAA-ODs in 5 Korean patients (all male, 59.8±7.3 years old) with long-standing persistent AF or permanent AF via a percutaneous trans-septal approach. Results 1) The major reasons for LAA-OD implantation were high risk of recurrent stroke (80%), labile international neutralizing ratio with hemorrhage (60%), and 3/5 (60%) patients had a past history of failed cardioversion for rhythm control. 2) The mean LA size was 51.3±5.0 mm and LAA size was 25.1×30.1 mm. We implanted the LAA-OD (28.8±3.4 mm device) successfully in all 5 patients with no complications. 3) After eight weeks of anticoagulation, all patients switched from warfarin to anti-platelet agent after confirmation of successful LAA occlusion by trans-esophageal echocardiography. Conclusion We report on our early experience with LAA-OD deployment in patients with 1) persistent or permanent AF who cannot tolerate anticoagulation despite significant risk of ischemic stroke, or 2) recurrent stroke in patients who are unable to maintain sinus rhythm. PMID:22187236

  3. [Successful direct thrombin inhibitor treatment of a left atrial appendage thrombus developed under rivaroxaban therapy].

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Nándor; Gellér, László; Tahin, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Széplaki, Gábor

    2016-01-24

    The authors present the history of a 62-year-old man on continuous rivaroxaban therapy who was scheduled for pulmonary vein isolation due to persistent atrial fibrillation. Preoperative transesophageal echocardiography detected the presence of left atrial appendage thrombus. Thrombophilia tests showed that the patient was heterozygous carrier of the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation. The authors hypothesized that a direct thrombin inhibitor might exert a more appropriate effect against thrombosis in this case and, therefore, a switch to dabigatran was performed. After two months of anticoagulation with the direct thrombin inhibitor and folic acid supplementation the thrombus resolved. The authors underline that thrombus formation may develop in atrial fibrillation even if the patient is adequately treated with rivaroxaban. This case suggests, that methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation may modulate the efficacy of direct Xa factor inhibitors. According to this case history, dabigatran may be an effective therapeutic option in resolving established thrombus.

  4. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure devices: safety, efficacy, and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Swaans, Martin J; Wintgens, Lisette IS; Alipour, Arash; Rensing, Benno JWM; Boersma, Lucas VA

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia treated in the clinical practice. One of the major complications of AF is a thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event. Up to 20% of all strokes are caused by AF. Thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event in patients with AF occurs due to atrial thrombi, mainly from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Prevention of clot formation with antiplatelet agents and especially oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonists or newer oral anticoagulants) has been shown to be effective in reducing the stroke risk in patients with AF but has several drawbacks with (major) bleedings as the most important disadvantage. Therefore, physical elimination of the LAA, which excludes the site of clot formation by surgical or percutaneous techniques, might be a good alternative. In this review, we discuss the safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of the Watchman™ LAA closure device.

  5. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure devices: safety, efficacy, and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Swaans, Martin J; Wintgens, Lisette IS; Alipour, Arash; Rensing, Benno JWM; Boersma, Lucas VA

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia treated in the clinical practice. One of the major complications of AF is a thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event. Up to 20% of all strokes are caused by AF. Thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event in patients with AF occurs due to atrial thrombi, mainly from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Prevention of clot formation with antiplatelet agents and especially oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonists or newer oral anticoagulants) has been shown to be effective in reducing the stroke risk in patients with AF but has several drawbacks with (major) bleedings as the most important disadvantage. Therefore, physical elimination of the LAA, which excludes the site of clot formation by surgical or percutaneous techniques, might be a good alternative. In this review, we discuss the safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of the Watchman™ LAA closure device. PMID:27621674

  6. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure devices: safety, efficacy, and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Swaans, Martin J; Wintgens, Lisette Is; Alipour, Arash; Rensing, Benno Jwm; Boersma, Lucas Va

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia treated in the clinical practice. One of the major complications of AF is a thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event. Up to 20% of all strokes are caused by AF. Thromboembolic cerebral ischemic event in patients with AF occurs due to atrial thrombi, mainly from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Prevention of clot formation with antiplatelet agents and especially oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonists or newer oral anticoagulants) has been shown to be effective in reducing the stroke risk in patients with AF but has several drawbacks with (major) bleedings as the most important disadvantage. Therefore, physical elimination of the LAA, which excludes the site of clot formation by surgical or percutaneous techniques, might be a good alternative. In this review, we discuss the safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of the Watchman™ LAA closure device. PMID:27621674

  7. Rationale and design of the Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Study (LAAOS) III

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Jeff; Vincent, Jessica; Brady, Kate; Teoh, Kevin; Royse, Alistair; Shah, Pallav; Guo, Yingqiang; Alings, Marco; Folkeringa, Richard J.; Paparella, Domenico; Colli, Andrea; Meyer, Steven R.; Legare, Jean-François; Lamontagne, François; Reents, Wilko; Böning, Andreas; Connolly, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Background Occlusion of the left atrial appendage (LAA) is a promising approach to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, evidence of its efficacy and safety to date is lacking. We herein describe the rationale and design of a definitive LAA occlusion trial in cardiac surgical patients with AF. Methods We plan to randomize 4,700 patients with AF in whom on-pump cardiac surgical procedure is planned to undergo LAA occlusion or no LAA occlusion. The primary outcome is the first occurrence of stroke or systemic arterial embolism over a mean follow-up of four years. Other outcomes include total mortality, operative safety outcomes (chest tube output in the first post-operative 24 hours, rate of post-operative re-exploration for bleeding in the first 48 hours post-surgery and 30-day mortality), re-hospitalization for heart failure, major bleed, and myocardial infarction. Results Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Study (LAAOS) III is funded in a vanguard phase by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), the Canadian Network and Centre for Trials Internationally, and the McMaster University Surgical Associates. As of September 9, 2013, 162 patients have been recruited into the study. Conclusions LAAOS III will be the largest trial to explore the efficacy of LAA occlusion for stroke prevention. Its results will lead to a better understanding of stroke in AF and the safety and efficacy of surgical LAA occlusion. PMID:24516797

  8. Thromboembolism Prevention via Transcatheter Left Atrial Appendage Closure with Transeosophageal Echocardiography Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Palios, John; Paraskevaidis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an independent risk factor for stroke. Anticoagulation therapy has a risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. The use of percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure devices is an alternative to anticoagulation therapy. Echocardiography has a leading role in LAA closure procedure in patient selection, during the procedure and during followup. A comprehensive echocardiography study is necessary preprocedural in order to identify all the lobes of the LAA, evaluate the size of the LAA ostium, look for thrombus or spontaneous echo contrast, and evaluate atrial anatomy, including atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale. Echocardiography is used to identify potential cardiac sources of embolism, such as atrial septal aneurysm, mitral valve disease, and aortic debris. During the LAA occlusion procedure transeosophageal echocardiography provides guidance for the transeptal puncture and monitoring during the release of the closure device. Procedure-related complications can be evaluated and acceptable device release criteria such as proper position and seating of the occluder in the LAA, compression, and stability can be assessed. Postprocedural echocardiography is used for followup to assess the closure of the LAA ostium. This overview paper describes the emerging role of LAA occlusion procedure with transeosophageal echocardiography guidance as an alternative to anticoagulation therapy in patients with AF. PMID:24672720

  9. An alternative transseptal intracardiac echocardiography strategy to guide left atrial appendage closure: the first described case.

    PubMed

    Fassini, Gaetano; Dello Russo, Antonio; Conti, Sergio; Tondo, Claudio

    2014-11-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the standard imaging technique to guide device implantation for left atrial appendage (LAA) closure. Unfortunately, TEE was contraindicated in this patient due to the high risk of variceal hemorrhage. Critical information about the exact anatomic characteristics of the LAA can be obtained using intracardiac echocardiography (ICE). However, standard right-side views do not allow a complete visualization of the LAA: in particular, a reliable left circumflex coronary artery short axis view, relevant for device positioning, is not always achievable. Transseptal views of the LAA with ICE might be used in planning an appropriate intervention strategy for patients who are not suitable for TEE imaging.

  10. A Review of the LARIAT Suture Delivery Device for Left Atrial Appendage Closure

    PubMed Central

    Safavi-Naeini, Payam; Razavi, Mehdi; Saeed, Mohammad; Rasekh, Abdi; Massumi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is 1-2 % in the general population, and the risk of embolic stroke in AF patients is 4-5 times higher than that in the general population. AF-related strokes are often severe, and the rate of permanent disability is much higher among individuals who have AF-related strokes than in those who have strokes unrelated to AF. In patients with AF, more than 90 % of thrombi originate from the left atrial appendage (LAA). The purpose of this paper is to review the efficacy and safety of performing the LAA closure with the LARIAT Suture Delivery Device to prevent AF-related stroke in patients with contraindications to oral anticoagulant therapy. PMID:26110004

  11. Fetal Heterotaxy with Tricuspid Atresia, Pulmonary Atresia, and Isomerism of the Right Atrial Appendages at 22 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Julia E.; Stock, John H.; Richardson, Randy R.; Silverman, Norman H.

    2013-01-01

    We report the accurate prenatal diagnosis at 22 weeks gestation of right atrial isomerism in association with tricuspid atresia. Several distinctive sonographic features of isomerism of the right atrial appendages were present in this fetus: complex cardiac abnormality, ventriculoarterial discordance, juxtaposition of the aorta and the inferior vena cava to the right side, pulmonary atresia, and anomalous pulmonary venous return to the morphological right atrium. Tricuspid atresia, which is an extremely rare lesion within heterotaxy spectrum disorders, was present. Postnatal investigations confirmed all prenatally diagnosed abnormalities, with additional findings of pulmonary atresia with discontinuous pulmonary arteries and bilateral arterial ducts, asplenia, and bilateral eparterial bronchi. To our knowledge, tricuspid atresia in the setting of isomerism of the right atrial appendages has not previously been diagnosed or reported prenatally. Because of the complexity of cardiac lesions that may be present in cases of atrial isomerism, these disorders should be considered even if sonographic findings are uncommon or atypical. PMID:24147244

  12. Treatment of lone atrial fibrillation: minimally invasive pulmonary vein isolation, partial cardiac denervation and excision of the left atrial appendage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since 1999, my colleagues and I have diligently pursued a minimally invasive surgical, beating-heart, left atrial isolation technique that is offered to patients with lone atrial fibrillation (AF). We began clinical cases in 2003. In 2005, we reported our initial experience with video-assisted bilateral pulmonary vein (PV) isolation and left atrial appendage (LAA) exclusion for the minimally invasive treatment of AF (Wolf technique). From our experience in over 1,000 cases there have been many lessons learned in the evaluation, selection and minimally invasive surgical treatment of patients with lone AF. In our experience we have had zero mortality and no conversions to sternotomy. Recently we reviewed 157 patients who are now 1 to 9 years out from the Wolf technique. The patients’ ages ranged from 15 to 87 years old. The AF-free rate for paroxysmal AF was 92%, for persistent AF 85%, and for long-standing persistent AF 75%. The follow-up included 7-day continuous monitoring. There were no deaths (personal review). The Wolf technique is a safe and effective treatment for selected patients with lone AF. PMID:24516806

  13. Postoperative pulmonary hypertensive crisis caused by inverted left atrial appendage after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qifeng; Hu, Xingti

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary hypertensive crisis (PHC) caused by an inverted left atrial appendage (ILAA) is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. We present a case of 23 day-old male infant who developed postoperative PHC attacks after undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery for repair of the coactation of aorta. A hyperechogenic left atrial mass was detected via bedside transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), which was identified as an ILAA and corrected following repeat surgery. In this case, both the negative pressure in vent catheter and the long left atrial appendage (LAA) with a narrow base led to an irreversible ILAA. As in this neonate, ILAA had significant influence on the left atrial volume and caused PHC since the ILAA was located on the mitral valve orifice and interfered with the blood flow through the valve. Therefore, we recommend that the vent catheter should be turned off before removing to avoid this potential complication. Additionally, LAA should be carefully inspected after CPB surgery, and intra-operative and post-operative transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) should be performed to detect ILAA intraoperatively so as to avoid the reoperation. When an ILAA is diagnosed postoperatively, whether conservative treatment or surgery will depend on the balance of benefit and risk for a particular patient.

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Detection of Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus: A Useful Technique in Patients with Transesophageal Echocardiography Contraindication

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Román, Alfonso; López-Viedma, Bartolomé; Piqueras-Flores, Jesús; López-Lluva, María T.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a diagnostic and therapeutic technique used in specialized centers for patients that have undergone digestive procedures. This technique enables highly precise real-time imaging of the digestive tract wall and surrounding organs. Endoscopic ultrasound is also useful in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation. In patients with contraindication for transesophageal echocardiography due to high risk of esophageal bleeding or complications that may require immediate intervention, endoscopic ultrasound may be a safer option for visualizing atrial chambers to rule out the presence of left atrial appendage thrombi before cardioversion.

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Detection of Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus: A Useful Technique in Patients with Transesophageal Echocardiography Contraindication.

    PubMed

    Marina-Breysse, Manuel; Jurado-Román, Alfonso; López-Viedma, Bartolomé; Piqueras-Flores, Jesús; López-Lluva, María T

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a diagnostic and therapeutic technique used in specialized centers for patients that have undergone digestive procedures. This technique enables highly precise real-time imaging of the digestive tract wall and surrounding organs. Endoscopic ultrasound is also useful in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation. In patients with contraindication for transesophageal echocardiography due to high risk of esophageal bleeding or complications that may require immediate intervention, endoscopic ultrasound may be a safer option for visualizing atrial chambers to rule out the presence of left atrial appendage thrombi before cardioversion. PMID:27642527

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Detection of Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus: A Useful Technique in Patients with Transesophageal Echocardiography Contraindication

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Román, Alfonso; López-Viedma, Bartolomé; Piqueras-Flores, Jesús; López-Lluva, María T.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a diagnostic and therapeutic technique used in specialized centers for patients that have undergone digestive procedures. This technique enables highly precise real-time imaging of the digestive tract wall and surrounding organs. Endoscopic ultrasound is also useful in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation. In patients with contraindication for transesophageal echocardiography due to high risk of esophageal bleeding or complications that may require immediate intervention, endoscopic ultrasound may be a safer option for visualizing atrial chambers to rule out the presence of left atrial appendage thrombi before cardioversion. PMID:27642527

  17. Combined catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation and Watchman® left atrial appendage occlusion procedures: Five-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Karen P.; Walker, Daniel T.; Humphries, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) may benefit from undergoing concomitant interventions of left atrial catheter ablation and device occlusion of the left atrial appendage (LAA) as a two-pronged strategy for rhythm control and stroke prevention. We report on the outcome of combined procedures in a single center case series over a 5-year timeframe. Methods Ninety-eight patients with non-valvular AF and a mean CHA2DS2-VASc score 2.6±1.0 underwent either first time, or redo pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) procedures, followed by successful implant of a Watchman® device. Results All procedures were generally uncomplicated with a mean case time of 213±40 min. Complete LAA occlusion was achieved at initial implant in 92 (94%) patients. Satisfactory LAA occlusion was achieved in 100% of patients at 12 months, with a complete LAA occlusion rate of 86%. All patients discontinued oral anticoagulation. Persistent late peri-device leaks were more frequently associated with device angulation or shoulder protrusion, and were associated with a significantly lower achieved device compression of 12±3% vs. 15±5% (p<0.01) than complete occlusion. One ischemic stroke was recorded over a mean follow-up time of 802±439 days. Twelve months׳ freedom from detectable AF was achieved in 77% of patients. Conclusions Combined procedures of catheter ablation for AF and Watchman® LAA implant appear to be feasible and safe, with excellent rates of LAA occlusion achieved and an observed stroke rate of 0.5% per year during mid-term follow-up. Incomplete occlusion was associated with lower achieved device compression and was more frequently associated with suboptimal device position. PMID:27092193

  18. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure: procedural techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jacqueline; Lempereur, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure technology for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation has significantly advanced in the past 2 decades. Several devices are under clinical investigation, and a few have already received Conformité Européene (CE)-mark approval and are available in many countries. The WATCHMAN device (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts) has the most supportive data and is under evaluation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for warfarin-eligible patients. The Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (St. Jude Medical, Plymouth, Minnesota) has a large real-world experience over the past 5 years, and a randomized trial comparing Amplatzer Cardiac Plug with the WATCHMAN device is anticipated in the near future. The Lariat procedure (SentreHEART Inc., Redwood City, California) has also gained interest lately, but early studies were concerning for high rates of serious pericardial effusion and major bleeding. The current real-world experience predominantly involves patients who are not long-term anticoagulation candidates or who are perceived to have high bleeding risks. This pattern of practice is expected to change when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves the WATCHMAN device for warfarin-eligible patients. This paper reviews in depth the procedural techniques, safety, and outcomes of the current leading devices.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Left Appendage Closure in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minesh R.; Biviano, Angelo B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) experience an increased morbidity and mortality from the hemodynamic consequences of AF and an increased stroke risk. Consequently, there has been increased attention to procedural alternatives to pharmacologic rhythm control and anticoagulation for stroke prevention. This review aims to evaluate the evidence for AF ablation and left atrial appendage (LAA) closure in HF patients. Recent Findings Several randomized control trials and systematic reviews support prior literature demonstrating the safety and efficacy of AF ablation in patients with HF and LV systolic dysfunction. In multiple trials, these patients have shown clinical benefit from AF ablation including improved LV systolic function, quality of life, and clinical HF symptoms. The evidence and clinical benefit of AF ablation in HF patients with preserved ejection fraction remains limited. Only a handful of randomized control trials have been performed evaluating LAA closure and there is insufficient data regarding the safety and efficacy of these procedures in HF patients. Summary AF ablation in HF patients remains safe with an overall efficacy comparable to AF ablation in patients without HF. There is consistent evidence for the clinical benefit of AF ablation in HF patients with LV systolic dysfunction and limited evidence for AF ablation in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction. Currently there is insufficient data regarding the safety and efficacy of LAA closure devices in HF patients. PMID:25807223

  20. Early Safety and Efficacy of Percutaneous Left Atrial Appendage Suture Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Price, Matthew J.; Gibson, Douglas N.; Yakubov, Steven J.; Schultz, Jason C.; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Burkhardt, J. David; Pershad, Ashish; Byrne, Timothy J.; Gidney, Brett; Aragon, Joseph R.; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Moulton, Kriegh; Patel, Taral; Knight, Bradley; Lin, Albert C.; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transcatheter left atrial appendage (LAA) ligation may represent an alternative to oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.. OBJECTIVES This study sought to assess the early safety and efficacy of transcatheter ligation of the LAA for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.. METHODS This was a retrospective, multicenter study of consecutive patients undergoing LAA ligation with the Lariat device at 8 U.S. sites. The primary endpoint was procedural success, defined as device success (suture deployment and <5 mm leak by post-procedure transesophageal echocardiography), and no major complication at discharge (death, myocardial infarction, stroke, Bleeding Academic Research Consortium bleeding type 3 or greater, or cardiac surgery). Post-discharge management was per operator discretion. RESULTS A total of 154 patients were enrolled. Median CHADS2 score (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke, transient ischemic attack, or thromboembolism [doubled]) was 3 (interquartile range: 2 to 4). Device success was 94%, and procedural success was 86%. A major complication occurred in 15 patients (9.7%). There were 14 major bleeds (9.1%), driven by the need for transfusion (4.5%). Significant pericardial effusion occurred in 16 patients (10.4%). Follow-up was available in 134 patients at a median of 112 days (interquartile range: 50 to 270 days): Death, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 4 patients (2.9%). Among 63 patients with acute closure and transesophageal echocardiography follow-up, there were 3 thrombi (4.8%) and 13 (20%) with residual leak. CONCLUSIONS In this initial multicenter experience of LAA ligation with the Lariat device, the rate of acute closure was high, but procedural success was limited by bleeding. A prospective randomized trial is required to adequately define clinical efficacy, optimal post-procedure medical therapy, and the effect of operator experience on

  1. [GISE/AIAC position paper on percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: recommendations for patient selection, facilities, competences, organizing and training requirements].

    PubMed

    Berti, Sergio; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Santoro, Gennaro; De Ponti, Roberto; Danna, Paolo; Zecchin, Massimo; Bedogni, Francesco; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    Thromboembolism from the left atrial appendage is the most feared complication in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The cornerstone for the management of chronic nonvalvular AF is stroke reduction with oral anticoagulation (OAC). However, poor compliance, maintaining a narrow therapeutic window, and major side effects such as bleeding have severely limited its use, creating a therapeutic dilemma. About 20% of AF patients do not receive OAC due to contraindications and less than half of AF patients are not on OAC due to reluctance of the prescribing physician and/or patient non-compliance. Fortunately, over the past decade, the introduction of percutaneous approaches for left atrial appendage occlusion has offered a viable alternative to the management of nonvalvular AF in patients with OAC contraindication. Occlusion devices such as the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug and Watch man device have shown their noninferiority to OAC for stroke prophylaxis with less bleeding complications, while more recently some new devices have been introduced. The aim of this position paper is to review the most relevant clinical aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion from patient selection to periprocedural and follow-up management. In addition, the importance of a medical team and an organizational environment adequate to optimize all the steps of this procedure is discussed.

  2. [GISE/AIAC position paper on percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: recommendations for patient selection, facilities, competences, organizing and training requirements].

    PubMed

    Berti, Sergio; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Santoro, Gennaro; De Ponti, Roberto; Danna, Paolo; Zecchin, Massimo; Bedogni, Francesco; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    Thromboembolism from the left atrial appendage is the most feared complication in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The cornerstone for the management of chronic nonvalvular AF is stroke reduction with oral anticoagulation (OAC). However, poor compliance, maintaining a narrow therapeutic window, and major side effects such as bleeding have severely limited its use, creating a therapeutic dilemma. About 20% of AF patients do not receive OAC due to contraindications and less than half of AF patients are not on OAC due to reluctance of the prescribing physician and/or patient non-compliance. Fortunately, over the past decade, the introduction of percutaneous approaches for left atrial appendage occlusion has offered a viable alternative to the management of nonvalvular AF in patients with OAC contraindication. Occlusion devices such as the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug and Watch man device have shown their noninferiority to OAC for stroke prophylaxis with less bleeding complications, while more recently some new devices have been introduced. The aim of this position paper is to review the most relevant clinical aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion from patient selection to periprocedural and follow-up management. In addition, the importance of a medical team and an organizational environment adequate to optimize all the steps of this procedure is discussed. PMID:25298359

  3. Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation in Combination With Left Atrial Appendage Closure: First Results of a Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Swaans, Martin J.; Post, Martijn C.; Rensing, Benno J.W.M.; Boersma, Lucas V.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) increasingly is being treated with catheter ablation. However, the long-term success rate, expressed as freedom from AF, is <50%. Therefore, vitamin K antagonists, with all their complications, remain necessary. Recently, left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion devices were introduced as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists. Here, we investigated whether AF ablation and LAA occlusion could be a feasible and safe combination in patients with symptomatic drug-refractory AF and a CHADS2 score ≥1 or a contraindication for vitamin K antagonists. Methods and Results Ablation was performed by using multielectrode catheters with phased radiofrequency energy. LAA was occluded with the Watchman device (Atritech, Inc, Plymouth, MN). Between February 2010 and February 2011, 30 patients were treated (21 male; age, 62.8±8.5 years). Median CHADS2 score was 2.5 (25th to 75th percentiles: 2 to 3), median CHADS-VASc score was 3 (25th to 75th percentiles: 3 to 5), 77% had prior stroke, and 27% had a contraindication for vitamin K antagonists. Median HAS-BLED score was 2 (range, 1 to 5). Successful device implantation was achieved with a median number of 1.5 devices (median diameter 24 mm [25th to 75th percentiles: 24 to 24 mm]). Total procedure time was 97 minutes (25th to 75th percentiles: 75 to 115 minutes). At 60 days, all patients met the criteria for successful sealing. Follow-up visit at 12 months showed a 30% rate of documented recurrence of AF. A repeated pulmonary vein isolation was performed successfully in 4 patients, without interference of the LAA closure device. No thromboembolic events occurred during 1-year follow-up. Conclusion LAA occlusion with the Watchman device and AF ablation can be combined successfully and safely in a single procedure. The Watchman does not interfere with a repeated ablation. PMID:23316289

  4. Left Atrial Appendage Volume Increased in More Than Half of Patients with Cryptogenic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taina, Mikko; Vanninen, Ritva; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Kärkkäinen, Satu; Tapiola, Tero; Sipola, Petri

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic strokes without a well-defined etiology are labeled as cryptogenic, and account for 30–40% of strokes in stroke registries. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the most typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation when associated with atrial fibrillation. Here, we examined whether increased LAA volume detected with cardiac computed tomography (cCT) constitutes a risk factor in cryptogenic stroke patients. Methods This study included 82 stroke/TIA patients (57 males; mean age, 58 years) with a diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke after extensive radiological and cardiological investigations. Cases were classified using the TOAST criteria modified by European Association of Echocardiography recommendations for defining cardiac sources of embolism. Forty age- and gender-matched control subjects without cardiovascular diseases were selected for pair-wise comparisons (21 males; mean age, 54 years). LAA volume adjusted for body surface area was measured three dimensionally by tracing the LAA borders on electrocardiogram-gated CT slices. Results In control subjects, mean LAA volume was 3.4±1.1 mL/m2. Mean+2SD, which was considered the upper limit for normal LAA volume was 5.6 mL/m2. In paired Student t-test between the patient group and matched controls, LAA volume was 67% larger in cryptogenic stroke/TIA patients (5.7±2.0 mL/m2 vs. 3.4±1.1 mL/m2; P<0.001). Forty-five (55%) patients with cryptogenic stroke/TIA had enlarged LAA. Conclusion LAA is significantly enlarged in more than half of patients with cryptogenic stroke/TIA. LAA thrombosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of stroke in patients considered to have cryptogenic stroke after conventional evaluation. PMID:24223960

  5. The role of multimodality imaging in percutaneous left atrial appendage suture ligation with the LARIAT device.

    PubMed

    Laura, Diana M; Chinitz, Larry A; Aizer, Anthony; Holmes, Douglas S; Benenstein, Ricardo; Freedberg, Robin S; Kim, Eugene E; Saric, Muhamed

    2014-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is a significant cause of embolic stroke. Although systemic anticoagulation is the primary strategy for preventing the thromboembolic complications of AF, anticoagulants carry major bleeding risks, and many patients have contraindications to their use. Because thromboembolism typically arises from a clot in the left atrial appendage (LAA), local therapeutic alternatives to systemic anticoagulation involving surgical or percutaneous exclusion of the LAA have been developed. Surgical exclusion of the LAA is typically performed only as an adjunct to other cardiac surgeries, thus limiting the number of eligible patients. Furthermore, surgical exclusion of the LAA is frequently incomplete, and thromboembolism may still occur. Percutaneous LAA exclusion includes two approaches: transseptal delivery of an occlusion device to the LAA and epicardial suture ligation of the LAA, the LARIAT procedure. In the LARIAT procedure, a pretied snare is placed around the epicardial surface of the LAA orifice via pericardial access. Proper snare placement is achieved with epicardial and endocardial magnet-tipped guidewires. The endocardial wire is advanced transvenously to the LAA apex after transseptal puncture. The epicardial wire, introduced into the pericardial space, achieves end-to-end union with the endocardial wire at the LAA apex. The snare is then placed over the LAA, tightened, and sutured. On the basis of early clinical experience, the LARIAT procedure has a high success rate of LAA exclusion with low risk for complications. The authors describe the indispensable role of real-time transesophageal echocardiography in the guidance of LAA epicardial suture ligation with the LARIAT device.

  6. Concentrations of teicoplanin in serum and atrial appendages of patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M G; Saginur, R; Desaulniers, D; Trottier, S; Goldstein, W; Foucault, P; Lessard, C

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of teicoplanin in sera and heart tissues of 49 patients undergoing coronary bypass were measured. Each patient received a 6- or 12-mg/kg dose of teicoplanin administered in a slow intravenous bolus injection over 3 to 5 min beginning at the time of induction of anesthesia. Mean +/- standard error of the mean concentrations in serum were, for the two doses, respectively, 58.1 +/- 1.7 and 123.3 +/- 7.4 micrograms/ml 5 min after administration and 22.2 +/- 0.7 and 56.5 +/- 2.8 micrograms/ml at the time of removal of atrial appendages. Mean +/- standard error of the mean concentrations in tissue were 70.6 +/- 1.7 and 139.8 +/- 2.2 micrograms/g, respectively, giving mean tissue/serum ratios of 3.7 +/- 0.3 and 2.8 +/- 0.2, respectively. Teicoplanin penetrates heart tissue readily and reaches levels in the serum far in excess of the MICs for most pathogens that have been found to cause infections following open heart surgery. PMID:2149493

  7. [ANMCO/AIAC/SICI-GISE/SIC/SICCH Consensus document: Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: indications, patient selection, competences, organization, and operator training].

    PubMed

    Casu, Gavino; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Molon, Giulio; Mazzone, Patrizio; Audo, Andrea; Casolo, Giancarlo; Di Lorenzo, Emilio; Portoghese, Michele; Pristipino, Christian; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Padeletti, Luigi; Tondo, Claudio; Berti, Sergio; Oreglia, Jacopo Andrea; Gerosa, Gino; Zanobini, Marco; Ussia, Gian Paolo; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Romeo, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and its prevalence is increasing due to the progressive aging of the population. About 20% of strokes are attributable to AF and AF patients are at 5-fold increased risk of stroke. The mainstay of treatment of AF is the prevention of thromboembolic complications with oral anticoagulation therapy. Drug treatment for many years has been based on the use of vitamin K antagonists, but recently newer and safer molecules have been introduced (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). Despite these advances, many patients still do not receive adequate anticoagulation therapy because of contraindications (relative and absolute) to this treatment. Over the last decade, percutaneous closure of left atrial appendage, main site of thrombus formation during AF, proved effective in reducing thromboembolic complications, thus offering a valid medical treatment especially in patients at increased bleeding risk. The aim of this consensus document is to review the main aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion (selection and multidisciplinary assessment of patients, currently available methods and devices, requirements for centers and operators, associated therapies and follow-up modalities) having as a ground the significant evolution of techniques and the available relevant clinical data. PMID:27571335

  8. [ANMCO/AIAC/SICI-GISE/SIC/SICCH Consensus document: Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: indications, patient selection, competences, organization, and operator training].

    PubMed

    Casu, Gavino; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Molon, Giulio; Mazzone, Patrizio; Audo, Andrea; Casolo, Giancarlo; Di Lorenzo, Emilio; Portoghese, Michele; Pristipino, Christian; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Padeletti, Luigi; Tondo, Claudio; Berti, Sergio; Oreglia, Jacopo Andrea; Gerosa, Gino; Zanobini, Marco; Ussia, Gian Paolo; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Romeo, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and its prevalence is increasing due to the progressive aging of the population. About 20% of strokes are attributable to AF and AF patients are at 5-fold increased risk of stroke. The mainstay of treatment of AF is the prevention of thromboembolic complications with oral anticoagulation therapy. Drug treatment for many years has been based on the use of vitamin K antagonists, but recently newer and safer molecules have been introduced (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). Despite these advances, many patients still do not receive adequate anticoagulation therapy because of contraindications (relative and absolute) to this treatment. Over the last decade, percutaneous closure of left atrial appendage, main site of thrombus formation during AF, proved effective in reducing thromboembolic complications, thus offering a valid medical treatment especially in patients at increased bleeding risk. The aim of this consensus document is to review the main aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion (selection and multidisciplinary assessment of patients, currently available methods and devices, requirements for centers and operators, associated therapies and follow-up modalities) having as a ground the significant evolution of techniques and the available relevant clinical data.

  9. Use of EchoNavigator, a novel echocardiography-fluoroscopy overlay system, for transseptal puncture and left atrial appendage occlusion.

    PubMed

    Gafoor, Sameer; Schulz, Philipp; Heuer, Luisa; Matic, Predrag; Franke, Jennifer; Bertog, Stefan; Reinartz, Markus; Vaskelyte, Laura; Hofmann, Ilona; Sievert, Horst

    2015-04-01

    Structural heart disease requires a coordinated effort to join echocardiographic and fluoroscopic data. Various methods have been used, including echocardiography, CT, and MRI. We report on the use of EchoNavigator (Philips Inc., Amsterdam, Netherlands), a novel echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion system. This new system allows real-time integration and marking of important structures that track on fluoroscopy even with movement of the C-arm. In this article, we describe potential uses for this system in respect to transseptal puncture and left atrial appendage closure.

  10. Application of an Epicardial Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Device by a Robotic-Assisted, Right Chest Approach.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Clifton T P; Stephens, Richard L; Horst, Vernon D; Angelillo, Margaret; Tyndal, Charles M

    2016-05-01

    Closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) has become a standard part of any mitral valve operation because it is thought to reduce the potential for late thrombus development and for embolic events. To date, surgeons performing robotic mitral valve operations have been limited to an endocardial approach to LAA closure. However, oversewing the orifice of the LAA is time consuming and lengthens the cross-clamp time, and failures to obtain permanent closure have been reported. We describe our technique for an epicardial approach that is safe and efficient and that gives a secure closure of the LAA.

  11. Resolving Thrombus in the Left Atrial Appendage by Edoxaban Treatment after Acute Ischemic Stroke: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shin; Shindo, Seigo; Tsudaka, Shun; Uchida, Kazutaka; Shirakawa, Manabu; Yoshimura, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    Here we report first 2 cases of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation with acute cardioembolic stroke in whom thrombi in the left atrial appendage (LAA) were resolved by edoxaban administration. Case 1 reports an 86-year-old woman who suddenly showed right hemiparesis and aphasia due to occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. She received mechanical thrombectomy and recovered neurologically. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) performed on day 1 demonstrated thrombus in the LAA. The thrombus was resolved on day 13 after initiation of edoxaban (30 mg once daily) instead of warfarin, which was administered before stroke onset. Case 2 reports a 49-year-old man who was admitted because of the sudden onset of left hemiparesis and aphasia. TEE demonstrated thrombus in the LAA on day 4, and edoxaban therapy (60 mg once daily) was initiated. The thrombus resolution was observed on day 16, and no embolic stroke occurred. PMID:27562709

  12. Effect of Metabolic Syndrome on Risk Stratification for Left Atrial or Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus Formation in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Yang; Liu, Qi; Liu, Li; Shu, Xiao-Rong; Su, Zi-Zhuo; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Nie, Ru-Qiong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Xie, Shuang-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a risk factor for stroke and thromboembolism event. Left atrial or LA appendage (LA/LAA) thrombus is a surrogate of potential stroke. The relationship between MS and atrial thrombus remains unclear. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of MS on risk stratification of LA/LAA thrombus formation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 294 consecutive NVAF patients without prior anticoagulant and lipid-lowering therapies. LA/LAA thrombus was determined by transesophageal echocardiography. Risk assessment of LA/LAA thrombus was performed using the CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, MS, CHADS2-MS, and CHA2DS2-VASc-MS scores. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine which factors were significantly related to LA/LAA thrombus. Odds ratio (OR) including 95% confidence interval was also calculated. The predictive powers of different scores for the risk of LA/LAA thrombus were represented by C-statistics and compared by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: LA/LAA thrombi were identified in 56 patients (19.0%). Logistic analysis showed that MS was the strongest risk factor for LA/LAA thrombus in NVAF patients (OR = 14.698, P < 0.001). ROC curve analyses revealed that the C-statistics of CHADS2-MS and CHA2DS2-VASc-MS was significantly higher than those of CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores (CHADS2-MS vs. CHADS2, 0.807 vs. 0.726, P = 0.0019). Furthermore, MS was helpful for identifying individuals with a high risk of LA/LAA thrombus in the population with a low risk of stroke (CHADS2 or CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0). Conclusions: MS is associated with LA/LAA thrombus risk in patients with NVAF. In addition to the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores, the CHADS2-MS and CHA2DS2-VASc-MS scores provide additional information on stroke risk assessment. PMID:27748329

  13. Early operative comparison of two epicardial left atrial appendage occluding systems applied during off-pump coronary revascularisation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Robert; Gryszko, Leszek; Kaczejko, Kamil; Żegadło, Arkadiusz; Frankowska, Emilia; Mróz, Jakub; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases long-term mortality and stroke rate in patients having coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Because oral anticoagulation (OAC) is associated with both a significant incidence of discontinuation and well known complication rates, left atrial appendage occlusion might be beneficial for stroke prevention. This study presents the first clinical and practical comparison of two epicardial left appendage occluders (LAAO) accruing experience in application during off-pump coronary revascularisation in patients with persistent AF. Material and methods Fifteen consecutive patients with persistent AF were assigned to intraoperative LAA occlusion with either TigerPaw System II (n = 8) or AtriClip (n = 7) device during off-pump CABG and concomitant left atrial epicardial ablation. Both systems were analysed in terms of ease and safety of application along with intraoperative LAA occlusion success. Results Surgical risk was increased in the study population (mean EuroScore II: 3.2 ± 0.3%). In all patients in the AtriClip group successful off-pump LAA occlusion confirmed by intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography was achieved. The TigerPaw application was quicker and easier, but in 2 patients it was unsuccessful. During the hospital stay there were no bleeding or thromboembolic events recorded. Conclusions In a pilot cohort epicardial LAAO during off-pump CABG in patients with persistent AF was performed safely and successfully with an AtriClip device. The TigerPaw System requires technological improvement. It might be useful to adapt the use of the type of occluding device to the LAA morphologic type and target revascularisation vessels to avoid the additional use of a heart positioner or obviate coronary compression. PMID:27212972

  14. Limb ischemia, an alarm signal to a thromboembolic cascade - renal infarction and nephrectomy followed by surgical suppression of the left atrial appendage.

    PubMed

    Caraşca, Cosmin; Borda, Angela; Incze, Alexandru; Caraşca, Emilian; Frigy, Attila; Suciu, HoraŢiu

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old male with mild hypertension and brief episodes of paroxysmal self-limiting atrial fibrillation (AF) since 2010. Despite a small cardioembolic risk score, CHA2DS2-Vasc=1 (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age=75, Diabetes melitus, prior Stroke), the patient is effectively anticoagulated using acenocumarol. In December 2014, he showed signs of plantar transitory ischemia, for which he did not address the doctor. In early January 2015, he urgently presented at the hospital with left renal pain, caused by a renal infarction, diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) angiography. Left nephrectomy was performed with pathological confirmation. He was discharged with effective anticoagulation treatment. Within the next two weeks, he suffered a transitory ischemic event and a stroke, associated with right sided hemiparesis. On admission, AF was found and converted to sinus rhythm with effective anticoagulation - international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.12. Transthoracic echocardiography detected no pathological findings. Transesophageal echocardiography showed an expended left atrial appendage (LAA) with a slow blood flow (0.2 m÷s) and spontaneous echocontrast. Considering these clinical circumstances, surgical LAA suppression was decided on as a last therapeutic resort. Postoperative evolution was favorable; the patient is still free of ischemic events, one year post-intervention. Some morphological and hemodynamic characteristics of LAA may add additional thromboembolic risk factors, not included in scores. Removing them by surgical LAA suppression may decrease the risk of cardioembolic events. Intraoperative presence of thrombus makes it an indisputable proof. PMID:27516032

  15. Implant success and safety of left atrial appendage closure with the WATCHMAN device: peri-procedural outcomes from the EWOLUTION registry

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Lucas V.A.; Schmidt, Boris; Betts, Timothy R.; Sievert, Horst; Tamburino, Corrado; Teiger, Emmanuel; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Kische, Stephan; Schmitz, Thomas; Stein, Kenneth M.; Bergmann, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Left atrial appendage closure is a non-pharmacological alternative for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. The objective of the multicentre EWOLUTION registry was to obtain clinical data on procedural success and complications, and long-term patient outcomes, including bleeding and incidence of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Here, we report on the peri-procedural outcomes of up to 30 days. Methods and results Baseline/implant data are available for 1021 subjects. Subjects in the study were at high risk of stroke (average CHADS2 score: 2.8 ± 1.3, CHA2DS2-VASc: 4.5 ± 1.6) and moderate-to-high risk of bleeding (average HAS-BLED score: 2.3 ± 1.2). Almost half of the subjects (45.4%) had a history of TIA, ischaemic stroke, or haemorrhagic stroke; 62% of patients were deemed unsuitable for novel oral anticoagulant by their physician. The device was successfully deployed in 98.5% of patients with no flow or minimal residual flow achieved in 99.3% of implanted patients. Twenty-eight subjects experienced 31 serious adverse events (SAEs) within 1 day of the procedure. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 0.7%. The most common SAE occurring within 30 days of the procedure was major bleeding requiring transfusion. Incidence of SAEs within 30 days was significantly lower for subjects deemed to be ineligible for oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) compared with those eligible for OAT (6.5 vs. 10.2%, P = 0.042). Conclusion Left atrial appendage closure with the WATCHMAN device has a high success rate in complete LAAC with low peri-procedural risk, even in a population with a higher risk of stroke and bleeding, and multiple co-morbidities. Improvement in implantation techniques has led to a reduction of peri-procedural complications previously limiting the net clinical benefit of the procedure. PMID:26822918

  16. Effectiveness of Integrating Delayed Computed Tomography Angiography Imaging for Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus Exclusion into the Care of Patients Undergoing Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bilchick, Kenneth C.; Mealor, Augustus; Gonzalez, Jorge; Norton, Patrick; Zhuo, David; Mason, Pamela; Ferguson, John D.; Malhotra, Rohit; Mangrum, J. Michael; Darby, Andrew E.; DiMarco, John; Hagspiel, Klaus; Dent, John; Kramer, Christopher M.; Stukenborg, George J.; Salerno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Computed tomography angiography (CTA) can identify and rule out left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus when delayed imaging is also performed. Objective In patients referred for CTA for pulmonary vein anatomy prior to ablation of atrial fibrillation or atypical left atrial flutter (AF), we sought to determine the effectiveness of a novel clinical protocol for integrating results of CTA delayed imaging of the LAA into pre-procedure care. Methods After making delayed imaging of the LAA part of our routine pre-ablation CTA protocol, we integrated early reporting of pre-ablation CTA LAA imaging results into clinical practice as part of a formal protocol in June 2013. We then analyzed the effectiveness of this protocol by evaluating 320 AF ablation patients with CTA imaging during 2012–2014. Results Among CTA patients with delayed LAA imaging, the sensitivity and negative predictive values for LAA thrombus with intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) or transesophageal echocardiograms (TEEs) as the reference standard were both 100%. ICE during ablation confirmed absence of thrombus in patients with a negative CTA or negative TEE. No patients with either a negative CTA or an equivocal CTA combined with a negative TEE had strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Overall, the need for TEEs decreased from 57.5% to 24.0% during the 3-year period as a result of the CTA protocol. Conclusions Clinical integration of CTA with delayed LAA imaging into the care of patients having catheter ablation of AF is feasible, safe, and effective. Such a protocol could be applied broadly to improve patient care. PMID:26341605

  17. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion – treatment outcomes and 6 months of follow-up – a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Karczewski, Michał; Skowronek, Radomir; Burysz, Marian; Fischer, Marcin; Anisimowicz, Lech; Demkow, Marcin; Konka, Marek; Ogorzeja, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Aim To present the results of treatment and evaluate 6 months of follow-up in a group of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, who underwent the procedure of percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion (PLAAO). Material and methods Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion was performed in 34 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and contraindications for oral anticoagulation therapy. The risk of thromboembolic and bleeding complications was determined based on the CHA2DS2VASc and HAS-BLED scales. The Amplatzer Amulet system from St. Jude Medical was used. On the first postoperative day, all patients were started on double antiplatelet therapy with 75 mg/day of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and 75 mg/day of clopidogrel (CLO). On the 30th postoperative day, the efficacy of the antiplatelet therapy was assessed with impedance aggregometry using a Multiplate analyzer (Roche). Echocardiographic examinations were performed intraoperatively and on the first postoperative day; subsequently, follow-up examinations were conducted 1 and 6 months after the implantation. Results In all patients, proper occluder position was observed throughout the follow-up. No leakage or thrombi around the implants were found. No strokes or bleeding complications associated with the antiplatelet therapy were observed. Multiplate assessment of platelet activity was conducted in 20 out of 34 patients. The efficacy of ASA treatment was demonstrated in all patients; no response to clopidogrel treatment was observed in 5 out of 20 patients. One patient suffered from cardiac tamponade, which required the performance of full sternotomy. Local complications (hematomas of the inguinal region) were observed in 3 patients. One of the patients died for reasons unrelated to the procedure. Conclusions Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion is an effective procedure in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and contraindications for chronic anticoagulation therapy. Further

  18. Predicting Peri-Device Leakage of Left Atrial Appendage Device Closure Using Novel Three-Dimensional Geometric CT Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyemoon; Jeon, Byunghwan; Han, Dongjin; Shim, Hackjoon; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Jung-Sun; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik

    2015-01-01

    Background After left atrial appendage (LAA) device closure, peri-device leakage into the LAA persists due to incomplete occlusion. We hypothesized that pre-procedural three-dimensional (3D) geometric analysis of the interatrial septum (IAS) and LAA orifice can predict this leakage. We investigated the predictive parameters of LAA device closure obtained from baseline cardiac computerized tomography (CT) using a novel 3D analysis system. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 22 patients who underwent LAA device closure. We defined peri-device leakage as the presence of a Doppler signal inside the LAA after device deployment (group 2, n = 5) compared with patients without peri-device leakage (group 1, n = 17). Conventional parameters were measured by cardiac CT. Angles θ and φ were defined between the IAS plane and the line, linking the LAA orifice center and foramen ovale. Results Group 2 exhibited significantly better left atrial (LA) function than group 1 (p = 0.031). Pre-procedural θ was also larger in this group (41.9° vs. 52.3°, p = 0.019). The LAA cauliflower-type morphology was more common in group 2. Overall, the patients' LA reserve significantly decreased after the procedure (21.7 mm3 vs. 17.8 mm3, p = 0.035). However, we observed no significant interval changes in pre- and post-procedural values of θ and φ in either group (all p > 0.05). Conclusion Angles between the IAS and LAA orifice might be a novel anatomical parameter for predicting peri-device leakage after LAA device closure. In addition, 3D CT analysis of the LA and LAA orifice could be used to identify clinically favorable candidates for LAA device closure. PMID:26755929

  19. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure with a novel self-modelizing device: a pre-clinical feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jai-Wun; Sherif, Mohammad A; Zintl, Konstantin; Lam, Yat-Yin; Goedde, Martin; Scharnweber, Tim; Jung, Friedrich; Franke, Ralf Peter; Brachmann, Johannes

    2014-12-20

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a new left atrial appendage (LAA) occluder. Twelve pigs were included. In 2 pigs the implantation process failed due to pericardial tamponade in 1 pig and device embolization in the other pig. The placement of the devices was controlled via TEE and fluoroscopy. After 6 weeks of implantation the hearts were explanted. The devices were found to be easy to deploy and showed a very good adaptation to the LAA tissue. Eight out of 10 pigs had full closure of the LAA directly after implantation. After six weeks, due to the self-modelizing properties of the device, all pigs had a full closure of the LAA. The macroscopic evaluation of the explanted hearts showed that all devices were securely integrated in LAA tissues. There was one case of mild pericarditis but no macroscopic signs of inflammation on the device surrounding endocardium. The explantation revealed that device loops had penetrated the LAA tissue in three pigs. However, no signs of bleeding, pericardial effusion, or other damage to the LAA wall could be detected and the pigs were in good condition with normal weight gain and no clinical symptoms. The Occlutech® LAA occluder achieved complete closure of the LAA in all pigs, and remained in the LAA, with benign healing and no evidence of new thrombus or damage to surrounding structures. Moreover, the uncompromised survival of all implanted pigs demonstrates the feasibility and safety of the device.

  20. A meta-analysis for efficacy and safety evaluation of transcatheter left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhonghai; Zhang, Xinlin; Wu, Han; Xie, Jun; Dai, Qing; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of transcatheter left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Methods: The randomized controlled trials (RCT) or observational studies with any transcatheter LAA occlusion devices were searched in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library from inception to November 2015. The incidence rates from individual studies were combined to evaluate the procedural efficacy and safety, including all-cause death, cardiac/neurological death, stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), thrombosis, hemorrhagic complications, and pericardial effusion/tamponade. Results: Thirty-eight studies involving 3585 patients and 6 different occlusion devices were eligible for our inclusion criteria. The procedural failure rate for LAA closure was 0.02 (95% CI: 0.02–0.03). The all-cause mortality was 0.03 (95% CI: 0.02–0.03) and cardiac/neurological mortality was 0 (95% CI: 0.00–0.01). The stroke/TIA rate was estimated only 0.01 (95% CI: 0.01–0.01). The incidence of thrombus on devices was 0.01 (95% CI: 0.01–0.02). The major hemorrhagic complication rate was estimated 0.01 (95% CI: 0.00–0.01). Pericardial effusion/tamponade was estimated 0.02 (95% CI: 0.02–0.03). No heterogeneity was observed for above pooled estimates (I2 = 0). In devices subgroups analysis, the all-cause mortality and cardiac/neurological mortality of PLAATO group were the highest (P = 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively), whereas the incidence of thrombus on devices in the ACP group was the highest (P < 0.01). In follow-up period subgroups analysis, there were significant differences in all-cause death, stroke/TIA, major hemorrhage, and pericardial effusion/tamponade events between the shorter and longer follow-up period subgroups (P < 0.05). However, the differences among the subgroups were numerically small. Conclusions: the pooled data demonstrated that transcatheter

  1. Contrast-enhanced CMR in patients after percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate the feasibility and value of first-pass contrast-enhanced dynamic and post-contrast 3D CMR in patients after transcatheter occlusion of left atrial appendage (LAA) to identify incorrect placement and persistent leaks. Methods 7 patients with different occluder systems (n = 4 PLAATO; n = 2 Watchman; n = 1 ACP) underwent 2 contrast-enhanced (Gd-DOTA) CMR sequences (2D TrueFISP first-pass perfusion and 3D-TurboFLASH) to assess localization, artifact size and potential leaks of the devices. Perfusion CMR was analyzed visually and semi-quantitatively to identify potential leaks. Results All occluders were positioned within the LAA. The ACP occluder presented the most extensive artifact size. Visual assessment revealed a residual perfusion of the LAA apex in 4 cases using first-pass perfusion and 3D-TurboFLASH indicating a suboptimal LAA occlusion. By assessing signal-to-time-curves the cases with a visually detected leak showed a 9-fold higher signal-peak in the LAA apex (567 ± 120% increase from baseline signal) than those without a leak (61 ± 22%; p < 0.03). In contrast, the signal increase in LAA proximal to the occluder showed no difference (leak 481 ± 201% vs. no leak 478 ± 125%; p = 0.48). Conclusion This CMR pilot study provides valuable non-invasive information in patients after transcatheter occlusion of the LAA to identify correct placement and potential leaks. We recommend incorporating CMR in future clinical studies to evaluate new device types. PMID:21726450

  2. Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion in Patients Aged <75 to ≥ 75 Years.

    PubMed

    Freixa, Xavier; Gafoor, Sameer; Regueiro, Ander; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Shakir, Samera; Omran, Heyder; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Kefer, Joelle; Landmesser, Ulf; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Sievert, Horst; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Nietlispach, Fabian; Gloekler, Steffen; Aminian, Adel; Danna, Paolo; Rezzaghi, Marco; Stock, Friederike; Stolcova, Miroslava; Costa, Marco; Ibrahim, Reda; Schillinger, Wolfgang; Park, Jai-Wun; Meier, Bernhard; Tzikas, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) is emerging as a promising alternative to oral anticoagulation. Because aged patients present a greater risk of not only cardioembolic events but also major bleeding, LAAO might represent a valid alternative as this would allow oral anticoagulation cessation while keeping cardioembolic protection. The objective of the study was to explore the safety and efficacy of LAAO in elderly patients. Data from the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug multicenter registry were analyzed. The cohort was categorized in 2 groups (<75 vs ≥ 75 years). A total of 1,053 subjects were included in the registry. Of them, 219 were excluded because of combined procedures. As a result, 828 subjects were included (54.6% ≥ 75 years). Procedural success was high and similar in both groups (97.3%). Acute procedural major adverse events were not statistically different among groups (3.2% in <75 years vs 5.1%; p = 0.17) although stratified analysis showed a higher incidence of cardiac tamponade in elderly patients (0.5% vs 2.2%; p = 0.04). With a median follow-up of 16.8 months, no significant differences in stroke/TIA (1.9% vs 2.3%; p = 0.89) and major bleeding (1.7% vs 2.6%; p = 0.54) were observed. In conclusion, LAAO was associated with similar procedural success in patients aged <75 and ≥ 75 years although older patients had a higher incidence of cardiac tamponade. At follow-up, stroke and major bleeding rates were similar among groups. PMID:26552507

  3. Preservation of high-energy phosphates in human myocardium. A phosphorus 31-nuclear magnetic resonance study of the effect of temperature on atrial appendages

    SciTech Connect

    Deslauriers, R.; Keon, W.J.; Lareau, S.; Moir, D.; Saunders, J.K.; Smith, I.C.; Whitehead, K.; Mainwood, G.W.

    1989-09-01

    After prolonged exposure to low temperatures (1 and 4{degrees}C), human atrial trabeculae show poor recovery of contraction. At somewhat higher temperatures (12 and 20{degrees}C), recovery is much better. Although better preservation of adenosine triphosphate and therefore improved contractile recovery might be expected after exposure to lower temperatures, it remained possible that, below a certain temperature, adenosine triphosphate-generating mechanisms could be slowed more than adenosine triphosphate utilization. To investigate this phenomenon further, we followed the time course of metabolic changes in human atrial appendages, harvested during cardiac bypass operations, at 1, 4, 12, and 20{degrees}C using high-resolution 31P and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results are quantitated by correlation with data obtained from biochemical assays on quick-frozen tissues. Initial adenosine triphosphate levels in myocytes of human atrial appendages are 3.3 to 4.3 mumol.gm-1 tissue wet weight. At 20{degrees}C, adenosine triphosphate disappears after 6 hours; at 12{degrees}C, about half the initial adenosine triphosphate is still observable at this time; at 4{degrees}C or 1{degree}C, the decline is still slower. Only a small contribution toward adenosine triphosphate maintenance comes from creatine phosphate, since creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate, and total creatine levels in the appendage are low (less than 2 mumol.gm-1 tissue wet weight). Glycolysis is active at all temperatures; the rate of glycolysis correlates positively with increasing temperature. Adenosine triphosphate generated by glycolysis falls just short of demand at all temperatures, but the difference is small at 1 and 4{degrees}C.

  4. The New 3D Printed Left Atrial Appendage Closure with a Novel Holdfast Device: A Pre-Clinical Feasibility Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Brzeziński, M.; Bury, K.; Dąbrowski, L.; Holak, P.; Sejda, A.; Pawlak, M.; Jagielak, D.; Adamiak, Z.; Rogowski, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many patients undergoing cardiac surgery have risk factors for both atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the primary site for thrombi formation. The most severe complication of emboli derived from LAA is stroke, which is associated with a 12-month mortality rate of 38% and a 12-month recurrence rate of 17%. The most common form of treatment for atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention is the pharmacological therapy with anticoagulants. Nonetheless this form of therapy is associated with high risk of major bleeding. Therefore LAA occlusion devices should be tested for their ability to reduce future cerebral ischemic events in patients with high-risk of haemorrhage. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of a novel left atrial appendage exclusion device with a minimally invasive introducer in a swine model. Materials and Methods A completely novel LAA device, which is composed of two tubes connected together using a specially created bail, was designed using finite element modelling (FEM) to obtain an optimal support force of 36 N at the closure line. The monolithic form of the occluder was obtained by using additive manufacturing of granular PA2200 powder with the technology of selective laser sintering (SLS). Fifteen swine were included in the feasibility tests, with 10 animals undergoing fourteen days of follow-up and 5 animals undergoing long-term observation of 3 months. For one animal, the follow-up was further prolonged to 6 months. The device was placed via minithoracotomy. After the observation period, all of the animals were euthanized, and their hearts were tested for LAA closure and local inflammatory and tissue response. Results After the defined observation period, all fifteen hearts were explanted. In all cases the full closure of the LAA was achieved. The macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of the explanted hearts showed that all devices were securely integrated in the

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of the Substantially Variable Morphology and Function of the Left Atrial Appendage and Its Relation with Adjacent Structures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Fan, Qiong-Ying; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Liu, Guo-Chao; Yang, Hai-Qing; Feng, Ping-Yong; Wang, Yong; Song, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate quantitatively the morphology, anatomy and function of the left atrial appendage (LAA) and its relation with adjacent structures. Materials and Methods A total of 860 patients (533 men, 62.0%, age 55.9±10.4 year) who had cardiac multidetector computed tomography angiography from May to October 2012 were enrolled for analysis. Results Seven types and 6 subtypes of LAA morphology were found with Type 2 being the most prevalent. Type 5 was more significantly (P<0.05) present in women (8.0%) than in men (4.2%). LAA orifice was oval in 81.5%, triangular in 7.3%, semicircular in 4%, water drop-like in 3.2%, round in 2.4% and foot-like in 1.6%. The LAA orifice had a significantly greater (P<0.01) major axis in men (24.79±3.81) than in women (22.68±4.07). The LAA orifice long axis was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with the height, weight and surface area of the patient. The LAA morphology parameters displayed strong positive correlation with the left atrium volume, aortic cross area long axis or LSPV long axis but poor correlation with the height, weight, surface area and vertebral body height of the patients. Four types of LAA ridge were identified: AI, AII, B and C with the distribution of 17.6%, 69.9%, 5.9% and 6.6%, respectively. The LAA had a significantly (P<0.05) greater distance from its orifice to the mitral ring in women than in men. The LAA had two filling and two emptying processes with the greatest volume at 45% phase but the least volume at 5% phase. The LAA maximal, minimal and emptying volumes were all significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with the body height, weight and surface area, whereas the LAA ejection fraction had an inverse correlation with the LAA minimal volume but no correlation with the maximal volume. Conclusion The LAA has substantially variable morphologies and relation with the adjacent structures, which may be helpful in guiding the LAA trans-catheter occlusion or catheter ablation

  6. Clinical impact of quantitative left atrial vortex flow analysis in patients with atrial fibrillation: a comparison with invasive left atrial voltage mapping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Myung; Hong, Geu-Ru; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Chi Young; Houle, Helene; Vannan, Mani A; Kim, Minji; Chung, Namsik

    2015-08-01

    Recently, left atrial (LA) vortex flow analysis using contrast transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been shown to be feasible and has demonstrated significant differences in vortex flow morphology and pulsatility between normal subjects and patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the relationship between LA vortex flow and electrophysiological properties and the clinical significance of LA vortex flow are unknown. The aims of this study were (1) to compare LA vortex flow parameters with LA voltage and (2) to assess the predictive value of LA vortex flow parameters for the recurrence of AF after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Thirty-nine patients with symptomatic non-valvular AF underwent contrast TEE before undergoing RFCA for AF. Quantitative LA vortex flow parameters were analyzed by Omega flow (Siemens Medical Solution, Mountain View, CA, USA). The morphology and pulsatility of LA vortex flow were compared with electrophysiologic parameters that were measured invasively. Hemodynamic, electrophysiological, and vortex flow parameters were compared between patients with and without early recurrence of AF after RFCA. Morphologic parameters, including LA vortex depth, length, width, and sphericity index were not associated with LA voltage or hemodynamic parameters. The relative strength (RS), which represents the pulsatility power of LA, was positively correlated with LA voltage (R = 0.53, p = 0.01) and LA appendage flow velocity (R = 0.73, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with LA volume index (R = -0.56, p < 0.001). Patients with recurrent AF after RFCA showed significantly lower RS (1.7 ± 0.2 vs 1.9 ± 0.4, p = 0.048) and LA voltage (0.9 ± 0.7 vs 1.7 ± 0.8, p = 0.004) than patients without AF recurrence. In the relatively small LA dimension group (LA volume index ≤ 33 ml/m(2)), RS was significantly lower (2.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.7 ± 0.1, p = 0.029) in patients with the recurrent AF. Quantitative LA vortex flow analysis, especially RS

  7. Clinical impact of quantitative left atrial vortex flow analysis in patients with atrial fibrillation: a comparison with invasive left atrial voltage mapping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Myung; Hong, Geu-Ru; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Chi Young; Houle, Helene; Vannan, Mani A; Kim, Minji; Chung, Namsik

    2015-08-01

    Recently, left atrial (LA) vortex flow analysis using contrast transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been shown to be feasible and has demonstrated significant differences in vortex flow morphology and pulsatility between normal subjects and patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the relationship between LA vortex flow and electrophysiological properties and the clinical significance of LA vortex flow are unknown. The aims of this study were (1) to compare LA vortex flow parameters with LA voltage and (2) to assess the predictive value of LA vortex flow parameters for the recurrence of AF after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Thirty-nine patients with symptomatic non-valvular AF underwent contrast TEE before undergoing RFCA for AF. Quantitative LA vortex flow parameters were analyzed by Omega flow (Siemens Medical Solution, Mountain View, CA, USA). The morphology and pulsatility of LA vortex flow were compared with electrophysiologic parameters that were measured invasively. Hemodynamic, electrophysiological, and vortex flow parameters were compared between patients with and without early recurrence of AF after RFCA. Morphologic parameters, including LA vortex depth, length, width, and sphericity index were not associated with LA voltage or hemodynamic parameters. The relative strength (RS), which represents the pulsatility power of LA, was positively correlated with LA voltage (R = 0.53, p = 0.01) and LA appendage flow velocity (R = 0.73, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with LA volume index (R = -0.56, p < 0.001). Patients with recurrent AF after RFCA showed significantly lower RS (1.7 ± 0.2 vs 1.9 ± 0.4, p = 0.048) and LA voltage (0.9 ± 0.7 vs 1.7 ± 0.8, p = 0.004) than patients without AF recurrence. In the relatively small LA dimension group (LA volume index ≤ 33 ml/m(2)), RS was significantly lower (2.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.7 ± 0.1, p = 0.029) in patients with the recurrent AF. Quantitative LA vortex flow analysis, especially RS

  8. Rationale and design of a study exploring the efficacy of once-daily oral rivaroxaban (X-TRA) on the outcome of left atrial/left atrial appendage thrombus in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter and a retrospective observational registry providing baseline data (CLOT-AF).

    PubMed

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Hammerstingl, Christoph; Marin, Francisco; Cappato, Riccardo; Meng, Isabelle Ling; Kirsch, Bodo; Morandi, Eolo; van Eickels, Martin; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-04-01

    There are still many unresolved issues concerning patient outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and left atrial/left atrial appendage (LA/LAA) thrombi. Rivaroxaban (Xarelto®), a potent and highly selective oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, is a new therapeutic option in this setting. The planned study program will consist of a prospective interventional study (X-TRA) and a retrospective observational registry (CLOT-AF). The primary objective of the X-TRA study is to explore the efficacy of rivaroxaban in the treatment of LA/LAA thrombi in patients with nonvalvular AF or atrial flutter, scheduled to undergo cardioversion or AF ablation, in whom an LA/LAA thrombus has been found on transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) before the procedure. The primary end point is the complete LA/LAA thrombus resolution rate at 6 weeks of end of treatment confirmed by TEE. The secondary objectives are to describe categories of thrombus outcome in patients (resolved, reduced, unchanged, larger, or new) confirmed on TEE at the end of treatment (after 6 weeks of treatment), incidence of the composite of stroke and noncentral nervous system systemic embolism at the end of treatment and during follow-up, and incidence of all bleeding at the end of treatment and during follow-up. The objective of the CLOT-AF registry is to provide retrospective thrombus-related patient outcome data after standard-of-care anticoagulant treatment in patients with nonvalvular AF or atrial flutter, who have TEE-documented LA/LAA thrombi. The data will be used as a reference for the prospective X-TRA study. In conclusion, X-TRA and CLOT-AF will provide some answers to the many unresolved issues concerning patient outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with AF and LAA thrombi. Results from this study program would provide the first prospective interventional study (X-TRA) and a large international retrospective observational registry (CLOT-AF) on the prevalence and

  9. Assessment of left and right atrial 3D hemodynamics in patients with atrial fibrillation: a 4D flow MRI study.

    PubMed

    Markl, Michael; Carr, Maria; Ng, Jason; Lee, Daniel C; Jarvis, Kelly; Carr, James; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2016-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with embolic stroke due to thrombus formation in the left atrium (LA). Based on the relationship of atrial stasis to thromboembolism and the marked disparity in pulmonary versus systemic thromboembolism in AF, we tested the hypothesis that flow velocity distributions in the left (LA) versus right atrium (RA) in patients with would demonstrate increased stasis. Whole heart 4D flow MRI was performed in 62 AF patients (n = 33 in sinus rhythm during imaging, n = 29 with persistent AF) and 8 controls for the assessment of in vivo atrial 3D blood flow. 3D segmentation of the LA and RA geometry and normalized velocity histograms assessed atrial velocity distribution and stasis (% of atrial velocities <0.2 m/s). Atrial hemodynamics were similar for RA and LA and significantly correlated (mean velocity: r = 0.64; stasis: r = 0.55, p < 0.001). RA and LA mean and median velocities were lower in AF patients by 15-33 % and stasis was elevated by 11-19 % compared to controls. There was high inter-individual variability in LA/RA mean velocity ratio (range 0.5-1.8) and LA/RA stasis ratio (range 0.7-1.7). Patients with a history of AF and in sinus rhythm showed most pronounced differences in atrial flow (reduced mean velocities, higher stasis in the LA). While there is no systematic difference in LA versus RA flow velocity profiles, high variability was noted. Further delineation of patient specific factors and/or regional atrial effects on the LA and RA flow velocity profiles, as well as other factors such as differences in procoagulant factors, may explain the more prevalent systemic versus pulmonary thromboembolism in patients with AF. PMID:26820740

  10. Successful Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion with the New Generation Amulet® Device after Late-Occurring Embolization of an Amplatzer® Cardiac Plug in a Patient with Repetitive Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Schillinger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (ACP) is one of the most commonly used devices for percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure in order to prevent a stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for long-term oral anticoagulation therapy. We have previously described a patient who had experienced an embolization of the ACP device about 12 months after implantation and the device could be percutaneously retrieved. A few years later, he suffered from a posterior stroke and a stroke located in the brainstem as well as a transischemic attack (TIA). In order to protect him from further cardioembolic events a reocclusion of the LAA with the new generation of ACP device, the Amplatzer Amulet, was performed. A stable position of the device within follow-up period could be confirmed and the patient was free of additional strokes/TIA or bleeding events. This case stresses the importance of proper LAA sizing in order to prevent device embolization and notes that LAA size is not static. Moreover, it demonstrates that repeated implantation of an LAA occlusion device was still possible; one should be aware of undersizing the LAA dimensions and that the modifications of new generation LAA occlusion devices may overcome limitations of first-generation devices in order to prevent a cardioembolic stroke. PMID:27800191

  11. Hemodynamics of a functional centrifugal-flow total artificial heart with functional atrial contraction in goats.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Takuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sano, Kyosuke; Taira, Yasunori; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Yamada, Akihiro; Miura, Hidekazu; Katahira, Shintaro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) is one of the therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure. There is no report on the hemodynamics of the functional centrifugal-flow TAH with functional atrial contraction (fCFTAH). We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow by atrial contraction in acute animal models. The goats received fCFTAH that we created from two centrifugal-flow ventricular assist devices. Some hemodynamic parameters maintained acceptable levels: heart rate 115.5 ± 26.3 bpm, aortic pressure 83.5 ± 10.1 mmHg, left atrial pressure 18.0 ± 5.9 mmHg, pulmonary pressure 28.5 ± 9.7 mmHg, right atrial pressure 13.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, pump flow 4.0 ± 1.1 L/min (left) 3.9 ± 1.1 L/min (right), and cardiac index 2.13 ± 0.14 L/min/m(2). fCFTAH with atrial contraction was able to maintain the TAH circulation by forming a pulsatile flow in acute animal experiments. Taking the left and right flow rate balance using the low internal pressure loss of the VAD pumps may be easier than by other pumps having considerable internal pressure loss. We showed that the remnant atrial contraction effected the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump, and the atrial contraction waves reflected the heart rate. These results indicate that remnant atria had the possibility to preserve autonomic function in fCFTAH. We may control fCFTAH by reflecting the autonomic function, which is estimated with the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump.

  12. BM-12CEREBRAL INFARCTION SECONDARY TO PULMONARY VEIN COMPRESSION AND LEFT ATRIAL APPENDAGE TUMOR INFILTRATION AS THE PRESENTING SIGN OF METASTATIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE BASE OF THE TONGUE

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn; Siegel, Jason; Jaeckle, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue has been documented to metastasize to the lungs and rarely involve the heart. The majority of documented cases of cardiac metastases are from postmortem analysis. Cases of sudden death, syncope, and dyspnea have been reported. However, stroke and tumor embolization to the brain as the initial clinical presentation has not been documented in the English literature. METHODS: Case Report. RESULTS: This case addresses a 61-year-old male with Stage IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue base, believed to be in remission after systemic chemotherapy and local radiation, who presented with acute cerebral infarctions involving multiple vascular territories. Cardiac CT obtained during stroke etiology evaluation displayed metastatic disease compressing the pulmonary vein resulting in virtual pulmonary vein thrombus. Transthoracic echocardiogram was negative for cardiac valvular pathology. Anticoagulation was initiated. Twelve days later he returned with recurrent strokes and suspected tumor embolization to the brain. Imaging displayed left atrial appendage structural abnormality highly suggestive of tumor infiltration. CONCLUSION: Cardiac metastases are rare and non-myxomatous tumor embolization to the brain even rarer especially in the setting of cerebral infarction due to pulmonary vein thrombus. Here we describe a case of multiple acute cerebral infarctions appearing from a proximal source refractory to anticoagulation. Thromboembolism from the pulmonary vein and tumor embolization from cardiac metastases are the likely mechanisms for his clinical presentation and radiographic findings. This case demonstrates the complexity of multiple stroke etiologies in one patient and the importance of cardiac imaging in stroke evaluation, particularly in the setting of a patient with a history of cancer.

  13. Passive appendages aid locomotion through symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Mazzino, Andrea; Kellay, Hamid; Brosse, Nicolas; Lundell, Fredrik; Ingremeau, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins, and other types of appendages to aid locomotion. Despite their enormous variation, passive appendages may contribute to locomotion by exploiting the same physical mechanism. We present a new mechanism that applies to body appendages surrounded by a separated flow, which often develops behind moving bodies larger than a few millimeters. We use theory, experiments, and numerical simulations to show that bodies with protrusions turn and drift by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in flowing fluid is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming fluid flow direction. The discovery suggests a new mechanism of locomotion that may be relevant for certain organisms; for example, how plumed seeds may drift without wind and how motile animals may passively reorient themselves.

  14. Percutaneous absorption of estradiol and progesterone in normal and appendage-free skin of the hairless rat: lack of importance of nutritional blood flow.

    PubMed

    Hueber, F; Besnard, M; Schaefer, H; Wepierre, J

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous absorption occurs after passive diffusion through the different layers of the skin and its appendages. Thereafter, a resorption process into the cutaneous microcirculation brings the compounds into the systemic circulation. The objective of this in vivo study in the hairless rat was to compare the percutaneous absorption of two steroids on normal and appendage-free (scar) skin and to show if differences in absorption result only from the lack of hair follicles and sebaceous glands and/or from a modification of local blood flow. Percutaneous absorption was evaluated with estradiol and progesterone after 30 min, 2 and 6 h. Except after 30 min, the reservoir function of the stratum corneum of scar skin was approximately twice as high as in normal skin. Eighty to ninety percent of the estradiol and progesterone found in the stratum corneum were located in its superficial layers. Inversely, whatever the application time was, the concentrations of both steroids in the epidermis and dermis were significantly higher in normal skin than in scar skin with maximal difference between about 40 and 400 microns, the area of sebaceous gland localization. Cutaneous blood flow in full-thickness skin, assessed by the thallium-201 method, was globally identical in normal and in scar skin. In scar skin, at the level of papillary dermis, a decrease in blood flow due to the thicker viable epidermis and the flat dermoepidermal junction has been shown without implying an accumulation of drug in the epidermis and superficial dermis. Under these conditions, our results clearly demonstrate that the nutritional blood flow does not interfere with the percutaneous absorption of estradiol and progesterone in normal and scar skin. Thus, they confirm the significant contribution of hair follicles and sebaceous glands to drug penetration into the skin and subsequently the systemic circulation.

  15. Atrial Mechanical Function Before and After Electrical or Amiodarone Cardioversion in Atrial Fibrillation: Assessment by Transesophageal Echocardiography and Pulsed Doppler.

    PubMed

    Maria Amuchastegui, Luis; Cravero, Cecilia; Salomone, Oscar; Amuchastegui, Marcos

    1996-03-01

    In some patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), it has been suggested that left atrial mechanical dysfunction can develop after successful electrical cardioversion, justifying postcardioversion anticoagulant treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in left atrial appendage peak flow velocities and the incidence of left atrial spontaneous echo contrast in patients with AF before and after electrical cardioversion or intravenous amiodarone, studied using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and pulsed Doppler. We performed a control TEE in 7 patients in the electrical group and 6 in the amiodarone group, with no significant clinical differences between both groups. A second TEE was performed immediately in the 7 patients with successful electrical cardioversion. The peak flow velocities in the appendage before and after the procedure were: filling 43.3 +/- 22 vs 27.7 +/- 28 cm/sec (P = 0.01) and emptying 35.5 +/- 22 vs 23.6 +/- 17 cm/sec (P = 0.01), respectively. The spontaneous echo contrast increased in 4 of the 7 patients. In 4 patients of the amiodarone group, the peak flow velocities in the appendage during AF and within the first 24 hours after restoration of sinus rhythm were: filling 37.4 +/- 12 vs 37.8 +/- 18 cm/sec and emptying 36.4 +/- 18 vs 35.9 +/- 18 cm/sec, respectively (P = NS). There was no change in spontaneous echo contrast. In conclusion, patients with AF reverted to sinus rhythm using amiodarone did not show changes in left atrial mechanical function; however, patients with electrical cardioversion showed mechanical dysfunction. Further investigations on the effects of amiodarone and other drugs on the mechanical function of the atria are needed to determine if patients reverted pharmacologically require anticoagulation post reversion. (ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, Volume 13, March 1996)

  16. Primary Epiploic Appendagitis.

    PubMed

    Matos, Hugo; Costa, Isidoro

    2015-12-01

    Primary epiploic appendagitis is an inflammation of the epiploic appendages occurring due to ischemic infarction as a result of appendage torsion or spontaneous thrombosis usually affecting patients from second to fifth decades, being more common in women and obese patients. It is a self-limiting entity with clinical features similar to other inflammatory abdominal processes and sometimes not remembered at clinical examinations. The awareness of this entity and its correct identification on imaging examinations could prevent unnecessary surgery. The authors present a clinical case complemented with ultrasound and CT images of this entity. PMID:27011574

  17. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals. PMID:25354545

  18. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  19. Robotic-assisted left atrial ligation for stroke reduction in chronic atrial fibrillation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiaii, Bob; McClure, R Scott; Skanes, Alan C; Ross, Ian G; Spouge, Alison R; Swinamer, Stuart; Rayman, Reiza; Bainbridge, Daniel T; Iglesias, Ivan; Novick, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation are at significant risk for sustaining a thromboembolic stroke. More than 90% of thromboemboli form in the left atrial appendage. Ligation of the left atrial appendage to reduce the risk of stroke is often performed in connection with other cardiac surgical procedures. As a stand-alone procedure, however, left atrial ligation has generally been deemed too invasive and has gained little support as an alternative therapeutic option. We report a case of port-access robotic-assisted left atrial ligation as a stand-alone procedure in a patient with chronic atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulation was a contraindication. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of stand-alone robotic-assisted left atrial ligation in the literature. PMID:16387671

  20. Passive control of a sphere by complex-shaped appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Olivieri, Stefano; Mazzino, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Appendages of various shapes and sizes (e.g. plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins) play an important role in dispersion and locomotion. In our previous work (Lacis, U. et al. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking. Nat. Commun. 5:5310, doi: 10.1038/ncomms6310, 2014), we showed that a free-falling cylinder with a splitter plate turns and drifts due to a symmetry-breaking instability (called inverted-pendulum instability or IPL). In other words, in a separated flow, the straight position of a short splitter plate is unstable and as a consequence a side force and a torque are induced on the cylinder. In this work, we seek the three-dimensional (3D) appendage shape (on a sphere at Re =200) that induces the largest drift of the sphere. We find that highly non-trivial shapes of appendages on a sphere increase the side force significantly compared to trivial shapes (such as an elliptic sheet). We also find that appendages may be designed to generate drift in either direction, that is, a free-falling sphere can drift either in the direction in which appendage is tilted or in the opposite direction depending on the particular geometry of the appendage. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these optimal appendage shapes in the context of the IPL instability.

  1. Atrial systole enhances intraventricular filling flow propagation during increasing heart rate.

    PubMed

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Okafor, Ikechukwu; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2016-02-29

    Diastolic fluid dynamics in the left ventricle (LV) has been examined in multiple clinical studies for understanding cardiac function in healthy humans and developing diagnostic measures in disease conditions. The question of how intraventricular filling vortex flow pattern is affected by increasing heart rate (HR) is still unanswered. Previous studies on healthy subjects have shown a correlation between increasing HR and diminished E/A ratio of transmitral peak velocities during early filling (E-wave) to atrial systole (A-wave). We hypothesize that with increasing HR under constant E/A ratio, E-wave contribution to intraventricular vortex propagation is diminished. A physiologic in vitro flow phantom consisting of a LV physical model was used for this study. HR was varied across 70, 100 and 120 beats per minute (bpm) with E/A of 1.1-1.2. Intraventricular flow patterns were characterized using 2D particle image velocimetry measured across three parallel longitudinal (apical-basal) planes in the LV. A pair of counter-rotating vortices was observed during E-wave across all HRs. With increasing HR, diminished vortex propagation occurred during E-wave and atrial systole was found to amplify secondary vorticity production. The diastolic time point where peak vortex circulation occurred was delayed with increasing HR, with peak circulation for 120bpm occurring as late as 90% into diastole near the end of A-wave. The role of atrial systole is elevated for higher HR due to the limited time available for filling. Our baseline findings and analysis approach can be applied to studies of clinical conditions where impaired exercise tolerance is observed. PMID:26895781

  2. Noninvasive assessment of left atrial maximum dP/dt by a combination of transmitral and pulmonary venous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Garcia, M. J.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Rodriguez, L.; Grimm, R. A.; Greenberg, N. L.; McCarthy, P. M.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study assessed whether hemodynamic parameters of left atrial (LA) systolic function could be estimated noninvasively using Doppler echocardiography. BACKGROUND: Left atrial systolic function is an important aspect of cardiac function. Doppler echocardiography can measure changes in LA volume, but has not been shown to relate to hemodynamic parameters such as the maximal value of the first derivative of the pressure (LA dP/dt(max)). METHODS: Eighteen patients in sinus rhythm were studied immediately before and after open heart surgery using simultaneous LA pressure measurements and intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Left atrial pressure was measured with a micromanometer catheter, and LA dP/dt(max) during atrial contraction was obtained. Transmitral and pulmonary venous flow were recorded by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Peak velocity, and mean acceleration and deceleration, and the time-velocity integral of each flow during atrial contraction was measured. The initial eight patients served as the study group to derive a multilinear regression equation to estimate LA dP/dt(max) from Doppler parameters, and the latter 10 patients served as the test group to validate the equation. A previously validated numeric model was used to confirm these results. RESULTS: In the study group, LA dP/dt(max) showed a linear relation with LA pressure before atrial contraction (r = 0.80, p < 0.005), confirming the presence of the Frank-Starling mechanism in the LA. Among transmitral flow parameters, mean acceleration showed the strongest correlation with LA dP/dt(max) (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Among pulmonary venous flow parameters, no single parameter was sufficient to estimate LA dP/dt(max) with an r2 > 0.30. By stepwise and multiple linear regression analysis, LA dP/dt(max) was best described as follows: LA dP/dt(max) = 0.1 M-AC +/- 1.8 P-V - 4.1; r = 0.88, p < 0.0001, where M-AC is the mean acceleration of transmitral flow and P-V is the peak velocity

  3. Quantification of left and right atrial kinetic energy using four-dimensional intracardiac magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Per M; Töger, Johannes; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2013-05-15

    Kinetic energy (KE) of atrial blood has been postulated as a possible contributor to ventricular filling. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the left (LA) and right (RA) atrial blood KE using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent CMR at 3 T, including a four-dimensional phase-contrast flow sequence. Mean LA KE was lower than RA KE (1.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.7 ± 0.1 mJ, P < 0.01). Three KE peaks were seen in both atria: one in ventricular systole, one during early ventricular diastole, and one during atrial contraction. The systolic LA peak was significantly smaller than the RA peak (P < 0.001), and the early diastolic LA peak was larger than the RA peak (P < 0.05). Rotational flow contained 46 ± 7% of total KE and conserved energy better than nonrotational flow did. The KE increase in early diastole was higher in the LA (P < 0.001). Systolic KE correlated with the combination of atrial volume and systolic velocity of the atrioventricular plane displacement (r(2) = 0.57 for LA and r(2) = 0.64 for RA). Early diastolic KE of the LA correlated with left ventricle (LV) mass (r(2) = 0.28), however, no such correlation was found in the right heart. This suggests that LA KE increases during early ventricular diastole due to LV elastic recoil, indicating that LV filling is dependent on diastolic suction. Right ventricle (RV) relaxation does not seem to contribute to atrial KE. Instead, RA KE generated during ventricular systole may be conserved in a hydraulic "flywheel" and transferred to the RV through helical flow, which may contribute to RV filling.

  4. Quantification of left and right atrial kinetic energy using four-dimensional intracardiac magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Per M; Töger, Johannes; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2013-05-15

    Kinetic energy (KE) of atrial blood has been postulated as a possible contributor to ventricular filling. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the left (LA) and right (RA) atrial blood KE using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent CMR at 3 T, including a four-dimensional phase-contrast flow sequence. Mean LA KE was lower than RA KE (1.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.7 ± 0.1 mJ, P < 0.01). Three KE peaks were seen in both atria: one in ventricular systole, one during early ventricular diastole, and one during atrial contraction. The systolic LA peak was significantly smaller than the RA peak (P < 0.001), and the early diastolic LA peak was larger than the RA peak (P < 0.05). Rotational flow contained 46 ± 7% of total KE and conserved energy better than nonrotational flow did. The KE increase in early diastole was higher in the LA (P < 0.001). Systolic KE correlated with the combination of atrial volume and systolic velocity of the atrioventricular plane displacement (r(2) = 0.57 for LA and r(2) = 0.64 for RA). Early diastolic KE of the LA correlated with left ventricle (LV) mass (r(2) = 0.28), however, no such correlation was found in the right heart. This suggests that LA KE increases during early ventricular diastole due to LV elastic recoil, indicating that LV filling is dependent on diastolic suction. Right ventricle (RV) relaxation does not seem to contribute to atrial KE. Instead, RA KE generated during ventricular systole may be conserved in a hydraulic "flywheel" and transferred to the RV through helical flow, which may contribute to RV filling. PMID:23493355

  5. A prospective randomized study to assess the efficacy of rate and site of atrial pacing on long-term development of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chu-Pak; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Ngarmukos, Tachapong; Kim, You-Ho; Kong, Chi-Woon; Omar, Razali; Sriratanasathavorn, Charn; Munawar, Muhammad; Kam, Ruth; Lee, Kathy Lf; Lau, Elizabeth Oi-Yan; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2009-09-01

    The Septal Pacing for Atrial Fibrillation Suppression Evaluation (SAFE) study is a single-blinded, parallel randomized designed multicenter study in pacemaker indicated patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective is to evaluate whether the site of atrial pacing--conventional right atrial appendage versus low atrial septal--with or without atrial overdrive pacing will influence the development of persistent AF. The study will provide a definitive answer to whether a different atrial pacing site or the use of AF suppression pacing or both can give incremental antiarrhythmic benefit when one is implanting a device for a patient with a history of paroxysmal AF. PMID:19460078

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases microvascular blood flow and macromolecular escape during renin infusion in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Boric, M.P.; Albertini, R. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) on microvascular hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity were studied in the hamster cheek pouch under resting conditions and during intravenous renin infusion. Fluorescent intravital microscopy was used to observe arteriolar diameters and to detect escape of fluorescent dextran of 150 K-Daltons (FITC-Dx-150). Microvascular plasma flow was estimated by clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and net macromolecular transport by clearance of FITC-Dx-150. At rest, topical ANP (2-250 ng/ml) had no effect on arteriolar diameter, 51Cr-EDTA clearance, relative vascular conductance (RVC) or FITC-Dx-150 clearance. Infusion of renin (10 mU/Kg/Hr, iv) elevated systemic arterial pressure by 30% and reduced cheek pouch RVC by 26%. During renin infusion, topical ANP (50 ng/ml) produced transient arteriolar vasodilation, and increased 51Cr-EDTA clearance (+35%), RVC (+58%) and FITC-Dx-150 clearance (+54%), without affecting systemic pressure. ANP did not induce venular leakage sites under any condition, but changes in FITC-Dx-150 clearance were highly correlated with changes in 51Cr-EDTA clearance, suggesting that the larger macromolecular escape was due to increases in microvascular blood flow and capillary/post-capillary hydrostatic pressure.

  7. Localized reentrant tachycardia in the aorta contiguity region mimicking perimitral atrial flutter in the context of atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Ejima, Koichiro; Shoda, Morio; Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Yashiro, Bun; Wakisaka, Osamu; Manaka, Tetsuyuki; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2013-07-01

    We describe a case with a focal atrial tachycardia (AT) masquerading as perimitral atrial flutter revealed after circumferential pulmonary vein antral isolation for atrial fibrillation. It was successfully terminated and became noninducible by a point ablation on the left atrial anterior wall (LAAW) near the mitral annulus in contact with the aortic root and on the left superior pulmonary vein-left atrial appendage ridge, without any linear ablation, using electroanatomical mapping and conventional precise mapping with a maximum amplified gain within the low-voltage area. The AT revealed in our case was an LAAW-aorta contiguity area-related AT.

  8. The Utility of 3D Left Atrial Volume and Mitral Flow Velocities as Guides for Acute Volume Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Santosa, Claudia M; Rose, David D; Fleming, Neal W

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) is the foundation of cardiac function assessment. Because of difficulties and risks associated with its direct measurement, correlates of LVEDP derived by pulmonary artery (PA) catheterization or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are commonly adopted. TEE has the advantage of being less invasive; however TEE-based estimation of LVEDP using correlates such as left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) has technical difficulties that limit its clinical usefulness. Using intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) as a controlled hemorrhagic model, we examined various mitral flow parameters and three-dimensional reconstructions of left atrial volume as surrogates of LVEDP. Our results demonstrate that peak E wave velocity and left atrial end-diastolic volume (LAEDV) correlated with known changes in intravascular volume associated with ANH. Although left atrial volumetric analysis was done offline in our study, recent advances in echocardiographic software may allow for continuous display and real-time calculation of LAEDV. Along with the ease and reproducibility of acquiring Doppler images of flow across the mitral valve, these two correlates of LVEDP may justify a more widespread use of TEE to optimize intraoperative fluid management. The clinical applicability of peak E wave velocity and LAEDV still needs to be validated during uncontrolled resuscitation.

  9. Minimally Invasive Surgical Therapies for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Kiaii, Bob; Chu, Michael W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with significant risks of thromboembolism, stroke, congestive heart failure, and death. There have been major advances in the management of atrial fibrillation including pharmacologic therapies, antithrombotic therapies, and ablation techniques. Surgery for atrial fibrillation, including both concomitant and stand-alone interventions, is an effective therapy to restore sinus rhythm. Minimally invasive surgical ablation is an emerging field that aims for the superior results of the traditional Cox-Maze procedure through a less invasive operation with lower morbidity, quicker recovery, and improved patient satisfaction. These novel techniques utilize endoscopic or minithoracotomy approaches with various energy sources to achieve electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins in addition to other ablation lines. We review advancements in minimally invasive techniques for atrial fibrillation surgery, including management of the left atrial appendage. PMID:22666609

  10. Pulmonary venous flow determinants of left atrial pressure under different loading conditions in a chronic animal model with mitral regurgitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hua; Jones, Michael; Shiota, Takahiro; Qin, Jian Xin; Kim, Yong Jin; Popovic, Zoran B.; Pu, Min; Greenberg, Neil L.; Cardon, Lisa A.; Eto, Yoko; Sitges, Marta; Zetts, Arthur D.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to quantitatively compare the changes and correlations between pulmonary venous flow variables and mean left atrial pressure (mLAP) under different loading conditions in animals with chronic mitral regurgitation (MR) and without MR. METHODS: A total of 85 hemodynamic conditions were studied in 22 sheep, 12 without MR as control (NO-MR group) and 10 with MR (MR group). We obtained pulmonary venous flow systolic velocity (Sv) and diastolic velocity (Dv), Sv and Dv time integrals, their ratios (Sv/Dv and Sv/Dv time integral), mLAP, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and MR stroke volume. We also measured left atrial a, x, v, and y pressures and calculated the difference between v and y pressures. RESULTS: Average MR stroke volume was 10.6 +/- 4.3 mL/beat. There were good correlations between Sv (r = -0.64 and r = -0.59, P <.01), Sv/Dv (r = -0.62 and r = -0.74, P <.01), and mLAP in the MR and NO-MR groups, respectively. Correlations were also observed between Dv time integral (r = 0.61 and r = 0.57, P <.01) and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in the MR and NO-MR groups. In velocity variables, Sv (r = -0.79, P <.001) was the best predictor of mLAP in both groups. The sensitivity and specificity of Sv = 0 in predicting mLAP 15 mm Hg or greater were 86% and 85%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary venous flow variables correlated well with mLAP under altered loading conditions in the MR and NO-MR groups. They may be applied clinically as substitutes for invasively acquired indexes of mLAP to assess left atrial and left ventricular functional status.

  11. Atrial fibrillation: relation between clinical risk factors and transoesophageal echocardiographic risk factors for thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Illien, S; Maroto-Järvinen, S; von der Recke, G; Hammerstingl, C; Schmidt, H; Kuntz-Hehner, S; Lüderitz, B; Omran, H

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To correlate clinical risk factors for thromboembolism with transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) markers of a thrombogenic milieu. Design: Clinical risk factors for thromboembolism and TOE markers of a thrombogenic milieu were assessed in consecutive patients with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The following TOE parameters were assessed: presence of spontaneous echo contrast, thrombi, and left atrial appendage blood flow velocities. A history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or thromboembolic events, patient age > 65 years, and chronic heart failure were considered to be clinical risk factors for thromboembolism. Setting: Tertiary cardiac care centre. Patients: 301 consecutive patients with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation scheduled for TOE. Results: 255 patients presented with clinical risk factors. 158 patients had reduced left atrial blood flow velocities, dense spontaneous echo contrast, or both. Logistic regression analysis showed that a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and age > 65 years were the only independent predictors of a thrombogenic milieu (both p < 0.0001). The probability of having a thrombogenic milieu increased with the number of clinical risk factors present (p < 0.0001). 17.4% of the patients without clinical risk factors had a thrombogenic milieu whereas 41.2% of the patients presenting one or more clinical risk factors had none. Conclusion: There is a close relation between clinical risk factors and TOE markers of a thrombogenic milieu. In addition, TOE examination allows for the identification of patients with a thrombogenic milieu without clinical risk factors. PMID:12527668

  12. Characterization of the left atrial vortex flow by two-dimensional transesophageal contrast echocardiography using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Hwan; Son, Jang-Won; Park, Won-Jong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Ung; Park, Jong-Seon; Shin, Dong-Gu; Kim, Young-Jo; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Houle, Helene; Vannan, Mani A; Hong, Geu-Ru

    2013-01-01

    This article is the first clinical investigation of the quantitative left atrial (LA) vortex flow by two-dimensional (2-D) transesophageal contrast echocardiography (2-D-TECE) using vector particle image velocimetry (PIV). The aims of this study were to assess the feasibility of LA vortex flow analysis and to characterize and quantify the LA vortex flow in controls and in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Thirty-five controls and 30 patients with AF underwent transesophageal contrast echocardiography. The velocity vector was estimated by particle image velocimetry. The morphology and pulsatility of the LA vortex flow were compared between the control and AF groups. In all patients, quantitative LA vortex flow analysis was feasible. In the control group, multiple, pulsatile, compact and elliptical-shaped vortices were seen in the periphery of the LA. These vortices were persistently maintained and vectors were directed toward the atrioventricular inflow. In the AF group, a large, merged, lower pulsatile and round-shaped vortex was observed in the center of the LA. In comparisons of vortex parameters, the relative strength was significantly lower in the AF group (1.624 ± 0.501 vs. 2.105 ± 0.226, p < 0.001). It is feasible to characterize and quantify the LA vortex flow by transesophageal contrast echocardiography in patients with AF, which offers a new method to obtain additional information on LA hemodynamics. The approach has the potential for early detection of the LA dysfunction and in decisions regarding treatment strategy and guiding anticoagulation treatment in patients with AF.

  13. Appendagitis following Diagnostic Laparoscopy and Laparoscopic Appendicectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R.; Bamford, R. F.; Kumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    Appendagitis is an uncommon clinical entity, often not recognised, and mistaken for more serious infective conditions. We describe a proven case of appendagitis which occurred after confirmed appendicitis. We postulate that this condition can coexist with appendicitis and indeed may be the result of coinflammation. This has several implications. Firstly, clinicians must retain an index of suspicion for this condition in a patient with localised abdominal pain which occurs after appendicitis. Secondly, it would be reasonable to suggest careful examination of colocated appendages in a patient with an otherwise normal-appearing appendix. Treatment might require laparoscopic resection, as performed in this case. PMID:27462475

  14. Appendagitis following Diagnostic Laparoscopy and Laparoscopic Appendicectomy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Bamford, R F; Kumar, D; Singh-Ranger, G

    2016-01-01

    Appendagitis is an uncommon clinical entity, often not recognised, and mistaken for more serious infective conditions. We describe a proven case of appendagitis which occurred after confirmed appendicitis. We postulate that this condition can coexist with appendicitis and indeed may be the result of coinflammation. This has several implications. Firstly, clinicians must retain an index of suspicion for this condition in a patient with localised abdominal pain which occurs after appendicitis. Secondly, it would be reasonable to suggest careful examination of colocated appendages in a patient with an otherwise normal-appearing appendix. Treatment might require laparoscopic resection, as performed in this case. PMID:27462475

  15. Relations of Arterial Stiffness and Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation With New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Amir Y; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Magnani, Jared W; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A; Mitchell, Gary F; Benjamin, Emelia J; McManus, David D

    2016-09-01

    The relations of measures of arterial stiffness, pulsatile hemodynamic load, and endothelial dysfunction to atrial fibrillation (AF) remain poorly understood. To better understand the pathophysiology of AF, we examined associations between noninvasive measures of vascular function and new-onset AF. The study sample included participants aged ≥45 years from the Framingham Heart Study offspring and third-generation cohorts. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models, we examined relations between incident AF and tonometry measures of arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), wave reflection (augmentation index), pressure pulsatility (central pulse pressure), endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), resting brachial arterial diameter, and hyperemic flow. AF developed in 407/5797 participants in the tonometry sample and 270/3921 participants in the endothelial function sample during follow-up (median 7.1 years, maximum 10 years). Higher augmentation index (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.32; P=0.02), baseline brachial artery diameter (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.43; P=0.04), and lower flow-mediated dilation (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.99; P=0.04) were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Central pulse pressure, when adjusted for age, sex, and hypertension (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.28; P=0.02) was associated with incident AF. Higher pulsatile load assessed by central pulse pressure and greater apparent wave reflection measured by augmentation index were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede development of AF. These measures may be additional risk factors or markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease associated with increased risk of incident AF. PMID:27456517

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Cecilia; Blanchard, Daniel G

    2016-09-15

    Atrial fibrillation is a supraventricular arrhythmia that adversely affects cardiac function and increases the risk of stroke. It is the most common arrhythmia and a major source of morbidity and mortality; its prevalence increases with age. Pulse rate is sensitive, but not specific, for diagnosis, and suspected atrial fibrillation should be confirmed with 12-lead electrocardiography. Because normal electrocardiographic findings do not rule out atrial fibrillation, home monitoring is recommended if there is clinical suspicion of arrhythmia despite normal test results. Treatment is based on decisions made regarding when to convert to normal sinus rhythm vs. when to treat with rate control, and, in either case, how to best reduce the risk of stroke. For most patients, rate control is preferred to rhythm control. Ablation therapy is used to destroy abnormal foci responsible for atrial fibrillation. Anticoagulation reduces the risk of stroke while increasing the risk of bleeding. The CHA2DS2-VASc scoring system assesses the risk of stroke, with a score of 2 or greater indicating a need for anticoagulation. The HAS-BLED score estimates the risk of bleeding. Scores of 3 or greater indicate high risk. Warfarin, dabigatran, factor Xa inhibitors (e.g., rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban), and aspirin are options for stroke prevention. Selection of therapy should be individualized based on risks and potential benefits, cost, and patient preference. Left atrial appendage obliteration is an option for reducing stroke risk. Two implantable devices used to occlude the appendage, the Watchman and the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug, appear to be as effective as warfarin in preventing stroke, but they are invasive. Another percutaneous approach to occlusion, wherein the left atrium is closed off using the Lariat, is also available, but data on its long-term effectiveness and safety are still limited. Surgical treatments for atrial fibrillation are reserved for patients who are undergoing

  17. TRIF promotes angiotensin II-induced cross-talk between fibroblasts and macrophages in atrial fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Guo, Meng; Zhan, Yang-Yang; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-14

    Aims: Atrial fibroblasts and macrophages have long been thought to participate in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, which specific mediator may regulate the interaction between them remains unclear. Methods and results: We provided the evidence for the involvement of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF), an important inflammation-related molecule, in the pathophysiology of AF. Patients with AF showed higher levels of angiotensin II (AngII) and TRIF expression and larger number of macrophages infiltration in left atria appendage than individuals with sinus rhythm (SR). In the cell study, AngII induced chemokines expressions in mouse atrial fibroblasts and AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts induced the chemotaxis of macrophages, which were reduced by losartan and TRIF siRNA. Meanwhile, AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts proliferation was enhanced by macrophages. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that TRIF may be a crucial factor promoting the interaction between atrial fibroblasts and macrophages, leading to atrial fibrosis. - Highlights: • Compared with SR, AF showed higher TRIF expression in left atrial appendage. • TRIF siRNA reversed macrophage chemotaxis induced by AngII-treated fibroblast. • TRIF siRNA reversed chemokines expressions induced by AngII in fibroblast. • AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblast proliferation was enhanced by macrophage.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia. The ... the heart's electrical system. Often, people who have AF may not even feel symptoms. But you may ...

  19. Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Goralnick, Eric; Bontempo, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia that results from the chaotic depolarization of atrial tissue. AF is the most common sustained cardiac dysrhythmia and the most common dysrhythmia diagnosed in US emergency departments. All patients with AF must have their cardioembolic risk assessed, even if sinus rhythm is restored. Novel oral anticoagulants may be considered instead of vitamin K antagonists for anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular AF. PMID:26226868

  20. Usefulness of transoesophageal echocardiography before cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation and different anticoagulant regimens

    PubMed Central

    Maltagliati, A; Galli, C A; Tamborini, G; Calligaris, A; Doria, E; Salehi, R; Pepi, M

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of atrial thrombi in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing different anticoagulation regimens before cardioversion; to evaluate the usefulness of transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) guided cardioversion to prevent thromboembolic complications; and to correlate the presence of atrial thrombi with clinical and echocardiographic data. Methods 757 consecutive patients admitted as candidates for cardioversion of atrial fibrillation were enrolled in the study. They were divided into four groups: effective conventional oral anticoagulation, short term anticoagulation, ineffective oral anticoagulation or subtherapeutic anticoagulation, and effective oral anticoagulation with a duration of < 3 weeks for various clinical reasons. All patients underwent TOE before cardioversion; in the presence of atrial thrombi or extreme left atrial echo contrast, cardioversion was postponed. The incidence of thromboembolic events was evaluated after cardioversion. Results Atrial thrombi were detected in 48 of the 757 (6.3%) patients. No significant differences in the percentage of atrial thrombosis were found in the four study groups. Patients with atrial thrombosis were older and had a higher percentage of mitral prosthetic valves, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, more severe atrial spontaneous echo contrast, and lower Doppler left atrial appendage velocities. 648 patients were scheduled for cardioversion. Cardioversion was successful in 89% of patients without any major thromboembolic event. Conclusions The prevalence of atrial thrombosis before cardioversion despite different treatments with anticoagulants is about 7% and a TOE guided approach may prevent the risk of embolic events. PMID:16284221

  1. [Esophageal echocardiography in patients with cerebrovascular stroke and atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Chlumský, J; Bojar, M; Sváb, P; Holá, D

    1997-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation is an important risk factor of embolization into the CNS. Thus affected patients should receive permanent anticoagulant therapy. Oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) can help our decision in patients with relative contraindications of anticoagulant therapy. TEE was performed in 52 patients with atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular attack (CMP) with an ischaemic aetiology. Transthoracic echocardiography did not reveal the source of embolization. In 10% patients a thrombus was found in the appendage of the left atrium, in another 9% patients a spontaneous echocontrast was found in the left atrium (prethrombotic condition) and in 5% patients an open foramen ovale. The results indicate the highly probable etiology of embolization in patients with cerebrovascular attacks and atrial fibrillation. This supports the recommendation of absolute indication of anticoagulant treatment in patients with cerebrovascular attacks and atrial fibrillation.

  2. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2015-07-28

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with the evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years before the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the preclinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is 1 component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding the success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. Although thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new-onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention.

  3. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2015-07-28

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with the evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years before the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the preclinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is 1 component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding the success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. Although thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new-onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention. PMID:26216085

  4. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J.; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years prior to the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the pre-clinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is one component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. While thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention. PMID:26216085

  5. Incremental value of live/real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography over the two-dimensional technique in the assessment of a tuberculoma involving the left atrium and appendage.

    PubMed

    Kemaloğlu Öz, Tuğba; Elsayed, Mahmoud; Nanda, Navin C; Kalenderoğlu, Koray; Akyüz, Şükrü; Atasoy, Işıl; Ösken, Altuğ; Onuk, Tolga; Eren, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    Intracardiac tuberculomas are extremely rare, and cardiac involvement in tuberculosis accounts for only 0.5% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. We report for the first time incremental value of live/real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography over two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of a tuberculoma involving the left atrium and left atrial appendage.

  6. Effects of altered left atrial pressure on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships.

    PubMed

    Ducas, J; Schick, U; Girling, L; Prewitt, R M

    1988-07-01

    We studied the effects of changes in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) on the slope (incremental resistance) and the extrapolated pressure intercept (PI) of the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP)-cardiac output (CO) relationship. Multipoint plots of PAP against CO were obtained in intact anesthetized dogs. Group 1 consisted of six dogs entirely in West zone 3 and group 2 of four dogs with mixed West zone 2-3. The four conditions studied were the following: 1) fixed low PCWP, 2) fixed high PCWP, 3) variable PCWP, and 4) time-control repeat of condition 1. The PI significantly exceeded PCWP at fixed low PCWP (group 1, 9.3 vs. 11.1 mmHg, group 2, 6.6 vs. 3.9 mmHg). PI became identical to PCWP only at fixed high PCWP in group 1 (19 +/- 2.0 vs. 19 +/- 1.1 mmHg). Thus PCWP reflects the effective vascular outflow pressure when PCWP is fixed and high. For both groups of dogs in condition 3, when PCWP was varied with CO, the slope of the resulting PAP-CO plot was significantly greater than when PCWP was constant. Also in 9 of 10 dogs, PI was less than PCWP when PCWP was varied. These findings demonstrate that when changes in PCWP are allowed to occur during the generation of a pulmonary artery pressure-flow plot, the resulting slope and intercept, as defined by a Starling resistor model, do not accurately represent the incremental resistance and outflow pressure of the pulmonary vasculature. PMID:3293470

  7. Syndecan-4 shedding is involved in the oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in left atrial tissue with valvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Zhou, Qing; Xie, Jun; Li, Guan-Nan; Chen, Qin-Hua; Kang, Li-Na; Xu, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play critical roles in the development and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). In addition, syndecan-4 (Synd4) shedding induced by oxidative stress or inflammation plays a role in the migration of inflammatory cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that Synd4 shedding was also involved in the inflammatory response in atrial fibrillation patients with valvular heart disease. To confirm this suppose, left atrial appendages and clinical data were obtained from 65 patients with valvular disease undergoing valve surgery. Ten left atrial appendages obtained from healthy heart donors were used as controls. Analyses including histopathology, western blotting, and enzyme kinetics were performed to assess the oxidative injury, inflammation responses, and Synd4 shedding. The results showed that the inflammatory response and oxidative injury were increased significantly, whereas as levels of the Synd4 ectodomain was decreased significantly in AF patients. Furthermore, Synd4 ectodomain levels were correlated with atrial oxidative and inflammatory markers. The results showed that Synd4 shedding is a molecular pathological alteration in the development and maintenance of inflammation-associated AF. PMID:26261514

  8. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L. Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  9. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  10. Age-related atrial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gramley, Felix; Lorenzen, Johann; Knackstedt, Christian; Rana, Obaida R; Saygili, Erol; Frechen, Dirk; Stanzel, Sven; Pezzella, Francesco; Koellensperger, Eva; Weiss, Christian; Münzel, Thomas; Schauerte, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    Many age-related diseases are associated with, and may be promoted by, cardiac fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, hypoxia-induced factor (HIF), and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) system have been implicated in fibrogenesis. Thus, we investigated whether age is related to these systems and to atrial fibrosis. Right atrial appendages (RAA) obtained during heart surgery (n = 115) were grouped according to patients' age (<50 years, 51-60 years, 61-70 years, or >70 years). Echocardiographic ejection fractions (EF) and fibrosis using Sirius-red-stained histological sections were determined. TGF-beta was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and hypoxia-related factors [HIF1 alpha, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-receptor, CD34 (a surrogate marker for microvessel density), the factor inhibiting HIF (FIH), and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD 3)] were detected by immunostaining. MMP-2 and -9 activity were determined zymographically, and mRNA levels of their common tissue inhibitor TIMP-1 were determined by RT-PCR. Younger patients (<50 years) had significantly less fibrosis (10.1% +/- 4.4% vs 16.6% +/- 8.3%) than older individuals (>70 years). While HIF1 alpha, FIH, the VEGF-receptor, and CD34 were significantly elevated in the young, TGF-beta and PHD3 were suppressed in these patients. MMP-2 and -9 activity was found to be higher while TIMP-1 levels were lower in older patients. Statistical analysis proved age to be the only factor influencing fibrogenesis. With increasing age, RAAs develop significantly more fibrosis. An increase of fibrotic and decrease of hypoxic signalling and microvessel density, coupled with differential expression of MMPs and TIMP-1 favouring fibrosis may have helped promote atrial fibrogenesis. PMID:19234766

  11. Dynamics modeling and simulation of autonomous underwater vehicles with appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yumin; Zhao, Jinxin; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Guocheng

    2013-03-01

    To provide a simulation system platform for designing and debugging a small autonomous underwater vehicle's (AUV) motion controller, a six-degree of freedom (6-DOF) dynamic model for AUV controlled by thruster and fins with appendages is examined. Based on the dynamic model, a simulation system for the AUV's motion is established. The different kinds of typical motions are simulated to analyze the motion performance and the maneuverability of the AUV. In order to evaluate the influences of appendages on the motion performance of the AUV, simulations of the AUV with and without appendages are performed and compared. The results demonstrate the AUV has good maneuverability with and without appendages.

  12. Hedgehog Signaling during Appendage Development and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhairab N; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Donaldson, Andrew; Weaver, Cyprian V; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory networks that govern embryonic development have been well defined. While a common hypothesis supports the notion that the embryonic regulatory cascades are reexpressed following injury and tissue regeneration, the mechanistic regulatory pathways that mediate the regenerative response in higher organisms remain undefined. Relative to mammals, lower vertebrates, including zebrafish and newts, have a tremendous regenerative capacity to repair and regenerate a number of organs including: appendages, retina, heart, jaw and nervous system. Elucidation of the pathways that govern regeneration in these lower organisms may provide cues that will enhance the capacity for the regeneration of mammalian organs. Signaling pathways, such as the hedgehog pathway, have been shown to play critical functions during development and during regeneration in lower organisms. These signaling pathways have been shown to modulate multiple processes including cellular origin, positional identity and cellular maturation. The present review will focus on the cellular and molecular regulation of the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway and its interaction with other signaling factors during appendage development and regeneration. PMID:26110318

  13. Hedgehog Signaling during Appendage Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhairab N.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Donaldson, Andrew; Weaver, Cyprian V.; Garry, Mary G.; Garry, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory networks that govern embryonic development have been well defined. While a common hypothesis supports the notion that the embryonic regulatory cascades are reexpressed following injury and tissue regeneration, the mechanistic regulatory pathways that mediate the regenerative response in higher organisms remain undefined. Relative to mammals, lower vertebrates, including zebrafish and newts, have a tremendous regenerative capacity to repair and regenerate a number of organs including: appendages, retina, heart, jaw and nervous system. Elucidation of the pathways that govern regeneration in these lower organisms may provide cues that will enhance the capacity for the regeneration of mammalian organs. Signaling pathways, such as the hedgehog pathway, have been shown to play critical functions during development and during regeneration in lower organisms. These signaling pathways have been shown to modulate multiple processes including cellular origin, positional identity and cellular maturation. The present review will focus on the cellular and molecular regulation of the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway and its interaction with other signaling factors during appendage development and regeneration. PMID:26110318

  14. Atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Essential facts Atrial fibrillation (AF) causes an abnormal, sometimes fast pulse, and is the most common heart rhythm disturbance. It occurs when electrical impulses controlling the heart's natural rhythm lose co-ordination. People with AF have a four or five times higher risk of stroke because it increases the risk of a blood clot forming in the chambers of the heart. The condition is responsible for 22,500 strokes a year in the UK, according to the British Heart Foundation (BHF). PMID:24593083

  15. Atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Thomas M.; Wu, Li-Qun; Shen, Win K.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia affecting patients today. Disease prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, and is associated with often catastrophic and costly consequences, including heart failure, syncope, dementia, and stroke. Therapies including anticoagulants, anti-arrhythmic medications, devices, and non-pharmacologic procedures in the last 30 years have improved patients' functionality with the disease. Nonetheless, it remains imperative that further research into AF epidemiology, genetics, detection, and treatments continues to push forward rapidly as the worldwide population ages dramatically over the next 20 years. PMID:24474959

  16. Some Practical Design Aspects of Appendages for Passenger Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hag Soo; Lee, Hwa Joon; Joo, Young Ryeol; Kim, Jung Joong; Chun, Ho Hwan

    2009-09-01

    The hydrodynamic effect of appendages for high-speed passenger vessels, such as Ro-Pax, Ro-Ro and cruiser vessels, is very severe and, therefore, it is essential to carry out the design of appendages for high-speed passenger vessels from the preliminary design stage to the final detail design stage through a full survey of the reference vessels together with sufficient technical investigation. Otherwise, many problems would be caused by mismatches between the appendages and the hull form. This paper investigates the design characteristics of some appendages, such as the side thruster, the shaft-strut, and the stern wedge, based on the design experience accumulated at Samsung, on CFD, and on model test results for high-speed passenger vessels. Further to this investigation, some practical and valuable design guidelines for such appendages are suggested.

  17. Partial co-option of the appendage patterning pathway in the development of abdominal appendages in the sepsid fly Themira biloba

    PubMed Central

    Nijhout, H. Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The abdominal appendages on male Themira biloba (Diptera: Sepsidae) are complex novel structures used during mating. These abdominal appendages superficially resemble the serially homologous insect appendages in that they have a joint and a short segment that can be rotated. Non-genital appendages do not occur in adult pterygote insects, so these abdominal appendages are novel structures with no obvious ancestry. We investigated whether the genes that pattern the serially homologous insect appendages have been co-opted to pattern these novel abdominal appendages. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression patterns of the genes extradenticle (exd), Distal-less (Dll), engrailed (en), Notch, and the Bithorax Complex in the appendages of T. biloba during pupation. The expression patterns of Exd, En, and Notch were consistent with the hypothesis that a portion of the patterning pathway that establishes the coxopodite has been co-opted to pattern the developing abdominal appendages. However, Dll was only expressed in the bristles of the developing appendages and not the proximal–distal axis of the appendage itself. The lack of Dll expression indicates the absence of a distal domain of the appendage suggesting that sepsid abdominal appendages only use genes that normally pattern the base of segmental appendages. PMID:20182886

  18. Brain structure resolves the segmental affinity of anomalocaridid appendages.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peiyun; Ma, Xiaoya; Hou, Xianguang; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2014-09-25

    Despite being among the most celebrated taxa from Cambrian biotas, anomalocaridids (order Radiodonta) have provoked intense debate about their affinities within the moulting-animal clade that includes Arthropoda. Current alternatives identify anomalocaridids as either stem-group euarthropods, crown-group euarthropods near the ancestry of chelicerates, or a segmented ecdysozoan lineage with convergent similarity to arthropods in appendage construction. Determining unambiguous affinities has been impeded by uncertainties about the segmental affiliation of anomalocaridid frontal appendages. These structures are variably homologized with jointed appendages of the second (deutocerebral) head segment, including antennae and 'great appendages' of Cambrian arthropods, or with the paired antenniform frontal appendages of living Onychophora and some Cambrian lobopodians. Here we describe Lyrarapax unguispinus, a new anomalocaridid from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota, southwest China, nearly complete specimens of which preserve traces of muscles, digestive tract and brain. The traces of brain provide the first direct evidence for the segmental composition of the anomalocaridid head and its appendicular organization. Carbon-rich areas in the head resolve paired pre-protocerebral ganglia at the origin of paired frontal appendages. The ganglia connect to areas indicative of a bilateral pre-oral brain that receives projections from the eyestalk neuropils and compound retina. The dorsal, segmented brain of L. unguispinus reinforces an alliance between anomalocaridids and arthropods rather than cycloneuralians. Correspondences in brain organization between anomalocaridids and Onychophora resolve pre-protocerebral ganglia, associated with pre-ocular frontal appendages, as characters of the last common ancestor of euarthropods and onychophorans. A position of Radiodonta on the euarthropod stem-lineage implies the transformation of frontal appendages to another structure in crown

  19. Brain structure resolves the segmental affinity of anomalocaridid appendages.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peiyun; Ma, Xiaoya; Hou, Xianguang; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2014-09-25

    Despite being among the most celebrated taxa from Cambrian biotas, anomalocaridids (order Radiodonta) have provoked intense debate about their affinities within the moulting-animal clade that includes Arthropoda. Current alternatives identify anomalocaridids as either stem-group euarthropods, crown-group euarthropods near the ancestry of chelicerates, or a segmented ecdysozoan lineage with convergent similarity to arthropods in appendage construction. Determining unambiguous affinities has been impeded by uncertainties about the segmental affiliation of anomalocaridid frontal appendages. These structures are variably homologized with jointed appendages of the second (deutocerebral) head segment, including antennae and 'great appendages' of Cambrian arthropods, or with the paired antenniform frontal appendages of living Onychophora and some Cambrian lobopodians. Here we describe Lyrarapax unguispinus, a new anomalocaridid from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota, southwest China, nearly complete specimens of which preserve traces of muscles, digestive tract and brain. The traces of brain provide the first direct evidence for the segmental composition of the anomalocaridid head and its appendicular organization. Carbon-rich areas in the head resolve paired pre-protocerebral ganglia at the origin of paired frontal appendages. The ganglia connect to areas indicative of a bilateral pre-oral brain that receives projections from the eyestalk neuropils and compound retina. The dorsal, segmented brain of L. unguispinus reinforces an alliance between anomalocaridids and arthropods rather than cycloneuralians. Correspondences in brain organization between anomalocaridids and Onychophora resolve pre-protocerebral ganglia, associated with pre-ocular frontal appendages, as characters of the last common ancestor of euarthropods and onychophorans. A position of Radiodonta on the euarthropod stem-lineage implies the transformation of frontal appendages to another structure in crown

  20. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical.

  1. Atrial fibrillation and stroke management: present and future.

    PubMed

    Holmes, David R

    2010-11-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death. Despite advances in treatment, the early and later outcomes remain poor with a high rate of death and or disability. Strategies for prevention have assumed a central role. Given the close relationship between advancing age, atrial fibrillation, and increasing stroke, there is great interest in this large specific population of patients. Although warfarin has been the cornerstone of therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, it is often not used because of absolute or relative contraindications, or is ineffective because of poor control of the international normalized ratio (INR). The relative risk-benefit ratio of stroke prevention versus bleeding hazard plays a central role in therapeutic decisions. New pharmacologic approaches have been studied, most recently direct thrombin inhibitors. These drugs may be associated with less bleeding than warfarin, although there continues to be incremental bleeding risk over a patient's lifetime. In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, device strategies are being tested. These are based upon the information that in such patients, stroke arises from thrombus in the left atrial appendage in 90% of cases. Left atrial appendage occlusion has now been tested in a randomized clinical trial. In this trial, device closure was found to be noninferior to warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke, cardiac death, and systemic embolization. There was an early safety hazard typically related to periprocedural pericardial effusions; however, subsequent experience has continued to document excellent efficacy and improved safety profiles. New randomized trials and registries continue to explore the potential for device placement as an alternative to anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in this group of patients.

  2. Determinants and importance of atrial pressure morphology in atrial septal defect.

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, D N; Fisher, J; Moses, J W; Goldberg, H L; Levin, A R; Engle, M A; Borer, J S

    1984-01-01

    A prominent "v" wave relative to the "a" wave in the jugular vein and right atrial pressure tracing is considered to be a common haemodynamic sign of atrial septal defect. Since the prevalence, age relation, and haemodynamic determinants of the "v" greater than or equal to "a" wave configuration have not been studied the pressure recordings from 15 adults and 80 children with an isolated secundum atrial septal defect in sinus rhythm and from 40 adults and 55 children in sinus rhythm without structural cardiac abnormalities or with coronary and valvular heart disease were studied to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the "v" greater than or equal to "a" wave configuration in atrial septal defect. Only 20% of adults with an atrial septal defect had prominent right atrial "v" waves compared with 63% of children, although the specificity was quite high for each group. In adults "left atrialisation " of the right atrium ("v" greater than or equal to "a" wave) occurred in younger patients with higher right atrial and right ventricular end diastolic pressures. In contrast, in children no age related or haemodynamic determinants for the "v" greater than or equal to "a" pattern were found. In addition, most adults but few children with an atrial septal defect had "right atrialisation " of the left atrial wave configuration ("a" greater than "v"). This was found in older adults with lower right atrial and right ventricular end diastolic pressures and in older children with larger left to right shunts. Thus in contrast to children adults with an atrial septal defect rarely show a prominent "v" wave in the right atrium. The presence of a prominent right atrial "v" wave in adults with an atrial septal defect is associated with relatively higher left atrial and right heart pressures than is the absence of this sign and may be related to relatively higher systolic transatrial flow in these patients. The relative paucity of prominent right atrial "v" waves in older adults

  3. Functional Role and Mechanism of microRNA-28b in Atrial Myocyte in a Persistent Atrial Fibrillation Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongbin; Kang, Weiqiang; Wang, Xu; Chen, Meina; Qin, Qiaoji; Guo, Minglei; Ge, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent atrial fibrillation has been indicated to be related with microRNA-28b. However, the exact role of microRNA-28b in persistent atrial fibrillation needs to be further elucidated. Therefore, this study aimed to establish a rat model of persistent atrial fibrillation to investigate the level of microRNA-28b in atrial myocytes and to explore the molecular mechanism involved. Material/Methods A persistent atrial fibrillation model was established in rats by using chronic rapid atrial pacing induction. The size of the heart was measured by ultrasonic method. The expression of microRNA-28b in left atrial myocytes was quantified by RT-PCR. Cardiomyocytes were isolated and cultured to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis by MTT and flow cytometry, respectively. The specific inhibitor of ERK signaling pathway, PD98059, was used to further illustrate the role of ERK signaling pathway in the modulation of cardiomyocytes in persistent atrial fibrillation. Results MicroRNA-28b was up-regulated in the experimental rat model with persistent atrial fibrillation. The proliferation of cardiomyocytes was significantly inhibited with potentiated apoptosis. Blockage of the ERK pathway suppressed the microRNA-28b expression and inhibited cell apoptosis. Conclusions microRNA-28b-induced growth inhibition and cell apoptosis of atrial myocytes was observed in the rat model with persistent atrial fibrillation, via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27574952

  4. Managing atrial fibrillation in the very elderly patient: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Karamichalakis, Nikolaos; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Bakalakos, Athanasios; Efremidis, Michael; Sideris, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia affecting elderly patients. Management and treatment of AF in this rapidly growing population of older patients involve a comprehensive assessment that includes comorbidities, functional, and social status. The cornerstone in therapy of AF is thromboembolic protection. Anticoagulation therapy has evolved, using conventional or newer medications. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure is a new invasive procedure evolving as an alternative to systematic anticoagulation therapy. Rate or rhythm control leads to relief in symptoms, fewer hospitalizations, and an improvement in quality of life. Invasive methods, such as catheter ablation, are the new frontier of treatment in maintaining an even sinus rhythm in this particular population. PMID:26604772

  5. Varying types of circus movement re-entry with both normal and dissociated contralateral conduction causing different right and left atrial rhythms in canine atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, S; Boineau, J P; Schuessler, R B; Cox, J L

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an animal model of atrial flutter (AFL) or fibrillation (AFB) and to determine precisely the pathway of atrial activation during arrhythmias induced by programmed stimulation. In 10 dogs, a shunt from the left subclavian artery to the left upper pulmonary vein was created to produce left atrial enlargement. Five months later, using programmed electrical stimulation, it was possible to induce 17 sustained atrial tachycardias in 9 of the 10 dogs, including 9 episodes of AFL caused by circus movement re-entry, 6 episodes of focal tachycardia, and 2 episodes of AFB. Short cycle length left atrial tachycardias caused by either circus movement or a focus did not propagate in a uniform 1:1 pattern to the right atrium (RA), resulting in RA dissociation. In these arrhythmias, complex wavefronts from both current and preceding left atrial cycles coexisted in the RA. Circus movement was associated with a spectrum of different re-entrant pathways with different path lengths. These differences in the path length were determined by various ways in which obstacles such as the superior vena cava and orifice of the right atrial appendage or pulmonary vein orifices were combined by contiguous areas of functional block.

  6. A Silurian short-great-appendage arthropod

    PubMed Central

    Siveter, Derek J.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Siveter, David J.; Sutton, Mark D.; Legg, David; Joomun, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    A new arthropod, Enalikter aphson gen. et sp. nov., is described from the Silurian (Wenlock Series) Herefordshire Lagerstätte of the UK. It belongs to the Megacheira (=short-great-appendage group), which is recognized here, for the first time, in strata younger than mid-Cambrian age. Discovery of this new Silurian taxon allows us to identify a Devonian megacheiran representative, Bundenbachiellus giganteus from the Hunsrück Slate of Germany. The phylogenetic position of megacheirans is controversial: they have been interpreted as stem chelicerates, or stem euarthropods, but when Enalikter and Bundenbachiellus are added to the most comprehensive morphological database available, a stem euarthropod position is supported. Enalikter represents the only fully three-dimensionally preserved stem-group euarthropod, it falls in the sister clade to the crown-group euarthropods, and it provides new insights surrounding the origin and early evolution of the euarthropods. Recognition of Enalikter and Bundenbachiellus as megacheirans indicates that this major arthropod group survived for nearly 100 Myr beyond the mid-Cambrian. PMID:24452026

  7. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  8. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  9. Atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bang, Casper N

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication after myocardial infarction (MI) and new-onset AF has been demonstrated to be associated with adverse outcome and a large excess risk of death in both MI and aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Prevention of new-onset AF is therefore a potential therapeutic target in AS and MI patients. Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent AF. Accordingly, statins are recommended as a class IIa recommendation for prevention of new-onset AF after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, this preventive effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with AS or a large scale first-time MI patient sample and data in patients not undergoing invasive cardiac interventions are limited. This PhD thesis was conducted at the Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, with the aim to investigate the three aforementioned questions and to add to the existing evidence of AF prevention with statins. This was done using three different settings: 1) a randomized patients sample of 1,873 from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 2) a register patient sample of 97,499 with first-time MI, and 3) all published studies until beginning of June 2011 examining statin treatment on new-onset and recurrent AF in patients not undergoing cardiac surgery. This thesis revealed that statins did not lower the incidence or the time to new-onset AF in patients with asymptomatic AS. However, statin treatment showed an independently preventive effect on new-onset AF, including type-dependent effect and a trend to dosage-dependent effect. In addition, this thesis showed that good compliance to statin treatment was important to prevent new-onset AF. Finally, the meta-analysis in this PhD thesis showed a preventive effect in the observational studies although this effect was absent in the randomized controlled trials. Based on this PhD thesis

  10. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation during Mitral-Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Parides, Michael K.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Voisine, Pierre; Ailawadi, Gorav; Bouchard, Denis; Smith, Peter K.; Mack, Michael J.; Acker, Michael A.; Mullen, John C.; Rose, Eric A.; Chang, Helena L.; Puskas, John D.; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Gardner, Timothy J.; Varghese, Robin; Horvath, Keith A.; Bolling, Steven F.; Michler, Robert E.; Geller, Nancy L.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Miller, Marissa A.; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G.; Williams, Paula; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Argenziano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Among patients undergoing mitral-valve surgery, 30 to 50% present with atrial fibrillation, which is associated with reduced survival and increased risk of stroke. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation has been widely adopted, but evidence regarding its safety and effectiveness is limited. Methods We randomly assigned 260 patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation who required mitral-valve surgery to undergo either surgical ablation (ablation group) or no ablation (control group) during the mitral-valve operation. Patients in the ablation group underwent further randomization to pulmonary-vein isolation or a biatrial maze procedure. All patients underwent closure of the left atrial appendage. The primary end point was freedom from atrial fibrillation at both 6 months and 12 months (as assessed by means of 3-day Holter monitoring). Results More patients in the ablation group than in the control group were free from atrial fibrillation at both 6 and 12 months (63.2% vs. 29.4%, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation between patients who underwent pulmonary-vein isolation and those who underwent the biatrial maze procedure (61.0% and 66.0%, respectively; P = 0.60). One-year mortality was 6.8% in the ablation group and 8.7% in the control group (hazard ratio with ablation, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.84; P = 0.55). Ablation was associated with more implantations of a permanent pacemaker than was no ablation (21.5 vs. 8.1 per 100 patient-years, P = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in major cardiac or cerebrovascular adverse events, overall serious adverse events, or hospital readmissions. Conclusions The addition of atrial fibrillation ablation to mitral-valve surgery significantly increased the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation at 1 year among patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation, but the

  11. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Teens > Atrial Septal Defect Print A ... Care of Yourself What Is an Atrial Septal Defect? Having a doctor listen to your heart is ...

  12. Feather-like development of Triassic diapsid skin appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Sebastian; Buchwitz, Michael; Fischer, Jan; Krause, Daniel; Georgi, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Of the recent sauropsid skin appendage types, only feathers develop from a cylindrical epidermal invagination, the follicle, and show hierarchical branching. Fossilized integuments of Mesozoic diapsids have been interpreted as follicular and potential feather homologues, an idea particularly controversially discussed for the elongate dorsal skin projections of the small diapsid Longisquama insignis from the Triassic of Kyrgyzstan. Based on new finds and their comparison with the type material, we show that Longisquama’s appendages consist of a single-branched internal frame enclosed by a flexible outer membrane. Not supporting a categorization either as feathers or as scales, our analysis demonstrates that the Longisquama appendages formed in a two-stage, feather-like developmental process, representing an unusual early example for the evolutionary plasticity of sauropsid integument.

  13. In vivo porcine left atrial wall stress: Computational model.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Elena S; Bellini, Chiara; Schwartzman, David S

    2011-10-13

    Most computational models of the heart have so far concentrated on the study of the left ventricle, mainly using simplified geometries. The same approach cannot be adopted to model the left atrium, whose irregular shape does not allow morphological simplifications. In addition, the deformation of the left atrium during the cardiac cycle strongly depends on the interaction with its surrounding structures. We present a procedure to generate a comprehensive computational model of the left atrium, including physiological loads (blood pressure), boundary conditions (pericardium, pulmonary veins and mitral valve annulus movement) and mechanical properties based on planar biaxial experiments. The model was able to accurately reproduce the in vivo dynamics of the left atrium during the passive portion of the cardiac cycle. A shift in time between the peak pressure and the maximum displacement of the mitral valve annulus allows the appendage to inflate and bend towards the ventricle before the pulling effect associated with the ventricle contraction takes place. The ventricular systole creates room for further expansion of the appendage, which gets in close contact with the pericardium. The temporal evolution of the volume in the atrial cavity as predicted by the finite element simulation matches the volume changes obtained from CT scans. The stress field computed at each time point shows remarkable spatial heterogeneity. In particular, high stress concentration occurs along the appendage rim and in the region surrounding the pulmonary veins. PMID:21907340

  14. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  15. Usefulness of phased-array intracardiac echocardiography for the assessment of left atrial mechanical "stunning" in atrial flutter and comparison with multiplane transesophageal echocardiography(*).

    PubMed

    Morton, Joseph B; Sanders, Prashanthan; Sparks, Paul B; Morgan, John; Kalman, Jonathan M

    2002-10-01

    We compared transesophageal and phased-array intracardiac echocardiography (TEE/ICE) for the 2-dimensional and spectral Doppler assessment of left atrial (LA) mechanical function. TEE is commonly used to assess LA body and LA appendage mechanical function in patients who are undergoing radiofrequency ablation of typical atrial flutter. Fifteen patients underwent TEE and ICE imaging before and after ablation of typical atrial flutter. The following parameters were measured: (1) LA appendage emptying velocity and fractional area change, (2) severity of LA spontaneous echo contrast (graded 0 to 4), (3) maximal inflow velocity of the left and right upper pulmonary veins, and (5) maximal mitral valve E- and A-wave inflow velocities in sinus rhythm. Diagnostic quality imaging was achieved in all patients with TEE and ICE. Comparing TEE and ICE, the following absolute values and linear correlation coefficient (R) were obtained: preablation LA appendage emptying velocity: 0.45 +/- 0.21 versus 0.44 +/- 0.21 m/s (r = 0.95, p = <0.001); postablation LA appendage velocity: 0.33 +/- 0.24 versus 0.34 +/- 0.24 m/s (r = 0.97, p <0.001); LA appendage fractional area change: 35.3 +/- 13.7 versus 35.9 +/- 17.1% (r = 0.81, p <0.001); left upper/right upper pulmonary vein inflow velocity: 0.50 +/- 0.17/0.49 +/- 0.18 versus 0.51 +/- 0.17/0.47 +/- 0.20 m/s (r = 0.93/0.90, p <0.001); mitral valve E/A wave: 0.66 +/- 0.14/0.31 +/- 0.14 versus 0.69 +/- 0.17/0.35 +/- 0.23 (r = 0.84/0.97, p <0.002); LA spontaneous echo contrast (pre- and postablation): 1.1 +/- 1.2/1.3 +/- 1.2 versus 1.2 +/- 1.3/1.4 +/- 1.3 (r = 0.92/0.90, p <0.001). No patients were identified with LA appendage thrombus. Thus, TEE and phased-array ICE provided equivalent imaging data with high statistical correlation. ICE may be an imaging alternative to TEE in the evaluation of a "stunned" left atrium.

  16. Intentional Right Atrial Exit and Carbon Dioxide Insufflation to Facilitate Subxiphoid Needle Entry Into the Empty Pericardial Space

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Adam B.; Rogers, Toby; Paone, Gaetano; Flynn, Shawn E.; Guerrero, Mayra E.; O’Neill, William W.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to test whether a microcatheter can safely be advanced across the right atrial appendage to access the pericardium and then withdrawn despite subsequent high-intensity anticoagulation. We also tested whether transatrial pericardial insufflation of carbon dioxide (CO2) would enhance the safety of subxiphoid needle access to the empty pericardium by separating the heart from the anterior pericardium. BACKGROUND Subxiphoid needle access to the empty pericardium, required for left atrial suture ligation and epicardial ablation for rhythm disorders, risks myocardial or coronary laceration. METHODS A catheter from the femoral vein engaged the right atrial appendage for angiographic confirmation of position. Through that catheter, the back end of a 0.014- or 0.018-inch guidewire crossed the right atrial wall to enter the pericardium and delivered a 2.4-F microcatheter. CO2 1 to 2 ml/kg was insufflated into the pericardium immediately before subxiphoid needle access under lateral projection fluoroscopy. Thirteen patients undergoing subxiphoid suture ligation of the left atrial appendage consented to participate in this research protocol. RESULTS Right atrial exit succeeded in 11 subjects (85%) and failed uneventfully in 2 subjects. CO2 insufflation of 96 ± 22 ml achieved 12 ± 4 mm separation of the anterior pericardium from the myocardial wall, allowed rapid and successful subxiphoid anterior needle and guidewire entry in all 11 subjects, and did not have any evident hemodynamic effects. The immediate pericardial aspirate was serous in all but 1 subject. CONCLUSIONS We report the first human intentional transatrial exit procedure. Transatrial microcatheter access to the pericardium can be achieved safely. Pericardial insufflation with CO2 makes subxiphoid access to the empty pericardium rapid and safe. Although our clinical experience to date remains small, with further experience, this approach may prevent the life

  17. The developing pulmonary veins and left atrium: implications for ablation strategy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Hisham M F

    2013-11-01

    The majority of cases of atrial fibrillation (AF) are the result of triggers originating in the area of the pulmonary veins. The reason for the predilection for that area remains unclear. We sought to examine the different mechanisms responsible for this observation through an extensive search of the medical literature, examining the development of the pulmonary veins, genetics of AF and left to -right cardiac chamber differentiation. Results confirm that the LAA is anatomically and embryologically different from other areas of the atrial walls and develops under distinct genetic and transcriptional pathways. Findings support an ablation strategy whose primary focus should be the creation of a 'box' lesion set, plus additional lines to prevent propagation to the left atrial appendage, the isthmus of the left atrium and the right atrium are likely to be more effective than simple pulmonary vein isolation.

  18. Trends in hospitalization for atrial fibrillation: epidemiology, cost, and implications for the future.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Azfar; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Nalluri, Nikhil; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Spagnola, Jonathan; Patel, Aashay; Asti, Deepak; Kanotra, Ritesh; Khan, Hafiz; Savani, Chirag; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Neil; Pau, Dhaval; Badheka, Apurva O; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Kowalski, Marcin; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Paydak, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia worldwide and the most common arrhythmia leading to hospitalization. Due to a substantial increase in incidence and prevalence of AF over the past few decades, it attributes to an extensive economic and public health burden. The increasing number of hospitalizations, aging population, anticoagulation management, and increasing trend for disposition to a skilled facility are drivers of the increasing cost associated with AF. There has been significant progress in AF management with the release of new oral anticoagulants, use of left atrial catheter ablation, and novel techniques for left atrial appendage closure. In this article, we aim to review the trends in epidemiology, hospitalization, and cost of AF along with its future implications on public health.

  19. Atrial natriuretic peptide frameshift mutation in familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Karst, Margaret L; Zingman, Leonid V; Heublein, Denise M; Darbar, Dawood; Herron, Kathleen J; Ballew, Jeffrey D; de Andrade, Mariza; Burnett, John C; Olson, Timothy M

    2008-07-10

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that is hereditary in a small subgroup of patients. In a family with 11 clinically affected members, we mapped an atrial fibrillation locus to chromosome 1p36-p35 and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding atrial natriuretic peptide. Circulating chimeric atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was detected in high concentration in subjects with the mutation, and shortened atrial action potentials were seen in an isolated heart model, creating a possible substrate for atrial fibrillation. This report implicates perturbation of the atrial natriuretic peptide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in cardiac electrical instability. PMID:18614783

  20. Selected Disorders of Skin Appendages--Acne, Alopecia, Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Vary, Jay C

    2015-11-01

    This article reviewed some of the more common diseases of the skin appendages that are encountered in medicine: hyperhidrosis, acne, AA, FPHL, AGA, and TE. The pathophysiology behind the conditions and their treatments were discussed so that the clinician can make logical therapeutic choices for their affected patients.

  1. Selected Disorders of Skin Appendages--Acne, Alopecia, Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Vary, Jay C

    2015-11-01

    This article reviewed some of the more common diseases of the skin appendages that are encountered in medicine: hyperhidrosis, acne, AA, FPHL, AGA, and TE. The pathophysiology behind the conditions and their treatments were discussed so that the clinician can make logical therapeutic choices for their affected patients. PMID:26476248

  2. Evaluation of some Vulval Appendages in Nematode Taxonomy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey of the nature and phylogenetic distribution of nematode vulval appendages revealed three major classes based on composition, position and orientation: membranes, flaps, and epiptygma. Minor classes included cuticular inflations, vulval tubes of extruded gonadal tissues, vulval ridges, and p...

  3. Atrial mass: a myxoma?

    PubMed

    Chatzis, Andrew C; Kostopanagiotou, Kostas; Kousi, Theofili; Mitropoulos, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    A middle-aged woman with a history of resected colorectal cancer and receiving chemotherapy presented with a right atrial mass and the provisional diagnosis of myxoma supported by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Successful surgical removal revealed organized thrombus instead. Atrial thrombus may be mistaken for myxoma and long-term intracardiac indwelling catheters can be thrombogenic. PMID:27525099

  4. Identification and Purification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Atrial-Like Cardiomyocytes Based on Sarcolipin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Josowitz, Rebecca; Lu, Jia; Falce, Christine; D’Souza, Sunita L.; Wu, Meng; Cohen, Ninette; Dubois, Nicole C.; Zhao, Yong; Sobie, Eric A.; Fishman, Glenn I.; Gelb, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes to study atrial biology and disease has been restricted by the lack of a reliable method for stem cell-derived atrial cell labeling and purification. The goal of this study was to generate an atrial-specific reporter construct to identify and purify human stem cell-derived atrial-like cardiomyocytes. We have created a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) reporter construct in which fluorescence is driven by expression of the atrial-specific gene sarcolipin (SLN). When purified using flow cytometry, cells with high fluorescence specifically express atrial genes and display functional calcium handling and electrophysiological properties consistent with atrial cardiomyocytes. Our data indicate that SLN can be used as a marker to successfully monitor and isolate hiPSC-derived atrial-like cardiomyocytes. These purified cells may find many applications, including in the study of atrial-specific pathologies and chamber-specific lineage development. PMID:25010565

  5. Heat loss regulation: role of appendages and torso in the deer mouse and the white rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, K.E.; Porter, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal conductance was subdivided into the component conductances of the appendages and torso using a heat transfer analysis for the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, and the white rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus. The authors analysis was based on laboratory measurements of skin temperature and respiratory gas exchange made between air temperatures of 8 and 34/sup 0/C for the deer mouse, and from published data for the white rabbit. Two series conductances to heat transfer for each appendage and torso were evaluated: (1) internal (h/sub in/), for blood flow and tissue conduction to the skin surface, and (2) external (h/sub ex/), for heat loss from the skin surface to the environment. These two series conductances were represented in a single, total conductance (h/sub tot/). The limit to h/sub tot/ was set by h/sub ex/ and was reached by the torso h/sub tot/ of both animals. The increase in torso h/sub tot/ observed with air temperature for the mouse suggests that a pilomotor change in fur depth occurred. A control of h/sub tot/ below the limit set by h/sub ex/ was achieved by the h/sub in/ of each appendage. Elevation of mouse thermal conductance (C) resulted from increases in feet, tail, and torso h/sub tot/. In contrast, the rabbit showed no change in torso h/sub tot/ between 5 and 30/sup 0/C and ear h/sub tot/ exclusively increased C over these air temperatures. They suggest that the hyperthermia reported for the rabbit at 35/sup 0/C resulted from C reaching the physical limit set by torso and near h/sub ex/. Thus the ear alone adjusted rabbit C, whereas the feet, tail, and the torso contributed to the adjustment of mouse C.

  6. Different transseptal puncture for different procedures: Optimization of left atrial catheterization guided by transesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Radinovic, Andrea; Mazzone, Patrizio; Landoni, Giovanni; Agricola, Eustachio; Regazzoli, Damiano; Bella, Paolo Della

    2016-01-01

    Background: Left atrial catheterization through transseptal puncture is frequently performed in cardiac catheterization procedures. Appropriate transseptal puncture is critical to achieve procedural success. Aims: The aim of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of selective transseptal punctures, using a modified radiofrequency (RF) transseptal needle and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), in different types of procedures that require specific sites of left atrial catheterization. Setting and Design: This was an observational trial in a cardiac catheterization laboratory of a teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing different percutaneous procedures requiring atrial transseptal puncture such as atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion, and mitral valve repair were included in the study. All procedures were guided by TEE and an RF transseptal needle targeting a specific region of the septum to perform the puncture. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis was descriptive only. Results: RF-assisted transseptal punctures were performed in six consecutive patients who underwent AF ablation (two patients), LAA closure (two patients), and mitral valve repair (two patients). In all patients, transseptal punctures were performed successfully at the desired site. No adverse events or complications were observed. Conclusions: Selective transseptal puncture, using TEE and an RF needle, is a feasible technique that can be used in multiple approaches requiring a precise site of access for left atrial catheterization. PMID:27716687

  7. Left atrial strain: a new predictor of thrombotic risk and successful electrical cardioversion

    PubMed Central

    González-Alujas, Teresa; Valente, Filipa; Aranda, Carlos; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; Gutierrez, Laura; Maldonado, Giuliana; Galian, Laura; Teixidó, Gisela; Evangelista, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Background Left atrial deformation (LAD) parameters are new markers of atrial structural remodelling that seem to be affected in atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL). This study aimed to determine whether LAD can identify patients with a higher risk of thrombosis and unsuccessful electrical cardioversion (ECV). Methods Retrospective study including 56 patients with AF or AFL undergoing ECV, with previous transthoracic (TTE) and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) studies. Echocardiographic parameters analysed were as follows: left ventricle function, left atrium (LA) dimensions, LAD parameters (positive and negative strain peaks), left atrial appendage (LAA) filling and emptying velocities and the presence of thrombi. Strain values were analysed according to thrombotic risk and success of ECV. Results Lower mean values of peak-positive strain (PPS) in patients with prothrombotic velocities (<25 cm/s) and a higher incidence of thrombi in LAA were observed compared with those with normal velocities. Multivariate analysis revealed PPS normalised by LA maximum volume indexed by body surface area (BSA) to be associated with prothrombotic risk (odds ratio 0.000 (95% CI: 0.000–0.243), P 0.017), regardless of CHADs2VASC score. Peak-negative strain normalised by LA volumes indexed by BSA were associated with unsuccessful ECV. Conclusions Atrial deformation parameters identify AF and AFL patients with a high risk of thrombosis and unsuccessful ECV. Therefore, these new parameters should be included in anticoagulation management and rhythm vs rate control strategies. PMID:27249551

  8. Electrophysiological Mechanisms of Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching- Tai; Chen, Shin-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Atrial flutter (AFL) is a common arrhythmia in clinical practice. Several experimental models such as tricuspid regurgitation model, tricuspid ring model, sterile pericarditis model and atrial crush injury model have provided important information about reentrant circuit and can test the effect of antiarrhythmic drugs. Human atrial flutter has typical and atypical forms. Typical atrial flutter rotates around tricuspid annulus and uses the crista terminalis and sometimes sinus venosa as the boundary. The IVC-tricuspid isthmus is a slow conduction zone and the target of radiofrequency ablation. Atypical atrial flutter may arise from the right or left atrium. Right atrial flutter includes upper loop reentry, free wall reentry and figure of eight reentry. Left atrial flutter includes mitral annular atrial flutter, pulmonary vein-related atrial flutter and left septal atrial flutter. Radiofrequency ablation of the isthmus between the boundaries can eliminate these arrhythmias. PMID:16943903

  9. Bilateral Atrial Myxoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Susupaus, Attapoom; Foofuengmonkolkit, Kumpoo

    2016-02-01

    Among the rare cardiac tumors, myxoma, which is mostly located in the left atrium, is the most common type. Bilateral atrial myxoma is extremely rare, and requires urgent surgery. The authors report the case of a 34-year-old male, who presented with one month of right hemiparesis and aphasia and subsequently diagnosed with bilateral atrial myxoma based on transthoracic echocardiography. An urgent operation for intra-cardiac tumor removal was performed with the biatrial approach. Once a diagnosis of myxoma has been made, an urgent operation for tumor removal is necessary due to the risk of serious complications, including sudden death from normal blood flow obstruction. PMID:27266240

  10. Lifestyle and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Anna Vittoria

    2011-07-01

    Lifestyle factors, in particular dietary intake, have been recognized as important, modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Consuming a heart-healthy diet lowers the individual's risk for cardiovascular disease. Data on the relationship between lifestyle and atrial fibrillation are controversial; however, the strong association between obesity, atrial/ventricular dysfunction and a nonhealthy lifestyle and atrial fibrillation, suggests that a correction of nutritional habits could prevent the development of arrhythmias through a reduction of underlying cardiac diseases. Today, the Mediterranean diet is considered one of the most effective in terms of its prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  11. Simulation of the photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) uses six video cameras in the Space Shuttle cargo bay to measure vibration of the Russian Mir space station Kvant-ll solar array. It occurs on Shuttle/Mir docking mission STS-74 scheduled for launch in November 1995. The objective of PASDE is to demonstrate photogrammetric technology for measuring 'untargeted' spacecraft appendage structural dynamics. This paper discusses a pre-flight simulation test conducted in July 1995, focusing on the image processing aspects. The flight camera system recorded vibrations of a full-scale structural test article having grids of white lines on black background, similar in appearance to the Mir solar array. Using image correlation analysis, line intersections on the structure are tracked in the video recordings to resolutions of less than 0.1 pixel. Calibration and merging of multiple camera views generated 3-dimensional displacements from which structural modal parameters are then obtained.

  12. Atrial Fibrillation Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... think you are pregnant If you notice red, dark brown or black urine or stools If you ... Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • Understand your Risk for AFib Children • Symptoms of ...

  13. Atrial fibrillation or flutter

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mitral valve) Hypertension Medicines Overactive thyroid gland ( hyperthyroidism ) Pericarditis Sick sinus syndrome Symptoms You may not ... procedures Heart attack Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Hyperthyroidism Pericarditis Pulse Stable angina Stroke Patient Instructions Atrial ...

  14. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... regular beat. Certain cells in your heart make electric signals that cause the heart to contract and ... read your ECG to find out if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the ...

  15. Genetics of skin appendage neoplasms and related syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D; Grossman, M; Schneiderman, P; Celebi, J

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade the molecular basis of many inherited syndromes has been unravelled. This article reviews the clinical and genetic aspects of inherited syndromes that are characterised by skin appendage neoplasms, including Cowden syndrome, Birt–Hogg–Dube syndrome, naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, generalised basaloid follicular hamartoma syndrome, Bazex syndrome, Brooke–Spiegler syndrome, familial cylindromatosis, multiple familial trichoepitheliomas, and Muir–Torre syndrome. PMID:16272260

  16. Attitude dynamic of spin-stabilized satellites with flexible appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renard, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Equations of motion and computer programs have been developed for analyzing the motion of a spin-stabilized spacecraft having long, flexible appendages. Stability charts were derived, or can be redrawn with the desired accuracy for any particular set of design parameters. Simulation graphs of variables of interest are readily obtainable on line using program FLEXAT. Finally, applications to actual satellites, such as UK-4 and IMP-1 have been considered.

  17. STS-74/Mir photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) is an International Space Station (ISS) Phase-1 risk mitigation experiment. Phase-1 experiments are performed during docking missions of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate the use of photogrammetric techniques for determination of structural dynamic mode parameters of solar arrays and other spacecraft appendages. Photogrammetric techniques are a low cost alternative to appendage mounted accelerometers for the ISS program. The objective of the first flight of PASDE, on STS-74 in November 1995, was to obtain video images of Mir Kvant-2 solar array response to various structural dynamic excitation events. More than 113 minutes of high quality structural response video data was collected during the mission. The PASDE experiment hardware consisted of three instruments each containing two video cameras, two video tape recorders, a modified video signal time inserter, and associated avionics boxes. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center in eight months. The flight hardware was integrated into standard Hitchhiker canisters at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and then installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay in locations selected to achieve good video coverage and photogrammetric geometry.

  18. Kodymirus and the case for convergence of raptorial appendages in Cambrian arthropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsdell, James C.; Stein, Martin; Selden, Paul A.

    2013-09-01

    Kodymirus vagans Chlupáč and Havlíček in Sb Geol Ved Paleontol 6:7-20, 1965 is redescribed as an aglaspidid-like arthropod bearing a single pair of enlarged raptorial appendages, which are shown to be the second cephalic appendage. A number of early Palaeozoic arthropods, recognized from predominantly Cambrian Konservat-Lagerstätten, are known to have borne single pairs of large raptorial appendages. They are well established for the iconic yet problematic anomalocarids, the common megacheirans, and the ubiquitous bivalved Isoxys. Further taxa, such as fuxianhuiids and Branchiocaris, have been reported to have single pairs of specialized cephalic appendages, i.e., appendages differentiated from a largely homonomous limbs series, members of which act in metachronal motion. The homology of these raptorial appendages across these Cambrian arthropods has often been assumed, despite differences in morphology. Thus, anomalocaridids, for instance, have long multiarticulate "frontal appendages" consisting of many articles bearing an armature of paired serial spines, while megacheirans and Isoxys have short "great appendages" consisting of few articles with well-developed endites or elongate fingers. Homology of these appendages would require them to belong to the same cephalic segment. We argue based on morphological evidence that, to the contrary, the raptorial appendages of some of these taxa can be shown to belong to different cephalic segments and are the result of convergence in life habits. K. vagans is yet another important example for this, representing an instance for this morphology from a marginal marine environment.

  19. Kodymirus and the case for convergence of raptorial appendages in Cambrian arthropods.

    PubMed

    Lamsdell, James C; Stein, Martin; Selden, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    Kodymirus vagans Chlupáč and Havlíček in Sb Geol Ved Paleontol 6:7-20, 1965 is redescribed as an aglaspidid-like arthropod bearing a single pair of enlarged raptorial appendages, which are shown to be the second cephalic appendage. A number of early Palaeozoic arthropods, recognized from predominantly Cambrian Konservat-Lagerstätten, are known to have borne single pairs of large raptorial appendages. They are well established for the iconic yet problematic anomalocarids, the common megacheirans, and the ubiquitous bivalved Isoxys. Further taxa, such as fuxianhuiids and Branchiocaris, have been reported to have single pairs of specialized cephalic appendages, i.e., appendages differentiated from a largely homonomous limbs series, members of which act in metachronal motion. The homology of these raptorial appendages across these Cambrian arthropods has often been assumed, despite differences in morphology. Thus, anomalocaridids, for instance, have long multiarticulate "frontal appendages" consisting of many articles bearing an armature of paired serial spines, while megacheirans and Isoxys have short "great appendages" consisting of few articles with well-developed endites or elongate fingers. Homology of these appendages would require them to belong to the same cephalic segment. We argue based on morphological evidence that, to the contrary, the raptorial appendages of some of these taxa can be shown to belong to different cephalic segments and are the result of convergence in life habits. K. vagans is yet another important example for this, representing an instance for this morphology from a marginal marine environment.

  20. In search of the Golden Fleece: Unraveling principles of morphogenesis by studying the integrative biology of skin appendages

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael W.; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Li, Ang; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Widelitz, Randall B.; Choung, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mythological story of the Golden Fleece symbolizes the magical regenerative power of skin appendages. Similar to the adventurous pursuit of the Golden Fleece by the multi-talented Argonauts, today we also need an integrated multi-disciplined approach to understand the cellular and molecular processes during development, regeneration and evolution of skin appendages. To this end, we have explored several aspects of skin appendage biology that contribute to the Turing activator / inhibitor model in feather pattern formation, the topo-biological arrangement of stem cells in organ shape determination, the macro-environmental regulation of stem cells in regenerative hair waves, and potential novel molecular pathways in the morphological evolution of feathers. Here we show our current integrative biology efforts to unravel the complex cellular behavior in patterning stem cells and the control of regional specificity in skin appendages. We use feather / scale tissue recombination to demonstrate the timing control of competence and inducibility. Feathers from different body regions are used to study skin regional specificity. Bioinformatic analyses of transcriptome microarrays show the potential involvement of candidate molecular pathways. We further show Hox genes exhibit some region specific expression patterns. To visualize real time events, we applied time-lapse movies, confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy to analyze the morphogenesis of cultured embryonic chicken skin explants. These modern imaging technologies reveal unexpectedly complex cellular flow and organization of extracellular matrix molecules in three dimensions. While these approaches are in preliminary stages, this perspective highlights the challenges we face and new integrative tools we will use. Future work will follow these leads to develop a systems biology view and understanding in the morphogenetic principles that govern the development and regeneration of ectodermal organs

  1. Anti-thromboembolic strategies in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Giuseppe; Amiet, Philpp; Jerie, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is highly effective for stroke prevention in high-risk-patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is also a risk for dementia, and effective OAC reduces the risk of dementia. Up to 30% of patients with AF have a coronary artery disease and antiplatelets are used to avoid thrombotic complications. Patients with AF often have an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and undergo a percutaneous intervention with stent-implantation. These patients require a triple therapy, i.e. the combination of OAC with dual-antiplatelet therapy. It is obvious that OAC may induce bleeding with potentially deleterious effects on mortality. Even the occurrence of minor bleeding is problematic. The review describes available data on used anti-thromboembolic regimens in patients treated with OAC (vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonists) who need a triple therapy (i.e. anticoagulation and antiplatelets). Most data are from patients who were treated for an ACS and cannot be directly extrapolated for patients with AF. The impact of used stents and novel P2Y12 antagonist-antiplatelets and duration of triple therapy is discussed. Often some high-risk patients with AF would need anticoagulation but cannot be given this therapy be-cause of excessive bleeding risks or contraindicating comorbidities: in these patients left atrial appendage closure with an occluding device can be used as an alternative to anti-thromboem-bolic therapy. The unavoidable anti-thromboembolic triple therapy carries a strong potential for bleeding events, which increase mortality. We have many data and several recommendations are offered. Nonetheless, we lack solid data on the best anti-thromboembolic regimen in patients with AF who need anticoagulation and antiplatelets. PMID:26779967

  2. Right coronary artery perforation by an active-fixation atrial pacing lead resulting in life-threatening tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Eiichiro; Abe, Yukio; Komatsu, Ryushi; Naruko, Takahiko; Itoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade resulting from perforation of a cardiac chamber is a relatively rare complication of pacemaker implantation. We report the first case of perforation of the right coronary artery related to the implantation of a screw-in atrial pacing lead, presenting as life-threatening cardiac tamponade. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman with complete atrioventricular block and dyspnea on exertion. A permanent pacemaker was implanted with bipolar Medtronic active-fixation leads positioned in the right atrial appendage and at the right ventricular basal septum without any difficulty. Approximately 3.5 h after the procedure, the patient complained of nausea, and the systolic blood pressure decreased to less than 60 mmHg. Echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion. Because the effects of pericardiocentesis lasted for less than an hour, the patient underwent a thoracotomy. After evacuation of a massive hemopericardium, bright red blood was seen gushing out from the right coronary artery, which was located on the opposite site of the right atrial appendage where a small portion of the screw tip was observed to be penetrating the atrial wall. The right coronary artery perforation was repaired using autologous pericardium-reinforced 7-0 prolene mattress sutures. Perforation of the right coronary artery is a potential complication and should be part of the differential diagnosis of cardiac tamponade after pacemaker implantation. PMID:26550089

  3. Right coronary artery perforation by an active-fixation atrial pacing lead resulting in life-threatening tamponade.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Eiichiro; Abe, Yukio; Komatsu, Ryushi; Naruko, Takahiko; Itoh, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac tamponade resulting from perforation of a cardiac chamber is a relatively rare complication of pacemaker implantation. We report the first case of perforation of the right coronary artery related to the implantation of a screw-in atrial pacing lead, presenting as life-threatening cardiac tamponade. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman with complete atrioventricular block and dyspnea on exertion. A permanent pacemaker was implanted with bipolar Medtronic active-fixation leads positioned in the right atrial appendage and at the right ventricular basal septum without any difficulty. Approximately 3.5 h after the procedure, the patient complained of nausea, and the systolic blood pressure decreased to less than 60 mmHg. Echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion. Because the effects of pericardiocentesis lasted for less than an hour, the patient underwent a thoracotomy. After evacuation of a massive hemopericardium, bright red blood was seen gushing out from the right coronary artery, which was located on the opposite site of the right atrial appendage where a small portion of the screw tip was observed to be penetrating the atrial wall. The right coronary artery perforation was repaired using autologous pericardium-reinforced 7-0 prolene mattress sutures. Perforation of the right coronary artery is a potential complication and should be part of the differential diagnosis of cardiac tamponade after pacemaker implantation.

  4. Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of atrial tissue using a suction catheter.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, T; Prunier, L; Cuize, L; Bruneval, P; Von Euw, D; Le Heuzey, J Y; Peronneau, P

    1989-01-01

    Closed chest ablative technique that avoid barotrauma would be attractive for ablation at thin walled cardiac structures, such as the atrial free wall or coronary sinus. Transcatheter radiofrequency (RF) currents produce tissue necrosis the size of which is dependent on the contact between the tissue and the electrode. In order to assess the effects of transvenous RF ablation of atrial free wall using a suction electrode catheter, we delivered in ten dogs, one single unmodulated RF pulse 1.2 MHz, in a unipolar mode, through the distal electrode of a lumen catheter (USCI 8F) (USCI, Billerica, MA USA) located in the right appendage. During the pulse an 80 KPa vacuum depression was applied to the lumen of the catheter. Each pulse had a 10 seconds duration and the mean delivered power was 4.3 +/- 1.4 W. Aortic pressure and electrocardiogram were monitored during the procedure. A right atrial electrophysiological study was performed at the ablated site, at control, after suction application and after RF pulse delivery. The animals were sacrificed after 14 or 21 days. Atrial pacing threshold values decreased after suction application in comparison to control values after the pulse (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs 0.60 +/- 0.23 mA, P less than O.05) but increased after the pulse delivery (2.60 +/- 1.85 mA, P less than 0.01). In contrast, the atrial effective refractory period did not significantly change after suction, nor after RF pulse delivery. Aortic pressure remained unchanged throughout the procedure. Complex arrhythmias were not observed during or after RF pulse delivery. One dog died suddenly at the first day after ablation, but this death was most probably unrelated to RF ablation. Anatomic lesions had a length of 8.8 +/- 3.3 mm, a width of 4.6 +/- 2.5 mm and a depth of 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm. They were transmural in nine of the ten dogs but without atrial wall perforation in any case. Lesions suggesting tissue volatilization were present in four dogs. These results demonstrate that

  5. Chemical-induced atrial thrombosis in NTP rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kissling, Grace E; Johnson, Jo Anne; Clayton, Natasha P; Flagler, Norris D; Nyska, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac thrombosis, one of the causes of sudden death throughout the world, plays a principal role in several cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. Data from studies of induction of chemical thrombosis in rodents help to identify substances in our environment that may contribute to cardiac thrombosis. Results for more than 500 chemicals tested in rodents in 2-year bioassays have been published as Technical Reports of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/index. We evaluated atrial thrombosis induced by these chemical exposures and compared it to similarly induced lesions reported in the literature. Spontaneous rates of cardiac thrombosis were determined for control Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice: 0% in rats and mice in 90-day studies and, in 2-year studies, 0.7% in both genders of mice, 4% in male rats, and 1% in female rats. Incidences of atrial thrombosis were increased in high-dosed groups involving 13 compounds (incidence rate: 20-100%): 2-butoxyethanol, C.I. Direct Blue 15, bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane, diazoaminobenzene, diethanolamine, 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine dihydrochloride, hexachloroethane, isobutene, methyleugenol, oxazepam, C.I. Pigment Red 23, C.I. Acid Red 114, and 4,4'-thiobis(6-t-butyl-m-cresol). The main localization of spontaneously occurring and chemically induced thromboses occurred in the left atrium. The literature survey suggested that chemical-induced atrial thrombosis might be closely related to myocardial injury, endothelial injury, circulatory stasis, hypercoagulability, and impaired atrial mechanical activity, such as atrial fibrillation, which could cause stasis of blood within the left atrial appendage, contributing to left atrial thrombosis. Supplementary data referenced in this paper are not printed in this issue of Toxicologic Pathology. They are available as downloadable files at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. To

  6. Atrial Electromechanical Cycle Length Mapping in Paced Canine Hearts In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Costet, Alexandre; Bunting, Ethan; Grondin, Julien; Gambhir, Alok; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias affect millions of people worldwide. Characterization and study of arrhythmias in the atria in the clinic is currently performed point-by-point using mapping catheters capable of generating maps of the electrical activation rate or cycle length. In this paper, we describe a new ultrasound-based mapping technique called Electromechanical Cycle Length Mapping (ECLM) capable of estimating the electromechanical activation rate, or cycle length, i.e., the rate of the mechanical activation of the myocardium which follows the electrical activation. ECLM relies on frequency analysis of the incremental strain within the atria and can be performed in a single acquisition. ECLM was validated in a canine model paced from the left atrial appendage, against pacing rates within the reported range of cycle lengths previously measured during atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation. Correlation between the global estimated electromechanical cycle lengths and pacing rates was shown to be excellent (slope = 0.983, intercept = 3.91, r2=0.9999). The effect of the number of cardiac cycles on the performance of ECLM was also investigated and the reproducibility of ECLM was demonstrated (error between consecutive acquisitions for all pacing rates: 6.3 ± 4.3 %). These findings indicate the potential of ECLM for non-invasively characterizing atrial arrhythmias and, provide feedback on the treatment planning of catheter ablation procedures in the clinic. PMID:26168174

  7. Principles of appendage design in robots and animals determining terradynamic performance on flowable ground.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feifei; Zhang, Tingnan; Korff, Wyatt; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Full, Robert J; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-10-08

    Natural substrates like sand, soil, leaf litter and snow vary widely in penetration resistance. To search for principles of appendage design in robots and animals that permit high performance on such flowable ground, we developed a ground control technique by which the penetration resistance of a dry granular substrate could be widely and rapidly varied. The approach was embodied in a device consisting of an air fluidized bed trackway in which a gentle upward flow of air through the granular material resulted in a decreased penetration resistance. As the volumetric air flow, Q, increased to the fluidization transition, the penetration resistance decreased to zero. Using a bio-inspired hexapedal robot as a physical model, we systematically studied how locomotor performance (average forward speed, v(x)) varied with ground penetration resistance and robot leg frequency. Average robot speed decreased with increasing Q, and decreased more rapidly for increasing leg frequency, ω. A universal scaling model revealed that the leg penetration ratio (foot pressure relative to penetration force per unit area per depth and leg length) determined v(x) for all ground penetration resistances and robot leg frequencies. To extend our result to include continuous variation of locomotor foot pressure, we used a resistive force theory based terradynamic approach to perform numerical simulations. The terradynamic model successfully predicted locomotor performance for low resistance granular states. Despite variation in morphology and gait, the performance of running lizards, geckos and crabs on flowable ground was also influenced by the leg penetration ratio. In summary, appendage designs which reduce foot pressure can passively maintain minimal leg penetration ratio as the ground weakens, and consequently permits maintenance of effective locomotion over a range of terradynamically challenging surfaces.

  8. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  9. Co-occurrence of carbohydrate malabsorption and primary epiploic appendagitis.

    PubMed

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Kalmar, Peter; Mangge, Harald; Krause, Robert; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra J

    2015-09-21

    Unspecific abdominal complaints including bloating and irregular bowel movements may be caused by carbohydrate malabsorption syndromes, e.g., lactose and fructose malabsorption. These symptoms were investigated with hydrogen (H2) breath tests and correlated to carbohydrate malabsorption. During performing these H2-breath tests the patient presented with an acute, localized, non-migratory pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant. Primary epiploic appendagitis is a rare cause of abdominal acute or subacute complaints and diagnosis of primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA) is made when computed tomography reveals a characteristic lesion. We report on a patient with co-occurrence of lactose and fructose malabsorption, which was treated successfully with a diet free of culprit carbohydrates, with PEA recovering without medication or surgical treatment within few days. Since the abdominal unspecific symptoms had been present for months, they appeared not to be correlated to the acute localized abdominal pain, therefore we speculate on a random co-occurrence of combined carbohydrate malabsorption and PEA.

  10. Exploiting periodicity to extract the atrial activity in atrial arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinares, Raul; Igual, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation disorders are one of the main arrhythmias of the elderly. The atrial and ventricular activities are decoupled during an atrial fibrillation episode, and very rapid and irregular waves replace the usual atrial P-wave in a normal sinus rhythm electrocardiogram (ECG). The estimation of these wavelets is a must for clinical analysis. We propose a new approach to this problem focused on the quasiperiodicity of these wavelets. Atrial activity is characterized by a main atrial rhythm in the interval 3-12 Hz. It enables us to establish the problem as the separation of the original sources from the instantaneous linear combination of them recorded in the ECG or the extraction of only the atrial component exploiting the quasiperiodic feature of the atrial signal. This methodology implies the previous estimation of such main atrial period. We present two algorithms that separate and extract the atrial rhythm starting from a prior estimation of the main atrial frequency. The first one is an algebraic method based on the maximization of a cost function that measures the periodicity. The other one is an adaptive algorithm that exploits the decorrelation of the atrial and other signals diagonalizing the correlation matrices at multiple lags of the period of atrial activity. The algorithms are applied successfully to synthetic and real data. In simulated ECGs, the average correlation index obtained was 0.811 and 0.847, respectively. In real ECGs, the accuracy of the results was validated using spectral and temporal parameters. The average peak frequency and spectral concentration obtained were 5.550 and 5.554 Hz and 56.3 and 54.4%, respectively, and the kurtosis was 0.266 and 0.695. For validation purposes, we compared the proposed algorithms with established methods, obtaining better results for simulated and real registers.

  11. Obesity and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Abed, H S; Wittert, G A

    2013-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasing public health problem, often described as the epidemic of the new millennium. The rising health economic impact of AF, its association with poor quality of life and independent probability of increased mortality, has recently been highlighted. Although population ageing is regarded as an important contributor to this epidemic, obesity and its associated cardiometabolic comorbidities may represent the principal driving factor behind the current and projected AF epidemic. Obesity-related risk factors, such as hypertension, vascular disease, obstructive sleep apnea and pericardial fat, are thought to result in atrial electro-structural dysfunction. In addition, insulin resistance, its associated abnormalities in nutrient utilization and intermediary metabolic by-products are associated with structural and functional abnormalities, ultimately promoting AF. Recent elucidation of molecular pathways, including those responsible for atrial fibrosis, have provided mechanistic insights and the potential for targeted pharmacotherapy. In this article, we review the evidence for an obesity-related atrial electromechanical dysfunction, the mechanisms behind this and its impact on AF therapeutic outcomes. In light of the recently described mechanisms, we illustrate proposed management approaches and avenues for further investigations.

  12. Evolving nature of the AP2 α-appendage hub during clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Praefcke, Gerrit J K; Ford, Marijn G J; Schmid, Eva M; Olesen, Lene E; Gallop, Jennifer L; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Vallis, Yvonne; Babu, M Madan; Mills, Ian G; McMahon, Harvey T

    2004-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis involves the assembly of a network of proteins that select cargo, modify membrane shape and drive invagination, vesicle scission and uncoating. This network is initially assembled around adaptor protein (AP) appendage domains, which are protein interaction hubs. Using crystallography, we show that FxDxF and WVxF peptide motifs from synaptojanin bind to distinct subdomains on α-appendages, called ‘top' and ‘side' sites. Appendages use both these sites to interact with their binding partners in vitro and in vivo. Occupation of both sites simultaneously results in high-affinity reversible interactions with lone appendages (e.g. eps15 and epsin1). Proteins with multiple copies of only one type of motif bind multiple appendages and so will aid adaptor clustering. These clustered α(appendage)-hubs have altered properties where they can sample many different binding partners, which in turn can interact with each other and indirectly with clathrin. In the final coated vesicle, most appendage binding partners are absent and thus the functional status of the appendage domain as an interaction hub is temporal and transitory giving directionality to vesicle assembly. PMID:15496985

  13. Comparison of Approaches for Stroke Prophylaxis in Patients with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation: Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirav; Hashim, Taimoor; Godara, Hemant; Ather, Sameer; Arora, Garima; Pasala, Tilak; Whitfield, Thomas T.; McGiffin, David C.; Ahmed, Mustafa I.; Lloyd, Steven G.; Limdi, Nita A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple novel oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure devices (WATCHMAN) have been tested against dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists in randomized controlled trials for stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation. No direct comparisons of these strategies are available from randomized controlled trials. We conducted the current analyses by combining efficacy and safety characteristics of all FDA approved stroke prophylaxis treatment strategies for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Materials and Methods We searched SCOPUS from 1945 till October 2015 for randomized controlled trials comparing these strategies and reporting efficacy and safety outcomes. Six randomized controlled trials were identified and included in the final analyses and review. We followed PRISMA guidelines for network meta-analyses while reporting the current analyses. We collected data on ischemic stroke, major bleeding, and the composite primary safety endpoint as defined by various randomized controlled trials. Network meta-analyses were conducted using consistency and inconsistency models for efficacy and safety outcomes. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve were then utilized to cluster rank these treatments for safety and efficacy. Results Six randomized controlled trials with 59,627 patients comparing six treatment strategies were eligible for the analyses. All prophylaxis strategies had comparable rates of ischemic stroke. Apixaban was associated with the least number of primary safety endpoint events as compared with all other treatments. In the cluster analyses assessing safety and efficacy, apixaban, edoxaban and dabigatran ranked best followed by vitamin K antagonists and rivaroxaban, whereas the WATCHMAN left atrial appendage closure device ranked last. Conclusions Dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists, novel oral anticoagulants, and the WATCHMAN left atrial appendage closure devices are equally efficacious for ischemic stroke

  14. The controversial origin of the abdominal appendage-like processes in immature insects: are they true segmental appendages or secondary outgrowths? (Arthropoda Hexapoda).

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Jacques

    2012-08-01

    In this article, I review the major characteristics of different types of appendage-like processes that develop at the abdominal segments of many immature insects, and I discuss their controversial morphological value. The main question is whether the abdominal processes are derived from segmental appendages serially homologous to thoracic legs, or whether they are "secondary" outgrowths not homologous with true appendages. Morphological and embryological data, in particular, a comparison with the structure and development of the abdominal appendages in primitive apterygote hexapods, and data from developmental genetics, support the hypothesis of appendicular origin of many of the abdominal processes present in the juvenile stages of various pterygote orders. For example, the lateral processes, such as the tracheal gills in aquatic nymphs of exopterygote insects, are regarded as derived from lateral portions of appendage primordia, homologous with the abdominal styli of apterygotan insects; these processes correspond either to rudimentary telopodites or to coxal exites. The ventrolateral processes, such as the prolegs of different endopterygote insect larvae, appear to be derived from medial portions of the appendicular primordia; they correspond to coxal endites. These views lead to the rejection of Hinton's hypothesis (Hinton [1955] Trans R Entomol Soc Lond 106:455-545) according to which all the abdominal processes of insect larvae are secondary outgrowths not derived from true appendage anlagen.

  15. Attitude dynamics simulation subroutines for systems of hinge-connected rigid bodies with nonrigid appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, G. E.; Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Three computer subroutines designed to solve the vector-dyadic differential equations of rotational motion for systems that may be idealized as a collection of hinge-connected rigid bodies assembled in a tree topology, with an optional flexible appendage attached to each body are reported. Deformations of the appendages are mathematically represented by modal coordinates and are assumed small. Within these constraints, the subroutines provide equation solutions for (1) the most general case of unrestricted hinge rotations, with appendage base bodies nominally rotating at a constant speed, (2) the case of unrestricted hinge rotations between rigid bodies, with the restriction that those rigid bodies carrying appendages are nominally nonspinning, and (3) the case of small hinge rotations and nominally nonrotating appendages. Sample problems and their solutions are presented to illustrate the utility of the computer programs.

  16. A conserved genetic mechanism specifies deutocerebral appendage identity in insects and arachnids.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant P; Tarazona, Oscar A; Lopez, Davys H; Schwager, Evelyn E; Cohn, Martin J; Wheeler, Ward C; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2015-06-01

    The segmental architecture of the arthropod head is one of the most controversial topics in the evolutionary developmental biology of arthropods. The deutocerebral (second) segment of the head is putatively homologous across Arthropoda, as inferred from the segmental distribution of the tripartite brain and the absence of Hox gene expression of this anterior-most, appendage-bearing segment. While this homology statement implies a putative common mechanism for differentiation of deutocerebral appendages across arthropods, experimental data for deutocerebral appendage fate specification are limited to winged insects. Mandibulates (hexapods, crustaceans and myriapods) bear a characteristic pair of antennae on the deutocerebral segment, whereas chelicerates (e.g. spiders, scorpions, harvestmen) bear the eponymous chelicerae. In such hexapods as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, cephalic appendages are differentiated from the thoracic appendages (legs) by the activity of the appendage patterning gene homothorax (hth). Here we show that embryonic RNA interference against hth in the harvestman Phalangium opilio results in homeonotic chelicera-to-leg transformations, and also in some cases pedipalp-to-leg transformations. In more strongly affected embryos, adjacent appendages undergo fusion and/or truncation, and legs display proximal defects, suggesting conservation of additional functions of hth in patterning the antero-posterior and proximo-distal appendage axes. Expression signal of anterior Hox genes labial, proboscipedia and Deformed is diminished, but not absent, in hth RNAi embryos, consistent with results previously obtained with the insect G. bimaculatus. Our results substantiate a deep homology across arthropods of the mechanism whereby cephalic appendages are differentiated from locomotory appendages. PMID:25948691

  17. A conserved genetic mechanism specifies deutocerebral appendage identity in insects and arachnids.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant P; Tarazona, Oscar A; Lopez, Davys H; Schwager, Evelyn E; Cohn, Martin J; Wheeler, Ward C; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2015-06-01

    The segmental architecture of the arthropod head is one of the most controversial topics in the evolutionary developmental biology of arthropods. The deutocerebral (second) segment of the head is putatively homologous across Arthropoda, as inferred from the segmental distribution of the tripartite brain and the absence of Hox gene expression of this anterior-most, appendage-bearing segment. While this homology statement implies a putative common mechanism for differentiation of deutocerebral appendages across arthropods, experimental data for deutocerebral appendage fate specification are limited to winged insects. Mandibulates (hexapods, crustaceans and myriapods) bear a characteristic pair of antennae on the deutocerebral segment, whereas chelicerates (e.g. spiders, scorpions, harvestmen) bear the eponymous chelicerae. In such hexapods as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, cephalic appendages are differentiated from the thoracic appendages (legs) by the activity of the appendage patterning gene homothorax (hth). Here we show that embryonic RNA interference against hth in the harvestman Phalangium opilio results in homeonotic chelicera-to-leg transformations, and also in some cases pedipalp-to-leg transformations. In more strongly affected embryos, adjacent appendages undergo fusion and/or truncation, and legs display proximal defects, suggesting conservation of additional functions of hth in patterning the antero-posterior and proximo-distal appendage axes. Expression signal of anterior Hox genes labial, proboscipedia and Deformed is diminished, but not absent, in hth RNAi embryos, consistent with results previously obtained with the insect G. bimaculatus. Our results substantiate a deep homology across arthropods of the mechanism whereby cephalic appendages are differentiated from locomotory appendages.

  18. A conserved genetic mechanism specifies deutocerebral appendage identity in insects and arachnids

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prashant P.; Tarazona, Oscar A.; Lopez, Davys H.; Schwager, Evelyn E.; Cohn, Martin J.; Wheeler, Ward C.; Extavour, Cassandra G.

    2015-01-01

    The segmental architecture of the arthropod head is one of the most controversial topics in the evolutionary developmental biology of arthropods. The deutocerebral (second) segment of the head is putatively homologous across Arthropoda, as inferred from the segmental distribution of the tripartite brain and the absence of Hox gene expression of this anterior-most, appendage-bearing segment. While this homology statement implies a putative common mechanism for differentiation of deutocerebral appendages across arthropods, experimental data for deutocerebral appendage fate specification are limited to winged insects. Mandibulates (hexapods, crustaceans and myriapods) bear a characteristic pair of antennae on the deutocerebral segment, whereas chelicerates (e.g. spiders, scorpions, harvestmen) bear the eponymous chelicerae. In such hexapods as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, cephalic appendages are differentiated from the thoracic appendages (legs) by the activity of the appendage patterning gene homothorax (hth). Here we show that embryonic RNA interference against hth in the harvestman Phalangium opilio results in homeonotic chelicera-to-leg transformations, and also in some cases pedipalp-to-leg transformations. In more strongly affected embryos, adjacent appendages undergo fusion and/or truncation, and legs display proximal defects, suggesting conservation of additional functions of hth in patterning the antero-posterior and proximo-distal appendage axes. Expression signal of anterior Hox genes labial, proboscipedia and Deformed is diminished, but not absent, in hth RNAi embryos, consistent with results previously obtained with the insect G. bimaculatus. Our results substantiate a deep homology across arthropods of the mechanism whereby cephalic appendages are differentiated from locomotory appendages. PMID:25948691

  19. Leaf epidermal appendages of desert plant: an ecological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yubing; Li, Xinrong; Li, Mengmeng

    2014-05-01

    Desert plant often have few, tiny or no leaves, which reduces transpiration. The epidermis of their leaves is often ornamented outgrowths called trichomes or hairs and a thick waxy cuticle. Hairs on the leaf surface trap humidity in dry climates and waxy leaf surfaces reduce water loss. Our present study is to investigate the characteristics of trichomes and waxy cuticle in leaf surface of desert plant, which in the long term acclimation in semi-humid, semi-arid and arid ecosystems of Northern China, from east (Zhangwu county, Liaoning province) to west (Korla city, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region), passing through several provinces including the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Shanxi province, the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region and Gansu province. 68 shrubs and 7 trees were selected in the natural habitats which were artificial sand fixing vegetation and the adjacent natural vegetation in sandy areas. The leaf epidermis was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the cuticle thickness was calculated in the leaf cross-section by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the epidermis of selected materials was divided into five categories: (1) Trichomes with different forms covered completely on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of leaf, and any other epidermal appendages could not been observed. (2) Epicuticular wax crystals with different forms almost completely covered in the epistomatal chambers as well as on the surrounding epidermis, and there were no other appendages on the leaf surface. (3) A lot of warty hairs arranged neatly on the surface and the stomatal index was too low. (4) Several or even dozens of papillary epidermal cells covered with waxy crystals enclosed a sunken stomata chamber, therefore the stomatal density is very low. (5) Like ordinary terrestrial plants, epidermal cells and cell outline are clear, with epidermal hairs or not, and the stomata and waxy crystals are visible. TEM showed that desert plants

  20. Skin and dermal appendages stem cells exposure to tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Kolanko, Emanuel; Czekaj, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to persist throughout human life possessing enormous capacity for proliferation and differentiation. These cells and their microenvironment are potential targets for environmental pollutions, for example tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke consists of thousands of substances which can disturb stem cell homeostasis by evoking, in particular, oxidative stress and hypoxia. It causes also deep, irreversible changes in the affected tissues. It is strongly linked with carcinogenesis. Skin is one of the most exposed tissues to tobacco smoke. Self-renewal dermal tissues, such as epidermis and its appendages, are composed of various stem cell populations. The tissue of the skin that is richest in SC is the hair follicle. In wound healing are involved: epidermal KSC population and stem populations from hair follicle, such as CD34+ and Lrig6+ cells. Some skin cancers, i.e., squamous cell carcinoma, originate from skin stem cells and are considered to be most associated with long-term smoking. Dermal stem cells can be affected by tobacco smoke components in two ways: internal, where xenobiotics are delivered with blood stream, and external, where the tissues are directly exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, as well as to third-hand smoke. Assessment of the dose- and time-response of the skin and dermal appendages to tobacco smoke exposure can allow to estimate the adverse health effects risk. Usually, to assess tobacco smoke exposure time, hairs and toenails are used. This is because they have a unique ability to store xenobiotics for longer periods of time in respect to their temporal appearance in the blood. Current scientific and medical problem is searching for more adequate biomarkers for TS exposure assessment. The unresolved question is, if stem cells isolated from the skin and its appendages might be good biomarkers for tobacco smoke exposure. We should take into consideration stem cell biology (proliferation vs. differentiation), expression of

  1. Emergency management of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, A; O'Neill, J

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia managed by emergency and acute general physicians. There is increasing evidence that selected patients with acute atrial fibrillation can be safely managed in the emergency department without the need for hospital admission. Meanwhile, there is significant variation in the current emergency management of acute atrial fibrillation. This review discusses evidence based emergency management of atrial fibrillation. The principles of emergency management of acute atrial fibrillation and the subset of patients who may not need hospital admission are reviewed. Finally, the need for evidence based guidelines before emergency department based clinical pathways for the management of acute atrial fibrillation becomes routine clinical practice is highlighted. PMID:12840118

  2. A new atrial septostomy technique.

    PubMed

    Park, S C; Zuberbuhler, J R; Neches, W H; Lenox, C C; Zoltun, R A

    1975-01-01

    Balloon atrial septostomy is usually ineffective if the atrial septum is thickened. A technique for incising the atrial septum is described. A no. 6 French catheter was modified to enclose a tiny surgical blade. The distal end of the blade was pivoted to the catheter tip, and the proximal end was attached to a guide wire in the catheter lumen. Advancing the guide wire protruded the blade through a slit in the long axis of the tip of the catheter. Atrial septostomy was performed in five newborn lambs in vivo and in adult dog hearts and human hearts in vitro by advancing the catheter tip across the atrial septum with the blade retracted and withdrawing it to the right atrium with the blade extended. Eight to 12 mm lacerations of the atrial septum were produced and could be extended by subsequent balloon septostomy. The technique may be useful when balloon septostomy has been ineffective.

  3. Clinical implications of atrial isomerism.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, I S; How, S W; Wang, J K; Wu, M H; Chu, S H; Lue, H C; Hung, C R

    1988-01-01

    Right atrial isomerism or left atrial isomerism is frequently diagnosed as situs ambiguous without further discrimination of the specific morbid anatomy. Thirty six cases of right atrial isomerism and seven cases of left atrial isomerism were collected from the records and pathological museum at the National Taiwan University Hospital. There was a necropsy report for 18 cases. In all patients one or more of the following conditions was met: (a) isomeric bronchial anatomy, (b) echocardiographic and angiocardiographic evidence of isomerism, and (c) surgical or necropsy evidence of abnormal atrial anatomy. An anomalous pulmonary venous connection was present in 55% of patients with right atrial isomerism; in left atrial isomerism one case (14%) had a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Forty per cent of cases of anomalous pulmonary venous connection with right atrial isomerism had obstruction. Six (86%) of seven cases with left atrial isomerism had an ambiguous biventricular atrioventricular connection. In contrast, univentricular atrioventricular connection (26 of 36, 72%) was significantly more common in right atrial isomerism. A common atrioventricular valve was the most frequent mode of connection in both forms. Two discrete atrioventricular valves were significantly more common in left atrial isomerism. Atrioventricular valve regurgitation was detected in 14 cases. Double outlet right ventricle was the most common type of ventriculoarterial connection. The most commonly cited causes of death after either palliative or definitive operation were undetected anomalous pulmonary venous connection, pulmonary venous stricture, and uncorrected atrioventricular valve or aortic regurgitation complicated by abnormal coagulation. Although the prognosis is poor, successful operation depends on knowledge of the precise anatomical arrangement associated with atrial isomerism. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3408620

  4. An unusual cause of hematuria; primary epiploic appendagitis

    PubMed Central

    Cakiroglu, Basri; Sinanoglu, Orhun; Abci, İlker; Tas, Tuncay; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Aksoy, Suleyman Hilmi; Bilsel, Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA) is self limiting inflammatory disease of colonic epiploic appendices. PRESENTATION OF CASE Herein, a 40 years old patient describing abdomino-inguinal pain with clotty hematuria having PEA was presented. At first, the patient was thought to have a primary bladder pathology, but after a meticioulus examination, he found to have PEA and managed by conservative measures. DISCUSSION Although PEA does not require surgical intervention, it may mimic other acute abdominal disorders which can be difficult to differentiate. Appendices overlying the sigmoid colon and cecum are more prone to be affected as they are more elongated and wider in size. The patient is usually admitted due to sudden onset of abdominal pain accompanied with fever, abdominal tenderness and leucocytosis. CONCLUSION The present case demonstrated that PEA located close to the lower urinary tract especially urinary bladder might present with urinary symptoms such as hematuria. dysuria, pollakuria and inguinal pain. PMID:25460432

  5. The effect of internal DC shocks on the atrial fibrillation frequency.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J; Castro, N; Escalona, O; Anderson, J McC; Glover, B M; Adgey, J A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study, was to investigate the effect of internal DC shocks on the atrial fibrillation frequency (AFF). AFF has previously been shown to predict the success and energy requirements in patients undergoing internal cardioversion (IC) of atrial fibrillation (AF). However the possibility that unsuccessful shocks during IC may influence the AFF has not been before studied. Thirty eight patients with AF, suggested for DC cardioversion at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast, were included in our study. Two catheters were positioned in the right atrial appendage (RAA) and the coronary sinus (CS), to deliver a biphasic shock waveform, synchronized with the R wave of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. A voltage step-up protocol (50-300 V) was used for patient cardioversion. The ECG was analyzed for a mean of 52,8+/-10.1 seconds (corresponding to segments before and after nonsuccessful shocks). Atrial fibrillatory activity was extracted by means of bandpass filtering and ventricular activity (QRST) cancellation. QRST complexes were cancelled using a recursive least squared (RLS) adaptive filter. FFT was applied to the residual atrial fibrillatory signal. AFF was estimated from the dominant frequency within the 3-12 Hz band of the power spectrum. R-R intervals during the segments were also analyzed. A total of 26 patients were successfully cardioverted, employing 167 shocks (141 nonsuccessful). AFF, computed with 10 s of signal, showed significant reduction (mean 0.3052 +/- 1.1055 Hz, P=0.028) comparing segments immediately before and after shocks, and AFF significantly increases (mean 0.2582 +/- 0.609 Hz, P=0.007) between segments immediately after shocks and those 35 s after. AFF showed distinct behavior according to the energy level of the shocks. In conclusion, intracardiac electric shocks could cause transitory changes in the AFF of patients with atrial fibrillation.

  6. Evo-Devo of Amniote Integuments and Appendages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Hou, Lianhai; Plikus, Maksim; Hughes, Michael; Scehnet, Jeffrey; Suksaweang, Sanong; Widelitz, Randall B.; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Integuments form the boundary between an organism and the environment. The evolution of novel developmental mechanisms in integuments and appendages allows animals to live in diverse ecological environments. Here we focus on amniotes. The major achievement for reptile skin is an adaptation to the land with the formation of a successful barrier. The stratum corneum enables this barrier to prevent water loss from the skin and allowed amphibian/reptile ancestors to go onto the land. Overlapping scales and production of β-keratins provide strong protection. Epidermal invagination led to the formation of avian feather and mammalian hair follicles in the dermis. Both adopted a proximal - distal growth mode that maintains endothermy. Feathers form hierarchical branches which produce the vane that makes flight possible. Recent discoveries of feathered dinosaurs in China inspire new thinking on the origin of feathers. In the laboratory, epithelial - mesenchymal recombinations and molecular mis-expressions were carried out to test the plasticity of epithelial organ formation. We review the work on the transformation of scales into feathers, conversion between barbs and rachis, and the production of “chicken teeth”. In mammals, tilting the balance of the BMP pathway in K14 noggin transgenic mice alters the number, size and phenotypes of different ectodermal organs, making investigators rethink the distinction between morpho-regulation and pathological changes. Models on the evolution of feathers and hairs from reptile integuments are discussed. A hypothetical Evo-Devo space where diverse integument appendages can be placed according to complex phenotypes and novel developmental mechanisms is presented. PMID:15272390

  7. Hyperuricemia and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Maharani, Nani; Kuwabara, Masanari; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-07-27

    The importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) as a cause of mortality and morbidity has prompted research on its pathogenesis and treatment. Recognition of AF risk factors is essential to prevent it and reduce the risk of death. Hyperuricemia has been widely accepted to be associated with the incidence of paroxysmal or persistent AF, as well as to the risk of AF in post cardiovascular surgery patients. The possible explanations for this association have been based on their relation with either oxidative stress or inflammation. To investigate the link between hyperuricemia and AF, it is necessary to refer to hyperuricemia-induced atrial remodeling. So far, both ionic channel and structural remodeling caused by hyperuricemia might be plausible explanations for the occurrence of AF. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, or the use of antioxidants, along with serum uric acid (SUA) level reduction to prevent inflammation, might be useful. Uric acid transporters (UATs) play a key role in the regulation of intracellular uric acid concentration. Intracellular rather than serum uric acid level is considered more important for the pathogenesis of AF. Identification of UATs expressed in cells is thus important, and targeting UATs might become a potential strategy to reduce the risk of hyperuricemia-induced atrial fibrillation. PMID:27396561

  8. Atypical Presentations of Epiploic Appendagitis: Early Diagnosis and Non-Operative Management is the Optimal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Zackariah

    2012-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis is a benign self-limiting inflammation of the appendices epiplocae of the colon. It often presents as abdominal pain rarely accompanied by fever, nausea, or vomiting or any other abdominal symptoms. It can mimick acute diverticulitis or appendicitis on clinical exam. The diagnosis of epiploic appendagitis primarily relies on imaging modalities such as CT. The treatment is analgesia and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are usually sufficient to control pain and no surgical intervention is needed. This report illustrates two cases with epiploic appendagitis who presented with atypical symptoms, clinical and radiological findings and management of this condition.

  9. Sinus Node and Atrial Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    John, Roy M; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-05-10

    Although sinus node dysfunction (SND) and atrial arrhythmias frequently coexist and interact, the putative mechanism linking the 2 remain unclear. Although SND is accompanied by atrial myocardial structural changes in the right atrium, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disease of variable interactions between left atrial triggers and substrate most commonly of left atrial origin. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the development and progression of SND and AF. Although some patients manifest SND as a result of electric remodeling induced by periods of AF, others develop progressive atrial structural remodeling that gives rise to both conditions together. The treatment strategy will thus vary according to the predominant disease phenotype. Although catheter ablation will benefit patients with predominantly AF and secondary SND, cardiac pacing may be the mainstay of therapy for patients with predominant fibrotic atrial cardiomyopathy. This contemporary review summarizes current knowledge on sinus node pathophysiology with the broader goal of yielding insights into the complex relationship between sinus node disease and atrial arrhythmias.

  10. Torsion of Fatty Appendage of Falciform Ligament: Acute Abdomen in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Maccallum, Caroline; Eaton, Sarah; Chubb, Daniel; Franzi, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Torsion of the fatty appendage of the falciform ligament is an extremely rare condition that leads to severe abdominal pain and raised inflammatory markers. It can be recognised on ultrasound or CT scan. The pathophysiology is the same as that involved in the more common torsion and/or infarction of the greater omentum or epiploic appendages. The condition is best managed conservatively with anti-inflammatory analgesia, and the early recognition of this type of torsion may prevent unnecessary operative intervention to look for a source of abdominal pain. There have been five reported adult cases of a torted fatty appendage of the falciform ligament identified on ultrasound and CT scan, but no paediatric cases. We report a case of torsion of the fatty appendage of the falciform ligament in a ten-year-old boy and describe its imaging characteristics on CT scan. PMID:26664796

  11. Canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial patterning by modulating levels of laminins in zebrafish appendages

    PubMed Central

    Nagendran, Monica; Arora, Prateek; Gori, Payal; Mulay, Aditya; Ray, Shinjini; Jacob, Tressa; Sonawane, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    The patterning and morphogenesis of body appendages – such as limbs and fins – is orchestrated by the activities of several developmental pathways. Wnt signalling is essential for the induction of limbs. However, it is unclear whether a canonical Wnt signalling gradient exists and regulates the patterning of epithelium in vertebrate appendages. Using an evolutionarily old appendage – the median fin in zebrafish – as a model, we show that the fin epithelium exhibits graded changes in cellular morphology along the proximo-distal axis. This epithelial pattern is strictly correlated with the gradient of canonical Wnt signalling activity. By combining genetic analyses with cellular imaging, we show that canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial cell morphology by modulating the levels of laminins, which are extracellular matrix components. We have unravelled a hitherto unknown mechanism involved in epithelial patterning, which is also conserved in the pectoral fins – evolutionarily recent appendages that are homologous to tetrapod limbs. PMID:25519245

  12. Atrial Cardiopathy: A Broadened Concept of Left Atrial Thromboembolism Beyond Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Hooman; Okin, Peter M.; Longstreth, W. T.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has long been associated with a heightened risk of ischemic stroke and systemic thromboembolism, but recent data require a re-evaluation of our understanding of the nature of this relationship. New findings about the temporal connection between AF and stroke, alongside evidence linking markers of left atrial abnormalities with stroke in the absence of apparent AF, suggest that left atrial thromboembolism may occur even without AF. These observations undermine the hypothesis that the dysrhythmia that defines AF is necessary and sufficient to cause thromboembolism. In this commentary, we instead suggest that the substrate for thromboembolism may often be the anatomic and physiological atrial derangements associated with AF. Therefore, our understanding of cardioembolic stroke may be more complete if we shift our representation of its origin from AF to the concept of atrial cardiopathy. PMID:26021638

  13. Regeneration versus scarring in vertebrate appendages and heart.

    PubMed

    Jaźwińska, Anna; Sallin, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to complex human organs, such as the limbs and the heart, result in pathological conditions, for which we often lack adequate treatments. While modern regenerative approaches are based on the transplantation of stem cell-derived cells, natural regeneration in lower vertebrates, such as zebrafish and newts, relies predominantly on the intrinsic plasticity of mature tissues. This property involves local activation of the remaining material at the site of injury to promote cell division, cell migration and complete reproduction of the missing structure. It remains an unresolved question why adult mammals are not equally competent to reactivate morphogenetic programmes. Although organ regeneration depends strongly on the proliferative properties of cells in the injured tissue, it is apparent that various organismic factors, such as innervation, vascularization, hormones, metabolism and the immune system, can affect this process. Here, we focus on a correlation between the regenerative capacity and cellular specialization in the context of functional demands, as illustrated by appendages and heart in diverse vertebrates. Elucidation of the differences between homologous regenerative and non-regenerative tissues from various animal models is essential for understanding the applicability of lessons learned from the study of regenerative biology to clinical strategies for the treatment of injured human organs. PMID:26414617

  14. Regulated deployment mechanism for a panel like appendage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, José Ignacio; Vázquez, Javier; Gavira, José Manuel; Migliorero, Gerard

    2001-09-01

    The definition of a cost effective deployment mechanism to deploy 180° panel like appendages in a safe way and with minimum end stroke deployment shock has been a challenge that led the design to achieve a low cost, light, compact, simple, flexible, modular, and low power demanding configuration. This mechanism is composed of an active hinge, that includes an optimised helical torsion spring with a deployment regulator in parallel, and a passive hinge, that includes the end stop and the monitorisation. The main functions of the mechanisms are decoupled in order to make the mechanism as flexible as possible to be adapted to very different needs such as different deployment torque, deployment angle, stiffness, interfaces, monitorisation, etc. The deployment mechanism is provided with a very compact novel deployment regulator based on the progressive melting of a band made of a low melting temperature metal alloy, that is cylindrically disposed. The deployment mechanism has been subject to a qualification test campaign including an extensive characterisation of the deployment regulator.

  15. The polyuria of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Stein, R. M.; Discala, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Two patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and an associated polyuria were studied to delineate the mechanism of the increase in urine flow. A striking saluresis was noted in both patients. The increased sodium excretion was probably due to decreased sodium reabsorption, perhaps at proximal tubular nephron sites. This inhibition of sodium reabsorption could explain both the saluresis and some part or all of the polyuria. Re-evaluation of earlier case reports reveals patterns of concomitant salt and water excretion consistent with this mechanism. The saluresis cannot be explained by the previously favored hypothesis of antidiuretic hormone inhibition.

  16. [Stroke. are there any difference between patients with or without patent foramen ovale in left atrial appendage systolic function?].

    PubMed

    Contreras, Alejandro E; Perrote, Federico; Concari, Ignacio; Brenna, Eduardo J; Lucero, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Introducción: El objetivo del presente trabajo fue comparar la función sistólica de la orejuela de la aurícula izquierda (OAI) en un grupo de pacientes con y sin foramen oval permeable (FOP) quienes sufrieron eventos cerebrovasculares isquémicos. Material y métodos: Entre septiembre de 2010 y octubre de 2011, 17 pacientes fueron enviados para la realización de un ecocardiograma transesofágico (ETE) por haber sufrido un accidente cerebrovascular (ACV). Se definió FOP al pasaje de al menos una burbuja a través del septum interauricular con test de burbujas. Se comparó la velocidad sistólica en la orejuela entre los pacientes con y sin FOP y con un grupo control. Resultados: Fueron 8 mujeres y 9 hombres, con una edad media de 54,1 ± 19,5 años. Todos los pacientes habían sufrido un evento cerebrovascular isquémico, el 41,2% habían tenido ACV, el 52,9% crisis isquémica transitoria y el 5,9% amaurosis fugaz. En la evaluación con ETE, el 11,8% tuvo aneurisma del septum interauricular y el 35,3% FOP. La velocidad sistólica media de la OAI fue 66,3 ± 20,3 cm/seg. No hubo diferencia en la velocidad sistólica de la OAI entre pacientes con o sin FOP (67,5 ± 11,8 cm/seg vs 65,7 ± 24,3 cm/seg respectivamente, p= 0,87). El grupo control compuesto por 8 pacientes, 5 mujeres y 3 hombres, con una edad media de 39,5 ± 18 años, tuvo una velocidad sistólica de la OAI de 77,6 ± 28,9 cm/seg, sin diferencias significativas con los pacientes isquémicos. Conclusión: No hubo diferencias en la función sistólica de la OAI entre pacientes con y sin FOP con eventos cerebrovasculares isquemicos.

  17. [Perioperative management of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Arguis, M J; Navarro, R; Regueiro, A; Arbelo, E; Sierra, P; Sabaté, S; Galán, J; Ruiz, A; Matute, P; Roux, C; Gomar, C; Rovira, I; Mont, L; Fita, G

    2014-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication in the perioperative period. When it appears there is an increased risk of perioperative morbidity due to stroke, thromboembolism, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, anticoagulation haemorrhage, and hospital readmissions. The current article focuses on the recommendations for the management of perioperative atrial fibrillation based on the latest Clinical Practice Guidelines on atrial fibrillation by the European Society of Cardiology and the Spanish Society of Cardiology. This article pays special attention to the preoperative management, as well as to the acute perioperative episode. For this reason, the latest recommendations for the control of cardiac frequency, antiarrhythmic treatment and anticoagulation are included.

  18. Left atrial volume change throughout the cardiac cycle in children with congenital heart disease associated with increased pulmonary blood flow: evaluation using a novel left atrium-tracking method.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Miho; Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Onishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the significance of left atrial (LA) volume and its changes throughout the cardiac cycle in pediatric patients with heart disease. The recently developed LA volume-tracking (LAVT) method can automatically construct the LA volume curve. The study group consisted of 48 pediatric patients with ventricular septal defect (n = 34) or patent ductus arteriosus (n = 14) and age-matched healthy controls. Maximum and minimum LA volumes (LAVmax and LAVmin, respectively) were measured. The total LA emptying volume (LAVtotal) was defined as LAVmax--LAVmin. Volume parameters were standardized by dividing by body surface area (BSA). The total LA emptying fraction (%LAVtotal) was defined as the ratio of LAVtotal to LAVmax. In the patient group, there was a positive correlation between the ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp/Qs) and LAVmax/BSA, LAVmin/BSA, and LAVtotal/BSA (r = 0.42, 0.44, and 0.34, respectively). LAVmin/BSA was positively correlated with the ratio of early mitral inflow velocity to early mitral annular diastolic tissue Doppler velocity (E/E') (r = 0.32). The %LAVtotal had a negative correlation with left-ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure (r = -0.32). There were significant correlations between serum B-type natriuretic peptide level and LAVmax/BSA, LAVmin/BSA, and %LAVtotal (r = 0.38, 0.49, and -0.35, respectively). The LAVT method is useful in the evaluation of LV diastolic function in pediatric patients with chronic LV volume overload.

  19. Evolution of nubbin function in hemimetabolous and holometabolous insect appendages.

    PubMed

    Turchyn, Nataliya; Chesebro, John; Hrycaj, Steven; Couso, Juan P; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2011-09-01

    Insects display a whole spectrum of morphological diversity, which is especially noticeable in the organization of their appendages. A recent study in a hemipteran, Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug), showed that nubbin (nub) affects antenna morphogenesis, labial patterning, the length of the femoral segment in legs, and the formation of a limbless abdomen. To further determine the role of this gene in the evolution of insect morphology, we analyzed its functions in two additional hemimetabolous species, Acheta domesticus (house cricket) and Periplaneta americana (cockroach), and re-examined its role in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly). While both Acheta and Periplaneta nub-RNAi first nymphs develop crooked antennae, no visible changes are observed in the morphologies of their mouthparts and abdomen. Instead, the main effect is seen in legs. The joint between the tibia and first tarsomere (Ta-1) is lost in Acheta, which in turn, causes a fusion of these two segments and creates a chimeric nub-RNAi tibia-tarsus that retains a tibial identity in its proximal half and acquires a Ta-1 identity in its distal half. Similarly, our re-analysis of nub function in Drosophila reveals that legs lack all true joints and the fly tibia also exhibits a fused tibia and tarsus. Finally, we observe a similar phenotype in Periplaneta except that it encompasses different joints (coxa-trochanter and femur-tibia), and in this species we also show that nub expression in the legs is regulated by Notch signaling, as had previously been reported in flies and spiders. Overall, we propose that nub acts downstream of Notch on the distal part of insect leg segments to promote their development and growth, which in turn is required for joint formation. Our data represent the first functional evidence defining a role for nub in leg segmentation and highlight the varying degrees of its involvement in this process across insects. PMID:21708143

  20. [Color-coded doppler echocardiography in atrial septal defects].

    PubMed

    Kautzner, J; Kozáková, M; Serf, B; Munclinger, M

    1990-04-20

    The magnitude of a left-to-right shunt in atrial septal defects was evaluated independently in catheterizations of the heart according to saturations and characteristics of the shunt stream in colour-flow Doppler echocardiography. The ratio of the pulmonary and systemic flow (Qp/Qs) assessed in 14 patients with atrial septal defects during catheterization correlated significantly with the maximal breadth (r = 0.8; p less than 0.001) and maximum area (r = 0.78; p less than 0.01) of the visualized shunted stream in transthoracic colour-flow Doppler echocardiography. Examination by means of transoesophageal colour-flow Doppler echocardiography in 8 patients revealed a correlation only with the maximal breadth of the shunted stream (r = 0.95; p less than 0.001). The magnitude of the maximum area of the shunted stream in transthoracic colour-flow Doppler echocardiography made it only possible to differentiate patients with a significant and not significant left-to-right shunt, i.e. Qp/Qs greater or smaller than 1.5:1. All patients with a shunt greater than 1.5:1 had a maximal area of the shunted stream greater than 10 sq.cm or 6 sq.cm/sq.m resp. Colour-flow Doppler echocardiography is a suitable method for the semiquantitative evaluation of the haemodynamic significance of atrial septal defects in adult patients.

  1. Expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel isoforms in a canine model of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    HE, WEI; ZHANG, JIAN; GAN, TIANYI; XU, GUOJUN; TANG, BAOPENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the mRNA and protein expression levels of atrial hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel isoforms in the left atrial muscle of dogs with multiple organ failure. A total of 14 beagle dogs with multiple organ failure, including seven cases with sinus rhythm and seven cases with atrial fibrillation (AF), underwent surgery to remove a sample of left atrial appendage tissue. The expression levels of a number of HCN channel subtypes were subsequently measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 increased significantly in the AF group when compared with the sinus rhythm group. However, expression of the HCN1 isoform was not detected. Therefore, increased expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 may be important molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AF, which were associated with differences in patients with valvular heart disease. PMID:27347074

  2. Atrial myxomas and coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Isma; Parthasarthy, H; Clark, C Grahame

    2010-07-01

    Coronary angiography is not an only important component of preoperative evaluation of the patient with underlying coronary artery disease but also diagnostic tool for delineating cardiac myxomas. This also serve as an important surgical anatomical marker. We present two cases which presented with repeated episode of chest pain, were found to have atrial blushing on coronary angiography subsequent confirmation of diagnosis of atrial myxoma on echocardiography. PMID:20578102

  3. Thermistor guided radiofrequency ablation of atrial insertion sites in patients with accessory pathways.

    PubMed

    Tracy, C M; Moore, H J; Solomon, A J; Rodak, D J; Fletcher, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has gained acceptance in the treatment of patients with symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relation between temperature and other electroconductive parameters in patients undergoing atrial insertion accessory pathway ablation utilizing a thermistor equipped catheter. The mean temperature and power at sites of atrial insertion ablation are lower than has been previously associated with creation of radiofrequency lesions in the ventricle. While high cavitary blood flow in the atrium may result in cooling, the thinner atrial tissue may require less energy to achieve adequate heating than ventricular myocardium.

  4. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques. PMID:27560278

  5. Rate control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Rienstra, Michiel; Crijns, Harry J G M; Olshansky, Brian

    2016-08-20

    Control of the heart rate (rate control) is central to atrial fibrillation management, even for patients who ultimately require control of the rhythm. We review heart rate control in patients with atrial fibrillation, including the rationale for the intervention, patient selection, and the treatments available. The choice of rate control depends on the symptoms and clinical characteristics of the patient, but for all patients with atrial fibrillation, rate control is part of the management. Choice of drugs is patient-dependent. β blockers, alone or in combination with digoxin, or non-dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (not in heart failure) effectively lower the heart rate. Digoxin is least effective, but a reasonable choice for physically inactive patients aged 80 years or older, in whom other treatments are ineffective or are contraindicated, and as an additional drug to other rate-controlling drugs, especially in heart failure when instituted cautiously. Atrioventricular node ablation with pacemaker insertion for rate control should be used as an approach of last resort but is also an option early in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation treated with cardiac resynchronisation therapy. However, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation should be considered before atrioventricular node ablation. Although rate control is a top priority and one of the first management issues for all patients with atrial fibrillation, many issues remain. PMID:27560277

  6. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques.

  7. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Ben; Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-08-20

    Atrial fibrillation is found in a third of all ischaemic strokes, even more after post-stroke atrial fibrillation monitoring. Data from stroke registries show that both unknown and untreated or under treated atrial fibrillation is responsible for most of these strokes, which are often fatal or debilitating. Most could be prevented if efforts were directed towards detection of atrial fibrillation before stroke occurs, through screening or case finding, and treatment of all patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk of stroke with well-controlled vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants. The default strategy should be to offer anticoagulant thromboprophylaxis to all patients with atrial fibrillation unless defined as truly low risk by simple validated risk scores, such as CHA2DS2-VASc. Assessment of bleeding risk using the HAS-BLED score should focus attention on reversible bleeding risk factors. Finally, patients need support from physicians and various other sources to start anticoagulant treatment and to ensure adherence to and persistence with treatment in the long term. PMID:27560276

  8. Segmental mismatch in crustacean appendages: the naupliar antennal exopod of Artemia (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Anostraca).

    PubMed

    Maruzzo, Diego; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2009-03-01

    Based on traditional techniques and confocal laser scanning microscopy for external morphology, and immunohistochemistry for the muscular system, we describe here the segmental features of the antennal exopod of Artemia nauplii. Two kinds of serial elements are present, i.e. setae (with cuticular folds at their base) and ringlets (serially arranged sclerites separated by joint-like cuticular folds not extending to form complete rings around the appendage). The two series are usually not in register. The cuticular folds of the setae and of the ringlets are also sites of intermediate insertions of the three exopod muscles: as the two tegumentary structures are discordant in periodicity, this is also mirrored in the pattern of muscle insertions on the two sides of the appendage. Similar cases of segmental mismatch are known for the trunk of several arthropods, but segmental mismatch along the appendages has received very little attention. The occurrence of segmental mismatch in the naupliar appendages of both extant and fossil crustaceans is reviewed and it is suggested here to be a primitive feature of the exopods of both second antennae and mandibles. Problems in the interpretation of morphological evidence are discussed, also in relation to development and evolution of segmentation of naupliar appendages.

  9. Input-Shaped Link Motion Control of Planar Space Robot Equipped with Flexible Appendage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Shinya; Kojima, Hirohisa

    Control of a space robot without actuators on the main body is an underactuated control problem. Various stabilization methods, such as the time-varying feedback control method, discontinuous feedback control method, center manifold-based method, zero-dynamics method and sliding-mode control method have been proposed. However, past studies have not considered underactuated space robots equipped with a flexible appendage, such as solar panels. If the manipulators are simply controlled to achieve the target state for the robot using the past controllers without taking a flexible appendage into consideration, residual vibration remains even after the link motion has finished. In order to suppress the residual vibration on the flexible appendage, we apply the input-shaping technique to the link motion of an underactuated planar space robot. Numerical and experimental studies are carried out to validate the proposed method for a planar dual-link space robot with a flexible appendage. The results show that the proposed method is capable of not only controlling the link angles and the main body attitude to the goal angles, but also suppressing the residual vibration on the flexible appendage.

  10. [Surgery in children with atrial septal defects without cardiac catheterization].

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Rosas, S J; Santamaría-Díaz, H; Gómez-Gómez, M; Alba-Espinosa, C; Maulen-Radovan, X; Palacios-Macedo, X

    1988-01-01

    We describe the results of surgical repair of atrial septal defects in 36 children who did not undergo pre-op cardiac catheterization. These cases were seen at the Hospital de Cardiologia y Neumología Dr. Luis Méndez del Centro Médico Nacional. There were 24 (67%) females and twelve (33%) males. The mean age was 6.4 +/- 2.4 years with a range from three to thirteen. All cases had auscultatory findings typical of atrial septal defect. Five patients with associated tricuspid murmur (chest film showed grade I cardiomegaly in 21 (58.3 per cent), grade II cardiomegaly in fifteen (41.7 percent). Pulmonary artery shadow was normal in 24 (66.6 percent) and increased in twelve (33.3%). Pulmonary blood flow was increased in all of them. Electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm in 35 (97.2%). In one instance left atrial rhythm; all EKGs demonstrated right axis deviation, complete right bundle branch block and right ventricular hypertrophy with diastolic overload. Only three had right atrial hypertrophy. The M-mode echocardiogram showed right ventricular dilatation in all and paradoxically septal motion in 26 (72.2%). Two-dimensional echo with the subxiphoid view allowed direct visualization of the defect in all cases. We performed contrast echocardiogram in eight cases and Doppler echocardiogram in six of them. Cardiac surgery findings were ostium secundum atrial septal defect in 34 (94.4%). Two of them also had partial anomalous venous connection. All had uneventful recovery. We conclude that in typical atrial septal defects operative repair is feasible without prior cardiac catheterization.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrillation also increases the risk of stroke and sudden death. Complications of familial atrial fibrillation can occur at ... beats , increasing the risk of syncope, stroke, and sudden death. Most cases of atrial fibrillation are not caused ...

  12. Left atrial myxoma masquerading as viral flu

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Kiernan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is a rare cardiac tumor that may be diagnosed incidentally on cardiac imaging or may present with life-threatening cardiac symptoms. We present a case of giant left atrial myxoma that presented as a flulike illness.

  13. Ultrastructural observations on feeding appendages and gills of Alvinella pompejana (Annelida, Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, V.; Gaill, F.

    1986-09-01

    The feeding appendages of Alvinella pompejana obtained from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment are described. They are characterized by a ciliated groove, the cells of which have a very distinctive ultrastructure, by groups of bipolar receptor cells and by several kinds of gland cells. Among these, one cell type is in an upside down position suggesting a function completely different from other epidermal secretory cells. The gills differ considerably from the feeding appendages on the basis of their ultrastructure. Their epidermis is very irregular in height; basal infoldings give the blood access to a space coming very near to the external medium. The blood vascular system is open. On the other hand, the gills of Amphicteis gunneri are not effective sites of gas exchange, since their columnar epithelium is underlain with muscle cells. The cells composing the feeding appendages and gills of Alvinella pompejana are characterized by ultrastructurally very different mitochondria.

  14. The chelifores of sea spiders (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) are the appendages of the deutocerebral segment.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Georg; Ungerer, Petra; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Within the last decade, gene expression patterns and neuro-anatomical data have led to a new consensus concerning the long-debated association between anterior limbs and neuromeres in the arthropod head. According to this new view, the first appendage in all extant euarthropods is innervated by the second neuromere, the deutocerebrum, whereas the anterior-most head region bearing the protocerebrum lacks an appendage. This stands in contrast to the clearly protocerebrally targeted "antennae" of Onychophora and to some evidence for protocerebral limbs in fossil euarthropod representatives. Yet, the latter "frontal appendages" or "primary antennae" have most likely been reduced or lost in the lineage, leading to extant taxa. Surprisingly, a recent neuro-anatomical study on a pycnogonid challenged this evolutionary scenario, reporting a protocerebral innervation of the first appendages, the chelifores. However, this interpretation was soon after questioned by Hox gene expression data. To re-evaluate the unresolved controversy, we analyzed neuro-anatomy and neurogenesis in four pycnogonid species using immunohistochemical techniques. We clearly show the postprotocerebral innervation of the chelifores, which is resolved as the plesiomorphic condition in pycnogonids when evaluated against a recently published comprehensive phylogeny. By providing direct morphological support for the deutocerebral status of the cheliforal ganglia, we reconcile morphological and gene expression data and argue for a corresponding position between the anterior-most appendages in all extant euarthropods. Consequently, other structures have to be scrutinized to illuminate the fate of a presumptive protocerebral appendage in recent euarthropods. The labrum and the "frontal filaments" of some crustaceans are possible candidates for this approach. PMID:19021742

  15. The chelifores of sea spiders (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) are the appendages of the deutocerebral segment.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Georg; Ungerer, Petra; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Within the last decade, gene expression patterns and neuro-anatomical data have led to a new consensus concerning the long-debated association between anterior limbs and neuromeres in the arthropod head. According to this new view, the first appendage in all extant euarthropods is innervated by the second neuromere, the deutocerebrum, whereas the anterior-most head region bearing the protocerebrum lacks an appendage. This stands in contrast to the clearly protocerebrally targeted "antennae" of Onychophora and to some evidence for protocerebral limbs in fossil euarthropod representatives. Yet, the latter "frontal appendages" or "primary antennae" have most likely been reduced or lost in the lineage, leading to extant taxa. Surprisingly, a recent neuro-anatomical study on a pycnogonid challenged this evolutionary scenario, reporting a protocerebral innervation of the first appendages, the chelifores. However, this interpretation was soon after questioned by Hox gene expression data. To re-evaluate the unresolved controversy, we analyzed neuro-anatomy and neurogenesis in four pycnogonid species using immunohistochemical techniques. We clearly show the postprotocerebral innervation of the chelifores, which is resolved as the plesiomorphic condition in pycnogonids when evaluated against a recently published comprehensive phylogeny. By providing direct morphological support for the deutocerebral status of the cheliforal ganglia, we reconcile morphological and gene expression data and argue for a corresponding position between the anterior-most appendages in all extant euarthropods. Consequently, other structures have to be scrutinized to illuminate the fate of a presumptive protocerebral appendage in recent euarthropods. The labrum and the "frontal filaments" of some crustaceans are possible candidates for this approach.

  16. [The natural course of atrial septal defects].

    PubMed

    Strube, G; Holtz, H; Dittrich, P; Assmann, I; Dück, K D; Rothe, R

    1981-09-15

    61 patients at the age of 18 to 70 years with untreated atrial septum defect were examined 7.5 to 21 (on the average 10.5) years after the first recognition. Subjective symptomatology, clinical picture, size of the heart, mean pressure of the pulmonary artery and shunt volume at the beginning and at the end of the period of observation were analysed. The results reveal an above all favourable prognosis of the congenital malformation. In a course without complications an age can be reached adequate to the average life-expectance. After the 40th year of age, however, in 75% of the patients complaints appeared or their number increased. With growing age the size of the heart and the frequency of disturbances of the cardiac rhythm increased. In the small left-to right-shunt (less than 30% of the pulmonary flow) in the majority of the cases (85%) the prognosis proved to be good. Even in shunt volumes of more than 60% in half of the patients no essential deterioration developed in the period of observation. No clear relations were found between the mean pressure of the pulmonary artery and the clinical degree of severity. The indication to the operative correction of the atrial septum defect diagnosed only at the adult age demands a critical individual judgement, in which case apart from the haemodynamic parameters anamnesis and clinical findings within a cardiological observation of the course are of particular importance.

  17. Monoamine Oxidase is a Major Determinant of Redox Balance in Human Atrial Myocardium and is Associated With Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ethan J.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Davies, Stephen W.; O'Neal, Wesley T.; Darden, Timothy M.; Thayne, Kathleen A.; Katunga, Lalage A.; Kindell, Linda C.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Anderson, Curtis A.; Chitwood, W. Randolph; Koutlas, Theodore C.; Williams, J. Mark; Rodriguez, Evelio; Kypson, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Onset of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common and costly complication of heart surgery despite major improvements in surgical technique and quality of patient care. The etiology of POAF, and the ability of clinicians to identify and therapeutically target high‐risk patients, remains elusive. Methods and Results Myocardial tissue dissected from right atrial appendage (RAA) was obtained from 244 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from multiple sources was assessed in this tissue, along with total glutathione (GSHt) and its related enzymes GSH‐peroxidase (GPx) and GSH‐reductase (GR). Monoamine oxidase (MAO) and NADPH oxidase were observed to generate ROS at rates 10‐fold greater than intact, coupled mitochondria. POAF risk was significantly associated with MAO activity (Quartile 1 [Q1]: adjusted relative risk [ARR]=1.0; Q2: ARR=1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.84 to 4.0; Q3: ARR=2.1, 95% CI=0.99 to 4.3; Q4: ARR=3.8, 95% CI=1.9 to 7.5; adjusted Ptrend=0.009). In contrast, myocardial GSHt was inversely associated with POAF (Quartile 1 [Q1]: adjusted relative risk [ARR]=1.0; Q2: ARR=0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.60 to 1.4; Q3: ARR=0.62, 95% CI=0.36 to 1.1; Q4: ARR=0.56, 95% CI=0.34 to 0.93; adjusted Ptrend=0.014). GPx also was significantly associated with POAF; however, a linear trend for risk was not observed across increasing levels of the enzyme. GR was not associated with POAF risk. Conclusions Our results show that MAO is an important determinant of redox balance in human atrial myocardium, and that this enzyme, in addition to GSHt and GPx, is associated with an increased risk for POAF. Further investigation is needed to validate MAO as a predictive biomarker for POAF, and to explore this enzyme's potential role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:24572256

  18. Totally thorascopic surgical ablation of persistent AF and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation using the "Dallas" lesion set.

    PubMed

    Edgerton, James R; Jackman, Warren M; Mahoney, Cecile; Mack, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgery consisting of bipolar radiofrequency pulmonary vein (PV) isolation and limited ganglionated plexus ablation is effective in eliminating atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with paroxysmal AF but is less effective in those with persistent AF or long-standing persistent AF. The purpose of this study was examine the results of minimally invasive surgery incorporating an additional set of radiofrequency ablation lines replicating a left-sided Cox maze III procedure. Thirty patients with persistent AF (n = 10) or long-standing persistent AF (n = 20) underwent minimally invasive surgery with an extended lesion set and PV isolation for a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Linear lesions were created at the roof line, at the anterior line, and between the roof line and the left atrial appendage. All patients underwent limited ganglionated plexus ablation and left atrial appendage excision as well as PV isolation verification. Block across the roof and anterior lines was confirmed in 29 (96.6%) of the 30 patients. Follow-up included 2-week event monitoring with auto-trigger in 21 patients, pacemaker interrogation in 8, and ECG in 1 who was in AF and refused longer-term monitoring. No operative mortality or major morbidity occurred. At 6 months, 24 (80%) of the 30 patients were free of AF: 15 (75%) with long-standing persistent AF and 9 (90%) with persistent AF. Among the six failures, burden of AF was low: one had 1 episode >15 seconds, two had 4 episodes, one had 6 episodes, one had >50 episodes, and one had AF on ECG and refused further monitoring. Early results of minimally invasive surgery with a new extended linear lesion set suggest increased efficacy over PV isolation and limited ganglionated plexus ablation in patients with persistent AF or long-standing persistent AF. PMID:19959146

  19. [Panic disorder and atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Olazabal Eizaguirre, N; Chavez, R; González-Torres, M A; Gaviria, M

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the relationship between atrial fibrillation and panic disorder. There are often doubts on the differential diagnosis in emergency services and general medical settings. Panic disorder prevalence rates have been found to be high in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. Various studies have observed that patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders frequently have higher cardiovascular disease rates compared to the general population. Usually, patients suffering from panic disorder exhibit somatic complaints suggesting coronary disease, such as chest pain or palpitations. The aim is to make the correct diagnosis and treatment for these different illnesses, and to decrease the costs due to misdiagnosis.

  20. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  1. [Atrial fibrillation and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Apor, Péter

    2013-03-31

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia. Its "lone" form (when underlying pathology is not discovered) can be detected in a small percentage of endurance sports participants, and in growing numbers among veterans, probably as a result of some cardiac or other irregularities. Enhanced vagal tone and sudden sympathetic impulse, repetitive oxidative stress, inflammatory processes, enlarged atria, electric instabilization can explain the higher occurrence. Treatment of atrial fibrillation enables the affected persons to participate in regular medium-intensity exercise, 3-5 hours a week, which offers a protective role against cardiovascular, metabolic and mental illnesses. PMID:23524234

  2. Genetics of Atrial Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Cascos, Andrés Sánchez

    1972-01-01

    Of 109 cases of atrial septal defect, cases with an isolated defect (92 cases) showed a female preponderance (sex ratio 0·64), but there was a higher risk to the sibs of the male patients, suggesting a multifactorial mechanism. Dermatoglyphs showed a large number of whorls on the fingers. In 17 cases there were multiple malformations, such as Holt-Oram syndrome (hypoplastic and triphalangic thumb, with ostium secundum atrial septal defect), polydactyly plus ostium primum defect, and tracheo-oesophageal fistula. ImagesFIG. 1.FIG. 2.FIG. 3. PMID:4261647

  3. Laser Atrial Septostomy: An Engineering Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shachar, Giora; Cohen, Mark H.; Riemenschneider, Thomas A.; Beder, Stanley D.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reproducible method for atrial septostomy in live animals, which would be independent of both atrial septal thickness and left atrial size. Seven mongrel dogs monitored electrocardiographically were anesthetized and instrumented with systemic and pulmonary arterial lines. A modified Mullin's transseptal sheath was advanced under fluoroscopic control to interrogate the left atrium and atrial septum. A 400 micron regular quartz or a laser heated metallic tip fiber was passed through the sheath up to the atrial septum. Lasing of the atrial septum was done with an Argon laser at power output of 5 watts. In three dogs, an atrial septosomy catheter was passed to the left atrium through the laser atrial septostomy and balloon atrial septostomy was performed. The laser atrial septostomy measured 3 x 5 mm in diameter. This interatrial communication could be enlarged with a balloon septostomy to over one cm in diameter. Hemodynamic and electrocardiographic monitoring were stable during the procedure. Engineering problems included: 1) radioluscency of the laser fibers thus preventing fluoroscopic localization of the fiber course; and 2) the inability to increase lateral vaporization of the atrial septum. It is concluded that further changes in the lasing fibers need to be made before the method can be considered for clinical use.

  4. Role of homeobox genes in the patterning, specification and differentiation of ectodermal appendages in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Morasso, Maria I.

    2008-01-01

    Homeobox genes are an evolutionarily conserved class of transcription factors that are key regulators during developmental processes such as regional specification, patterning and differentiation. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern, loss-and/or gain-of-function mouse models, and naturally occurring mouse and human mutations of known homeobox genes required for the development of ectodermal appendages. PMID:18459147

  5. Knockdown of Parhyale Ultrabithorax recapitulates evolutionary changes in crustacean appendage morphology.

    PubMed

    Liubicich, Danielle M; Serano, Julia M; Pavlopoulos, Anastasios; Kontarakis, Zacharias; Protas, Meredith E; Kwan, Elaine; Chatterjee, Sandip; Tran, Khoa D; Averof, Michalis; Patel, Nipam H

    2009-08-18

    Crustaceans possess remarkably diverse appendages, both between segments of a single individual as well as between species. Previous studies in a wide range of crustaceans have demonstrated a correlation between the anterior expression boundary of the homeotic (Hox) gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and the location and number of specialized thoracic feeding appendages, called maxillipeds. Given that Hox genes regulate regional identity in organisms as diverse as mice and flies, these observations in crustaceans led to the hypothesis that Ubx expression regulates the number of maxillipeds and that evolutionary changes in Ubx expression have generated various aspects of crustacean appendage diversity. Specifically, evolutionary changes in the expression boundary of Ubx have resulted in crustacean species with either 0, 1, 2, or 3 pairs of thoracic maxillipeds. Here we test this hypothesis by altering the expression of Ubx in Parhyale hawaiensis, a crustacean that normally possesses a single pair of maxillipeds. By reducing Ubx expression, we can generate Parhyale with additional maxillipeds in a pattern reminiscent of that seen in other crustacean species, and these morphological alterations are maintained as the animals molt and mature. These results provide critical evidence supporting the proposition that changes in Ubx expression have played a role in generating crustacean appendage diversity and lend general insights into the mechanisms of morphological evolution.

  6. Cell proliferation dynamics in regeneration of the operculum head appendage in the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David Ellard Keith

    2014-07-01

    Regeneration of lost or damaged appendages is a widespread and ecologically important ability in the animal kingdom, and also of great significance to developing regenerative medicine. The operculum of serpulid polychaetes is one among the many diverse appendages found in the lophotrochozoan superphylum, a clade hitherto understudied with respect to the mechanisms of appendage regeneration. In this study, we establish the normal time course of opercular regeneration in the serpulid Pomatoceros lamarckii and describe cell proliferation patterns in the regenerating opercular filament. The P. lamarckii operculum regenerates through a rapid and consistent series of morphogenetic events. Based on 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and anti-phosphohistone H3 immunohistochemistry, opercular regeneration appears to be a mixture of an early morphallactic stage, and a later phase characterized by widespread proliferative activity within the opercular filament. Tracking residual pigmentation suggests that the distal part of the stump gives rise to the most distal structures of the operculum via morphallactic remodeling, whereas more proximal structures are derived from the proximal stump. Our work underscores the diversity of regenerative strategies employed by animals and introduces P. lamarckii as an emerging model of appendage regeneration. PMID:24799350

  7. Morphological and histological organization of the pyriform appendage of the tetrabranchiate Nautilus pompilius (Cephalopoda, Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Spintzik, Jessica; Springer, Jochen; Westermann, Bettina

    2009-04-01

    The pyriform appendage, an organ only found in nautiloid cephalopods was investigated with histological, histochemical and ultrastructural methods in order to characterize the anatomical and the cytological structure of this organ. The pyriform appendage is situated within the genital septum and lies in close contact with the ventricle of the heart. The proximal side ends blindly near the gonad whereas the distal side is developed into a duct. The duct was observed to open into the mantle cavity in juvenile and adult Nautilus pompilius of both sexes. Injections of India ink in the heart demonstrate that the organ is supplied with hemolymph from an artery that extends from the heart. The pyriform appendage is a hollow organ consisting mainly of glandular tissue. The lumen is covered with a columnar epithelium, the tunica mucosa, consisting of only one cell type containing vacuoles with different inclusions. Underneath the tunica mucosa is the tunica muscularis, which is embedded in connective tissue and folded, enlarging the internal surface. A cuboidal tunica serosa surrounds this organ. The vacuoles and the secretory products contain neutral mucopolysaccharides, glycoproteins and glycolipids. Acid phosphatase and serotonin were localized in the tunica mucosa. Acetylcholinesterase, catecholamines and the tetrapeptide FMRF-amide were demonstrated within the nerve endings of the tunica muscularis indicating a dual "cholinergic-aminergic" neuroregulation, possibly modulated by FMRF-amide. These findings suggest that the pyriform appendage is not a rudimentary organ but instead has distinct biological functions in nautiloid cephalopods, possibly in intraspecific communication.

  8. Use of frequency analysis on the ECG for the prognosis of low energy cardioversion treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J; Escalona, O; Glover, B M; Manoharan, G

    2009-01-01

    Electric cardioversion is the most effective therapy for restoring sinus rhythm in patient with atrial fibrillation (AF), however, there is not a guiding criteria for advising on when and in whom it will be successful. The objective of this study was to employ frequency analysis on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) to predict the outcome of low energy internal cardioversion in patients with AF. Thirty nine patients with AF, for elective DC cardioversion were included in this study. One catheter was positioned in the right atrial appendage and another in the coronary sinus. A voltage step-up protocol (50-300 V) was used for patient cardioversion. Prior to shock delivery, residual atrial activity signal (RAAS) was derived from 60 seconds of surface ECG from defibrillator pads, by bandpass filtering and ventricular activity (QRST) cancellation. Dominant atrial fibrillatory frequency (DAFF) was estimated from the RAAS power spectrum as the dominant frequency within the 3-12 Hz band. DAFF was calculated from whole 60 seconds segment (DAFF_L) and from the finals 10 seconds segment (DAFF_S) of the RAAS. Lower DAFF_L and DAFF_S were found in successfully cardioverted patients than in those nonsuccessful ones, with energy < or =3 and < or =6 joules. Therapy result (employing 3J or less) was predicted in 35/39 (89.7%) patients with DAFF_L=5.40Hz, and DAFF_L was > or =5.75Hz in a 100% of noncardioverted patients. In conclusion, frequency analysis of the RAAS could be useful for predicting success of low energy internal cardioversion of patients with atrial fibrillation.

  9. Appendage patterning in the primitively wingless hexapods Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma: Lepismatidae) and Folsomia candida (Collembola: Isotomidae).

    PubMed

    Schaeper, Nina D; Wimmer, Ernst A; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2013-11-01

    Arthropod appendages are among the most diverse animal organs and have been adapted to a variety of functions. Due to this diversity, it can be difficult to recognize homologous parts in different appendage types and different species. Gene expression patterns of appendage development genes have been used to overcome this problem and to identify homologous limb portions across different species and their appendages. However, regarding the largest arthropod group, the hexapods, most of these studies focused on members of the winged insects (Pterygota), but primitively wingless groups like the springtails (Collembola) or silverfish and allies (Zygentoma) are underrepresented. We have studied the expression of a set of appendage patterning genes in the firebrat Thermobia domestica and the white springtail Folsomia candida. The expressions of Distal-less (Dll) and dachshund (dac) are generally similar to the patterns reported for pterygote insects. Modifications of gene regulation, for example, the lack of Dll expression in the palp of F. candida mouthparts, however, point to changes in gene function that can make the use of single genes and specific expression domains problematic for homology inference. Such hypotheses should therefore not rely on a small number of genes and should ideally also include information about gene function. The expression patterns of homothorax (hth) and extradenticle (exd) in both species are similar to the patterns of crustaceans and pterygote insects, but differ from those in chelicerates and myriapods. The proximal specificity of hth thus appears to trace from a common hexapod ancestor and also provides a link to the regulation of this gene in crustaceans. PMID:23873479

  10. Body appendages fine-tune posture and moments in freely manoeuvring fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Berthé, Ruben; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2015-10-01

    The precise control of body posture by turning moments is key to elevated locomotor performance in flying animals. Although elevated moments for body stabilization are typically produced by wing aerodynamics, animals also steer using drag on body appendages, shifting their centre of body mass, and changing moments of inertia caused by active alterations in body shape. To estimate the instantaneous contribution of each of these components for posture control in an insect, we three-dimensionally reconstructed body posture and movements of body appendages in freely manoeuvring fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) by high-speed video and experimentally scored drag coefficients of legs and body trunk at low Reynolds number. The results show that the sum of leg- and abdomen-induced yaw moments dominates wing-induced moments during 17% of total flight time but is, on average, 7.2-times (roll, 3.4-times) smaller during manoeuvring. Our data reject a previous hypothesis on synergistic moment support, indicating that drag on body appendages and mass-shift inhibit rather than support turning moments produced by the wings. Numerical modelling further shows that hind leg extension alters the moments of inertia around the three main body axes of the animal by not more than 6% during manoeuvring, which is significantly less than previously reported for other insects. In sum, yaw, pitch and roll steering by body appendages probably fine-tune turning behaviour and body posture, without providing a significant advantage for posture stability and moment support. Motion control of appendages might thus be part of the insect's trimming reflexes, which reduce imbalances in moment generation caused by unilateral wing damage and abnormal asymmetries of the flight apparatus.

  11. Body appendages fine-tune posture and moments in freely manoeuvring fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Berthé, Ruben; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2015-10-01

    The precise control of body posture by turning moments is key to elevated locomotor performance in flying animals. Although elevated moments for body stabilization are typically produced by wing aerodynamics, animals also steer using drag on body appendages, shifting their centre of body mass, and changing moments of inertia caused by active alterations in body shape. To estimate the instantaneous contribution of each of these components for posture control in an insect, we three-dimensionally reconstructed body posture and movements of body appendages in freely manoeuvring fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) by high-speed video and experimentally scored drag coefficients of legs and body trunk at low Reynolds number. The results show that the sum of leg- and abdomen-induced yaw moments dominates wing-induced moments during 17% of total flight time but is, on average, 7.2-times (roll, 3.4-times) smaller during manoeuvring. Our data reject a previous hypothesis on synergistic moment support, indicating that drag on body appendages and mass-shift inhibit rather than support turning moments produced by the wings. Numerical modelling further shows that hind leg extension alters the moments of inertia around the three main body axes of the animal by not more than 6% during manoeuvring, which is significantly less than previously reported for other insects. In sum, yaw, pitch and roll steering by body appendages probably fine-tune turning behaviour and body posture, without providing a significant advantage for posture stability and moment support. Motion control of appendages might thus be part of the insect's trimming reflexes, which reduce imbalances in moment generation caused by unilateral wing damage and abnormal asymmetries of the flight apparatus. PMID:26347566

  12. Appendage patterning in the primitively wingless hexapods Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma: Lepismatidae) and Folsomia candida (Collembola: Isotomidae).

    PubMed

    Schaeper, Nina D; Wimmer, Ernst A; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2013-11-01

    Arthropod appendages are among the most diverse animal organs and have been adapted to a variety of functions. Due to this diversity, it can be difficult to recognize homologous parts in different appendage types and different species. Gene expression patterns of appendage development genes have been used to overcome this problem and to identify homologous limb portions across different species and their appendages. However, regarding the largest arthropod group, the hexapods, most of these studies focused on members of the winged insects (Pterygota), but primitively wingless groups like the springtails (Collembola) or silverfish and allies (Zygentoma) are underrepresented. We have studied the expression of a set of appendage patterning genes in the firebrat Thermobia domestica and the white springtail Folsomia candida. The expressions of Distal-less (Dll) and dachshund (dac) are generally similar to the patterns reported for pterygote insects. Modifications of gene regulation, for example, the lack of Dll expression in the palp of F. candida mouthparts, however, point to changes in gene function that can make the use of single genes and specific expression domains problematic for homology inference. Such hypotheses should therefore not rely on a small number of genes and should ideally also include information about gene function. The expression patterns of homothorax (hth) and extradenticle (exd) in both species are similar to the patterns of crustaceans and pterygote insects, but differ from those in chelicerates and myriapods. The proximal specificity of hth thus appears to trace from a common hexapod ancestor and also provides a link to the regulation of this gene in crustaceans.

  13. Zebrafish foxc1a drives appendage-specific neural circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Santanu; Hayer, Katharina; Hogenesch, John B.; Granato, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neural connectivity between the spinal cord and paired appendages is key to the superior locomotion of tetrapods and aquatic vertebrates. In contrast to nerves that innervate axial muscles, those innervating appendages converge at a specialized structure, the plexus, where they topographically reorganize before navigating towards their muscle targets. Despite its importance for providing appendage mobility, the genetic program that drives nerve convergence at the plexus, as well as the functional role of this convergence, are not well understood. Here, we show that in zebrafish the transcription factor foxc1a is dispensable for trunk motor nerve guidance but is required to guide spinal nerves innervating the pectoral fins, equivalent to the tetrapod forelimbs. In foxc1a null mutants, instead of converging with other nerves at the plexus, pectoral fin nerves frequently bypass the plexus. We demonstrate that foxc1a expression in muscle cells delineating the nerve path between the spinal cord and the plexus region restores convergence at the plexus. By labeling individual fin nerves, we show that mutant nerves bypassing the plexus enter the fin at ectopic positions, yet innervate their designated target areas, suggesting that motor axons can select their appropriate fin target area independently of their migration through the plexus. Although foxc1a mutants display topographically correct fin innervation, mutant fin muscles exhibit a reduction in the levels of pre- and postsynaptic structures, concomitant with reduced pectoral fin function. Combined, our results reveal foxc1a as a key player in the development of connectivity between the spinal cord and paired appendages, which is crucial for appendage mobility. PMID:25670796

  14. The AP-2 Adaptor β2 Appendage Scaffolds Alternate Cargo Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Keyel, Peter A.; Thieman, James R.; Roth, Robyn; Erkan, Elif; Everett, Eric T.; Watkins, Simon C.; Heuser, John E.

    2008-01-01

    The independently folded appendages of the large α and β2 subunits of the endocytic adaptor protein (AP)-2 complex coordinate proper assembly and operation of endocytic components during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The β2 subunit appendage contains a common binding site for β-arrestin or the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) protein. To determine the importance of this interaction surface in living cells, we used small interfering RNA-based gene silencing. The effect of extinguishing β2 subunit expression on the internalization of transferrin is considerably weaker than an AP-2 α subunit knockdown. We show the mild sorting defect is due to fortuitous substitution of the β2 chain with the closely related endogenous β1 subunit of the AP-1 adaptor complex. Simultaneous silencing of both β1 and β2 subunit transcripts recapitulates the strong α subunit RNA interference (RNAi) phenotype and results in loss of ARH from endocytic clathrin coats. An RNAi-insensitive β2-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expressed in the β1 + β2-silenced background restores cellular AP-2 levels, robust transferrin internalization, and ARH colocalization with cell surface clathrin. The importance of the β appendage platform subdomain over clathrin for precise deposition of ARH at clathrin assembly zones is revealed by a β2-YFP with a disrupted ARH binding interface, which does not restore ARH colocalization with clathrin. We also show a β-arrestin 1 mutant, which engages coated structures in the absence of any G protein-coupled receptor stimulation, colocalizes with β2-YFP and clathrin even in the absence of an operational clathrin binding sequence. These findings argue against ARH and β-arrestin binding to a site upon the β2 appendage platform that is later obstructed by polymerized clathrin. We conclude that ARH and β-arrestin depend on a privileged β2 appendage site for proper cargo recruitment to clathrin bud sites. PMID:18843039

  15. Surgical Repair of Right Atrial Wall Rupture after Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Telich-Tarriba, Jose E.; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma is a catastrophic event associated with high mortality rates. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who was ejected 40 feet during a motor vehicle accident. Upon presentation, she was awake and alert, with a systolic blood pressure of 100 mmHg. Chest computed tomography disclosed a large pericardial effusion; transthoracic echocardiography confirmed this finding and also found right ventricular diastolic collapse. A diagnosis of cardiac tamponade with probable cardiac injury was made; the patient was taken to the operating room, where median sternotomy revealed a 1-cm laceration of the right atrial appendage. This lesion was directly repaired with 4-0 polypropylene suture. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she continued to recover from injuries to the musculoskeletal system. This case highlights the need for a high degree of suspicion of cardiac injuries after blunt chest trauma. An algorithm is proposed for rapid recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions. PMID:22949784

  16. Involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide in blood pressure reduction induced by estradiol in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Belo, Najara O; Silva-Barra, Juliana; Carnio, Evelin C; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Dos Reis, Adelina M

    2004-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in blood pressure (BP) alterations induced by estradiol treatment. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar rats (WR) were ovariectomized and, after 3 weeks, were injected daily for 4 days with estradiol benzoate (E2; 5 microg/100 g/day) or a vehicle. One day after the last injection, the animals were decapitated, blood was collected, and both right and left atrial appendages were quickly removed for determination of ANP by radioimmunoassay (RIA), or used for ANP mRNA determination. Estradiol treatment induced a significant reduction of blood pressure in SHR, but not in WR. This reduction was correlated with the increase of plasma ANP levels that were significantly increased in E2-treated, compared with vehicle-treated, SHR. E2-treated SHR showed significant increases in ANP concentration in the right and left atria compared to the vehicle-treated animals. These observations were confirmed by ANP mRNA. In summary, the present study shows that short-term estradiol treatment reduces the blood pressure of ovariectomized SHR, but not of WR. This reduction was highly correlated with increased plasma estradiol and ANP levels. These results suggest that ANP is involved in mediating the effect of estradiol on blood pressure reduction.

  17. Is there a relationship between atrial septal aneurysm and atrial tachycardia?

    PubMed

    Muser, Daniele; De Biasio, Marzia; Rebellato, Luca; Proclemer, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    We describe the case of a 37-year-old woman with atrial tachycardia associated to atrial septal aneurysm. We consider a localized reentry mechanism as the pathogenetic mechanism of the arrhythmia as demostrated by means of electrophisiological evaluation and electroanatomical mapping. The treatment by radiofrequency appears as an effective and well tolerated treatment of this unusual left atrial tachycardia.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atrial Fibrillation (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Atrial Fibrillation 心房纤维颤动 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Atrial Fibrillation 心房纖維顫動 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - ...

  19. Almanac 2015: atrial fibrillation research in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jawad-Ul-Qamar, Muhammad; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to attract interest in the cardiovascular community and in Heart. Over 60 original research and review papers published in Heart in 2014–2015 cover various aspects of atrial fibrillation, from associated conditions and precipitating factors to new approaches to management. Here, we provide an overview of articles on atrial fibrillation published in Heart in 2014–2015, highlighting new developments, emerging concepts and novel approaches to treatment. PMID:26791994

  20. The use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for perinatal support of an infant with d-transposition of the great arteries, intact atrial and ventricular septa, and flow-restricted ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kevin J; Lacey, Stephanie R; Schrum, Stefanie F; Freid, Eugene B; Collins, Steve V; Bouchard, Amy R; Burns, Scott E; Poulos, Nicholas D; Walsh, Danielle S; Ingyinn, Ma; Ettedgui, Jose A; Ceithaml, Eric L; Jerabek, Charles F; Herald, Tammy S; Castillo, Ramon A; Trogolo, Frank; Bleiweis, Mark S; Hudak, Mark L

    2014-05-15

    Prenatal assessment of a fetus with D-transposition of the great arteries demonstrated an absence of mixing between systemic and pulmonary circulations, and predicted lethal postnatal hypoxemia. A multidisciplinary meeting evaluated therapeutic options. After cesarean delivery, veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was instituted in preparation for open atrial septectomy. The infant subsequently underwent an arterial switch procedure. Prenatal delineation of pulmonary and systemic circulations in the fetus with D-transposition of the great arteries influences postnatal management. Multidisciplinary planning enhanced the perinatal outcome.

  1. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159459.html Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation Blood thinners -- not aspirin -- dramatically cut the risk of stroke, researchers say ...

  2. MARCKS-like protein is an initiating molecule in axolotl appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Takuji; Wang, Heng; Barsacchi, Rico; Simon, Andras; Tanaka, Elly M

    2016-03-10

    Identifying key molecules that launch regeneration has been a long-sought goal. Multiple regenerative animals show an initial wound-associated proliferative response that transits into sustained proliferation if a considerable portion of the body part has been removed. In the axolotl, appendage amputation initiates a round of wound-associated cell cycle induction followed by continued proliferation that is dependent on nerve-derived signals. A wound-associated molecule that triggers the initial proliferative response to launch regeneration has remained obscure. Here, using an expression cloning strategy followed by in vivo gain- and loss-of-function assays, we identified axolotl MARCKS-like protein (MLP) as an extracellularly released factor that induces the initial cell cycle response during axolotl appendage regeneration. The identification of a regeneration-initiating molecule opens the possibility of understanding how to elicit regeneration in other animals.

  3. Dynamics of a spacecraft with large flexible appendage constrained by multi-strut passive damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ying-Hong; Xu, Shi-Jie; Hu, Quan

    2013-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a spacecraft with multi-strut passive damper for large flexible appendage. The damper platform is connected to the spacecraft by a spheric hinge, multiple damping struts and a rigid strut. The damping struts provide damping forces while the rigid strut produces a motion constraint of the multibody system. The exact nonlinear dynamical equations in reducedorder form are firstly derived by using Kane's equation in matrix form. Based on the assumptions of small velocity and small displacement, the nonlinear equations are reduced to a set of linear second-order differential equations in terms of independent generalized displacements with constant stiffness matrix and damping matrix related to the damping strut parameters. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the damping effectiveness of the damper for both the motion of the spacecraft and the vibration of the flexible appendage, and verify the accuracy of the linear equations against the exact nonlinear ones.

  4. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Thomas H; Snyder, Emily R; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K

    2015-10-15

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1-Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine. PMID:26494786

  5. The integumental appendages of the turtle shell: an evo-devo perspective.

    PubMed

    Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Cherepanov, Gennadii O

    2015-05-01

    The turtle shell is composed of dorsal armor (carapace) and ventral armor (plastron) covered by a keratinized epithelium. There are two epithelial appendages of the turtle shell: scutes (large epidermal shields separated by furrows and forming a unique mosaic) and tubercles (numerous small epidermal bumps located on the carapaces of some species). In our perspective, we take a synthetic, comparative approach to consider the homology and evolution of these integumental appendages. Scutes have been more intensively studied, as they are autapomorphic for turtles and can be diagnostic taxonomically. Their pattern of tessellation is stable phylogenetically, but labile in the individual. We discuss the history of developmental investigations of these structures and hypotheses of evolutionary and anomalous variation. In our estimation, the scutes of the turtle shell are an evolutionary novelty, whereas the tubercles found on the shells of some turtles are homologous to reptilian scales.

  6. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Thomas H; Snyder, Emily R; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K

    2015-10-15

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1-Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine.

  7. MARCKS-Like Protein is an Initiating Molecule in Axolotl Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Takuji; Wang, Heng; Barsacchi, Rico; Simon, Andras; Tanaka, Elly M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying key molecules that launch regeneration has been a long sought goal. Multiple regenerative animals show an initial wound-associated proliferative response that transits into sustained proliferation if a significant portion of the body part has been removed 1-3. In the axolotl, appendage amputation initiates a round of wound-associated cell cycle induction followed by continued proliferation that is dependent on nerve-derived signals 4,5. A wound-associated molecule that triggers the initial proliferative response to launch regeneration has remained obscure. Using an expression cloning strategy followed by in vivo gain- and loss-of-function assays, we identified axolotl MARCKS like Protein (MLP) as an extracellularly released factor that induces the initial cell cycle response during axolotl appendage regeneration. PMID:26934225

  8. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Thomas H.; Snyder, Emily R.; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1–Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine. PMID:26494786

  9. MARCKS-like protein is an initiating molecule in axolotl appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Takuji; Wang, Heng; Barsacchi, Rico; Simon, Andras; Tanaka, Elly M

    2016-03-10

    Identifying key molecules that launch regeneration has been a long-sought goal. Multiple regenerative animals show an initial wound-associated proliferative response that transits into sustained proliferation if a considerable portion of the body part has been removed. In the axolotl, appendage amputation initiates a round of wound-associated cell cycle induction followed by continued proliferation that is dependent on nerve-derived signals. A wound-associated molecule that triggers the initial proliferative response to launch regeneration has remained obscure. Here, using an expression cloning strategy followed by in vivo gain- and loss-of-function assays, we identified axolotl MARCKS-like protein (MLP) as an extracellularly released factor that induces the initial cell cycle response during axolotl appendage regeneration. The identification of a regeneration-initiating molecule opens the possibility of understanding how to elicit regeneration in other animals. PMID:26934225

  10. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ray, Robert P; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J

    2015-08-10

    How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape.

  11. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Robert P.; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S.; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape. PMID:26190146

  12. Congenital cystic eye with multiple dermal appendages and intracranial congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Michaelides, Michael; Tsantiridis, Christos; Spyridi, Styliani; Arvanity, Mary; Efstratiou, Ioannis

    2010-06-01

    Congenital cystic eye (anophthalmia with cyst) is an extremely rare anomaly discovered at birth with few reported cases in the literature, resulting from partial or complete failure during invagination of the primary optic vesicle during fetal development. Herein we present the radiographic, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a unique case of congenital cystic eye associated with dermal appendages and advanced intracranial congenital anomalies in a 3-month-old boy.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a system of hinge-connected rigid bodies with nonrigid appendages. [equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Equations of motion are derived for use in simulating a spacecraft or other complex electromechanical system amenable to idealization as a set of hinge-connected rigid bodies of tree topology, with rigid axisymmetric rotors and nonrigid appendages attached to each rigid body in the set. In conjunction with a previously published report on finite-element appendage vibration equations, this report provides a complete minimum-dimension formulation suitable for generic programming for digital computer numerical integration.

  14. Body plan innovation in treehoppers through the evolution of an extra wing-like appendage.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, Benjamin; Minervino, Caroline; Hocine, Mélanie; Cande, Jessica D; Aouane, Aïcha; Dufour, Héloïse D; Kassner, Victoria A; Gompel, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    Body plans, which characterize the anatomical organization of animal groups of high taxonomic rank, often evolve by the reduction or loss of appendages (limbs in vertebrates and legs and wings in insects, for example). In contrast, the addition of new features is extremely rare and is thought to be heavily constrained, although the nature of the constraints remains elusive. Here we show that the treehopper (Membracidae) 'helmet' is actually an appendage, a wing serial homologue on the first thoracic segment. This innovation in the insect body plan is an unprecedented situation in 250 Myr of insect evolution. We provide evidence suggesting that the helmet arose by escaping the ancestral repression of wing formation imparted by a member of the Hox gene family, which sculpts the number and pattern of appendages along the body axis. Moreover, we propose that the exceptional morphological diversification of the helmet was possible because, in contrast to the wings, it escaped the stringent functional requirements imposed by flight. This example illustrates how complex morphological structures can arise by the expression of ancestral developmental potentials and fuel the morphological diversification of an evolutionary lineage.

  15. Regulatory evolution of Tbx5 and the origin of paired appendages.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Noritaka; Robinson, Molly; Goolsbee, Aden; Shubin, Neil H

    2016-09-01

    The diversification of paired appendages has been a major factor in the evolutionary radiation of vertebrates. Despite its importance, an understanding of the origin of paired appendages has remained elusive. To address this problem, we focused on T-box transcription factor 5 (Tbx5), a gene indispensable for pectoral appendage initiation and development. Comparison of gene expression in jawless and jawed vertebrates reveals that the Tbx5 expression in jawed vertebrates is derived in having an expression domain that extends caudal to the heart and gills. Chromatin profiling, phylogenetic footprinting, and functional assays enabled the identification of a Tbx5 fin enhancer associated with this apomorphic pattern of expression. Comparative functional analysis of reporter constructs reveals that this enhancer activity is evolutionarily conserved among jawed vertebrates and is able to rescue the finless phenotype of tbx5a mutant zebrafish. Taking paleontological evidence of early vertebrates into account, our results suggest that the gain of apomorphic patterns of Tbx5 expression and regulation likely contributed to the morphological transition from a finless to finned condition at the base of the vertebrate lineage.

  16. Setal morphology of grooming appendages in the spider crab, Libinia dubia.

    PubMed

    Wortham, Jen L; LaVelle, Amanda D

    2016-08-01

    In crustaceans, grooming behaviors decrease fouling by removing debris from the exoskeleton and body structures; these grooming behaviors improve respiration, sensory reception, movement, and reproduction. Setal morphologies of the following grooming appendages in the decapod crustacean spider crab Libinia dubia are examined including the first pereiopod (cheliped), first, second, and third maxillipeds (mouthparts), and first, second, and third epipods (internal extensions of the maxillipeds). The objective of this study was to describe setal morphologies of these grooming appendages and to elucidate possible functions and efficiencies of setal structures. Spider crabs are hypothesized to have elaborate setal morphologies, mainly for cleaning specialized decorating setae as well as for cleaning inside the gill chamber, which has a higher likelihood of becoming fouled compared to other decapods such as shrimps. Fourteen setal types are documented and included several varieties of serrate and pappose setae as well as simple setae, cuspidate setae, papposerrate setae, and canoe setae. Maxillipodal epipods in the gill chamber are free of fouling, suggesting the setation on the third maxilliped protopod has an efficient functional morphology in removing debris before water enters the gill chamber. Serrate setae may function for detangling and separating structures whereas pappose setae may function for fine detailed grooming. The cheliped is the only grooming appendage that can reach decorating setae and it contains only pappose setae; thus decorating setae is not likely groomed in a manner that would greatly decrease fouling. J. Morphol. 277:1045-1061, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27149925

  17. Regulatory evolution of Tbx5 and the origin of paired appendages.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Noritaka; Robinson, Molly; Goolsbee, Aden; Shubin, Neil H

    2016-09-01

    The diversification of paired appendages has been a major factor in the evolutionary radiation of vertebrates. Despite its importance, an understanding of the origin of paired appendages has remained elusive. To address this problem, we focused on T-box transcription factor 5 (Tbx5), a gene indispensable for pectoral appendage initiation and development. Comparison of gene expression in jawless and jawed vertebrates reveals that the Tbx5 expression in jawed vertebrates is derived in having an expression domain that extends caudal to the heart and gills. Chromatin profiling, phylogenetic footprinting, and functional assays enabled the identification of a Tbx5 fin enhancer associated with this apomorphic pattern of expression. Comparative functional analysis of reporter constructs reveals that this enhancer activity is evolutionarily conserved among jawed vertebrates and is able to rescue the finless phenotype of tbx5a mutant zebrafish. Taking paleontological evidence of early vertebrates into account, our results suggest that the gain of apomorphic patterns of Tbx5 expression and regulation likely contributed to the morphological transition from a finless to finned condition at the base of the vertebrate lineage. PMID:27503876

  18. Coupling dynamic analysis of spacecraft with multiple cylindrical tanks and flexible appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Jun; Yue, Bao-Zeng; Huang, Hua

    2016-02-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the coupling dynamic analysis of a complex spacecraft consisting of one main rigid platform, multiple liquid-filled cylindrical tanks, and a number of flexible appendages. Firstly, the carrier potential function equations of liquid in the tanks are deduced according to the wall boundary conditions. Through employing the Fourier-Bessel series expansion method, the dynamic boundaries conditions on a curved free-surface under a low-gravity environment are transformed to general simple differential equations and the rigid-liquid coupled sloshing dynamic state equations of liquid in tanks are obtained. The state vectors of rigid-liquid coupled equations are composed with the modal coordinates of the relative potential function and the modal coordinates of wave height. Based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the D'Alembert's principle, the rigid-flexible coupled dynamic state equations of flexible appendages are directly derived, and the coordinate transform matrixes of maneuvering flexible appendages are precisely computed as time-varying. Then, the coupling dynamics state equations of the overall system of the spacecraft are modularly built by means of the Lagrange's equations in terms of quasi-coordinates. Lastly, the coupling dynamic performances of a typical complex spacecraft are studied. The availability and reliability of the presented method are also confirmed.

  19. The Mother Centriole Appendage Protein Cenexin Modulates Lumen Formation through Spindle Orientation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hui-Fang; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    Establishing apical-basal polarity is instrumental in the functional shaping of a solitary lumen within an acinus. By exploiting micropatterned slides, wound healing assays, and three-dimensional culture systems, we identified a mother centriole subdistal appendage protein, cenexin, as a critical player in symmetric lumen expansion through the control of microtubule organization. In this regard, cenexin was required for both centrosome positioning in interphase cells and proper spindle orientation during mitosis. In contrast, the essential mother centriole distal appendage protein CEP164 did not play a role in either process, demonstrating the specificity of subdistal appendages for these events. Importantly, upon closer examination we found that cenexin depletion decreased astral microtubule length, disrupted astral microtubule minus-end organization, and increased levels of the polarity protein NuMA at the cell cortex. Interestingly, spindle misorientation and NuMA mislocalization were reversed by treatment with a low dose of the microtubule-stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Taken together, these results suggest that cenexin modulates microtubule organization and stability to mediate spindle orientation. PMID:26948879

  20. Regulatory evolution of Tbx5 and the origin of paired appendages

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Noritaka; Robinson, Molly; Goolsbee, Aden; Shubin, Neil H.

    2016-01-01

    The diversification of paired appendages has been a major factor in the evolutionary radiation of vertebrates. Despite its importance, an understanding of the origin of paired appendages has remained elusive. To address this problem, we focused on T-box transcription factor 5 (Tbx5), a gene indispensable for pectoral appendage initiation and development. Comparison of gene expression in jawless and jawed vertebrates reveals that the Tbx5 expression in jawed vertebrates is derived in having an expression domain that extends caudal to the heart and gills. Chromatin profiling, phylogenetic footprinting, and functional assays enabled the identification of a Tbx5 fin enhancer associated with this apomorphic pattern of expression. Comparative functional analysis of reporter constructs reveals that this enhancer activity is evolutionarily conserved among jawed vertebrates and is able to rescue the finless phenotype of tbx5a mutant zebrafish. Taking paleontological evidence of early vertebrates into account, our results suggest that the gain of apomorphic patterns of Tbx5 expression and regulation likely contributed to the morphological transition from a finless to finned condition at the base of the vertebrate lineage. PMID:27503876

  1. Putative Domain-Domain Interactions in the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus L Polymerase Protein Appendage Region

    PubMed Central

    Ruedas, John B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The multidomain polymerase protein (L) of nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses catalyzes transcription and replication of the virus genome. The N-terminal half of the protein forms a ring-like polymerase structure, while the C-terminal half encoding viral mRNA transcript modifications consists of a flexible appendage with three distinct globular domains. To gain insight into putative transient interactions between L domains during viral RNA synthesis, we exchanged each of the four distinct regions encompassing the appendage region of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) Indiana serotype L protein with their counterparts from VSV New Jersey and analyzed effects on virus polymerase activity in a minigenome system. The methyltransferase domain exchange yielded a fully active polymerase protein, which functioned as well as wild-type L in the context of a recombinant virus. Exchange of the downstream C-terminal nonconserved region abolished activity, but coexchanging it with the methyltransferase domain generated a polymerase favoring replicase over transcriptase activity, providing strong evidence of interaction between these two regions. Exchange of the capping enzyme domain or the adjacent nonconserved region thought to function as an “unstructured” linker also abrogated polymerase activity even when either domain was coexchanged with other appendage domains. Further probing of the putative linker segment using in-frame enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) insertions similarly abrogated activity. We discuss the implications of these findings with regard to L protein appendage domain structure and putative domain-domain interactions required for polymerase function. IMPORTANCE NNS viruses include many well-known human pathogens (e.g., rabies, measles, and Ebola viruses), as well as emerging viral threats (e.g., Nipah and Hendra viruses). These viruses all encode a large L polymerase protein similarly organized into multiple domains that work in

  2. Left atrial myxoma masquerading as viral flu

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Kiernan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is a rare cardiac tumor that may be diagnosed incidentally on cardiac imaging or may present with life-threatening cardiac symptoms. We present a case of giant left atrial myxoma that presented as a flulike illness. PMID:27695187

  3. A novel and simple atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Kofidis, Theo; Lee, Chuen Neng

    2011-05-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac operations require specialized equipment. Atrial retractors are a frequently used tool to expose heart valves for minimally invasive and open procedures. The models currently available in the market are efficient; however, they may be complex, bulky, or expensive. We introduce a novel, very simple atrial retractor we designed using ubiquitously available materials.

  4. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  5. Familial atrial fibrillation with fetal onset

    PubMed Central

    Tikanoja, T; Kirkinen, P; Nikolajev, K; Eresmaa, L; Haring, P

    1998-01-01

    A woman presented during two pregnancies (at 25 and 23 weeks' gestation, respectively) because the fetuses had rapid, irregular tachycardia and hydrops. After maternal drug treatment and achievement of slower fetal heart rates, the hydrops gradually resolved. Both babies were born full term with continuing atrial fibrillation. In the first, an ectopic atrial rhythm was temporarily achieved during high dose flecainide treatment but, in the younger sibling, all medications and repeated cardioversions failed even temporarily to convert the atrial fibrillation with an almost isoelectric baseline in ECG to sinus rhythm. Good rate control has been achieved with digoxin in both patients. No infective, immunological, or structural cause was found in either case, and thus an inherited aetiology is probable.

 Keywords: atrial fibrillation;  arrhythmias;  fetal atrial fibrillation;  familial arrhythmias PMID:9538316

  6. Baseline and post-atrial pacing release of atrial natriuretic factor in mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Malatino, L S; Stancanelli, B; Greco, G; Polizzi, G; Leonardi, C; Russo, G; Tamburino, C; Greco, G; Giuffrida, G; Tamburino, G

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the release of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in mitral stenosis and the influence of the increase on the frequency of atrial contraction or atrial distention on ANF secretion, we studied 10 patients with symptoms of congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association classes II and III) in sinus rhythm, who were undergoing cardiac catheterization as part of an evaluation workup for mitral stenosis. Echocardiographic tracings, repeat determinations of mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure (MPAWP) and mean right atrial pressure, and blood sampling from the pulmonary artery for measurements of ANF were performed at baseline, during atrial pacing (pacing rate of 125 beats/min for 5 minutes), and 5 minutes after the pacing protocol was completed. Baseline ANF levels were closely related to right atrial pressure (r = 0.89; p less than 0.001) and increased markedly after atrial pacing from 205.6 +/- 39.8 (SEM) to 343.9 +/- 57.9 (SEM) pg/ml. A similar pacing-induced increase was shown for MPAWP and left atrial size. Our data indicate that pacing-induced increases in atrial distention and intracavitary pressure further stimulate release of ANF. However, an independent effect of frequency of atrial pacing on plasma ANF in humans could not be identified. PMID:2136967

  7. Atrial fibrillation and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bosomworth, N. John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence on the effects of various levels of physical activity (PA) on the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in both the general population and in endurance athletes. Data sources A PubMed search was done initially using the MeSH headings or text words (with the search-field descriptor TIAB [title and abstract]) atrial fibrillation and exercise or physical activity or athlet* or sport*, without additional filters. Conclusions regarding quality and strength of evidence were based on the GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation) system. Study selection No interventional studies were available. Observational studies were therefore considered acceptable, and, although larger long-term prospective cohort studies were preferred, case-control or cross-sectional trials were also included in this review. Synthesis Available evidence suggests a dose-response association linking increased exercise levels with reduced incident AF in women. The same is true in men at low and moderate levels of exertional activity. In men only, high levels of PA are associated with increased risk of AF in most, but not all, studies. This risk is moderate, with a hazard ratio of 1.29 in one of the better studies. The risk of AF for most people who exercise regularly is lower than that of a matched sedentary population. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation is probably less common as PA increases, with a demonstrable dose-response relationship. Exercise at any level should be promoted for its effect on physical well-being and mortality reduction. In men exercising at high levels, beneficial effects on AF might be lost and risk might exceed that of the sedentary population; however, the evidence is neither robust nor consistent. These men should be made aware of this modest increase in risk should they choose to continue to engage in high levels of PA. PMID:26668285

  8. The Spatiotemporal Stability of Dominant Frequency Sites in In-Silico Modeling of 3-Dimensional Left Atrial Mapping of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Minki; Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously reported that stable rotors were observed in in-silico human atrial fibrillation (AF) models, and were well represented by dominant frequency (DF). We explored the spatiotemporal stability of DF sites in 3D-AF models imported from patient CT images of the left atrium (LA). Methods We integrated 3-D CT images of the LA obtained from ten patients with persistent AF (male 80%, 61.8 ± 13.5 years old) into an in-silico AF model. After induction, we obtained 6 seconds of AF simulation data for DF analyses in 30 second intervals (T1–T9). The LA was divided into ten sections. Spatiotemporal changes and variations in the temporal consistency of DF were evaluated at each section of the LA. The high DF area was defined as the area with the highest 10% DF. Results 1. There was no spatial consistency in the high DF distribution at each LA section during T1–T9 except in one patient (p = 0.027). 2. Coefficients of variation for the high DF area were highly different among the ten LA sections (p < 0.001), and they were significantly higher in the four pulmonary vein (PV) areas, the LA appendage, and the peri-mitral area than in the other LA sections (p < 0.001). 3. When we conducted virtual ablation of 10%, 15%, and 20% of the highest DF areas (n = 270 cases), AF was changed to atrial tachycardia (AT) or terminated at a rate of 40%, 57%, and 76%, respectively. Conclusions Spatiotemporal consistency of the DF area was observed in 10% of AF patients, and high DF areas were temporally variable. Virtual ablation of DF is moderately effective in AF termination and AF changing into AT. PMID:27459377

  9. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  10. Dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Maund, E; McKenna, C; Sarowar, M; Fox, D; Stevenson, M; Pepper, C; Palmer, S; Woolacott, N

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report on the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal process. The population considered in the submission were adult clinically stable patients with a recent history of or current non-permanent AF. Comparators were the current available anti-arrhythmic drugs: class 1c agents (flecainide and propafenone), sotalol and amiodarone. Outcomes were AF recurrence, all-cause mortality, stroke, treatment discontinuations (due to any cause or due to adverse events) and serious adverse events. The main evidence came from four phase III randomised controlled trials, direct and indirect meta-analyses from a systematic review, and a synthesis of the direct and indirect evidence using a mixed-treatment comparison. Overall, the results from the different synthesis approaches showed that the odds of AF recurrence appeared statistically significantly lower with dronedarone and other anti-arrhythmic drugs than with non-active control, and that the odds of AF recurrence are statistically significantly higher for dronedarone than for amiodarone. However, the results for outcomes of all-cause mortality, stroke and treatment discontinuations and serious adverse events were all uncertain. A discrete event simulation model was used to evaluate dronedarone versus antiarrhythmic drugs and standard therapy alone. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of dronedarone was relatively robust and less than 20,000 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year. Exploratory work undertaken by the ERG identified that the main drivers of cost-effectiveness were the benefits assigned to dronedarone for all-cause mortality and stroke. Dronedarone is not cost-effective relative to its comparators when

  11. A Functional Polymorphism C-509T in TGFβ-1 Promoter Contributes to Susceptibility and Prognosis of Lone Atrial Fibrillation in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yijiang; Wang, Dongjin

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is an important mediator of atrial fibrosis and atrial fibrillation (AF). But the involved genetic mechanism is unknown. Herein, the TGF-β1 C-509T polymorphism (rs1800469) was genotyped in a case-control study of 840 patients and 845 controls in Chinese population to explore the association between the polymorphism and susceptibility and prognosis of lone AF. As a result, the CT and/or TT genotypes had an increased lone AF risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.50 for CT, OR = 3.72 for TT, and OR = 2.15 for CT/TT], compared with the TGF-β1CC genotype. Moreover, patients carrying CT/TT genotypes showed a higher possibility of AF recurrence after catheter ablation, compared with patients carrying CC genotype. In a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis using 24 normal left atrial appendage samples, increasing gradients of atrial TGF-β1 expression levels positively correlated with atrial collagen volume fraction were identified in samples with CC, CT and TT genotypes. The in vitro luciferase assays also showed a higher luciferase activity of the -509T allele than that of the -509C allele. In conclusion, the TGF-β1 C-509T polymorphism is involved in the etiology of lone AF and thus may be a marker for genetic susceptibility to lone AF and predicting prognosis after catheter ablation in Chinese populations. Therefore, we provide new information about treatment strategies and our understanding of TGF-β1 in AF. PMID:25402477

  12. Stroke risk assessment in atrial fibrillation: risk factors and markers of atrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Brandon W; Fuster, Valentin; Halperin, Jonathan L; Granger, Christopher B

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex phenomenon associated with electrical, mechanical, and structural abnormalities of the atria. Ischaemic stroke in AF is only partially understood, but the mechanisms are known to be related to the atrial substrate as well as the atrial rhythm. The temporal dissociation between timing of AF and occurrence of stroke has led to the hypothesis that fibrotic, prothrombotic atrial tissue is an important cause of thrombus formation in patients with AF, independent of the atrial rhythm. Current stroke risk scores are practical, but limited in their capacity to predict stroke risk accurately in individual patients. Stroke prediction might be improved by the addition of emerging risk factors, many of which are expressions of atrial fibrosis. The use of novel parameters, including clinical criteria, biomarkers, and imaging data, might improve stroke risk prediction and inform on optimal treatment for patients with AF and perhaps individuals only at risk of AF. PMID:27383079

  13. Proboscis lateralis-like appendage: description of a new facial anomaly.

    PubMed

    Arora, Garima; Arora, Vipin; Chawla, Deepak

    2011-04-01

    Proboscis lateralis is a rare craniofacial anomaly characterized by a trunk-like process attached to the medial portion of the orbital roof on the affected side. We report a case, which, though resembling proboscis lateralis in some ways, has certain unique features. This case had an appendage arising from the right malar region with a central tract lined by stratified squamous epithelium. It had erectile properties and was communicating with an enlarged ipsilateral maxillary sinus. Because of these characteristic features it appears to be a new, as yet unreported, facial anomaly. PMID:21200312

  14. Detection of atrial-flutter and atrial-fibrillation waveforms by fetal magnetocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Kandori, A; Hosono, T; Kanagawa, T; Miyashita, S; Chiba, Y; Murakami, M; Miyashita, T; Tsukada, K

    2002-03-01

    Two cases of fetal tachycardia are reported: atrial flutter and fibrillation. The waveforms from each case were detected by fetal magnetocardiograms (FMCGs) using a 64-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system. Because the magnitude of supraventricular arrhythmia signals is very weak, two subtraction methods were used to detect the fetal MCG waveforms: subtraction of the maternal MCG signal, and subtraction of the fetal ORS complex signal. It was found that atrial-flutter waveforms showed a cyclic pattern and that atrial-fibrillation waveforms showed f-waves with a random atrial rhythm. Fast Fourier transform analysis determined the main frequency of the atrial flutter to be about 7Hz, and the frequency distribution of atrial fibrillation consisted of small, broad peaks. To visualise the current pattern, current-arrow maps, which simplify the observation of pseudo-current patterns in fetal hearts, of the averaged atrial flutter and fibrillation waveforms were produced. The map of the atrial flutter had a circular pattern, indicating a re-entry circuit, and the map of the atrial fibrillation indicated one wavelet, which was produced by a micro-re-entry circuit. It is thus concluded that an FMCG can detect supraventricular arrhythmia, which can be characterised by re-entry circuits, in fetuses. PMID:12043803

  15. Transoccipital endoscopic fenestration of atrial cysts causing ventricular entrapment.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason A; McCormick, Paul C; Feldstein, Neil A; Ghatan, Saadi

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Cystic lesions in the atrium (trigone) of the lateral ventricle may become symptomatic due to obstruction of physiological CSF circulation and/or from mass effect on adjacent structures. A minimally invasive approach that not only allows for straightforward access to multiple regions of the atrial cyst wall, but also enables direct inspection of the entire lateral ventricular system, has not been elaborated. In this paper the authors describe their experience with the endoscopic transoccipital horn approach for treating cystic lesions in the atrium of the lateral ventricle. METHODS A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent endoscopic surgical treatment for cysts in the atrium of the lateral ventricle between 1999 and 2014. RESULTS The cohort consisted of 13 consecutive patients who presented with symptomatic lateral ventricular entrapment due to the presence of an atrial cyst. There were 9 male and 4 female patients, with a median age of 5 years. Headache was the most common complaint at presentation. The transoccipital horn approach facilitated successful cyst reduction and fenestration in all cases. Temporal and occipital horn entrapment was reversed in all cases, with reestablishment of a physiological CSF flow pattern throughout the ventricles. Hydrocephalus was also reversed in all patients presenting with this neuroimaging finding at presentation. No cyst or ventricular entrapment was noted to recur during a mean follow-up period of 36 months. No patient in the study cohort required repeat surgery or permanent CSF diversion postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS The endoscopic transoccipital horn approach represents a safe and effective treatment strategy for patients with symptomatic atrial cysts of the lateral ventricle. Using this minimally invasive technique, all poles of the lateral ventricular system can be visualized and the unobstructed flow of CSF can be confirmed after cyst resection obviating the need for additional diversion.

  16. Crystal structure of the α appendage of AP-2 reveals a recruitment platform for clathrin-coat assembly

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Linton M.; Downs, Maureen A.; Westrich, Jennifer L.; Fremont, Daved H.

    1999-01-01

    AP-2 adaptors regulate clathrin-bud formation at the cell surface by recruiting clathrin trimers to the plasma membrane and by selecting certain membrane proteins for inclusion within the developing clathrin-coat structure. These functions are performed by discrete subunits of the adaptor heterotetramer. The carboxyl-terminal appendage of the AP-2 α subunit appears to regulate the translocation of several endocytic accessory proteins to the bud site. We have determined the crystal structure of the α appendage at 1.4-Å resolution by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. It is composed of two distinct structural modules, a β-sandwich domain and a mixed α–β platform domain. Structure-based mutagenesis shows that alterations to the molecular surface of a highly conserved region on the platform domain differentially affect associations of the appendage with amphiphysin, eps15, epsin, and AP180, revealing a common protein-binding interface. PMID:10430869

  17. Left atrial electrophysiologic feature specific for the genesis of complex fractionated atrial electrogram during atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hoshiyama, Tadashi; Yamabe, Hiroshige; Koyama, Junjiroh; Kanazawa, Hisanori; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-05-01

    Complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) has been suggested to contribute to the maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, electrophysiologic characteristics of the left atrial myocardium responsible for genesis of CFAE have not been clarified. Non-contact mapping of the left atrium was performed at 37 AF onset episodes in 24 AF patients. Electrogram amplitude, width, and conduction velocity were measured during sinus rhythm, premature atrial contraction (PAC) with long- (L-PAC), short- (S-PAC) and very short-coupling intervals (VS-PAC). These parameters were compared between CFAE and non-CFAE regions. Unipolar electrogram amplitude was higher in CFAE than non-CFAE during sinus rhythm, L-, S- and VS-PAC (1.82 ± 0.73 vs. 1.13 ± 0.38, p < 0.001; 1.44 ± 0.54 vs. 0.92 ± 0.35, p < 0.001; 1.09 ± 0.40 vs. 0.70 ± 0.27, p < 0.001; 0.76 ± 0.30 vs. 0.53 ± 0.25 mV, p < 0.001). Laplacian bipolar electrogram amplitude was also higher in CFAE than non-CFAE during sinus rhythm, L-, S- and VS-PAC. Unipolar electrogram width was similar in CFAE and non-CFAE. Laplacian bipolar electrogram width was wider in CFAE than non-CFAE during L-, S- and VS-PAC (85.5 ± 6.8 vs. 79.6 ± 4.5, p < 0.001; 96.1 ± 9.7 vs. 84.5 ± 5.9, p < 0.001; 122.4 ± 16.0 vs. 99.6 ± 9.6 ms, p < 0.001), but not during sinus rhythm. The conduction velocity was slower in CFAE during sinus rhythm, L-, S- and VS-PAC than non-CFAE (1.7 ± 0.3 vs. 2.4 ± 0.4, p < 0.001; 1.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.0 ± 0.5, p < 0.001; 1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 1.7 ± 0.5, p < 0.001; and 0.9 ± 0.3 vs. 1.4 ± 0.4 m/s, p < 0.001). CFAE was generated in the high amplitude atrial myocardium with slow and non-uniform conduction properties which were pronounced associated with premature activation, suggesting that heterogeneous conduction produced in high amplitude region contributes to the genesis of CFAE.

  18. Designing Comparative Effectiveness Trials of Surgical Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Experience of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Argenziano, Michael; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Iribarne, Alexander; DeRose, Joseph J.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Russo, Mark J.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Parides, Michael K.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Bouchard, Denis; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; Geller, Nancy L.; Acker, Michael A.; Gelijns, Annetine C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of the cut-and-sew Cox-Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF) there has been substantial innovation in techniques for ablation. Use of alternate energy sources for ablation simplified the procedure and has resulted in dramatic increase in the number of AF patients treated by surgical ablation. Despite its increasingly widespread adoption, there is lack of rigorous clinical evidence to establish this as an effective clinical therapy. Methods and Results This paper describes a comparative effectiveness randomized trial, supported by the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, of surgical ablation with left atrial appendage (LAA) closure versus LAA closure alone in patients with persistent and longstanding persistent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery. Nested within this trial, is a further randomized comparison of 2 different lesions sets: pulmonary vein isolation and full Maze lesion set. This paper addresses trial design challenges, including how to best characterize the target population, operationalize freedom from AF as a primary endpoint, account for the impact of anti-arrhythmic drugs, and measure and analyze secondary endpoints, such as post-operative AF load. Conclusions This paper concludes by discussing how insights that emerge from this trial may affect surgical practice and guide future research in this area. PMID:21616507

  19. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiac impedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50-300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz - 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  20. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiacimpedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50–300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz − 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  1. Trichohyalin-like proteins have evolutionarily conserved roles in the morphogenesis of skin appendages

    PubMed Central

    Mlitz, Veronika; Strasser, Bettina; Jaeger, Karin; Hermann, Marcela; Ghannadan, Minoo; Buchberger, Maria; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    S100 fused-type proteins (SFTPs) such as filaggrin, trichohyalin and cornulin are differentially expressed in cornifying keratinocytes of the epidermis and various skin appendages. To determine evolutionarily conserved, and thus presumably important, features of SFTPs, we characterized non-mammalian SFTPs and compared their amino acid sequences and expression patterns to those of mammalian SFTPs. We identified an ortholog of cornulin and a previously unknown SFTP, termed scaffoldin, in reptiles and birds, whereas filaggrin was confined to mammals. In contrast to mammalian SFTPs, both cornulin and scaffoldin of the chicken are expressed in the embryonic periderm. However, scaffoldin resembles mammalian trichohyalin with regard to its expression in the filiform papillae of the tongue and in the epithelium underneath the forming tips of the claws. Furthermore, scaffoldin is expressed in the epithelial sheath around growing feathers, reminiscent of trichohyalin expression in the inner root sheath of hair. The results of this study show that SFTP-positive epithelia function as scaffolds for the growth of diverse skin appendages such as claws, nails, hair and feathers, indicating of a common evolutionary origin. PMID:24780931

  2. Time-varying modal parameters identification of a spacecraft with rotating flexible appendage by recursive algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Zhiyu; Mu, Ruinan; Xun, Guangbin; Wu, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The rotation of spacecraft flexible appendage may cause changes in modal parameters. For this time-varying system, the computation cost of the frequently-used singular value decomposition (SVD) identification method is high. Some control problems, such as the self-adaptive control, need the latest modal parameters to update the controller parameters in time. In this paper, the projection approximation subspace tracking (PAST) recursive algorithm is applied as an alternative method to identify the time-varying modal parameters. This method avoids the SVD by signal subspace projection and improves the computational efficiency. To verify the ability of this recursive algorithm in spacecraft modal parameters identification, a spacecraft model with rapid rotational appendage, Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) satellite, is established, and the time-varying modal parameters of the satellite are identified recursively by designing the input and output signals. The results illustrate that this recursive algorithm can obtain the modal parameters in the high signal noise ratio (SNR) and it has better computational efficiency than the SVD method. Moreover, to improve the identification precision of this recursive algorithm in the low SNR, the wavelet de-noising technology is used to decrease the effect of noises.

  3. Border of Notch activity establishes a boundary between the two dorsal appendage tube cell types.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ellen J; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Riddiford, Lynn M; Berg, Celeste A; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2006-09-15

    Boundaries establish and maintain separate populations of cells critical for organ formation. We show that Notch signaling establishes the boundary between two types of post-mitotic epithelial cells, the Rhomboid- and the Broad-positive cells. These cells will undergo morphogenetic movements to generate the two sides of a simple organ, the dorsal appendage tube of the Drosophila egg chamber. The boundary forms due to a difference in Notch levels in adjacent cells. The Notch expression pattern mimics the boundary; Notch levels are high in Rhomboid cells and low in Broad cells. Notch(-) mutant clones generate an ectopic boundary: ectopic Rhomboid cells arise in Notch(+) cells adjacent to the Notch(-) mutant cells but not further away from the clonal border. Pangolin, a component of the Wingless pathway, is required for Broad expression and for rhomboid repression. We further show that Broad represses rhomboid cell autonomously. Our data provide a foundation for understanding how a single row of Rhomboid cells arises adjacent to the Broad cells in the dorsal appendage primordia. Generating a boundary by the Notch pathway might constitute an evolutionarily conserved first step during organ formation in many tissues. PMID:16828735

  4. Robotic and mathematical modeling reveal general principles of appendage control and coordination in terrestrial locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInroe, Benjamin; Astley, Henry; Gong, Chaohui; Kawano, Sandy; Schiebel, Perrin; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    The transition from aquatic to terrestrial life presented new challenges to early walkers, necessitating robust locomotion on complex, flowable substrates (e.g. sand, mud). Locomotion on such substrates is sensitive to limb morphology and kinematics. Although early walker morphologies are known, principles of appendage control remain elusive. To reveal limb control strategies that facilitated the invasion of land, we study both robotic and mathematical models. Robot experiments show that an active tail is critical for robust locomotion on granular media, enabling locomotion even with poor foot placement and limited ability to lift the body. Using a granular resistive force theory model, we construct connection vector fields that reveal how appendage coordination and terrain inclination impact locomotor performance. This model replicates experimental results, showing that moving limbs/tail in phase is most effective (suggesting a locomotor template). Varying limb trajectories and contacts, we find gaits for which tail use can be neutral or harmful, suggesting limb-tail coordination to be a nontrivial aspect of locomotion. Our findings show that robot experiments coupled with geometric mechanics provide a general framework to reveal principles of robust terrestrial locomotion. This work was supported by NSF PoLS.

  5. An armoured Cambrian lobopodian from China with arthropod-like appendages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianni; Steiner, Michael; Dunlop, Jason A; Keupp, Helmut; Shu, Degan; Ou, Qiang; Han, Jian; Zhang, Zhifei; Zhang, Xingliang

    2011-02-24

    Cambrian fossil Lagerstätten preserving soft-bodied organisms have contributed much towards our understanding of metazoan origins. Lobopodians are a particularly interesting group that diversified and flourished in the Cambrian seas. Resembling 'worms with legs', they have long attracted much attention in that they may have given rise to both Onychophora (velvet worms) and Tardigrada (water bears), as well as to arthropods in general. Here we describe Diania cactiformis gen. et sp. nov. as an 'armoured' lobopodian from the Chengjiang fossil Lagerstätte (Cambrian Stage 3), Yunnan, southwestern China. Although sharing features with other typical lobopodians, it is remarkable for possessing robust and probably sclerotized appendages, with what appear to be articulated elements. In terms of limb morphology it is therefore closer to the arthropod condition, to our knowledge, than any lobopodian recorded until now. Phylogenetic analysis recovers it in a derived position, close to Arthropoda; thus, it seems to belong to a grade of organization close to the point of becoming a true arthropod. Further, D. cactiformis could imply that arthropodization (sclerotization of the limbs) preceded arthrodization (sclerotization of the body). Comparing our fossils with other lobopodian appendage morphologies--see Kerygmachela, Jianshanopodia and Megadictyon--reinforces the hypothesis that the group as a whole is paraphyletic, with different taxa expressing different grades of arthropodization. PMID:21350485

  6. Structural properties of the tubular appendage spinae from marine bacterium Roseobacter sp. strain YSCB

    PubMed Central

    Bernadac, A.; Wu, L.-F.; Santini, C.-L.; Vidaud, C.; Sturgis, J. N.; Menguy, N.; Bergam, P.; Nicoletti, C.; Xiao, T.

    2012-01-01

    Spinae are tubular surface appendages broadly found in Gram-negative bacteria. Little is known about their architecture, function or origin. Here, we report structural characterization of the spinae from marine bacteria Roseobacter sp. YSCB. Electron cryo-tomography revealed that a single filament winds into a hollow flared base with progressive change to a cylinder. Proteinase K unwound the spinae into proteolysis-resistant filaments. Thermal treatment ripped the spinae into ribbons that were melted with prolonged heating. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a dominant beta-structure of the spinae. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses showed three endothermic transformations at 50–85°C, 98°C and 123°C, respectively. The heating almost completely disintegrated the spinae, abolished the 98°C transition and destroyed the beta-structure. Infrared spectroscopy identified the amide I spectrum maximum at a position similar to that of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, the spinae distinguish from other bacterial appendages, e.g. flagella and stalks, in both the structure and mechanism of assembly. PMID:23230515

  7. Effect of Red Clover Isoflavones over Skin, Appendages, and Mucosal Status in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lipovac, Markus; Chedraui, Peter; Gruenhut, Christine; Gocan, Anca; Kurz, Christine; Neuber, Benedikt; Imhof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of red clover extract (RCE) isoflavones over subjective status of skin, appendages, and several mucosal sites. Method. Postmenopausal women (n = 109) were randomly assigned to receive either two daily capsules of the active compound (80 mg RCE, Group A) or placebo of equal appearance (Group B) for a 90-day period. After a washout period of 7 days, medication was crossed over and taken for 90 days more. Subjective improvement of skin, appendages, and several mucosal site status was assessed for each studied group at 90 and 187 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In addition, libido, tiredness, and urinary, sleep, and mood complaints were also evaluated. Results. Women after RCE intervention (both groups) reported better subjective improvement of scalp hair and skin status, libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness. Improvement of urinary complaints, nail, body hair, and mucosa (oral, nasal, and ocular) status did not differ between treatment phases (intra- and intergroup). Overall satisfaction with treatment was reported higher after RCE intervention (both groups) as compared to placebo. Conclusion. RCE supplementation exerted a subject improvement of scalp hair and skin status as well as libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness in postmenopausal women. PMID:22135679

  8. Cis-regulatory programs in the development and evolution of vertebrate paired appendages.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Andrew R; Shubin, Neil H

    2016-09-01

    Differential gene expression is the core of development, mediating the genetic changes necessary for determining cell identity. The regulation of gene activity by cis-acting elements (e.g., enhancers) is a crucial mechanism for determining differential gene activity by precise control of gene expression in embryonic space and time. Modifications to regulatory regions can have profound impacts on phenotype, and therefore developmental and evolutionary biologists have increasingly focused on elucidating the transcriptional control of genes that build and pattern body plans. Here, we trace the evolutionary history of transcriptional control of three loci key to vertebrate appendage development (Fgf8, Shh, and HoxD/A). Within and across these regulatory modules, we find both complex and flexible regulation in contrast with more fixed enhancers that appear unchanged over vast timescales of vertebrate evolution. The transcriptional control of vertebrate appendage development was likely already incredibly complex in the common ancestor of fish, implying that subtle changes to regulatory networks were more likely responsible for alterations in phenotype rather than the de novo addition of whole regulatory domains. Finally, we discuss the dangers of relying on inter-species transgenesis when testing enhancer function, and call for more controlled regulatory swap experiments when inferring the evolutionary history of enhancer elements. PMID:26783722

  9. Gene signatures of postoperative atrial fibrillation in atrial tissue after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in patients receiving β-blockers

    PubMed Central

    Kertai, Miklos D.; Qi, Wenjing; Li, Yi-Ju; Lombard, Frederick W.; Liu, Yutao; Smith, Michael. P.; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Newman, Mark F.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Podgoreanu, Mihai V.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial tissue gene expression profiling may help to determine how differentially expressed genes in the human atrium before cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are related to subsequent biologic pathway activation patterns, and whether specific expression profiles are associated with an increased risk for postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) or altered response to β-blocker (BB) therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Right atrial appendage (RAA) samples were collected from 45 patients who were receiving perioperative BB treatment, and underwent CABG surgery. The isolated RNA samples were used for microarray gene expression analysis, to identify probes that were expressed differently in patients with and without postoperative AF. Gene expression analysis was performed to identify probes that were expressed differently in patients with and without postoperative AF. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed to determine how sets of genes might be systematically altered in patients with postoperative AF. Of the 45 patients studied, genomic DNA from 42 patients was used for target sequencing of 66 candidate genes potentially associated with AF, and 2,144 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. We then performed expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis to determine the correlation between SNPs identified in the genotyped patients, and RAA expression. Probes that met a false discovery rate < 0.25 were selected for eQTL analysis. Of the 17,678 gene expression probes analyzed, 2 probes met our prespecified significance threshold of false discovery rate < 0.25. The most significant probe corresponded to vesicular overexpressed in cancer – prosurvival protein 1 gene (VOPP1; 1.83 fold change; P = 3.47 × 10−7), and was up-regulated in patients with postoperative AF, whereas the second most significant probe, which corresponded to the LOC389286 gene (0.49 fold change; P = 1.54 × 10−5), was down-regulated in patients

  10. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsett, Mark; Hamilton, Douglas; Lemery, Jay; Polk, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible scenario of an astronaut having Atrial Fibrillation during a Mars Mission. In the case review the presentation asks several questions about the alternatives for treatment, medications and the ramifications of the decisions.

  11. [New antiarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Drici, M-D

    2009-12-01

    The development of new antiarrhythmic drugs is mainly aimed to treat atrial fibrillation, because of its prevalence and major consequences in terms cerebral vascular thrombosis. Specific blockade of I(Na) et I(K), even if efficacious, have previously shown to be proarrhythmogenic, with a global impairment of the cardiac patient's outcome. This lead to the development of new drugs, selectively targeting atrial currents such as I(Kur) ou I(KAch). The efficacy of amiodarone in treatment of atrial fibrillation has also yielded a whole array of new antiarrhythmic drugs targeting both these atrial currents but also sharing amiodarone pharmacodynamics properties. This renders the Vaughan-Williams classification ill-adapted for such drugs.

  12. [Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Schlitt, Axel; Kamke, Wolfram; Guha, Manju; Haberecht, Olaf; Völler, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The course of cardiac rehabilitation is often altered due to episodes of paroxysmal, predominantly postoperative atrial fibrillation. In symptomatic patients, a TEE-guided cardioversion - preferential DC shock - is indicated. In patients with persistent / permanent atrial fibrillation, a heart rate up to 110 / min and 170 / min at rest and during physical activity should, respectively, be tolerated. Therefore, training should not be quitted by heart rate but rather by load. The antithrombotic management is in addition a great task in treating patients with atrial fibrillation. With the exception of patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc-Score < 1, oral anticoagulation is indicated. Atrial fibrillation has little impact on social aspects, whereas the underlying heart disease and drug treatment (oral anticoagulation) has an important impact.

  13. Atrial conduction delay predicts atrial fibrillation in paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia patients after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Xin; Rong, Bing; Zhu, Qing; Zheng, Zhaotong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could predict atrial fibrillation (AF) for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) patients after successful treatment by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Echocardiography examination was performed on 524 consecutive PSVT patients (15 patients were excluded). Left atrial dimension, right atrial diameter and intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were measured before ablation. Patients were divided into group A (n = 32): occurrence of AF after the ablation and group B (n = 477): remained in sinus rhythm during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to estimate the predictive value of intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay. Both intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were higher in group A than in group B (4.79 ± 0.30 msec vs. 4.56 ± 0.32 msec; 21.98 ± 1.32 msec vs. 20.01 ± 1.33; p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that intra- and inter-atrial conduction were significant influential factors for the occurrence of AF (odds ratio [OR] = 13.577, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.469-48.914; OR = 2.569, 95% CI, 1.909-3.459, p < 0.05). The ROC cure analysis revealed that intra-atrial conduction delay ≥ 4.45 msec and inter-atrial conduction delay ≥ 20.65 were the most optimal cut-off value for predicting AF in PSVT patients after RFCA. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could effectively predict AF in post-ablation PSVT patients.

  14. Serum Soluble Semaphorin 4D is Associated with Left Atrial Diameter in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Li; You, Tao; Chen, Jianchang; Xu, Weiting; Jiao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum soluble semaphorin 4D (sSema4D) in patients with atrial fibrillation and to investigate the relationship of serum sSema4D with left atrial diameter (LAD). Material/Methods We studied a total of 113 patients who were subdivided into paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal (included persistent and permanent) atrial fibrillation groups, respectively. Another 55 subjects without atrial fibrillation were enrolled as the healthy control group. Serum levels of soluble semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) were measured in all subjects using the enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay method. We also evaluated the coagulation parameters and left atrial diameters. Results Patients with paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation had significantly higher sSema4D level compared with controls (8.50±2.19 ng/mL and 9.30±2.28 ng/mL vs. 6.56±1.27 ng/ml, P<0.05). Serum sSema4D concentrations were elevated in patients with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation compared to those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P<0.001). The level of sSema4D was positively correlated with LAD (r=0.606, P<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that serum sSema4D, LAD, male sex, heart rate, hypertension, and coronary artery disease were associated with atrial fibrillation (P<0.05). Conclusions Serum sSema4D levels are increased in patients with atrial fibrillation and are independently associated with atrial remodeling. PMID:26417899

  15. Multifocal atrial tachycardia caused by risperidone.

    PubMed

    Oner, Taliha; Akdeniz, Celal; Adaletli, Hilal

    2016-01-15

    Risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic drug, is one of the most frequently used atypical neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of symptoms of behavioral disorders seen in autism. Although various cardiovascular side effects have been reported with risperidone, to our knowledge, it has not yet been reported that it can also result in multifocal atrial tachycardia. Based on the case reported herein, our aim is to bring awareness that risperidone may cause multifocal atrial tachycardia.

  16. Atrial fibrillation precipitated by tyramine containing foods.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, L H; Carron, D B

    1987-01-01

    Episodes of atrial fibrillation that occurred after meals developed in a 60 year old man with a history of ischaemic heart disease. The attacks were precipitated by precursors and metabolites of tyramine and tyramine containing foods and drinks, in the absence of monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The patient has remained free of atrial fibrillation for the past twelve months on a diet that does not contain tyramine. PMID:3814458

  17. Differential Expression Levels of Integrin α6 Enable the Selective Identification and Isolation of Atrial and Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wiencierz, Anne Maria; Kernbach, Manuel; Ecklebe, Josephine; Monnerat, Gustavo; Tomiuk, Stefan; Raulf, Alexandra; Christalla, Peter; Malan, Daniela; Hesse, Michael; Bosio, Andreas; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Eckardt, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Central questions such as cardiomyocyte subtype emergence during cardiogenesis or the availability of cardiomyocyte subtypes for cell replacement therapy require selective identification and purification of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes. However, current methodologies do not allow for a transgene-free selective isolation of atrial or ventricular cardiomyocytes due to the lack of subtype specific cell surface markers. Methods and Results In order to develop cell surface marker-based isolation procedures for cardiomyocyte subtypes, we performed an antibody-based screening on embryonic mouse hearts. Our data indicate that atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized by differential expression of integrin α6 (ITGA6) throughout development and in the adult heart. We discovered that the expression level of this surface marker correlates with the intracellular subtype-specific expression of MLC-2a and MLC-2v on the single cell level and thereby enables the discrimination of cardiomyocyte subtypes by flow cytometry. Based on the differential expression of ITGA6 in atria and ventricles during cardiogenesis, we developed purification protocols for atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse hearts. Atrial and ventricular identities of sorted cells were confirmed by expression profiling and patch clamp analysis. Conclusion Here, we introduce a non-genetic, antibody-based approach to specifically isolate highly pure and viable atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse hearts of various developmental stages. This will facilitate in-depth characterization of the individual cellular subsets and support translational research applications. PMID:26618511

  18. [Radiofrequency transcatheter ablation in atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Morales Hernández, J A

    2000-01-01

    Incessant atrial tachycardia is an infrequent arrhythmia. Specially difficult to treat medically. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has been used successfully to cure a variety of supraventricular tachycardias. The purpose of this work is to report our initial experience in the treatment of atrial tachycardia. Ten patients, mean age 28.7 +/- 15 year with conventional drug-resistant symptomatic atrial tachycardia were treated with selective ablation of the focus using radiofrequency energy. It was found an abnormal automaticity in 10 tachycardias and in only one patient intra-atrial reentrant was supported. Radiofrequency energy was successful in 10 of 11 tachycardias with a mean of 9.3 +/- 6.8 applications using the technique of local atrial electrogram activation time with a mean value of -54 +/- -31 milliseconds at the successful ablation sites. No complications were observed and one patient had an early clinical recurrence. All patients with successful ablation are symptom-free, in sinus rhythm and without antiarrhythmic medications after 1 to 28 months of follow-up. Our initial experience support that radiofrequency catheter ablation is a safe and effective therapeutic option for incessant atrial tachycardia. PMID:10855411

  19. Antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation: new insights.

    PubMed

    Le Heuzey, J Y

    2012-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation are quickly increasing, mainly due to the ageing of the population. Atrial fibrillation is, to date, a problem of public health. Atrial fibrillation is associated to a five-fold risk of stroke, which may be identified by score risks, such as CHADS(2) score. The classical antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation is based on vitamin K antagonists. Trials made in the 90's have clearly shown that vitamin K antagonists were able to decrease stroke risk by about 60%. New oral anticoagulants are now available on the market to treat patients with atrial fibrillation. These drugs are dabigatran which has demonstrated an interest in the RE-LY trial. Two doses may be prescribed, 110 mg bid and 150 mg bid. Anti Xa have also demonstrated an interest : rivaroxaban in the ROCKET AF trial and apixaban in the AVERROES (versus aspirin) and ARISTOTLE trials. In the future these drugs will have a major place in the armamentarium used to treat patients with atrial fibrillation. In all these trials a decrease in intra cranial haemorrhages has been demonstrated. In the everyday practice it will be necessary to be very cautious in patients with impaired renal function, as all these drugs are eliminated by kidneys. PMID:23026665

  20. Selection on bristle length has the ability to drive the evolution of male abdominal appendages in the sepsid fly Themira biloba.

    PubMed

    Herath, B; Dochtermann, N A; Johnson, J I; Leonard, Z; Bowsher, J H

    2015-12-01

    Many exaggerated and novel traits are strongly influenced by sexual selection. Although sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary force, underlying genetic interactions can constrain evolutionary outcomes. The relative strength of selection vs. constraint has been a matter of debate for the evolution of male abdominal appendages in sepsid flies. These abdominal appendages are involved in courtship and mating, but their function has not been directly tested. We performed mate choice experiments to determine whether sexual selection acts on abdominal appendages in the sepsid Themira biloba. We tested whether appendage bristle length influenced successful insemination by surgically trimming the bristles. Females paired with males that had shortened bristles laid only unfertilized eggs, indicating that long bristles are necessary for successful insemination. We also tested whether the evolution of bristle length was constrained by phenotypic correlations with other traits. Analyses of phenotypic covariation indicated that bristle length was highly correlated with other abdominal appendage traits, but was not correlated with abdominal sternite size. Thus, abdominal appendages are not exaggerated traits like many sexual ornaments, but vary independently from body size. At the same time, strong correlations between bristle length and appendage length suggest that selection on bristle length is likely to result in a correlated increase in appendage length. Bristle length is under sexual selection in T. biloba and has the potential to evolve independently from abdomen size.

  1. Contained Ascending Aortic Rupture Disguised as a Right Atrial Mass

    PubMed Central

    Marzolino, Philip S.; Reynolds, Justin H.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Grigore, Alina M.

    2008-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography can incidentally detect cardiac masses. A right atrial mass has many possible causes, including metastatic extension from various solid organs, malignant melanoma, mediastinal cysts, hematoma, myxoma, lipoma, and artifact. Herein, we report our discovery of a right atrial mass during the initial intraoperative transesophageal echocardiographic examination of a patient who was undergoing repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm. The mass, with a smooth border and homogenous grayscale density, showed no flow during color-flow Doppler echocardiography. Further examination revealed tricuspid annular dilation and severe tricuspid insufficiency. When the mediastinum was opened, we found a large extracardiac hematoma along the right atrium within the pericardial space. These findings suggested an acute, contained rupture of the ascending aorta. After the hematoma was evacuated, imaging revealed complete resolution of the mass and reduction of tricuspid insufficiency. The patient underwent the scheduled aortic repair and was discharged from the hospital in good condition. In order to ensure an accurate diagnosis and to gain appropriate clinical guidance that can lead to a successful outcome, we suggest performing a thorough echocardiographic investigation to identify any such mass before planned surgery proceeds. PMID:18427651

  2. Present concepts in management of atrial fibrillation: From drug therapy to ablation

    PubMed Central

    Forleo, Giovanni B; Santini, Luca; Romeo, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) management requires knowledge of its pattern of presentation, underlying conditions, and decisions about restoration and maintenance of sinus rhythm, control of the ventricular rate, and anti-thrombotic therapy. Maintenance of sinus rhythm is a desirable goal in AF patients because the prevention of recurrence may improve cardiac function, relieve symptoms and reduce the likelihood of adverse events. Anti-arrhythmic drug therapy is the first-line treatment for patients with paroxysmal and persistent AF based on current guidelines. However, currently used drugs have limited efficacy and cause cardiac and extracardiac toxicity. Thus, there is a continued need to develop new drugs, device and ablative approaches to rhythm management. Additionally, simpler and safer stroke prevention regimens are needed for AF patients on life-long anticoagulation, including occlusion of the left atrial appendage. The results of the Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulant Therapy study are encouraging in these settings. Knowledge on the pathophysiology of AF is rapidly expanding and identification of focally localized triggers has led to the development of new treatment options for this arrhythmia. Conversely, the clinical decision whether to restore and maintain sinus rhythm or simply control the ventricular rate has remained a matter of intense debate. In the minority of patients in whom AF cannot be adequately managed by pharmacological therapy, the most appropriate type of non-pharmacological therapy must be selected on an individualized basis. Curative treatment of AF with catheter ablation is now a legitimate option for a large number of patients. The evolution of hybrid therapy, in which two or more different strategies are employed in the same patient, may be an effective approach to management of AF. In any case, planning a treatment regimen for AF should include evaluation of the risks inherent in the use of various drugs as well as more

  3. Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atrial Fibrosis in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation.

    PubMed

    Spragg, David D; Khurram, Irfan; Nazarian, Saman

    2013-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) likely involves a complex interplay between triggering activity, usually from pulmonary vein foci, and maintenance of the arrhythmia by an arrhythmogenic substrate. Both components of AF, triggers and substrate have been linked to atrial fibrosis and attendant changes in atrial electrophysiology. Recently, there has been a growing use of imaging modalities, particularly cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), to quantify the burden of atrial fibrosis and scar in patients either undergoing AF ablation, or who have recently had the procedure. How to use the CMR derived data is still an open area of investigation. The aim of this article is to summarise what is known as atrial fibrosis, as assessed by traditional catheter-based techniques and newer imaging approaches, and to report on novel efforts from our group to advance the use of CMR in AF ablation patients.

  4. Outcomes after ablation for typical atrial flutter (from the Loire Valley Atrial Fibrillation Project).

    PubMed

    Clementy, Nicolas; Desprets, Laurent; Pierre, Bertrand; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Simeon, Edouard; Brunet-Bernard, Anne; Babuty, Dominique; Fauchier, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Similar predisposing factors are found in most types of atrial arrhythmias. The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) among patients with atrial flutter is high, suggesting similar outcomes in patients with those arrhythmias. We sought to investigate the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with AF and/or atrial flutter with contemporary management using radiofrequency ablation. In an academic institution, we retrospectively examined the clinical course of 8,962 consecutive patients admitted to our department with a diagnosis of AF and/or atrial flutter. After a median follow-up of 934 ± 1,134 days, 1,155 deaths and 715 stroke and/thromboembolic (TE) events were recorded. Patients with atrial flutter undergoing cavotricuspid isthmus ablation (n = 875, 37% with a history of AF) had a better survival rate than other patients (hazard ratio [HR] 0.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25 to 0.49, p <0.0001). Using Cox proportional hazards model and propensity score model, after adjustment for main other confounders, ablation for atrial flutter was significantly associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.84, p = 0.006) and stroke and/or TE events (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.92, p = 0.02). After ablation, there was no significant difference in the risk of TE between patients with a history of AF and those with atrial flutter alone (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.41 to 1.67, p = 0.59). In conclusion, in patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias, those with atrial flutter with contemporary management who undergo cavotricuspid isthmus radiofrequency ablation independently have a lower risk of stroke and/or TE events and death of any cause, whether a history of AF is present or not.

  5. Determinants of Left Atrial Volume in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hochgruber, Thomas; Krisai, Philipp; Zimmermann, Andreas J.; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Pumpol, Katrin; Kessel-Schaefer, Arnheid; Stephan, Frank-Peter; Handschin, Nadja; Sticherling, Christian; Osswald, Stefan; Kaufmann, Beat A.; Paré, Guillaume; Kühne, Michael; Conen, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Left atrial (LA) enlargement is an important risk factor for incident stroke and a key determinant for the success of rhythm control strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, factors associated with LA volume in AF patients remain poorly understood. Methods Patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF were enrolled in this study. Real time 3-D echocardiography was performed in all participants and analyzed offline in a standardized manner. We performed stepwise backward linear regression analyses using a broad set of clinical parameters to determine independent correlates for 3-D LA volume. Results We included 210 patients (70.9% male, mean age 61±11years). Paroxysmal and persistent AF were present in 95 (45%) and 115 (55%) patients, respectively. Overall, 115 (55%) had hypertension, 11 (5%) had diabetes, and 18 (9%) had ischemic heart disease. Mean indexed LA volume was 36±12ml/m2. In multivariable models, significant associations were found for female sex (β coefficient -10.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) -17.85;-3.16), p = 0.0053), undergoing cardioversion (β 11.95 (CI 5.15; 18.74), p = 0.0006), diabetes (β 14.23 (CI 2.36; 26.10), p = 0.019), body surface area (BSA) (β 34.21 (CI 19.30; 49.12), p<0.0001), glomerular filtration rate (β -0.21 (CI -0.36; -0.06), p = 0.0064) and plasma levels of NT-pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) (β 6.79 (CI 4.05; 9.52), p<0.0001), but not age (p = 0.59) or hypertension (p = 0.42). Our final model explained 52% of the LA volume variability. Conclusions In patients with AF, the most important correlates with LA volume are sex, BSA, diabetes, renal function and NT-proBNP, but not age or hypertension. These results may help to refine rhythm control strategies in AF patients. PMID:27701468

  6. Atrial Ectopy as a Predictor of Incident Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Dewland, Thomas A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Mandyam, Mala C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Gottdiener, John S.; Marcus, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) prediction models have unclear clinical utility given the absence of AF prevention therapies and the immutability of many risk factors. Premature atrial contractions (PACs) play a critical role in AF pathogenesis and may be modifiable. Objective To investigate whether PAC count improves model performance for AF risk. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 4 U.S. communities. Patients A random subset of 1260 adults without prevalent AF enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study between 1989 and 1990. Measurements The PAC count was quantified by 24-hour electrocardiography. Participants were followed for the diagnosis of incident AF or death. The Framingham AF risk algorithm was used as the comparator prediction model. Results In adjusted analyses, doubling the hourly PAC count was associated with a significant increase in AF risk (hazard ratio, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.13 to 1.22]; P < 0.001) and overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.06 [CI, 1.03 to 1.09]; P < 0.001). Compared with the Framingham model, PAC count alone resulted in similar AF risk discrimination at 5 and 10 years of follow-up and superior risk discrimination at 15 years. The addition of PAC count to the Framingham model resulted in significant 10-year AF risk discrimination improvement (c-statistic, 0.65 vs. 0.72; P < 0.001), net reclassification improvement (23.2% [CI, 12.8% to 33.6%]; P < 0.001), and integrated discrimination improvement (5.6% [CI, 4.2% to 7.0%]; P < 0.001). The specificity for predicting AF at 15 years exceeded 90% for PAC counts more than 32 beats/h. Limitation This study does not establish a causal link between PACs and AF. Conclusion The addition of PAC count to a validated AF risk algorithm provides superior AF risk discrimination and significantly improves risk reclassification. Further study is needed to determine whether PAC modification can prospectively reduce AF risk. Primary Funding Source American Heart Association, Joseph Drown Foundation

  7. Development of segments and appendages in embryos of the desert scorpion Paruroctonus mesaensis (Scorpiones: Vaejovidae).

    PubMed

    Farley, R D

    2001-10-01

    The scanning electron microscope was used to study the changing features of scorpion embryos from the blastula through early stages in the development of appendages. The earliest scorpion fossils (Silurian period) have structures more advanced than the embryos herein, so the possibility is considered that these embryos still retain and display some features indicative of evolutionary patterns in adult pre-Silurian ancestors. The blastodisc stage is followed by a knob-like germinal center that gives rise to most of the embryo body. The germinal center elongates on the ventral surface of the spherical yolk mass. The broad cephalic lobe is first delineated from the following pedipalpal segment. The limbbuds for the pedipalps and anterior walking legs appear, as additional segments are added at a growth zone at the rear of the embryo body. Initially, in the cephalic lobe there are no limbbuds; then the cheliceral buds emerge from the posterior part of the lobe. The stomodeum appears first in the anterior half of the cephalic lobe, but an oral groove forms and the mouth is displaced posteriorly within the groove. This repositioning allows space anteriorly for invagination (semilunar grooves) of epithelium for the brain and medial eyes. The mouth is directed ventrally in all stages of this study. The widespread chelicerae are initially posterior to the mouth, but later move anterior and dorsal to it. Small limbbud bulges on mesosomal segments disappear later and never become protruding appendages. Metasomal segments are produced free from the yolk surface in a ventral flexure beneath the embryo body. The telson starts as two spherical lobes, but later elongates and tapers distally, not yet developing the sharp sting (aculeus) seen in Silurian and all subsequent scorpions. The walking legs are digitigrade, as in most fossil aquatic scorpions. Segments are delineated in the appendages; the chelicerae and pedipalps are divided distally for chela (claw) formation. Bilateral

  8. A Conserved MicroRNA Regulatory Circuit Is Differentially Controlled during Limb/Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    King, Benjamin L.; Yin, Viravuth P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although regenerative capacity is evident throughout the animal kingdom, it is not equally distributed throughout evolution. For instance, complex limb/appendage regeneration is muted in mammals but enhanced in amphibians and teleosts. The defining characteristic of limb/appendage regenerative systems is the formation of a dedifferentiated tissue, termed blastema, which serves as the progenitor reservoir for regenerating tissues. In order to identify a genetic signature that accompanies blastema formation, we employ next-generation sequencing to identify shared, differentially regulated mRNAs and noncoding RNAs in three different, highly regenerative animal systems: zebrafish caudal fins, bichir pectoral fins and axolotl forelimbs. Results These studies identified a core group of 5 microRNAs (miRNAs) that were commonly upregulated and 5 miRNAs that were commonly downregulated, as well as 4 novel tRNAs fragments with sequences conserved with humans. To understand the potential function of these miRNAs, we built a network of 1,550 commonly differentially expressed mRNAs that had functional relationships to 11 orthologous blastema-associated genes. As miR-21 was the most highly upregulated and most highly expressed miRNA in all three models, we validated the expression of known target genes, including the tumor suppressor, pdcd4, and TGFβ receptor subunit, tgfbr2 and novel putative target genes such as the anti-apoptotic factor, bcl2l13, Choline kinase alpha, chka and the regulator of G-protein signaling, rgs5. Conclusions Our extensive analysis of RNA-seq transcriptome profiling studies in three regenerative animal models, that diverged in evolution ~420 million years ago, reveals a common miRNA-regulated genetic network of blastema genes. These comparative studies extend our current understanding of limb/appendage regeneration by identifying previously unassociated blastema genes and the extensive regulation by miRNAs, which could serve as a foundation

  9. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (AF) ... the lungs and body. This can lead to signs and symptoms, such as: Palpitations (feelings that your ...

  10. Atrial Septal Defects – Clinical Manifestations, Echo Assessment, and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Seth S; Shapiro, Edward P; Mukherjee, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital abnormality that occurs in the form of ostium secundum, ostium primum, sinus venosus, and rarely, coronary sinus defects. Pathophysiologic consequences of ASDs typically begin in adulthood, and include arrhythmia, paradoxical embolism, cerebral abscess, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular failure. Two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic echocardiography with Doppler is a central aspect of the evaluation. This noninvasive imaging modality often establishes the diagnosis and provides critical information guiding intervention. A comprehensive echocardiogram includes evaluation of anatomical ASD characteristics, flow direction, associated abnormalities (eg, anomalous pulmonary veins), right ventricular anatomy and function, pulmonary pressures, and the pulmonary/systemic flow ratio. The primary indication for ASD closure is right heart volume overload, whether symptoms are present or not. ASD closure may also be reasonable in other contexts, such as paradoxical embolism. ASD type and local clinical expertise guide choice of a percutaneous versus surgical approach to ASD closure. PMID:25861226

  11. Effect of phenylephrine infusion on atrial electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, J. W.; Basta, M.; Fletcher, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of changes in autonomic tone induced by phenylephrine infusion on atrial refractoriness and conduction. DESIGN: Left and right atrial electrophysiological properties were measured before and after a constant phenylephrine infusion designed to increase sinus cycle length by 25%. SUBJECTS: 20 patients, aged 53 (SD 6) years, undergoing electrophysiological study for investigation of idiopathic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (seven patients) or for routine follow up after successful catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (13 patients). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in left and right atrial effective refractory periods, atrial activation times, and frequency of induction of atrial fibrillation. RESULTS: Phenylephrine (mean dose 69 (SD 18) mg/min) increased mean blood pressure by 22 (12) mm Hg (range 7 to 44) and lengthened sinus cycle length by 223 (94) ms (20 to 430). Left atrial effective refractory period lengthened following phenylephrine infusion from 250 (25) to 264 (21) ms (P < 0.001) but there was no significant change in right atrial effective refractory period: 200 (20) v 206 (29), P = 0.11. There was a significant relation between the effect of phenylephrine on sinus cycle length and on right atrial refractoriness (r = 0.6, P = 0.005) with shortening of right atrial refractoriness in patients with the greatest prolongation in sinus cycle length. During phenylephrine infusion, the right atrial stimulus to left atrial activation time at the basic pacing cycle length of 600 ms was unchanged, at 130 (18) v 131 (17) ms, but activation delay with a premature extrastimulus increased: 212 (28) v 227 (38) ms, P = 0.002. Atrial fibrillation was induced by two of 58 refractory period measurements at baseline and by 12 of 61 measurements during phenylephrine infusion (P < 0.01). Phenylephrine increased the difference between left and right atrial refractory periods by 22.8 (19.4) ms in the five patients with induced atrial

  12. The chemosensory appendage proteome of Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) reveals putative odorant-binding and other chemoreception-related proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic analyses were done on 2 chemosensory appendages of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Proteins in the fore tarsi, which contain the olfactory Haller's organ, and in the palps, that include gustatory sensilla, were compared with proteins in the third tarsi. Also, male and female tick...

  13. Three-dimensionally preserved minute larva of a great-appendage arthropod from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Melzer, Roland R.; Haug, Joachim T.; Haug, Carolin; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Hörnig, Marie K.; He, Yu-yang; Hou, Xian-guang

    2016-05-01

    A three-dimensionally preserved 2-mm-long larva of the arthropod Leanchoilia illecebrosa from the 520-million-year-old early Cambrian Chengjiang biota of China represents the first evidence, to our knowledge, of such an early developmental stage in a short-great-appendage (SGA) arthropod. The larva possesses a pair of three-fingered great appendages, a hypostome, and four pairs of well-developed biramous appendages. More posteriorly, a series of rudimentary limb Anlagen revealed by X-ray microcomputed tomography shows a gradient of decreasing differentiation toward the rear. This, and postembryonic segment addition at the putative growth zone, are features of late-stage metanauplii of eucrustaceans. L. illecebrosa and other SGA arthropods, however, are considered representative of early chelicerates or part of the stem lineage of all euarthropods. The larva of an early Cambrian SGA arthropod with a small number of anterior segments and their respective appendages suggests that posthatching segment addition occurred in the ancestor of Euarthropoda.

  14. A Case of Giant Right Atrial Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Ravindra S; Tiwari, Ashish; Suresh, P V; Raj, Vimal; Kaushik, Pradeepkumar

    2016-07-01

    Giant right atrial aneurysm is a rare entity in infants and children. It needs to be distinguished from an atrial diverticulum, which can have similar presentation. Generally, an incidental finding in children, it can present with varied symptoms. We report a case of a giant right atrial aneurysm in an asymptomatic child with a large clot in the dilated right atrium, who underwent successful resection of the atrial aneurysm. PMID:26884450

  15. The design and development of a spacecraft appendage tie down mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygren, W. D.; Head, R.

    1985-01-01

    The design and evolution is described of a spacecraft Appendage Tie Down Mechanism (ATDM). Particular emphasis is paid to the mechanical aspects of using dry lubricants to increase the efficiency of acme threads and worm gearing. The ATDM consists of five major components. These are a dc torque motor, a worm gear speed reducer, the tension bolt (or T-bolt), nut capture and centering jaws and the capture nut. In addition, there are several minor components such as limit switch assemblies and an antibackdrive mechanism which couples the drive motor to the worm shaft. A development model of the ATDM in various configurations was under test for some time. In its latest version, it has successfully completed thermal vacuum testing, vibration testing, and extended life testing.

  16. Unusual anal fin in a Devonian jawless vertebrate reveals complex origins of paired appendages.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Robert S; Gabbott, Sarah E; Purnell, M A

    2013-06-23

    Jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) have undergone radical anatomical and developmental changes in comparison with their jawless cousins (cyclostomes). Key among these is paired appendages (fins, legs and wings), which first evolved at some point on the gnathostome stem. The anatomy of fossil stem gnathostomes is, therefore, fundamental to our understanding of the nature and timing of the origin of this complex innovation. Here, we show that Euphanerops, a fossil jawless fish from the Devonian, possessed paired anal-fin radials, but no pectoral or pelvic fins. This unique condition occurs at an early stage on the stem-gnathostome lineage. This condition, and comparison with the varied condition of paired fins in other ostracoderms, indicates that there was a large amount of developmental plasticity during this episode-rather than a gradual evolution of this complex feature. Apparently, a number of different clades were exploring morphospace or undergoing multiple losses.

  17. A shared role for sonic hedgehog signalling in patterning chondrichthyan gill arch appendages and tetrapod limbs.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Hall, Brian K

    2016-04-15

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays and holocephalans) possess paired appendages that project laterally from their gill arches, known as branchial rays. This led Carl Gegenbaur to propose that paired fins (and hence tetrapod limbs) originally evolved via transformation of gill arches. Tetrapod limbs are patterned by asonic hedgehog(Shh)-expressing signalling centre known as the zone of polarising activity, which establishes the anteroposterior axis of the limb bud and maintains proliferative expansion of limb endoskeletal progenitors. Here, we use loss-of-function, label-retention and fate-mapping approaches in the little skate to demonstrate that Shh secretion from a signalling centre in the developing gill arches establishes gill arch anteroposterior polarity and maintains the proliferative expansion of branchial ray endoskeletal progenitor cells. These findings highlight striking parallels in the axial patterning mechanisms employed by chondrichthyan branchial rays and paired fins/limbs, and provide mechanistic insight into the anatomical foundation of Gegenbaur's gill arch hypothesis. PMID:27095494

  18. Unusual anal fin in a Devonian jawless vertebrate reveals complex origins of paired appendages

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Robert S.; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Purnell, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) have undergone radical anatomical and developmental changes in comparison with their jawless cousins (cyclostomes). Key among these is paired appendages (fins, legs and wings), which first evolved at some point on the gnathostome stem. The anatomy of fossil stem gnathostomes is, therefore, fundamental to our understanding of the nature and timing of the origin of this complex innovation. Here, we show that Euphanerops, a fossil jawless fish from the Devonian, possessed paired anal-fin radials, but no pectoral or pelvic fins. This unique condition occurs at an early stage on the stem-gnathostome lineage. This condition, and comparison with the varied condition of paired fins in other ostracoderms, indicates that there was a large amount of developmental plasticity during this episode—rather than a gradual evolution of this complex feature. Apparently, a number of different clades were exploring morphospace or undergoing multiple losses. PMID:23576777

  19. Hereditary hair loss and the ancient signaling pathways that regulate ectodermal appendage formation.

    PubMed

    Van Raamsdonk, C D

    2009-10-01

    All epidermal appendages, including hair, teeth, and nails, begin as a thickening of the ectoderm, called a placode. The placode arises from a primary induction signal that is sent from the underlying mesenchyme to the overlying epidermis. In mammals, the precise arrangement of hair follicles in the skin is due to the amount and distribution of signals that promote and inhibit hair placode formation. Continued development of a hair follicle after placode formation requires a complex cross-talk between the mesenchyme and epidermis. Here, I will review recent studies in humans and mice that have increased our understanding of the role of these signaling pathways in normal development and in hereditary hair loss syndromes. The study of normal hair development may suggest ways to restore or eliminate hair and might identify possible targets for the therapy of basal cell carcinoma, a cancer which strongly resembles embryonic hair follicles.

  20. Displacement of Amplatzer septal occluder in a patient with atrial septal defects and an atrial septal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Oda, Takeshi; Kato, Seiya; Suda, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects has become more common because of its high success rate and low morbidity; however, this treatment for patients with atrial septal aneurysms is still challenging. PMID:27434107

  1. Evidence for a further stimulation of atrial natriuretic factor release by atrial pacing in patients with mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Malatino, L S; Stancanelli, B; Greco, G; Polizzi, G; Leonardi, C; Russo, G; Tamburino, C; Greco, G; Giuffrida, G; Tamburino, G

    1989-12-01

    To investigate the release of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in mitral stenosis and the effect of an increased atrial contraction frequency on atrial distension and ANF secretion, we studied 14 patients [New York Heart Association (NYHA) grades II-III] in sinus rhythm, undergoing cardiac catheterization for mitral stenosis. Echocardiographic tracings, repeat determinations of mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure and blood samples from the pulmonary artery for ANF measurements were taken at baseline, during atrial pacing (125 beats/min for 5 min) and 5 min after pacing. After pacing, ANF levels rose markedly with a parallel increase in mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure and left atrial size. These data indicate that atrial pacing is capable of further stimulating ANF release, even in patients with elevated baseline ANF and left atrial pressure and an increased left atrial dimension. PMID:2534411

  2. Peripheral Axons of the Adult Zebrafish Maxillary Barbel Extensively Remyelinate During Sensory Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alex C.; Mark, Tiffany E.; Hogan, Ann K.; Topczewski, Jacek; LeClair, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    Myelination is a cellular adaptation allowing rapid conduction along axons. We have investigated peripheral axons of the zebrafish maxillary barbel (ZMB), an optically clear sensory appendage. Each barbel carries taste buds, solitary chemosensory cells, and epithelial nerve endings, all of which regenerate after amputation (LeClair and Topczewski [2010] PLoS One 5:e8737). The ZMB contains axons from the facial nerve; however, myelination within the barbel itself has not been established. Transcripts of myelin basic protein (mbp) are expressed in normal and regenerating adult barbels, indicating activity in both maintenance and repair. Myelin was confirmed in situ by using toluidine blue, an anti-MBP antibody, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adult ZMB contains ~180 small-diameter axons (<2 μm), approximately 60% of which are myelinated. Developmental myelination was observed via whole-mount immunohistochemistry 4-6 weeks postfertilization, showing myelin sheaths lagging behind growing axons. Early-regenerating axons (10 days postsurgery), having no or few myelin layers, were disorganized within a fibroblast-rich collagenous scar. Twenty-eight days postsurgery, barbel axons had grown out several millimeters and were organized with compact myelin sheaths. Fiber types and axon areas were similar between normal and regenerated tissue; within 4 weeks, regenerating axons restored ~85% of normal myelin thickness. Regenerating barbels express multiple promyelinating transcription factors (sox10, oct6 = pou3f1; krox20a/b = egr2a/b) typical of Schwann cells. These observations extend our understanding of the zebrafish peripheral nervous system within a little-studied sensory appendage. The accessible ZMB provides a novel context for studying axon regeneration, Schwann cell migration, and remyelination in a model vertebrate. PMID:22592645

  3. On Dorsal Prothoracic Appendages in Treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae) and the Nature of Morphological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mikó, István; Friedrich, Frank; Yoder, Matthew J.; Hines, Heather M.; Deitz, Lewis L.; Bertone, Matthew A.; Seltmann, Katja C.; Wallace, Matthew S.; Deans, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    A spectacular hypothesis was published recently, which suggested that the “helmet” (a dorsal thoracic sclerite that obscures most of the body) of treehoppers (Insecta: Hemiptera: Membracidae) is connected to the 1st thoracic segment (T1; prothorax) via a jointed articulation and therefore was a true appendage. Furthermore, the “helmet” was interpreted to share multiple characteristics with wings, which in extant pterygote insects are present only on the 2nd (T2) and 3rd (T3) thoracic segments. In this context, the “helmet” could be considered an evolutionary novelty. Although multiple lines of morphological evidence putatively supported the “helmet”-wing homology, the relationship of the “helmet” to other thoracic sclerites and muscles remained unclear. Our observations of exemplar thoraces of 10 hemipteran families reveal multiple misinterpretations relevant to the “helmet”-wing homology hypothesis as originally conceived: 1) the “helmet” actually represents T1 (excluding the fore legs); 2) the “T1 tergum” is actually the anterior dorsal area of T2; 3) the putative articulation between the “helmet” and T1 is actually the articulation between T1 and T2. We conclude that there is no dorsal, articulated appendage on the membracid T1. Although the posterior, flattened, cuticular evagination (PFE) of the membracid T1 does share structural and genetic attributes with wings, the PFE is actually widely distributed across Hemiptera. Hence, the presence of this structure in Membracidae is not an evolutionary novelty for this clade. We discuss this new interpretation of the membracid T1 and the challenges of interpreting and representing morphological data more broadly. We acknowledge that the lack of data standards for morphology is a contributing factor to misinterpreted results and offer an example for how one can reduce ambiguity in morphology by referencing anatomical concepts in published ontologies. PMID:22272287

  4. Gross distortion of atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial relations associated with left juxtaposition of atrial appendages. Bizarre form of atrioventricular criss-cross.

    PubMed Central

    Coto, E O; Wilkinson, J L; Dickinson, D F; Rufilanchas, J J; Márquez, J

    1979-01-01

    Two pathological specimens are described in which a bizarre distortion of atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial relations existed. In both cases anterior and leftward displacement of the tricuspid valve coexisted with rightward displacement of the infundibular regions and semilunar valves. Abnormal expansion of the AV canal, possibly secondary to malrotation of the cardiac tube, is considered as a possible cause of the anomaly. One of the hearts showed severe subpulmonary stenosis produced by a valve-like structure which was well differentiated, with a complete annulus and chordae tendineae that inserted in a parachute-like fashion on the infundibular septum. The morphology of this structure was clearly different from that fo the fibrous tags described in other anomalies. Its origin is uncertain. These anomalies have important implications in relation to the nomenclature and classification of congenital heart malformations, and illustrate the value of recent modifications of the segmental approach. Images PMID:465217

  5. The architecture of the anterior appendage in the egg of the assassin bug, Zelus longipes (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Wolf, K W; Reid, W

    2000-01-01

    The eggshell of Zelus longipes, a Hemiptera species of the family Reduviidae (assassin bugs), has been studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The emphasis was on the architecture of an anterior appendage connected to the main eggshell of both ovarian and deposited eggs. The analysis of eggs fractured at various angles and levels reveals a relatively complex organization of this appendage. There is a cylindrical outer layer, the veil, of roughly the same diameter as, and continuous with, the main eggshell. At its anterior pole, the veil folds inwards and forms an hourglass-shaped tube that is attached through slender extensions to a curved plate oriented at right angles to the long axis of the egg and spanning the internal diameter of the veil. The plate is solid at the center, shows honeycomb-shaped perforations in its mid-section and contains a very delicate meshwork along its circumference. Underneath the plate lies a hollow cylinder oriented at right angles to the long axis of the egg and attached to the anterior plate of the egg, the operculum. The outer openings of aeropyles lie at the inner face of the veil and at its base. While the outer surface of the entire eggshell appears smooth, the inner face of the anterior appendage is highly and diversely sculptured. The eggs are deposited in batches of at least 15 and completely surrounded by viscous secretion. This substance does not encroach on the anterior appendage. The major function of this appendage may lie in the protection of the aeropyles and particularly in preventing their being clogged by the viscous material. PMID:18088938

  6. Atrial fibrillation from the pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Electrophysiologically, it is characterized by a high rate of asynchronous atrial cell depolarization causing a loss of atrial contractile function and irregular ventricular rates. For a long time, AF was considered as a pure functional disorder without any structural background. Only in recent years, have new mapping and imaging techniques identified atrial locations, which are very often involved in the initiation and maintenance of this supraventricular arrhythmia (i.e. the distal portion of the pulmonary veins and the surrounding atrial myocardium). Morphological analysis of these myocardial sites has demonstrated significant structural remodeling as well as paved the way for further knowledge of AF natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment. This architectural myocardial disarrangement is induced by the arrhythmia itself and the very frequently associated cardiovascular disorders. At the same time, the structural remodeling is also capable of sustaining AF, thereby creating a sort of pathogenetic vicious circle. This review focuses on current understanding about the structural and genetic bases of AF with reference to their classification, pathogenesis, and clinical implications. PMID:24462196

  7. Dedifferentiation of atrial cardiomyocytes as a result of chronic atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Ausma, J.; Wijffels, M.; van Eys, G.; Koide, M.; Ramaekers, F.; Allessie, M.; Borgers, M.

    1997-01-01

    Chronic atrial fibrillation was induced in goats by electrical pacing. After 9 to 23 weeks of sustained atrial fibrillation, the morphology of the atrial structures was examined. The majority of the cardiomyocytes exhibited marked changes in their cellular substructures, with the replacement of sarcomeres by glycogen as the main characteristic. Using immuno-histochemical staining procedures, we assessed the expression and organization of contractile and cytoskeletal proteins in these cases and compared them with the expression and organization of these proteins in normal atria. Part of the atrial cardiomyocytes acquired a dedifferentiated phenotype, as deduced from the re-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, the disappearance of cardiotin, and the staining patterns of titin, which resembled those of embryonic cardiomyocytes. From these results we conclude that chronic atrial fibrillation induces myocardial dedifferentiation. This model of chronic atrial fibrillation in goats offers the possibility to study the time course of changes in cardiac structure during sustained atrial fibrillation and after cardioversion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9327732

  8. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans: insight from atrial pacing.

    PubMed

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    2012-04-15

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min(−1)) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P < 0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P < 0.01). Atrial pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) at rest and during ATP infusion (P < 0.05), whereas MAP remained unchanged during exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P < 0.05) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (P < 0.05) in all conditions, whereas it did not affect pulmonary mean arterial pressure. Atrial pacing lowered the left ventricular contractility index (dP/dt) (P < 0.05) in all conditions and plasma noradrenaline levels at rest (P < 0.05), but not during exercise and ATP infusion. These results demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output. PMID:22351638

  9. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans: insight from atrial pacing

    PubMed Central

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    2012-01-01

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min−1) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P < 0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min−1, cardiac output did not change in any of the three conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P < 0.01). Atrial pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) at rest and during ATP infusion (P < 0.05), whereas MAP remained unchanged during exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P < 0.05) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (P < 0.05) in all conditions, whereas it did not affect pulmonary mean arterial pressure. Atrial pacing lowered the left ventricular contractility index (dP/dt) (P < 0.05) in all conditions and plasma noradrenaline levels at rest (P < 0.05), but not during exercise and ATP infusion. These results demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output. PMID:22351638

  10. Analysis of left atrial respiratory and cardiac motion for cardiac ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R.; Johnson, S. B.; Lehmann, H. I.; Robb, R. A.; Packer, D. L.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation therapy is often guided by models built from preoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. One of the challenges in guiding a procedure from a preoperative model is properly synching the preoperative models with cardiac and respiratory motion through computational motion models. In this paper, we describe a methodology for evaluating cardiac and respiratory motion in the left atrium and pulmonary veins of a beating canine heart. Cardiac catheters were used to place metal clips within and near the pulmonary veins and left atrial appendage under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance and a contrast-enhanced, 64-slice multidetector CT scan was collected with the clips in place. Each clip was segmented from the CT scan at each of the five phases of the cardiac cycle at both end-inspiration and end-expiration. The centroid of each segmented clip was computed and used to evaluate both cardiac and respiratory motion of the left atrium. A total of three canine studies were completed, with 4 clips analyzed in the first study, 5 clips in the second study, and 2 clips in the third study. Mean respiratory displacement was 0.2+/-1.8 mm in the medial/lateral direction, 4.7+/-4.4 mm in the anterior/posterior direction (moving anterior on inspiration), and 9.0+/-5.0 mm superior/inferior (moving inferior with inspiration). At end inspiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 1.5+/-1.3 mm in the medial/lateral direction, and 2.1+/-2.0 mm in the anterior/posterior and 1.3+/-1.2 mm superior/inferior directions. At end expiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 2.0+/-1.5mm in the medial/lateral direction, 3.0+/-1.8mm in the anterior/posterior direction, and 1.5+/-1.5 mm in the superior/inferior directions.

  11. Electrophysiologic abnormalities of children with ostium secundum atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Ruschhaupt, D G; Khoury, L; Thilenius, O G; Replogle, R L; Arcilla, R A

    1984-06-01

    Sinus node (SN) and atrioventricular node (AVN) function were evaluated in 49 patients with secundum type atrial septal defect (ASD). Automaticity and conduction system function were assessed by intracardiac recording of the AH and HV intervals at rest, corrected SN recovery time, sinoatrial conduction time, AVN refractory period and the ability of the AVN to conduct rapidly paced atrial beats to the ventricles. Electrophysiologic abnormalities were found in 41% of the 34 patients who were studied before surgery. However, no preoperative abnormalities were present in children younger than 2.5 years. If only children older than 2.5 years were analyzed, the incidence of conduction abnormalities was similar for the patients studied before operation (62%) and those studied after operation (71%). The size and ejection fractions of the right and left ventricles, the magnitude of shunt flow and the size of the ASD did not differ between the patients with and those without electrophysiologic abnormalities. AVN dysfunction was present in 40% of the patients who were studied after surgical repair. While this frequency was more than twice the preoperative incidence of AVN dysfunction, it was not statistically significant. The data suggest that patient age is the major factor that influences the presence of conduction system dysfunction in patients with ASD.

  12. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethysmography of supine healthy male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n = 6) and during placebo infusion (n = 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 +/- 4 to 2,568 +/- 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion: mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3%, respectively, relative to preinfusion baseline values (p less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however, was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20% with ANP infusion, whereas blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/ arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, pharmacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchnic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  13. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethys-mography of supine health male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n equals 6) and during placebo infusion (n equals 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 plus or minus 4 to 2,568 plus or minus 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion; mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3 percent respectively, relative to pre-infusion baseline values (p is less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20 percent with ANP infusion, wheras blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, phamacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  14. Aorta-right atrial tunnel.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, Cheemalapati; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta-right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary-cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure.The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass.Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2).

  15. Atrial tachycardia originating from the atrial septum in a patient with dextrocardia and complex structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ya-Lei; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Lee, Pi-Chang; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2012-10-01

    We report a case with dextrocardia, corrected transposition of the great arteries. He also had an atrial septum defect (ASD) with patch repair. Activation map showed a centrifugal activation from a focal origin on the systemic lower left atrial ASD patch. Ablation of the origin can terminate the atrial tachycardia.

  16. Increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial fibrosis in transgenic goats expressing transforming growth factor - B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in people with significant morbidity and mortality. There is a strong association between atrial fibrosis and AF. Transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1) is an essential mediator of atrial fibrosis in animal models and human pat...

  17. Expression of Distal-less, dachshund, and optomotor blind in Neanthes arenaceodentata (Annelida, Nereididae) does not support homology of appendage-forming mechanisms across the Bilateria

    PubMed Central

    Winchell, Christopher J.; Valencia, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    The similarity in the genetic regulation of arthropod and vertebrate appendage formation has been interpreted as the product of a plesiomorphic gene network that was primitively involved in bilaterian appendage development and co-opted to build appendages (in modern phyla) that are not historically related as structures. Data from lophotrochozoans are needed to clarify the pervasiveness of plesiomorphic appendage-forming mechanisms. We assayed the expression of three arthropod and vertebrate limb gene orthologs, Distal-less (Dll), dachshund (dac), and optomotor blind (omb), in direct-developing juveniles of the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata. Parapodial Dll expression marks pre-morphogenetic notopodia and neuropodia, becoming restricted to the bases of notopodial cirri and to ventral portions of neuropodia. In outgrowing cephalic appendages, Dll activity is primarily restricted to proximal domains. Dll expression is also prominent in the brain. dac expression occurs in the brain, nerve cord ganglia, a pair of pharyngeal ganglia, presumed interneurons linking a pair of segmental nerves, and in newly differentiating mesoderm. Domains of omb expression include the brain, nerve cord ganglia, one pair of anterior cirri, presumed precursors of dorsal musculature, and the same pharyngeal ganglia and presumed interneurons that express dac. Contrary to their roles in outgrowing arthropod and vertebrate appendages, Dll, dac, and omb lack comparable expression in Neanthes appendages, implying independent evolution of annelid appendage development. We infer that parapodia and arthropodia are not structurally or mechanistically homologous (but their primordia might be), that Dll’s ancestral bilaterian function was in sensory and central nervous system differentiation, and that locomotory appendages possibly evolved from sensory outgrowths. PMID:21116826

  18. Expression of Distal-less, dachshund, and optomotor blind in Neanthes arenaceodentata (Annelida, Nereididae) does not support homology of appendage-forming mechanisms across the Bilateria.

    PubMed

    Winchell, Christopher J; Valencia, Jonathan E; Jacobs, David K

    2010-12-01

    The similarity in the genetic regulation of arthropod and vertebrate appendage formation has been interpreted as the product of a plesiomorphic gene network that was primitively involved in bilaterian appendage development and co-opted to build appendages (in modern phyla) that are not historically related as structures. Data from lophotrochozoans are needed to clarify the pervasiveness of plesiomorphic appendage-forming mechanisms. We assayed the expression of three arthropod and vertebrate limb gene orthologs, Distal-less (Dll), dachshund (dac), and optomotor blind (omb), in direct-developing juveniles of the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata. Parapodial Dll expression marks pre-morphogenetic notopodia and neuropodia, becoming restricted to the bases of notopodial cirri and to ventral portions of neuropodia. In outgrowing cephalic appendages, Dll activity is primarily restricted to proximal domains. Dll expression is also prominent in the brain. dac expression occurs in the brain, nerve cord ganglia, a pair of pharyngeal ganglia, presumed interneurons linking a pair of segmental nerves, and in newly differentiating mesoderm. Domains of omb expression include the brain, nerve cord ganglia, one pair of anterior cirri, presumed precursors of dorsal musculature, and the same pharyngeal ganglia and presumed interneurons that express dac. Contrary to their roles in outgrowing arthropod and vertebrate appendages, Dll, dac, and omb lack comparable expression in Neanthes appendages, implying independent evolution of annelid appendage development. We infer that parapodia and arthropodia are not structurally or mechanistically homologous (but their primordia might be), that Dll's ancestral bilaterian function was in sensory and central nervous system differentiation, and that locomotory appendages possibly evolved from sensory outgrowths.

  19. Cephalic and limb anatomy of a new Isoxyid from the Burgess Shale and the role of "stem bivalved arthropods" in the disparity of the frontalmost appendage.

    PubMed

    Aria, Cédric; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe Surusicaris elegans gen. et sp. nov. (in Isoxyidae, amended), a middle (Series 3, Stage 5) Cambrian bivalved arthropod from the new Burgess Shale deposit of Marble Canyon (Kootenay National Park, British Columbia). Surusicaris exhibits 12 simple, partly undivided biramous trunk limbs with long tripartite caeca, which may illustrate a plesiomorphic "fused" condition of exopod and endopod. We construe also that the head is made of five somites (= four segments), including two eyes, one pair of anomalocaridid-like frontalmost appendages, and three pairs of poorly sclerotized uniramous limbs. This fossil may therefore be a candidate for illustrating the origin of the plesiomorphic head condition in euarthropods, and questions the significance of the "two-segmented head" in, e.g., fuxianhuiids. The frontalmost appendage in isoxyids is intriguingly disparate, bearing similarities with both dinocaridids and euarthropods. In order to evaluate the relative importance of bivalved arthropods, such as Surusicaris, in the hypothetical structuro-functional transition between the dinocaridid frontal appendage and the pre-oral-arguably deutocerebral-appendage of euarthropods, we chose a phenetic approach and computed morphospace occupancy for the frontalmost appendages of 36 stem and crown taxa. Results show different levels of evolutionary decoupling between frontalmost appendage disparity and body plans. Variance is greatest in dinocaridids and "stem bivalved" arthropods, but these groups do not occupy the morphospace homogeneously. Rather, the diversity of frontalmost appendages in "stem bivalved" arthropods, distinct in its absence of clear clustering, is found to link the morphologies of "short great appendages," chelicerae and antennules. This find fits the hypothesis of an increase in disparity of the deutocerebral appendage prior to its diversification in euarthropods, and possibly corresponds to its original time of development. The analysis of this

  20. Cephalic and Limb Anatomy of a New Isoxyid from the Burgess Shale and the Role of “Stem Bivalved Arthropods” in the Disparity of the Frontalmost Appendage

    PubMed Central

    Aria, Cédric; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe Surusicaris elegans gen. et sp. nov. (in Isoxyidae, amended), a middle (Series 3, Stage 5) Cambrian bivalved arthropod from the new Burgess Shale deposit of Marble Canyon (Kootenay National Park, British Columbia). Surusicaris exhibits 12 simple, partly undivided biramous trunk limbs with long tripartite caeca, which may illustrate a plesiomorphic “fused” condition of exopod and endopod. We construe also that the head is made of five somites (= four segments), including two eyes, one pair of anomalocaridid-like frontalmost appendages, and three pairs of poorly sclerotized uniramous limbs. This fossil may therefore be a candidate for illustrating the origin of the plesiomorphic head condition in euarthropods, and questions the significance of the “two-segmented head” in, e.g., fuxianhuiids. The frontalmost appendage in isoxyids is intriguingly disparate, bearing similarities with both dinocaridids and euarthropods. In order to evaluate the relative importance of bivalved arthropods, such as Surusicaris, in the hypothetical structuro-functional transition between the dinocaridid frontal appendage and the pre-oral—arguably deutocerebral—appendage of euarthropods, we chose a phenetic approach and computed morphospace occupancy for the frontalmost appendages of 36 stem and crown taxa. Results show different levels of evolutionary decoupling between frontalmost appendage disparity and body plans. Variance is greatest in dinocaridids and “stem bivalved” arthropods, but these groups do not occupy the morphospace homogeneously. Rather, the diversity of frontalmost appendages in “stem bivalved” arthropods, distinct in its absence of clear clustering, is found to link the morphologies of “short great appendages,” chelicerae and antennules. This find fits the hypothesis of an increase in disparity of the deutocerebral appendage prior to its diversification in euarthropods, and possibly corresponds to its original time of development

  1. Platelet Reactivity Is Independent of Left Atrial Wall Deformation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Procter, Nathan; Goh, Vincent; Mahadevan, Gnanadevan; Stewart, Simon; Horowitz, John

    2016-01-01

    It has been documented recently that left atrial (LA) deformation in AF patients (while in AF) is predictive of subsequent stroke risk. Additionally, diminished LA deformation during AF correlates with the presence of LA blood stasis. Given that endothelial function is dependent on laminar blood flow, the present study sought to investigate the effect of diminished LA deformation (during AF) on platelet reactivity and inflammation in AF patients. Patients (n = 17) hospitalised with AF underwent echocardiography (while in AF) for determination of peak positive LA strain (LASp). Whole blood impedance aggregometry was used to measure extent of ADP-induced aggregation and subsequent inhibitory response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor, sodium nitroprusside. Platelet thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) content was determined by immunohistochemistry. LASp tended (p = 0.078) to vary inversely with CHA2DS2VASc scores. However, mediators of inflammation (C-reactive protein, Txnip) did not correlate significantly with LASp nor did extent of ADP-induced platelet aggregation or platelet NO response. These results suggest that the thrombogenic risk associated with LA stasis is independent of secondary effects on platelet aggregability or inflammation. PMID:27069318

  2. Practice implications of the Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne B

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common and complex cardiac arrhythmias. Using currently available evidence, leading medical societies have established recommendations for the optimal management of atrial fibrillation. These guidelines have recently been updated by 4 consensus groups: the European Society of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and a task force of 3 societies from the United States: the American College of Cardiology Foundation, the American Heart Association, and the Heart Rhythm Society. The present review focused on the similarities and differences among these recently updated guidelines. Key revisions included updated information on newer treatments for rhythm control, treatment options to reduce atrial fibrillation complications, and updated anticoagulant management for thromboprophylaxis.

  3. Ablation therapy for left atrial autonomic modification.

    PubMed

    Malcolme-Lawes, Louisa; Sandler, Belinda C; Sikkel, Markus B; Lim, Phang Boon; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2016-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system is implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) but few studies have attempted neural targeting for therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated that short bursts of stimulation, at specific sites of left atrial ganglionated plexi (GPs), trigger fibrillation-inducing atrial ectopy and importantly continuous stimulation of these sites may not induce AV block, the 'conventional' marker used to locate GPs. We have shown that these ectopy-triggering GP (ET-GP) sites are anatomically stable and can be rendered inactive by either ablation at the site or by ablation between the site and the adjacent pulmonary vein (PV). This may have important implications for planning patient specific strategies for ablation of paroxysmal AF in the future. PMID:27595199

  4. Left Atrial Myxoma Mimicking Mitral Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ojji, Dike B; Mamven, Manmak H; Omonua, Odiase; Habib, Zaiyad; Osaze, Hamamatu; Sliwa, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma is a benign (non-malignant) neoplasm that represents the most common primary tumour of the heart. We present the case of a 36 year old woman with background hypertension who presented with features of left ventricular failure and seizures, and was found during transthoracic echocardiography to have left atrial myxoma protruding through the mitral valve orifice. She subsequently had excision of the atrial myxoma. The usefulness of early transthoracic echocardiography in any patient presenting with features of heart failure even when the aetiology seems obvious cannot be over-emphasised. PMID:22844201

  5. Atrial Septal Defects and Cardioembolic Strokes.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Michelle; Poisson, Sharon N; Carroll, John D

    2016-05-01

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) can be complicated by cardioembolic strokes, but the exact incidence is unknown. Patients with large and small shunts may present with a cardioembolic stroke. Patients with cryptogenic strokes should have cardiac ultrasound to see if an ASD is present. Cardioembolic strokes associated with ASD principally occur with 2 mechanisms. The first is paradoxic embolism involving a venous-based source of thrombus, which may subsequently pass through the ASD by right-to-left shunting, causing a cardioembolic stroke. The second is atrial fibrillation that can complicate the course of patients with ASDs, especially as they age. PMID:27150170

  6. [Obesity as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Duraj, Iwona; Broncel, Marlena

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and obesity is a growing problem of public health both in Poland and in the whole world. AF risk factors may be summarized as elderliness, male sex, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, cardiac surgery. Once obesity is an independent, potentially modifiable risk factor for AF. The connection between obesity and atrial fibrillation is very up-to-date because of incremental prevalence, almost epidemic of obesity in the whole world. The probability of AF among obese patients increases with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea. Regardless many researches it hasn't been assessed yet how obesity itself predisposes to AF. It could be an effect of change in the atrial anatomy, the rise of atrial pressure, mechanical stretch, interstitial atrial fibrosis and disruption of atrial electric integrity. A great role is ascribed to inflammation, especially proinflammatory cytokines increased by adipocites of left atrial epicardial adiposity. PMID:26891428

  7. [Obesity as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Duraj, Iwona; Broncel, Marlena

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and obesity is a growing problem of public health both in Poland and in the whole world. AF risk factors may be summarized as elderliness, male sex, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, cardiac surgery. Once obesity is an independent, potentially modifiable risk factor for AF. The connection between obesity and atrial fibrillation is very up-to-date because of incremental prevalence, almost epidemic of obesity in the whole world. The probability of AF among obese patients increases with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea. Regardless many researches it hasn't been assessed yet how obesity itself predisposes to AF. It could be an effect of change in the atrial anatomy, the rise of atrial pressure, mechanical stretch, interstitial atrial fibrosis and disruption of atrial electric integrity. A great role is ascribed to inflammation, especially proinflammatory cytokines increased by adipocites of left atrial epicardial adiposity.

  8. Antithrombotic Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    You, John J.; Singer, Daniel E.; Howard, Patricia A.; Lane, Deirdre A.; Eckman, Mark H.; Fang, Margaret C.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Schulman, Sam; Go, Alan S.; Hughes, Michael; Spencer, Frederick A.; Manning, Warren J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The risk of stroke varies considerably across different groups of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Antithrombotic prophylaxis for stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. We provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment based on net clinical benefit for patients with AF at varying levels of stroke risk and in a number of common clinical scenarios. Methods: We used the methods described in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines article of this supplement. Results: For patients with nonrheumatic AF, including those with paroxysmal AF, who are (1) at low risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 [congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 years, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack] score of 0), we suggest no therapy rather than antithrombotic therapy, and for patients choosing antithrombotic therapy, we suggest aspirin rather than oral anticoagulation or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; (2) at intermediate risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of 1), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, and we suggest oral anticoagulation rather than aspirin or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; and (3) at high risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of ≥ 2), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, aspirin, or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Where we recommend or suggest in favor of oral anticoagulation, we suggest dabigatran 150 mg bid rather than adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist therapy. Conclusions: Oral anticoagulation is the optimal choice of antithrombotic therapy for patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS2 score of ≥ 2). At lower levels of stroke risk, antithrombotic treatment decisions will require a more individualized

  9. Computational models of atrial cellular electrophysiology and calcium handling, and their role in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Heijman, Jordi; Erfanian Abdoust, Pegah; Voigt, Niels; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2016-02-01

    The complexity of the heart makes an intuitive understanding of the relative contribution of ion channels, transporters and signalling pathways to cardiac electrophysiology challenging. Computational modelling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has proven useful to integrate experimental findings, extrapolate results obtained in expression systems or animal models to other systems, test quantitatively ideas based on experimental data and provide novel hypotheses that are experimentally testable. While the bulk of computational modelling has traditionally been directed towards ventricular bioelectricity, increasing recognition of the clinical importance of atrial arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, has led to widespread efforts to apply computational approaches to understanding atrial electrical function. The increasing availability of detailed, atrial-specific experimental data has stimulated the development of novel computational models of atrial-cellular electrophysiology and Ca(2+) handling. To date, more than 300 studies have employed mathematical simulations to enhance our understanding of atrial electrophysiology, arrhythmogenesis and therapeutic responses. Future modelling studies are likely to move beyond current whole-cell models by incorporating new data on subcellular architecture, macromolecular protein complexes, and localized ion-channel regulation by signalling pathways. At the same time, more integrative multicellular models that take into account regional electrophysiological and Ca(2+) handling properties, mechano-electrical feedback and/or autonomic regulation will be needed to investigate the mechanisms governing atrial arrhythmias. A combined experimental and computational approach is expected to provide the more comprehensive understanding of atrial arrhythmogenesis that is required to develop improved diagnostic and therapeutic options. Here, we review this rapidly expanding area, with a particular focus on Ca(2+) handling, and

  10. Effect of adenosine triphosphate on left atrial electrogram interval and dominant frequency in human atrial fibrillation☆

    PubMed Central

    Kogawa, Rikitake; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro; Kofune, Masayoshi; Nagashima, Koichi; Mano, Hiroaki; Sonoda, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Naoko; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Ohkubo, Kimie; Nakai, Toshiko; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAEs) and high dominant frequency (DF) are targets for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Although adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to promote AF by shortening the atrial refractory period, its role in the pathogenesis of CFAEs and DF during AF is not fully understood. Methods We recorded electrical activity from a 64-electrode basket catheter placed in the left atrium (LA) of patients with paroxysmal AF (PAF, n=18) or persistent AF (PerAF, n=19) before ablation. Atrial electrogram fractionation intervals (FIs) and DFs were measured from bipolar electrograms of each adjacent electrode pair. Offline mean atrial FIs and DFs were obtained before bolus injection of 30 mg ATP. Peak effect was defined as an R–R interval >3 s. Results With ATP, the mean FI decreased (from 110.4±29.1 ms to 90.5±24.7 ms, P<0.0001) and DF increased (from 6.4±0.6 Hz to 7.1±0.8 Hz, P<0.0001) in all patients. There was no difference in the FI decrease between the two groups (−20.3±20.5 ms vs. −19.6±14.5 ms, P=0.6032), but the increase in DF was significantly greater in PAF patients (1.1±0.8 Hz vs. 0.3±0.6 Hz, P=0.0051). Conclusions ATP shortens atrial FIs and increases DFs in both PAF and PerAF patients. The significant increase in DF in PAF patients suggests that pathophysiologic characteristics related to the frequency of atrial fractionation change as atrial remodeling progresses. PMID:26702319

  11. Adjusted Left Atrial Emptying Fraction as a Predictor of Procedural Outcome after Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Won; Choi, Cheol Ung; Kim, Jin Won; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo; Lim, Hong Euy

    2015-01-01

    Structural remodeling of the left atrium is a risk factor for recurrent arrhythmia after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation; however, data are sparse regarding the role of functional left atrial remodeling in predicting procedural outcomes. We evaluated whether left atrial transport function could be used to predict recurrent atrial fibrillation. From July 2008 through August 2010, we enrolled 202 consecutive patients who underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal=120, persistent=82). Left atrial volumes (LAVs) were measured by means of multislice computed tomography at every 10% of the R-R interval, and measurements were adjusted for body surface area to yield the LAV index (LAVI) at baseline. The left atrial emptying fraction (LAEF) was calculated according to LAV differences. During the mean follow-up period of 10 ± 4 months after a single ablation procedure, atrial fibrillation recurred in 59 patients (paroxysmal=19, persistent=40). Multivariate analysis revealed that persistent atrial fibrillation, early mitral inflow velocity, LAVImax, LAVImin, LAEF, LAVImax/LAEF, and LAVImin/LAEF were all independent predictors of atrial fibrillation, but the best predictor was LAVImin/LAEF (β=1.329, P=0.001). The cutoff value was 1.61 (mL/m2)/%, and the sensitivity and specificity were 74.6% and 62.2%, respectively (area under the curve=0.761). Our study shows that adjusted left atrial emptying fraction with use of multislice computed tomography might be a useful, noninvasive method to select patients for ablation. PMID:26175632

  12. Assessment of atrial fibrosis for the rhythm control of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Begg, Gordon A; Holden, Arun V; Lip, Gregory Y H; Plein, Sven; Tayebjee, Muzahir H

    2016-10-01

    Rhythm control of atrial fibrillation (AF) remains challenging, with modest long-term success rates. Atrial fibrosis has been associated with AF, but the clinical utility of assessment of this fibrosis has yet to be fully elucidated. In this paper we review the current state of understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrosis in AF, and its impact upon the instigation and propagation of the arrhythmia. Fibrosis causes an increase in volume of dysfunctional extracellular matrix, and is associated with cellular alterations such as hypertrophy, apoptosis and membrane dysfunction within the atrial myocardium. In turn, these cause pathological alterations to atrial conduction, such as increased anisotropy, conduction block and re-entry, which can lead to AF. We review current methods of assessing atrial fibrosis and their impact upon the prediction of success of interventional rhythm control strategies such as ablation and cardioversion. We focus particularly on circulating biomarkers of fibrosis and scar formation; their role in the fibrotic process, and their value in the prediction of rhythm control success. We also review imaging and invasive electrocardiographic mapping techniques that may identify fibrosis, and again assess their potential predictive value. In this area there exist many unanswered questions, but further work will help to refine techniques to reliably identify and treat those patients who are most likely to benefit from rhythm control treatment strategies. PMID:27389440

  13. Spontaneous atrial fibrillation in a freestyle skier.

    PubMed

    Whyte, G; Stephens, N; Sharma, S; Shave, R; Budgett, R; McKenna, W J

    2004-04-01

    A male freestyle skier was found to have atrial fibrillation during a routine physiological assessment. This was found to be associated with the consumption of an unusually large amount of alcohol. Athletes should be counselled about the potential dangers of alcohol consumption before exhaustive exercise.

  14. Molecular developmental evidence for a subcoxal origin of pleurites in insects and identity of the subcoxa in the gnathal appendages.

    PubMed

    Coulcher, Joshua F; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Telford, Maximilian J

    2015-10-28

    Pleurites are chitinous plates in the body wall of insects and myriapods. They are believed to be an adaptation to locomotion on land but their developmental and evolutionary origins are unclear. A widely endorsed explanation for their origin is through toughening pre-existing parts of the body wall; in contrast, the subcoxal theory suggests pleurites derive from a redeployment of the proximal-most section of the leg, the subcoxa. Here, by studying expression of appendage patterning genes in embryos and larvae of the beetle Tribolium castaneum, we provide the first molecular evidence for the existence of a cryptic subcoxal segment in developing legs. We follow this structure during development and show that the embryonic subcoxa later forms the pleurites of the larva as predicted by the subcoxal theory. Our data also demonstrate that subcoxal segments are present in all post-antennal appendages, including the first molecular evidence of a two-segmented mandible with a subcoxal segment in insects.

  15. Setal morphology of the grooming appendages of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Palaemonidae) and review of decapod setal classification.

    PubMed

    Wortham, Jennifer L; Vanmaurik, Lauren N; Wayne Price, W

    2014-06-01

    Setae are vital in grooming activities and aiding in the removal of epibionts and sedimentary fouling from the body surfaces of decapod crustaceans. Thus, the setal structures and their arrangement on the grooming appendages and sensory structures of the commercially important shrimp, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Macrobrachium rosenbergii is extensively grown in aquaculture and exhibits unique male morphological forms, termed morphotypes. The three male morphotypes are termed blue-clawed males, orange-clawed males, and small-clawed or undifferentiated males and all three differ in their dominance, behavior, body morphology, and reproductive success. Seven setal types, two of which have never been described in the literature, are identified on the grooming appendages (third maxillipeds, first, second, and fifth pereopods) and antennae: simple, serrate, serrulate, spiniform, pappose, crinoid, and spinulate. The latter two setae are newly identified. Certain setal types, such as serrate and serrulate setae were located and associated with specific grooming appendages such as the first pereopods. The types of setae on the grooming appendages varied among females and male morphotypes and the novel setal types (crinoid and spinulate) were found only on two of the male morphotypes. A literature review of terminology related to the structure of setae and setal types in decapod crustaceans is offered as the usage of various terms is ambiguous and conflicting in the literature. The intention of this review is to provide future authors with a comprehensive collection of terms and images that can be used to describe various aspects of setal morphology in decapods.

  16. Atrial inflow can alter regurgitant jet size: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Grimes, R Y; Nyarko, S J; Pulido, G A; Yang, S; Walker, P G; Levine, R A; Yoganathan, A P

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have attempted to predict the severity of regurgitant lesions from color Doppler jet size, which is a function of orifice momentum for free jets. Jets of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, however, are opposed by flows entering the atria. Despite their low velocities, these counterflows may have considerable momentum that can limit jet penetration. The purpose of this study was to address the hypothesis that such counterflow fields influence regurgitant jet size. Steady flow was driven through 2.4- and 5.1-mm-diameter circular orifices at 2 to 6 m/s. At a constant orifice velocity and flow rate, the velocity of a uniform counterflow field was varied from 5 to 30 cm/s. Jet dimensions were measured by both fluorescent dye visualization and Doppler color flow mapping. The results showed that despite its relatively low velocities, counterflow dramatically curtailed jet length and area. Jet dimensions were functions of the ratio of jet to counterflow momentum. Thus, atrial inflow may participate in determining jet size and can alter the relation between jet size and lesion severity in mitral and tricuspid regurgitation.

  17. Evolution of a novel appendage ground plan in water striders is driven by changes in the Hox gene Ultrabithorax.

    PubMed

    Khila, Abderrahman; Abouheif, Ehab; Rowe, Locke

    2009-07-01

    Water striders, a group of semi-aquatic bugs adapted to life on the water surface, have evolved mid-legs (L2) that are long relative to their hind-legs (L3). This novel appendage ground plan is a derived feature among insects, where L2 function as oars and L3 as rudders. The Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) is known to increase appendage size in a variety of insects. Using gene expression and RNAi analysis, we discovered that Ubx is expressed in both L2 and L3, but Ubx functions to elongate L2 and to shorten L3 in the water strider Gerris buenoi. Therefore, within hemimetabolous insects, Ubx has evolved a new expression domain but maintained its ancestral elongating function in L2, whereas Ubx has maintained its ancestral expression domain but evolved a new shortening function in L3. These changes in Ubx expression and function may have been a key event in the evolution of the distinct appendage ground plan in water striders.

  18. C2cd3 is critical for centriolar distal appendage assembly and ciliary vesicle docking in mammals.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuan; Zeng, Huiqing; Ning, Gang; Reiter, Jeremy F; Liu, Aimin

    2014-02-11

    The primary cilium plays critical roles in vertebrate development and physiology, but the mechanisms underlying its biogenesis remain poorly understood. We investigated the molecular function of C2 calcium-dependent domain containing 3 (C2cd3), an essential regulator of primary cilium biogenesis. We show that C2cd3 is localized to the centriolar satellites in a microtubule- and Pcm1-dependent manner; however, C2cd3 is dispensable for centriolar satellite integrity. C2cd3 is also localized to the distal ends of both mother and daughter centrioles and is required for the recruitment of five centriolar distal appendage proteins: Sclt1, Ccdc41, Cep89, Fbf1, and Cep164. Furthermore, loss of C2cd3 results in failure in the recruitment of Ttbk2 to the ciliary basal body as well as the removal of Cp110 from the ciliary basal body, two critical steps in initiating ciliogenesis. C2cd3 is also required for recruiting the intraflagellar transport proteins Ift88 and Ift52 to the mother centriole. Consistent with a role in distal appendage assembly, C2cd3 is essential for ciliary vesicle docking to the mother centriole. Our results suggest that C2cd3 regulates cilium biogenesis by promoting the assembly of centriolar distal appendages critical for docking ciliary vesicles and recruiting other essential ciliogenic proteins. PMID:24469809

  19. Current problems concerning parasitology and mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Błaszkowska, Joanna; Wójcik, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Current issues concerning Parasitology and Mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages are presented. Aspects of diagnostics, clinical picture and therapy of skin and nail mycoses, as well as difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of both native parasitoses (toxoplasmosis) and imported human tropical parasitoses (malaria, filariosis) have been emphasised. The clinical importance of environmental mould fungi in nosocomial infections and fungal meningitis, as well as selected properties of fungi isolated from patients with head and neck neoplasms treated by radiotherapy are discussed. Other mycological topics include the characteristics of newly-synthesized thiosemicarbazides and thiadiazoles as potential drugs against toxoplasmosis and their biological activity against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, selected molecular mechanisms of resistance to azoles, Candida albicans strains and a new tool (barcoding DNA) for describing the biodiversity of potential allergenic molds. The importance of environmental factors in pathogenesis of mycoses and parasitoses is noted. The characteristics of pathogenic fungi isolated from natural ponds in Bialystok and potentially pathogenic yeast-like fungi isolated from children's recreation areas in Lodz are presented. The ongoing problem of anthropozoonoses is considered, as are the roles of stray cats and dogs in contaminating soil with the developing forms of intestinal parasites. The characteristics of the human microbiome, including population composition, activity and their importance in normal human physiology, are presented, as are the major goals of the Human Microbiome Project initiated by National Institutes of Health (NIH). PMID:23444796

  20. Current problems concerning parasitology and mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Błaszkowska, Joanna; Wójcik, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Current issues concerning Parasitology and Mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages are presented. Aspects of diagnostics, clinical picture and therapy of skin and nail mycoses, as well as difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of both native parasitoses (toxoplasmosis) and imported human tropical parasitoses (malaria, filariosis) have been emphasised. The clinical importance of environmental mould fungi in nosocomial infections and fungal meningitis, as well as selected properties of fungi isolated from patients with head and neck neoplasms treated by radiotherapy are discussed. Other mycological topics include the characteristics of newly-synthesized thiosemicarbazides and thiadiazoles as potential drugs against toxoplasmosis and their biological activity against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, selected molecular mechanisms of resistance to azoles, Candida albicans strains and a new tool (barcoding DNA) for describing the biodiversity of potential allergenic molds. The importance of environmental factors in pathogenesis of mycoses and parasitoses is noted. The characteristics of pathogenic fungi isolated from natural ponds in Bialystok and potentially pathogenic yeast-like fungi isolated from children's recreation areas in Lodz are presented. The ongoing problem of anthropozoonoses is considered, as are the roles of stray cats and dogs in contaminating soil with the developing forms of intestinal parasites. The characteristics of the human microbiome, including population composition, activity and their importance in normal human physiology, are presented, as are the major goals of the Human Microbiome Project initiated by National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  1. Localization of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' and Evidence for Surface Appendages in the Potato Psyllid Vector.

    PubMed

    Cicero, J M; Fisher, T W; Brown, J K

    2016-02-01

    The potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli is implicated as the vector of the causal agent of zebra chip of potato and vein-greening of tomato diseases. Until now, visual identification of bacteria in the genus 'Candidatus Liberibacter' has relied on direct imaging by light and electron microscopy without labeling, or with whole-organ fluorescence labeling only. In this study, aldehyde fixative followed by a coagulant fixative, was used to process adult psyllids for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) colloidal gold in situ hybridization experiments. Results indicated that 'Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum' (CLso)-specific DNA probes annealed to a bacterium that formed extensive, monocultural biofilms on gut, salivary gland, and oral region tissues, confirming that it is one morphotype of potentially others, that is rod-shaped, approximately 2.5 µm in diameter and of variable length, and has a rough, granular cytosol. In addition, CLso, prepared from shredded midguts, and negatively stained for TEM, possessed pili- and flagella-like surface appendages. Genes implicating coding capacity for both types of surface structures are encoded in the CLso genome sequence. Neither type was seen for CLso associated with biofilms within or on digestive organs, suggesting that their production is stimulated only in certain environments, putatively, in the gut during adhesion leading to multiplication, and in hemolymph to afford systemic invasion. PMID:26551449

  2. The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, E. A. B.; Delorme, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although amniotes (reptiles, including birds, and mammals) are capable of replacing certain tissues, complete appendage regeneration is rare. Perhaps the most striking example is the lizard tail. Tail loss initiates a spontaneous epimorphic (blastema‐mediated) regenerative program, resulting in a fully functional but structurally non‐identical replacement. Here we review lizard tail regeneration with a particular focus on the blastema. In many lizards, the original tail has evolved a series of fracture planes, anatomical modifications that permit the tail to be self‐detached or autotomized. Following tail loss, the wound site is covered by a specialized wound epithelium under which the blastema develops. An outgrowth of the spinal cord, the ependymal tube, plays a key role in governing growth (and likely patterning) of the regenerate tail. In some species (e.g., geckos), the blastema forms as an apical aggregation of proliferating cells, similar to that of urodeles and teleosts. For other species (e.g., anoles) the identification of a proliferative blastema is less obvious, suggesting an unexpected diversity in regenerative mechanisms among tail‐regenerating lizards. PMID:27499867

  3. Scrotal Exploration for Testicular Torsion and Testicular Appendage Torsion: Emergency and Reality

    PubMed Central

    Yu, You; Zhang, Feng; An, Qun; Wang, Long; Li, Chao; Xu, Zhilin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scrotal exploration is considered the procedure of choice for acute scrotum. Objectives: We evaluated the importance of early diagnosis and testicular salvage on the therapeutic outcomes of patients with pediatric testicular torsion (TT) and testicular appendage torsion (TAT) in our geographic area. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective database analysis of patients who underwent emergency surgery for TT or TAT between January 1996 and June 2009. Patient history, physical examination findings, laboratory test results, color Doppler sonography (CDS) results, and surgical findings were reviewed. Results: A total of 65 cases were included in our analysis. Forty-two cases were followed up for at least 3 months. Testicular tenderness was identified as the major clinical manifestation of TT, while only a few patients with TAT presented with swelling. CDS was an important diagnostic modality. The orchiectomy rate was 71% in the TT group. Conclusions: Cases of acute scrotum require attention in our area. Early diagnosis and scrotal exploration could salvage the testis or preserve normal function without the need for surgery. PMID:26199690

  4. CD44 standard and variant isoform expression in normal human skin appendages and epidermis.

    PubMed

    Seelentag, W K; Günthert, U; Saremaslani, P; Futo, E; Pfaltz, M; Heitz, P U; Roth, J

    1996-09-01

    CD44 isoforms have been implicated in tumor progression and metastasis formation. This study presents a thorough immunohistochemical analysis of CD44 standard and isoform expression in normal human skin appendages and epidermis applying monoclonal antibodies against CD44s, CD44v3, -v4, -v5, -v6, and -v9. An improved immunohistochemical protocol with microwave-based antigen retrieval in paraffin sections and heavy metal amplification of the diaminobenzidine reaction product provided enhanced resolution and sensitivity as compared to studies on frozen sections. The hair follicle, the seborrheic and eccrine sweat glands were strongly positive for all CD44 isoforms studied. In the latter, the clear cells but not the dark (intercalated) cells were positive. the sudoriferous ducts adjacent to the glands were weakly positive for all CD44 isoforms and strongly positive near the skin surface. In the apocrine glands, the basal cells showed only a moderate positivity. The myoepithelial cells expressed only CD44s. In the epidermis, all CD44 isoforms were detectable, with strongest CD44 immunostaining in the lower third of the stratum spinosum and weaker staining in the stratum basale and the upper two-thirds of the stratum granulosum. The stratum granulosum and corneum were unreactive. Thus, a regional and cell type-specific CD44 expression was revealed. PMID:8897069

  5. Functional analyses in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus (Hemiptera) support a role for Wnt signaling in body segmentation but not appendage development.

    PubMed

    Angelini, David R; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2005-07-15

    Specification of the proximal-distal (PD) axis of insect appendages is best understood in Drosophila melanogaster, where conserved signaling molecules encoded by the genes decapentaplegic (dpp) and wingless (wg) play key roles. However, the development of appendages from imaginal discs as in Drosophila is a derived state, while more basal insects produce appendages from embryonic limb buds. Therefore, the universality of the Drosophila limb PD axis specification mechanism has been debated since dpp expression in more basal insect species differs dramatically from Drosophila. Here, we test the function of Wnt signaling in the development of the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, a species with the basal state of appendage development from limb buds. RNA interference of wg and pangolin (pan) produce defects in the germband and eyes, but not in the appendages. Distal-less and dachshund, two genes regulated by Wg signaling in Drosophila and expressed in specific PD domains along the limbs of both species, are expressed normally in the limbs of pan-depleted Oncopeltus embryos. Despite these apparently paradoxical results, Armadillo protein, the transducer of Wnt signaling, does not accumulate properly in the nuclei of cells in the legs of pan-depleted embryos. In contrast, engrailed RNAi in Oncopeltus produces cuticular and appendage defects similar to Drosophila. Therefore, our data suggest that Wg signaling is functionally conserved in the development of the germband, while it is not essential in the specification of the limb PD axis in Oncopeltus and perhaps basal insects. PMID:15939417

  6. Nonpharmacologic approaches to the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Baker, B M; Smith, J M; Cain, M E

    1995-10-01

    The high prevalence of atrial fibrillation, the associated morbidity and mortality, the absence of safe and effective drug therapy, and an increased understanding of the pathophysiologic basis of atrial fibrillation and flutter have collectively led to the development of novel nonpharmacologic treatments for the management of these arrhythmias, including the CORRIDOR and MAZE surgical procedures, catheter-based ablation and modification of AV conduction, catheter-based ablation of atrial flutter and fibrillation, and internal atrial defibrillation. These surgical and catheter-based techniques offer potentially curative therapy while sparing the long-term risk of antiarrhythmic drug therapy. For patients with typical atrial flutter, catheter ablation affords to cure rate in excess of 70%. As technological innovations further facilitate identification and ablation of the critical isthmus in the floor of the right atrium, success rates should improve substantially. For patients with atrial fibrillation, AV junction ablation with implantation of a rate-responsive ventricular pacemaker should be considered palliative therapy, as should modification of AV junction conduction. The MAZE procedure offers very high cure rates, but because it currently involves open heart surgery, patient selection is critical. Catheter-based procedures emulating aspects of the MAZE procedure may one day offer cure rates comparable to those of the surgery itself, but additional research and technological development are necessary to further define and refine the minimal effective procedure, and then to facilitate the placement of contiguous, full-thickness lesions in precise three-dimensional configurations. In the interim, the implantable automatic atrial defibrillator may offer a means for rapidly restoring sinus rhythm without the risks of long-term antiarrhythmic drug therapy.

  7. Intra-atrial conduction block mimicking atrioventricular nodal block after multiple catheter ablation procedures for atrial tachycardia in a patient with cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Aman; Yokokawa, Miki; Baman, Timir; Bogun, Frank; Wu, Audrey

    2012-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman with a history of cardiomyopathy and multiple ablation procedures for atrial tachycardia developed intra-atrial conduction block that mimicked atrioventricular (AV) nodal block during radiofrequency ablation at the cavotricuspid isthmus. She was treated with atrial pacing (from the coronary sinus), which overcame intra-atrial conduction block and resulted in AV nodal conduction.

  8. Atrial septostomy benefits severe pulmonary hypertension patients by increase of left ventricular preload reserve.

    PubMed

    Koeken, Yvette; Kuijpers, Nico H L; Lumens, Joost; Arts, Theo; Delhaas, Tammo

    2012-06-15

    At present, it is unknown why patients suffering from severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) benefit from atrial septostomy (AS). Suggested mechanisms include enhanced filling of the left ventricle, reduction of right ventricular preload, increased oxygen availability in the peripheral tissue, or a combination. A multiscale computational model of the cardiovascular system was used to assess the effects of AS in PH. Our model simulates beat-to-beat dynamics of the four cardiac chambers with valves and the systemic and pulmonary circulations, including an atrial septal defect (ASD). Oxygen saturation was computed for each model compartment. The acute effect of AS on systemic flow and oxygen delivery in PH was assessed by a series of simulations with combinations of different ASD diameters, pulmonary flows, and degrees of PH. In addition, blood pressures at rest and during exercise were compared between circulations with PH before and after AS. If PH did not result in a right atrial pressure exceeding the left one, AS caused a left-to-right shunt flow that resulted in decreased oxygenation and a further increase of right ventricular pump load. Only in the case of severe PH a right-to-left shunt flow occurred during exercise, which improved left ventricular preload reserve and maintained blood pressure but did not improve oxygenation. AS only improves symptoms of right heart failure in patients with severe PH if net right-to-left shunt flow occurs during exercise. This flow enhances left ventricular filling, allows blood pressure maintenance, but does not increase oxygen availability in the peripheral tissue.

  9. Control of submersible vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Donaldson, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    Vortex flows produced by submersibles typically unfavorably influence key figures of merit such as acoustic and nonacoustic stealth, control effectiveness/maneuverability, and propulsor efficiency/body drag. Sources of such organized, primarily longitudinal, vorticity include the basic body (nose and sides) and appendages (both base/intersection and tip regions) such as the fairwater, dive planes, rear control surfaces, and propulsor stators/tips. Two fundamentally different vortex control approaches are available: (1) deintensification of the amplitude and/or organization of the vortex during its initiation process; and (2) downstream vortex disablement. Vortex control techniques applicable to the initiation region (deintensification approach) include transverse pressure gradient minimization via altered body cross section, appendage dillets, fillets, and sweep, and various appendage tip and spanload treatment along with the use of active controls to minimize control surface size and motions. Vortex disablement can be accomplished either via use of control vortices (which can also be used to steer the vortices off-board), direct unwinding, inducement of vortex bursting, or segmentation/tailoring for enhanced dissipation. Submersible-applicable vortex control technology is also included derived from various aeronautical applications such as mitigation of the wing wake vortex hazard and flight aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack as well as the status of vortex effects upon, and mitigation of, nonlinear control forces on submersibles. Specific suggestions for submersible-applicable vortex control techniques are presented.

  10. Aorto-left atrial tunnel: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sajiv K; Gajjar, Trushar P; Desai, Neelam B

    2013-05-01

    Aorto-left atrial tunnel (ALAT) is a vascular channel that originates from 1 of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in the left atrium. The aorto-left atrial tunnel is an extremely rare anomaly. We describe here a case of congenital aorto-left atrial tunnel in a 4-year-old child who underwent successful surgical ligation with good immediate and early results.

  11. Atrial fibrillation in inherited cardiac channelopathies: From mechanisms to management.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Andres; Antzelevitch, Charles; Bismah, Verdah; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in cardiac channelopathies and may be the presenting feature in some patients. The pathogenesis is related to the primary ion channel dysfunction in atrial myocytes that affects atrial conduction or repolarization. The development of AF is associated with adverse outcomes, and its management is challenging in these patients. In this article we review the current information on the prevalence, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of AF in specific cardiac channelopathies. PMID:27291509

  12. Extreme variation in the atrial septation of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Desiderius M; Wilkinson, Mark; Jensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Caecilians (order Gymnophiona) are elongate, limbless, snake-like amphibians that are the sister-group (closest relatives) of all other recent amphibians (frogs and salamanders). Little is known of their cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, but one nearly century old study suggests that Hypogeophis (family Indotyphlidae), commonly relied upon as a representative caecilian species, has atrial septation in the frontal plane and more than one septum. In contrast, in other vertebrates there generally is one atrial septum in the sagittal plane. We studied the adult heart of Idiocranium (also Indotyphlidae) using immunohistochemistry and confirm that the interatrial septum is close to the frontal plane. Additionally, a parallel right atrial septum divides three-fourths of the right atrial cavity of this species. Idiocranium embryos in the Hill collection reveal that atrial septation initiates in the sagittal plane as in other tetrapods. Late developmental stages, however, see a left-ward shift of visceral organs and a concordant rotation of the atria that reorients the atrial septa towards the frontal plane. The gross anatomies of species from six other caecilian families reveal that (i) the right atrial septum developed early in caecilian evolution (only absent in Rhinatrematidae) and that (ii) rotation of the atria evolved later and its degree varies between families. In most vertebrates a prominent atrial trabeculation associates with the sinuatrial valve, the so-called septum spurium, and the right atrial septum seems homologous to this trabeculation but much more developed. The right atrial septum does not appear to be a consequence of body elongation because it is absent in some caecilians and in snakes. The interatrial septum of caecilians shares multiple characters with the atrial septum of lungfishes, salamanders and the embryonic septum primum of amniotes. In conclusion, atrial septation in caecilians is based on evolutionarily conserved structures but

  13. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders.

  14. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:26118041

  15. Aorto-left atrial tunnel: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sajiv K; Gajjar, Trushar P; Desai, Neelam B

    2013-05-01

    Aorto-left atrial tunnel (ALAT) is a vascular channel that originates from 1 of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in the left atrium. The aorto-left atrial tunnel is an extremely rare anomaly. We describe here a case of congenital aorto-left atrial tunnel in a 4-year-old child who underwent successful surgical ligation with good immediate and early results. PMID:23608293

  16. Extreme variation in the atrial septation of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Desiderius M; Wilkinson, Mark; Jensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Caecilians (order Gymnophiona) are elongate, limbless, snake-like amphibians that are the sister-group (closest relatives) of all other recent amphibians (frogs and salamanders). Little is known of their cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, but one nearly century old study suggests that Hypogeophis (family Indotyphlidae), commonly relied upon as a representative caecilian species, has atrial septation in the frontal plane and more than one septum. In contrast, in other vertebrates there generally is one atrial septum in the sagittal plane. We studied the adult heart of Idiocranium (also Indotyphlidae) using immunohistochemistry and confirm that the interatrial septum is close to the frontal plane. Additionally, a parallel right atrial septum divides three-fourths of the right atrial cavity of this species. Idiocranium embryos in the Hill collection reveal that atrial septation initiates in the sagittal plane as in other tetrapods. Late developmental stages, however, see a left-ward shift of visceral organs and a concordant rotation of the atria that reorients the atrial septa towards the frontal plane. The gross anatomies of species from six other caecilian families reveal that (i) the right atrial septum developed early in caecilian evolution (only absent in Rhinatrematidae) and that (ii) rotation of the atria evolved later and its degree varies between families. In most vertebrates a prominent atrial trabeculation associates with the sinuatrial valve, the so-called septum spurium, and the right atrial septum seems homologous to this trabeculation but much more developed. The right atrial septum does not appear to be a consequence of body elongation because it is absent in some caecilians and in snakes. The interatrial septum of caecilians shares multiple characters with the atrial septum of lungfishes, salamanders and the embryonic septum primum of amniotes. In conclusion, atrial septation in caecilians is based on evolutionarily conserved structures but

  17. Association of Atrial Fibrillation with Morphological and Electrophysiological Changes of the Atrial Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Matějková, Adéla; Šteiner, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. For long time it was considered as pure functional disorder, but in recent years, there were identified atrial locations, which are involved in the initiation and maintenance of this arrhythmia. These structural changes, so called remodelation, start at electric level and later they affect contractility and morphology. In this study we attempted to find a possible relation between morphological (scarring, amyloidosis, left atrial (LA) enlargement) and electrophysiological (ECG features) changes in patients with AF. We examined grossly and histologically 100 hearts of necropsy patients - 54 with a history of AF and 46 without AF. Premortem ECGs were evaluated. The patients with AF had significantly heavier heart, larger LA, more severely scarred myocardium of the LA and atrial septum, and more severe amyloidosis in both atria. Severity of amyloidosis was higher in LAs vs. right atria (RAs). Distribution of both fibrosis and amyloidosis was irregular. The most affected area was in the LA anterior wall. Patients with a history of AF and with most severe amyloidosis have more often abnormally long P waves. Finding of long P wave may contribute to diagnosis of a hitherto undisclosed atrial fibrillation. PMID:27526304

  18. Mitochondrial respiration and microRNA expression in right and left atrium of patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Slagsvold, Katrine Hordnes; Johnsen, Anne Berit; Rognmo, Oivind; Høydal, Morten Andre; Wisløff, Ulrik; Wahba, Alexander

    2014-07-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia with a potential to cause serious complications. Mitochondria play central roles in cardiomyocyte function and have been implicated in AF pathophysiology. MicroRNA (miR) are suggested to influence both mitochondrial function and the development of AF. Yet mitochondrial function and miR expression remain largely unexplored in human atrial tissue. This study aims to investigate mitochondrial function and miR expression in the right (RA) and left atria (LA) of patients with AF and sinus rhythm (SR). Myocardial tissue from the RA and LA appendages was investigated in 37 patients with AF (n = 21) or SR (n = 16) undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and/or heart valve surgery. Mitochondrial respiration was measured in situ after tissue permeabilization by saponin. MiR expression was assessed by miR array and real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Maximal mitochondrial respiratory rate was increased in both RA and LA tissue of patients with AF vs. SR. Biatrial downregulation of miR-208a and upregulation of miR-106b, -144, and -451 were observed in AF vs. SR. In addition, miR-15b was upregulated in AF within RA only, and miR-106a, -18a, -18b, -19a, -19b, -23a, -25, -30a, -363, -486-5p, -590-5p, and -93 were upregulated in AF within LA only. These findings suggest that mitochondrial function and miR are involved in AF pathophysiology and should be areas of focus in the exploration for potential novel therapeutic targets.

  19. Effects of Angiotensin-II Receptor Blocker on Inhibition of Thrombogenicity in a Canine Atrial Fibrillation Model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Seung; Kim, Min Kyung; Sim, Jaemin; Kim, Jin Seok; Lim, Hong Euy; Park, Sang Weon; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs) are known to reduce the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) through reverse-remodeling. However, the effect of ARBs on thrombogenicity in AF remains unknown. Materials and Methods Twelve dogs were assigned to control (n=4), ARB (candesartan cilexitil 10 mg/kg/day p.o., 12 weeks; n=4), or sham (n=4) groups. Sustained AF was induced by rapid atrial pacing. Both arterial and venous serum levels of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, von Willebrand factor, P-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were measured at baseline and during AF (0, 4, and 12 weeks) with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Biopsies from both atria including the appendages were performed to semi-quantitatively assess endocardial and myocardial fibrosis after 12 weeks. Results The serum levels of bio-markers were not significantly different at baseline or during AF between the control and the candesartan groups. The levels were not significantly different over time, but there was a trend toward a decrease in arterial VCAM-1 from 4 to 12 weeks in the candesartan group compared to the control group. The grades of endocardial fibrosis after 12 weeks but not those of myocardial fibrosis were slightly reduced in the candesartan group compared to the control group. Conclusion This study did not show that the ARB candesartan significantly reverses thrombogenicity or fibrosis during AF. Future studies using a larger number of subjects are warranted to determine the therapeutic effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade on prothrombogenic processes in AF. PMID:27275170

  20. Hemodynamic forces regulate developmental patterning of atrial conduction.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Michael C; Louie, Jonathan D; Mikawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous action potential conduction through the atrial chambers of the heart can lead to severe cardiac arrhythmia. To date, however, little is known regarding the mechanisms that pattern proper atrial conduction during development. Here we demonstrate that atrial muscle functionally diversifies into at least two heterogeneous subtypes, thin-walled myocardium and rapidly conducting muscle bundles, during a developmental window just following cardiac looping. During this process, atrial muscle bundles become enriched for the fast conduction markers Cx40 and Nav1.5, similar to the precursors of the fast conduction Purkinje fiber network located within the trabeculae of the ventricles. In contrast to the ventricular trabeculae, however, atrial muscle bundles display an increased proliferation rate when compared to the surrounding myocardium. Interestingly, mechanical loading of the embryonic atrial muscle resulted in an induction of Cx40, Nav1.5 and the cell cycle marker Cyclin D1, while decreasing atrial pressure via in vivo ligation of the vitelline blood vessels results in decreased atrial conduction velocity. Taken together, these data establish a novel model for atrial conduction patterning, whereby hemodynamic stretch coordinately induces proliferation and fast conduction marker expression, which in turn promotes the formation of large diameter muscle bundles to serve as preferential routes of conduction.

  1. [Giant aneurysm of the inter-atrial septum].

    PubMed

    Akoudad, H; Cherti, M; Chaouki, S; Ztot, S; Haddour, L; el Mrabet, I; el Khadiri, A; Benmimoun, E G; Arharbi, A

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a large atrial septal aneurysm and a review of the literature. Atrial septal aneurysm is found in 1-8% of normal subjects. Its prevalence is higher among patients with ischemic stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography is an optimal tool for the diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm. The clinical course may be complicated by arterial embolism, but mechanical complications may also occur, as in this case. Due to the lack of general agreement, treatment options should be discussed on an individual basis for patients with atrial septal aneurysm. PMID:10093663

  2. Keratin Gene Mutations in Disorders of Human Skin and its Appendages

    PubMed Central

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Syed, Deeba N.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia, are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 21 different genes including hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been associated with diverse hereditary disorders. The exact phenotype of each disease mostly reflects the spatial level of expression and types of the mutated keratin genes, the positions of the mutations as well as their consequences at sub-cellular levels. The identification of specific mutations in keratin disorders is the basis of our understanding that lead to reclassification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe cutaneous keratin genodermatoses. A disturbance in cutaneous keratins as a result of mutation(s) in the gene(s) that encode keratin intermediate filaments (KIF) causes keratinocytes and cutaneous tissue fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by a loss of structural integrity in keratinocytes expressing mutated keratins in vivo, often manifested as keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI), pachyonychia congenital (PC), monilethrix, steatocystoma multiplex and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). These keratins also have been identified to have roles in cell growth, apoptosis, tissue polarity, wound healing and tissue remodeling. PMID:21176769

  3. Effect of novel modified bipolar radiofrequency ablation for preoperative atrial fibrillation combined with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaolei; Ma, Nan; Tang, Min; Liu, Hao; Ding, Fangbao; Yin, Hang; Mei, Ju

    2015-11-01

    We described a novel modified bipolar radiofrequency (RF) ablation for preoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) combined with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCABG) for patients with AF and coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this novel procedure and to determine whether it can eliminate AF for CAD patients. From January 2007 to June 2013, 45 patients (26 male patients) with AF (9 paroxysmal, 17 persistent, and 19 long-standing persistent) and CAD underwent the novel modified bipolar RF ablation combined with OPCABG in our department. After median sternotomy, the modified bipolar RF ablation and OPCABG were performed on beating heart without cardiopulmonary bypass. Pulmonary vein isolation and left atrium ablation were achieved using a bipolar RF champ. Mitral annular lesion and ganglionic plexus were ablated with a bipolar RF pen. The left atrial appendage was excluded using a surgical stapler. 24 h holter monitoring and echocardiography were performed at discharge and 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively as well as every year thereafter. The modified bipolar RF ablation and OPCABG were performed successfully in all patients. Mean AF ablation time was 33.6 ± 4.2 min, and mean OPCABG time was 87.6 ± 13.3 min. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 12.6 ± 5.5 days. The maintenance of sinus rhythm was 95.6 % (43/45) at discharge. There was no early death and permanent pacemaker implantation in perioperation. At a mean follow-up of 29.8 ± 10.2 months, 38 of 45 (84.4 %) patients were in sinus rhythm. Follow-up TTE at 6 months postoperatively showed that left atrial diameter was significantly reduced and left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly increased. The novel modified bipolar RF ablation procedure was safe, feasible and effective. It may be useful in selecting the best ablation approaches for patients with AF and CAD. PMID:24820449

  4. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization.

  5. Propofol effects on atrial fibrillation wavefront delays.

    PubMed

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; Millet, José; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2010-08-01

    Since the cardiac activity during atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by autonomic modulations, in this study, a novel method to quantify the effects of the most common anesthetic agent (propofol) in AF ablation procedures is introduced. This study has two main objectives: first, to assess whether the sedation earlier to radio frequency ablation affects the arrhythmia itself, and second, to provide new information that contributes to a better understanding of the influence of the autonomic nervous system on AF. The methodology presented is based on the measurement of synchronization and delay indexes between two atrial activations at adjacent intracavitary electrodes. These parameters aim to estimate whether two activations at different sites may be caused by the same propagating wavefront, or otherwise, are the consequence of independent wavefronts. The results showed that the mentioned indexes have a different behavior at both atria: the right atrium becomes more synchronized with propofol administration, whereas the synchronization index decreases at the left atrium.

  6. Atrial fibrillation due to licorice root syrup.

    PubMed

    Erkuş, Musluhittin Emre; Altıparmak, İbrahim Halil; Demirbağ, Recep; Günebakmaz, Özgür

    2016-04-01

    While it is known that consumption of licorice may lead to cardiac arrhythmias, there have been no reports of atrial fibrillation resulting from the consumption of licorice root syrup. A 57-year-old male with no prior history of cardiovascular disease was admitted to the emergency department with palpitation. His electrocardiogram showed atrial fibrillation with a moderate to rapid ventricular rate. In laboratory assessment, potassium was 2.0 mmol/L and plasma renin activity and aldosterone level were suppressed (<300 ng/L/hour, 42 ng/L respectively). Volumes of the heart chambers were within normal range and functions and structures of the heart valves were normal in echocardiographic assessment. The arrhythmia was resolved with propafenone infusion. PMID:27138313

  7. Minimally invasive surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Timothy S; Melby, Spencer J; Damiano, Ralph J

    2016-04-01

    The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been revolutionized over the past two decades through surgical innovation and improvements in endoscopic imaging, ablation technology, and surgical instrumentation. These advances have prompted the development of the less complex and less morbid Cox-Maze IV procedure, and have allowed its adaptation to a minimally invasive right mini-thoracotomy approach that can be used in stand-alone AF ablation and in patients undergoing concomitant mitral and tricuspid valve surgery. Other minimally invasive ablation techniques have been developed for stand-alone AF ablation, including video-assisted pulmonary vein isolation, extended left atrial lesion sets, and a hybrid approach. This review will discuss the tools, techniques, and outcomes of minimally invasive surgical procedures currently being practiced for AF ablation.

  8. Atrial-like cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells are a robust preclinical model for assessing atrial-selective pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Devalla, Harsha D; Schwach, Verena; Ford, John W; Milnes, James T; El-Haou, Said; Jackson, Claire; Gkatzis, Konstantinos; Elliott, David A; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Mummery, Christine L; Verkerk, Arie O; Passier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drugs targeting atrial-specific ion channels, Kv1.5 or Kir3.1/3.4, are being developed as new therapeutic strategies for atrial fibrillation. However, current preclinical studies carried out in non-cardiac cell lines or animal models may not accurately represent the physiology of a human cardiomyocyte (CM). In the current study, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived atrial CMs could predict atrial selectivity of pharmacological compounds. By modulating retinoic acid signaling during hESC differentiation, we generated atrial-like (hESC-atrial) and ventricular-like (hESC-ventricular) CMs. We found the expression of atrial-specific ion channel genes, KCNA5 (encoding Kv1.5) and KCNJ3 (encoding Kir 3.1), in hESC-atrial CMs and further demonstrated that these ion channel genes are regulated by COUP-TF transcription factors. Moreover, in response to multiple ion channel blocker, vernakalant, and Kv1.5 blocker, XEN-D0101, hESC-atrial but not hESC-ventricular CMs showed action potential (AP) prolongation due to a reduction in early repolarization. In hESC-atrial CMs, XEN-R0703, a novel Kir3.1/3.4 blocker restored the AP shortening caused by CCh. Neither CCh nor XEN-R0703 had an effect on hESC-ventricular CMs. In summary, we demonstrate that hESC-atrial CMs are a robust model for pre-clinical testing to assess atrial selectivity of novel antiarrhythmic drugs. PMID:25700171

  9. Diagnosis of the cavo-hepato-atrial pathway in Budd-Chiari syndrome by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Gai, Yong-Hao; Cai, Shi-Feng; Fan, Hui-Li; Liu, Qing-Wei

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrasonic features of the cavo-hepato-atrial pathway in Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), by which blood is drained from the occluded inferior vena cava (IVC) to the right atrium via hepatic veins. Ultrasonograms from 11 patients with BCS with cavo-hepato-atrial pathways were retrospectively studied. Doppler ultrasound was used to observe the direction of the flow and measure the velocity of the blood-draining vessels. Blood flow in the draining vessels and the collaterals was shown as blue, red or bicolored depending on whether the flow direction was away from the transducer, towards the transducer or both. For measurement, the Doppler angle between the axis of the Doppler beam and that of the vein examined was always <60°. Ultrasonography was performed 1-2 weeks prior to digital subtraction angiography (DSA). All patients were confirmed by DSA. Membranous and segmental occlusions of IVCs were observed in seven and four cases, respectively. Blood flow from the IVC reversed to the hepatic/accessory hepatic vein, continued through the dilated intrahepatic collaterals, onward to the other hepatic vein and finally to the right atrium. The majority of the inlets (8/11) of hepatic veins above the occlusion were narrow compared with the dilated distant parts of the lumens. Accelerated blood flow in the inlets was detected in all patients regardless of the luminal diameter. In conclusion, the results from the present study suggest that the unusual cavo-hepato-atrial pathway can be diagnosed reliably by ultrasonography, which may be useful for clinical management. PMID:25120601

  10. The exploitation of spatial topographies for atrial signal extraction in atrial fibrillation ECGs.

    PubMed

    Bonizzi, Pietro; Phlypo, Ronald; Zarzoso, Vicente; Meste, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    The accuracy in the extraction of the atrial activity (AA) from electrocardiogram (ECG) signals recorded during atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes plays an important role in the analysis and characterization of atrial arrhythmias. The present contribution puts forward a method for AA signal extraction based on a blind source separation (BSS) formulation. The latter exploits spatial information on the different components in the ECG related or not to AF. The source directions or spatial topographies of the components not related to AF are used to determine the nullspace of the AA, so that the topographies related to AA become more suitable to describe AF sources. The comparative performance of the method is evaluated on real data recorded from patients with noticeable AF. The AA extraction quality of the proposed technique is comparable to that of previous algorithms.

  11. Ogilvie's Syndrome following Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Halawani, Moh'd; Thawabi, Mohammad; Abdeen, Yazan; Miller, Richard A.; Fedida, Andre A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute colonic pseudoobstruction, also known as Ogilvie's syndrome, is characterized by distension of the colon in the absence of a mechanical obstruction as evident by abdominal radiography. This syndrome is usually treated conservatively; however, medical or surgical therapies can be employed in refractory cases. Ogilvie's syndrome has been reported following cardiac events, such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cardiac bypass surgeries. We report the first case of Ogilvie's syndrome following synchronized electric cardioversion for atrial fibrillation. PMID:25214851

  12. Atrial fibrillation and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Iaccarino, Guido; De Luca, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia, especially in the elderly, and has a significant genetic component. Recently, several independent investigators have demonstrated a functional role for small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) in the pathophysiology of this cardiac arrhythmia. This report represents a systematic and updated appraisal of the main studies that established a mechanistic association between specific microRNAs and AF, focusing both on the regulation of electrical and structural remodeling of cardiac tissue. PMID:24478726

  13. Delay in diagnosis of right atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Northcote, R.J.; Sethia, B.; Ballantyne, D.

    1985-02-01

    Clinical, echocardiographic, and nuclear angiographic findings in a 51-year-old woman who presented with a history of dyspnea are discussed. Initial echocardiography revealed no abnormality. However, a subsequent radionuclide angiogram revealed a filling defect on the right side of the heart. This represented a right atrial myxoma. Radionuclide angiography can provide a useful noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of intracardiac tumors when echocardiography has not been helpful.

  14. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipset, Mark A.; Lemery, Jay; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A long-duration exploration class mission is fraught with numerous medical contingency plans. Herein, we explore the challenges of symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) occurring during an exploration class mission. The actions and resources required to ameliorate the situation, including the availability of appropriate pharmaceuticals, monitoring devices, treatment modalities, and communication protocols will be investigated. Challenges of Atrial Fibrillation during an Exploration Mission: Numerous etiologies are responsible for the initiation of AF. On Earth, we have the time and medical resources to evaluate and determine the causative situation for most cases of AF and initiate therapy accordingly. During a long-duration exploration class mission resources will be severely restricted. How is one to determine if new onset AF is due to recent myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, fluid overload, thyrotoxicosis, cardiac structural abnormalities, or CO poisoning? Which pharmaceutical therapy should be initiated and what potential side effects can be expected? Should anti-coagulation therapy be initiated? How would one monitor the therapeutic treatment of AF in microgravity? What training would medical officers require, and which communication strategies should be developed to enable the best, safest therapeutic options for treatment of AF during a long-duration exploration class mission? Summary: These questions will be investigated with expert opinion on disease elucidation, efficient pharmacology, therapeutic monitoring, telecommunication strategies, and mission cost parameters with emphasis on atrial fibrillation being just one illustration of the tremendous challenges that face a long-duration exploration mission. The limited crew training time, medical hardware, and drugs manifested to deal with such an event predicate that aggressive primary and secondary prevention strategies be developed to protect a multibillion-dollar asset like the

  15. Sequential Hybrid Procedure for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bulava, Alan; Mokracek, Ales; Hanis, Jiri; Kurfirst, Vojtech; Eisenberger, Martin; Pesl, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation yields an unsatisfactorily high number of failures. The hybrid approach has recently emerged as a technique that overcomes the limitations of both surgical and catheter procedures alone. Methods and Results We investigated the sequential (staged) hybrid method, which consists of a surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency ablation procedure followed by radiofrequency catheter ablation 6 to 8 weeks later using the CARTO 3 mapping system. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age 62±7 years, 32 males) with long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (41±34 months) and a dilated left atrium (>45 mm) were included and prospectively followed in an unblinded registry. During the electrophysiological part of the study, all 4 pulmonary veins were found to be isolated in 36 (72%) patients and a complete box‐lesion was confirmed in 14 (28%) patients. All gaps were successfully re‐ablated. Twelve months after the completed hybrid ablation, 47 patients (94%) were in normal sinus rhythm (4 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation required propafenone and 1 patient underwent a redo catheter procedure). The majority of arrhythmias recurred during the first 3 months. Beyond 12 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences detected. The surgical part of the procedure was complicated by 7 (13.7%) major complications, while no serious adverse events were recorded during the radiofrequency catheter part of the procedure. Conclusions The staged hybrid epicardial–endocardial treatment of long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation seems to be extremely effective in maintenance of normal sinus rhythm compared to radiofrequency catheter or surgical ablation alone. Epicardial ablation alone cannot guarantee durable transmural lesions. Clinical Trial Registration URL: www.ablace.cz Unique identifier: cz‐060520121617 PMID:25809548

  16. [Risk of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Csanádi, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation is considered as one of the cardiovascular pandemics of our days due to its increasing prevalence and the significant burden on healthcare systems. Management, especially prevention of thromboembolism associated with the arrhythmia is still a challenge even with recently available treatment options. Herein, the author reviews the possibilities of risk stratification and stroke prevention, which are important to all medical professionals who potentially encounter patients with this arrhythmia. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1511-1515. PMID:27640617

  17. Atrial fibrillation pearls and perils of management.

    PubMed Central

    Kudenchuk, P J

    1996-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, a common arrhythmia, is responsible for considerable cardiovascular morbidity. Its management demands more than antiarrhythmic therapy alone, but must address the causes and consequences of the arrhythmia. Although remediable causes are infrequently found, a thorough search for associated heart disease or its risk factors results in better-informed patient management. Controlling the ventricular response and protecting from thromboembolic complications are important initial goals of therapy and may include the administration of aspirin in younger, low-risk patients. Older patients and those with risk factors for systemic embolism are not adequately protected from stroke complications by aspirin therapy alone. It remains controversial whether all high-risk patients should receive warfarin and at what intensity. Whether and how sinus rhythm should be restored and maintained poses the greatest therapeutic controversy for atrial fibrillation. The mortal risk of antiarrhythmic therapy is substantially greater in patients with evidence of heart failure. In such persons, the risks and benefits of maintaining normal sinus rhythm with antiarrhythmic medications should be weighted carefully. A definitive cure for atrial fibrillation remains elusive, but promising surgical and catheter ablation therapies are being developed. PMID:8686300

  18. [Dilated cardiomyopathy induced by ectopic atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Martínez Enríquez, A

    2000-01-01

    The deleterious effect of chronic or incessant supraventricular tachycardia on ventricular function is well-known and it has been demonstrated than can ultimately lead to dilated cardiomyopathy if unrecognized. Any variety of supraventricular tachycardia with chronic evolution may lead to left ventricular dysfunction, ectopic atrial tachycardia because of its persistent nature, often incessant and poorly responsive to antiarrhythmic drugs is a frequent cause of reversible congestive heart failure in patients without other demonstrable organic heart disease. Five patients (aged 14 to 52 years) were referred with symptoms of heart failure, NYHA functional class II (one patient), class III (one patient) and class IV (3 patients) associated with an incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia. Four patients underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of the ectopic focus and one patient was treated with amiodarone. All patients were successfully treated and the echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function indicated regression of the cardiomyopathy picture with recovery of systolic function, (mean left ventricular ejection fraction 39.2 +/- 6.1% before vs mean 62.4 +/- 4.8% after (p < 0.01). The clinical and echocardiographic picture of cardiomyopathy induced by incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia is reversible after successful treatment. This stresses the necessity of recognizing such arrhythmia as cause of primary heart failure. PMID:10959459

  19. Vernakalant. Too dangerous in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    The usual aim of treatment for patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or recent-onset atrial fibrillation, including after cardiac surgery, is to slow the heart rate. Electrical and drug (amiodarone) cardioversion are other options. Vernakalant, an antiarrhythmic drug, has been authorised in the European Union for rapid reduction of recent-onset atrial fibrillation. It is only available in an injectable form. Vernakalant has not been compared in clinical trials with treatments slowing the heart rate, or with electrical cardioversion. The only available comparison with another antiarrhythmic agent is a clinical pharmacology study versus amiodarone, a slow-acting drug, based on the rate of cardioversion at 90 minutes in 240 patients. As expected, given the brief observation period, the rate was significantly higher with vernakalant (51.7% versus 5.2%). During clinical evaluation, 6 deaths occurred in the vernakalant groups versus none in the other groups (placebo or amiodarone). The main adverse effects of vernakalant are cardiac arrhythmias (ventricular arrhythmia, torsades de pointes, bradycardia) and severe hypotension. Altered taste, sneezing, paraesthesia, nausea and pruritus were frequent, and respiratory and neuropsychological effects were also reported. A trial in atrial flutter was interrupted when cases of cardiogenic shock occurred. Interactions are to be expected with drugs that prolong the QT interval, and also with drugs that lower the heart rate or the blood potassium concentration. In practice, it is better to continue to use amiodarone for drug cardioversion and to avoid using vernakalant. PMID:22827000

  20. Lone atrial fibrillation: Pathologic or not?

    PubMed

    Chambers, Patrick William

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation risk has been strongly associated with increasing age and visceral obesity. These characteristics are strongly associated with diabetes, decreased heart rate variability, and chronic inflammation. Lone atrial fibrillation (LAF) on the other hand exhibits a predilection for the physically fit and the middle aged, especially males. Given these opposing features it is postulated that pathologic AF is due to cardiac fibrosis and other age related changes while LAF is due to physiologic neurohormonal changes related to autonomic tone, insulin sensitivity, and electrolyte imbalance and that pathologic AF and LAF can be reliably differentiated via an anthropometric approach using weight, height, hip, and waist measurements. An anthropometric study is undertaken from an LAF database to test this hypothesis. Such individuals in addition to being younger and predominantly male appear to be taller with less central adiposity vs. those with pathologic AF. The ramifications of these findings with respect to insulin resistance, sympathetic tone, inflammation and hypertension, often associated with pathologic atrial fibrillation, are discussed. Speculation is drawn about possible etiologic link with mitral valve prolapse, which is commonly encountered in the tall and thin and which shares multiple clinical features with LAF. PMID:17005327

  1. Focal Atrial Tachycardia Surrounding the Anterior Septum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zulu; Ouyang, Jinge; Liang, Yanchun; Jin, Zhiqing; Yang, Guitang; Liang, Ming; Li, Shibei; Yu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background— Focal atrial tachycardias (ATs) surrounding the anterior atrial septum (AAS) have been successfully ablated from the right atrial septum (RAS), the aortic cusps, and the aortic mitral junction. However, the strategy for mapping and ablation of AAS-ATs has not been well defined. Methods and Results— Of 227 consecutive patients with AT, 47 (20.7%; mean age, 56.3±11.6 years) with AAS-ATs were studied; among them, initial ablation was successful at RAS in only 5 of 14 patients and at noncoronary cusp (NCC) in 28 of 33 patients. In 45 of the 47 patients, the 46 of 48 AAS-ATs were eliminated at RAS in 8 patients, NCC in 35 patients (earliest activation time at NCC was later than that at RAS by 5–10 ms in 6 patients), and aortic mitral junction in 3 patients (all with negative P wave in lead aVL and positive P wave in the inferior leads), including 1 patient whose 2 ATs were eliminated separately from the NCC and the aortic mitral junction. Conclusions— Most of the ATs surrounding the AAS can be eliminated from within the NCC, which is usually the preferential ablation site. Ablation at the RAS and aortic mitral junction should be considered when supported by P-wave morphologies on surface ECG and results of activation mapping and ablation. PMID:25908691

  2. Atrial fibrillation: effects beyond the atrium?

    PubMed

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Casadei, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained clinical arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity, mostly secondary to heart failure and stroke, and an estimated two-fold increase in premature death. Efforts to increase our understanding of AF and its complications have focused on unravelling the mechanisms of electrical and structural remodelling of the atrial myocardium. Yet, it is increasingly recognized that AF is more than an atrial disease, being associated with systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and adverse effects on the structure and function of the left ventricular myocardium that may be prognostically important. Here, we review the molecular and in vivo evidence that underpins current knowledge regarding the effects of human or experimental AF on the ventricular myocardium. Potential mechanisms are explored including diffuse ventricular fibrosis, focal myocardial scarring, and impaired myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve. The complex relationship between AF, systemic inflammation, as well as endothelial/microvascular dysfunction and the effects of AF on ventricular calcium handling and oxidative stress are also addressed. Finally, consideration is given to the clinical implications of these observations and concepts, with particular reference to rate vs. rhythm control.

  3. Atrial Fibrillation: The Science behind Its Defiance

    PubMed Central

    Czick, Maureen E.; Shapter, Christine L.; Silverman, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia in the world, due both to its tenacious treatment resistance, and to the tremendous number of risk factors that set the stage for the atria to fibrillate. Cardiopulmonary, behavioral, and psychological risk factors generate electrical and structural alterations of the atria that promote reentry and wavebreak. These culminate in fibrillation once atrial ectopic beats set the arrhythmia process in motion. There is growing evidence that chronic stress can physically alter the emotion centers of the limbic system, changing their input to the hypothalamic-limbic-autonomic network that regulates autonomic outflow. This leads to imbalance of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, most often in favor of sympathetic overactivation. Autonomic imbalance acts as a driving force behind the atrial ectopy and reentry that promote AF. Careful study of AF pathophysiology can illuminate the means that enable AF to elude both pharmacological control and surgical cure, by revealing ways in which antiarrhythmic drugs and surgical and ablation procedures may paradoxically promote fibrillation. Understanding AF pathophysiology can also help clarify the mechanisms by which emerging modalities aiming to correct autonomic imbalance, such as renal sympathetic denervation, may offer potential to better control this arrhythmia. Finally, growing evidence supports lifestyle modification approaches as adjuncts to improve AF control. PMID:27699086

  4. Atrial Fibrillation: The Science behind Its Defiance

    PubMed Central

    Czick, Maureen E.; Shapter, Christine L.; Silverman, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia in the world, due both to its tenacious treatment resistance, and to the tremendous number of risk factors that set the stage for the atria to fibrillate. Cardiopulmonary, behavioral, and psychological risk factors generate electrical and structural alterations of the atria that promote reentry and wavebreak. These culminate in fibrillation once atrial ectopic beats set the arrhythmia process in motion. There is growing evidence that chronic stress can physically alter the emotion centers of the limbic system, changing their input to the hypothalamic-limbic-autonomic network that regulates autonomic outflow. This leads to imbalance of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, most often in favor of sympathetic overactivation. Autonomic imbalance acts as a driving force behind the atrial ectopy and reentry that promote AF. Careful study of AF pathophysiology can illuminate the means that enable AF to elude both pharmacological control and surgical cure, by revealing ways in which antiarrhythmic drugs and surgical and ablation procedures may paradoxically promote fibrillation. Understanding AF pathophysiology can also help clarify the mechanisms by which emerging modalities aiming to correct autonomic imbalance, such as renal sympathetic denervation, may offer potential to better control this arrhythmia. Finally, growing evidence supports lifestyle modification approaches as adjuncts to improve AF control.

  5. Rotigaptide (ZP123) improves atrial conduction slowing in chronic volume overload-induced dilated atria.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Ketil; Miyamoto, Takuya; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao; Nakayama, Jun; Shimojo, Hisashi; Hirose, Masamichi

    2006-07-01

    Chronic atrial dilation is associated with atrial conduction velocity slowing and an increased risk of developing atrial tachyarrhythmias. Rotigaptide (ZP123) is a selective gap junction modifier that increases cardiac gap junctional intercellular communication. We hypothesised that rotigaptide treatment would increase atrial conduction velocity and reduce the inducibility to atrial tachyarrhythmias in a model of chronic volume overload induced chronic atrial dilatation characterized by atrial conduction velocity slowing. Chronic volume overload was created in Japanese white rabbits by arterio-venous shunt formation. Atrial conduction velocity and atrial tachyarrhythmias inducibility were examined in Langendorff-perfused chronic volume overload hearts (n=12) using high-resolution optical mapping before and after treatment with rotigaptide. Moreover, expression levels of atrial gap junction proteins (connexin40 and connexin43) were examined in chronic volume overload hearts (n=6) and compared to sham-operated controls (n=6). Rotigaptide treatment significantly increased atrial conduction velocity in chronic volume overload hearts, however, rotigaptide did not decrease susceptibility to the induction of atrial tachyarrhythmias. Protein expressions of Cx40 and Cx43 were decreased by 32% and 72% (P<0.01), respectively, in chromic volume overload atria compared to control. To conclude, rotigaptide increased atrial conduction velocity in a rabbit model of chromic volume overload induced atrial conduction velocity slowing. The demonstrated effect of rotigaptide on atrial conduction velocity did not prevent atrial tachyarrhythmias inducibility. Whether rotigaptide may possess antiarrhythmic efficacy in other models of atrial fibrillation remains to be determined.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide: water and electrolyte homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, C J; Jardine, A G

    1989-08-01

    In the few years since its identification, a clear role for ANP in the regulation of water and electrolyte balance has emerged (Figure 3). The peptide is released in response to blood volume expansion, both acutely and gradually during changes in dietary sodium intake. Similarly, plasma levels are elevated in pathophysiological conditions such as cardiac and renal failure. It has become apparent that ANP has natriuretic, diuretic and vasorelaxant properties. Many of the original studies employed what we now know to be pharmacological doses of the peptide. However, recent reports have confirmed that small, sustained elevations in plasma ANP within or marginally above the 'normal' physiological range produce similar effects. A number of recent studies have tried to specifically address the physiological relevance of ANP. Although undoubtedly release by atrial distension and effective when infused to similar concentrations, atrial distension also has other effects via neural pathways. Thus, the demonstration that excretion of saline is impaired by atrial appendectomy (Benjamin et al, 1988) does not imply that this is only due to the absence of an atrial hormone. Goetz et al (1986) demonstrated that in the denervated heart, although ANP is still released, the excretion of a saline load is impaired. Similarly, in man, Richards et al (1988a) needed to infuse ANP to much higher plasma levels than those achieved by a saline load in order to reproduce the natriuresis. Although these experiments can be criticized, they confirm that ANP is not the sole mechanism for excreting a volume load, or for the natriuresis following atrial distension, but that these effects are likely to reflect the balance between ANP, AVP, the renin-angiotensin and autonomic nervous systems. In rats immunized against ANP (Greenwald et al, 1988), although the ability to excrete an acute saline load was impaired, long-term sodium balance was normal, suggesting that the rats were able to compensate for

  7. Interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and atrial natriuretic factor in the control of renal functions.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Protasoni, G; Assi, C; Golin, R; Stella, A; Zanchetti, A

    1990-08-01

    We studied neural influences on the renal actions of atrial peptides in anaesthetized cats by comparing the response to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) infusion in the innervated kidney and in the contralateral surgically denervated kidney. During ANF infusion arterial pressure decreased, the heart rate did not change and blood flow to both kidneys increased slightly. Vascular conductances became slightly but significantly higher in the denervated kidneys than in the controls. In both kidneys, the glomerular filtration rate increased transiently and significantly. Inhibition of renin release was more prompt and larger in the innervated than in the denervated kidneys. ANF infusion caused a significant increase in sodium and water excretion from both the innervated and denervated kidneys. However, the diuretic and natriuretic effect in the innervated kidneys, although proportionally greater than that in the denervated kidneys, was of shorter duration and subsided after 20 min of ANF infusion. Efferent renal nerve activity did not change during the initial 10 min of ANF infusion but thereafter increased progressively and significantly. We conclude that the effects of atrial peptides on renin release and excretory functions are influenced by renal nerve activity.

  8. Prolonged and fractionated right atrial electrograms during sinus rhythm in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sick sinus node syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, M; Fukatani, M; Konoe, A; Isomoto, S; Kadena, M; Hashiba, K

    1991-02-01

    Intraatrial catheter mapping of the right atrium was performed during sinus rhythm in 92 patients: Group I = 43 control patients without paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or sick sinus node syndrome; Group II = 31 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation but without sick sinus node syndrome; and Group III = 18 patients with both paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sick sinus node syndrome. Atrial electrograms were recorded at 12 sites in the right atrium. The duration and number of fragmented deflections of the atrial electrograms were quantitatively measured. The mean duration and number of fragmented deflections of the 516 atrial electrograms in Group I were 74 +/- 11 ms and 3.9 +/- 1.3, respectively. The criteria for an abnormal atrial electrogram were defined as a duration of greater than or equal to 100 ms or eight or more fragmented deflections, or both. Abnormal atrial electrograms were observed in 10 patients (23.3%) in Group I, 21 patients (67.7%) in Group II and 15 patients (83.3%) in Group III (Group II versus Group I, p less than 0.001; Group III versus Group I, p less than 0.001). The mean number of abnormal electrograms per patient with an abnormal electrogram was 1.3 +/- 0.7 in Group I, 2.5 +/- 1.9 in Group II and 3.5 +/- 2.5 in Group III (Group I versus Group II, p less than 0.01; Group II versus Group III, p less than 0.05). A prolonged and fractionated atrial electrogram characteristic of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation can be closely related to the vulnerability of the atrial muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effect of whiskey on atrial vulnerability and "holiday heart".

    PubMed

    Engel, T R; Luck, J C

    1983-03-01

    Vulnerability to atrial fibrillation and flutter was examined in 11 alcohol abusers who did not have cardiomyopathy or manifest heart failure. Atrial extrastimulation was done with rapid pacing (drive cycle length 500 ms) to facilitate induction of atrial vulnerability, seen in four alcohol abusers. The remaining seven were retested 30 minutes after drinking 60 to 120 ml of 86 proof whiskey (ethanol blood levels were 49 to 101 mg/100 ml but pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained normal in all) and atrial fibrillation or flutter was induced in three of the drinkers. Three nondrinkers, symptomatic with sinus bradycardia but not in heart failure, were found not to be vulnerable to atrial fibrillation or flutter, but flutter was induced in two of the three after drinking whiskey. Whiskey did not alter atrial functional refractory periods (mean +/- standard error of the mean 297 +/- 14 to 290 +/- 12 ms) or widen the dispersion among three disparate right atrial sites (57 +/- 13 to 47 +/- 12 ms). Thus, whiskey enhanced vulnerability to atrial fibrillation and flutter in patients without heart failure or cardiomyopathy, substantiating the "holiday heart" syndrome.

  10. Hypertension and Atrial Fibrillation: Any Change with the New Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Taddei, Stefano; Virdis, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and atrial fibrillation are the most common cardiovascular risk factors and clinically significant arrhythmia, respectively. These conditions frequently coexist and their prevalence increases rapidly with aging. Despite several different risk factors and clinical conditions predisposing to hypertension for its high prevalence in the population is still the main risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms (such as structural changes at the level of left ventricle and or atrium, neurohormonal activation, arterial stiffness, etc.) can contribute to the onset of atrial fibrillation. Some antihypertensive treatments have been shown to contribute to reduce the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for stroke, which is further increased in the presence of hypertension. For this reason, hypertension is included as a major risk factor in the available models for the risk stratification and the prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this article we will review the relationship between atrial fibrillation and hypertension, looking at the possible specific indications of the antithrombotic treatment with new classes of anticoagulants in the prevention of thromboembolic events in hypertensive patients with atrial fibrillation.

  11. Calcified right atrial thrombus in HIV infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Mwita, Julius Chacha; Goepamang, Monkgogi; Mkubwa, Jack Joseph; Gunness, Teeluck Kumar; Reebye, Deshmukh; Motumise, Kelebogile

    2013-01-01

    Calcified right atrial thrombi are rare cardiac masses that may be complicated by pulmonary embolism. Although they can be discovered by a transthoracic echocardiography, they may need histological examination to differentiate them from other cardiac masses. We report a case of a 44-year-old woman who presented with a calcified right atrial thrombus and progressive dyspnoea. PMID:23819008

  12. Atrial Arrhythmias and Their Implications for Space Flight - Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. D.; Barr, Y. R.; Bauer, P.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kerstman, E.; Tarver, B.

    2010-01-01

    This panel will discuss the implications of atrial arrhythmias in astronauts from a variety of perspectives; including historical data, current practices, and future challenges for exploration class missions. The panelists will present case histories, outline the evolution of current NASA medical standards for atrial arrhythmias, discuss the use of predictive tools, and consider potential challenges for current and future missions.

  13. Novel Interventional Strategies for the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Siontis, Konstantinos C; Oral, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of the invasive management of atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained arrhythmia in humans, has changed dramatically in the last decade owing to numerous advances in arrhythmia mapping and ablation technologies. The current review critically appraises novel interventional strategies for the treatment of atrial fibrillation with a focus on clinical effectiveness and safety. PMID:27403294

  14. Effects of spironolactone towards rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid pacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fa; Gu, Lei; Huang, Meng-Xun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Li, Hua; Zhang, Bang-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the effects of spironolactone towards the rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid atrial pacing (RAP). 30 rabbits were randomly divided into control group, RAP group and spironolactone group, with 10 rabbits in each group. RAP was performed at the speed of 800 beats/min for 8 h, atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was determined before and at the 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) of the pacing, the expressions of atrial muscular calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA were performed the RT-PCR detection, and ultrastructural changes of atrial myocytes were observed. AERP of RAP group shortened, with poor frequency adaptability; the expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA decreased 22% and 26%, respectively, when compared with the control group; ultrastructure of atrial myocytes changed significantly. AERP of spironotlactone group shortened less that RAP group, and the frequency adaptability was maintained, the decreased expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA significantly reduced. RAP could cause atrial remodeling, while spironolactone could inhibit RAP-induced atrial remodeling. PMID:26826809

  15. The increasing prevalence of atrial fibrillation among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Patrick, Amanda R; Liu, Jun; Brookhart, M Alan; Setoguchi, Soko

    2011-02-01

    A half million Americans have ESRD, which puts them at high risk for cardiovascular disease and poor outcomes. Little is known about the epidemiology of atrial fibrillation among patients with ESRD. We analyzed data from annual cohorts (1992 to 2006) of prevalent hemodialysis patients from the United States Renal Data System. In each cohort, we searched 1 year of medical claims for relevant diagnosis codes to determine the prevalence of atrial fibrillation. Among 2.5 million patient observations, 7.7% had atrial fibrillation, with the prevalence increasing 3-fold from 3.5% (1992) to 10.7% (2006). The number of affected patients increased from 3620 to 23,893 (6.6-fold) during this period. Older age, male gender, and several comorbid conditions were associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation. Compared with otherwise similar Caucasians, the prevalence of atrial fibrillation rates was substantially lower for blacks, Asians, and Native Americans. One-year mortality was twice as high among hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation compared with those without (39% versus 19%), and this increased risk was constant during the 15 years of the study. In conclusion, the prevalence of diagnosed atrial fibrillation among patients receiving hemodialysis in the United States is increasing, varies by race, and remains associated with substantially increased mortality. Identifying potentially modifiable risk factors for incident atrial fibrillation requires further investigation.

  16. Mechanics of breathing in patients with atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Troyer, A D; Yernault, J C; Englert, M

    1977-03-01

    Mechanics of breathing and pulmonary diffusing properties were investigated in 24 adult patients with atrial septal defect. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to mean pulmonary artery pressure: less than 19 mm Hg (group I), 20 to 24 mm Hg (group II), and greater than 25 mm Hg (group III). The only change observed in group I was a marked increase in diffusing capacity. Patients of group II showed not only an increase in diffusing capacity, but also an overt decrease in maximal expiratory flow at all lung volumes and at any given driving pressure. For these two groups, a highly significant inverse correlation was found between changes in diffusing and elastic lung properties (r = -0.71; P less than 0.001). In patients of group III, the expiratory flow remained clearly decreased; furthermore, lung compliance and lung volumes were sharply reduced, airway resistance was elevated, and diffusing capacity was normal. Finally, from group I to group III, the lung elastic recoil became progressively diminished at small lung volumes. These results suggest that an increased pulmonary blood volume induces an increase in diffusing capacity and a slight decrease in lung compliance. Simultaneous existance of high intravascular pressure strengthens the effects of increased pulmonary blood volume on lung mechanics and results in significant abnormalities in the lung mechanical behavior. It is postulated that these effects are due to a competition for space between vessels and airways within the bronchovascular sheaths, with a subsequent compression of small airways. PMID:842953

  17. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  18. Keratin gene mutations in disorders of human skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Syed, Deeba N; Adhami, Vaqar M; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-04-15

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 22 different genes including, the cornea, hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been implicated in a wide range of hereditary diseases. The exact phenotype of each disease usually reflects the spatial expression level and the types of mutated keratin genes, the location of the mutations and their consequences at sub-cellular levels as well as other epigenetic and/or environmental factors. The identification of specific pathogenic mutations in keratin disorders formed the basis of our understanding that led to re-classification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe keratin genodermatoses. Molecular defects in cutaneous keratin genes encoding for keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) causes keratinocytes and tissue-specific fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS; K5, K14), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI; K1, K2, K10) i.e. epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI; K1, K10) and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS; K2), pachyonychia congenita (PC; K6a, K6b, K16, K17), epidermolytic palmo-plantar keratoderma (EPPK; K9, (K1)), monilethrix (K81, K83, K86), ectodermal dysplasia (ED; K85) and steatocystoma multiplex. These keratins also have been identified to have roles in apoptosis, cell proliferation

  19. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts. Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael; Watkins, Sharmila; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the findings of a panel of heart experts brought together to study if atrial arrhythmias more prevalent in astronauts, and potential risk factors that may predispose astronauts to atrial arrhythmias. The objective of the panel was to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, identify gaps in knowledge, and propose relevant research initiatives. While Atrial Arrhythmias occur in approximately the same percents in astronauts as in the general population, they seem to occur at younger ages in astronauts. Several reasons for this predisposition were given: gender, hypertension, endurance training, and triggering events. Potential Space Flight-Related Risk factors that may play a role in precipitating lone atrial fibrillation were reviewed. There appears to be no evidence that any variable of the space flight environment increases the likelihood of developing atrial arrhythmias during space flight.

  20. Global burden of atrial fibrillation in developed and developing nations.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Sumeet S; Roth, Gregory A; Gillum, Richard F; Mensah, George A

    2014-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder in the world, with major public health impact especially due to increased risk of stroke and hospitalizations. The recently published results on epidemiology of atrial fibrillation from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study confirm the existence of a significant and progressive worldwide increase in the burden of atrial fibrillation. However, there appears to be regional variation in both the burden of atrial fibrillation and availability of epidemiological data regarding this condition. In this review, the authors identify issues that are unique to the developed versus developing regions and outline a road map for possible approaches to surveillance, management, and prevention of atrial fibrillation at the global level.

  1. Dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter: approval and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrette, Deborah; Gonzalez, Mario; Samii, Soraya; Banchs, Javier; Penny-Peterson, Erica; Naccarelli, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Dronedarone, a new Class III antiarrhythmic agent, has now been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Approval came in March 2009 due to the positive results of the ATHENA trial showing significant reductions in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalization with dronedarone use. A post hoc analysis of the ATHENA data also suggested a decrease in stroke risk with this agent. However, due to safety concerns in the heart failure population in the earlier ANDROMEDA trial, dronedarone is not recommended for patients with an ejection fraction <35% and recent decompensated heart failure. Dronedarone is an amiodarone analog with multichannel blocking electrophysiologic properties similar to those of amiodarone, but several structural differences. Dronedarone’s lack of the iodine moiety reduces its potential for thyroid and pulmonary toxicity. Preliminary data from the DIONYSOS trial, and an indirect meta-analysis comparing amiodarone with dronedarone, showed amiodarone to be more effective in maintaining sinus rhythm, while dronedarone was associated with fewer adverse effects resulting in early termination of the drug. Dronedarone is the first antiarrhythmic drug for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter shown to reduce cardiovascular hospitalizations. In patients with structural heart disease who have an ejection fraction >35% and no recent decompensated heart failure, dronedarone should be considered earlier than amiodarone in the treatment algorithm. PMID:20730068

  2. Silent Atrial Fibrillation: Definition, Clarification, and Unanswered Issues.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Harold L

    2015-11-01

    Silent or subclinical asymptomatic atrial fibrillation has currently gained wide interest in the epidemiologic, neurologic and cardiovascular communities. The association of brief episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or surrogate atrial arrhythmias which predict future clinical adverse events have been established. Nevertheless there exists a confounding array of definitions to indicate its presence without discrete indication of which populations should be examined. Moreover the term "atrial fibrillation burden" (AFB) has emerged from such studies with a plethora of descriptions to prognosticate both arrhythmic and clinical adverse events. This presentation suggests clarification of diagnostic definitions associated with silent atrial fibrillation, and a more precise description of AFB. It examines the populations across the current disease and cardiovascular invasive therapeutic spectrum that lead to both silent atrial fibrillation and AFB. It describes the diagnostic methods of arrhythmia detection utilizing the surface ECG, subcutaneous ECG or intra-cardiac devices and their relationship in seeking meaningful arrhythmic markers of silent atrial fibrillation. Whereas a wide range of clinical risk factors of silent atrial fibrillation have been validated in the literature, there is an ongoing search for those arrhythmic risk factors that precisely identify and prognosticate outcome events in diverse populations at risk of atrial fibrillation and its complications. This presentation identifies this chaos, and focuses attention on the issues to be addressed to facilitate descriptive and comparative scientific studies in the future. It is a call to action specifically to the medical arrhythmic community and its specialty societies (i.e., ISHNE, HRS, EHRA) to begin a quest to unravel the arrhythmic quagmire associated with "silent atrial fibrillation."

  3. [Maze procedure in a case of dextrocardia with atrial septal defect and persistent left superior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Arata; Kawada, Masaaki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with dextrocardia at the age of 1 year and was asymptomatic until 1 year before admission. He was transferred to our hospital for management of atrial fibrillation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed dextrocardia with atrial septal defect;moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation; and a large, persistent left superior vena cava. A cardiac catheterization study revealed that pulmonary flow/systemic flow (Qp/Qs) was 3.6 and that pulmonary vascular resistance was 2.5 Wood U·m². Intracardiac repair with tricuspid annuloplasty and a maze procedure was scheduled. When establishing cardiopulmonary bypass, venous drainage was initially obtained from the inferior vena cava and the left superior vena cava, and the small superior vena cava was then directly cannulated after opening the right atrium. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and serial electrocardiograms have demonstrated maintenance of normal sinus rhythm for 3.5 years after the operation.

  4. Spectral Doppler interrogation of the pulmonary veins in atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Bahaa M; Mohty, Dania; Aldawood, Wafa; Dahdouh, Ziad; Di Salvo, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    The various components of the pulmonary venous (PV) flow are linked to physiological and pathological changes that predominantly occur in the left heart. Thus, spectral Doppler interrogation of the PVs provides hemodynamic insight mainly into left-sided cardiac function. An exception to the dependence of PV flow on left heart events occurs in the setting of an atrial septal defect (ASD). The latter causes a portion of the PV blood flow, intended to cross the mitral valve, to be channeled into the more compliant right heart. This phenomenon makes the PV flow more dependent on the left-to-right interatrial shunt. The identification on the PV Doppler of a pattern that suggests uncoupling with left heart hemodynamics should raise the suspicion of an underlying ASD.

  5. Disrupted calcium release as a mechanism for atrial alternans associated with human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kelly C; Bayer, Jason D; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, but our knowledge of the arrhythmogenic substrate is incomplete. Alternans, the beat-to-beat alternation in the shape of cardiac electrical signals, typically occurs at fast heart rates and leads to arrhythmia. However, atrial alternans have been observed at slower pacing rates in AF patients than in controls, suggesting that increased vulnerability to arrhythmia in AF patients may be due to the proarrythmic influence of alternans at these slower rates. As such, alternans may present a useful therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of AF, but the mechanism underlying alternans occurrence in AF patients at heart rates near rest is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how cellular changes that occur in human AF affect the appearance of alternans at heart rates near rest. To achieve this, we developed a computational model of human atrial tissue incorporating electrophysiological remodeling associated with chronic AF (cAF) and performed parameter sensitivity analysis of ionic model parameters to determine which cellular changes led to alternans. Of the 20 parameters tested, only decreasing the ryanodine receptor (RyR) inactivation rate constant (kiCa) produced action potential duration (APD) alternans seen clinically at slower pacing rates. Using single-cell clamps of voltage, fluxes, and state variables, we determined that alternans onset was Ca2+-driven rather than voltage-driven and occurred as a result of decreased RyR inactivation which led to increased steepness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release slope. Iterated map analysis revealed that because SR Ca2+ uptake efficiency was much higher in control atrial cells than in cAF cells, drastic reductions in kiCa were required to produce alternans at comparable pacing rates in control atrial cells. These findings suggest that RyR kinetics may play a critical role in altered Ca2+ homeostasis which drives proarrhythmic

  6. Genetic Loci Associated With Atrial Fibrillation: Relation to Left Atrial Structure in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Yin, Xiaoyan; McManus, David D.; Chuang, Michael L.; Cheng, Susan; Lubitz, Steven A.; Arora, Garima; Manning, Warren J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants associated with AF. Whether genetic variants associated with AF are also associated with atrial structure, an intermediate phenotype for AF, has had limited investigation. We sought to investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and atrial structure obtained by cardiovascular imaging in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods and Results We selected 11 SNPs that have been associated with AF in GWAS. We examined the SNPs' relations to cross‐sectional left atrial (LA) dimensions (determined by transthoracic echocardiography) and LA volume (determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance [CMR]) employing linear regression. The total sample included 1555 participants with CMR LA volume (age 60±9 years, 53% women) and 6861 participants with echocardiographic LA diameter (age 48±13 years, 52% women) measured. We employed a significance threshold of P<0.0023 to account for multiple testing of the 11 SNPs and 2 LA measures. In a primary analysis, no SNPs were significantly related to the LA measures. Likewise, in secondary analyses excluding individuals with prevalent AF (n=77, CMR sample; n=105, echocardiography sample) no SNPs were related to LA volume or diameter. Conclusion In a community‐based cohort, we did not identify a statistically significant association between selected SNPs associated with AF and measures of LA anatomy. Further investigations with larger longitudinally assessed samples and a broader array of SNPs may be necessary to determine the relation between genetic loci associated with AF and atrial structure. PMID:24695651

  7. Predictors of atrial fibrillation termination and clinical success of catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Heist, E Kevin; Chalhoub, Fadi; Barrett, Conor; Danik, Stephan; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Mansour, Moussa

    2012-08-15

    The termination of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) during catheter ablation has been associated in some, but not all, studies with reduced arrhythmia during clinical follow-up. We sought to determine the rate of persistent AF termination achievable with a stepwise ablation strategy, the predictors of AF termination, and the clinical outcomes associated with termination and nontermination. A total of 143 consecutive patients (age 62 ± 9 years, AF duration 5.7 ± 5.2 years) with persistent and longstanding persistent AF resistant to antiarrhythmic medication who presented in AF for catheter ablation were studied. Ablation was done with a stepwise approach, including pulmonary vein isolation, followed by complex fractionated atrial electrogram ablation and ablation of resultant atrial tachycardias. Clinical follow-up was then performed after a 2-month blanking period to assess arrhythmia recurrence, defined as AF or atrial tachycardia lasting ≥ 30 seconds. AF termination by ablation was achieved in 95 (66%) of the 143 patients. Multivariate predictors of AF termination included longer baseline AF cycle length (p <0.001) and smaller left atrial size (p = 0.002). AF termination by ablation was associated with both a lower incidence of arrhythmia recurrence after a single procedure without antiarrhythmic drugs (p = 0.01) and overall clinical success (single or multiple procedures, with or without antiarrhythmic drugs; p = 0.005). On multivariate analysis, the predictors of overall clinical success included AF termination by ablation (p = 0.001), a shorter ablation duration (p = 0.002), younger age (p = 0.02), male gender (p = 0.03), and the presence of hypertension (p = 0.03). In conclusion, among patients with persistent AF, termination of AF by ablation can be achieved in most patients and is associated with reduced recurrence of arrhythmia. PMID:22591670

  8. Prevalence of left atrial abnormalities in atrial fibrillation versus normal sinus patients

    PubMed Central

    Ketai, Loren H; Teague, Shawn D; Rissing, Stacy M

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) may be the cause or sequela of left atrial abnormalities and variants. Purpose To determine the prevalence of left atrial (LA) abnormalities in AF patients compared to normal sinus rhythm (NSR) patients. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 281 cardiac CT examinations from 2010 to 2012, excluding patients with prior pulmonary vein ablation, known coronary artery disease, prior coronary stent placement, or coronary artery bypass grafts. The first group consisted of 159 AF patients undergoing cardiac CT prior to pulmonary vein ablation and the second group consisted of 122 NSR patients evaluated with coronary CT angiography. Demographic data were collected. LA abnormalities were analyzed. Left atrial diameter was measured on an axial view. Results A total of 281 patients were included. The male gender has significantly higher prevalence of AF than female gender, P value <0.001. Patients with AF were significantly older (mean age, 57.4 years; standard deviation [SD], 11.8 years) than NSR patients (mean age, 53.4 years; SD, 13.6 years), P value, 0.01. The left atrial diameter was greater in the AF patients (mean diameter, 4.3 cm; SD, 0.82 cm) versus the NSR patients (3.4 cm; SD, 0.58 cm), P value, <0.0001. LA diverticulum was the most prevalent variant, occurring in 28.4% of the entire patient population followed by LA pouch, occurring in 24%. There was no significant between group differences in the prevalence of these or the remainder of the LA variants. Conclusion AF patients differed significantly from NSR patients in LA size, gender, and mean age. There was no statistical significance between the two groups with regard to the LA morphologic abnormalities other than size. PMID:27358747

  9. Heart failure after transvenous closure of atrial septal defect associated with atrial standstill and thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Vehbi; Senocak, Filiz; Orün, Utku Arman; Ceylan, Ozben

    2013-10-01

    Despite advances in device closure for atrial septal defect, post-closure heart failure remains a clinical problem in adult patients but is seen only rarely in children. An eight-year-old boy, who had been followed by a local pediatrician with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and congenital heart disease, was consulted to us for cardiac re-evaluation. Electrocardiography demonstrated absent P waves, and echocardiography revealed enlargement of the right ventricle and both atria and secundum atrial septal defect. With the diagnosis of atrial standstill, secundum atrial septal defect and thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia, acute heart failure developed after transvenous closure of the atrial septal defect, which improved dramatically with thiamine and supportive treatment. PMID:24164997

  10. Metamorphic labral axis patterning in the beetle Tribolium castaneum requires multiple upstream, but few downstream, genes in the appendage patterning network.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank W; Angelini, David R; Gaudio, Matthew S; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-03-01

    The arthropod labrum is an anterior appendage-like structure that forms the dorsal side of the preoral cavity. Conflicting interpretations of fossil, nervous system, and developmental data have led to a proliferation of scenarios for labral evolution. The best supported hypothesis is that the labrum is a novel structure that shares development with appendages as a result of co-option. Here, we use RNA interference in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum to compare metamorphic patterning of the labrum to previously published data on ventral appendage patterning. As expected under the co-option hypothesis, depletion of several genes resulted in similar defects in the labrum and ventral appendages. These include proximal deletions and proximal-to-distal transformations resulting from depletion of the leg gap genes homothorax and extradenticle, large-scale deletions resulting from depletion of the leg gap gene Distal-less, and smaller distal deletions resulting from knockdown of the EGF ligand Keren. However, depletion of dachshund and many of the genes that function downstream of the leg gap genes in the ventral appendages had either subtle or no effects on labral axis patterning. This pattern of partial similarity suggests that upstream genes act through different downstream targets in the labrum. We also discovered that many appendage axis patterning genes have roles in patterning the epipharyngeal sensillum array, suggesting that they have become integrated into a novel regulatory network. These genes include Notch, Delta, and decapentaplegic, and the transcription factors abrupt, bric à brac, homothorax, extradenticle and the paralogs apterous a and apterous b.

  11. Metamorphic labral axis patterning in the beetle Tribolium castaneum requires multiple upstream, but few downstream, genes in the appendage patterning network

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Frank W.; Angelini, David R.; Gaudio, Matthew; Jockusch, Elizabeth L.

    2014-01-01

    The arthropod labrum is an anterior appendage-like structure that forms the dorsal side of the preoral cavity. Conflicting interpretations of fossil, nervous system and developmental data have led to a proliferation of scenarios for labral evolution. The best supported hypothesis is that the labrum is a novel structure that shares development with appendages as a result of co-option. Here, we use RNA interference in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum to compare metamorphic patterning of the labrum to previously published data on ventral appendage patterning. As expected under the co-option hypothesis, depletion of several genes resulted in similar defects in the labrum and ventral appendages. These include proximal deletions and proximal-to-distal transformations resulting from depletion of the leg gap genes homothorax and extradenticle, large-scale deletions resulting from depletion of the leg gap gene Distal-less, and smaller distal deletions resulting from knockdown of the EGF ligand Keren. However, depletion of dachshund and many of the genes that function downstream of the leg gap genes in the ventral appendages had either subtle or no effects on labral axis patterning. This pattern of partial similarity suggests that upstream genes act through different downstream targets in the labrum. We also discovered that many appendage axis patterning genes have roles in patterning the epipharyngeal sensillum array, suggesting that they have become integrated into a novel regulatory network. These genes include Notch, Delta, and decapentaplegic, and the transcription factors abrupt, bric à brac, homothorax, extradenticle and the paralogs apterous a and apterous b. PMID:24617987

  12. Righting and turning in mid-air using appendage inertia: reptile tails, analytical models and bio-inspired robots.

    PubMed

    Jusufi, A; Kawano, D T; Libby, T; Full, R J

    2010-12-01

    Unlike the falling cat, lizards can right themselves in mid-air by a swing of their large tails in one direction causing the body to rotate in the other. Here, we developed a new three-dimensional analytical model to investigate the effectiveness of tails as inertial appendages that change body orientation. We anchored our model using the morphological parameters of the flat-tailed house gecko Hemidactylus platyurus. The degree of roll in air righting and the amount of yaw in mid-air turning directly measured in house geckos matched the model's results. Our model predicted an increase in body roll and turning as tails increase in length relative to the body. Tails that swung from a near orthogonal plane relative to the body (i.e. 0-30° from vertical) were the most effective at generating body roll, whereas tails operating at steeper angles (i.e. 45-60°) produced only half the rotation. To further test our analytical model's predictions, we built a bio-inspired robot prototype. The robot reinforced how effective attitude control can be attained with simple movements of an inertial appendage.

  13. Frequency-tuning input-shaped manifold-based switching control for underactuated space robot equipped with flexible appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirohisa; Ieda, Shoko; Kasai, Shinya

    2014-08-01

    Underactuated control problems, such as the control of a space robot without actuators on the main body, have been widely investigated. However, few studies have examined attitude control problems of underactuated space robots equipped with a flexible appendage, such as solar panels. In order to suppress vibration in flexible appendages, a zero-vibration input-shaping technique was applied to the link motion of an underactuated planar space robot. However, because the vibrational frequency depends on the link angles, simple input-shaping control methods cannot sufficiently suppress the vibration. In this paper, the dependency of the vibrational frequency on the link angles is measured experimentally, and the time-delay interval of the input shaper is then tuned based on the frequency estimated from the link angles. The proposed control method is referred to as frequency-tuning input-shaped manifold-based switching control (frequency-tuning IS-MBSC). The experimental results reveal that frequency-tuning IS-MBSC is capable of controlling the link angles and the main body attitude to maintain the target angles and that the vibration suppression performance of the proposed frequency-tuning IS-MBSC is better than that of a non-tuning IS-MBSC, which does not take the frequency variation into consideration.

  14. Electrogram Morphology Recurrence Patterns during Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jason; Gordon, David; Passman, Rod S.; Knight, Bradley P.; Arora, Rishi; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional mapping of atrial fibrillation (AF) is limited by changing electrogram morphologies and variable cycle lengths. Objective We tested the hypothesis that morphology recurrence plot analysis would identify sites of stable and repeatable electrogram morphology patterns. Methods AF electrograms recorded from left atrial (LA) and right atrial (RA) sites in 19 patients (10 male, 59±10 years old) prior to AF ablation were analyzed. Morphology recurrence plots for each electrogram recording were created by cross-correlation of each automatically detected activation with every other activation in the recording. A recurrence percentage, the percentage of the most common morphology, and the mean cycle length of activations with the most common morphology (CLR) were computed. Results The morphology recurrence plots commonly showed checkerboard patterns of alternating high and low cross correlation values indicating periodic recurrences in morphologies. The mean recurrence percentage for all sites and all patients was 38±25%. The highest recurrence percentage per patient averaged 83±17%. The highest recurrence percentage was located in the RA in 5 patients and in the LA in 14 patients. Patients with sites of shortest CLR in the LA and RA had ablation failure rates of 25% and 100%, respectively (HR=4.95; p=0.05). Conclusions A new technique to characterize electrogram morphology recurrence demonstrated that there is a distribution of sites with high and low repeatability of electrogram morphologies. Sites with rapid activation of highly repetitive morphology patterns may be critical to sustaining AF. Further testing of this approach to map and ablate AF sources is warranted. PMID:25101485

  15. Atrial fibrillation: mechanisms, therapeutics, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pellman, Jason; Sheikh, Farah

    2015-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia, affecting 1% to 2% of the general population. It is characterized by rapid and disorganized atrial activation leading to impaired atrial function, which can be diagnosed on an EKG by lack of a P-wave and irregular QRS complexes. AF is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is a risk factor for embolic stroke and worsening heart failure. Current research on AF support and explore the hypothesis that initiation and maintenance of AF require pathophysiological remodeling of the atria, either specifically as in lone AF or secondary to other heart disease as in heart failure-associated AF. Remodeling in AF can be grouped into three categories that include: (i) electrical remodeling, which includes modulation of L-type Ca(2+) current, various K(+) currents and gap junction function; (ii) structural remodeling, which includes changes in tissues properties, size, and ultrastructure; and (iii) autonomic remodeling, including altered sympathovagal activity and hyperinnervation. Electrical, structural, and autonomic remodeling all contribute to creating an AF-prone substrate which is able to produce AF-associated electrical phenomena including a rapidly firing focus, complex multiple reentrant circuit or rotors. Although various remodeling events occur in AF, current AF therapies focus on ventricular rate and rhythm control strategies using pharmacotherapy and surgical interventions. Recent progress in the field has started to focus on the underlying substrate that drives and maintains AF (termed upstream therapies); however, much work is needed in this area. Here, we review current knowledge of AF mechanisms, therapies, and new areas of investigation. PMID:25880508

  16. Atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves the canine rapid atrial pacing-induced structural and electrical remodeling. Fan, ACE2 improves atrial substrate remodeling.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinqi; Zou, Lili; Cui, Kun; Woo, Kamsang; Du, Huaan; Chen, Shaojie; Ling, Zhiyu; Zhang, Quanjun; Zhang, Bo; Lan, Xianbin; Su, Li; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) by homogeneous transmural atrial gene transfer can reverse atrial remodeling and its mechanisms in a canine atrial-pacing model. Twenty-eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated, AF-control, gene therapy with adenovirus-enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) and gene therapy with Ad-ACE2 (Ad-ACE2) (n = 7 per subgroup). AF was induced in all dogs except the Sham-operated group by rapid atrial pacing at 450 beats/min for 2 weeks. Ad-EGFP and Ad-ACE2 group then received epicardial gene painting. Three weeks after gene transfer, all animals except the Sham group underwent rapid atrial pacing for another 3 weeks and then invasive electrophysiological, histological and molecular studies. The Ad-ACE2 group showed an increased ACE2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) expression, and decreased Angiotensin II expression in comparison with Ad-EGFP and AF-control group. ACE2 overexpression attenuated rapid atrial pacing-induced increase in activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) levels, and decrease in MAPK phosphatase 1(MKP-1) level, resulting in attenuation of atrial fibrosis collagen protein markers and transforming growth factor-β1. Additionally, ACE2 overexpression also modulated the tachypacing-induced up-regulation of connexin 40, down-regulation of connexin 43 and Kv4.2, and significantly decreased the inducibility and duration of AF. ACE2 overexpression could shift the renin-angiotensin system balance towards the protective axis, attenuate cardiac fibrosis remodeling associated with up-regulation of MKP-1 and reduction of MAPKs activities, modulate tachypacing-induced ion channels and connexin remodeling, and subsequently reduce the inducibility and duration of AF.

  17. Prediction of sinus rhythm maintenance following DC-cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation – the role of atrial cycle length

    PubMed Central

    Meurling, Carl J; Roijer, Anders; Waktare, Johan EP; Holmqvist, Fredrik; Lindholm, Carl J; Ingemansson, Max P; Carlson, Jonas; Stridh, Martin; Sörnmo, Leif; Olsson, S Bertil

    2006-01-01

    Background Atrial electrical remodeling has been shown to influence the outcome the outcome following cardioversion of atrial fibrillation (AF) in experimental studies. The aim of the present study was to find out whether a non-invasively measured atrial fibrillatory cycle length, alone or in combination with other non-invasive parameters, could predict sinus rhythm maintenance after cardioversion of AF. Methods Dominant atrial cycle length (DACL), a previously validated non-invasive index of atrial refractoriness, was measured from lead V1 and a unipolar oesophageal lead prior to cardioversion in 37 patients with persistent AF undergoing their first cardioversion. Results 32 patients were successfully cardioverted to sinus rhythm. The mean DACL in the 22 patients who suffered recurrence of AF within 6 weeks was 152 ± 15 ms (V1) and 147 ± 14 ms (oesophagus) compared to 155 ± 17 ms (V1) and 151 ± 18 ms (oesophagus) in those maintaining sinus rhythm (NS). Left atrial diameter was 48 ± 4 mm and 44 ± 7 mm respectively (NS). The optimal parameter predicting maintenance of sinus rhythm after 6 weeks appeared to be the ratio of the lowest dominant atrial cycle length (oesophageal lead or V1) to left atrial diameter. This ratio was significantly higher in patients remaining in sinus rhythm (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 3.1 ± 0.4 ms/mm respectively, p = 0.04). Conclusion In this study neither an index of atrial refractory period nor left atrial diameter alone were predictors of AF recurrence within the 6 weeks of follow-up. The ratio of the two (combining electrophysiological and anatomical measurements) only slightly improve the identification of patients at high risk of recurrence of persistent AF. Consequently, other ways to asses electrical remodeling and / or other variables besides electrical remodeling are involved in determining the outcome following cardioversion. PMID:16533393

  18. NASA's First Atrial Fibrillation Case - Deke Slayton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about heart dysrhythmia have been present since the earliest days of the US manned space program. While information about an astronaut's health is general kept private, one of the original seven American astronaut's health status was played out in a very public forum. Donald "Deke" Slayton was removed from the second manned space flight when it was discovered he had idiopathic atrial fibrillation. Referencing the original medical documents, details of how this was discovered and managed from the medical perspective will be reviewed. This is NASA's first heart dysrhythmia case in an astronaut and it proves quite interesting when placed in historic perspective.

  19. Science Linking Pulmonary Veins and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Saagar; Sacher, Frederic; Derval, Nicolas; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Hooks, Darren; Denis, Arnaud; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanistic basis of atrial fibrillation (AF). One of the most important discoveries in this context has been that pulmonary veins (PV) play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of AF. PV isolation has since become the most widely used technique for treatment of paroxysmal AF. Multiple studies have demonstrated that the electrophysiological and anatomical characteristics of PVs create a proarrhythmogenic substrate. The following review discusses the mechanistic links between PVs and AF. PMID:26835098

  20. Minimally Invasive Atrial Fibrillation Surgery: Hybrid Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Jared P.; Downs, Emily A.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a challenging pathologic process. There continues to be a great need for the development of a reproducible, durable cure when medical management has failed. An effective, minimally invasive, sternal-sparing intervention without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass is a promising treatment approach. In this article, we describe a hybrid technique being refined at our center that combines a thoracoscopic epicardial surgical approach with an endocardial catheter-based procedure. We also discuss our results and review the literature describing this unique treatment approach. PMID:27127561

  1. Atrial natriuretic factor and body water distribution.

    PubMed

    Vidal, N A; Arranz, C T; Mones Sias, M C; Herrmann, A P; Martinez Seeber, A

    1987-11-01

    In the rat, the effects of an atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) (Rat, 8-33 Peninsula Lab) on body water distribution have been evaluated. The ANF administration to nephrectomized animals produced a decrease in plasma volume and a slight increase in haematocrit and in plasma albumin concentration. No modifications were observed in total and intracellular water. The fluid efflux from the capillaries appeared to be located in the interstitial space. These results suggest that ANF could regulate plasma volume and systemic blood pressure, concurrently with its other known effects.

  2. Cardiometabolic risk factors and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Arthur R; Lavie, Carl J; Dinicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James; Morin, Daniel P; Khatib, Sammy; Abi-Samra, Freddy M; Messerli, Franz H; Milani, Richard V

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia worldwide; it is a significant risk factor for stroke and embolization, and has an impact on cardiac function. Despite its impact on morbidity and mortality, our understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this disease process is still incomplete. Over the past several decades, there has been evidence to suggest that AF has a significant correlation with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Furthermore, AF appears to be more closely related to specific components of MetS compared with others. This article provides an overview of the various components of MetS and their impact on AF. PMID:24448257

  3. The Epidemiology of Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sacco, Simona; Tiseo, Cindy; Degan, Diana; Ornello, Raffaele; Carolei, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The burden of stroke is increasing due to aging population and unhealthy lifestyle habits. The considerable rise in atrial fibrillation (AF) is due to greater diffusion of risk factors and screening programs. The link between AF and ischemic stroke is strong. The subtype most commonly associated with AF is cardioembolic stroke, which is particularly severe and shows the highest rates of mortality and permanent disability. A trend toward a higher prevalence of cardioembolic stroke in high-income countries is probably due to the greater diffusion of AF and the control of atherosclerotic of risk factors. PMID:27150174

  4. Multi-part modeling and segmentation of left atrium in C-arm CT for image-guided ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yefeng Zheng; Dong Yang; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2014-02-01

    As a minimally invasive surgery to treat atrial fibrillation (AF), catheter based ablation uses high radio-frequency energy to eliminate potential sources of abnormal electrical events, especially around the ostia of pulmonary veins (PV). Fusing a patient-specific left atrium (LA) model (including LA chamber, appendage, and PVs) with electro-anatomical maps or overlaying the model onto 2-D real-time fluoroscopic images provides valuable visual guidance during the intervention. In this work, we present a fully automatic LA segmentation system on nongated C-arm computed tomography (C-arm CT) data, where thin boundaries between the LA and surrounding tissues are often blurred due to the cardiac motion artifacts. To avoid segmentation leakage, the shape prior should be exploited to guide the segmentation. A single holistic shape model is often not accurate enough to represent the whole LA shape population under anatomical variations, e.g., the left common PVs vs. separate left PVs. Instead, a part based LA model is proposed, which includes the chamber, appendage, four major PVs, and right middle PVs. Each part is a much simpler anatomical structure compared to the holistic one and can be segmented using a model-based approach (except the right middle PVs). After segmenting the LA parts, the gaps and overlaps among the parts are resolved and segmentation of the ostia region is further refined. As a common anatomical variation, some patients may contain extra right middle PVs, which are segmented using a graph cuts algorithm under the constraints from the already extracted major right PVs. Our approach is computationally efficient, taking about 2.6 s to process a volume with 256 × 256 × 245 voxels. Experiments on 687 C-arm CT datasets demonstrate its robustness and state-of-the-art segmentation accuracy.

  5. Idiopathic atrial fibrillation in a champion Standardbred racehorse.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G A; Fulton, L J; McKellar, C D

    1990-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation is described in a champion pacer which earlier had been named Australian Harness Horse of the Year as a 3-year-old in 1986-87. Prior to conversion atrial fibrillation had been present for at least 6 weeks, during which the horse had not raced. Successful treatment was achieved with two 10g doses of quinidine sulphate per oesophageal tube, after slow digitalisation with intravenous digoxin over 4d. Four hours after commencement of quinidine therapy the arrhythmia had regressed to atrial flutter and converted to sinus rhythm 10 min later. Considering his age, standard of racing and high reputation the horse's overall performance as a 5-year-old after conversion from atrial fibrillation appeared comparable to his previous performance as a 4-year-old before the disorder occurred. In one of the wins since his return to sinus rhythm, the horse recorded his fastest winning speed and created a new track record at the major Melbourne racetrack. The absence of abnormalities of atrial and atrio-ventricular conduction after the cessation of the arrhythmia, together with the horse's return to successful racing, indicate that this was case of atrial fibrillation occurring as a functional disorder without persistent atrial pathology. PMID:2378602

  6. Doppler echo evaluation of pulmonary venous-left atrial pressure gradients: human and numerical model studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; Prior, D. L.; Scalia, G. M.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The simplified Bernoulli equation relates fluid convective energy derived from flow velocities to a pressure gradient and is commonly used in clinical echocardiography to determine pressure differences across stenotic orifices. Its application to pulmonary venous flow has not been described in humans. Twelve patients undergoing cardiac surgery had simultaneous high-fidelity pulmonary venous and left atrial pressure measurements and pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler echocardiography performed. Convective gradients for the systolic (S), diastolic (D), and atrial reversal (AR) phases of pulmonary venous flow were determined using the simplified Bernoulli equation and correlated with measured actual pressure differences. A linear relationship was observed between the convective (y) and actual (x) pressure differences for the S (y = 0.23x + 0.0074, r = 0.82) and D (y = 0.22x + 0.092, r = 0.81) waves, but not for the AR wave (y = 0. 030x + 0.13, r = 0.10). Numerical modeling resulted in similar slopes for the S (y = 0.200x - 0.127, r = 0.97), D (y = 0.247x - 0. 354, r = 0.99), and AR (y = 0.087x - 0.083, r = 0.96) waves. Consistent with numerical modeling, the convective term strongly correlates with but significantly underestimates actual gradient because of large inertial forces.

  7. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts - Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, Sharmila D.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Problem Definition: To evaluate NASA s current standards and practices related to atrial arrhythmias in astronauts, Space Medicine s Advanced Projects Section at the Johnson Space Center was tasked with organizing a summit to discuss the approach to atrial arrhythmias in the astronaut cohort. Since 1959, 11 cases of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, or supraventricular tachycardia have been recorded among active corps crewmembers. Most of the cases were paroxysmal, although a few were sustained. While most of the affected crewmembers were asymptomatic, those slated for long-duration space flight underwent radiofrequency ablation treatment to prevent further episodes of the arrhythmia. The summit was convened to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, to identify gaps in knowledge, and to propose relevant research initiatives. Summit Meeting Objectives: The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together a panel of six cardiologists, including nationally and internationally renowned leaders in cardiac electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space flight cardiovascular physiology. The primary objectives of the summit discussions were to evaluate cases of atrial arrhythmia in the astronaut population, to understand the factors that may predispose an individual to this condition, to understand NASA s current capabilities for screening, diagnosis, and treatment, to discuss the risks associated with treatment of crewmembers assigned to long-duration missions or extravehicular activities, and to discuss recommendations for prevention or management of future cases. Summary of Recommendations: The summit panel s recommendations were grouped into seven categories: Epidemiology, Screening, Standards and Selection, Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Manifesting Preflight, Atrial Fibrillation during Flight, Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation, and Future Research

  8. Cost effectiveness of therapies for atrial fibrillation. A review.

    PubMed

    Teng, M P; Catherwood, L E; Melby, D P

    2000-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common supraventricular tachyarrhythmia encountered in clinical practice, affecting over 5% of persons over the age of 65 years. A common pathophysiological mechanism for arrhythmia development is atrial distention and fibrosis induced by hypertension, coronary artery disease or ventricular dysfunction. Less frequently, atrial fibrillation is caused by mitral stenosis or other provocative factors such as thyrotoxicosis, pericarditis or alcohol intoxication. Depending on the extent of associated cardiovascular disease, atrial fibrillation may produce haemodynamic compromise, or symptoms such as palpitations, fatigue, chest pain or dyspnoea. Arrhythmia-induced atrial stasis can precipitate clot formation and the potential for subsequent thromboembolism. Comprehensive management of atrial fibrillation requires a multifaceted approach directed at controlling symptoms, protecting the patient from ischaemic stroke or peripheral embolism and possible conversion to or maintenance of sinus rhythm. Numerous randomised trials have demonstrated the efficacy of warfarin--and less so aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid)--in reducing the risk of embolic events. Furthermore, therapeutic strategies exist that can favourably modify symptoms by restoring and maintaining sinus rhythm with cardioversion and antiarrhythmic prophylaxis. However, the risks and benefits of various treatments is highly dependent on patient-specific features, emphasising the need for an individualised approach. This article reviews the findings of cost-effectiveness studies published over the past decade that have evaluated different components of treatment strategies for atrial fibrillation. These studies demonstrate the economic attractiveness of acute management options, long term warfarin prophylaxis, telemetry-guided initiation of antiarrhythmic therapy, approaches to restore and maintain sinus rhythm, and the potential role of transoesophageal echocardiographic screening for

  9. Sodium current kinetics in cat atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Follmer, C H; ten Eick, R E; Yeh, J Z

    1987-01-01

    1. Na+ current kinetics were studied in isolated atrial myocytes from the adult cat using the single suction-pipette voltage-clamp technique. 2. Current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships were similar to those described in other cardiac myocyte preparations. 3. Analysis of Na+ current decay using single-pulse, double-pulse and tail current measurements were in agreement and demonstrate a second-order process of current decay. 4. Voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation curves was not symmetrical, having an inflexion at about -90 mV. These results suggest more than a single inactivation process for Na+ channel in the negative potential region. 5. Recovery of Na+ current from inactivation had a sigmoid time course: an initial slow component (delay) followed by a fast and then a second slow component. Increasing the pre-pulse duration slowed the time course of recovery. 6. Taken together, the results were consistent with the presence of multiple inactivated states for the atrial myocyte Na+ channel. PMID:2443658

  10. Relation of porphyria to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Patel, Mehul B; Abdelmoneim, Sahar S; Puttarajappa, Chethan; Abela, George S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2009-08-01

    Porphyrias are a group of inherited disorders affecting enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway, leading to overproduction and/or accumulation of porphyrin or its precursors. Porphyrias have been associated with autonomic dysfunction, which in turn can develop atrial fibrillation (AF). The purpose of this study was to characterize the prevalence of AF and atrial flutter (AFl) in patients with porphyrias. A single-center retrospective cohort study was designed using data from chart reviews of patients who were admitted to the hospital from January 2000 to June 2008. Fifty-six distinct cases were found with a discharge diagnosis of porphyria including all its subtypes. From the same database, age- and gender-matched controls were identified using computer-generated random numbers. We selected 1 age- and gender-matched control for each case. Electrocardiograms and echocardiograms were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. Only patients with available 12-lead electrocardiograms that showed AF/AFl were labeled with that diagnosis. All patients with a diagnosis of porphyria were included in the study irrespective of their age. Seven of 56 patients with porphyria met inclusion criteria, yielding a prevalence of AF/AFl of 12.5%. This association was significant (p = 0.028, relative risk 7.45, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 66.14) compared with the age- and gender-matched control group (2%). In conclusion, our observations suggest that porphyria may be significantly associated with AF/AFl.

  11. Current hot potatoes in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  12. Atrial Fibrillation and SCN5A Variants

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Darbar, Dawood

    2014-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF) is clinically and genetically a highly heterogeneous disease, recent studies suggest that the arrhythmia may arise because of interactions between genetic and acquired risk factors – the so called “double-hit” hypothesis. Genome-wide association studies have identified common AF susceptibility loci, and linkage analysis and candidate gene approaches have identified mutations in genes that encode for cardiac ion channels and signaling proteins; however, most of the heritability of AF still remains unexplained. The voltage-dependent cardiac sodium channel, encoded by SCN5A, conducts the main cardiac inward sodium current (INa) and is responsible for the upstroke of the atrial action potential. Mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the α-subunit of the NaV1.5 channel, have been linked with increased susceptibility to not only AF but also ventricular arrhythmias (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome), progressive cardiac conduction disease, and overlap syndromes with mixed arrhythmia phenotypes. Over the last decade, functional characterization of SCN5A mutations by expressing the channel in heterologous expression systems and applying cellular electrophysiological techniques has not only advanced our understanding of molecular mechanisms of AF but also potentially identified a mechanism-based approach to treating this common and morbid condition. PMID:25484998

  13. P-wave Variability and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Censi, Federica; Corazza, Ivan; Reggiani, Elisa; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of P-wave template has been widely used to extract indices of Atrial Fibrillation (AF) risk stratification. The aim of this paper was to assess the potential of the analysis of the P-wave variability over time in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. P-wave features extracted from P-wave template together with novel indices of P-wave variability have been estimated in a population of patients suffering from persistent AF and compared to those extracted from control subjects. We quantify the P-wave variability over time using three algorithms and we extracted three novel indices: one based on the cross-correlation coefficients among the P-waves (Cross-Correlation Index, CCI), one associated to variation in amplitude of the P-waves (Amplitude Dispersion Index, ADI), one sensible to the phase shift among P-waves (Warping Index, WI). The control group resulted to be characterized by shorter P-wave duration and by a less amount of fragmentation and variability, respect to AF patients. The parameter CCI shows the highest sensitivity (97.3%) and a good specificity (95%). PMID:27225709

  14. P-wave Variability and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Censi, Federica; Corazza, Ivan; Reggiani, Elisa; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of P-wave template has been widely used to extract indices of Atrial Fibrillation (AF) risk stratification. The aim of this paper was to assess the potential of the analysis of the P-wave variability over time in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. P-wave features extracted from P-wave template together with novel indices of P-wave variability have been estimated in a population of patients suffering from persistent AF and compared to those extracted from control subjects. We quantify the P-wave variability over time using three algorithms and we extracted three novel indices: one based on the cross-correlation coefficients among the P-waves (Cross-Correlation Index, CCI), one associated to variation in amplitude of the P-waves (Amplitude Dispersion Index, ADI), one sensible to the phase shift among P-waves (Warping Index, WI). The control group resulted to be characterized by shorter P-wave duration and by a less amount of fragmentation and variability, respect to AF patients. The parameter CCI shows the highest sensitivity (97.3%) and a good specificity (95%). PMID:27225709

  15. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans: insight from right atrial pacing during maximal exercise

    PubMed Central

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R; Secher, N H; González-Alonso, J; Mortensen, S P

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power () is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax) and remained unchanged until exhaustion. SV initially increased, plateaued and then decreased before exhaustion (P < 0.05) despite an increase in right atrial pressure (RAP) and a tendency (P = 0.056) for a reduction in left ventricular transmural filling pressure (LVFP). Atrial pacing increased HRmax from 184 ± 2 to 206 ± 3 beats min−1 (P < 0.05), but remained similar to the control condition at all intensities because of a lower SV and LVFP (P < 0.05). No differences in arterial pressure, peripheral haemodynamics, catecholamines or were observed, but pacing increased the rate pressure product and RAP (P < 0.05). Atrial pacing had a similar effect on haemodynamics during KEE, except that pacing decreased RAP. In conclusion, the human heart can be paced to a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit in healthy individuals. A limited left ventricular filling and possibly altered contractility reduce SV during atrial pacing, whereas a plateau in LVFP appears to restrict close to . Key points During high intensity whole-body exercise, systemic and contracting skeletal muscle O2 delivery and uptake (>) are compromised, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We evaluated the effect of a ∼20 beats min−1 increase in heart rate (HR) by right atrial pacing during incremental cycling and knee

  16. Transseptal fine needle aspiration of a large left atrial tumour.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Wing; Ruygrok, Peter; Sutton, Timothy; Ding, Patricia; van Vliet, Chris; Occleshaw, Christopher; Smith, Warren

    2010-07-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac tumours is often based on images without tissue diagnosis or tissue obtained at surgery. Percutaneous myocardial biopsy via a transvenous approach has been described in literatures but this technique is not feasible with left atrial tumours. We report a patient presenting with heart failure and left atrial tumour. The diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasm was established pre-operatively via successful transseptal fine needle aspiration of cells from a left atrial tumour. We believe this technique worth consideration to aid pre-surgery diagnosis.

  17. Atrial Septal Aneurysm Presenting as Clubbing without Clinically Apparent Cyanosis.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Laxmi Kant; Banerjee, S; Yadav, R N; Singh, Gajraj; Ganguli, Sujata; Isran, Rohit

    2015-09-01

    Atrial septal aneurysm (ASA) is a localised "saccular" deformity which protrudes to the right or the left atrium or on both sides. It is a rare, but well recognised cardiac abnormality. It is usually an incidental finding or may presents as atrial arrhythmias or arterial embolism. Though it is an acyanotic congenital heart disease but it may result in significant right to left shunt and cyanosis. We describe a patient of ASA with atrial septal defect who presented with clubbing and right to left shunt without clinically apparent cyanosis. PMID:27608873

  18. Development of a transgenic goat model wih cardiac-specific overexpression of transforming growth factor - {beta} 1 to study the relationship between atrial fibrosis and atrial fibrillation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies on patients, large animal models and transgenic mouse models have shown a strong association of atrial fibrosis with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear whether there is a causal relationship between atrial fibrosis and AF or whether these events appear as a result of independen...

  19. Ciliopathy-associated gene Cc2d2a promotes assembly of subdistal appendages on the mother centriole during cilia biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Veleri, Shobi; Manjunath, Souparnika H.; Fariss, Robert N.; May-Simera, Helen; Brooks, Matthew; Foskett, Trevor A.; Gao, Chun; Longo, Teresa A.; Liu, Pinghu; Nagashima, Kunio; Rachel, Rivka A.; Li, Tiansen; Dong, Lijin; Swaroop, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The primary cilium originates from the mother centriole and participates in critical functions during organogenesis. Defects in cilia biogenesis or function lead to pleiotropic phenotypes. Mutations in centrosome-cilia gene CC2D2A result in Meckel and Joubert syndromes. Here we generate a Cc2d2a-/- mouse that recapitulates features of Meckel syndrome including embryonic lethality and multi-organ defects. Cilia are absent in Cc2d2a-/- embryonic node and other somatic tissues; disruption of cilia-dependent Shh signaling appears to underlie exencephaly in mutant embryos. The Cc2d2a-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lack cilia though mother centriole and pericentriolar proteins are detected. Odf2, associated with subdistal appendages, is absent and ninein is reduced in mutant MEFs. In Cc2d2a-/- MEFs, subdistal appendages are lacking or abnormal by transmission-EM. Consistent with this, CC2D2A localizes to subdistal appendages by immuno-EM in wild type cells. We conclude that CC2D2A is essential for the assembly of subdistal appendages, which anchor cytoplasmic microtubules and prime the mother centriole for axoneme biogenesis. PMID:24947469

  20. The dynamics and optimal control of spinning spacecraft with movable telescoping appendages. Part C: Effect of flexibility during boom deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; James, P. K.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamics of a spinning symmetrical spacecraft system during the deployment (or retraction) of flexible boom-type appendages were investigated. The effect of flexibility during boom deployment is treated by modelling the deployable members as compound spherical pendula of varying length (according to a control law). The orientation of the flexible booms with respect to the hub, is described by a sequence of two Euler angles. The boom members contain a flexural stiffness which can be related to an assumed effective restoring linear spring constant, and structural damping which effects the entire system. Linearized equations of motion for this system, when the boom length is constant, involve periodic coefficients with the frequency of the hub spin. A bounded transformation is found which converts this system into a kinematically equivalent one involving only constant coefficients.

  1. In vitro establishment and propagation of a Brazilian strain of Anaplasma marginale with appendage in IDE8 (Ixodes scapularis) cells

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Camila V.; Passos, Lygia M. F.; Vasconcelos, Maria Mercês C.; Ribeiro, Múcio F. B.

    2009-01-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Anaplasma marginale with appendage was successfully established and maintained in vitro in a tick cell line (IDE8). Infection was confirmed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, primers MSP1aNF2 and MSP1aNR2 amplified products from DNA extracted from infected IDE8 cells. Comparisons with partial sequences of the msp1α gene and the complete genome of A. marginale confirmed that the sequences of amplified fragments were from the A. marginale genome. This is the first establishment of a Brazilian A. marginale isolate in tick cells, representing a new system for biological and molecular studies and also a new source of material for diagnosis and development of vaccines. PMID:24031379

  2. Genetics Home Reference: chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry (1 link) Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia Scientific ... Brooker AS, Berkowitz KM. The roles of cohesins in mitosis, meiosis, and human health and disease. Methods Mol Biol. 2014;1170:229-66. doi: 10. ...

  3. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  4. Apixaban for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Littrell, Rachel; Flaker, Greg

    2012-02-01

    Until recently, pharmaceutical options for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation were restricted to aspirin or vitamin K antagonist therapy. In recent years development has been underway for alternatives. Apixaban, a direct Factor Xa inhibitor, is orally dosed, target selective and has few known drug or food interactions. As such, it is a member of a new generation of anticoagulants expected to revolutionize the way we approach anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Apixaban has been studied in Phase II and Phase III trials for a variety of indications. The AVERROES trial established apixaban as superior to aspirin for stroke reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation for whom vitamin K antagonist therapy is unsuitable. The recent ARISTOTLE trial found apixaban to be superior to warfarin for stroke prevention in a wide range of patients with atrial fibrillation, with significantly lower bleeding risk, and lower risk of all-cause mortality. PMID:22292869

  5. Mother Centriole Distal Appendages Mediate Centrosome Docking at the Immunological Synapse and Reveal Mechanistic Parallels with Ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stinchcombe, Jane C.; Randzavola, Lyra O.; Angus, Karen L.; Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Griffiths, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are highly effective serial killers capable of destroying virally infected and cancerous targets by polarized release from secretory lysosomes. Upon target contact, the CTL centrosome rapidly moves to the immunological synapse, focusing microtubule-directed release at this point [1, 2, 3]. Striking similarities have been noted between centrosome polarization at the synapse and basal body docking during ciliogenesis [1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], suggesting that CTL centrosomes might dock with the plasma membrane during killing, in a manner analogous to primary cilia formation [1, 4]. However, questions remain regarding the extent and function of centrosome polarization at the synapse, and recent reports have challenged its role [9, 10]. Here, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography analysis to show that, as in ciliogenesis, the distal appendages of the CTL mother centriole contact the plasma membrane directly during synapse formation. This is functionally important as small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting of the distal appendage protein, Cep83, required for membrane contact during ciliogenesis [11], impairs CTL secretion. Furthermore, the regulatory proteins CP110 and Cep97, which must dissociate from the mother centriole to allow cilia formation [12], remain associated with the mother centriole in CTLs, and neither axoneme nor transition zone ciliary structures form. Moreover, complete centrosome docking can occur in proliferating CTLs with multiple centriole pairs. Thus, in CTLs, centrosomes dock transiently with the membrane, within the cell cycle and without progression into ciliogenesis. We propose that this transient centrosome docking without cilia formation is important for CTLs to deliver rapid, repeated polarized secretion directed by the centrosome. PMID:26670998

  6. Mother Centriole Distal Appendages Mediate Centrosome Docking at the Immunological Synapse and Reveal Mechanistic Parallels with Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, Jane C; Randzavola, Lyra O; Angus, Karen L; Mantell, Judith M; Verkade, Paul; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2015-12-21

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are highly effective serial killers capable of destroying virally infected and cancerous targets by polarized release from secretory lysosomes. Upon target contact, the CTL centrosome rapidly moves to the immunological synapse, focusing microtubule-directed release at this point [1-3]. Striking similarities have been noted between centrosome polarization at the synapse and basal body docking during ciliogenesis [1, 4-8], suggesting that CTL centrosomes might dock with the plasma membrane during killing, in a manner analogous to primary cilia formation [1, 4]. However, questions remain regarding the extent and function of centrosome polarization at the synapse, and recent reports have challenged its role [9, 10]. Here, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography analysis to show that, as in ciliogenesis, the distal appendages of the CTL mother centriole contact the plasma membrane directly during synapse formation. This is functionally important as small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting of the distal appendage protein, Cep83, required for membrane contact during ciliogenesis [11], impairs CTL secretion. Furthermore, the regulatory proteins CP110 and Cep97, which must dissociate from the mother centriole to allow cilia formation [12], remain associated with the mother centriole in CTLs, and neither axoneme nor transition zone ciliary structures form. Moreover, complete centrosome docking can occur in proliferating CTLs with multiple centriole pairs. Thus, in CTLs, centrosomes dock transiently with the membrane, within the cell cycle and without progression into ciliogenesis. We propose that this transient centrosome docking without cilia formation is important for CTLs to deliver rapid, repeated polarized secretion directed by the centrosome.

  7. Hox genes require homothorax and extradenticle for body wall identity specification but not for appendage identity specification during metamorphosis of Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank W; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-11-01

    The establishment of segment identity is a key developmental process that allows for divergence along the anteroposterior body axis in arthropods. In Drosophila, the identity of a segment is determined by the complement of Hox genes it expresses. In many contexts, Hox transcription factors require the protein products of extradenticle (exd) and homothorax (hth) as cofactors to perform their identity specification functions. In holometabolous insects, segment identity may be specified twice, during embryogenesis and metamorphosis. To glean insight into the relationship between embryonic and metamorphic segmental identity specification, we have compared these processes in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, which develops ventral appendages during embryogenesis that later metamorphose into adult appendages with distinct morphologies. At metamorphosis, comparisons of RNAi phenotypes indicate that Hox genes function jointly with Tc-hth and Tc-exd to specify several region-specific aspects of the adult body wall. On the other hand, Hox genes specify appendage identities along the anteroposterior axis independently of Tc-hth/Tc-exd and Tc-hth/Tc-exd specify proximal vs. distal identity within appendages independently of Hox genes during this stage. During embryogenesis, Tc-hth and Tc-exd play a broad role in the segmentation process and are required for specification of body wall identities in the thorax; however, contrasting with results from other species, we did not obtain homeotic transformations of embryonic appendages in response to Tc-hth or Tc-exd RNAi. In general, the homeotic effects of interference with the function of Hox genes and Tc-hth/Tc-exd during metamorphosis did not match predictions based on embryonic roles of these genes. Comparing metamorphic patterning in T. castaneum to embryonic and post-embryonic development in hemimetabolous insects suggests that holometabolous metamorphosis combines patterning processes of both late embryogenesis and

  8. Homologs of wingless and decapentaplegic display a complex and dynamic expression profile during appendage development in the millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2004-01-01

    Background The Drosophila genes wingless (wg) and decapentaplegic (dpp) comprise the top level of a hierarchical gene cascade involved in proximal-distal (PD) patterning of the legs. It remains unclear, whether this cascade is common to the appendages of all arthropods. Here, wg and dpp are studied in the millipede Glomeris marginata, a representative of the Myriapoda. Results Glomeris wg (Gm-wg) is expressed along the ventral side of the appendages compatible with functioning during the patterning of both the PD and dorsal-ventral (DV) axes. Gm-wg may also be involved in sensory organ formation in the gnathal appendages by inducing the expression of Distal-less (Dll) and H15 in the organ primordia. Expression of Glomeris dpp (Gm-dpp) is found at the tip of the trunk legs as well as weakly along the dorsal side of the legs in early stages. Taking data from other arthropods into account, these results may be interpreted in favor of a conserved mode of WG/DPP signaling. Apart from the main PD axis, many arthropod appendages have additional branches (e.g. endites). It is debated whether these extra branches develop their PD axis via the same mechanism as the main PD axis, or whether branch-specific mechanisms exist. Gene expression in possible endite homologs in Glomeris argues for the latter alternative. Conclusion All available data argue in favor of a conserved role of WG/DPP morphogen gradients in guiding the development of the main PD axis. Additional branches in multibranched (multiramous) appendage types apparently do not utilize the WG/DPP signaling system for their PD development. This further supports recent work on crustaceans and insects, that lead to similar conclusions. PMID:15679927

  9. Inherited Structural Heart Diseases With Potential Atrial Fibrillation Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Manuguerra, Roberta; Callegari, Sergio; Corradi, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    Inherited cardiac diseases inducing structural remodeling of the myocardium sometimes develop arrhythmias of various kinds. Among these rhythm disturbances, atrial fibrillation is well known to frequently worsen the prognosis of the primary disorder by increasing morbidity and mortality, especially because of a higher rate of heart failure. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the literature on the most important inherited structural cardiac diseases in whose clinical history atrial fibrillation may occur fairly often.

  10. Termination of acute wide QRS complex atrial fibrillation with ibutilide.

    PubMed

    Sobel, R M; Dhruva, N N

    2000-07-01

    Ibutilide is a Vaughan-Williams class III antiarrhythmic agent approved for chemical cardioversion of acute onset atrial fibrillation/flutter. Emergency physicians rarely use ibutilide despite its proven clinical value. We report a case of successful chemical cardioversion using ibutilide in a patient with atrial fibrillation and delayed ventricular depolarization (wide QRS complex). We recommend that ibutilide be considered for wider use in the emergency department and that further studies be conducted.

  11. Renal Denervation Suppresses the Inducibility of Atrial Fibrillation in a Rabbit Model for Atrial Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong; Xu, Juan; Zhou, Genqing; Chen, Songwen; Ouyang, Ping; Liu, Shaowen

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation (RD) was reported to reduce the susceptibility of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the underlying mechanism has not been well understood. This study was performed to investigate the effect of RD on the inducibility of AF in a rabbit model for atrial fibrosis and to explore the potential mechanisms. Thirty-five rabbits were randomly assigned into sham-operated group (n = 12), abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) group (n = 12) and AAC with RD (AAC-RD) group (n = 11). The incidence of AF induced by burst pacing in atriums was determined. Blood was collected to measure the levels of rennin, angiotensin II and aldosterone. Atrial samples were preserved to evaluate protein and gene expression of collagen, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Our data suggested cardiac structure remodeling and atrial fibrosis were successfully induced by AAC. Compared with the AAC group, the AAC-RD rabbits had smaller ascending aortic diameter and left ventricular end-systolic diameter. For burst pacing at the left atrium (LA), AF was induced in two of the 12 rabbits in the sham-operated group, 10 of the 12 rabbits in the AAC group, and 2 of the 11 rabbits in the AAC-RD group, with great difference among the three groups (P = 0.001). The percentage of LA burst stimulations with induced AF achieved 47.2% in the AAC group, which was higher than those in both the AAC-RD (12.1%) and the Sham-operated (5.6%) groups. Significantly increasing intercellular space in the AAC group (P<0.001) compared with the sham-operated rabbits. RD clearly decreased the volume fraction of collagen in LA and right atrium compared with that of the AAC group (P< 0.01). AAC-induced elevation of collagen I, CTGF and TGF-β1 was suppressed by RD. In conclusion, RD suppressed the inducibility of AF in a rabbit model for pressure associated atrial fibrosis, potentially by modulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreasing pro-fibrotic factors

  12. Renal Denervation Suppresses the Inducibility of Atrial Fibrillation in a Rabbit Model for Atrial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Genqing; Chen, Songwen; Ouyang, Ping; Liu, Shaowen

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation (RD) was reported to reduce the susceptibility of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the underlying mechanism has not been well understood. This study was performed to investigate the effect of RD on the inducibility of AF in a rabbit model for atrial fibrosis and to explore the potential mechanisms. Thirty-five rabbits were randomly assigned into sham-operated group (n = 12), abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) group (n = 12) and AAC with RD (AAC-RD) group (n = 11). The incidence of AF induced by burst pacing in atriums was determined. Blood was collected to measure the levels of rennin, angiotensin II and aldosterone. Atrial samples were preserved to evaluate protein and gene expression of collagen, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Our data suggested cardiac structure remodeling and atrial fibrosis were successfully induced by AAC. Compared with the AAC group, the AAC-RD rabbits had smaller ascending aortic diameter and left ventricular end-systolic diameter. For burst pacing at the left atrium (LA), AF was induced in two of the 12 rabbits in the sham-operated group, 10 of the 12 rabbits in the AAC group, and 2 of the 11 rabbits in the AAC-RD group, with great difference among the three groups (P = 0.001). The percentage of LA burst stimulations with induced AF achieved 47.2% in the AAC group, which was higher than those in both the AAC-RD (12.1%) and the Sham-operated (5.6%) groups. Significantly increasing intercellular space in the AAC group (P<0.001) compared with the sham-operated rabbits. RD clearly decreased the volume fraction of collagen in LA and right atrium compared with that of the AAC group (P< 0.01). AAC-induced elevation of collagen I, CTGF and TGF-β1 was suppressed by RD. In conclusion, RD suppressed the inducibility of AF in a rabbit model for pressure associated atrial fibrosis, potentially by modulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreasing pro-fibrotic factors

  13. Atrial Fibrillation, Cognitive Decline And Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Alvaro; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia. Growing evidence supports a role for AF as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. In this review, we summarize epidemiologic observations linking AF with cognitive outcomes, describe potential mechanisms, and explore the impact of AF treatments on cognitive decline and dementia. Community-based, observational studies show a consistent higher rate of cognitive decline and risk of dementia in persons with AF. These associations are partly due to the increased risk of clinical stroke in AF, but other mechanisms, including incidence of silent cerebral infarcts, microbleeds, and cerebral hypoperfusion, are likely additional contributors. Adequate oral anticoagulation and improved management of the overall cardiovascular risk profile in persons with AF offer the promise of reducing the impact of AF on cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:27547248

  14. Bridging the gender gap in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Oza, Nishaki Mehta; Baveja, Swati; Tedrow, Usha

    2015-03-01

    Women have a similar lifetime prevalence of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) compared with that of men. Given the significant morbidity and potential mortality associated with NVAF, it is crucial to understand gender differences with NVAF. Women can be more symptomatic than men. Despite a higher baseline stroke risk, they are less likely to be on anticoagulation. Women have a greater risk of thromboembolism and a similar rate of bleeding risk compared with men on anticoagulation. Initial experience suggests that novel oral anticoagulants have similar safety and efficacy profile in men and women. Although women can have more adverse reactions from antiarrhythmic therapies, they are often referred later than men for ablation. As a group, a mitigating factor in ablation referral is that women also have a higher incidence of procedural complications from catheter ablation. This review summarizes the available literature highlighting significant gender-based differences and also highlights areas for research to improve NVAF outcomes in women. PMID:25586881

  15. Individualising Anticoagulant Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Patients.

    PubMed

    Alings, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as alternatives to VKAs for the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Four NOACS: dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban and edoxaban, have received regulatory approval in Europe from the European Medicines Agency. Numerous factors can influence the decision to prescribe a NOAC, the most important of which are assessment of stroke and bleeding risks. Given the variation in design of the pivotal phase III clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of NOACs, and in the absence of head-to-head comparative data, it is impossible to recommend one NOAC over the other. However, NOACS offer the opportunity for individualised therapy based on factors such as renal function, age or patient/doctor preference for once- or twice-daily dosing regimens. Dose reduction of some NOACS should be considered in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27617088

  16. Familial recurrent atrial myxoma: Carney's complex.

    PubMed

    Shetty Roy, A Nagesh; Radin, Michael; Sarabi, Dennis; Shaoulian, Emanuel

    2011-02-01

    We report on a family of 4 members, all of whom have had multifocal, recurrent atrial myxomas associated with skin pigmentation, melanotic schwannomas, mucocutaneous myxomas, and tumors of the ovary and pituitary, adrenal, and thyroid glands. Immunochemistry of the myxoma cells is positive for calretinin, confirming their neuroendocrine origin. Genetic studies confirmed mutations in the gene coding protein kinase A, regulatory subunit 1-α (PRKAR1α). This is Carney's complex, characterized by multiple, mucocutaneous myxomas; pigmented lesions over the lips, conjunctiva, and genitalia; adenomas of the breast and thyroid; schwannomas; and endocrinal abnormalities including Cushing syndrome and acromegaly. Members of the family require vigorous screening, including urinary free cortisol, plasma transforming growth factor-β(1) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, testicular ultrasound, routine echocardiographic screening, searches for cardiac and mucocutaneous myxomas in multiple locations, and genetic studies for the PRKAR1α gene sequence. PMID:21298650

  17. New anthyarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matassini, Maria Vittoria; Guerra, Federico; Scappini, Lorena; Scappini, Loren; Urbinati, Alessia; Capucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Different studies have shown no significant difference between rhythm and rate control strategies in terms of mortality. Moreover, the use of antiarrhythmic drugs is afflicted by cardiac and extracardiac toxicity and related costs of hospitalization. Nevertheless, some patients require a rhythm-control strategy and new anti-AF agents are being sought. Only few novel agents showed promising results in term of efficacy and safety. Dronedarone and vernakalant are two of these compounds, respectively introduced for the chronic and acute rhythm control of AF. This article will review pharmacology and clinical evidence on the use of dronedarone and vernakalant and will mention currently investigated new antiarrhythmic drugs. PMID:26631497

  18. Individualising Anticoagulant Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as alternatives to VKAs for the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Four NOACS: dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban and edoxaban, have received regulatory approval in Europe from the European Medicines Agency. Numerous factors can influence the decision to prescribe a NOAC, the most important of which are assessment of stroke and bleeding risks. Given the variation in design of the pivotal phase III clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of NOACs, and in the absence of head-to-head comparative data, it is impossible to recommend one NOAC over the other. However, NOACS offer the opportunity for individualised therapy based on factors such as renal function, age or patient/doctor preference for once- or twice-daily dosing regimens. Dose reduction of some NOACS should be considered in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27617088

  19. Individualising Anticoagulant Therapy i