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Sample records for atrial myxoma case

  1. Atrial Myxoma: A Case Presentation and Review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ronny; Singh, Gagandeep; Mena, Derrick; Garcia, Christine A.; Loarte, Pablo; Mirrer, Brooks

    2012-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors, most frequently found in the left atrium. We present a case of an atrial myxoma. An in-depth review of atrial myxoma is presented, examining the important clinical symptoms and diagnostic indicators. The treatment of atrial myxoma is then discussed, with an emphasis on current therapies. An extensive literature review has been performed to present a comprehensive review of the causes, pathophysiology of atrial myxoma.

  2. Coronary steal by left atrial myxoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jose Rubio; Quiroga, Juan Sierra; Cereijo, Jose Manuel Martinez; Lopez, Laura Reija

    2009-06-18

    This report describes a 41-year-old man who had atypical angina resulting from coronary steal by left atrial myxoma. The tumor was completely excised and the patient was symptoms free after operation.

  3. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical.

  4. Left atrial myxoma masquerading as viral flu

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Kiernan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is a rare cardiac tumor that may be diagnosed incidentally on cardiac imaging or may present with life-threatening cardiac symptoms. We present a case of giant left atrial myxoma that presented as a flulike illness. PMID:27695187

  5. An unusual presentation of atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Anpalakhan, Shaemala; Ramasamy, Dewi; Fan, Kin Sing

    2014-01-01

    Myxomas are uncommon primary cardiac tumours that usually affect the left atrium. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with right heart failure and proteinuria, leading to the diagnosis of atrial myxoma. Surgical resection resulted in resolution of the patient’s symptoms. PMID:25631903

  6. A case of large atrial myxoma presenting as an acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Praneet; Aung, Myo Myo; Awan, Muhammad Umer; Kososky, Charles; Barn, Kulpreet

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial myxomas are rare primary cardiac tumors. Their incidence is estimated to be about 0.1% of total cases. Neurological complications resulting from cardiac myxomas are seen in 20–35% of patients. Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is preferred over transthoracic echocardiogram for evaluation of left atrial myxoma. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography ensures better visualization of intracardiac structures. It has been used prior to surgery for diagnostic support in the surgical treatment of cardiac masses. We present a case of a 46-year-old Hispanic male who developed acute ischemic stroke of left frontal lobe and was also found to have multiple ‘silent’ cerebral infarcts in the MRI of the brain. On further workup, he was found to have a left atrial myxoma on 3D TEE. This was resected with the assistance of intra-operative 3D TEE imaging. We present this case to increase awareness and to stress at early evaluation of secondary causes of ischemic cerebrovascular accident, outside the realm of hypercoagulability. This case also exhibits the need for basic cardiac workup in young individuals who present with symptoms of intermittent palpitations or chest pain to minimize significant morbidity or mortality. PMID:26908377

  7. The left atrial "Medusa myxoma".

    PubMed

    Williams, Elbert E; Pratt, Jerry W; Martin, David E

    2014-02-01

    Although myxomas are the most commonly seen primary cardiac tumors, encompassing 30% to 50% of all primary tumors of the heart, they remain a rare finding with an annual reported incidence of 0.5 per million. The presenting symptoms of an atrial myxoma are widely varied as are the clinical consequences. Regardless of presentation, once a diagnosis is made prompt surgical excision is recommended to minimize the potential complications of obstruction or embolization. We present the "Medusa myxoma," an arborizing 4-fingered left atrial myxoma extending from the fossa ovalis across the left atrium.

  8. [Excision of a left atrial myxoma through right minithoracotomy in a patient with multiple myeloma; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yutaka; Goto, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Shinji; Baba, Hiroshi; Okawa, Yasuhide

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of a 63-year-old female who underwent an excision of a left atrial myxoma. Previously, she had been diagnosed with multiple myelomas and received radiation therapy and chemotherapy. A left atrial myxoma was found at an annual medical check-up. The myxoma was removed via a right minithoracotomy with peripheral cannulation to minimize bleeding complications and surgical site infection. She was transferred to the referring hospital on postoperative day 7 due to recurrence of multiple myelomas. She was doing well 14 months after the operation. Right minithoracotomy is a useful approach to minimizing the risks of bleeding and infection in patients with multiple myelomas.

  9. A rare large right atrial myxoma with rapid growth rate.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Shawn C; Steffen, Kelly; Stys, Adam T

    2014-10-01

    Atrial myxomas are the most common benign intracavitary cardiac neoplasms. They most frequently occur in the left atrium. Right atrial tumors are rare, comprising 20 percent of myxomas achieving an incidence of 0.02 percent. Due to their rarity, right atrial tumor development and associated clinical symptoms has not been well described. The classical clinical triad for the presentation of left atrial myxomas--heart failure, embolic events, and constitutional symptoms--may not be applicable to right sided tumors. Also, natural development of myxoma is not well described, as surgical resection is the common practice. Previously ascribed growth rates of myxomas refer mostly to left atrial ones, as right atrial tumors are rare. We present a case of right atrial myxoma with growth rates exceeding those previously described.

  10. [Superselective fibrinolysis for a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a left atrial myxoma: case report].

    PubMed

    Yamanome, T; Yoshida, K; Miura, K; Ogawa, A

    2000-07-01

    A case of successful treatment by local fibrinolysis of a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a thrombus from a left atrial myxoma is reported. A 62-year-old woman using a pacemaker and suffering from sick sinus syndrome was admitted on December 29th 1996, complaining of transient restlessness. CT and cerebral angiography revealed no abnormal vascular lesions. Eighteen months after the initial episode, she suffered a sudden onset of left hemiparesis and loss of consciousness. CT scan performed during the second episode revealed no lesions and, in particular, no early CT infarction sign, but emergent cerebral angiography revealed a right middle cerebral artery embolic occlusion. Local fibrinolysis using a tissue plasminogen activator was performed within 3 hours after the beginning of the episode, and partial recanalization was obtained within one hour after initiation of the fibrinolytic therapy. On the first hospital day, though CT revealed a small low-density area in the right basal ganglia, motor deficits gradually improved. Considering the possibility of a cardiac source of the embolism, trans-esophageal echocardiography was performed and revealed a left atrial tumor suspected to be a myxoma. It was removed by surgery on the 34th hospital day. Histological examination proved it to be a myxoma. Nine months after local fibrinolytic therapy, the patient returned to work. The diagnosis of cerebral embolism caused by cardiac myxoma is difficult to make at the time when the patient is first examined after admission. It is also hard to discover during emergent cerebral angiography with fibrinolytic therapy. Therefore, in the case of patients with cerebral embolism for which local fibrinolysis is ineffective, it should be presumed that cardiac myxoma is the source of the embolus. Direct PTA alone may be effective for such tumoral embolism.

  11. [A case of cerebral embolism caused by atrial myxoma--superselective fibrinolytic therapy].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, T; Takahashi, A; So, K; Yoshimoto, T; Suzuki, J; Suzuki, Y; Horiuchi, T

    1987-12-01

    A 37-year-old man was admitted to our clinic 3 hours after the onset of cerebrovascular accident with right hemiparesis and total aphasia. On admission, we started combined administration of mannitol, vitamin E, phenytoin (Sendai Cocktail) and perfluorochemicals to protect ischemic brain. Left cerebral angiography revealed occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery involving its perforating arteries. Following the performance of angiography, vascular balloon catheter was introduced into the embolus, and fibrinolytic agent (urokinase) was continuously injected. Soon after the injection of 240,000 unit urokinase, recanalization of left middle cerebral artery was shown by repeated cerebral angiography performed 5.5 hours after the onset. On his clinical course, left hemiparesis and aphasia were improved step by step, and 1 week later, he could walk by himself with minor neurological deficits. Further examination revealed that myxoma was located on left atrium by echocardiography. Within 1 week, the patient was transferred to cardio-surgical unit, and myxoma was successfully removed. Now he is in good health and has returned to his job. Usually cerebral embolisms result from atrial myxoma cause severe cerebral infarction. Here we reported a case of cerebral embolism by myxoma and recanalized using fibrinolytic agent by balloon catheter injection. The damage will be reduced if the duration of occlusion is limited, so this method will be helpful to treat cerebral embolism.

  12. Atrial Myxoma in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Mahmoud; Hayek, Salim; Williams, Byron R.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common primary cardiac tumor. Patients with atrial myxoma typically present with obstructive, embolic, or systemic symptoms; asymptomatic presentation is very rare. To our knowledge, isolated association of atrial myxoma with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been reported only once in the English-language medical literature. We report the case of an asymptomatic 71-year-old woman with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a left atrial mass was incidentally identified on cardiac magnetic resonance images. After surgical excision of the mass and partial excision of the left atrial septum, histopathologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of atrial myxoma. The patient was placed on preventive implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and remained asymptomatic. The management of asymptomatic cardiac myxoma is a topic of debate, because no reports definitively favor either conservative or surgical measures. PMID:24082380

  13. [A case of multiple cerebral aneurysm which showed rapid growth caused by left atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Takahashi, H; Shimura, T; Nakazawa, S

    1995-11-01

    A 24-year-old woman was admitted complaining of right hemiparesis and episodes of syncope. Computed tomography demonstrated a low density area in the left putaminal region. Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) showed two aneurysms in the distal segment of the right middle cerebral artery. Cerebral emboli from a cardiac source was suspected, and cardioechography was performed. Myxoma was located in the left atrium. The patient was transferred to a cardio surgical unit, and the myxoma was successfully removed. After removal by operation of the cardiac tumor, follow-up third IVDSA was performed. One aneurysm of the distal segment of the right middle cerebral artery had grown larger. On the other hand, the other aneurysm had disappeared. Clipping of the enlarged aneurysm was performed. After the clipping operation of the enlarged aneurysm, a follow-up 4th IVDSA was performed. A new aneurysm of the proximal segment of the left cerebral artery was observed. A follow-up 5th IVDSA was performed, revealing that the new aneurysm was enlarging. No operation was performed, because the aneurysm was the fusiform type. At present, the patient is complaining of slight right hemiparesis and has returned to her job. Here we reported a case of cerebral aneurysm caused by left atrial myxoma.

  14. Right coronary artery fistula misdiagnosed as right atrial cardiac myxoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Yang, Junya; Jiao, Zhouyang; Fu, Guowei; Zhao, Wenzeng

    2016-06-01

    The current study describes a case of right coronary artery fistula (CAF) misdiagnosed as right atrial myxoma (RAM). A 33-year-old man presented with a 13-year history of intermittent chest pain, and aggravation for 3 days. Echocardiography revealed an occupying lesion in the right atrium producing a partial dynamic tricuspid obstruction. The initial diagnosis was RAM, which causes partial right ventricular inflow tract obstruction. During cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, a giant mass was detected in the anterior wall of the right ventricle and an abnormal vascular fistula was observed at the bottom of the mass. Successful excision of the mass and closure of the fistula completely relieved the patient's presenting symptoms. The disease was subsequently diagnosed as right CAF draining to the myocardial void. The surgical management and misdiagnosis of the case are discussed herein.

  15. Spinal cord ischemia and left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Hirose, G; Kosoegawa, H; Takado, M; Shimazaki, K; Murakami, E

    1979-07-01

    A 62-year-old man had an acute, transient, flaccid paraplegia. Examination showed a primary cardiac tumor with emboli to major branches of the aorta. A myxoma was removed from the left atrium, and normal function returned. Left atrial myxoma should be suspected as a cause for embolism to the CNS.

  16. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  17. Atrial myxoma: a rare cause of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Negi, R C; Chauhan, Vivek; Sharma, Brij; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Thakur, Surinder

    2013-04-01

    Arial myxoma can present as stroke and should be considered as a differential diagnosis of stroke in young individuals. We present here a 42 years female who presented with sudden loss of conciousness. After extensive work up for young stroke, left atrial myxoma was detected and tumor was removed surgically and histopathological report was consistent with the atrial myxoma.

  18. Right atrial myxoma arising from the Eustachian valve in a patient with colonic polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Pramod; Sachithanandan, Anand; Graham, Alastair N J; Richardson, S Geoffery; Gladstone, Dennis J

    2002-07-01

    Right atrial myxoma arising from the Eustachian valve is rare, with only two reported cases; moreover, any association with colonic polyps is uncommon, with only one such case documented. A case is described of a 68-year-old male who presented with chronic anemia; an initial investigation revealed colonic polyps, but anemia persisted after polypectomy. Further investigation revealed a right atrial myxoma arising from the Eustachian valve and prolapsing into the right ventricle through the tricuspid valve. After successful removal of the lesion, hematological indices returned to normal. In cases of persisting anemia, other rare causes such as atrial myxoma should be sought.

  19. Acute myocardial infarction caused by left atrial myxoma: Role of intracoronary catheter aspiration.

    PubMed

    Al-Fakhouri, Ahmad; Janjua, Muhammad; DeGregori, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) caused by left atrial myxoma is very rare. Catheter-based approaches or thrombolytic therapy are mostly the first step in the management of STEMI with less time delay. We report a case of acute anterior/lateral STEMI caused by a left atrial myxoma. The patient was successfully treated by intracoronary aspiration with an Export aspiration catheter, with excellent distal coronary flow. Intracoronary catheter aspiration in acute myocardial infarction caused by a left atrial myxoma may help to salvage the infarcting myocardium with less time delay.

  20. A large left atrial myxoma causing multiple cerebral infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Saba; Edmunds, Eiry; Raybould, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old man presented with a history of sudden onset diplopia. On neurological examination, the only abnormality was a right-sided oculomotor (third nerve) palsy. A brain CT was performed and reported as showing no abnormality. He was discharged to be investigated as an outpatient. He presented 1 month later with a new expressive dysphasia and confusional state. MRI was performed which revealed multiple cerebral infarcts. He was discharged on secondary stroke prevention medication. Six months elapsed, before a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed. This showed a large left atrial myxoma. The patient underwent an emergency resection and made a good postoperative recovery. This case report showed the importance of considering a cardiogenic source of emboli in patients who present with cerebral infarcts. Performing echocardiography early will help to detect treatable conditions such as atrial myxoma, and prevent further complications. PMID:24285802

  1. A large left atrial myxoma causing multiple cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Saba; Edmunds, Eiry; Raybould, Adrian

    2013-11-27

    A 52-year-old man presented with a history of sudden onset diplopia. On neurological examination, the only abnormality was a right-sided oculomotor (third nerve) palsy. A brain CT was performed and reported as showing no abnormality. He was discharged to be investigated as an outpatient. He presented 1 month later with a new expressive dysphasia and confusional state. MRI was performed which revealed multiple cerebral infarcts. He was discharged on secondary stroke prevention medication. Six months elapsed, before a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed. This showed a large left atrial myxoma. The patient underwent an emergency resection and made a good postoperative recovery. This case report showed the importance of considering a cardiogenic source of emboli in patients who present with cerebral infarcts. Performing echocardiography early will help to detect treatable conditions such as atrial myxoma, and prevent further complications.

  2. Left atrial myxoma detected after an initial diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica.

    PubMed

    Mano, Yoshinori; Yoshizawa, Akihiro; Itabashi, Yuji; Ohki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Tatsuo; Mori, Mitsuharu; Shin, Hankei; Tanaka, Youichi

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 69-year-old woman with left atrial myxoma detected following treatment with glucocorticoids for an initial diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). The glucocorticoids markedly improved the patient's symptoms, and the tumor was excised after rapidly tapering the glucocorticoid dose. The PMR-like symptoms did not recur and the inflammatory marker levels returned to normal after surgery. The patient's clinical course indicated that the initial PMR-like symptoms were entirely caused by the left atrial myxoma. This case demonstrates that glucocorticoid treatment for suspected PMR can mask the symptoms of myxoma, leading to a delay in diagnosis.

  3. Fatal Disruption of a Left Atrial Myxoma Associated with Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Iacco, Anthony; Billimoria, Nazneen; Howells, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are benign tumors composed of sparse stellate cells in an extensive mucoid stroma. The surface of these tumors is often friable and gelatinous. Their intracardiac location makes embolization a constant threat. We report a patient who had diffuse systemic embolization of a left atrial myxoma coincident with a low-velocity frontal motor vehicle crash. PMID:22489244

  4. Fever of unknown origin from a left atrial myxoma: an immunologic basis and cytokine association.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lu, Li-Fen; Lin, Hsi-Hsun

    2011-05-01

    Myxoma is the most common primary tumor of the heart. The typical presentations include a triad of embolic phenomena, intracardiac flow obstruction, and constitutional symptoms. We report a case of cardiac myxoma presenting as prolonged fever. Leukocytosis with a left shift, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein were noted. A large left atrial myxoma was found incidentally by chest computed tomography. The fever subsided after surgical removal of the myxoma. His elevated serum interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-12 p70, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α returned to undetectable levels four days after surgery. Cardiac myxomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of prolonged fever, even though no typical symptoms could be found.

  5. Right atrial myxoma as a possible cause of hemorrhagic stroke and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sabageh, Donatus; Odujoko, Oluwole Olaniyi; Komolafe, Akinwumi Oluwole

    2012-04-01

    Right atrial myxomas are rare primary tumors of the heart. They may remain asymptomatic or eventually cause constitutional signs and symptoms. Less frequently, obstruction of the tricuspid valve occurs, resulting in exertional dyspnea, syncope, or sudden death. Neurological manifestation as initial presentation of atrial myxomas is rarely, if ever, associated with right atrial myxomas and may be secondary to cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and, more rarely subarachnoid hemorrhage. We review the case of a previously unknown, middle-aged Nigerian man who presented to hospital with severe headache and sudden loss of consciousness. A clinical diagnosis of hypertensive hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident was made. The patient died suddenly a few hours after presentation. Post-mortem examination revealed a small intracerebral hemorrhage in the left superior temporal lobe as well as a large right atrial myxoma, a ventricular septal defect in the muscular septum, and right ventricular hypertrophy. The liver showed fatty change while the kidneys showed evidence of benign nephrosclerosis. Right atrial myxomas may, therefore, be remotely considered as a cause of intracranial hemorrhage, especially in the presence of predisposing cardiac anomalies such as a ventricular septal defect. Similarly, being a known cause of right heart failure, sudden death, and other constitutional derangements, it may contribute significantly to disease outcome. Hence, it should be given due consideration in the differential diagnosis of cerebrovascular accidents.

  6. Bi-atrial myxomas presenting as recurrent pulmonary emboli in a girl.

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J.; de Buitleir, M.; Shaw, K.; Maurer, B.; FitzGerald, M. X.

    1984-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl whose sole presenting features were symptoms of pulmonary embolism, was found to have bi-atrial myxomas. The diagnosis was made preoperatively, and the patient had a successful outcome following elective surgery. The absence of other features such as systemic embolism, atrioventricular valvular obstruction, fever and constitutional symptoms makes this a most unusual case. Right atrial myxoma should be considered in any patient presenting with pulmonary embolism for which there is no obvious source. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6709549

  7. Mitral valve regurgitation due to annular dilatation caused by a huge and floating left atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of mitral valve annular dilatation caused by a huge left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve orifice. A 50-year-old man presenting with palpitation was found to have a huge left atrial myxoma protruding into the left ventricle during diastole, causing severe mitral regurgitation. The diagnosis was made with echocardiogram. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a solid mass of 75 × 55 mm. During operation, the myxoma was completely removed from its attachment in the atrium. We preferred to place a mechanical heart valve after an annuloplasty ring because of severely dilated mitral annulus and chordae elongation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case suggests that immediate surgery, careful evaluation of mitral valve annulus preoperatively is recommended. PMID:26702283

  8. The loud first heart sound in left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Gershlick, A H; Leech, G; Mills, P G; Leatham, A

    1984-10-01

    The interrelation between the loudness of the first heart sound, the time interval from the Q wave to the onset of the first heart sound (QM1), and the mitral valve closure rate was studied in nine patients presenting with left atrial myxomata. In seven patients the first heart sound was loud preoperatively and was associated with delayed mitral valve closure. After removal of the myxoma the onset of mitral valve closure returned towards normal, the mitral valve closure rate was reduced, and the first heart sound became softer. In two patients the first heart sound was normal before and after operation as were both the time of onset of mitral valve closure and the mitral valve closure rate. In neither of these patients did the myxoma completely fill the mitral orifice during diastole. The loud first heart sound in left atrial myxoma is a useful clinical sign, and intensity is directly related to the delay in onset of closure of mitral leaflets.

  9. [Recurrent multiple cardiac myxomas: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hada, Y; Sakamoto, T; Takenaka, K; Amano, K; Yamaguchi, T; Ishimitsu, T; Takahashi, H

    1982-06-01

    A case of recurrent multiple cardiac myxomas was presented. The patient was a 27-year-old housewife. Four years ago, she underwent urgent resection of a left atrial myxoma and replacement of the interatrial septum with a patch graft by right atrial approach. The tumor was very friable and a part of the tumor dropped into cardiac chambers during the operation, and immediately saline lavage and aspiration were performed. The recovery was uneventful. On March, 1981, she was readmitted to our hospital because of increasing dry cough. Two-dimensional echocardiography demonstrated abnormal masses in the right atrium, right ventricle, and left atrium. Open heart surgery revealed three independent tumors, which were successfully removed. All tumors were benign myxomas histologically. The patient returned to full-time housework again. A case of recurrent multiple myxomas has not been previously reported. The recurrence of the myxoma in our case is thought to be caused by implantation of tumor cells during the initial operative procedure. Our case will suggest the malignant potentiality of cardiac myxoma. The necessity of radical excision and gentle handling of the tumor during the operation are reemphasized. Postoperative follow-up study is also mandatory for early detection of the recurrence of this potentially malignant neoplasm.

  10. Huge right atrial myxoma causing fixed tricuspid stenosis with constitutional symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Erkan; Cingöz, Faruk; Günay, Celalettin; Demirkiliç, Ufuk; Tatar, Harun

    2003-01-01

    Nonspecific constitutional symptoms are reported mostly in patients with left-atrial myxomas, which occur five times as often as its right-atrial counterpart. We present huge right-atrial myxoma, which obstructs tricuspid orifice with nonspecific constitutional symptoms without any pulmonary embolism attack.

  11. The role of computed tomography in detecting splenic arteriovenous fistula and concomitant atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Rroji, Arben; Bilaj, Fatmir; Qirinxhi, Denis; Vucini, Ortencia; Hasimi, Endri; Goda, Artan

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 45 Final Diagnosis: Arterio-venous fistula of the splean Symptoms: Lef-side abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Splenic arterial-venous fistula and atrial myxoma are not rare cases but the co-existence of both lesions in the same patient is unpublished so far. Case Report: A 45- year-old woman presented with vague left flank pain. She was initially scanned by B-dimensional echography, which revealed multiple enlarged hypo-echoic lesions in the splenic hilum. To further characterize the lesion, we performed computed tomography angiography (CTA). CTA showed dilatation of the splenic artery, and aneurismal dilatation of the splenic vein, associated with early opacification of the portal system. CTA showed also an intrasplenic venous aneurism, which was presumed to be the site of fistulous communication. Celiac arteriography confirmed the CTA findings. A left atrial mass was detected by cardiac echography, which was evaluated better by CTA, and was consistent with atrial myxoma. The patient underwent open surgery in different stage with resection of the atrial mass and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful. Conclusions: This is a unique case in the literature, showing the coexistence of a dual-pathology splenic arterial venous fistula and atrial myxoma. PMID:24803978

  12. Esophageal ulcer of unknown origin complicated by left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamagami, Shinichiro; Hayakawa, Daisuke; Takashima, Shiori; Nomura, Osamu; Sai, Eiryu; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Matsuyama, Shujiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma induces the onset of paraneoplastic syndromes by excreting various humoral mediators and is therefore known to present with diverse symptoms. A 40-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of an esophageal ulcer, the cause of which could not be identified on various examinations. Notably, a left atrial tumor was incidentally found on chest enhanced computed tomography. The esophageal ulcer, which was intractable to conventional therapy, improved with the administration of 5-aminosalicylate, a drug known to inhibit IL-1β. This inhibitory action effectively suppressed the development of myxoma-induced paraneoplastic syndrome.

  13. Incidental Epstein-Barr virus associated atypical lymphoid proliferation arising in a left atrial myxoma: a case of long survival without any postsurgical treatment and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bartoloni, Giovanni; Pucci, Angela; Giorlandino, Alexandra; Berretta, Massimiliano; Mignosa, Carmelo; Italia, Fabrizio; Carbone, Antonino; Canzonieri, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of left atrial cardiac myxoma harbouring an incidental atypical B-cell lymphoid proliferation. Histology disclosed classic myxoma cells embedded in a mucopolysaccharide-rich matrix and a micronodular atypical lymphoid proliferation under the surface of the mass. Myxoma cells were immunoreactive for calretinin, while lymphoid cells expressed B lineage markers (CD 20+, CD79a), without evidence of clonality. Moreover, they were LMP1 positive; EBNA2 negative; KSHV/HHV8 negative; and, by in situ hybridization, EBER/Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive and Kappa and Lambda negative. According to the 2008 WHO schemes, the present case shares close similarities either with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas growing in the context of long-standing chronic inflammation or with primary effusion lymphomas, solid variant, both associated with EBV infection. This is the sixth case of incidental atypical lymphoid proliferation discovered in a cardiac myxoma reported so far. The optimal treatment of such lesions remains undefined, but their clinical course is indolent. After an accurate staging workup, without any postsurgical treatment, the patient we observed has been well with no recurrence of the disease at 6 years of follow-up.

  14. Left atrial myxoma, ruptured chordae tendinae causing mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Raj, Ravi; Jayant, Aveek; Kuthe, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation is uncommon with left atrial myxoma. The echocardiographic assessment of presence of mitral regurgitation and its severity are impaired by the presence of left atrial myxoma. We describe an uncommon association of left atrial myxoma with coronary artery disease and mitral regurgitation. MR was reported as mild on pre-operative transthoracic echocardiography but found to be severe due to ruptured chordae tendinae during intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography, which lead to change in the surgical plan to mitral valve replacement in addition to excision of myxoma.

  15. AN UNUSUAL ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC PATTERN OF A LEFT ATRIAL MYXOMA

    PubMed Central

    Mathurin, Jean-Robert; Adyanthaya, Ajit V.; Petrovich, Lawrence J.; Franco, Mauricio; Mattox, Kenneth L.; Alexander, James K.

    1977-01-01

    Unusual echocardiographic findings in a 58-year-old woman with a history of rheumatic fever and an angiographically demonstrated prolapsing left atrial myxoma are presented. With variations of gain and damping controls, it was possible to isolate a more distinct anterior mitral leaflet echo, or a more posterior linear echo, thought to represent the prolapsing tumor. The tumor, instead of presenting as a cloud of echoes behind the anterior mitral valve leaflet, demonstrated an alternate pattern of a single linear dense echo at this location. Echocardiography, though very useful in the diagnosis of left atrial tumors, can be fallible at times. Images PMID:15216092

  16. Left ventricular myxoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Liming; Chen, Xin; Liu, Peisheng; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma, the most common primary heart tumor, is located mainly in the left atrium. We reported a rare case of left ventricular myxoma incidentally found on echocardiography in an asymptomatic 60-year-old male. The tumor was carefully resected without fragmentation. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged home on the 4th postoperative day. Surgical resection of this type of cardiac myxoma is recommended due to the rarity of tumor location. PMID:25469121

  17. [Resection of intracardiac myxoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Delgado, Víctor Manuel; Deloya-Maldonado, Angélica María; Carranza-Bernal, María Lourdes; Hinojosa-Pérez, Arturo; Farías-Mayene, Leobardo

    2017-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors, which are considered emergency surgery. The resection should not be delayed because 8-9% of affected patients may die due to intracardiac blood flow obstruction. We presente a clinical case of a 47 year old female, history of dyslipidemia. Disease starts with retrosternal oppression feeling, dyspnea on moderate exercise, dizziness, pain in joints hands. Arrhytmic heart sounds, diastolic mitral murmur II/IV, breth sounds present, no lymph. Laboratory: hemoglobin 11.0, leucocyte 9000, glucose 96 mg/dL, chest RX medium arch prominence cardiac silhouette. ECO transthoracic LVEF 60 %, with left atrial intracardiac tumor 13x11 cm, pedicle fixed the interatrial septum, the mitral valve bulges, with mild mitral valve. Half sternotomy is performed intracardiac tumor resection, pericardial placement interatrial with extracorporeal circulation support 65', aortic clamping time of 40'. Intracardiac tumor surgical findings interatrial septum fixed to left side, pedicle, rounded, yellow, multiloculated, soft, 13x10 cm in diameter. Histopathological diagnosis cardiac myxoma. We conclude that the tumor resection was carried in a timely manner with satisfactory evolution.

  18. [Evaluation of superior transseptal approach for the removal of left atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Kunitomo, R; Okamoto, K; Utoh, J; Nishimura, K; Muranaka, T; Tsurusaki, S; Hagio, K; Kitamura, N

    2001-03-01

    We compared the operative outcomes among 14 patients who underwent the removal of left atrial myxoma with four different approaches; right lateral (n = 2), transseptal bi-atrial (Dubost, n = 4), conventional transseptal (n = 4) and superior transseptal approach (STA, n = 4). Concomitant operations were performed in 4 cases (CABG, two; aortic valvuloplasty, one; mitral valve replacement, one), and two out of 4 cases were in the STA group. The mean operation, cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were shorter in the STA group compared to the other three group. The total amount of postoperative drain discharge and the peak value of creatine kinase were also lower in the STA group compared to the other three groups. Among the patients in sinus rhythm before operation, the use of STA was associated with a greater incidence (100%) of postoperative atrial fibrillation or junctional rhythm. These rhythm disturbances were temporary, and all returned to sinus rhythms during hospital stay. We conclude that STA is an excellent approach with a nice surgical view to expose and remove the left atrial myxoma.

  19. Unilateral anhidrosis: a rare presentation of atrial myxoma?

    PubMed

    Gould, Justin

    2012-12-10

    A 50-year-old Chinese woman, non-smoker, presented with a 6-month history of increased sweating on the right side of her face, exertional chest tightness and breathlessness. Although the patient presented with increased sweating on the right, further history and examination revealed unilateral, left-sided anhidrosis, left partial ptosis and miosis consistent with Horner's syndrome. The patient was subsequently investigated with thoracic CT to assess for an apical lung mass (Pancoast tumour). A CT chest ruled out a mediastinal tumour, however, it revealed a large 60×41 mm soft tissue mass arising from the left atrium, protruding across the mitral valve into the left ventricle, suspicious of an intracardiac tumour. The patient was referred urgently for cardiothoracic assessment at a tertiary referral centre and successful open resection was performed. Histology confirmed an atrial myxoma. The patient developed postoperative atrial fibrillation but otherwise made a full recovery.

  20. Left atrial myxomas in childhood: Presentation with emboli—diagnosis by ultrasonics

    PubMed Central

    Pridie, Ronald B.

    1972-01-01

    Three children with left atrial myxomas are described. All suffered major arterial occlusion with consequent permanent morbidity before the diagnosis was made and the tumour removed. Each child had had previous small embolic phenomena. In two, the diagnosis was made by ultrasound. In any child who has had an arterial embolus without obvious cause, a left atrial myxoma should be considered and looked for by an ultrasonic mitral echogram. Images PMID:4647636

  1. Huge Left Atrial Myxoma and Concomitant Silent Coronary Artery Disease in a Young Man

    PubMed Central

    Gennari, Marco; Rubino, Mara; Andreini, Daniele; Polvani, Gianluca; Agrifoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Severe but silent coronary artery disease may rarely exist in young patients with a low-risk profile but with a family history of coronary artery disease. We describe the case of a 33-year-old Caucasian male with progressive shortness of breath caused by a huge left atrial myxoma who was diagnosed to have significant coronary artery disease in the preoperative assessment. After investigations, the patient underwent resection of the left atrial tumor and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with a successful outcome. Even in the case of a young male, it may be prudent to investigate silent coronary artery disease in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and family history of coronary artery disease. The learning objective of this case is to debate about the usefulness of a preoperative coronary study even in the young population with cardiac nonischemic pathologies (ie, valve pathology, cardiac tumors, etc.). PMID:28096692

  2. Intrascrotal Muscular Myxoma - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Debata, Prasanna Kumar; Mohanty, Ramakant; Barad, Jitendra Kumar; Debata, Debasis

    2017-01-01

    Myxomas are gelatinous tumours that commonly appear as circumscribed masses situated within muscles. It can occur at various sites. However, mostly found in cardiac muscles and skeletal muscles of extremities. Published cases of intrascrotal myxoma are rare in literature. A 28-year-old male was admitted to our General Surgery Department with a history of a gradually enlarging mass in the scrotum and scrotal discomfort since two years. After cytological and imaging investigations, a scrotal exploration was performed with plexiform neurofibroma as the preoperative diagnosis. Histopathological examination of the specimen revealed features of intramuscular myxoma. Although a relatively rare diagnosis, intramuscular myxoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis of testicular and paratesticular tumours.

  3. Surviving catastrophic disintegration of a large left atrial myxoma: the importance of multi-disciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Habbab, Louay; Alfaraidi, Haifa; Lamy, Andre

    2014-09-12

    Atrial myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors, representing ∼50% of all benign cardiac tumors. Patients with a left atrial myxoma (LAM) generally present with symptoms of mechanical obstruction of blood flow, systemic emboli or constitutional symptoms. Embolic complications may occur any time with progression of the tumor; therefore, myxoma is usually considered an indication for urgent surgery. This report describes a patient with mobile large LAM who survived multiple emboli to the brain, spleen, kidneys, abdominal aorta and lower limbs during hospitalization for surgery, illustrating the critical nature of this finding and its possible catastrophic complications and demonstrating the importance of multi-disciplinary team in the decision-making process and the management of such complications and supporting the hypothesis that intravenous thrombolysis may be safely used in the treatment of embolic stroke due to cardiac myxoma.

  4. Concomitant Left Atrial Myxoma and Patent Foramen Ovale: Is It an Evolutional Synergy for a Cerebrovascular Event?

    PubMed Central

    Lasam, Glenmore; Ramirez, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old female who presented initially with an abrupt onset of left facial and hand numbness after her routine yoga with no associated syncope, palpitation, chest pain or dyspnea. She consulted her primary care physician and recommended hospital care for possible stroke. On the day of admission, she complained of left facial and hand hemiparesthesia. Cranial imaging and angiography were unremarkable but echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography revealed left atrial mass. She underwent resection of the left atrial mass with an incidental finding of patent foramen ovale intraoperatively. The left atrial mass was confirmed to be an atrial myxoma. Patient’s neurologic complaints resolved towards the end of her hospital course. She was discharged stable with no recurrence of neurologic symptoms on health maintenance evaluation. PMID:28275422

  5. Sporadic Multicentric Right Atrial and Right Ventricular Myxoma Presenting as Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyajit; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Mohanty, Bipin Bihari; Biswas, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric cardiac myxoma is a rare syndrome; usually it is familial. We report a rare case of sporadic right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) myxoma in a 26-year-old female presenting to our hospital for the evaluation of sudden onset of dyspnea and left precordial pain attributed to the embolization of degenerating tumor fragments to the pulmonary artery (PA). The exact incidence of sporadic multicentric RA and RV myxoma presenting as acute pulmonary embolism is unknown as multicentric RA and RV myxoma are very rare. Myxomas presenting as pulmonary embolism is <10%. Majority of cardiac myxomas present as exertional dyspnea, chest pain, positional syncope, fever, weight loss and other constitutional symptoms. Any young patient presenting with acute onset dyspnea with multiple cardiac masses may have tumor embolization to the PA diagnosis with transthoracic echocardiography and high-resolution computed tomography of thorax, fast-tracks patient transfer for urgent cardiac surgery to prevent further embolization.

  6. Dumb-bell in the heart: rare case of biatrial myxoma with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Ananthanarayanan, Chandrasekaran; Bishnoi, Arvind Kumar; Ramani, Jayadip; Gandhi, Hemang

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare intracardiac tumors, and the majority are benign myxomas involving the left atrium. We report a case of the very rare occurrence of biatrial myxoma associated with mitral regurgitation, which was successfully treated.

  7. Intra-Arterial Treatment in a Child with Embolic Stroke Due to Atrial Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    van den Wijngaard, Ido; Wermer, Marieke; van Walderveen, Marianne; Wiendels, Natalie; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arterial ischaemic stroke is an important cause of morbidity in children. Timely diagnosis is necessary for acute stroke treatment but can be challenging in clinical practice. Due to a paucity of data there are no specific recommendations regarding the use of mechanical thrombectomy devices in current paediatric stroke guidelines. A 14-year-old boy presented with a severe acute left hemisphere stroke due to a proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion caused by emboli from an atrial myxoma. No clinical improvement was seen after administration of intravenous thrombolysis. Subsequent mechanical thrombectomy with a second-generation stent-based thrombectomy device resulted in successful recanalization and clinical improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mechanical thrombectomy in a child with acute embolic stroke caused by atrial myxoma. PMID:24976098

  8. Left atrial myxoma in a patient with a biventricular pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Przywara-Chowaniec, Brygida; Czarnecki, Łukasz; Nowalny-Kozielska, Ewa; Opara, Mariusz; Puzio, Agata; Kawecki, Damian; Wesołowski, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Myxomas make up about 50% of benign cardiac neoplasms. The most common location is within the left atrium. At the initial stage they do not exhibit any specific clinical symptoms, so they are often diagnosed by accident or during examinations recommended for other reasons. Here we present a case of left atrium myxoma in a patient (a man, age 68 years) with a dual chamber pacemaker. The myxoma did not reveal any clinical symptoms and was discovered in echocardiography during routine diagnostic examination preceding pacemaker implantation. The literature search made by the authors showed that this is the first recorded case of myxoma in a patient after the implantation of a biventricular pacemaker. PMID:28096843

  9. Gerstmann's syndrome: can cardiac myxoma be the cause?

    PubMed

    Sakellaridis, Timothy; Argiriou, Michalis; Koukis, Ioannis; Panagiotakopoulos, Vicror; Spiliotopoulos, Constantinos; Dimakopoulou, Antonia; Charitos, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are primary cardiac tumours. Clinical presentations vary. Central nervous embolism has been a constant association. We describe a case of a 40-year-old female who presented with neurological signs and symptoms of Gerstmann's syndrome secondary to a left atrial myxoma.

  10. An Interesting Case of Intramuscular Myxoma with Scapular Bone Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Tirefort, Jérôme; Kolo, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Intramuscular myxoma is a rare benign primitive tumor of the mesenchyme founded at the skeletal muscle level; it presents itself like an unpainful, slow-growing mass. Myxomas with bone lysis are even more rare; only 7 cases have been reported in the English literature, but never at the shoulder level. Case Presentation. We describe an 83-year-old patient with a growing mass in the deltoid muscle with unique scapular lysis, without any symptom. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a biopsy were performed and the diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma has been retained. In front of this diagnosis of nonmalignant lesion, the decision of a simple follow-up was taken. One year after this decision, the patient was still asymptomatic. Conclusion. In the presence of an intramuscular growing mass with associated bone lysis, intramuscular myxoma as well as malignant tumor should be evoked. MRI has to be part of the initial radiologic appraisal but biopsy is essential to confirm the diagnosis. By consensus, the standard treatment is surgical excision but conservative treatment with simple follow-up can be an option. PMID:28194289

  11. Atrial myxoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Date 5/5/2016 Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  12. The role of interleukin-6 in cases of cardiac myxoma. Clinical features, immunologic abnormalities, and a possible role in recurrence.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, C E; Rosado, M F; Bernal, L

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor, 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

  13. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Cases of Cardiac Myxoma: Clinical Features, Immunologic Abnormalities, and a Possible Role in Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Cesar Emilio; Rosado, Manuel Francisco; Bernal, Leon

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor; 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively, the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:11330738

  14. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla- A Rare case Report

    PubMed Central

    Subramaiam, Ramkumar; Narasimhan, Malathi; Giri, Veda; Kumar, Santhosh

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon, benign, locally invasive, non-metastasizing neoplasm arising from the odontogenic ectomesenchyme that usually occurs in the tooth bearing areas of the jaws. These lesions arouse special interest as they pose high diagnostic challenge. Here, we present a rare case of OM of the maxilla in an 18-year-old male. The clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed in this paper. PMID:26155585

  15. A Rare Presentation of Conjunctival Myxoma with Pain and Redness: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Po; Tsung, Swei Hsiung; Yet-Min Lin, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    Background Conjunctival myxoma is a type of rare, benign tumor of mesenchymal cells, with fewer than 30 reported cases in the English literature. It is mostly an isolated occurrence but can sometimes be associated with systemic diseases such as Carney complex or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It is necessary in clinical practice to differentiate it from other similar lesions, such as amelanotic nevus, lymphangioma, myxoid liposarcoma, spindle-cell lipoma, myxoid neurofibroma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. Case Presentation The usual presentation of conjunctival myxoma is a translucent, well-circumscribed, and painless conjunctival mass, but in this report we discuss an unusual case of conjunctival myxoma in a 47-year-old Taiwanese woman who presented initially with pain and redness. This atypical presentation complicated the diagnosis and the management at first. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. The mass was found to be a conjunctival myxoma. The patient subsequently underwent extensive evaluation but was found not to have any systemic diseases with known association with conjunctival myxoma. Conclusions In summary, we present a case of conjunctival myxoma in a 47-year-old Taiwanese woman. The initial presentation with pain and redness was atypical for conjunctival myxoma. The lesion was successfully managed with complete excisional biopsy. PMID:22649349

  16. "Syndrome myxoma": a subset of patients with cardiac myxoma associated with pigmented skin lesions and peripheral and endocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Vidaillet, H J; Seward, J B; Fyke, F E; Su, W P; Tajik, A J

    1987-01-01

    From January 1954 to December 1985 cardiac myxoma was diagnosed in 75 patients at the Mayo Clinic. The clinical presentation was typical in 70 cases and was referred to as "sporadic myxoma". Forty four other cases of cardiac myxomas (five from the Mayo Clinic) presented with a combination of distinctive clinical features and these cases are described as "syndrome myxoma". The patients with syndrome myxoma were younger (mean age, 25 vs 56 years) and had unusual skin freckling (68%), associated benign non-cardiac myxomatous tumours (57%), endocrine neoplasms (30%), and a high frequency of familial cardiac myxoma (25%) and familial endocrine tumours (14%). The two types of cardiac tumour were different (syndrome vs sporadic): atrial location, 87% vs 100%; ventricular location, 13% vs 0%; single tumour, 50% vs 99%; multiple tumours, 50% vs 1%; and recurrent tumour, 18% vs 0%. It is concluded that patients with syndrome myxoma represent a distinctive subgroup in which there are important clinical, surgical, and genetic implications. More importantly, syndrome myxoma appears to be only one expression of a much larger disease entity. Images Fig 3 Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 4 PMID:3566983

  17. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma.

    PubMed

    González-Cantú, Yessica M; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy.

  18. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    González-Cantú, Yessica M.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy. PMID:26509093

  19. MULTIPLE CALCIFIED RIGHT ATRIAL MYXOMAS ASSOCIATED WITH TRICUSPID INSUFFICIENCY IN A CHILD

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Manuel Jimenez; Franco, Eliud Hernandez; Avalos, Luis Lasso; Perez, Alejandro Martinez

    1979-01-01

    Multiple calcified myxomas of the right atrium were discovered in a 12-year-old girl and were associated with a dysplastic tricuspid valve that was grossly insufficient. Surgical resection of three pedunculated masses was performed, and the tricuspid valve was replaced with a biologic prosthesis. Images PMID:15216310

  20. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  1. Left atrial appendage mass: is it always a thrombus?

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Adem; Kurkluoglu, Mustafa; Yesil, Fahri Gurkan; Tavlasoglu, Murat; Cingoz, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Myxoma is the most common benign tumor of the heart, but it is very rare for it to originate from the left atrial appendage. Distinguishing between a mass, a thrombus, and a tumor in the body of the left atrium with preoperative transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography is very difficult, even more so in patients with mitral valve disease and chronic atrial fibrillation. A 50-year-old male patient was admitted for surgery with the diagnosis of mitral stenosis and chronic atrial fibrillation. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated a mass attached to the wall of the left atrial appendage. Histopathological examination of the mass showed an image compatible with a myxoma. We hereby describe a case of a left atrial appendage myxoma mimicking a left atrial appendage thrombus. PMID:28096835

  2. Management of Recurrent Odontogenic Myxoma of Mandible: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Ankita; Varghese, K George; Dwivedi, Shailendra; Goyal, Vidhi

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic Myxoma (OM) is a slow growing painless locally aggressive tumor seen in gnathic bones and is generally asymptomatic. OM is characterized by spindle, wedge or stellate shaped cells loosely arranged in an abundant mucoid stroma. It is found incidentally on radiographs and may vary from a unilocular radiolucency to a multilocular lesion with well-defined or diffuse margins. Treatment includes surgical management that may range from simple enucleation and curettage to surgical excision including peripheral osteotomy, segmental resection, hemimandibulectomy and maxillectomy. Here we are presenting a case report on odontogenic myxoma with recurrence after conservative treatment. PMID:27891488

  3. Preoperative Emboli in a Pregnant Woman with Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Freidoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The left atrium is the most common location of myxomas, which are benign tumors. Only a few cases of myxomas in pregnancies have been reported. Our thorough medical literature search showed only 17 reported cases in the course of pregnancy. Myxomas during pregnancy and in the preterm period constitute a serious phenomenon that can mimic an early sign of a life-threatening pathology like severe mitral stenosis. We describe a 33-year-old woman, who presented with acute dyspnea to a gynecology center and was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a huge left atrial myxoma, and computed tomography scan illustrated paradoxical pulmonary embolism in the left upper lung lobe via a large patent foramen ovale. The tumor required urgent cardiac surgery. In this article, we review causes of dyspnea in pregnancy and the cardiovascular effects of myxomas in pregnancy. We also describe the pathophysiological effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on the mother, fetus, and the feto-placental system during open-heart surgery. We performed a successful surgical resection of a myxoma in a pregnant woman. Given the rarity of such cases, individual multidisciplinary assessment and management strategies are essential. PMID:27365558

  4. Clinico-pathological features of breast myxoma: report of a case with histogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Magro, Gaetano; Cavanaugh, Barbara; Palazzo, Juan

    2010-05-01

    We herein report the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings of a rare case of myxoma occurring in the breast parenchyma of a 75-year-old female. The tumor was incidentally detected at a mammographic screening and, ultrasonographically, presented as an ovoid mass. Histologically, an encapsulated hypocellular, myxoid tumor with low vascularization was evident. Neoplastic cells were round- to spindle/stellate-shaped and stained with vimentin and focally with calponin. We emphasize that morphology remains preeminent in the diagnosis of a breast myxoma, while immunohistochemistry may assist in ruling out other tumor entities. Differential diagnosis with all benign and malignant myxoid lesions, primarily occurring in the breast, is provided. The histogenesis of breast myxoma is unknown. The lack of expression of desmin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD34, CD99, CD10, bcl-2 protein, and estrogen/progesterone/androgen receptors, all markers characteristically expressed by "the benign spindle cell tumors of the mammary stroma," would suggest that breast myxoma does not fall into this tumor category and that its putative precursor mesenchymal cell resides in the interlobular stroma.

  5. Cardiac myxoma with glandular elements: a clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study of five new cases with an emphasis on differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghui; Ding, Li; Liu, Yanhui; Xue, Ling

    2014-01-01

    This paper reported five new cases of cardiac myxoma with glandular components, known as glandular cardiac myxoma. The goals of this study were to analyze the clinicopathological features of this disease and to explore new features for differential diagnosis. The patient series included three women and two men. All tumors were located in the left atrium without invasion of the adjacent myocardium. Patients presented with cardiac-related or embolization symptoms. Histologically, neoplasms consisted of well-formed glandular structures and typical myxoma areas. No nuclear atypia, mitosis, or necrosis was identified in the glandular structures. Glandular lining cells were strongly positive for pan-cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, CAM5.2 and cytokeratin 7, but were negative for some organ-specific markers, such as thyroid transcription factor-1, calretinin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, gross cystic disease fluid protein, prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific acid phosphatase, cytokeratin 20 and caudal type homeobox 2. In conclusion, glandular cardiac myxoma is a rare disease which shows characteristics similar to those of classical cardiac myxoma. Because of its rarity, glandular cardiac myxoma must be distinguished from adenocarcinoma metastatic to the heart. The combination of histopathological features and immunohistochemical profiles should improve the diagnostic accuracy of glandular cardiac myxoma.

  6. [A case of cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebellar hemorrhages and elevation of interleukin-6 in the cerebrospinal fluid].

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yasuo; Sengoku, Renpei; Sato, Hironori; Inoue, Kiyoharu

    2004-10-01

    We report a 25-year old man with cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebellar hemorrhages and elevation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The patient was first admitted to our hospital because of cerebral infarctions at the age of 23. After systemic exploration he was diagnosed as cardiac myxoma. In this patient, the serum level of IL-6 was elevated. The cardiac myxoma was resected and the serum IL-6 level returned to normal. His neurological symptoms improved almost to normal and he was discharged. The patient had been well for two years until he developed headache at the age of 25. Brain MRI revealed multiple cerebellar hemorrhages that overlaid old infarctions. The hemorrhages enlarged in a three months period and his headache became worse, and then he was admitted again. The IL-6 value was normal in serum at that time, but it was elevated in the CSF. The CSF IgG index was also elevated. Cerebral angiograms showed no abnormal vessel in the infratentorium, while multiple fusiform aneurysms were found in both middle cerebral arteries. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed no recurrence of cardiac myxoma. Craniotomy was performed and intracerebellar hematomas were removed. Histopathological examination showed only old and recent bleedings; no metastatic myxoma tissue was found. Although no myxoma tissue was found in biopsy specimen, it seemed reasonable that an elevated level of IL-6 in the CSF was due to metastasized intracranial myxoma, which caused cerebellar embolism, and then invaded the vessel walls and continued to grow. In reviewing the literature we have found no reported case of cardiac myxoma with analysis of IL-6 value in the CSF. We speculate that the level of IL-6 in the CSF might be a good marker for the neurological manifestations of cardiac myxoma.

  7. [Spontaneous course of myxoma of the left atrium].

    PubMed

    Allal, J; Coisne, D; Ciber, M; Malin, F; Christiaens, L; Foullon, P; Barraine, R

    1988-10-01

    Little is known about the natural history of left intra-atrial myxomas. We report 3 cases of that disease where successive echocardiographic examinations provided figures of 11, 12 and 14 months respectively for the formation of the tumour in the left atrium. Echocardiography is perfectly reliable for the diagnosis of myxoma. False-negative results are rare and usually due to very small myxomas being beyond the resolution potential of the instrument; this seems to have been the case in 2 of our 3 patients. Two data, however, remain unknown: the beginning of formation and the rapidity of tumoral growth. These 3 cases raise the problem of repeat echocardiography some time after a cerebral accident of suspected embolic origin, when the initial examination is negative.

  8. Radiological characteristics and management of intramuscular myxoma of the temporal muscle: case report.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old male with a 3-year history of a slow-growing, asymptomatic, subcutaneous mass in the left temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined extracranial lesion with heterogeneous enhancement and without invasion of the skull. A variety of soft tissue tumors were included in the differential diagnosis. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor, and a diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma was confirmed histologically. There was no evidence of recurrence at 6-month follow-up. The present case is the first characterization of the radiological appearance of intramuscular myxoma in the temporal muscle. I emphasize that increased awareness of this rare lesion and a careful clinical and radiological preoperative assessment are crucial in determining an appropriate treatment strategy for patients with a soft tissue tumor of the head.

  9. Radiological Characteristics and Management of Intramuscular Myxoma of the Temporal Muscle: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HIGASHIDA, Tetsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old male with a 3-year history of a slow-growing, asymptomatic, subcutaneous mass in the left temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined extracranial lesion with heterogeneous enhancement and without invasion of the skull. A variety of soft tissue tumors were included in the differential diagnosis. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor, and a diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma was confirmed histologically. There was no evidence of recurrence at 6-month follow-up. The present case is the first characterization of the radiological appearance of intramuscular myxoma in the temporal muscle. I emphasize that increased awareness of this rare lesion and a careful clinical and radiological preoperative assessment are crucial in determining an appropriate treatment strategy for patients with a soft tissue tumor of the head. PMID:24418787

  10. Intramuscular myxoma associated with an increased carbohydrate antigen 19.9 level in a woman: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular myxoma is a rare benign soft tissue tumor. The lack of specific symptoms and widely used laboratory tests makes the diagnosis quite difficult. We present a case of an Intramuscular myxoma associated with an increased carbohydrate antigen 19.9 level. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any reported cases of an association of Intramuscular myxoma with tumor markers in the literature. Case presentation A 45-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our department for resection of a mass in her left groin area, discovered incidentally on a triplex ultrasonography of her lower extremities. The diagnosis of Intramuscular myxoma was confirmed on histopathology after the complete surgical excision of the tumor. On laboratory examination, the serum level of carbohydrate antigen 19.9 was found to be elevated, but it returned to normal six months after resection of the mass. Conclusion Carbohydrate antigen 19.9 is a tumor marker that increases in a variety of malignant and benign conditions. After the exclusion of all other possible reasons for carbohydrate antigen 19.9 elevation, we assumed a possible connection of carbohydrate antigen 19.9 elevation and Intramuscular myxoma, an issue that requires needs further investigation. PMID:21569608

  11. Right Atrial Paraganglioma: An Extremely Rare Primary Cardiac Neoplasm Mimicking Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ashok; Mishra, Deepika; Maharia, Hari Ram; Goyal, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of 35-year-old lady who had presented with atypical chest pain and exertional breathlessness for past six months. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms showed a well-circumscribed, echo-dense mass in the right atrium, attached to the interatrial septum at the level of atrioventricular junction and in the vicinity of coronary sinus ostium. She underwent successful resection of the cardiac mass. Histopathology revealed paraganglioma, which was reconfirmed by immunohistochemistry study. This represents an extremely rare presentation as primary cardiac tumors are 20-times less common than metastatic tumors and paraganglioma is one of the rarest primary cardiac tumors, accounting for < 1% of all cases. PMID:28090263

  12. Left Atrial Myxoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    enhanced pulmonary CT angiogram demonstrated normal pulmonary arteries (i.e. no pulmonary embolus) and confirmed the presence of left-sided pulmonary ... arteries without evidence for pulmonary embolism but note of patchy airspace disease within the left upper and lower lobes (Figure 1C), which...1A) and lateral (Figure 1B) chest radiographs were obtained and the patient also underwent a contrast-enhanced pulmonary CT angiogram (CTA; Figure

  13. Association between herpes simplex virus Types 1 and 2 with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Sabagh, Moud; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Ziaei, Shayan; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Pourgholi, Leyla; Jenab, Yaser; Abbasi, Kyomars

    Most cases of atrial myxoma are sporadic, and the exact etiology is unknown. We examined if herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2 antigens and/or DNA could be detected in a cohort of Iranian patients with cardiac myxomas. From July 2004 to June 2014, among a total of 36,703 patients undergoing open heart surgeries, consecutive patients with cardiac myxoma who were treated by surgical excision at our center included in this study. Of 73 patients studied, 56% were female with a mean age of 54 years (ranging from 23 to 77 years). Seventy-four myxomas were surgically removed from 73 patients, since one patient had two myxomas which were located on both the right atrium and right ventricle. The materials for this analysis were retrospectively gathered from extracted tumors that stored in a pathology bank of tissue paraffin blocks. The formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples were investigated for HSV genomic DNA by both immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In all 74 cases there was no presence of HSV 1 and HSV 2 infection. This suggests that HSV may not play a role in sporadic cardiac myxomas; however, evidence for such association is currently lacking, and further studies are required to determine such a role.

  14. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma mimicking cystic intracavitary atrial mass.

    PubMed

    Bahnacy, Yasser; Suresh, Cheriyil; Dawoud, Hamed; Zubaid, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common benign primary tumor of the heart most commonly in the left atrium (LA). Cystic or cavitated intracardiac masses are rare. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient admitted with chest infection, hemoptysis, and severe respiratory distress, who had to be ventilated. Chest computed tomography showed bilateral lung consolidation with large mass occupying the region of the LA. Transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography showed a large intracavitary left atrial cystic mobile mass. Open-heart surgical exploration did not show any mass inside the LA. A posterior left atrial wall hematoma was found and evacuated. Biopsies confirmed the presence of blood clots. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma may appear as left atrial intracavitary cystic mass and should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic left atrial mass.

  15. [Histopathological and immunohistochemical features of cardiac myxomas].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bringas, Omar; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Mixomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors with an estimate incidence of 0,5-1 per 10(6) individuals per year. These tumors have generated interest due to their unique location (left side of the atrial septum near the fossa ovalis), variable clinical presentation and undefined histogenesis. Most cardiac myxomas occur sporadically while approximately 10% of diagnosed cases develop as part of Carney complex. This neoplasm is of uncertain histogenesis, however, endothelial, neurogenic, fibroblastic, and cardiac and smooth muscle cells differentiation has been proposed, and rarely glandular differentiation has been observed. Recently, due to the expression of certain cardiomyocyte-specific factors, an origin of mesenchymal cardiomyocytes progenitor cells has been suggested. Histologically cardiac myxomas are mainly composed of stellated, fusiform and polygonal cells, immersed in an amorphous myxoid matrix. Immunohistochemically some endothelial markers, such as CD31, CD34, FVIIIAg, are present. Positive staining has also been reported for S-100 protein, calretinin, vimentin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin, CD56, α1 antitrypsin and α 1antichymotrypsin. Surgical resection is currently the only treatment of choice. We present in this article a histopathological and immunohistochemical review of cardiac myxomas.

  16. [Fever, asthenia, myalgia and murmur due to cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Giménez Roca, C; Felipe Villalobos, A; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Prada Martínez, F; Caffarena Calvar, J M; Jou Muñoz, C

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac tumours are rare, especially in children, and most of them are benign. Myxomas are unusual in children, being more common among adults. They are usually located in the left atrium, with 25% appearing in the right. The clinical signs and symptoms depend mainly on where the tumour is located. A feature of these tumours is that they can be accompanied by constitutional symptoms and laboratory abnormalities. Echocardiography is the study of choice, and a prompt resection is required to prevent serious complications. We present a case of a 10 year-old girl diagnosed with right atrial myxoma who presented with a fever, myalgia, asthenia and laboratory abnormalities. Diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and the early surgical resection of the tumour ran smoothly and showed a good postoperative recovery.

  17. Periocular Myxoma in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Ríos y Valles-Valles, Dolores; Vera-Torres, Ana María; Rodríguez-Martínez, Héctor A.; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Myxomas are locally invasive, benign mesenchymal neoplasms with odontogenic, osteogenic, or soft tissue origin. Facial myxomas probably account for less than 0.5% of all paranasal sinus and nasal tumors. We report a case of a left painless periocular mass in a 11-month-old girl. The lesion was resected with a clinical diagnosis of lacrimal sac tumor. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry proved the tumor to be a myxoma. There has been no recurrence after 4 years of followup. Midfacial myxomas should be differentiated from other benign and malignant tumors such as dermoid, hamartoma, neurofibroma, nasolacrimal duct cyst, and sarcomas in particular embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Because of the infiltrative nature of these tumors, a wide surgery is required to achieve clear resection margins and avoid recurrence. PMID:22606502

  18. Intramuscular myxoma of the hyoglossus muscle: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LI, GUIQI; JIANG, WEN; LI, WEI; LI, JUNCHUAN

    2014-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma (IM) is a benign intramuscular neoplasm composed of fibroblasts and abundant myxoid stroma. IMs most commonly affect larger skeletal muscles, while those affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions are rare, with a small number of documented cases in the available literature. The aim of the present study was to describe a highly rare case of an IM within the hyoglossus muscle of the tongue in a 74-year-old male. The patient presented with a painless mass in the submental space that had been growing slowly for more than five years. A computed tomography scan revealed a hypodense lesion located in the root of the tongue. The mass was easily excised with thin margins, including only a small amount of the adjacent muscle tissue. The pathological diagnosis of the mass was an IM. The patient made an excellent recovery following the surgery and the follow-up three years later revealed no local recurrence. IMs of the hyoglossus muscle are highly rare, however must be considered in the differential diagnosis of swellings in the root of the tongue region. PMID:24765200

  19. Cardiac myxoma in Iceland: a case series with an estimation of population incidence.

    PubMed

    Sigurjonsson, Hannes; Andersen, Karl; Gardarsdottir, Marianna; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Klemenzson, Gudmundur; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Danielsen, Ragnar; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac myxoma (CM) is the most common primary benign tumor of the heart, but the true age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) has remained unknown. We therefore used nationwide registries in Iceland to study CM and establish its incidence rate. This was a retrospective study involving all patients diagnosed with CM in Iceland between 1986 and 2010. Cases were identified through three different registries, and hospital charts and histology results reviewed. An ASR was estimated based on a world standard population (w). Nine cases of CM (six women) were identified with a mean age of 62.8 years (range: 37-85), giving an ASR of 0.11 (95% CI: 0.05-0.22) per 100,000. The mean tumor size was 4.4 cm (range: 1.5-8.0) with all the tumors located in the left atrium. Dyspnea (n = 6) and ischemic stroke (n = 2) were the most common symptoms. All patients underwent complete resection of the tumor and there were no postoperative deaths or CM-related deaths at follow-up (mean 85 months). The ASR of CM in Iceland was 0.11 per 100,000. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine the incidence of CM in an entire population. In Iceland, the presenting symptoms and mode of detection of CM are similar to those in other series.

  20. Unusual case of right atrial reinfarction.

    PubMed

    Radojevic, Nemanja; Savic, Slobodan; Aleksic, Vuk; Cukic, Dragana

    2012-02-01

    death of the patient, but not ventricular fibrillation or electromechanical dissociation due to ventricular infarction. The presented case shows that detailed autopsy examination of atrial wall and blood vessels can sometimes be crucial in disclosing the cause and mode of death if the ischemia and necrosis attack only the atrial wall, especially in the region of the heart conduction system.

  1. [Large mitral annulus myxoma presenting with syncope: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Vega, Julián; Gabrielli, Luigi; Olivares, Gabriel; Córdova, Samuel; Méndez, Manuel; González, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    We report a 23-year-old woman, with three recent exertional syncopes. Transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) echocardiography found a large heterogeneous mass (38 x 35 mm) arising from the posterior mitral annulus, protruding in systole through the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). Heart MRI confirmed the echocardiography findings, suggesting a cardiac myxoma. Cardiac surgery accomplished the complete resection of the lesion, confirming a mass arising from the posterior mitral annulus and preserving mitral anatomy and function. Pathology was positive for a myxoma. Uneventful evolution allowed the discharge of the patient at the fifth postoperative day. Control TTE discarded any complication.

  2. Intramuscular myxoma presenting as a rare posterior neck mass in a young child: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ishoo, Edwin

    2007-04-01

    Intramuscular myxoma (IMM) is an uncommon benign tumor that presents as a slow-growing, deep-seated mass confined to the skeletal muscle. Histologically, these lesions most resemble umbilical cord tissue. They are generally found in the proximal thigh, gluteal region, or shoulder girdle and are exceedingly rare neck masses in the pediatric population. These tumors most often present as painless, deep-seated intramuscular masses that may exhibit symptoms of compression of surrounding structures.(1) I report a case of a 22-month-old girl with an IMM in the posterior cervical triangle.

  3. NASA's First Atrial Fibrillation Case - Deke Slayton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about heart dysrhythmia have been present since the earliest days of the US manned space program. While information about an astronaut's health is general kept private, one of the original seven American astronaut's health status was played out in a very public forum. Donald "Deke" Slayton was removed from the second manned space flight when it was discovered he had idiopathic atrial fibrillation. Referencing the original medical documents, details of how this was discovered and managed from the medical perspective will be reviewed. This is NASA's first heart dysrhythmia case in an astronaut and it proves quite interesting when placed in historic perspective.

  4. [Antenatal atrial tachycardia. Two case reports].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, M; Lupoglazoff, J M; Denjoy, I; Luton, D; Magnier, S; Casasoprana, A; Azancot, A

    2001-05-01

    The authors report two cases of foetal supraventricular tachycardia in healthy hearts with 1/1 atrioventricular conduction which turned out to be atrial tachycardias in the postnatal period. The first foetus had permanent tachycardia at 190/minute at 34 weeks' amenorrhea with left ventricular dysfunction at 36 weeks. In the postnatal period, treatment with digoxine and amiodarone restored sinus rhythm and normal left ventricular function. Permanent foetal tachycardia, even at a rate of less than 200 beats/minute, should suggest an arrhythmia and may lead to left ventricular dysfunction in utero. The other foetus had an aneurysm of the foramen ovale with paroxysmal tachycardias at 220/minute without cardiac dysfunction. A Holter at 1 month showed paroxysmalatrial tachycardia. Postnatal rhythm monitoring is necessary in paroxysmal foetus tachycardia, especially with prenatal aneurysm of the foramen ovale.

  5. [Carney's Complex: familial cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Guerra, Miguel S; Santos, Nelson; Neves, Fátima; Carlos Mota, João; Miranda, José António; Vouga, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The Carney Complex is a very rare autosomal dominant disease including multiple neoplasia syndrome. This syndrome was initially described in 1985 under the rubric "...the complex of myxomas, spotty pigmentation, and endocrine overactivity". We present a case report of an old woman with Carney Complex who had the characteristic features of facial hirsutism and acromegalic facies, a large pigmented swelling over the face and a cardiac myxoma arising from the left atrium. We emphasize the need for periodic echocardiographic screening of patients and family members.

  6. [Multiple embolisms by atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Contreras, Alejandro E; Cragnolini, Ana C; Brenna, Eduardo J; Parisi, Gustavo R; Chamale, Roberto A; Assante, Maria L; Paladini, Guillermo; Martinez Colombres, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    El mixoma es el tumor cardiaco más frecuente, se presenta comúnmente entre la tercera y sexta decada de la vida y es más prevalente en mujeres. Una forma de presentación es la embolia sistémica. Una mujer de 56 años de edad presentó síntomas de isquemia cerebral, infarto agudo de miocardio silente e isquemia en miembro inferior derecho. Se diagnosticó mixoma de aurícula izquierda y fue intervenida quirúrgicamente de urgencia.

  7. Odontogenic myxoma of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Kaymakci, Mustafa; Yazici, Selçuk

    2011-01-01

    Myxomas are mostly seen in the 2th and 3rd decades. They rarely occur in childhood and maxillofacial region is rarely involved. The recurrence incidence is high. We report this unusual case occurring in a 9-year-old girl in the maxillofacial region and recurrence four months after initial treatment. PMID:24765377

  8. Bone metastasis of glandular cardiac myxoma mimicking a metastatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uppin, Shantveer G; Jambhekar, Nirmala; Puri, Ajay; Kumar, Rajiv; Agarwal, Manish; Sanghvi, Darshana

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal metastasis from a cardiac myxoma is rare. We describe an extremely unusual case of a cardiac myxoma metastasing to the femur in a 46-year-old female presenting with pain in the right hip. Radiographs showed an expansile lytic lesion with pathological fracture involving the neck and proximal shaft of the right femur. Histology revealed features of cardiac myxoma with heterologous glandular elements, which was initially mistaken for a metastatic mucin-secreting adenocarcinoma.

  9. Cardiac myxoma: preoperative diagnosis using a multimodal imaging approach and surgical outcome in a large contemporary series.

    PubMed

    Rahmanian, Parwis B; Castillo, Javier G; Sanz, Javier; Adams, David H; Filsoufi, Farzan

    2007-08-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac myxoma is typically suggested in the presence of symptoms and echocardiographic findings of an intracardiac mass and confirmed histologically. Coronary angiography (CA) and cardiac magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) may provide specific additional information which could lead to a precise preoperative diagnosis. Herein we report a series of 28 patients who underwent excision of myxoma between 1998 and 2005. Data analysis included patient demographics, clinical presentation, imaging modalities, and operative outcome. Echocardiography revealed an intra-atrial mass in all patients but did not differentiate between myxoma and other formations such as thrombi. CA showed neovascularization suggestive of cardiac tumor in 12 (53%) patients. MRI demonstrated specific characteristics of myxomatous tissue in all cases. Surgical removal was performed with no hospital mortality or major complications. Mid-term survival was similar to that of the general population. In patients with a cardiac mass, echocardiography remains the first diagnostic imaging modality but does not allow definite discrimination between cardiac tumors and thrombi. CA shows neovascularization in 50% and has, therefore, a low sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing the nature of the mass. MRI shows specific tissue characteristics facilitating the diagnosis of myxoma preoperatively. Surgery should be performed promptly and this can provide excellent early and mid-term results.

  10. Stroke of a cardiac myxoma origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical features of cardiac myxoma stroke have not been sufficiently described. Debates remain concerning the options and timing of treatment and the clinical outcomes are unknown. This article aims to highlight the pertinent aspects of this rare condition. Methods Data source of the present study came from a comprehensive literature collection of cardiac myxoma stroke in PubMed, Google search engine and Highwire Press for the year range 2000-2014. Results Young adults, female predominance, single cerebral vessel (mostly the middle cerebral artery), multiple territory involvements and solitary left atrial myxoma constituted the outstanding characteristics of this patient setting. The most common affected cerebral vessel (the middle cerebral artery) and areas (the basal ganglion, cerebellum and parietal and temporal regions) corresponded well to the common manifestations of this patient setting, such as conscious alteration, ataxia, hemiparesis and hemiplegia, aphasia and dysarthria. Initial computed tomography scan carried a higher false negative rate for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction than magnetic resonance imaging did. A delayed surgical resection of cardiac myxoma was associated with an increased risk of potential consequences in particular otherwise arterial embolism. The mortality rate of this patient population was 15.3%. Conclusion Cardiac myxoma stroke is rare. Often does it affect young females. For an improved diagnostic accuracy, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and echocardiography are imperative for young stroke patients in identifying the cerebral infarct and determining the stroke of a cardiac origin. Immediate thrombolytic therapy may completely resolve the cerebral stroke and improve the neurologic function of the patients. An early surgical resection of cardiac myxoma is recommended in patients with not large territory cerebral infarct. PMID:26107455

  11. An interleukin-6-producing cardiac myxoma associated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T; Sumino, H; Kanda, T; Kobayashi, I; Nagai, R; Ichikawa, S

    1999-01-01

    We report our experience with a patient whose mediastinal lymphadenopathy resolved after resection of a cardiac myxoma that secreted interleukin-6 (IL-6). The patient was a 68-year-old female who complained of nocturnal chest discomfort related to congestive heart failure. An echocardiogram demonstrated a large left atrial mass. A computed tomogram showed not only the left atrial mass but multiple enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. The serum IL-6 level was markedly elevated at 13.7 pg/ml. After resection of the cardiac myxoma, serum IL-6 returned to the normal range. A repeat computed tomogram showed no mediastinal lymphadenopathy. We believe that overproduction of IL-6 by the cardiac myxoma was the cause of the mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

  12. Splanchnectopia Accompanied With Atrial Septal Defect: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Splanchnetopia accompanied with atrial septal defect is a rare congenital malformation clinically. Recent studies show that the patients are susceptible to lung disease. We present a case of a 62-year-old man who presented to our hospital with cough, palpitation and short of breath after activity. On physical examination, we found cyanosis of lips and face, swollen jugular vein, bubble sounds at the lung bottom, irregular heart rhythm, the large liver under the left rib and the lower limbs edema. Laboratory studies revealed white blood cell 18.6 × 109/L and neutrophils 73.9%. Electrocardiogram showed disappearance of P wave and substituted F wave with irregular R-R interval. Ultrasound cardiogram indicated that there was a 24 mm-long gap in the middle of the atrial septal. Dextrocardia, pulmonary artery extrudes and infection of lung were found by chest x-ray. The abdomen ultrasound indicated organ flip. Clinical diagnosis was congenital heart disease, splanchnectopia, atrial septal defect, Eisenmenger’s syndrome, atrial flutter, cardiac function class III and pneumonia. The patient left hospital after 2-week treatment. Its clinical significance is when the thoracic and celiac organs are ill, the position of the symptoms and physical signs are contrary to the normal place. Therefore, we should make a careful and systematic examination of the patients in order to avoid misdiagnosis and delay in treatment.

  13. A Case of a Paracardial Osteophyte Causing Atrial Compression

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Christodoulos; Vassilikos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Osteophytes are pointed or beaked osseous outgrowths at the margins of articular surfaces that are often associated with degenerative changes of articular cartilage. They are the most common aspect of osteoarthritis and they infrequently cause symptoms by compression of the adjacent anatomic structures, such as nerves, vessels, bronchi, and esophagus. We present here a rare case of a patient with a left atrial deformation by a large osteophyte. PMID:28119739

  14. A Primary Ossifying Intracranial Myxoma Arising from the Ethmoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Je Il; Kim, Jae Min; Kim, Choong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Myxomas are rare benign tumors that originate from mesenchymal tissue. They usually develop in the atrium of the heart, the skin, subcutaneous tissue, or bone. Involvement of the skull base with an intracranial extension is very rare and not well-described in the literature. We report a rare case of primary intracranial ossifying myxoma arising from the anterior skull base and mimicking a huge chondrosarcoma, and we review the relevant literature. PMID:26539274

  15. Pediatric giant right atrial aneurysm: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Harder, Erika E; Ohye, Richard G; Knepp, Marc D; Owens, Sonal T

    2014-01-01

    Giant right atrial aneurysm is a rare form of congenital heart disease with a wide spectrum of clinical presentation varying from asymptomatic patients to those with refractory atrial arrhythmias or severe airway obstruction. Diagnosis is often confused with other causes of right atrial dilation such as Ebstein disease. Because of its rare occurrence and variable clinical presentation, inconsistencies in medical and surgical management strategies exist between centers. We present five cases of giant right atrial aneurysm managed at our institution and discuss the clinical presentation, diagnostic challenges, and medical and surgical management.

  16. A rare case of obstructive right atrial lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, M; Wiedemann, D; Rath, C; Kocher, A

    2014-01-01

    Benign cardiac tumours are rare and cardiac lipomas account only for a small fraction among those. Most of these tumours differ in terms of clinical manifestation, diagnosis, morphology and size, and are therefore not diagnosed easily unless they become symptomatic. We report the case of a 71-year-old Caucasian woman with recurrent episodes of shortness of breath presenting with an acute exacerbation of dyspnoea and hypertensive crisis. Diagnosis of a right atrial lipoma with a coexisting patent foramen ovale was established on echocardiography and computed tomography, and the patient was evaluated for elective surgery. Comprising the entire free wall of the right atrium, the tumour was removed during open heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass. The right atrium and the orifices of both the superior and inferior vena cava were reconstructed with bovine pericardium. No evidence of tumour relapse was observed during successive follow-up visits. PMID:25245725

  17. Cytology of cardiac myxomas: presence of Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin by immunoperoxidase staining.

    PubMed

    Iwa, N; Yutani, C

    1993-12-01

    Cytological findings are presented of seven cases of cardiac myxomas. Avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method was employed to demonstrate Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin in imprint smears as well as in paraffin-embedded tissue sections in cardiac myxomas. The cytology was characterized by tumor cells with polyhedral or stellate and mucinous background with lymphocytes, neutrophils, and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. In smears as well as tissue sections, UEA-I lectin was detected throughout the cytoplasm of myxoma cells. This study established the applicability of the immunoperoxidase staining for cardiac myxoma as an aid in cytopathological diagnosis.

  18. Alcohol and new onset atrial fibrillation: a case-control study of a current series.

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, P; Kupari, M; Leinonen, H; Luomanmäki, K

    1987-01-01

    The aetiological role of alcohol in new onset atrial fibrillation was evaluated in a case-control study of 100 consecutive patients aged 21-64 years. Clinical examination, routine diagnostic tests, and echocardiography revealed an underlying disease or other identifiable factor for atrial fibrillation in 65 patients (group 1); 35 patients had idiopathic atrial fibrillation (group 2). The most common diseases associated with atrial fibrillation were ischaemic heart disease (21%), hypertension (13%), and cardiomyopathy (8%). Data on alcohol consumption were obtained by interviewing the patients and their age and sex matched controls on admission. The mean daily alcohol intake of group 2 patients during the week preceding atrial fibrillation was significantly larger than that of either controls or group 1 patients. Compared with controls significantly more patients in both groups with atrial fibrillation had consumed alcohol within two days of the onset of the arrhythmia. Significantly more patients had onset of arrhythmia on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday than on any other weekday, including patients with high alcohol intake. This study establishes alcohol as an important precipitating factor for new onset atrial fibrillation. PMID:3593617

  19. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L. Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  20. Juxtaarticular Myxoma in a Pigtail Macaque (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Brianna L; Johnson, Crystal H; Lacy, Shannon H

    2016-01-01

    A 10-y-old pigtail macaque presented with a subcutaneous, soft-tissue mass overlying the right stifle joint. Here we describe the clinical case and histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of this lesion. This case represents the first published report of juxtaarticular myxoma in a pigtail macaque. PMID:27780010

  1. Left atrial approach to close the atrial septal defect type II in case of right lung agenesis with extreme dextroversion.

    PubMed

    Pietrzykowski, Witold D; Moll, Maciej; Kobielski, Artur; Moll, Jacek J

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a case of a rare combination of right lung agenesis and atrial septal defect type II (ASD II). Successful surgical repair of ASD II was performed at the age of six years with total circulatory arrest (TCA) and deep hypothermia, because of difficult approach. Computed tomography and intraoperative findings are described. From patho-embryological consideration, defects in the primitive respiratory apparatus in embryo stages were presumably responsible for agenesis of the lung. The patient was found to have a very short stump of the right pulmonary artery, but this malformation seems to be secondary.

  2. A case of atrial tachycardia sensitive to increased caffeine intake.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Toru; Kurita, Takashi; Nohara, Ryuji; Smith, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese man with atrial tachycardia visited our clinic. He regularly consumed daily alcohol with cola, one cup of regular coffee, and a candy containing 0.7 mg of caffeine per tablet. After stopping his caffeine intake, his arrhythmia ameliorated. Since caffeine might be associated with his arrhythmia, a caffeine load test (equivalent to his daily intake of caffeine) was performed for 4 days. Atrial tachycardia time from a Holter recording was 44.2 minute/day before the caffeine load, compared with 215.2 minute/day during the caffeine load. Plasma caffeine concentration before and during caffeine loading was 3.1 mg/dL and 5.4 mg/dL, respectively. Caffeine use seemed to be an important factor for his atrial tachycardia, since his arrhythmia became worse during caffeine load testing and was ameliorated after the cessation of caffeine.

  3. [Primary left atrial hemangiopericytoma. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Bedmar, Daniel; Varela, Cecilia; Squella, Gina; Belletti, José; Donoso, María Victoria

    2011-06-01

    We report a 41-year-old male presenting with progressive dyspnea lasting one month. A CAT scan disclosed a left atrial mass, that was surgically excised. The pathological study of the surgical piece showed a primary hemangiopericytoma. One month later, the patient consulted for cervical pain and a positron emission tomography showed multiple metastases. The patient died two months later.

  4. An unusual case of aorta-right atrial tunnel with windsock aneurysm: imaging, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shehzaadi Aneesah; Scholtz, Leonie; Snyders, F Adriaan; de Villiers, Johan

    2017-03-15

    The first successfully diagnosed and treated case of aorta-right atrial tunnel was reported by Coto et al. in 1980. The most common cause of aorta-right atrial tunnel is a ruptured aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms had been reported as early as 1840 by Thurnam; these were diagnosed at autopsy. With the advances in radiology, many cases of aorta-right atrial tunnel have been reported since then, each with its own subtle variations. We report on a unique case of aorta-right atrial tunnel with a windsock aneurysm in the right atrium. A 55-year-old male presented with abdominal pain and the chest X-ray revealed cardiomegaly. On further investigation with echocardiography and computed tomography angiography, there was an incidental aorta-right atrial tunnel with a windsock aneurysm in the right atrium. He was treated successfully with surgery. A similar case has been reported only once before by Iyisoy et al. in 2014.

  5. Two Cases of Acute Renal Infarction in the Setting of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Ziffra, Jeffrey; Iqbal, Hina; Said, Albara; Oyama, Joseph H.; Lerma, Edgar V.; Chadaga, Amar R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute renal infarction (ARI) is an uncommon and often overlooked diagnosis in patients presenting with acute kidney injury and abdominal pain. Case Reports: We present 2 cases of ARI in the setting of atrial fibrillation along with a review of medical literature pertaining to ARI. Conclusion: This article should aid clinicians in the diagnosis of ARI. PMID:27660583

  6. Case report: Atrial fibrillation following exposure to ambient air pollution particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONTEXT: Exposure to air pollution can result in the onset of atrial fibrillation. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a case of a 58 year old woman who volunteered to participate in a controlled exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs). Twenty minutes into the exposure, there...

  7. Juxta-articular Myxoma of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou-Xi; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Wilson, Julian J

    2015-11-01

    The juxta-articular myxoma represents a benign mesenchymal neoplasm that arises from tissue within or adjacent to a joint space. There have been a number of reported cases involving myxomas of the knee, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hip. To our knowledge there, however, have been no reported cases of juxta-articular myxomas of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This report describes the case of a 57-year-old woman with a juxta-articular myxoma of the left TMJ extending into the infratemporal fossa (ITF). Access to the tumor was accomplished via a preauricular incision and low condylar osteotomy which allowed for displacement of the condyle for direct visualization and excision of the tumor. The postoperative course was benign and the patient demonstrated no cosmetic or functional limitation. Likewise, follow-up at 30 months showed no evidence of recurrence. Benign encapsulated tumors of the ITF can be effectively accessed by means of a modified preauricular incision, low condylar osteotomy, and anterior meniscal release. This direct approach allows for excellent surgical exposure, minimal surgical site morbidity, and maintenance of physiologic joint function and occlusion.

  8. [Giant congenital intrapericardial left atrial appendage aneurysm: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Zhari, Bouchra; Bellamlih, Habib; Boumdine, Hassan; Amil, Touriya; Bamous, Mehdi; En-Nouali, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial appendage aneurysm is a very rare heart anomaly. It may be congenital or acquired, secondary to inflammatory or degenerative processes. Most cases are asymptomatic. The prevalence of these lesions in pediatric age has been very rarely reported. As it can cause potentially fatal arrhythmias or thrombus, surgery is required immediately after diagnosis. This study reports the case of a 14-year-old boy with rapidly progressive dyspnea, palpitations, sensation of repetitive dizziness and fainting, in whom congenital left atrial appendage aneurysm was detected. Diagnosis was based on coronary CTA data. The patient was successfully treated with surgical resection of the aneurysm.

  9. [Early migration of the device for transcatheter closure of atrial septal defect. Case report].

    PubMed

    Santos, Nelson; Guerra, Miguel; Neves, Fátima; Gonçalves, Manuel; Gama, Vasco; Mota, João; Vouga, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The transcatheter closure of the atrial septal defect (ASD) has been proposed as an alternative to surgical therapy for the ostium secundum ASD. It is considered an effective and safe procedure, although rare but potentially fatal complications have been reported. The authors report a case of early migration of a device for transcatheter closure of an ASD to the right pulmonary artery.

  10. Left Atrial to Esophageal Fistula: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Yasir; Siddiqui, Waqas Javed; Iyer, Praneet S.; Dirweesh, Ahmed; Karabulut, Nigahus

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 57 Final Diagnosis: Left atrial to esophageal fistula Symptoms: Chest pain • syncope Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Left atrial to esophageal fistula (LAEF) is a rare fatal complication of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for atrial fibrillation and is associated with high mortality. Clinical features can be nonspecific and include fever, dysphagia, upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, sepsis, and embolic stroke a after recent history of RFA for atrial fibrillation. Case Report: A 57-year-old Caucasian male was brought to the emergency department (ED) by his family because of an altered mental status. He had undergone a radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation three weeks earlier. Several hours after admission to the ED, the patient transiently became unresponsive and had a right sided hemiplegia. A brain MRI revealed multiple cerebral infarcts. On the following day, the patient had an episode of melena, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed which did not reveal any source of bleeding. While the patient was being monitored in the intensive care unit (ICU), he had an episode of hematemesis and went into cardiac arrest from which he was successfully resuscitated and transferred to another facility. He had another EGD, which uncovered a flap of mucosa covering the lower third of his esophagus and a 1 cm fistulous opening was seen with fresh blood oozing out of it. The patient had another cardiac arrest during the endoscopy and died despite all measures. Conclusions: We present this case to stress the importance of early diagnosis of LAEF. LAEF can be fatal if diagnosis is delayed or missed. Early surgical intervention can reduce LAEF morbidity and mortality. Newer diagnostic modalities such as endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) can be helpful in cases where conventional imaging is unclear. PMID:27803496

  11. Case study: a patient's survival.

    PubMed

    Nauer, K A; Kramer, L; Lockard, K L

    2000-05-01

    Presentation of a case study involving a female patient, in her 20s, undergoing routine surgery for removal of atrial myxoma leading to a heart transplant. This case study will show the progression from postcardiotomy failure, the emergent use of the extracorporeal membrane oxygenator device, the insertion of the HeartMate device, and the final return to the operating room for a heart transplant. The case study will examine the physiologic demands on the patient, as well as the psychological effects from the various life-saving devices.

  12. Altered Mental Status in a Child With an Unwitnessed Fall: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fleurat, Michelle R; Zaia, Brita E

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of altered mental status in a 5-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department after presumed head trauma. A computed tomography head was conducted and its findings were normal, and the boy was discharged home. He returned the next day with persistent altered mental status and was found to have an abnormal MR brain suggestive of embolic strokes. An echocardiogram revealed a large atrial mass that was later confirmed by pathology to be an atrial myxoma. This is a unique and, to our knowledge, unreported presentation of a known but rare disease process in a pediatric patient.

  13. [Unexpected atrial fibrillation when monitoring in operating room. Case of the trimester].

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    A real case reported to the SENSAR database of incidents is presented. In a patient scheduled for nose fracture repair surgery an unexpected atrial fibrillation was found when monitored in the operating room. The operation was not delayed. After induction of general anaesthesia heart rate suddenly increased and hemodinamic situation was impaired. Cardioversion was required. Two electric countershocks were given but sinus rhythm was not restored. Heart rate was controlled with amiodarone infusion. Optimal defibrillation characteristics are described in these cases. Increased risk of thromboembolism (1-2%) following cardioversion is present even if atrial thrombi are ruled out. The mainstay therapies of are rhythm and rate control and prevention of thromboembolic complications. We describe recommendations on the management of these critical situations with emphasis in learning through the creation of protocols and training practice in simulation.

  14. Biatrial Approach Provides Better Outcomes in the Surgical Treatment of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Ahmet; Saba, Davit; Velioğlu, Yusuf; Ener, Serdar; Özkan, Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to present clinical features, surgical approaches, importance of surgical technique and long-term outcomes of our patients with cardiac myxoma who underwent surgery. Methods We retrospectively collected data of patients with cardiac myxoma who underwent surgical resection between February 1990 and November 2014. Biatrial approach is the preferred surgical method in a large proportion of patients that are operated due to left atrial myxoma because it provides wider exposure than the uniatrial approach. To prevent recurrence during surgical resection, a large excision is made so as to include at least 5 mm of normal area from clean tissue around the tumor. Moreover, special attention is paid to the excision that is made as a whole, without digesting the fragment of tumor with gentle dissections. Results Forty-three patients (20 males, mean age of 51.7±8.8 years) were included. Most common symptom was dyspnea (48.8%). Tumor was located in the left atrium in 37 (86%) patients. Resections were achieved via biatrial approach in 34 patients, uniatrial approach in 8 patients, and right atriotomy with right ventriculotomy in 1 patient. One patient died due to low cardiac output syndrome in the early postoperative period. Mean follow-up time was 102.3±66.5 months. Actuarial survival rates were 95%, 92% and 78% at five, 10 and 15 years, respectively. Recurrence was observed in none of the patients during follow-up. Conclusion Although myxomas are benign tumors, due to embolic complications and obstructive signs, they should be treated surgically as soon as possible after diagnosis. To prevent recurrence, especially in cardiac myxomas which are located in left atrium, preferred biatrial approach is suggested for wide resection of the tumor and to avoid residual tumor. PMID:27849304

  15. The first case of atrial fibrillation-related graft kidney infarction following acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Native renal infarction is uncommon in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF)-related thromboembolism. Graft infarction is also rare, with such cases mostly occurring in the main graft artery postoperatively. To date, there have been no studies of AF-related graft kidney infarction. We herein describe the first case of AF-related graft kidney infarction. The clinical manifestations of this condition mimic and follow those of acute pyelonephritis; therefore, these diseases should be differentially diagnosed as early as possible using lactic dehydrogenase testing and computed tomography. Aggressive treatment with intravascular thrombolysis should be administered, even when the diagnosis is delayed, in order to restore a viable renal function.

  16. Incidental finding of a giant asymptomatic right atrial tumor

    PubMed Central

    Strecker, Thomas; Agaimy, Abbas; Zelzer, Peter; Weyand, Michael; Wachter, David Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are very rare, atrial myxoma being the most common benign tumor of the heart. They may present with a great variety of incidental asymptomatic masses to severe life-threatening cardiovascular complications necessitating emergency surgery. Here we report the diagnostic evaluation and successful surgical resection of such a giant cardiac tumor which was found on a routine medical check-up in a 62-year-old patient. Histology confirmed diagnosis of unusually huge myxoma. This article demonstrates it’s necessary to include cardiac tumors in the differential diagnosis of subtle and non-specific cardiothoracic symptoms. PMID:25120848

  17. [Interatrial electromechanic resynchronization by dual atrial pacing in the prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation --report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J C; Figueiredo, H; Correia, J M

    2000-12-01

    We presented the case of a 78 year old woman who five years ago underwent myectomic surgery, and aortic valvular replacement, for obstructive cardiomyopathy and valvular aortic stenosis. After surgery, the aortic transvalvular gradient was insignificant (20 mm/Hg). In spite of this she suffers from frequent AF crises, (3 times a month), with a cardiac frequency of 140-150/min. She was in sinus bradycardia (40-45/min), which was a clear counter-indication for the use of antiarrhythmic drugs. Her ECG showed sinusal bradycardia with 45/min, a two-phase P-wave (positive-negative) in DII, DIII aVF, and bimodal P-wave in DI. Furthermore, she showed a 1st degree auriculo-ventricular block with complete left-branch block. In her echocardiogram there was concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, with diastolic disfunction and left atrial dilatation. In the auricular IEGM we observed a slowed-down interauricular conduction (right atrium-left atrium = 120 msecs); The A-wave was fragmented. The auriculo-ventricular Wenckbach point was at 90/min. In view of these findings we proceeded with the implantation of a DDD-pacemaker with biauricular stimulation, as follows: 1. We used two auricular electrodes, one with an active fixation to the crista terminalis of the right atrium and the other (having in mind the stimulation of the left atrium) applied to the proximal coronary sinus. These two electrodes were connected to the auricular pin of the pacemaker by means of an "Y"--type Biotronick adaptor. 2. The right ventricular stimulation was done with a normal, bipolar ventricular electrode, on the apex of the ventricle. After biauricular, simultaneous, stimulation, we proceeded with interauricular re-synchronization. After this procedure, the A-wave no longer appeared fragmented, and the right auricular--left auricular waves were then simultaneous and with two-phase morphology. Three months later the interauricular resynchronization procedure was induced and without any antiarrhythmic

  18. Giant biatrial myxoma nearly obstructing the orifice of the inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are the most common type of benign cardiac tumors and most of them occur in the left atrium but the biatrial myxoma is uncommon. We present a rare case of giant biatrial myxoma nearly obstructing the orifice of the inferior vena cava. A 58-year old woman presented with exertional dyspnea and intermittent chest discomfort. The non-pedunculated tumor involved most of the interatrial septum and extended from the orifice of the inferior vena cava to the displaced mitral annulus and the lower left pulmonary vein. The resected specimen weighed 76 gram and measured 80 × 40 × 30 mm. She did not complain of dyspnea or show any sign of recurrence by echocardiography during the 2-year follow-up period. PMID:23758983

  19. A Large Left Ventricle Myxoma: Presenting with Epigastric Pain and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are the most common benign tumors found in the heart. They usually appear in the left atrium. Those originating from the left ventricle (LV) are rare. Although clinical presentation may vary, dyspnea and embolism are the most commonly reported symptoms. In the present case study, a 27-year-old woman with a large myxoma originating from the left ventricular free wall is studied. She had atypical complaints, mainly epigastric discomfort, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia. She was hospitalized for acute abdomen, but subsequent investigations revealed a large myxoma that fully filled the LV and severely compromised the flow of the aortic and mitral valves. After successful emergency tumor resection, all symptoms disappeared. The uncommon presentation caused by these tumors is discussed in this study. PMID:28090362

  20. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. RESULTS In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma) have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. CONCLUSION The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms), which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising. PMID:26735605

  1. Atrial fibrillation in healthy adolescents after highly caffeinated beverage consumption: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Energy drinks and highly caffeinated drinks comprise some of the fastest growing products of the beverage industry, often targeting teenagers and young adults. Cardiac arrhythmias in children related to high caffeine consumption have not been well described in the literature. This case series describes the possible association between the consumption of highly caffeinated drinks and the subsequent development of atrial fibrillation in the adolescent population. Case presentations We report the cases of two Caucasian adolescent boys of 14 and 16 years of age at the time of presentation, each without a significant cardiac history, who presented with palpitations or vague chest discomfort or both after a recent history of excessive caffeine consumption. Both were found to have atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram; one patient required digoxin to restore a normal sinus rhythm, and the other self-converted after intravenous fluid administration. Conclusion With the increasing popularity of energy drinks in the pediatric and adolescent population, physicians should be aware of the arrhythmogenic potential associated with highly caffeinated beverage consumption. It is important for pediatricians to understand the lack of regulation in the caffeine content and other ingredients of these high-energy beverages and their complications so that parents and children can be educated about the risk of cardiac arrhythmias with excessive energy drink consumption. PMID:21247417

  2. Clarence Crafoord and the first successful resection of a cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, W R

    1992-11-01

    In 1954 Clarence Crafoord, the pioneer Swedish cardiovascular surgeon, removed an intraatrial myxoma for the first time. The patient was a 40-year-old woman with atypical symptoms of mitral stenosis. Follow-up 38 years later finds the patient alive and well. This case represents not only the first extirpation of a cardiac tumor on cardiopulmonary support but also the dawn of open cardiac surgery in Sweden. Others were soon to follow the lead of Crafoord and his team. However, their bold efforts prepared the way for the early diagnosis and facile extirpation of cardiac myxomas. Moreover, this group played an integral part in the development of safe, effective cardiopulmonary perfusion.

  3. Odontogenic myxoma in a 52-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Hari; Mehta, Gagan; Kumar, Manoj; Lone, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare benign but locally aggressive tumour of the jaws. It is usually seen in the second to third decade of life. Women are more frequently affected than men and it has more predilections for the mandible rather than the maxilla. OM presents as an asymptomatic swelling in most of the cases. Owing to the non-capsulated and aggressive nature of OM, a high rate of recurrence has been reported. Here we present a case of OM in a 52-year-old woman managed by segmental mandibulectomy. Sign of recurrence was seen after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24859552

  4. Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fi-bri-LA- ... Works article. Understanding the Electrical Problem in Atrial Fibrillation In AF, the heart's electrical signals don't ...

  5. Tulip deformity with Cera atrial septal defect devices: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Vikas

    2015-02-01

    Device closure of secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) is the treatment of choice when anatomy is favourable. Amplatzer device has remained the gold standard for closure of ASD. Cobra deformity is a well-reported problem with devices. Recently, Tulip deformity has been reported in a single case. We report a series of cases where we noted Tulip deformity along with inability to retract the device in the sheath in Cera Lifetech devices. This resulted in prolongation of procedure, excessive fluoroscopic exposure and additional interventional procedures not usually anticipated in ASD device closure. We believe that the problem is due to the stiffness of the device resulting in its inability to be retracted into the sheath. We also report a unique way of retrieving the device.

  6. Large multifocal cardiac myxoma causing the sudden unexpected death of a 2-month-old infant--a rapidly growing, acquired lesion versus a congenital process?: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kure, Kiyoe; Lingamfelter, Daniel; Taboada, Eugenio

    2011-06-01

    We report the occurrence of a clinically undiagnosed biatrial myxoma with left ventricular involvement in a 2-month-old male infant, resulting in sudden death. During a routine well-baby examination, a grade (34) holosystolic murmur was detected at the left sternal border with radiation to the axilla and back. On the following day, the patient collapsed and died suddenly. An autopsy revealed a large multifocal neoplasm diffusely involving the aortic valve while displaying mitral, tricuspid, and left ventricular extensions. The ensuing histopathologic and immunohistochemical studies were diagnostic for myxoma. We discuss the occurrence of cardiac myxoma within the pediatric population and review the literature as to theorize whether this lesion was a congenital process versus a rapidly growing tumor that developed after the child was born. Lastly, we address the potential for sudden death in patients with such tumors.

  7. [Odontogenic myxoma of nasosinusal localization in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Arjona Amo, M; Belmonte Caro, R; Valdivieso del Pueblo, C; Batista Cruzado, A; Torres Lagares, D; Gutiérrez Pérez, J L

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we report and discuss a case of odontogenic myxoma in a 13-month-old patient. Only two other reports have been published in the literature describing the occurrence of this type of tumor at an earlier age. Odontogenic myxoma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm of the maxilla more common between the third and fourth decades of life. The case here reported is exceptional as it presents in an infant and, although some cases have been reported in the literature, this type of tumor is rare in early childhood. The most common locations include the ascending ramus and the angle of the jaw, although these tumors may also affect the upper maxilla, in which case they may involve the maxillary sinus. According to the review of the literature, these tumors show a recurrence rate of about 25%. Consequently, after the intraoperative clinical examination of the lesion and the assessment of the initial suspected diagnosis by means of intraoperative biopsy under general anesthesia, we carried out the resection of the tumor with wide margins at some points of the tumor location.

  8. Atrial fibrillation as an unexpected complication after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM): a case report.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Abdulaziz M; Hennessey, Hooman; von Renteln, Daniel; Vassiliou, Melina C

    2014-10-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an entirely endoscopic approach for the treatment of achalasia. This new procedure has been shown to be safe, effective, and associated with only minor complications in the postoperative period. This case report describes the development of atrial fibrillation after POEM secondary to direct compression from a hematoma in the submucosal tunnel. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a delayed hematoma after POEM. This procedure is still novel, and it is important to continue to share information about potential complications and long-term results. This report also includes several interesting radiographic images to illustrate what occurred. Finally, we provide a brief review of the literature on complications that have been described after POEM.

  9. [Serum/tissue interleukin-6 concentrations and constitutional abnormalities in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Saji, T; Matsuo, N; Shiono, N; Yokomuro, H; Watanabe, Y; Takanashi, Y; Komatsu, H

    1993-09-01

    Immunological features and the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma were studied. The patients' age ranged from 11 years old to 57 years old; all 4 patients were female. Case 1, an 11-year-old female patient with myxoma located in the right ventricle, was considered to be a familial case. Her mother had myxomas in the right and left atrium, and had undergone removal of both tumors 3 years before. Peripheral blood examination revealed various inflammatory parameters in all of these patients. White blood cell (WBC) count was over 8,000/cmm in 3 of the 4 patients, positive CRP was found in 2 patients, IgG was higher than 1,500 mg/dl in 3 patients, positive anti-nuclear antibody was seen in 1 patient, and positive rheumatoid factor was identified in 1 patient. The OKT 4/8 ratio of lymphocyte subpopulation was 4.65 in one patient. The lymphocyte mitogenic response to PHA was increased in 2 patients. Serum IL-6 increased in 3 of 4 patients, and returned to normal within 3 to 4 weeks after operation. The IL-6 concentration in the homogenized sample remarkably increased in all 4 patients. Tumors larger than 4 cm contained higher tissue IL-6 concentrations than those smaller than 2 cm. The cultured myxoma cells produced abundant IL-6 in the culture medium supernatant. We conclude that inflammatory signs and immunological abnormalities are common in patients with large cardiac myxoma, and, in addition, serum IL-6 levels may increase in such patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Atrial Fibrillation Identified During Echocardiography in a Patient with Recurrent Cardioembolic Events: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Christia, Panagiota; Katsa, Ioanna; Ocava, Lenore; Faillace, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 80 Final Diagnosis: Stroke Symptoms: Weakness • left sided Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Echocardiogram Specialty: Naurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Stroke is the major cause of disability and the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. In 30–40% of strokes the etiology remains uncertain or unknown. Identifying the cause of a cerebrovascular event offers the opportunity for an intervention that may decrease the risk of future stroke and thus prevent the resultant impairment. Case Report: We report the case of an 80-year-old African American woman with a prior right middle cerebral artery stroke, who presented to the hospital with new left-sided weakness and was found to have a new right-sided frontal lobe infarct. Twenty-four hour Holter monitoring performed during this hospitalization and prior 24-h electrocardiogram (ECG) recording did not reveal an arrhythmia. However, the patient was found to have an isolated episode of atrial fibrillation (AF) during an echocardiogram as part of the evaluation for stroke etiology. Conclusions: AF is an important and treatable cause of recurrent stroke and needs to be ruled out by thorough evaluation before the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke is assigned. Despite meticulous diagnostic work-up, many strokes caused by paroxysmal AF remain undetected and longer ECG monitoring (>24 h) may be required. PMID:26932564

  11. [Atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia characterized by no-coordinated atrial contraction that results in an inefficient atrial systole. The clinical classification of atrial fibrillation includes: ocassional, paroxysmal, persistent, and permanent. Multiple mechanisms have been described and accounts for a single ECG manifestation. Treatment should be individualized and has to considered several aspects including age, associated heart disease, and symptoms. Treatment strategies are: rhythm control, rate control, and thromboprophylaxis.

  12. First case of a left atrial dissection after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Kaddissi, Georges I; Sabir, Sajjad A; Topalian, Simon K

    2016-06-01

    The left atrial dissection is a very infrequently encountered complication after valve replacement and never seen after Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We present an 84-year-old female, who underwent successful transapical TAVR and consequently developed contained left atrial dissection seen on transesophageal echocardiogram. The patient remained stable throughout the procedure and was monitored in critical care unit with conservative management. Although there is low associated intraop mortality, prompt recognition is paramount with follow-up serial imaging.

  13. A case of aorta-right atrial tunnel presented with an asymptomatic murmur.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Nyoun; Cho, Kyoung-Im; Kim, Jae-Joon; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Goo, Ja-Jun; Lee, Ja-Young; Kim, Seong-Man

    2013-09-01

    Aorta-right atrial tunnel is a rare and distinct congenital anomaly. It is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva with a tortuous course anterior or posterior to the ascending aorta, and terminates either in the superior vena cava or in the right atrium (RA). We report a 42-year-old female briefly with aorta-right atrial tunnel in which the left coronary artery arose from the tunnel and terminated into the RA.

  14. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  15. The case against using hypertension as the only criterion for oral anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Simon W; Moe, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    According to recent guidelines for atrial fibrillation (AF) management, the presence of hypertension warrants anticoagulation, often involving the use of newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs). To discuss this idea, we posited the case against this proposition. We note that the data on hypertension that formulated the most commonly used Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes, Stroke/Transient Ischemic Attack (CHADS2) risk algorithm were not clearly defined and that there are insufficient data that hypertension in the presence of AF produces a meaningful incremental increase in stroke risk over and above the stroke risk increase for hypertension alone. Data exist that persons younger than 65 years of age with only 1 stroke risk factor such as hypertension, have a very small stroke risk. We further note that there are no quantitative data to allow clinicians to decide the level of blood pressure that meaningfully increases stroke risk in AF. Furthermore, there are insufficient data on the blood pressure level at which the risk of cerebral hemorrhage outweighs the risk of cardioembolic events. Clinical trials of NOACs in AF did not usually include hypertension as the only entry criteria. Another issue is the recent changes in the level of blood pressure for the diagnosis of hypertension based on home and ambulatory blood pressure measurement, which were not used to construct either stroke risk algorithms or entry criteria for NOAC clinical trials. These considerations highlight some of the complexities of using hypertension as a sole criterion for decision-making for anticoagulation in AF.

  16. Nerve sheath myxoma of the dorsal paravertebral space

    PubMed Central

    Malkoc, Melih; Ormeci, Tugrul; Keskinbora, Mert; Yılmaz, Adem; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Tanik, Canan Besleyici

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nerve sheath myxomas (NSM) are rare benign soft tissue tumors. The dorsal paravertebral placed NMS diagnosis can be difficult. PRESENTATION OF CASE This article presents clinical, radiological findings and treatment of the NSM of the dorsal paravertebral space in a 32-year-old man presented with a right shoulder and back pain for 4 years. DISCUSSION NSM is a rare and benign tumor and that most often occurs in the skin of the head, neck or upper limbs of younger patients. Rare locations such as intracranial, spinal canal, trunk, lower limb and oral cavity were also reported. The appropriate treatment of NSM is surgical excision. Diagnosis is difficult in an uncommon presentation. CONCLUSION Although the most presented case of NMS are dermal tumors, it may also be found extremely rare locations. We conclude that, the definitive treatment of NSM is surgical excision with safe margins even when it is possible. PMID:25462051

  17. Isolated Atrial Amyloidosis in Patients with Various Types of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Sukhacheva, T V; Eremeeva, M V; Ibragimova, A G; Vaskovskii, V A; Serov, R A; Revishvili, A Sh

    2016-04-01

    The myocardium of the right and left atrial appendages (auricles) in patients with paroxysmal, persistent, and permanent forms of atrial fibrillation was examined by histological methods and electron microscopy. Isolated atrial amyloidosis was detected in the left (50.0-56.3% patients) and in the right (45.0-55.6% patients) atrial appendages. In all cases, immunohistochemistry revealed atrial natriuretic peptide in fibrillary amyloid deposits. Ultrastructurally, amyloid masses formed clusters of myofibrils 8-10 nm in diameter. They were chaotically located in the extracellular space along the sarcolemma as well as in membrane invaginations, dilated tubules of cardiomyocyte T-tubular system, and vascular walls. Amyloidosis was predominantly observed in women; its degree positively correlated with age of patients and duration of atrial fibrillation but negatively correlated with atrial fibrosis. The study revealed positive (in permanent atrial fibrillation) and negative (in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation) correlation of amyloidosis with myofibril content in atrial cardiomyocytes.

  18. Two cases of delayed cardiac tamponade due to pericarditis after pulmonary vein (PV) isolation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Sadayoshi; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Imai, Mikimasa; Kuroyanagi, Akira; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yamano, Tetsuhiro; Matsumuro, Akiyoshi; Shirayama, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF). The incidence of major complications related to the procedure is reported to be 4.5%, and delayed cardiac tamponade (DCT) is a rare, although recently recognized, complication. However, the mechanisms underlying the development of DCT remain unclear. We herein report the cases of two men, both 49 years of age, who developed cardiac tamponade requiring pericardiocentesis a few weeks after undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF. Physicians should explain to the patient the potential for DCT as a complication prior to performing catheter ablation and provide careful follow-up for at least a few weeks after the session.

  19. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Roberto A.; Rosa, Ronaldo F.; Santos, Silvio CM

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses atrial fibrillation according to the guidelines of Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias and the Brazilian Cardiogeriatrics Guidelines. We stress the thromboembolic burden of atrial fibrillation and discuss how to prevent it as well as the best way to conduct cases of atrial fibrillatios in the elderly, reverting the arrhythmia to sinus rhythm, or the option of heart rate control. The new methods to treat atrial fibrillation, such as radiofrequency ablation, new oral direct thrombin inhibitors and Xa factor inhibitors, as well as new antiarrhythmic drugs, are depicted. PMID:22916053

  20. Post-Acceleration Chaotic Atrial Rhythm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    atrial flutter or two discrete P-wave morphologies with the rate less fibrillation. than 100 bpm). and sinus bradycardia. An occasional The time...mulhilocal paroxysmal atrial tach.- cardia with cclic Wcnckchach phenomenon under observation examinations. The chaotic atrial rhythm in this case ji r 13...CHAOTIC ATRIAL RHYTHM Final Report 1 July 81 - 30 July 81 6. PERFORMING OIG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERS) r James E

  1. A rare case of sinus of valsalva-right atrial fistula secondary to an abscess perforation from underlying aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva-right atrial fistulas are abnormal connections between the aorta and the right atrium, and present challenging surgical conditions. An extremely rare etiology of aorto-right atrial fistula is infective endocarditis. This case report presents a 21 year old Caucasian female patient who had native aortic valve Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis complicated by sinus of Valsalva abscess perforation associated with an acute heart block, an aorto-right atrial fistula, severe heart failure, and cardiogenic shock. She underwent emergent aortic valve replacement and complex sinus of Valsalva fistula pericardial patch reconstruction and repair. This case report further explores the advantages and disadvantages of different valves for different patient populations, and evaluates the patient’s prosthesis mismatch and effective orifice area. PMID:25022608

  2. Acute Chest Pain and Broad Complex Tachycardia. A Non-typical Case of Pre-excited Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Ramon Suarez; Villanueva, Nuria Perez; Cubero, Gustavo Iglesias; Lopez, Jose Rubin

    2011-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a common condition in the emergency department. A case is presented of a 76-year-old patient with acute chest pain and broad complex tachycardia. Despite the fact that previous and post cardioversion ECG tracings in sinus rhythm showed no signs of pre-excitation, the characteristic pattern of pre-excited atrial fibrillation (AF) is recognized and after successful DC cardioversion the patient is referred for catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. This case illustrates a non-typical presentation of the WPW syndrome, with an older patient than usual with slight signs of pre-excitation. We highlight the need for high grades of suspicion for the early recognition of pre-excited AF when attending patients with tachycardia and the obligation to know the distinctive aspects of its management for this potentially life-threatening arrhythmia.

  3. Thrombosed cor triatriatum sinistrum mimicking left atrial mass and causing unilateral pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Lengua, Carlos A; Kumar, Pirkash; Cham, Matthew; Sanz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    46 year old female with history of progressive shortness of breath for 3 years associated with recurrent right lung infiltrates and hemoptisis. A computed tomography of the chest showed a left atrial mass suggestive of atrial myxoma confirmed with transesophageal echocardiogram. Contrary with findings from a dedicated EKG gated cardiac computed tomography suggestive of cor triatriatum with associated thrombus and less likely a neoplasm; findings later on confirmed during surgery. Cardiac CT offers superior spatial resolution and multi-planar image reconstructions, allowing improved characterization of cardiac structures and cardiac masses compared to other traditional cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  4. Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... your body's cells and organs. Read More "Atrial Fibrillation" Articles Atrial Fibrillation / Who Is at Risk for ...

  5. Right Atrial Mass in a Patient With HIV and Hepatitis B: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Umer; khan, Masroor; Anderson, Timithy

    2013-01-01

    A 41-year-old man presented to the emergency room for evaluation of substernal chest pain, shortness of breath and generalized failure to thrive. Patient had history of hepatitis B and HIV. During recent evaluation of hepatic mass, patient was found to have hepatocellular carcinoma on biopsy. Patient had no history of cirrhosis of the liver in the past. On Echocardiogram patient was noted to have a large mass filling the right atrial cavity. CT scan of abdomen, pelvis and chest showed a diffusely enlarged heterogeneously enhancing liver consistent with large hepatoma, with portal venous and hepatic vein thrombosis. Tumor thrombus extended through the hepatic veins and upper inferior vena cava into the right atrium. There was 6 cm greatest diameter enhancing mass in the right atrium. Patient had primary hepatocellular carcinoma with extensive invasion into vascular structures. His prognosis was poor and patient opted for palliative care only. In conclusion, patients with co-infection of HIV and Hepatitis B are at risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma with extension into the right atrium and physicians managing these patients should have high suspicion of right atrial involvement with tumor extension and low threshold to order a screening echocardiogram.

  6. Central Myxoma / Myxofibroma of the Jaws: A Clinico-Epidemiologic Review

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Agbara; Benjamin, Fomete; Athanasius-Chukwudi, Obiadazie; Uchenna-Kevin, Omeje; Modupeola-Omotara, Samaila

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Myxomas are a group of benign rare tumors of connective-tissue origin that occur in both hard (central) and soft tissues of the body. The aim of this study is to highlight our experience in the management of central myxoma of the jaw, with emphasis on its clinic-epidemiologic features as seen in our environment. Materials and Methods: All patients who were managed for central myxoma of the jaw at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery department of a regional University Teaching Hospital between September 1997 and October 2015 were retrospectively studied. Details sourced included age, sex, site of tumor, duration, signs/symptoms, treatment given, and complications. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) and Microsoft Excel 2007 (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA). Results from descriptive statistics were represented in the form of tables and charts, with a test for significance (ρ) using Pearson Chi-square (χ2) set at 0.05. Results: A total of 16 patients were managed within the period reviewed, consisting of 10 (62.5%) females and six (37.5%) males, giving a male-to-female ratio of 1:1.7. The ages of patients ranged from 5 to 70 years, with a mean of 27.06±15.45 years. The mandible accounted for nine (56.3%) cases and the maxilla for six (37.5%) cases, while a combination of the maxilla and the zygoma were involved in one (6.3%) case. Bucco-lingual or bucco-palatal expansion were the most common presentation (six [46.2%] cases each). Histological assessment of tissue specimens showed that fibromyxoma accounted for seven (43.8%) cases, while the remaining nine (56.3%) cases were diagnosed as myxoma. All patients had jaw resections, and these consisted of mandibulectomies in nine (60.0%) patients and maxillectomies in six (40.0%) patients. The duration of hospital stay ranged from 5 to 29 days, with a mean of 17.86±7.68 days. Complications were noted in three patients, and all were

  7. Usefulness of CHA2DS2-VASc Scoring Systems for Predicting Risk of Perioperative Embolism in Patients of Cardiac Myxomas Underwent Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liang; Wang, Jing; Li, Wei; Ling, Xinyu; Xue, Qian; Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Zhinong

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare but manifested with risk of embolism and often cause unexpected symptoms or sudden death. We retrospectively collected the medical records of patients diagnosed of cardiac myxomas at the cardiac center of our university. Overall 465 patients were included in this study, patients in the embolism group had significantly higher CHA2DS2-VASc scores (P = 0.005). In embolic group, stroke was recorded in 110 (77.14%) patients, while embolic events in the limbs were observed in 10 (2.15%) and 9(1.93%) developed splenic infarction. Patients in embolism group had older age (P = 0.021) and higher BMI (P  <0.001) than those in non-embolism group. There was no significant difference between two groups in terms of time of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.065), ICU stay (P = 0.053), hospital stay (P = 0.071) and volume of drainage (P = 0.083), blood transfusions (P = 0.060) except that patients with embolic events had significantly higher incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (P = 0.032) and lower survival rate (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the CHA2DS2-VASc score was a significant predictor of embolism in patients with cardiac myxomas (P = 0.015; P = 0.003) and the Kaplan-Meier analysis obtained a higher rate of embolism in patients with higher stratification of CHA2DS2-VASc scores (P = 0.002). In conclusion, CHA2DS2-VASc scoring scheme was strongly predictive of stroke and embolic events in patients with cardiac myxomas. PMID:27982112

  8. Left Ventricular Assist Device Insertion in a Patient With Biventricular Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy, Ebstein Anomaly, and a Left Atrial Mass: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nikhil; Troianos, Christopher A; Baisden, Joshua S

    2016-12-15

    In this report, we present the case of a patient with biventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy, Ebstein anomaly, and a left atrial mass who required emergent placement of a left ventricular assist device. The noncompaction cardiomyopathy complicated the left ventricular assist device implantation procedure because the thickened, trabeculated myocardium made it difficult to place the inflow cannula. We discuss our perioperative management strategy, in which transesophageal echocardiography was used, to help the surgical team identify the proper cannula placement and provide a bridge to transplantation.

  9. [Big myxoma of the left atrium suggesting pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Teresa; Stachurski, Andrzej; Rachwalik, Maciej; Kustrzycki, Wojciech; Szełemej, Roman

    2010-06-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare. They usually appear as a sporadic isolated mass in the left atrium of women with no other pathology. Our patient had symptoms which may suggest pulmonary embolism (PE)-TTE, D-dimers, ECG, laboratory findings seemed to confirm acute PE. Physical examination was unremarkable. Signs of pulmonary hypertension and shortened acceleration time also suggested PE. However, angio-CT excluded it. The patient was transfered to surgical department. During the operation the big myxoma filling the whole space of the left atrium and blocking the entrance to the left ventricle was found and easily removed. Kardiol Pol 2010; 68, 6: 695-696.

  10. Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Treatment for atrial fibrillation depends on how often you have symptoms, how ...

  11. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  12. Oncolytic myxoma virus: the path to clinic.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie M; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2013-09-06

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials.

  13. Myxoma virus: propagation, purification, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Sherin E; Rahman, Masmudur M; Smith, Dorothy W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-05-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a member of the Poxviridae family and prototype for the genus Leporipoxvirus. It is pathogenic only for European rabbits, in which it causes the lethal disease myxomatosis, and two North American species, in which it causes a less severe disease. MYXV replicates exclusively in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Although not infectious in humans, its genome encodes proteins that can interfere with or modulate host defense mechanisms; it is able to productively infect a number of human cancer cell lines, but not normal human cells, and has also been shown to increase survival time in mouse models of human glioma. These characteristics suggest that MYXV could be a viable therapeutic agent, e.g., in anti-inflammatory or anti-immune therapy, or as an oncolytic agent. MYXV is also an excellent model for poxvirus biology, pathogenesis, and host tropism studies. It is easily propagated in a number of cell lines, including adherent cells and suspension cultures, and minimal purification is required to provide a stock for in vivo and in vitro studies.

  14. Oncolytic Myxoma Virus: The path to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials. PMID:23726825

  15. Aligning health care policy with evidence-based medicine: the case for funding direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Stone, James A; Earl, Karen M; O'Neill, Blair J; Sharma, Mukul; Huynh, Thao; Leblanc, Kori; Ward, Richard; Teal, Philip A; Cox, Jafna L

    2014-10-01

    Misalignment between evidence-informed clinical care guideline recommendations and reimbursement policy has created care gaps that lead to suboptimal outcomes for patients denied access to guideline-based therapies. The purpose of this article is to make the case for addressing this growing access barrier to optimal care. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is discussed as an example. Stroke is an extremely costly disease, imposing a significant human, societal, and economic burden. Stroke in the setting of AF carries an 80% probability of death or disability. Although two-thirds of these strokes are preventable with appropriate anticoagulation, this has historically been underprescribed and poorly managed. National and international guidelines endorse the direct oral anticoagulants as first-line therapy for this indication. However, no Canadian province has provided these agents with an unrestricted listing. These decisions appear to be founded on silo-based cost assessment-the drug costs rather than the total system costs-and thus overlook several important cost-drivers in stroke. The discordance between best scientific evidence and public policy requires health care providers to use a potentially suboptimal therapy in contravention of guideline recommendations. It represents a significant obstacle for knowledge translation efforts that aim to increase the appropriate anticoagulation of Canadians with AF. As health care professionals, we have a responsibility to our patients to engage with policy-makers in addressing and resolving this barrier to optimal patient care.

  16. Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zimetbaum, Peter

    2017-03-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of atrial fibrillation, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  17. Mandibular odontogenic myxoma. Reconstructive considerations by means of the vascularized fibular free flap.

    PubMed

    González García, Raúl; Rodríguez Campo, Francisco J; Naval Gías, Luis; Muñoz Guerra, Mario F; Sastre Pérez, Jesús; Díaz González, Francisco J

    2006-11-01

    The odontogenic myxoma is a rare entity located in mandible and upper maxilla. Due to its local aggressiveness, wide surgical excision is mandatory. Several surgical techniques have been described for the reconstruction of segmental mandibular defects. In comparison with other free flaps, the vascularized free fibular flap (VFFF) supports the longest amount of bone and, due to the nature of the vascular supply a complete freedom in location of the osteotomy is present. A precise mandibular arc can be performed following bone resection. We suggest the performance of the in situ VFFF technique in order to recreate mandibular contour by means of several osteotomies, while the pedicle is still attached to the leg. Substantial decrease in surgical time is obtained. With the double-barrel technique and subsequent osseointegrated implants, good results are obtained in the reconstruction of dentate patients without maxillary atrophy. We present two new cases of large odontogenic mandibular myxoma. Wide surgical excision by means of hemimandibulectomies and subsequent reconstruction with VFFF were performed.

  18. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2017-02-15

    Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All sequences were affected by several mutations, covering 24 to 93 open reading frames (ORFs) and resulted in amino acid substitutions, insertions, or deletions. Only strains Munich-1 and MAV revealed the deletion of 10 ORFs (M007L to M015L) and 11 ORFs (M007L to M008.1L and M149R to M008.1R), respectively. Major differences were observed in the 27 immunomodulatory proteins encoded by MYXV. Compared to the reference strain Lausanne, strains FLI-H, 2604, 3207, and ZA showed the highest amino acid identity (>98.4%). In strains Munich-1 and MAV, deletion of 5 and 10 ORFs, respectively, was observed, encoding immunomodulatory proteins with ankyrin repeats or members of the family of serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, putative immunodominant surface proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VACV) were investigated in the sequenced strains. Only strain MAV revealed above-average frequencies of amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations. Finally, we performed recombination analysis and found signs of recombination in vaccine strain MAV. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship of strain MAV and the MSW strain of Californian MYXV. However, in a challenge model, strain MAV provided full protection against lethal challenges with strain ZA.

  19. Fetal atrial tachycardia diagnosed by magnetocardiography and direct fetal electrocardiography. A case report of treatment with propranolol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Keisuke; Chiba, Yoshihide; Sasaki, Yoshihito; Kawamata, Kazuya; Miyashita, Susumu

    2003-01-01

    At 26 weeks of gestation, fetal tachyarrhythmias (about 250 bpm) and ascites were detected by ultrasonography, and oral treatment with propranolol (30 mg/day) was commenced. Within 10 h, the fetal heart rate changed to approximately 85 bpm. The averaged fetal magnetocardiogram triggered by R peaks showed P wave and QRS complexes and an extra P wave. In addition, many extra nonconducted P-waves were detected in a fetal direct electrocardiogram. At 27 weeks of gestation, fetal tachycardia occurred again, and arrhythmia was diagnosed as the result of a blocked premature atrial contraction (PAC) with intermittent atrial tachycardia by fetal electrocardiogram. Administration of transplacental propranolol (90 mg/day) resolved the fetal tachyarrhythmias and ascites. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of propranolol for fetal atrial tachycardia.

  20. Atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Thomas M.; Wu, Li-Qun; Shen, Win K.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia affecting patients today. Disease prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, and is associated with often catastrophic and costly consequences, including heart failure, syncope, dementia, and stroke. Therapies including anticoagulants, anti-arrhythmic medications, devices, and non-pharmacologic procedures in the last 30 years have improved patients' functionality with the disease. Nonetheless, it remains imperative that further research into AF epidemiology, genetics, detection, and treatments continues to push forward rapidly as the worldwide population ages dramatically over the next 20 years. PMID:24474959

  1. Two cases of massive mitral annular calcification mimicking left atrial neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon William; Pearse, Simon; Dahdal, Maher; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Dalby, Miles; Mittal, Tarun

    2011-08-31

    The authors describe two cases of massive mitral annular calcification, initially picked up on echocardiography and suspected of being neoplastic. Subsequent evaluation by CT scanning confirmed the location, aetiology, structure and diagnosis. Both cases demonstrated large masses, with calcification of varying density. This is likely explained by the presence of the previously reported amorphous caseous material demonstrated to be present within such mass structures. Such a feature is described as caseous degeneration. Both patients described have been managed conservatively with medical therapy, predominantly due to their age and general frailty.

  2. Two cases of massive mitral annular calcification mimicking left atrial neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Dubrey, Simon William; Pearse, Simon; Dahdal, Maher; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Dalby, Miles; Mittal, Tarun

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of massive mitral annular calcification, initially picked up on echocardiography and suspected of being neoplastic. Subsequent evaluation by CT scanning confirmed the location, aetiology, structure and diagnosis. Both cases demonstrated large masses, with calcification of varying density. This is likely explained by the presence of the previously reported amorphous caseous material demonstrated to be present within such mass structures. Such a feature is described as caseous degeneration. Both patients described have been managed conservatively with medical therapy, predominantly due to their age and general frailty. PMID:22679051

  3. Unguarded tricuspid orifice---a rare cause of fetal right atrial dilatation with characteristic color doppler sign: Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar Vikraman, Seneesh; Chandra, Vipin; Balakrishnan, Bijoy; Jaiman, Sunil; Batra, Meenu; Kannoly, Gopinathan

    2016-10-18

    The anatomic causes for fetal right atrial dilatation with tricuspid regurgitation include Ebstein anomaly, tricuspid dysplasia, unguarded tricuspid orifice, and Uhl anomaly. Unguarded tricuspid orifice is characterized by complete or partial agenesis of the tricuspid valvular and subvalvular structures. It is commonly associated with pulmonary atresia. Its prenatal diagnosis is usually associated with unfavorable prognosis. We present a prenatally diagnosed case of fetal unguarded tricuspid orifice with description of its diagnostic workup, along with a review of literature, to enhance the understanding of this rarely reported entity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound, 2016.

  4. Late atypical atrial flutter after ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Raquel; Primo, João; Adão, Luís; Gonzaga, Anabela; Gonçalves, Helena; Santos, Rui; Fonseca, Paulo; Santos, José; Gama, Vasco

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac surgery for structural heart disease (often involving the left atrium) and radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation have led to an increased incidence of regular atrial tachycardias, often presenting as atypical flutters. This type of flutter is particularly common after pulmonary vein isolation, especially after extensive atrial ablation including linear lesions and/or defragmentation. The authors describe the case of a 51-year-old man, with no relevant medical history, referred for a cardiology consultation in 2009 for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. After failure of antiarrhythmic therapy, he underwent catheter ablation, with criteria of acute success. Three years later he again suffered palpitations and atypical atrial flutter was documented. The electrophysiology study confirmed the diagnosis of atypical left flutter and reappearance of electrical activity in the right inferior pulmonary vein. This vein was again ablated successfully and there has been no arrhythmia recurrence to date. In an era of frequent catheter ablation it is essential to understand the mechanism of this arrhythmia and to recognize such atypical flutters.

  5. Treatment of an 8-mm Myxoma Using Acellular Corneal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyung Sup; Wee, Sung Wook

    2014-01-01

    A myxoma is a benign tumor found in the heart and in various soft tissues; however, a corneal myxoma is rare. A mucinous mass of unknown etiology was observed on the left cornea of a 32-year-old male patient. We performed deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using acellular corneal tissue and concurrent amniotic membrane transplantation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed vacuolation of the parenchyma and myxoid change in the corneal tissue that occurred in the anterior half of the corneal parenchyma. We identified a myxoid stroma by Alcian blue staining and observed collagen fibers with denatured stroma by Masson trichrome staining. The patient's visual acuity improved from light perception to 20 / 200, and the intraocular pressure remained within the normal range for one year after surgery. The transplanted cornea survived successfully with well-maintained transparency, and recurrence was not observed one year after surgery. PMID:24505204

  6. Atrial flutter a manifestation of cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Pabón, Guillermo Mora; Ramírez, John A

    2012-04-01

    Atrial flutter (AFL) is a common arrhythmia that is associated with postpericardiotomy and pericarditis. The relationship of AFL with tamponade has rarely been reported. A case of AFL with acute pericarditis and cardiac tamponade is thus presented here.

  7. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsett, Mark; Hamilton, Douglas; Lemery, Jay; Polk, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible scenario of an astronaut having Atrial Fibrillation during a Mars Mission. In the case review the presentation asks several questions about the alternatives for treatment, medications and the ramifications of the decisions.

  8. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Cardiovascular Conditions What Is Atrial Fibrillation? Your heart has a natural pacemaker, called the “ ... if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the heart’s two small upper chambers (atria) ...

  9. Management of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Moukabary, Talal; Gonzalez, Mario D

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a very common clinical problem with a high prevalence that is expected to rise over time because of increasing risk factors (eg, age, obesity, hypertension). This high prevalence is also associated with high cost, because atrial fibrillation represents about 1% of overall health care spending. The management of atrial fibrillation involves multiple facets: (1) management of underlying disease if present and the management of atrial fibrillation risk factors, (2) prevention of thromboembolism, (3) control of the ventricular rate during atrial fibrillation, and (4) restoration and maintenance of normal sinus rhythm.

  10. NRG™ RF powered transseptal needle: a useful technique for transcatheter atrial septostomy and Fontan fenestration: report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Karagöz, Tevfik; Akin, Alper; Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Transseptal puncture (TSP) is a frequently performed procedure for gaining access to the left atrium for catheter ablation, hemodynamic assessment of the left heart, left ventricular assist device implantation, percutaneous left atrial appendage closure or mitral valvuloplasty during childhood and adulthood. The standard technique for transseptal puncture applies mechanical pressure on the fossa ovalis with a Brockenbrough needle. However, this method is not feasible when the fossa ovalis is thick and aneurysmatic. In such patients, the radiofrequency ablation energy systems can be offered as a better alternative for TSP. Here, we aimed to demonstrate the outcome of transseptal puncture performed with an NRG™ RF powered transseptal needle in three patients. PMID:25428681

  11. Radiologic Evaluation of Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Brent W.; Lin, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 22-year-old man was referred for palpitations. On transthoracic echocardiography, he was found to have a right ventricular outflow tract mass. Further cardiac imaging was conducted by means of transesophageal echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance. Complete surgical resection of the tumor was achieved, and pathologic examination revealed the lesion to be a myxoma. Cardiac tumors located in the right ventricular outflow tract are rare and can present unusual diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are becoming more widely available and can be useful adjuncts in the management of such tumors. PMID:23466872

  12. [1:1 atrial flutter in an elderly patient: one of the methods of discovering Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Apropos of a case in an adult].

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, L; Adamec, R; Perrenoud, J J

    1984-01-01

    Atrial flutter with 1:1 atrioventricular conduction giving rise to a ventricular rhythm of 240/min in an 80 year old man was the first sign of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome; all previous electrocardiogrammes had shown no evidence of pre-excitation. It was only on the fifth day of hospitalisation that the ECG showed a short PR interval with a delta wave. This case illustrates that: --all supraventricular arrhythmias with abnormally high ventricular rates (over 220/min in adults) should alert to the possibility of an accessory atrioventricular pathway; --rapid atrioventricular conduction may be the first sign of an accessory pathway; --the differential diagnosis lies between an accessory atrioventricular pathway and an atriohisian tract; --digitalis, which may shorten the refractory period of the accessory pathway, is contraindicated in patients with a Kent bundle.

  13. Aorto-left atrial tunnel: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sajiv K; Gajjar, Trushar P; Desai, Neelam B

    2013-05-01

    Aorto-left atrial tunnel (ALAT) is a vascular channel that originates from 1 of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in the left atrium. The aorto-left atrial tunnel is an extremely rare anomaly. We describe here a case of congenital aorto-left atrial tunnel in a 4-year-old child who underwent successful surgical ligation with good immediate and early results.

  14. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Treated? Treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) depends on ... much thyroid hormone). Who Needs Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation? People who have AF but don't have ...

  15. Cardiac tumour masquerades as mid-life (menopause) event

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Gareth J; Goode, Emily F; Godazgar, Faezah; Dubrey, Simon William

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumours encountered. Their detection may be incidental, owing to embolic events, intracardiac obstructive features or in some cases, non-specific constitutional symptoms. We describe a middle-aged woman attributing constitutional symptoms to menopause, but later determined to be due to an atrial myxoma. PMID:23362067

  16. An unusual case of refractory wheeze

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Venkat; Acharya, Vishak; Pai, Narasimha; Krishnan, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old man presented with a history of episodic wheeze and breathlessness of 3 years’ duration refractory to treatment. Physical examination revealed diffuse expiratory polyphonic rhonchi while the remainder of the examination including the cardiac examination was reported as normal. Pulmonary function testing revealed mild obstruction with bronchodilator reversibility. The patient was discharged on a 6-month course of antitubercular treatment (ATT) as bronchial brush cytology (obtained via bronchoscopy) was positive for acid-fast bacilli. The patient presented after completing 6 months of ATT with persistent symptoms, a loud S1 and a mid-diastolic murmur at the apex. High-resolution CT of the chest showed bilateral dependent ground glass opacities. An echocardiogram revealed a left atrial myxoma, and normal RV size and pressures. The patient underwent successful surgical removal of the same, and made a complete recovery. Refractory wheeze is a very unusual presentation of a left atrial myxoma. PMID:25733086

  17. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Auricular fibrillation - discharge; A-fib - discharge; AF - discharge; Afib - discharge ... been in the hospital because you have atrial fibrillation . This condition occurs when your heart beats faster ...

  18. Odontogenic myxoma involving the orbit in a 3-year-old boy: removal, reconstruction and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Teis Schjals; Danielsson, Lina Isabella; Fast, Søren; Thygesen, Torben H

    2016-02-17

    We present a rare case of a 3-year-old boy with an odontogenic myxoma (OM) involving the orbita. Including our case, only nine cases of OM have been reported to involve the eye in children.There is no gold standard for treatment of OM in children with orbital involvement. The recurrence rate of OM in children seems low, which advocates for less invasive surgery. A gentle resection of the OM was carried out. The floor and medial wall of the orbit was reconstructed immediately using a non-resorbable Medpor implant with passive adaptation. Reconstruction with a Medpor implant in children has rarely been reported in the literature. No clinical or radiological recurrence was observed 24 months after surgical removal, and the patient presented with symmetric appearance and normal vision.

  19. Atrial Arrhythmias and Their Implications for Space Flight - Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. D.; Barr, Y. R.; Bauer, P.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kerstman, E.; Tarver, B.

    2010-01-01

    This panel will discuss the implications of atrial arrhythmias in astronauts from a variety of perspectives; including historical data, current practices, and future challenges for exploration class missions. The panelists will present case histories, outline the evolution of current NASA medical standards for atrial arrhythmias, discuss the use of predictive tools, and consider potential challenges for current and future missions.

  20. Impact of Cryoballoon Ablation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-related Heart Failure due to Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. A Comparative Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar; Christoph, Arnd; Oernek, Ahmet; Meissner, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a turning point in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Pulmonary Vein Isolation (PVI) with Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) is accepted to be successful in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in HCM patients. The efficacy of cryoballoon (CB) therapy in HCM patients has not been studied so far. Methods: 166 patients with AF underwent PVI with CB technology in our single center between 1/2012 and 12/2015. To evaluate the efficacy of the CB therapy in HCM patients, we compared their clinical outcome with those in “Non-HCM” AF patients in a 3 and 6 months follow-up. Results: Out of 166 AF patients (65.7% paroxysmal AF, PAF), 4 patients had HCM and PAF (young males < 50 years). During the blanking period, 26 patients (15.8%) suffered from AF recurrence (11.0% PAF), including all HCM patients. The 6 months follow up of “Non-HCM” AF patients showed acceptable results (80% stable SR), whereas the HCM patients remained AF. In Conclusion: Even if the CB provides advantages, the single device cannot be recommended in HCM patients because of early AF recurrences. Anyway, because of the specific hemodynamic changes in HCM patients with AF, ablation should be sought in an early state of its occurrence, then, however, preferably with RFCA. PMID:27647995

  1. Can We Predict Individual Combined Benefit and Harm of Therapy? Warfarin Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation as a Test Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guowei; Thabane, Lehana; Delate, Thomas; Witt, Daniel M.; Levine, Mitchell A. H.; Cheng, Ji; Holbrook, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To construct and validate a prediction model for individual combined benefit and harm outcomes (stroke with no major bleeding, major bleeding with no stroke, neither event, or both) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) with and without warfarin therapy. Methods Using the Kaiser Permanente Colorado databases, we included patients newly diagnosed with AF between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2012 for model construction and validation. The primary outcome was a prediction model of composite of stroke or major bleeding using polytomous logistic regression (PLR) modelling. The secondary outcome was a prediction model of all-cause mortality using the Cox regression modelling. Results We included 9074 patients with 4537 and 4537 warfarin users and non-users, respectively. In the derivation cohort (n = 4632), there were 136 strokes (2.94%), 280 major bleedings (6.04%) and 1194 deaths (25.78%) occurred. In the prediction models, warfarin use was not significantly associated with risk of stroke, but increased the risk of major bleeding and decreased the risk of death. Both the PLR and Cox models were robust, internally and externally validated, and with acceptable model performances. Conclusions In this study, we introduce a new methodology for predicting individual combined benefit and harm outcomes associated with warfarin therapy for patients with AF. Should this approach be validated in other patient populations, it has potential advantages over existing risk stratification approaches as a patient-physician aid for shared decision-making PMID:27513986

  2. Left Atrial Appendage Exclusion for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Faisal F.; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Friedman, Paul A.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure is increasingly being used as a treatment strategy to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who have contraindications to anticoagulants. A number of approaches and devices have been developed in the last few years, each with their own unique set of advantages and disadvantages. We review the published studies on surgical and percutaneous approaches to LAA closure; focusing on stroke mechanisms in AF, LAA structure and function relevant to stroke prevention, practical differences in procedural approach, and clinical considerations surrounding management. PMID:25443240

  3. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  4. Surgical outcomes associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation after robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy: retrospective review of 208 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Emily P.; Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Rodriguez, Kathryn L.; Thau, Matthew R.; Moodie, Carla C.; Garrett, Joseph R.; Fontaine, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of post-operative atrial fibrillation (POAF) after robotic-assisted video-thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy on comorbid postoperative complications, chest tube duration, and hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data from 208 consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy by one surgeon for known or suspected lung cancer. Postoperatively, 39 (18.8%) of these patients experienced POAF during their hospital stay. The occurrence of postoperative complications other than POAF, chest tube duration, and hospital LOS were analyzed in patients with POAF and without POAF. Statistical significance (P≤0.05) was determined by unpaired Student’s t-test or by Chi-square test. Results Of patients with POAF, 46% also had other concurrent postoperative complications, while only 31% of patients without POAF experienced complications. The average number of postoperative complications experienced by patients with POAF was significantly higher than that experienced by those without POAF (0.9 vs. 0.4, P<0.05). Median chest tube duration in POAF patients (6 days) was significantly higher than in patients without POAF (4 days). A similar result was also seen with hospital LOS, with the median hospital LOS of 8 days in POAF patients being significantly longer than in those without POAF, whose median hospital LOS was 4 days. No other significant difference was detected between the two groups of patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated the association between the incidence of POAF and a more complicated hospital course. Further studies are needed to determine whether confounders were involved in this association. PMID:27621862

  5. Surgical Treatment of Primary Intracardiac Myxoma: 20-Year Experience in “Shahid Modarres Hospital”—A Tertiary University Hospital—Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ansari Aval, Zahra; Ghaderi, Hamid; Tatari, Hassan; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Mirjafari, Seyedeh Adeleh; Forozeshfard, Mohammad; Fani, Kamal; Khaheshi, Isa

    2015-01-01

    Although cardiac tumors are not common they may vary in terms of race and surgical approach in different countries. Method. Patients data of 20 years was collected and evaluated in the “Shahid Modarres Hospital”—a tertiary university hospital—Tehran, Iran. Results. 42 patients with cardiac myxoma (all cases in 20 years) were included in study, 17 males and 25 females, age difference: 13 to 76 years (mean 50.6). Most of patients were in functional classes I, II. 35 patients complained of dyspnea and 3 patients had embolic events. 97.6% of tumors were primary (41 patients) and one tumor was recurrent (2.4%), 85.7% of tumors (36 cases) were located in LA, and 88.1% of tumors (37 cases) were pediculated. 40 patients (95%) had one tumor. In 22 patients (52.3%) after tumor resection septal defects were repaired primarily while in 18 patients (42.8%) the defects were repaired with pericardial patch and In one patient, tumor resected without any septal defect. Mean tumor size was about 5.22 cm (range of 2.2 to 8.2 cm). Postoperatively, 33 patients discharged from hospital without any complication. Discussion. The research reveals that patients' age and gender were similar to that of other studies in other countries while tumor's incidence seems to be higher. 3 patients were diagnosed after remote embolic event and one patient was diagnosed after MI reflecting relatively high tumor complications and late diagnosis. Conclusion. In our study mean time from diagnosis to operation was too long. The patients had more preoperative embolic events and complication. However, size of myxoma and location of that was as same as its rate in the other literature. As recommendation we suggested that in all patients with vague chest pain or remote embolic events cardiac myxomas should be ruled out. PMID:25688375

  6. Surgery for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher P; Henn, Matthew C; Damiano, Ralph J

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and its treatment options include drug therapy or catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its fourth iteration (Cox-Maze IV). This article reviews the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. This article also reviews the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous cut-and-sew method.

  7. Surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher P; Henn, Matthew C; Damiano, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and its treatment options include drug therapy or catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its fourth iteration (Cox-Maze IV). This article reviews the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. This article also reviews the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous cut-and-sew method.

  8. Systemic therapy with oncolytic myxoma virus cures established residual multiple myeloma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Bartee, Mee Y; Bogen, Bjarne; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignancy of plasma B-cells. Traditional chemotherapeutic regimes often induce initial tumor regression; however, virtually all patients eventually succumb to relapse caused by either reintroduction of disease during autologous transplant or expansion of chemotherapy resistant minimal residual disease. It has been previously demonstrated that an oncolytic virus known as myxoma can completely prevent myeloma relapse caused by reintroduction of malignant cells during autologous transplant. The ability of this virus to treat established residual disease in vivo, however, remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that intravenous administration of myxoma virus into mice bearing disseminated myeloma results in the elimination of 70–90% of malignant cells within 24 hours. This rapid debulking was dependent on direct contact of myxoma virus with residual myeloma and did not occur through destruction of the hematopoietic bone marrow niche. Importantly, systemic myxoma therapy also induced potent antimyeloma CD8+ T cell responses which localized to the bone marrow and were capable of completely eradicating established myeloma in some animals. These results demonstrate that oncolytic myxoma virus is not only effective at preventing relapse caused by reinfusion of tumor cells during stem cell transplant, but is also potentially curative for patients bearing established minimal residual disease. PMID:27933316

  9. Genome Scale Evolution of Myxoma Virus Reveals Host-Pathogen Adaptation and Rapid Geographic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Rogers, Matthew B.; Fitch, Adam; DePasse, Jay V.; Cattadori, Isabella M.; Twaddle, Alan C.; Hudson, Peter J.; Tscharke, David C.; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified. PMID:24067966

  10. Genome scale evolution of myxoma virus reveals host-pathogen adaptation and rapid geographic spread.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Twaddle, Alan C; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-12-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified.

  11. Ex Vivo Virotherapy With Myxoma Virus Does Not Impair Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bais, Swarna; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Moreb, Jan S; Rosenau, Emma H.; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Relapsing disease is a major challenge after hematopoietic cell transplant for hematological malignancies. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is an oncolytic virus that can target and eliminate contaminating cancer cells from auto-transplant grafts. The aims of this study were to examine the impact of MYXV on normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and define the optimal treatment conditions for ex vivo virotherapy. Methods Bone marrow (BM) and mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (mPBSCs) from patients with hematological malignancies were treated with MYXV at various time, temperature and incubation media conditions. Treated BM cells from healthy normal donors were evaluated by flow cytometry for MYXV infection, LTC-IC assay, and CFC assay. Results MYXV initiated infection in up to 45% of antigen presenting monocytes, B cells and natural killer cells; however, these infections were uniformly aborted in > 95% of all cells. Fresh graft sources showed higher levels of MYXV infection initiation than cryopreserved specimens but all cases, less than 10% of CD34+ cells could be infected after ex vivo MYXV treatment. MYXV did not impair LTC-IC colony numbers compared to mock treatment. CFC colony types and numbers were also not impaired by MYXV treatment. MYXV incubation time, temperature or culture media did not significantly change percentage of infected cells, LTC-IC colony formation or CFC colony formation. Conclusions Human hematopoietic cells are non-permissive for MYXV. Human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were not infected and thus unaffected by MYXV ex vivo treatment. PMID:26857235

  12. Atrial Fibrillation Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... think you are pregnant If you notice red, dark brown or black urine or stools If you ... Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • Understand your Risk for AFib Children • Symptoms of ...

  13. [Operative management of trigono-atrial lesions].

    PubMed

    Hussein, S

    1998-01-01

    Trigono-atrial-Lesions are microsurgically serios accessible, the results of transcortical aproaches are difficult and frequently unsatisfactory. The microsurgical anatomy of the trigono-atrial region will be studied on 100 brain hemispheres (the posterior cerebral arteries were injected selective on 70 hemispheres). According to the anatomical findings, an interhemispheric microsurgical approach has been developed. The operative results of 25 patients with different atrial lesions are presented. There was no operative mortality, the postoperative morbidity was 12%, in 24% (n = 6) the preoperative state was still unchanged, in 12 cases (48%) we note a normal neurological and neuropsychological postoperative status. In 4 patients (16%) the neurological symptoms are postoperatively improved. According to these first results, the described transatrial approach seems to be a real alternative for careful selected meanly leftsided lesions of the trigone.

  14. Atrial fibrillation (acute onset)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute atrial fibrillation is rapid, irregular, and chaotic atrial activity of recent onset. Various definitions of acute atrial fibrillation have been used in the literature, but for the purposes of this review we have included studies where atrial fibrillation may have occurred up to 7 days previously. Risk factors for acute atrial fibrillation include increasing age, cardiovascular disease, alcohol, diabetes, and lung disease. Acute atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. The condition resolves spontaneously within 24 to 48 hours in more than 50% of people; however, many people will require interventions to control heart rate or restore sinus rhythm. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent embolism, for conversion to sinus rhythm, and to control heart rate in people with recent-onset atrial fibrillation (within 7 days) who are haemodynamically stable? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amiodarone, antithrombotic treatment before cardioversion, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, digoxin, diltiazem, direct current cardioversion, flecainide, metoprolol, nebivolol, propafenone, sotalol, timolol, and verapamil. PMID:25430048

  15. Atrial Septal Defect (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... an X-ray Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Kids > Atrial Septal Defect Print A A A What's ...

  16. Can Atrial Fibrillation Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atrial Fibrillation Be Prevented? Following a healthy lifestyle and taking ... for heart disease may help you prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). These steps include: Following a heart healthy ...

  17. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association Cardiology Patient Page Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Christian T. Ruff Download PDF https://doi.org/ ... an irregular and fast heartbeat. What Causes Atrial Fibrillation? Several factors and medical conditions make it more ...

  18. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  19. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts - Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, Sharmila D.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Problem Definition: To evaluate NASA s current standards and practices related to atrial arrhythmias in astronauts, Space Medicine s Advanced Projects Section at the Johnson Space Center was tasked with organizing a summit to discuss the approach to atrial arrhythmias in the astronaut cohort. Since 1959, 11 cases of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, or supraventricular tachycardia have been recorded among active corps crewmembers. Most of the cases were paroxysmal, although a few were sustained. While most of the affected crewmembers were asymptomatic, those slated for long-duration space flight underwent radiofrequency ablation treatment to prevent further episodes of the arrhythmia. The summit was convened to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, to identify gaps in knowledge, and to propose relevant research initiatives. Summit Meeting Objectives: The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together a panel of six cardiologists, including nationally and internationally renowned leaders in cardiac electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space flight cardiovascular physiology. The primary objectives of the summit discussions were to evaluate cases of atrial arrhythmia in the astronaut population, to understand the factors that may predispose an individual to this condition, to understand NASA s current capabilities for screening, diagnosis, and treatment, to discuss the risks associated with treatment of crewmembers assigned to long-duration missions or extravehicular activities, and to discuss recommendations for prevention or management of future cases. Summary of Recommendations: The summit panel s recommendations were grouped into seven categories: Epidemiology, Screening, Standards and Selection, Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Manifesting Preflight, Atrial Fibrillation during Flight, Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation, and Future Research

  20. Loss of atrial contractility is primary cause of atrial dilatation during first days of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Schotten, Ulrich; de Haan, Sunniva; Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Eijsbouts, Sabine; Blaauw, Yuri; Tieleman, Robert; Allessie, Maurits

    2004-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) induces a progressive dilatation of the atria which in turn might promote the arrhythmia. The mechanism of atrial dilatation during AF is not known. To test the hypothesis that loss of atrial contractile function is a primary cause of atrial dilatation during the first days of AF, eight goats were chronically instrumented with epicardial electrodes, a pressure transducer in the right atrium, and piezoelectric crystals to measure right atrial diameter. AF was induced with the use of repetitive burst pacing. Atrial contractility was assessed during sinus rhythm, atrial pacing (160-, 300-, and 400-ms cycle length), and electrically induced AF. The compliance of the fibrillating right atrium was measured during unloading the atria with diuretics and loading with 1 liter of saline. All measurements were repeated after 6, 12, and 24 h of AF and then once a day during the first 5 days of AF. Recovery of the observed changes after spontaneous cardioversion was also studied. After 5 days of AF, atrial contractility during sinus rhythm or slow atrial pacing was greatly reduced. During rapid pacing (160 ms) or AF, the amplitude of the atrial pressure waves had declined to 20% of control. The compliance of the fibrillating atria increased twofold, whereas the right atrial pressure was unchanged. As a result, the mean right atrial diameter increased by approximately 12%. All changes were reversible within 3 days of sinus rhythm. We conclude that atrial dilatation during the first days of AF is due to an increase in atrial compliance caused by loss of atrial contractility during AF. Atrial compliance and size are restored when atrial contractility recovers after cardioversion of AF.

  1. Evolutionary History and Attenuation of Myxoma Virus on Two Continents

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Ghedin, Elodie; DePasse, Jay V.; Fitch, Adam; Cattadori, Isabella M.; Hudson, Peter J.; Tscharke, David C.; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    The attenuation of myxoma virus (MYXV) following its introduction as a biological control into the European rabbit populations of Australia and Europe is the canonical study of the evolution of virulence. However, the evolutionary genetics of this profound change in host-pathogen relationship is unknown. We describe the genome-scale evolution of MYXV covering a range of virulence grades sampled over 49 years from the parallel Australian and European epidemics, including the high-virulence progenitor strains released in the early 1950s. MYXV evolved rapidly over the sampling period, exhibiting one of the highest nucleotide substitution rates ever reported for a double-stranded DNA virus, and indicative of a relatively high mutation rate and/or a continually changing selective environment. Our comparative sequence data reveal that changes in virulence involved multiple genes, likely losses of gene function due to insertion-deletion events, and no mutations common to specific virulence grades. Hence, despite the similarity in selection pressures there are multiple genetic routes to attain either highly virulent or attenuated phenotypes in MYXV, resulting in convergence for phenotype but not genotype. PMID:23055928

  2. Evolutionary history and attenuation of myxoma virus on two continents.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Ghedin, Elodie; DePasse, Jay V; Fitch, Adam; Cattadori, Isabella M; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    The attenuation of myxoma virus (MYXV) following its introduction as a biological control into the European rabbit populations of Australia and Europe is the canonical study of the evolution of virulence. However, the evolutionary genetics of this profound change in host-pathogen relationship is unknown. We describe the genome-scale evolution of MYXV covering a range of virulence grades sampled over 49 years from the parallel Australian and European epidemics, including the high-virulence progenitor strains released in the early 1950s. MYXV evolved rapidly over the sampling period, exhibiting one of the highest nucleotide substitution rates ever reported for a double-stranded DNA virus, and indicative of a relatively high mutation rate and/or a continually changing selective environment. Our comparative sequence data reveal that changes in virulence involved multiple genes, likely losses of gene function due to insertion-deletion events, and no mutations common to specific virulence grades. Hence, despite the similarity in selection pressures there are multiple genetic routes to attain either highly virulent or attenuated phenotypes in MYXV, resulting in convergence for phenotype but not genotype.

  3. Association of atrial septal defect with Poland-Moebius syndrome: vascular disruption can be a common etiologic factor. A case report.

    PubMed

    Matsui, A; Nakagawa, M; Okuno, M

    1997-03-01

    The authors describe an association of atrial septal defect with partial symptoms of the Poland-Moebius syndrome. Both are thought to be caused by developmental disorders of the mesenchyme and ectodermal derivatives. This anomalous association can be accepted as one concept of the subclavian artery blood supply disruption sequence during embryo-genesis.

  4. Surviving Right Atrial Rupture From Blunt Thoracic Trauma After Pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Sepehr Seyed; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Nova, George; Marshman, David

    2016-02-01

    Right atrial rupture secondary to blunt trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a case report of blunt chest trauma and right atrial rupture in a patient with a background of pericardiectomy that were successfully managed surgically. Right atrial rupture must be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with blunt chest trauma. In patients with previous pericardiectomy, this injury may manifest with massive hemothorax, and insertion of a chest drain should be performed with extreme caution. In our experience, urgent exploratory thoracotomy and repair of the defect are the mainstays of acute management.

  5. Endurance sport practice as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Mont, Lluís; Elosua, Roberto; Brugada, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Although the benefits of regular exercise in controlling cardiovascular risk factors have been extensively proven, little is known about the long-term cardiovascular effects of regular and extreme endurance sport practice, such as jogging, cycling, rowing, swimming, etc. Recent data from a small series suggest a relationship between regular, long-term endurance sport practice and atrial fibrillation (AF) and flutter. Reported case control studies included less than 300 athletes, with mean age between 40 and 50. Most series recruited only male patients, or more than 70% males, who had been involved in intense training for many years. Endurance sport practice increases between 2 and 10 times the probability of suffering AF, after adjusting for other risk factors. The possible mechanisms explaining the association remain speculative. Atrial ectopic beats, inflammatory changes, and atrial size have been suggested. Some of the published studies found that atrial size was larger in athletes than in controls, and this was a predictor for AF. It has also been shown that the left atrium may be enlarged in as many as 20% of competitive athletes. Other proposed mechanisms are increased vagal tone and bradycardia, affecting the atrial refractory period; however, this may facilitate rather than cause the arrhythmia. In summary, recent data suggest an association between endurance sport practice and atrial fibrillation and flutter. The underlying mechanism explaining this association is unclear, although structural atrial changes (dilatation and fibrosis) are probably present. Larger longitudinal studies and mechanistic studies are needed to further characterize the association to clarify whether a threshold limit for the intensity and duration of physical activity may prevent AF, without limiting the cardiovascular benefits of exercise.

  6. [Polymorphic atrial tachycardia and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in a newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Chantepie, A; Ramponi, N; Vaillant, M C; Laugier, J; Raynaud, P; Fauchier, J P

    1986-08-01

    The authors report a case of polymorphic supraventricular tachycardia in a premature neonate born at 33 weeks by caesarean section because of foeto-placental insufficiency and hydramnios due to foetal tachycardia diagnosed in utero. This arrhythmia was of interest because of the association of chaotic atrial tachycardia and the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), which has rarely been described in the neonate. The mechanism of atrial tachycardia in the WPW syndrome is variable. In our case, there was retrograde atrial activation by the accessory pathway with atrial desynchronisation aided by left atrial dilatation. Digoxin, an effective anti arrhythmic agent in neonatal tachycardia, should not be used in cases of atrial tachycardia associated with ventricular preexcitation because of the risk of dangerous ventricular tachycardia.

  7. The immunoregulatory properties of oncolytic myxoma virus and their implications in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; McFadden, Grant

    2010-12-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus with a strict rabbit-specific host-tropism for pathogenesis. The immunoregulatory factors encoded by MYXV can suppress some functions of immune effectors from other species. We review their mechanisms of action, implications in therapeutics and the potential to improve MYXV as an oncolytic agent in humans.

  8. Idiopathic atrial fibrillation in a champion Standardbred racehorse.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G A; Fulton, L J; McKellar, C D

    1990-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation is described in a champion pacer which earlier had been named Australian Harness Horse of the Year as a 3-year-old in 1986-87. Prior to conversion atrial fibrillation had been present for at least 6 weeks, during which the horse had not raced. Successful treatment was achieved with two 10g doses of quinidine sulphate per oesophageal tube, after slow digitalisation with intravenous digoxin over 4d. Four hours after commencement of quinidine therapy the arrhythmia had regressed to atrial flutter and converted to sinus rhythm 10 min later. Considering his age, standard of racing and high reputation the horse's overall performance as a 5-year-old after conversion from atrial fibrillation appeared comparable to his previous performance as a 4-year-old before the disorder occurred. In one of the wins since his return to sinus rhythm, the horse recorded his fastest winning speed and created a new track record at the major Melbourne racetrack. The absence of abnormalities of atrial and atrio-ventricular conduction after the cessation of the arrhythmia, together with the horse's return to successful racing, indicate that this was case of atrial fibrillation occurring as a functional disorder without persistent atrial pathology.

  9. Exploiting periodicity to extract the atrial activity in atrial arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinares, Raul; Igual, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation disorders are one of the main arrhythmias of the elderly. The atrial and ventricular activities are decoupled during an atrial fibrillation episode, and very rapid and irregular waves replace the usual atrial P-wave in a normal sinus rhythm electrocardiogram (ECG). The estimation of these wavelets is a must for clinical analysis. We propose a new approach to this problem focused on the quasiperiodicity of these wavelets. Atrial activity is characterized by a main atrial rhythm in the interval 3-12 Hz. It enables us to establish the problem as the separation of the original sources from the instantaneous linear combination of them recorded in the ECG or the extraction of only the atrial component exploiting the quasiperiodic feature of the atrial signal. This methodology implies the previous estimation of such main atrial period. We present two algorithms that separate and extract the atrial rhythm starting from a prior estimation of the main atrial frequency. The first one is an algebraic method based on the maximization of a cost function that measures the periodicity. The other one is an adaptive algorithm that exploits the decorrelation of the atrial and other signals diagonalizing the correlation matrices at multiple lags of the period of atrial activity. The algorithms are applied successfully to synthetic and real data. In simulated ECGs, the average correlation index obtained was 0.811 and 0.847, respectively. In real ECGs, the accuracy of the results was validated using spectral and temporal parameters. The average peak frequency and spectral concentration obtained were 5.550 and 5.554 Hz and 56.3 and 54.4%, respectively, and the kurtosis was 0.266 and 0.695. For validation purposes, we compared the proposed algorithms with established methods, obtaining better results for simulated and real registers.

  10. Myxoma Virus and the Leporipoxviruses: An Evolutionary Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Liu, June; Cattadori, Isabella; Ghedin, Elodie; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is the type species of the Leporipoxviruses, a genus of Chordopoxvirinae, double stranded DNA viruses, whose members infect leporids and squirrels, inducing cutaneous fibromas from which virus is mechanically transmitted by biting arthropods. However, in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), MYXV causes the lethal disease myxomatosis. The release of MYXV as a biological control for the wild European rabbit population in Australia, initiated one of the great experiments in evolution. The subsequent coevolution of MYXV and rabbits is a classic example of natural selection acting on virulence as a pathogen adapts to a novel host species. Slightly attenuated mutants of the progenitor virus were more readily transmitted by the mosquito vector because the infected rabbit survived longer, while highly attenuated viruses could be controlled by the rabbit immune response. As a consequence, moderately attenuated viruses came to dominate. This evolution of the virus was accompanied by selection for genetic resistance in the wild rabbit population, which may have created an ongoing co-evolutionary dynamic between resistance and virulence for efficient transmission. This natural experiment was repeated on a continental scale with the release of a separate strain of MYXV in France and its subsequent spread throughout Europe. The selection of attenuated strains of virus and resistant rabbits mirrored the experience in Australia in a very different environment, albeit with somewhat different rates. Genome sequencing of the progenitor virus and the early radiation, as well as those from the 1990s in Australia and Europe, has shown that although MYXV evolved at high rates there was no conserved route to attenuation or back to virulence. In contrast, it seems that these relatively large viral genomes have the flexibility for multiple pathways that converge on a similar phenotype. PMID:25757062

  11. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses bind differentially to human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie M; Bartee, Eric C; Moreb, Jan S; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H; McFadden, Grant

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes.

  12. Myxoma virus and the Leporipoxviruses: an evolutionary paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Liu, June; Cattadori, Isabella; Ghedin, Elodie; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-03-06

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is the type species of the Leporipoxviruses, a genus of Chordopoxvirinae, double stranded DNA viruses, whose members infect leporids and squirrels, inducing cutaneous fibromas from which virus is mechanically transmitted by biting arthropods. However, in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), MYXV causes the lethal disease myxomatosis. The release of MYXV as a biological control for the wild European rabbit population in Australia, initiated one of the great experiments in evolution. The subsequent coevolution of MYXV and rabbits is a classic example of natural selection acting on virulence as a pathogen adapts to a novel host species. Slightly attenuated mutants of the progenitor virus were more readily transmitted by the mosquito vector because the infected rabbit survived longer, while highly attenuated viruses could be controlled by the rabbit immune response. As a consequence, moderately attenuated viruses came to dominate. This evolution of the virus was accompanied by selection for genetic resistance in the wild rabbit population, which may have created an ongoing co-evolutionary dynamic between resistance and virulence for efficient transmission. This natural experiment was repeated on a continental scale with the release of a separate strain of MYXV in France and its subsequent spread throughout Europe. The selection of attenuated strains of virus and resistant rabbits mirrored the experience in Australia in a very different environment, albeit with somewhat different rates. Genome sequencing of the progenitor virus and the early radiation, as well as those from the 1990s in Australia and Europe, has shown that although MYXV evolved at high rates there was no conserved route to attenuation or back to virulence. In contrast, it seems that these relatively large viral genomes have the flexibility for multiple pathways that converge on a similar phenotype.

  13. Myxoma and Vaccinia Viruses Bind Differentially to Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Bartee, Eric C.; Moreb, Jan S.; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes. PMID:23388707

  14. Surgery for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Christopher P.; Henn, Matthew C.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and its treatment options include drug therapy or, catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure which was developed by James Cox in 1987 is a procedure where multiple surgical incisions are created along the atria to interrupt the electrical pathways thought to allow atrial fibrillation to persist. This procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its 4th iteration called the Cox-Maze IV. The Cox-Maze IV replaced the previous “cut-and-sew” method with a combination of cryoablation and bipolar RF ablation. The adaption of ablation technologies allowed the Cox-Maze IV procedure to be performed through a less invasive right minithoracotomy instead of a traditional sternotomy approach. The aim of this article is to review the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. A description of the operative techniques for both a sternotomy and right mini-thoracotomy approach will be discussed in addition to specific postoperative considerations. Finally, this article will review the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous “cut-and-sew” method. PMID:25443237

  15. [Atrial fibrillation and regular tachycardia in two young patients--are both treated with atrial fibrillation ablation?].

    PubMed

    von Bodman, G; Brömsen, J; Kopf, C; Füller, M; Block, M

    2014-04-17

    Two young patients with documented episodes of symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation have been referred for pulmonary vein isolation. Both patients had a history of concomitant regular tachycardia. in both cases pulmonaryvein isolation has not been performed but in each patient a supraventricular tachycardia (right focal atrial tachycardia/atrioventricular reentry tachycardia) could be induced and ablated instead. Concomitant supraventricular tachycardia acting as a trigger arrhythmia is frequent in young patients with atrial fibrillation without underlying cardiacdisease. In these patients a concomitant supra-ventricular tachycardia should beexcluded by electrophysiological study or ablated before pulmonary vein isolation or initiating an antiarrhythmic drug therapy. In most cases ablation of supraventricular tachycardia is safe and successful whereas the risks of ablative therapy of atrial fibrillation can not be neglected and success is moderate.

  16. Multimodality imaging in the assessment of cardiac lymphoma presented as new-onset atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Trifunovic, Danijela; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Vuckovic, Maja; Ostojic, Miodrag; Ristic, Arsen; Bogdanovic, Andrija; Mihaljevic, Biljana; Andjelic, Bosko; Perunicic-Jovanovic, Maja; Antonic, Zelimir

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac involvement by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is not uncommon, however rarely diagnosed during life due to nonspecific clinical presentation. We report a case of secondary cardiac lymphoma in patient who presented with new-onset atrial fibrillation. Cardiac lymphoma was in a form of bulky right atrial mass, infiltrating the atrial septum and cavo-atrial junction with concomitant mild pericardial effusion. In the present case, we illustrate complementary role of transthoracic, transesophageal echocardiography and multislice CT scan with three-dimensional reconstruction, in detection and evaluation of secondary cardiac tumor. Usefulness of echocardiography to follow up the effects of chemotherapy is also shown.

  17. Atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmias in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Posselt, Bonnie N; Cox, A T; D'Arcy, J; Rooms, M; Saba, M

    2015-09-01

    Although rare, sudden cardiac death does occur in British military personnel. In the majority of cases, the cause is considered to be a malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmia, which can be precipitated by a number of underlying pathologies. Conversely, a tachyarrhythmia may have a more benign and treatable cause, yet the initial clinical symptoms may be similar, making differentiation difficult. This is an overview of the mechanisms underlying the initiation and propagation of arrhythmias and the various pathological conditions that predispose to arrhythmia genesis, classified according to which parts of the heart are involved: atrial tachyarrhythmias, atrial and ventricular, as well as those affecting the ventricles alone. It encompasses atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardias and ventricular tachycardias, including the more commonly encountered inherited primary electrical diseases, also known as the channelopathies. The clinical features, investigation and management strategies are outlined. The occupational impact-in serving military personnel and potential recruits-is described, with explanations relating to the different conditions and their specific implication on continued military service.

  18. Serum atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) as an objective indicator for the diagnosis of neurogenic shock: animal experiment and human case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min-Zhu; Li, Yong-Guo; Zhang, Peng; Xiong, Jin-Cheng; Zhu, Shi-Sheng; Xiao, Xuan; Li, Jian-Bo

    2017-03-01

    In forensic medicine, the diagnosis of death due to neurogenic shock is considered to be an aporia, as lacking objective indicators and presenting atypical symptoms in autopsy. Medico-legal disputes and complaints occasionally result from this ambiguity. To explore potential objective indicators of neurogenic shock, we set up a model of neurogenic shock by applying an external mechanical force on the carotid sinus baroreceptor in rabbits. The serum atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) level was measured by radioimmunoassay in the control group (n = 8), survival group (n = 15) and death group (n = 5) both before and after the insult. The serum ANP level showed a significant increase after the insult in the death group compared with the serum obtained before the insult (P = 0.006), while the serum ANP level after the insult in the survival group and control group was not statistically significant compared with the serum obtained before the insult (P = 0.332 and P = 0.492, respectively). To verify the repeatability of the model and the postmortem behavior of serum ANP, five healthy adult rabbits underwent the same procedure as the experimental group. The mortality rate was consistent with the former experiment (20 %). There were no significant changes in serum ANP level in vitro and in vivo (within 48 and 24 h, respectively). But there was a significant decrease in serum ANP level at 48 h postmortem in vivo (P = 0.001). A female patient who expired due to neurogenic shock during a hysteroscopy was reported. Neither fatal primary disease nor evidence for mechanical injuries or intoxication was found according to the autopsy. The serum ANP level was assayed as a supplementary indicator and was found to be three-fold higher than the normal maximum limit. Combined with the animal experiment, this case highlights that serum ANP has the potential to be an objective indicator for the diagnosis of death due to neurogenic shock.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Carney complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... addition, some affected individuals have at least one blue-black mole called a blue nevus. Related Information What does it mean if ... Carney Syndrome LAMB - Lentigines, atrial myxoma, mucocutaneous myoma, blue nevus syndrome NAME - Nevi, atrial myxoma, skin myxoma, ...

  20. Repair of atrial septal defect with Eisenmenger syndrome after long-term sildenafil therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hwue; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yun, Tae-Jin; Lee, Yonghee; Kim, Yong Beom; Choi, Hyung Soon; Jhang, Won Kyoung; Shin, Hong Ju; Park, Jeong-Jun; Seo, Dong-Man; Ko, Jae-Kon; Park, In-Sook

    2010-05-01

    We report a woman with atrial septal defect and severe pulmonary hypertension with 25.0 Wood unit.m(2) of indexed total pulmonary vascular resistance. She underwent successful corrective repair of atrial septal defect after 2 years of treatment with sildenafil, and has been monitored for 4 years after repair. This case supports a "treat and repair" approach using advanced pulmonary vasodilator therapy in selected patients with inoperable severe pulmonary hypertension associated with atrial septal defect.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial atrial fibrillation familial atrial fibrillation Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial atrial fibrillation is an inherited condition that disrupts the heart's ...

  2. A new atrial septostomy technique.

    PubMed

    Park, S C; Zuberbuhler, J R; Neches, W H; Lenox, C C; Zoltun, R A

    1975-01-01

    Balloon atrial septostomy is usually ineffective if the atrial septum is thickened. A technique for incising the atrial septum is described. A no. 6 French catheter was modified to enclose a tiny surgical blade. The distal end of the blade was pivoted to the catheter tip, and the proximal end was attached to a guide wire in the catheter lumen. Advancing the guide wire protruded the blade through a slit in the long axis of the tip of the catheter. Atrial septostomy was performed in five newborn lambs in vivo and in adult dog hearts and human hearts in vitro by advancing the catheter tip across the atrial septum with the blade retracted and withdrawing it to the right atrium with the blade extended. Eight to 12 mm lacerations of the atrial septum were produced and could be extended by subsequent balloon septostomy. The technique may be useful when balloon septostomy has been ineffective.

  3. The atrial natriuretic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Genest, J

    1986-01-01

    In less than three years since the rapid and potent natriuretic response to intravenous injection of atrial myocardial extract in rats was reported the factor responsible for the diuretic, natriuretic, and vasodilating activity of the atrial homogenates was isolated, its chemical structure elucidated, and its total synthesis achieved. Also the cDNA and the gene encoding for the atrial natriuretic factor in mice, rats, and man have been cloned and the chromosomal site identified. The major effects of this hormone are vasodilatation, prevention and inhibition of the contraction induced by noradrenaline and angiotensin II, diuresis, and natriuresis associated in most instances with a pronounced increase in glomerular filtration rate and filtration fraction, inhibition of aldosterone secretion, and considerable stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase activity. High density specific binding sites have been demonstrated in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex, in the renal glomeruli, and in the collecting ducts, and in the brain areas involved in the regulation of blood pressure and of sodium and water (AV3V region, subfornical organ, nucleus tractus solitarius, area postrema). Images Fig 1 Fig 5 PMID:2945572

  4. [Recurrent right atrial thrombus in a patient with atrial fibrillation and heart failure].

    PubMed

    Elikowski, Waldemar; Wróblewski, Dariusz; Małek-Elikowska, Małgorzata; Mazurek, Andrzej; Foremska-Iciek, Joanna; Łazowski, Stanisław

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation and heart failure are factors predisposing to locally formed intracardiac thrombosis, which is usually localized in left-sided chambers. A case report. The authors present a case of a 50-year-old male with permanent atrial fibrillation and dilated cardiomyopathy in whom recurrent right atrial thrombus was observed. Initially, the lesion was detected in echocardiography while he was hospitalized due to extensive right-sided pneumonia. The thrombus was successfully treated with heparin, followed by warfarin. Even though the patient continued warfarin use properly, there was recurrence of the thrombus two years later during a new episode of heart failure exacerbation. Because the thrombus was resistant to intensified anticoagulation, cardiac surgery was needed. A large (30 x 25 mm) pedunculated thrombus, as well as two smaller ones (each of 10 x 10 mm) attached closely to the atrial wall and previously not detected either by echocardiography or by magnetic resonance imaging, were excited. A partially organized pattern of the thrombi in histological examination can explain lack of anticoagulation effectiveness.

  5. Myxoma of the penis in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris)

    PubMed Central

    TAKAMI, Yoshinori; YASUDA, Namie; UNE, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    A penile tumor (4 × 2.5 × 1 cm) was surgically removed from an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) aged 3 years and 5 months. The tumor was continuous with the dorsal fascia of the penile head. Histopathologically, tumor cells were pleomorphic (oval-, short spindle- and star-shaped cells) with low cell density. Abundant edematous stroma was weakly positive for Alcian blue staining and positive for colloidal iron reaction. Tumor cells displayed no cellular atypia or karyokinesis. Tumor cell cytoplasm was positive for vimentin antibody, while cytoplasm and nuclei were positive for S-100 protein antibody. Tumor cell ultrastructure matched that of fibroblasts, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum was enlarged. The tumor was diagnosed as myxoma. This represents the first report of myxoma in a hedgehog. PMID:27784859

  6. Distinct pharmacologic substrate in lidocaine-sensitive, repetitive atrial tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Chiale, Pablo A; Faivelis, Luciano; Garro, Hugo A; Fernández, Pablo A; Herrera Paz, Juan J; Elizari, Marcelo V

    2012-06-01

    Lidocaine-sensitive, repetitive atrial tachycardia is an uncommon arrhythmia. The electrophysiologic substrate is still unknown, and the pharmacologic responses have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intravenous adenosine and verapamil in patients with lidocaine-sensitive atrial tachycardia. In 9 patients with repetitive uniform atrial tachycardia, the response to intravenous adenosine (12 mg), lidocaine (1 mg/kg body weight), and verapamil (10 mg) were sequentially investigated. Simultaneous 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded at baseline and continuously monitored thereafter. Tracings were obtained at regularly timed intervals right after the administration of each drug to evaluate changes in the arrhythmia characteristics. Repetitive atrial tachycardia was abolished by intravenous lidocaine in the 9 patients within the first 2 minutes after the end of injection. Adenosine suppressed the arrhythmia in 2 patients and shortened the runs of atrial ectopic activity in 1 patient, while verapamil was effective in 2 patients, 1 of them insensitive to adenosine and the other 1 sensitive to this agent. In 5 patients, the arrhythmia was abolished by radiofrequency ablation at different sites of the right atrium. Lidocaine-sensitive atrial tachycardia may eventually be also suppressed by adenosine and/or verapamil. This suggests that this enigmatic arrhythmia may be caused by different underlying electrophysiologic substrates and that at least in some cases, delayed afterdepolarizations seem to play a determining role.

  7. Management of Atrio-Esophageal Fistula Following Left Atrial Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Keshmiri, Hesam; Bulwa, Zachary; Kramer, Jason; Sharjeel Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad; Issa, Rasha; Woznicka, Daniel; Gordon, Paul; Abi-Mansour, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no guidelines have been established for the treatment of atrio-esophageal fistula (AEF) secondary to left atrial ablation therapy. After comprehensive literature review, we aim to make suggestions on the management of this complex complication and also present a case series. We performed a review of the existing literature on AEF in the setting of atrial ablation. Using keywords atrial fibrillation, atrial ablation, fistula formation, atrio-esophageal fistula, complications, interventions, and prognosis, a search was made using the medical databases PUBMED and MEDLINE for reports in English from 2000 to April 2015. A statistical analysis was performed to compare the three different intervention arms: medical management, stent placement and surgical intervention. The results of our systematic review confirm the high mortality rate associated with AEF following left atrial ablation and the necessity to diagnose atrio-esophageal injury in a timely manner. The mortality rates of this complication are 96% with medical management alone, 100% with stent placement, and 33 % with surgical intervention. Atrio-esophageal injury and subsequent AEF is an infrequent but potentially fatal complication of atrial ablation. Early, prompt, and definitive surgical intervention is the treatment of choice. PMID:28197267

  8. Ebstein Anomaly With Right Atrial Clot

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prakash; Singhal, Gaurav; Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Umeshwar; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve (TV), often associated with other cardiac malformations, especially atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale (PFO) which is present in 80-90% of patients and predisposes to paradoxical embolization. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female, who presented with worsening exertional dyspnea, fatigue and pedal edema and atrial fibrillation (AF). Transthoracic echocardiography showed EA with severely dilated right atrium (RA), small functional right ventricle (RV), low velocity flow across TV with spontaneous echo contrast and giant clot in RA. Fortunately for the patient, contrast and transesophageal echocardiography revealed an intact interatrial septum with no PFO preventing any paradoxical embolism from large clot in RA, more so in the background of AF. Important differential diagnosis of congenitally unguarded TV orifice was ruled out due to presence of septal and anterior leaflets of TV and associated chordae. PMID:28197250

  9. Ebstein Anomaly With Right Atrial Clot.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prakash; Singhal, Gaurav; Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Umeshwar; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-10-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve (TV), often associated with other cardiac malformations, especially atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale (PFO) which is present in 80-90% of patients and predisposes to paradoxical embolization. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female, who presented with worsening exertional dyspnea, fatigue and pedal edema and atrial fibrillation (AF). Transthoracic echocardiography showed EA with severely dilated right atrium (RA), small functional right ventricle (RV), low velocity flow across TV with spontaneous echo contrast and giant clot in RA. Fortunately for the patient, contrast and transesophageal echocardiography revealed an intact interatrial septum with no PFO preventing any paradoxical embolism from large clot in RA, more so in the background of AF. Important differential diagnosis of congenitally unguarded TV orifice was ruled out due to presence of septal and anterior leaflets of TV and associated chordae.

  10. The orosomucoid 1 protein (α1 acid glycoprotein) is overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign, but locally invasive, neoplasm occurring in the jaws. However, the molecules implicated in its development are unknown. OM as well as Dental Follicle (DF), an odontogenic tissue surrounding the enamel organ, is derived from ectomesenchymal/mesencyhmal elements. To identify some protein that could participate in the development of this neoplasm, total proteins from OM were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the profiles were compared with those obtained from DF, used as a control. Results We identified eight proteins with differential expression; two of them were downregulated and six upregulated in OM. A spot consistently overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma, with a molecular weight of 44-kDa and a pI of 3.5 was identified as the orosomucoid 1 protein. Western blot experiments confirmed the overexpression of this protein in odontogenic myxoma and immunohistochemical assays showed that this protein was mainly located in the cytoplasm of stellate and spindle-shaped cells of this neoplasm. Conclusion Orosomucoid 1, which belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins, may play a role in the modulation of the immune system and possibly it influences the development of OM. PMID:22888844

  11. [Non-pharmacologic treatment of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Csanádi, Zoltán; Fazekas, Tamás; Varró, András

    2003-06-29

    The authors provide an update on non-pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). They emphasize that although antiarrhythmic drugs continue to be first-line therapy for the arrhythmia considered to be a cardiovascular epidemic, clinical research to develop non-pharmacological means of treatment has been unprecedentally intensified during the last decade. Electrical cardioversion is the most successful non-pharmacological method to restore sinus rhythm, also the efficacy and safety of AV node ablation for palliative ventricular rate-controll is established. "Hybrid" therapeutic procedures, involving combinations of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have gained widespread use. Curative transcatheter ablation for arrhythmia prevention is to be considered in case of clinical suggestions that AF is initiated by a primary regular arrhythmia that is amenable to routine catheter ablation (secondary AF). Despite encouraging results, at this point in time, curative catheter ablation for primary AF may offer significant improvement or even cure only for a small subset of patients, mostly young individuals with normal heart, and paroxysmal AF with frequent, symptomatic episodes refractory to multiple antiarrhythmic drugs. These interventions are to be performed in the settings of a clinical research project in some institutions. Regarding pacemaker therapy in case of bradycardia indication, physiologic pacing (AAI or DDD) is associated with significantly lower incidence of atrial fibrillation than ventricular pacing. Large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the clinical value of specially designed implantable devices to prevent atrial fibrillation in patients with no conventional bradycardia indication. Also, technical optimization and proper clinical evaluation is needed for implantable atrioverters and implantable cardioverter defibrillators capable of atrial cardioversion therapy.

  12. Atrial Cardiopathy: A Broadened Concept of Left Atrial Thromboembolism Beyond Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Hooman; Okin, Peter M.; Longstreth, W. T.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has long been associated with a heightened risk of ischemic stroke and systemic thromboembolism, but recent data require a re-evaluation of our understanding of the nature of this relationship. New findings about the temporal connection between AF and stroke, alongside evidence linking markers of left atrial abnormalities with stroke in the absence of apparent AF, suggest that left atrial thromboembolism may occur even without AF. These observations undermine the hypothesis that the dysrhythmia that defines AF is necessary and sufficient to cause thromboembolism. In this commentary, we instead suggest that the substrate for thromboembolism may often be the anatomic and physiological atrial derangements associated with AF. Therefore, our understanding of cardioembolic stroke may be more complete if we shift our representation of its origin from AF to the concept of atrial cardiopathy. PMID:26021638

  13. Left Atrial Epicardial Adiposity and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Batal, Omar; Schoenhagen, Paul; Shao, Mingyuan; Ayyad, Ala Eddin; Van Wagoner, David R.; Halliburton, Sandra S.; Tchou, Patrick J.; Chung, Mina K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been linked to inflammatory factors and obesity. Epicardial fat is a source of several inflammatory mediators related to the development of coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that periatrial fat may have a similar role in the development of AF. Methods and Results Left atrium (LA) epicardial fat pad thickness was measured in consecutive cardiac CT angiograms performed for coronary artery disease or AF. Patients were grouped by AF burden: no (n=73), paroxysmal (n=60), or persistent (n=36) AF. In a short-axis view at the mid LA, periatrial epicardial fat thickness was measured at the esophagus (LA-ESO), main pulmonary artery, and thoracic aorta; retrosternal fat was measured in axial view (right coronary ostium level). LA area was determined in the 4-chamber view. LA-ESO fat was thicker in patients with persistent AF versus paroxysmal AF (P=0.011) or no AF (P=0.003). LA area was larger in patients with persistent AF than paroxysmal AF (P=0.004) or without AF (P<0.001). LA-ESO was a significant predictor of AF burden even after adjusting for age, body mass index, and LA area (odds ratio, 5.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.39 to 20.24; P=0.015). A propensity score–adjusted multivariable logistic regression that included age, body mass index, LA area, and comorbidities was also performed and the relationship remained statistically significant (P=0.008). Conclusions Increased posterior LA fat thickness appears to be associated with AF burden independent of age, body mass index, or LA area. Further studies are necessary to examine cause and effect, and if inflammatory, paracrine mediators explain this association. PMID:20504944

  14. Benchmarking electrophysiological models of human atrial myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Mathias; Hettmann, Hanne; Maleckar, Mary M.; Koivumäki, Jussi T.; Dössel, Olaf; Seemann, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of cardiac electrophysiology is an insightful method to investigate the underlying mechanisms responsible for arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF). In past years, five models of human atrial electrophysiology with different formulations of ionic currents, and consequently diverging properties, have been published. The aim of this work is to give an overview of strengths and weaknesses of these models depending on the purpose and the general requirements of simulations. Therefore, these models were systematically benchmarked with respect to general mathematical properties and their ability to reproduce certain electrophysiological phenomena, such as action potential (AP) alternans. To assess the models' ability to replicate modified properties of human myocytes and tissue in cardiac disease, electrical remodeling in chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF) was chosen as test case. The healthy and remodeled model variants were compared with experimental results in single-cell, 1D and 2D tissue simulations to investigate AP and restitution properties, as well as the initiation of reentrant circuits. PMID:23316167

  15. Uncontrolled ventricular rate in atrial fibrillation. A manifestation of dissimilar atrial rhythms.

    PubMed Central

    Leier, C V; Johnson, T M; Lewis, R P

    1979-01-01

    A patient with coarse atrial fibrillation and a rapid ventricular response developed periods of high grade atrioventricular block interpersed with periods of rapid ventricular conduction after the administration of digitalis and propranolol. Intracardiac atrial recordings showed similar atrial rhythms of high right atrial flutter and left atrial fibrillation. The low right atrial recordings showed flutter during the periods of fast ventricular rates and fibrillation during periods of slower ventricular rates. Images PMID:475927

  16. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipset, Mark A.; Lemery, Jay; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A long-duration exploration class mission is fraught with numerous medical contingency plans. Herein, we explore the challenges of symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) occurring during an exploration class mission. The actions and resources required to ameliorate the situation, including the availability of appropriate pharmaceuticals, monitoring devices, treatment modalities, and communication protocols will be investigated. Challenges of Atrial Fibrillation during an Exploration Mission: Numerous etiologies are responsible for the initiation of AF. On Earth, we have the time and medical resources to evaluate and determine the causative situation for most cases of AF and initiate therapy accordingly. During a long-duration exploration class mission resources will be severely restricted. How is one to determine if new onset AF is due to recent myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, fluid overload, thyrotoxicosis, cardiac structural abnormalities, or CO poisoning? Which pharmaceutical therapy should be initiated and what potential side effects can be expected? Should anti-coagulation therapy be initiated? How would one monitor the therapeutic treatment of AF in microgravity? What training would medical officers require, and which communication strategies should be developed to enable the best, safest therapeutic options for treatment of AF during a long-duration exploration class mission? Summary: These questions will be investigated with expert opinion on disease elucidation, efficient pharmacology, therapeutic monitoring, telecommunication strategies, and mission cost parameters with emphasis on atrial fibrillation being just one illustration of the tremendous challenges that face a long-duration exploration mission. The limited crew training time, medical hardware, and drugs manifested to deal with such an event predicate that aggressive primary and secondary prevention strategies be developed to protect a multibillion-dollar asset like the

  17. Syndrome of diminished vasodilator reserve of the coronary microcirculation (microvascular angina or syndrome X): Diagnosis by combined atrial pacing and thallium 201 imaging--a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Magarian, G.J.; Palac, R.; Reinhart, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Patients with angina-like chest pain without evidence of epicardial coronary artery disease or coronary arterial vasospasm are becoming increasingly recognized. These are often related to noncardiac causes including esophageal, musculoskeletal, and hyperventilatory or panic states. However, recently a subgroup of such patients are being recognized as having true myocardial ischemia and chest pain on the basis of diminished coronary microvascular vasodilatory reserve (microvascular ischemia or Syndrome X). The authors describe such a patient who was found to have replication of anginal pain associated with a reversible ischemic defect on thallium 201 imaging during atrial pacing, suggesting ischemia in this myocardial segment. Resolution of angina and ST segment electrocardiographic changes of ischemia occurred with cessation of pacing. We believe this is the first report of a patient with this form of myocardial ischemia diagnosed by this method and should be considered in patients with anginal chest pain after significant coronary artery disease and coronary vasospasm have been excluded.

  18. Atrial Papillary Fibroelastoma: A Stranger in a Strange Place

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Imran; Kawsar, Hameem; Khattak, Himad; Siddiqui, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Papillary fibroelastoma (PFE) is the most common primary tumor of cardiac valves and predominantly located on the left side. Its origin from non-valvular endocardium is extremely rare. We describe a case of an 81-year-old Caucasian male who presented with a mobile right atrial mass at the junction of right atrial wall and superior vena cava (SVC). Initially it was thought to be a thrombus and the patient was treated with anti-coagulation therapy without any change in size of the mass. Surgical excision was performed to establish the diagnosis and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of PFE. In conclusion, this case is unique due to location of the tumor and its attachment with superior vena cava. Physicians should consider this unusual location of PFE in the differential diagnoses of an intra-atrial mass. PMID:27326351

  19. Atrial Septal Defect in a Very Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Elika; Gomes, Andre Amaral; Silva, Maria Joao; Torres, Tiago Pinheiro; Coelho, Andreia; Almeida, Pedro Bernardo; Lourenco, Patricia; Bettencourt, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) is one of the most frequently congenital heart diseases in adults and it is often asymptomatic until adulthood. We report a case of a 90-year-old woman admitted to hospital with dyspnea and orthopnea insidiously progressing over the preceding 5 years and becoming severe with dyspnea on minimal activities, orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, in the last 2 weeks. The transthoracic echocardiogram revealed an atrial septal defect ostium secundum type, with left-to-right shunt, moderate to severe tricuspid insufficiency, severe pulmonary hypertension (72 mmHg) and preserved biventricular function. With diuretic therapy optimization the patient showed symptomatic improvement. This present case represents and unusual and very late presentation of an atrial septal defect ostium secundum type, which is usually diagnosed at the mild adult age. Our patient lived symptom-free for over 80 years.

  20. [Perioperative management of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Arguis, M J; Navarro, R; Regueiro, A; Arbelo, E; Sierra, P; Sabaté, S; Galán, J; Ruiz, A; Matute, P; Roux, C; Gomar, C; Rovira, I; Mont, L; Fita, G

    2014-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication in the perioperative period. When it appears there is an increased risk of perioperative morbidity due to stroke, thromboembolism, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, anticoagulation haemorrhage, and hospital readmissions. The current article focuses on the recommendations for the management of perioperative atrial fibrillation based on the latest Clinical Practice Guidelines on atrial fibrillation by the European Society of Cardiology and the Spanish Society of Cardiology. This article pays special attention to the preoperative management, as well as to the acute perioperative episode. For this reason, the latest recommendations for the control of cardiac frequency, antiarrhythmic treatment and anticoagulation are included.

  1. Insomnia and the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiu-Hao; Chen, Yueh-Chung; Chen, Jien-Jiun; Lo, Shih-Hsiang; Guo, Yue-Liang; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background Although advancements in the treatment of atrial fibrillation have improved patient prognosis for this persistent condition, interest in atrial fibrillation development is growing. Of note is the fact that additional attention is being focused on the accompanying effect of insomnia. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of insomnia on the risk of atrial fibrillation development. Methods This was a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study using data from the Taiwan National health Insurance Research Database. We analyzed 64,421 insomnia cases and 128,842 matched controls without insomnia from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. A Cox regression model was used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for atrial fibrillation development. Results During the follow-up period, the incidence of atrial fibrillation development was significantly higher in the insomnia cases than in the comparison cohort (2.6% vs. 2.3%, p < 0.001). Insomnia was associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.14). Males, those > 65 years of age, and patients with peripheral artery disease who have insomnia had a higher rate of atrial fibrillation development. Conclusions The findings of this nationwide analysis support the hypothesis that insomnia is associated with a significant risk of atrial fibrillation development. PMID:28344420

  2. Reduced kidney function is a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Jari A; Zaccardi, Francesco; Karppi, Jouni; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kurl, Sudhir

    2016-08-01

    There is limited knowledge on the relationship between kidney function and incidence of atrial fibrillation. Thus, this prospective study was designed to evaluate whether various biomarkers of kidney function are associated to the risk of atrial fibrillation. The study population consisted of 1840 subjects (615 women and 1225 men) aged 61-82 years. Cystatin C- and creatinine-based estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcys and eGRFcreat , respectively) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) were assessed to investigate their relationship with the risk of atrial fibrillation. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, a total of 159 incident atrial fibrillation cases occurred. After adjustment for potential confounders, the risk of atrial fibrillation was increased (hazard ratio 2.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.56-4.81, P < 0.001) in subjects with reduced kidney function (eGFRcys , 15-59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) compared to subjects with normal kidney function (≥90 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ). Similar results were also found when comparing the respective groups of subjects defined by their eGRFcreat levels (hazard ratio 2.41, CI 1.09-5.30, P = 0.029). Consistently, subjects with ACR ≥300 mg/g had an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 2.16, CI 1.35-2.82, P < 0.001) compared to those with ACR <30 mg/g. Reduced eGFR and albuminuria were associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation.

  3. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure: is atrial fibrillation a disease?

    PubMed

    Tilman, V

    2014-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation in heart failure often occur together. The relationship between atrial fibrillation and heart failure has remained a subject of research. The main manifestation of the violation of hydrodynamics in heart failure is the increased end-diastolic pressure, which is transmitted through the intercommunicated system (left ventricle-left atrium-pulmonary veins-alveolar capillaries) causing increased pulmonary wedge pressure with the danger for pulmonary edema. End-diastolic pressure is the sum of left ventricle diastolic pressure and left atrial systolic pressure. Stopping the mechanical systole of the left atrium can reduce the pressure in the system in heart failure. Atrial fibrillation stops the mechanical systole of the left atrium and decreases the intercommunicating pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure. It is possible that atrial fibrillation is a mechanism for protection from increasing end-diastolic pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure, and prevents the danger of pulmonary edema. This hypothesis may explain the relationship between heart failure and atrial fibrillation and their frequent association.

  4. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome with restrictive atrial septum and advanced heart block documented with a novel fetal electrocardiographic monitor

    PubMed Central

    NARAYAN, H. K.; FIFER, W.; CARROLL, S.; KERN, J.; SILVER, E.; WILLIAMS, I. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoplastic left ventricle with congenital heart block has been reported previously in a fetus with concurrent left atrial isomerism and levo-transposition of the great arteries. We present the unusual case of an infant diagnosed in utero with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a restrictive atrial septum and advanced heart block but with D-looping of the ventricles and no atrial isomerism. In addition, fetal heart rhythm was documented with the assistance of a new fetal electrocardiographic monitor. PMID:21374749

  5. Atrial Septal Defect (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... wall called the septum that normally separates the blue and red blood. In a person with an atrial septal defect, there's an opening in that wall. This hole in the wall lets oxygen-rich blood from ...

  6. Atrial fibrillation and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M L; Martinez, C M; Gallagher, E J

    1999-01-01

    A young male bodybuilder, consuming large doses of anabolic steroids (AS), presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with symptomatic rapid atrial fibrillation (AF). Echocardiogram revealed significant septal hypokinesis, and posterior and septal wall thickness at the upper limit of normal for highly trained athletes. The atrial fibrillation had not recurred at 10 weeks after discontinuation of AS use. Consumption of these agents in athletes has been associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and sudden death.

  7. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques.

  8. Percutaneous closure of an atrial septal defect in an infant with Shone's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petit, Christopher J; Justino, Henri; Fraser, Charles D

    2012-08-01

    Rarely is closure of the atrial septal defect indicated in infants. Yet, an atrial septal defect in the presence of congenital mitral stenosis may cause significant congestive heart failure in infancy. We present the case of an infant with Shone's syndrome, left ventricular hypoplasia, and a large ostium secundum atrial septal defect who developed pulmonary overcirculation following repair of coarctation of the aorta. The infant underwent cardiac catheterization, hemodynamic assessment, and successful percutaneous closure of the atrial septal defect. The patient improved dramatically following the intervention. Follow-up echocardiograms have demonstrated growth of mitral valve annulus diameter and left ventricular dimensions. Atrial septal defect closure in this small infant was associated with immediate improved clinical status, and improved growth of the left heart structures.

  9. Aorta-Right Atrial Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Cheemalapati Sai; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta–right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary–cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure. The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass. Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2). PMID:20844628

  10. Aorta-right atrial tunnel.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, Cheemalapati; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta-right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary-cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure.The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass.Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2).

  11. [Double tachycardia: association of an atrial flutter and a fascicular ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Monsel, F; El Hraiech, A; Amara, W

    2013-11-01

    Double tachycardia is an uncommon type of tachycardia. We report the case of a 42-year-old patient, admitted in our department for palpitations. Two types of tachycardia, narrow and wide QRS one, have been documented in the moment of palpitations. The electrophysiology study highlights an atrial flutter and a fascicular ventricular tachycardia. The patient had no recurrence of palpitations after atrial flutter ablation and medical treatment by verapamil for his ventricular tachycardia. This is the first published case combining an atrial flutter and a ventricular tachycardia.

  12. The polyuria of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Stein, R. M.; Discala, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Two patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and an associated polyuria were studied to delineate the mechanism of the increase in urine flow. A striking saluresis was noted in both patients. The increased sodium excretion was probably due to decreased sodium reabsorption, perhaps at proximal tubular nephron sites. This inhibition of sodium reabsorption could explain both the saluresis and some part or all of the polyuria. Re-evaluation of earlier case reports reveals patterns of concomitant salt and water excretion consistent with this mechanism. The saluresis cannot be explained by the previously favored hypothesis of antidiuretic hormone inhibition.

  13. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  14. Left atrial intramural hematoma after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Franks, Russell J; de Souza, Anthony; Di Mario, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    We describe a rare complication of a complex chronic total occlusion recanalization procedure. Perforation of a distal right coronary artery collateral results in a left atrial intramural hematoma with consequent circulatory collapse. Access to prompt transoesophageal echocardiography and urgent surgical intervention were lifesaving and the case highlights possible implications on the planning of complex chronic total occlusion recanalization procedures.

  15. [Torsade de pointes in the management of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Urtubia Palacios, A; Usieto López, L; Fernández Esteban, M I; Puértolas Ortega, M

    2014-01-01

    Torsade de pointes is a frequent cause of sudden death of cardiac origin, with uncertain mechanisms of actions and very diverse origins. A case is presented of a patient with a bronchial condition on pharmacological treatment with macrolides, and who, as well as having atrial fibrillation, suffered an episode of self-limiting torsade de pointes that abated spontaneously with no associated clinical complications.

  16. A case of marked diuresis by combined dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide administration without renal injury in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Masataka; Sato, Naoki; Akiya, Mai; Okazaki, Hirotake; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    Renal injury is an important factor for worsening outcome in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). An 81-year-old woman was admitted due to ADHF with dyspnea and mild peripheral edema. The patient was managed with intravenous administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) at a dose of 0.0125 μg/kg/minute, which did not control volume overload even at an increased dose of 0.025 μg/kg/minute. After a low dose of dopamine (DA) of 1.0 μg/kg/ minute was added, urine output increased markedly to 120 from 30 mL/hour. Furthermore, her heart rate decreased to 80-100 from 120 bpm and the congestion improved with a reduced brain natriuretic peptide level. Interestingly, the combination of ANP and DA therapy reduced serum creatinine as well as the levels of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein, a novel reno-tubular stress marker, by 98.9%, and an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, by 88.2% from baseline levels. Thus, this ADHF patient, a nonresponder to ANP alone, improved without renal injury when administered combination therapy consisting of low doses of ANP and DA, suggesting that this combined therapy might be useful for better management of ADHF in patients without diuretic responses with ANP alone. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  17. The impact of 6 weeks of atrial fibrillation on left atrial and ventricular structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Kazui, Toshinobu; Henn, Mathew C.; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kovács, Sándor J.; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Greenberg, Jason W.; Moon, Marc; Schuessler, Richard B.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The impact of prolonged episodes of atrial fibrillation on atrial and ventricular function has been incompletely characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of atrial fibrillation on left atrial and ventricular function in a rapid paced porcine model of atrial fibrillation. Methods A control group of pigs (group 1, n = 8) underwent left atrial and left ventricular conductance catheter studies and fibrosis analysis. A second group (group 2, n = 8) received a baseline cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to characterize left atrial and left ventricular function. The atria were rapidly paced into atrial fibrillation for 6 weeks followed by cardioversion and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results After 6 weeks of atrial fibrillation, left atrial contractility defined by atrial end-systolic pressure-volume relationship slope was significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (1.1 ± 0.5 vs 1.7 ± 1.0; P = .041), whereas compliance from the end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship was unchanged (1.5 ± 0.9 vs 1.6 ± 1.3; P = .733). Compared with baseline, atrial fibrillation resulted in a significantly higher contribution of left atrial reservoir volume to stroke volume (32% vs 17%; P = .005) and lower left atrial booster pump volume contribution to stroke volume (19% vs 28%; P = .029). Atrial fibrillation also significantly increased maximum left atrial volume (206 ± 41 mL vs 90 ± 21 mL; P < .001). Left atrial fibrosis in group 2 was significantly higher than in group 1. Atrial fibrillation decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (29% ± 9% vs 58 ± 8%; P < .001), but left ventricular stroke volume was unchanged. Conclusions In a chronic model of atrial fibrillation, the left atrium demonstrated significant structural remodeling and decreased contractility. These data suggest that early intervention in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation might mitigate against adverse atrial and ventricular structural

  18. Right atrial tunnel to the left atrial appendage: a danger during balloon septostomy.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J D; McFeeley, P; Bornikova, L

    2001-01-01

    Right atrial tunnel to the left atrial appendage is a very rare anomaly not previously described. Per se, it has no physiological significance but is a source of potential disaster during balloon atrial septostomy. The precise anatomy is demonstrated and ways are proposed to avoid tearing the atrial wall during therapeutic cardiac catheterization.

  19. Spontaneous Transition of Double Tachycardias with Atrial Fusion in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongmin

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT) and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) can coexist in a single patient. Direct transition of both tachycardias is rare; however, it can occur after premature atrial or ventricular activity if the cycle lengths of the two tachycardias are similar. Furthermore, persistent atrial activation by an accessory pathway (AP) located outside of the AV node during ongoing AVNRT is also rare. This article describes a case of uncommon atrial activation by an AP during AVNRT and gradual transition of the two supraventricular tachycardias without any preceding atrial or ventricular activity in a patient with preexcitation syndrome. PMID:27482269

  20. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  1. Atrial fibrillation in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    There is a growing population of veteran endurance athletes, regularly participating in training and competition. Although the graded benefit of exercise on cardiovascular health and mortality is well established, recent studies have raised concern that prolonged and strenuous endurance exercise may predispose to atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter are facilitated by atrial remodelling, atrial ectopy, and an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system. Endurance sports practice has an impact on all of these factors and may therefore act as a promoter of these arrhythmias. In an animal model, long-term intensive exercise training induced fibrosis in both atria and increased susceptibility to AF. While the prevalence of AF is low in young competitive athletes, it increases substantially in the aging athlete, which is possibly associated with an accumulation of lifetime training hours and participation in competitions. A recent meta-analysis revealed a 5-fold increased risk of AF in middle-aged endurance athletes with a striking male predominance. Beside physical activity, height and absolute left atrial size are independent risk factors for lone AF and the stature of men per se may explain part of their higher risk of AF. Furthermore, for a comparable amount of training volume and performance, male non-elite athletes exhibit a higher blood pressure at rest and peak exercise, a more concentric type of left ventricular remodelling, and an altered diastolic function, possibly contributing to a more pronounced atrial remodelling. The sports cardiologist should be aware of the distinctive features of AF in athletes. Therapeutic recommendations should be given in close cooperation with an electrophysiologist. Reduction of training volume is often not desired and drug therapy not well tolerated. An early ablation strategy may be appropriate for some athletes with an impaired physical performance, especially when continuation of

  2. Silent Atrial Fibrillation and Cryptogenic Strokes.

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S

    2017-03-01

    A new suspected cause of cryptic strokes is "silent atrial fibrillation." Pacemakers and other implanted devices allow continuous recording of cardiac rhythm for months or years. They have discovered that short periods of atrial fibrillation lasting minutes or hours are frequent and usually are asymptomatic. A meta-analysis of 50 studies involving more than 10,000 patients with a recent stroke found that 7.7% had new atrial fibrillation on their admitting electrocardiogram. In 3 weeks during and after hospitalization, another 16.9% were diagnosed. A total of 23.7% of these stroke patients had silent atrial fibrillation; that is, atrial fibrillation diagnosed after hospital admission. Silent atrial fibrillation is also frequent in patients with pacemakers who do not have a recent stroke. In a pooled analysis of 3 studies involving more than 10,000 patients monitored for 24 months, 43% had at least 1 day with atrial fibrillation lasting more than 5 minutes. Ten percent had atrial fibrillation lasting at least 12 hours. Despite the frequency of silent atrial fibrillation in these patients with multiple risk factors for stroke, the annual incidence of stroke was only 0.23%. When silent atrial fibrillation is detected in patients with recent cryptogenic stroke, anticoagulation is indicated. In patients without stroke, silent atrial fibrillation should lead to further monitoring for clinical atrial fibrillation rather than immediate anticoagulation, as some have advocated.

  3. Diagnosis of atrial fibrillation using electrograms from chronic leads: evaluation of computer algorithms.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, J; Noh, K H; Guezennec, A; Bump, T; Arzbaecher, R

    1988-05-01

    This study compares the performance of three detection algorithms for the recognition of atrial fibrillation in chronic pacing leads. Multiple serial recordings were obtained of wideband and filtered electrograms from chronic atrial and ventricular leads in dogs for a period up to 55 days following implantation. Each dog was recorded in sinus rhythm and induced atrial fibrillation. Four days were chosen for processing: The day of implantation and a day in the first, second or third, and fifth weeks. Three signal processing methods were assessed for performance in detection of atrial fibrillation: software recognition of rate with automatic threshold control, amplitude distribution, and frequency spectral analysis. A software trigger for rate determination was adjusted to thresholds of 10, 20, and 30% of maximum baseline-to-peak amplitude. At 10%, a rate boundary anywhere between 420 and 560 beats per minute (bpm) perfectly separated atrial fibrillation from sinus rhythm even though atrial electrograms were contaminated with large QRS deflections and double-sensing was present. At 20% and 30%, a rate boundary around 300 bpm could be used, but sensitivity and specificity were reduced to 90%. In amplitude distribution analysis, a percent of time within a baseline window provided perfect separation of atrial fibrillation from sinus rhythm. In all cases, the signal was within this window less than 43% of the time in atrial fibrillation, and more than 43% in sinus rhythm. In spectral analysis, frequency bands were examined for power content. In the 6 to 30 Hz band atrial fibrillation contained the greater power. Choosing 58% of total power as a discriminant, sensitivity and specificity of atrial fibrillation detection were 100% and 95% respectively.

  4. Identification and ablation of atypical atrial flutter. Entrainment pacing combined with electroanatomic mapping.

    PubMed

    Horlitz, M; Schley, P; Shin, D-I; Ghouzi, A; Sause, A; Wehner, M; Müller, M; Klein, R M; Bufe, A; Gülker, H

    2004-06-01

    Differentiation between typical and atypical atrial flutter solely based upon surface ECG pattern may be limited. However, successful ablation of atrial flutter depends on the exact identification of the responsible re-entrant circuit and its critical isthmus. Between August 2001 and June 2003, we performed conventional entrainment pacing within the cavotricuspid isthmus in 71 patients with sustained atrial flutter. In patients with positive entrainment we considered the arrhythmia as typical flutter and treated them with conventional ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus. As a consequence of negative entrainment we performed 3D-electroanatomic activation mapping (CARTO trade mark ). Conventional ablation of the right atrial isthmus was successful in all patients (n = 54) with positive entrainment. We performed electroanatomic mapping in the remaining 17 patients (14 male; age 60.9 +/- 16 years) resulting in the identification of 6 cases with typical and 11 cases with atypical flutter. Therefore, entrainment pacing was able to predict the true presence of typical atrial flutter in 91.5%. Atypical flutter was right sided in 4 patients and left sided in 7 cases. Electrically silent ("low voltage") areas probably demonstrating atrial myopathy were identified in all cases with left sided and in 2 patients with right sided flutter. In these patients targets for ablation lines were located between silent areas and anatomic barriers (inferior pulmonary veins, mitral respectively tricuspid annulus, or vena cava inferior). In 1 patient, the investigation was stopped due to variable ECG pattern and atrial cycle lengths. In the remaining cases, ablation was acutely successful. One patient, after surgical closure of a ventricular septal defect, demonstrated a dual-loop intra-atrial reentry tachycardia dependent on two different isthmuses. This arrhythmia required ablation of those distinct isthmuses to be interrupted. After a mean follow-up of 8.8 +/- 3.4 months, there was one

  5. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of the California MSW strain of myxoma virus reveals potential host adaptations.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-11-01

    Myxomatosis is a rapidly lethal disease of European rabbits that is caused by myxoma virus (MYXV). The introduction of a South American strain of MYXV into the European rabbit population of Australia is the classic case of host-pathogen coevolution following cross-species transmission. The most virulent strains of MYXV for European rabbits are the Californian viruses, found in the Pacific states of the United States and the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. The natural host of Californian MYXV is the brush rabbit, Sylvilagus bachmani. We determined the complete sequence of the MSW strain of Californian MYXV and performed a comparative analysis with other MYXV genomes. The MSW genome is larger than that of the South American Lausanne (type) strain of MYXV due to an expansion of the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of the genome, with duplication of the M156R, M154L, M153R, M152R, and M151R genes and part of the M150R gene from the right-hand (RH) end of the genome at the left-hand (LH) TIR. Despite the extreme virulence of MSW, no novel genes were identified; five genes were disrupted by multiple indels or mutations to the ATG start codon, including two genes, M008.1L/R and M152R, with major virulence functions in European rabbits, and a sixth gene, M000.5L/R, was absent. The loss of these gene functions suggests that S. bachmani is a relatively recent host for MYXV and that duplication of virulence genes in the TIRs, gene loss, or sequence variation in other genes can compensate for the loss of M008.1L/R and M152R in infections of European rabbits.

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Complete Genome Sequence of the California MSW Strain of Myxoma Virus Reveals Potential Host Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Rogers, Matthew B.; Fitch, Adam; DePasse, Jay V.; Cattadori, Isabella M.; Hudson, Peter J.; Tscharke, David C.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Myxomatosis is a rapidly lethal disease of European rabbits that is caused by myxoma virus (MYXV). The introduction of a South American strain of MYXV into the European rabbit population of Australia is the classic case of host-pathogen coevolution following cross-species transmission. The most virulent strains of MYXV for European rabbits are the Californian viruses, found in the Pacific states of the United States and the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. The natural host of Californian MYXV is the brush rabbit, Sylvilagus bachmani. We determined the complete sequence of the MSW strain of Californian MYXV and performed a comparative analysis with other MYXV genomes. The MSW genome is larger than that of the South American Lausanne (type) strain of MYXV due to an expansion of the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of the genome, with duplication of the M156R, M154L, M153R, M152R, and M151R genes and part of the M150R gene from the right-hand (RH) end of the genome at the left-hand (LH) TIR. Despite the extreme virulence of MSW, no novel genes were identified; five genes were disrupted by multiple indels or mutations to the ATG start codon, including two genes, M008.1L/R and M152R, with major virulence functions in European rabbits, and a sixth gene, M000.5L/R, was absent. The loss of these gene functions suggests that S. bachmani is a relatively recent host for MYXV and that duplication of virulence genes in the TIRs, gene loss, or sequence variation in other genes can compensate for the loss of M008.1L/R and M152R in infections of European rabbits. PMID:23986601

  7. Relation of porphyria to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Patel, Mehul B; Abdelmoneim, Sahar S; Puttarajappa, Chethan; Abela, George S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2009-08-01

    Porphyrias are a group of inherited disorders affecting enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway, leading to overproduction and/or accumulation of porphyrin or its precursors. Porphyrias have been associated with autonomic dysfunction, which in turn can develop atrial fibrillation (AF). The purpose of this study was to characterize the prevalence of AF and atrial flutter (AFl) in patients with porphyrias. A single-center retrospective cohort study was designed using data from chart reviews of patients who were admitted to the hospital from January 2000 to June 2008. Fifty-six distinct cases were found with a discharge diagnosis of porphyria including all its subtypes. From the same database, age- and gender-matched controls were identified using computer-generated random numbers. We selected 1 age- and gender-matched control for each case. Electrocardiograms and echocardiograms were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. Only patients with available 12-lead electrocardiograms that showed AF/AFl were labeled with that diagnosis. All patients with a diagnosis of porphyria were included in the study irrespective of their age. Seven of 56 patients with porphyria met inclusion criteria, yielding a prevalence of AF/AFl of 12.5%. This association was significant (p = 0.028, relative risk 7.45, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 66.14) compared with the age- and gender-matched control group (2%). In conclusion, our observations suggest that porphyria may be significantly associated with AF/AFl.

  8. [Successful treatment of atrial fibrillation by resection of a congenital aneurysm of the left heart atrium].

    PubMed

    Heigl, F; Steinbeck, G; Rienmüller, R; Kemkes, B M; Klinner, W

    1992-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurred in a 27-year-old patient with a history of globular cardiac enlargement since childhood. Because of the probable causal relationship between the preexisting heart disease-which was supposed to be an enlargement of the left atrium-and the rhythm disturbance, we recommended a surgical intervention. Cardiac surgery revealed a congenital aneurysm of the left atrial appendage which could be resected without any complication. Postoperatively, atrial fibrillation had returned to regular sinus rhythm. The bad prognosis with a high risk of systemic embolism is the reason why early cardiac surgery should be performed after diagnosis of this rare anomaly (20 reported cases) of the left atrium.

  9. Obstructive membrane at the base of the left atrial appendage, a multi-imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Chejtman, Demián; Failo, Matías; Richarte Rueda, Valeria; Logarzo, Emilio; Barja, Luis; Benticuaga, Alejandro; Ayerdi, Maria Laura; Turri, Domingo; Baratta, Sergio; Aguirre, Pablo; Hita, Alejandro

    2015-05-01

    The left atrial appendage (LAA) is a small muscular extension that grows from the anterolateral wall of the left atrium, in the proximity of the left pulmonary veins. The presence of a membrane in the LAA is a rare clinical entity whose origin is not known. Its clinical implication in the genesis of atrial arrhythmias and thromboembolic risk remains unknown. We report a case of an obstructive membrane located at the base of the LAA, found incidentally in a young patient who was initially undergoing a transesophageal echocardiogram prior to an invasive treatment for atrial fibrillation.

  10. Three-dimensional electroanatomic entrainment map in atypical atrial flutter late after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roten, Laurent; Tanner, Hildegard; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Delacrétaz, Etienne

    2010-02-01

    Atrial flutter in the donor part of orthotopic heart transplants has been reported and successfully treated by radiofrequency ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus, but mapping and ablation of atypical flutter circuits may be challenging.(1) Entrainment mapping has been used in combination with activation mapping to define the mechanism of atypical atrial flutter. Here, we report a case where colour-coded three-dimensional (3D) entrainment mapping allowed us to accurately determine and visualize the 3D location of the reentrant circuit and to plan the ablation of a left atrial flutter without the need for activation mapping.

  11. Ethanol Infusion in the Vein of Marshall in a Patient with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jah Yeon; Park, Eun Jin; Kim, Hee Dong; Park, Sung Hun; Song, Ji Young; Lee, Dae In; Shim, Jaemin

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 64-year-old male with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) terminated by ethanol infusion into vein of Marshall as add-on therapy. Three-dimensional automated complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) during AF revealed clustering of CFAE at perimitral isthmus (PMI) and its unipolar mapping showed rotor-like activation, which was suggested to be critical in the perpetuation of AF. AF was organized to atrial tachycardia (AT) by 100% ethanol infusion in the vein of Marshall. Adjunctive radiofrequency ablation at PMI successfully terminated AT and led to bidirectional block of PMI. PMID:26413111

  12. [Panic disorder and atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Olazabal Eizaguirre, N; Chavez, R; González-Torres, M A; Gaviria, M

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the relationship between atrial fibrillation and panic disorder. There are often doubts on the differential diagnosis in emergency services and general medical settings. Panic disorder prevalence rates have been found to be high in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. Various studies have observed that patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders frequently have higher cardiovascular disease rates compared to the general population. Usually, patients suffering from panic disorder exhibit somatic complaints suggesting coronary disease, such as chest pain or palpitations. The aim is to make the correct diagnosis and treatment for these different illnesses, and to decrease the costs due to misdiagnosis.

  13. Depression in Atrial Fibrillation in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Sandra; Wiltink, Jörg; Wild, Philipp S.; Sinning, Christoph R.; Lubos, Edith; Ojeda, Francisco M.; Zeller, Tanja; Munzel, Thomas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Beutel, Manfred E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Initial evidence suggests that depressive symptoms are more frequent in patients with atrial fibrillation. Data from the general population are limited. Methods and Results In 10,000 individuals (mean age 56±11 years, 49.4% women) of the population-based Gutenberg Health Study we assessed depression by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and a history of depression in relation to manifest atrial fibrillation (n = 309 cases). The median (25th/75th percentile) PHQ-9 score of depressive symptoms was 4 (2/6) in atrial fibrillation individuals versus 3 (2/6) individuals without atrial fibrillation, . Multivariable regression analyses of the severity of depressive symptoms in relation to atrial fibrillation in cardiovascular risk factor adjusted models revealed a relation of PHQ-9 values and atrial fibrillation (odds ratio (OR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–1.08; P = 0.023). The association was stronger for the somatic symptom dimension of depression (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.15; P = 0.0085) than for cognitive symptoms (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.98–1.11; P = 0.15). Results did not change markedly after additional adjustment for heart failure, partnership status or the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein. Both, self-reported physical health status, very good/good versus fair/bad, (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.41–0.70; P<0.001) and mental health status (OR 0.61 (0.46–0.82); P = 0.0012) were associated with atrial fibrillation in multivariable-adjusted models. Conclusions In a population-based sample we observed a higher burden of depressive symptoms driven by somatic symptom dimensions in individuals with atrial fibrillation. Depression was associated with a worse perception of physical or mental health status. Whether screening and treatment of depressive symptoms modulates disease progression and outcome needs to be shown. PMID:24324579

  14. Laser Atrial Septostomy: An Engineering Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shachar, Giora; Cohen, Mark H.; Riemenschneider, Thomas A.; Beder, Stanley D.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reproducible method for atrial septostomy in live animals, which would be independent of both atrial septal thickness and left atrial size. Seven mongrel dogs monitored electrocardiographically were anesthetized and instrumented with systemic and pulmonary arterial lines. A modified Mullin's transseptal sheath was advanced under fluoroscopic control to interrogate the left atrium and atrial septum. A 400 micron regular quartz or a laser heated metallic tip fiber was passed through the sheath up to the atrial septum. Lasing of the atrial septum was done with an Argon laser at power output of 5 watts. In three dogs, an atrial septosomy catheter was passed to the left atrium through the laser atrial septostomy and balloon atrial septostomy was performed. The laser atrial septostomy measured 3 x 5 mm in diameter. This interatrial communication could be enlarged with a balloon septostomy to over one cm in diameter. Hemodynamic and electrocardiographic monitoring were stable during the procedure. Engineering problems included: 1) radioluscency of the laser fibers thus preventing fluoroscopic localization of the fiber course; and 2) the inability to increase lateral vaporization of the atrial septum. It is concluded that further changes in the lasing fibers need to be made before the method can be considered for clinical use.

  15. Catapult launch-associated cardioversion of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bohnker, B K; Feeks, E F; McEwen, G

    1993-10-01

    A patient is presented with new-onset atrial fibrillation. While being air-evacuated, he cardioverted during the acceleration associated with aircraft carrier catapult launch. This case suggests a possible myocardial response to the kinetic energy produced by the acceleration force, similar to the electrical energy commonly used for cardioversion. Cardioversion using acceleration forces is probably not a clinically useful modality; however, this case demonstrates the importance of acceleration forces on patients during medical evacuation from aircraft carriers.

  16. Partial left pericardial defect with herniation of the left atrial appendage

    PubMed Central

    Pernot, C.; Hoeffel, J C.; Henry, M.; Frisch, R.; Brauer, B.

    1972-01-01

    A case is reported of herniation of the left atrial appendage through a partial pericardial defect, probably congenital. The diagnosis was suggested by the history of chest pain and bulging of the middle segment of the left heart border on the plain chest film, without other signs. Angiography revealed a dilated left atrial appendage. An artificial left pneumothorax confirmed the presence of a pleuropericardial defect. The surgical procedure included excision of the appendage and closure of the defect. Images PMID:5034603

  17. Facts about Atrial Septal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental Disabilities) be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image. Close × Atrial Septal Defect The images are ... Developmental Disabilities) be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image. Close Information For... ... Makers Language: English ...

  18. Is the pulse in atrial fibrillation irregularly irregular?

    PubMed Central

    Rawles, J M; Rowland, E

    1986-01-01

    The belief that there is total irregularity of the pulse in atrial fibrillation has been re-examined. In a computerised analysis of R-R intervals and pulse volumes, 100-500 (mean 237) consecutive cycles were examined in 74 patients with atrial fibrillation, of whom 36 were on digoxin and 38 were not taking any antiarrhythmic treatment. A Doppler ultrasound technique was used to assess pulse volumes, against which R-R intervals were correlated. Although the sequence of consecutive R-R intervals was random in 52 (70%), patients there was a significant correlation between consecutive intervals in 22 (30%), the correlation coefficient being negative in 11 and positive in 11. In 43 (58%) cases the sequence of consecutive pulse volumes was significantly non-random; 34 (46%) showed pulsus alternans, indicated by a negative correlation between consecutive volumes. The proportion of patients with a non-random sequence of R-R intervals or pulse volumes was the same whether or not they were taking digoxin. Thus patients with atrial fibrillation often have patterns of regularity of the pulse, with the ventricular rhythm being non-random in almost one third and the sequence of pulse volumes being non-random in over a half. Contrary to classic teaching, in many patients with atrial fibrillation the pulse is not irregularly irregular. PMID:3730206

  19. Left atrial metastases of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma diagnosed by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging--case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Eduardo Gehling; Severo, Mateus Dornelles; Scheffel, Rafael Selbach; Foppa, Murilo; de Azevedo, Mirela Jobim; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2012-02-01

    Intracardiac metastases of thyroid carcinoma are a rare event. Their incidence is low in large autopsy series, and antemortem diagnosis is even less common. We present the case of a woman with advanced poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma who had extensive intracardiac metastases. This case highlights the usefulness of echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cardiac metastases.

  20. [Atrial fibrillation and cognitive function].

    PubMed

    Duron, Emmanuelle; Hanon, Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), which prevalence increases with age, is a growing public health problem and a well known risk factor for stroke. On the other hand, dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly, and with aging of the population in developed countries, the number of demented patients will increase in absence of prevention. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity and metabolic syndrome, hypercholesterolemia) have been found, with various degree of evidence, to be associated with vascular dementia but also, surprisingly, with Alzheimer's disease. This review is devoted to the links between atrial fibrillation, cognitive decline and dementia. Globally, transversal studies showed a significant association between atrial fibrillation, cognitive decline and dementia. However, these studies are particularly sensitive to various biases. In this context, recent longitudinal studies of higher level of evidence have been conducted to assess the link between AF and dementia. One study disclosed a high incidence of dementia among patients suffering from atrial fibrillation during a 4.6 years follow-up. Similarly another study showed that atrial fibrillation was significantly associated with conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia during a 3 years follow-up. Nevertheless two other longitudinal studies did not find any significant association between AF and dementia, but this discrepancy should be interpreted taking into account that the comparability of all these studies is moderate because they were using different methodologies (population, cognitive testing, and mean follow-up). Possible explanatory mechanisms for the association between AF and the risk of dementia are proposed, such as thrombo-embolic ischemic damage and cerebral hypo perfusion due to fluctuations in the cardiac output. Thus, there is some evidence that FA could be associated with cognitive decline and dementia but this

  1. Atrial pacing at multiple sites in the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Denes, P; Wyndham, C R; Amat-y-Leon, F; Wu, D; Dhingra, R C; Miller, R H; Rosen, K M

    1977-01-01

    Atrial pacing at multiple sites was used in an attempt to predict the site of pre-excitation in 5 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with 5 different anomalous pathway locations (right anterior, right posterior, septal, left posterior, and left lateral). At least 3 atrial pacing sites were tested in each patient. Pacing sites tested included high right atrium, low lateral right atrium, low septal right atrium, proximal coronary sinus, and distal coronary sinus. Atrial stimulation sites with shortest and longest stimulus-delta intervals could be identified in each patient, the shortest stimulus-delta interval in each case ranging from 60 to 80 ms. The difference between the shortest and longest stimulus-delta interval in each case ranged from 60 to 110 ms. It was suggested that the site with the shortest stimulus-delta interval corresponded to a site close to the atrial insertion of the anomalous pathway. This hypothesis was confirmed in all cases (3 with epicardial mapping and 2 with retrograde atrial activation data). In conclusion, atrial pacing at multiple sites is helpful in predicting the site of anterogradely conducting anomalous pathways, and appears particularly useful for differentiation of right posterior, left posterior, and septal pre-excitation. Images PMID:861093

  2. Genome comparison of a nonpathogenic myxoma virus field strain with its ancestor, the virulent Lausanne strain.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Ramírez, Miguel A; Cano, María J; Párraga, Mario; Castilla, Joaquín; Pérez-Ordoyo, Luis I; Torres, Juan M; Bárcena, Juan

    2009-03-01

    One of the best-studied examples of host-virus coevolution is the release of myxoma virus (MV) for biological control of European rabbits in Australia and Europe. To investigate the genetic basis of MV adaptation to its new host, we sequenced the genome of 6918, an attenuated Spanish field strain, and compared it with that of Lausanne, the strain originally released in Europe in 1952. Although isolated 43 years apart, the genomes were highly conserved (99.95% identical). Only 32 of the 159 MV predicted proteins revealed amino acid changes. Four genes (M009L, M036L, M135R, and M148R) in 6918 were disrupted by frameshift mutations.

  3. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Uptake in Intramuscular Myxoma Imitates Prostate Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja; Hjulskov, Sonja H; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-03-31

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is becoming the most promising imaging modality for detecting recurrent prostate cancer. The modality has the advantage of being able to detect recurrent disease, even at very low prostate-specific antigen levels. However, several studies report Ga-PSMA uptake in tissue unrelated to prostate cancer. We present a 74-year-old man who underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT for recurrent prostate cancer 5 years after radical prostatectomy. The Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed an intramuscular lesion with increased PSMA uptake in the left vastus medialis muscle. The lesion was surgically removed, and histopathology found it to be an intramuscular myxoma that showed immunohistochemical PSMA expression.

  4. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1 - low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2 - the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3 - knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  5. In vitro permissivity of bovine cells for wild-type and vaccinal myxoma virus strains.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Béatrice; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Allemandou, Aude; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Foucras, Gilles; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2007-09-27

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a leporide-specific poxvirus, represents an attractive candidate for the generation of safe, non-replicative vaccine vector for non-host species. However, there is very little information concerning infection of non-laboratory animals species cells with MYXV. In this study, we investigated interactions between bovine cells and respectively a wild type strain (T1) and a vaccinal strain (SG33) of MYXV. We showed that bovine KOP-R, BT and MDBK cell lines do not support MYXV production. Electron microscopy observations of BT-infected cells revealed the low efficiency of viral entry and the production of defective virions. In addition, infection of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) occurred at a very low level, even following non-specific activation, and was always abortive. We did not observe significant differences between the wild type strain and the vaccinal strain of MYXV, indicating that SG33 could be used for new bovine vaccination strategies.

  6. Myxoma virus expressing interleukin-15 fails to cause lethal myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Reinhard, Mary; Roy, Edward; MacNeill, Amy; McFadden, Grant

    2009-06-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus pathogenic only for European rabbits, but its permissiveness in human cancer cells gives it potential as an oncolytic virus. A recombinant MYXV expressing both the tdTomato red fluorescent protein and interleukin-15 (IL-15) (vMyx-IL-15-tdTr) was constructed. Cells infected with vMyx-IL-15-tdTr secreted bioactive IL-15 and had in vitro replication kinetics similar to that of wild-type MYXV. To determine the safety of this virus for future oncolytic studies, we tested its pathogenesis in European rabbits. In vivo, vMyx-IL-15-tdTr no longer causes lethal myxomatosis. Thus, ectopic IL-15 functions as an antiviral cytokine in vivo, and vMyx-IL-15-tdTr is a safe candidate for animal studies of oncolytic virotherapy.

  7. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1--low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2--the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3--knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  8. Production of Myxoma virus gateway entry and expression libraries and validation of viral protein expression.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Sherin E; Rahman, Masmudur M; Werden, Steven J; Martino, Maria Fernanda; McFadden, Grant

    2011-05-01

    Invitrogen's Gateway technology is a recombination-based cloning method that allows for rapid transfer of numerous open reading frames (ORFs) into multiple plasmid vectors, making it useful for diverse high-throughput applications. Gateway technology has been utilized to create an ORF library for Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family of DNA viruses. MYXV is the prototype virus for the genus Leporipoxvirus, and is pathogenic only in European rabbits. MYXV replicates exclusively in the host cell cytoplasm, and its genome encodes 171 ORFs. A number of these ORFs encode proteins that interfere with or modulate host defense mechanisms, particularly the inflammatory responses. Furthermore, MYXV is able to productively infect a variety of human cancer cell lines and is being developed as an oncolytic virus for treating human cancers. MYXV is therefore an excellent model for studying poxvirus biology, pathogenesis, and host tropism, and a good candidate for ORFeome development.

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of myxoma virus as a new viral vector for small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Béatrice; Boullier, Séverine; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bozzetti, Marjorie; Russo, Pierre; Foulon, Eliane; Meyer, Gilles; Delverdier, Maxence; Foucras, Gilles; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2008-06-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a leporide-specific poxvirus, represents an attractive candidate for the generation of safe and non-replicative vaccine vectors for other species. With the aim of developing new recombinant vaccines for ruminants, we evaluated the safety and the immunogenicity of recombinant MYXV in sheep. In vitro studies indicated that ovine primary fibroblasts were not permissive for MYXV and that infection of ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells occurred at a low rate. Although non-specific activation significantly improved the susceptibility of lymphocytes, MYXV infection remained abortive. Histological and immunohistochemical examination at the inoculation sites revealed the development of an inflammatory process and allowed the detection of sparse infected cells in the dermis. In addition, inoculated sheep developed an antibody response directed against MYXV and the product of the transgene. Overall, these results provide the first line of evidence on the potential of MYXV as a viral vector for ruminants.

  10. Horizontal Transmissible Protection against Myxomatosis and Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease by Using a Recombinant Myxoma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Juan; Morales, Mónica; Vázquez, Belén; Boga, José A.; Parra, Francisco; Lucientes, Javier; Pagès-Manté, Albert; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José M.; Blasco, Rafael; Torres, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for immunization of wild rabbit populations against myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) that uses recombinant viruses based on a naturally attenuated field strain of myxoma virus (MV). The recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV major capsid protein (VP60) including a linear epitope tag from the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) nucleoprotein. Following inoculation, the recombinant viruses induced specific antibody responses against MV, RHDV, and the TGEV tag. Immunization of wild rabbits by the subcutaneous and oral routes conferred protection against virulent RHDV and MV challenges. The recombinant viruses showed a limited horizontal transmission capacity, either by direct contact or in a flea-mediated process, promoting immunization of contact uninoculated animals. PMID:10627521

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (AF) usually causes the heart's lower ... pain Dizziness or fainting Fatigue (tiredness) Confusion Atrial Fibrillation Complications AF has two major complications— stroke and ...

  12. Intraventricular injection of myxoma virus results in transient expression of viral protein in mouse brain ependymal and subventricular cells.

    PubMed

    France, Megan R; Thomas, Diana L; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; MacNeill, Amy L; Roy, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses that selectively infect and lyse cancer cells have potential as therapeutic agents. Myxoma virus, a poxvirus that is known to be pathogenic only in rabbits, has not been reported to infect normal tissues in humans or mice. We observed that when recombinant virus was injected directly into the lateral ventricle of the mouse brain, virally encoded red fluorescent protein was expressed in ependymal and subventricular cells. Cells were positive for nestin, a marker of neural stem cells. Rapamycin increased the number of cells expressing the virally encoded protein. However, protein expression was transient. Cells expressing the virally encoded protein did not undergo apoptosis and the ependymal lining remained intact. Myxoma virus appears to be safe when injected into the brain despite the transient expression of virally derived protein in a small population of periventricular cells.

  13. Present treatment options for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lairikyengbam, S; Anderson, M; Davies, A

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It accounts for >35% of all hospital admissions for cardiac arrhythmias in the United States. The presence of atrial fibrillation increases the mortality of a population by up to twofold. The risk of stroke increases from 1.5% in patients with atrial fibrillation from 50–59 years of age to up to 23.5% for such patients aged 80–89 years. Although the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is usually straightforward, effective treatment is not. This article will discuss how rhythm control of atrial fibrillation can best be achieved, the controversy over the rhythm versus rate control, the maintenance of sinus rhythm with antiarrhythmic drugs after cardioversion, and prevention of thromboembolism. Finally, the recent advances in various non-pharmacological approaches for the treatment of atrial fibrillation will be highlighted. PMID:12612318

  14. Fifty-Year Trends in Atrial Fibrillation Prevalence, Incidence, Risk Factors, and Mortality in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Renate B.; Yin, Xiaoyan; PhilimonGona; Larson, Martin G.; Beiser, Alexa S.; McManus, David D.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Lubitz, Steven A.; Magnani, Jared W.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; SudhaSeshadri; Wolf, Philip A; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Comprehensive long-term data on atrial fibrillation trends in men and women are scant. Methods We investigated trends in atrial fibrillation incidence, prevalence, and risk factors, and in stroke and mortality following its onset in Framingham Heart Study participants (n=9511) from 1958 to 2007. To accommodate sex differences in atrial fibrillation risk factors and disease manifestations, sex-stratified analyses were performed. Findings During 50 years of observation (202,417 person-years), there were 1,544 new-onset atrial fibrillation cases (46.8% women). We observed about a fourfold increase in the age-adjusted prevalence and more than a tripling in age-adjusted incidence of atrial fibrillation (prevalence 20.4 versus 96.2 per 1000 person-years in men; 13.7 versus 49.4 in women; incidence rates in first versus last decade 3.7 versus 13.4 per 1000 person-years in men; 2.5 versus 8.6 in women, ptrend<0.0001). For atrial fibrillation diagnosed by ECG during routine Framingham examinations, age-adjusted prevalence increased (12.6versus 25.7 per 1000 person-years in men; 8.1 versus 11.8 in women, ptrend<0.0001). The age-adjusted incidence increased, but did not achieve statistical significance. Although the prevalence of most risk factors changed over time, their associated hazards for atrial fibrillation changed little. Multivariable-adjusted proportional hazards models revealed a 73.5% decline in stroke and a 25.4% decline in mortality following atrial fibrillation onset (ptrend=0.0001, ptrend=0.003, respectively). Interpretation Our data suggest that observed trends of increased incidence of atrial fibrillation in the community were partially due to enhanced surveillance. Stroke occurrence and mortality following atrial fibrillation onset declined over the decades, and prevalence increased approximately fourfold. The hazards for atrial fibrillation risk factors remained fairly constant. Our data indicate a need for measures to enhance early

  15. Atrial septal defect of the persistent ostium primum type with hypoplastic right ventricle in a Welsh pony foal.

    PubMed Central

    Physick-Sheard, P W; Maxie, M G; Palmer, N C; Gaul, C

    1985-01-01

    Valvular competency of the foramen ovale (patent foramen ovale) is regarded as a common finding in the neonatal foal and usually occurs in isolation. True atrial septal defects appear to be uncommon and are usually associated with other congenital cardiac lesions. The present report describes a case of atrial septal defect type 1 (persistent ostium primum) complicated by hypoplastic right ventricle, and tricuspid dysplasia, in a Welsh Mountain pony foal, and discusses the embryogenesis of the abnormality. A critical review of the literature suggests that atrial septal defects may occur more frequently than they are reported, and that on occasion they may be described erroneously as patent foramen ovale. The clinical significance of uncomplicated discontinuity of the atrial septum is slight, depending upon the size and location of the defect. Complicated atrial septal defects vary in clinical significance according to the nature of the associated defects. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:4075243

  16. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation: new oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure].

    PubMed

    Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Bode, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Thrombo-embolic prophylaxis is a key element within the therapy of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter. Besides new oral anticoagulants the concept of left atrial appendage occlusion has approved to be a good alternative option, especially in patients with increased risk of bleeding.

  17. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J.; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years prior to the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the pre-clinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is one component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. While thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention. PMID:26216085

  18. Case report and literature review: surgical treatment of a right atrial metastatic melanoma from a previously resected "advanced" primary site with regional lymph nodes involvement.

    PubMed

    Parissis, Haralabos; Al-Alao, Bassel Suffian; Young, Vincent K

    2012-10-01

    Although melanoma of the right atrium is a rare cardiac tumor, melanoma in general has a high propensity to involve the heart. Unfortunately, however, when the tumor is involving the heart, widespread metastasis ensues and hence surgery becomes a questionable option. We report a case of a young female who presented with an advanced skin primary melanoma and regional lymph node involvement and a metastasis into the right atrium. Postoperatively tumor dissemination was controlled with adjuvant chemotherapy. A vigorous attempt aiming at tumor clearance followed by adjuvant multimodality therapy along with a tumor surveillance program may improve survival even in advanced cases.

  19. Coccidian and nematode infections influence prevalence of antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bertó-Moran, Alejandro; Pacios, Isabel; Serrano, Emmanuel; Moreno, Sacramento; Rouco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The interaction among several parasites in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is crucial to host fitness and to the epidemiology of myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease. These diseases have caused significant reductions in rabbit populations on the Iberian Peninsula. Most studies have focused on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these viruses individually, and little is known about interactions between these viruses and other parasites. Taking advantage of an experimental restocking program in Spain, the effects of coccidian and nematode infections on the probability of having detectable antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses were tested in European wild rabbits. For 14 mo, we monitored rabbit abundance and parasite loads (coccidia and nematodes) in three reintroduced rabbit populations. While coccidian and nematode loads explained seasonal antibody prevalences to myxoma virus, the pattern was less clear for rabbit hemorrhagic disease. Contrary to expectations, prevalence of antibody to myxoma virus was inversely proportional to coccidian load, while nematode load seemed to play a minor role. These results have implications for viral disease epidemiology and for disease management intended to increase rabbit populations in areas where they are important for ecosystem conservation.

  20. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  1. Almanac 2015: atrial fibrillation research in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jawad-Ul-Qamar, Muhammad; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to attract interest in the cardiovascular community and in Heart. Over 60 original research and review papers published in Heart in 2014–2015 cover various aspects of atrial fibrillation, from associated conditions and precipitating factors to new approaches to management. Here, we provide an overview of articles on atrial fibrillation published in Heart in 2014–2015, highlighting new developments, emerging concepts and novel approaches to treatment. PMID:26791994

  2. [Spontaneous hematoma of the atrial wall].

    PubMed

    Iglesias López, A; Rodríguez Pan, A; Pazos Silva, V

    2014-01-01

    The clinical signs of heart masses tend to be nonspecific, generally depending more on their repercussions on heart function caused by their location rather than on their type. Imaging techniques make it possible to limit the differential diagnosis of heart masses based on their location, morphology, and characteristics of echogenicity, density, or intensity, depending on the technique used to study them. We present the case of a woman with squeezing mid chest pain irradiating to her shoulder and positive cardiac markers in whom a left atrial mass was identified at echocardiography. This finding was confirmed at chest CT. The signs at chest CT were compatible with a mural hematoma and this diagnosis was confirmed after intraoperative biopsy.

  3. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Devices

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Perez, Irving E; Krumerman, Andrew; Garcia, Mario J; Lucariello, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk for thromboembolic stroke five-fold. The left atrial appendage (LAA) has been shown to be the main source of thrombus formation in the majority of strokes associated with AF. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin and novel anticoagulants remains the standard of care; however, it has several limitations, including bleeding and poor compliance. Occlusion of the LAA has been shown to be an alternative therapeutic approach to drug therapy. The purpose of this article is to review the different techniques and devices that have emerged for the purpose of occluding this structure, with a particular emphasis on the efficacy and safety studies published to date in the medical literature. PMID:24963274

  4. Imaging of thrombi and assessment of left atrial appendage function: a prospective study comparing transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Omran, H; Jung, W; Rabahieh, R; Wirtz, P; Becher, H; Illien, S; Schimpf, R; Luderitz, B

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To compare the value of current transthoracic echocardiographic systems and transoesophageal echocardiography for assessing left atrial appendage function and imaging thrombi.
Design—Single blind prospective study. Patients were first investigated by transthoracic echocardiography and thereafter by a second investigator using transoesophageal echocardiography. The feasibility of imaging the left atrial appendage, recording its velocities, and identifying thrombi within the appendage were determined by both methods.
Patients—117 consecutive patients with a stroke or transient neurological deficit.
Setting—Tertiary cardiac and neurological care centre.
Results—Imaging of the complete appendage was feasible in 75% of the patients by transthoracic echocardiography and in 95% by transoesophageal echocardiography. Both methods were concordant for the detection of thrombi in 10 cases. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed two additional thrombi. In one of these patients, transthoracic echocardiography was not feasible and in the other the thrombus had been missed by transthoracic examination. In patients with adequate transthoracic echogenicity, the specificity and sensitivity of detecting left atrial appendage thrombi were 100% and 91%, respectively. Recording of left atrial appendage velocities by transthoracic echocardiography was feasible in 69% of cases. None of the patients with a velocity > 0.3 m/s had left atrial appendage thrombi. In the one patient in whom transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation missed a left atrial appendage thrombus, the peak emptying velocity of the left atrial appendage was 0.25 m/s.
Conclusions—A new generation echocardiographic system allows for the transthoracic detection of left atrial appendage thrombi and accurate determination of left atrial appendage function in most patients with a neurological deficit.

 Keywords: echocardiography; left atrial appendage thrombi; stroke; thromboembolism

  5. Assessment of atrial electromechanical interval using echocardiography after catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Minglong; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Bing; Ju, Weizhu; Zhang, Fengxiang; Cao, Kejiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We sought to investigate variation of atrial electromechanical interval after catheter ablation procedure in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation using pulse Doppler (PW) and pulse tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI). A total of 25 consecutive in-patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, who restored sinus rhythm after ablation procedure, were recruited in our cardiac center. Echocardiography was performed on each patient at 2 hours, 1 day, 5 days, 1 month and 3 months after the ablation therapy, and atrial electromechanical delay was measured simultaneously by PW and PW-TDI. There was no significant difference between PW and TDI in measuring atrial electromechanical delay. However, at postoperative 2 hours, peak A detection rates were mathematically but nonsignificantly greater by PW-TDI than by PW. Second, there was a significant decreasing trend in atrial electromechanical interval from postoperative 2 hours to 3 months, but only postoperative 2-hour atrial electromechanical interval was significantly greater than atrial electromechanical interval at other time. Lastly, patients without postoperative 2-hour atrial electromechanical interval had a significantly longer duration of atrial fibrillation as compared to those with postoperative 2-hour atrial electromechanical interval, by the PW or by PW-TDI, respectively. In patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, atrial electromechanical interval may decrease significantly within the first 24 hours after ablation but remain consistent later, and was significantly related to patients’ duration of atrial fibrillation. Atrial electromechanical interval, as a potential predicted factor, is recommended to be measured by either PW or TDI after 24 hours, when patients had recovered sinus rhythm by radiofrequency ablation. PMID:27924066

  6. Myxoma virus attenuates expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) which has implications for the treatment of proteasome inhibitor–resistant multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Katherine M; Bartee, Mee Y; Bartee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of chemotherapeutic proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib, has improved the outcomes of patients suffering from the plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma. Unfortunately, many patients treated with these drugs still suffer relapsing disease due to treatment-induced upregulation of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl1. We have recently demonstrated that an oncolytic poxvirus, known as myxoma, can rapidly eliminate primary myeloma cells by inducing cellular apoptosis. The efficacy of myxoma treatment on proteasome inhibitor–relapsed or –refractory myeloma, however, remains unknown. We now demonstrate that myxoma-based elimination of myeloma is not affected by cellular resistance to proteasome inhibitors. Additionally, myxoma virus infection specifically prevents expression of Mcl1 following induction of the unfolded protein response, by blocking translation of the unfolded protein response activating transcription factor (ATF)4. These results suggest that myxoma-based oncolytic therapy represents an attractive option for myeloma patients whose disease is refractory to chemotherapeutic proteasome inhibitors due to upregulation of Mcl1. PMID:27512665

  7. Lipomatous Hypertrophy of the Atrial Septum in a Patient Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Michael; Agaimy, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lipomatous hypertrophy of the atrial septum (LHAS) is a rare entity characterized by mass-forming deposition of fatty tissue within the atrial septum. To date, <300 cases have been reported; many of them were autopsy findings. The clinical presentation of LHAS varies from incidental asymptomatic mass (most frequent form) to severe life-threatening cardiovascular complications necessitating emergency cardiac surgery. Case Presentation. Here, we present the successful surgical resection of such a massive LHAS which was found incidentally on preoperative investigation of a 71-year-old patient with progressive coronary heart disease. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of lipomatous hypertrophy of the atrial septum. Conclusions. The described case report illustrates an unusual example of LHAS in a patient undergoing a planned coronary artery bypass surgery. In this case, surgical intervention was justified to avoid later outflow obstructions. PMID:28078155

  8. Dynamics of AV coupling during human atrial fibrillation: role of atrial rate.

    PubMed

    Masè, M; Marini, M; Disertori, M; Ravelli, F

    2015-07-01

    The causal relationship between atrial and ventricular activities during human atrial fibrillation (AF) is poorly understood. This study analyzed the effects of an increase in atrial rate on the link between atrial and ventricular activities during AF. Atrial and ventricular time series were determined in 14 patients during the spontaneous acceleration of the atrial rhythm at AF onset. The dynamic relationship between atrial and ventricular activities was quantified in terms of atrioventricular (AV) coupling by AV synchrogram analysis. The technique identified n:m coupling patterns (n atrial beats in m ventricular cycles), quantifying their percentage, maximal length, and conduction ratio (= m/n). Simulations with a difference-equation AV model were performed to correlate the observed dynamics to specific atrial/nodal properties. The atrial rate increase significantly affected AV coupling and ventricular response during AF. The shortening of atrial intervals from 185 ± 32 to 165 ± 24 ms (P < 0.001) determined transitions toward AV patterns with progressively decreasing m/n ratios (from conduction ratio = 0.34 ± 0.09 to 0.29 ± 0.08, P < 0.01), lower occurrence (from percentage of coupled beats = 27.1 ± 8.0 to 21.8 ± 6.9%, P < 0.05), and higher instability (from maximal length = 3.9 ± 1.5 to 2.8 ± 0.7 s, P < 0.01). Advanced levels of AV block and coupling instability at higher atrial rates were associated with increased ventricular interval variability (from 123 ± 52 to 133 ± 55 ms, P < 0.05). AV pattern transitions and coupling instability in patients were predicted, assuming the filtering of high-rate irregular atrial beats by the slow recovery of nodal excitability. These results support the role of atrial rate in determining AV coupling and ventricular response and may have implications for rate control in AF.

  9. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  10. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Ramos Cuadra, José Angel; Lara Toral, Juan; Lozano Cabezas, Cristobal; Fernández Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery.

  11. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Cuadra, José Ángel Ramos; Toral, Juan Lara; Cabezas, Cristobal Lozano; Guerrero, Juan Carlos Fernández

    2008-01-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery. PMID:18401474

  12. A novel and simple atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Kofidis, Theo; Lee, Chuen Neng

    2011-05-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac operations require specialized equipment. Atrial retractors are a frequently used tool to expose heart valves for minimally invasive and open procedures. The models currently available in the market are efficient; however, they may be complex, bulky, or expensive. We introduce a novel, very simple atrial retractor we designed using ubiquitously available materials.

  13. Who Is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects millions of people, and the number is rising. Men are more ... conditions. It may act as a trigger in people who have other AF risk factors. Genetic factors also may play a role in causing AF. However, their role ... SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT ...

  14. Cor triatriatum sinistrum: presentation of syncope and atrial tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Avari, Malcolm; Nair, Sunil; Kozlowska, Zofia; Nashef, Samer

    2017-02-14

    We present a rather unusual cause for syncope associated with atrial tachycardia. A man aged 39 years presented with an episode of syncope and narrow complex tachycardia. Further investigations, including transoesophageal echocardiography, identified cor triatriatum sinistrum (CTS), a rare congenital abnormality characterised by the atrium being divided by a fibrous membrane. Although it is rare, there has been an increase in diagnosis due to developments in diagnostic imaging techniques. Symptoms are related to the size of fenestrations within the fibrous membrane. Presenting symptoms can mimic those seen in mitral stenosis. It is a condition that can occur in isolation, but it can also be associated with other cardiac abnormalities such as an atrial septal defect (ASD) (as in this case). Surgery is the definitive treatment (this man had surgical repair of CTS and closure of ASD) and should be considered at any age if there are any associated symptoms or complications.

  15. [Prevention of brain infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    The patients with cardioembolic stroke sometimes suffer from severe neurological deficit and from recurrent strokes. Since atrial fibrillation, especially non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is associated with over half of the cardioembolic strokes, the prevention of cardioembolic stroke in patients with NVAF is important. There have been some reports about how to prevent stroke. They have indicated that the best medication for preventing from stroke was anticoagulation by warfarin. Therefore, the guidelines recommended the patients with NVAF to take warfarin. In case with the older patients under 70 years, prothrombin international normalized ratio (PT-INR) should be kept from 2.0 to 3.0. On the other hand, if the patients with NVAF are over 70 years, PT-INR has to be controlled from 1.6 to 2.6. Before extraction of a tooth, anticoagulation should not be call off.

  16. Aortic root and left atrial wall motion. An echocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, G; Layton, C

    1977-01-01

    The echocardiographically recorded movement of the aortic root was studied by analysing the relation between posterior aortic wall motion and other intracardiac events. The systolic anterior movement of the aortic root continued beyond aortic valve closure and in cases with mitral regurgitation began significantly earlier than in normal subjects. The diastolic rapid posterior movement began after mitral valve opening but did not occur in patients with mitral stenosis. The total amplitude of aortic root motion was increased in patients with mitral regurgitation, diminished in cases of mitral stenosis, and was normal with aortic regurgitation. In patients with atrioventricular block an abrupt posterior movement followed the P wave of the electrocardiogram irrespective of its timing in diastole. These observations correlate with the expected changes in left atrial volume during the cardiac cycle both in the normal subjects and patients with heart disease. The results support the hypothesis that phasic changes in left atrial dimension are largely responsible for the echocardiographically observed movement of the aortic root and indicate a potential role for echocardiography in the analysis of left atrial events. Images PMID:911559

  17. Is there a synergic effect of propafenone associated with atrial overdrive pacing for atrial arrhythmia prevention? A randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Garrigue, S; Barold, S; Cazeau, S; Hocini, M; Jais, P; Haissaguerre, M; Clementy, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the effect of adding propafenone to atrial overdrive for the prevention of atrial arrhythmia episodes in patients with DDD pacemakers.
DESIGN—22 patients (8 female, 14 male, mean (SD) age 67 (9) years, range 48 to 77) with DDD pacemakers and frequent paroxysmal atrial arrhythmia episodes were evaluated in a randomised crossover study.
SETTING—University hospital.
METHODS—Atrial overdrive was defined as a paced rate of 10 paced beats/min above the mean ventricular rate stored for the last 24 hours in the pacemaker memory function. The protocol consisted of two phases of one month each. The first phase consisted of atrial overdrive alone, while in the second phase, propafenone (600 mg/day) was added to atrial overdrive (atrial overdrive + propafenone). All 22 patients underwent the two phases in random order.
RESULTS—Mean ventricular rate was 72 (8) beats/min with atrial overdrive v 73 (6) with atrial overdrive + propafenone (NS). With atrial overdrive, 14 patients (64.6%) had no recorded atrial arrhythmia v 15 (68.2%) with atrial overdrive + propafenone (NS). There was no statistical difference between the atrial overdrive and atrial overdrive + propafenone phases with regard to the number of atrial arrhythmia episodes (14 (27) v 13 (28)), their total duration (30 (78) v 29 (63) h), and their maximum duration (41 (72) v 31 (58) min). However, in the brady-tachy subgroup with persistent atrial arrhythmias, atrial overdrive + propafenone produced a shorter mean cumulative duration of atrial arrhythmia than atrial overdrive (104 (115) v 178 (149) h, p = 0.04), with a significant decrease in the number of atrial arrhythmia episodes (134 (98) v 102 (83), p = 0.05). The proportion of asymptomatic atrial arrhythmia episodes increased only in the AV block group during atrial overdrive + propafenone (p = 0.03). Three patients had atrial arrhythmias during atrial overdrive + propafenone but not

  18. Endovascular Repair of Supra-Celiac and Abdominal Aortic Pseudo Aneurysms Concomitant with a Right Atrial Mass in a Patient with Behçet’s Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Shirzad, Mahmood; Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Shahrzad, Maryam; Molavi, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Behcet’s disease is a rare immune mediated systemic vasculitis which besides it’s more frequent involvement of eyes and skin, sometimes present with aortic pseudo aneurysm and more rarely cardiac inflammatory masses.A 51-year-old patient with Behçet’s Disease presented with two symptomatic aortic pseudoaneurysms concomitant with a right atrial mass. Computed tomography (CT) revealed one supra-celiac and another infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysms. Echocardiography showed a large mobile mass in the right atrium. Both pseudoaneurysms were successfully excluded simultaneously via endovascular approach with Zenith stent-grafts, and the atrial mass was surgically removed 10 days later. Post-implant CT showed successful exclusion of both pseudo-aneurysms, patency of all relevant arteries, and patient is now asymptomatic and has returned to normal lifestyle. Multiple pseudoaneurysms concomitant with a right atrial mass can be an initial manifestation of Behçet’s disease. Endovascular repair can be a good treatment option for the pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25870643

  19. Spontaneous normal sinus rhythm conversion using integrative medicine in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Wendy S; Fyfe-Johnson, Amber L; Baechler, Courtney J; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2012-05-01

    The relationship between acute life stress and the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been noted in the literature. However, the use of integrative medicine (IM) in restoring cardiac rhythm has not been adequately studied. This case report describes how an IM approach was used in a patient with atrial fibrillation and acute pain. Spontaneous cardioversion to normal sinus rhythm occurred during the IM session, in addition to marked decreases in self-reported pain, anxiety, and nausea at the conclusion of IM treatment. These results provide initial support that for some cases of AF, IM therapies can help to reduce costs via avoidance of additional hospitalization, electrocardioversion, and general anesthesia.

  20. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further.

  1. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the immune response of the patient to the virus infection limits the utility of the therapy, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using nonspecific pharmacologic inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumors, and robust monocyte, T-, and NK cell infiltration 3 days after MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumor-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumor-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of cyclophosphamide-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multifaceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with cyclophosphamide-mediated lymphoablation.

  2. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy.

  3. Myxoma virus virotherapy for glioma in immunocompetent animal models: optimizing administration routes and synergy with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Lun, XueQing; Alain, Tommy; Zemp, Franz J; Zhou, Hongyuan; Rahman, Masmudur M; Hamilton, Mark G; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-01-15

    Oncolytic myxoma virus (MYXV) is being developed as a novel virotherapeutic against human brain cancer and has promising activity against human brain tumor models in immunocompromised hosts. Because an intact immune system could reduce its efficacy, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncolytic potential of MYXV in immunocompetent racine glioma models. Here, we report that MYXV infects and kills all racine cell glioma lines and that its effects are enhanced by rapamycin. Intratumoral administration of MYXV with rapamycin improved viral replication in the tumor and significantly prolonged host survival. Similarly, coadministration via a method of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) enhanced viral replication and efficacy in vivo. Mechanisms by which rapamycin improved MYXV oncolysis included an inhibition of type I IFN production in vitro and a reduction of intratumoral infiltration of CD68(+) microglia/macrophages and CD163(+) macrophages in vivo. Our findings define a method to improve MYXV efficacy against gliomas by rapamycin coadministration, which acts to promote immune responses engaged by viral delivery.

  4. Inhibition of macrophage activation by the myxoma virus M141 protein (vCD200).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leiliang; Stanford, Marianne; Liu, Jia; Barrett, Catherine; Jiang, Lei; Barclay, A Neil; McFadden, Grant

    2009-09-01

    The M141 protein of myxoma virus (MYXV) is a viral CD200 homolog (also called vOX-2) that inhibits macrophage activation in infected rabbits. Here, we show that murine myeloid RAW 264.7 cells became activated when infected with MYXV in which the M141 gene was deleted (vMyx-M141KO) but not with the parental wild-type MYXV. Moreover, transcript and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were rapidly upregulated in an NF-kappaB-dependent fashion in the RAW 264.7 cells infected with vMyx-M141KO. M141 protein is present in the virion and counteracts this NF-kappaB activation pathway upon infection with the wild-type MYXV. Our data suggest that upregulation of these classic macrophage-related proinflammatory cytokine markers following infection of myeloid cells with the M141-knockout MYXV is mediated via the rapid activation of the cellular NF-kappaB pathway.

  5. The current status and future directions of myxoma virus, a master in immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Spiesschaert, Bart; McFadden, Grant; Hermans, Katleen; Nauwynck, Hans; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2011-06-09

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) gained importance throughout the twentieth century because of the use of the highly virulent Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS) by the Australian government in the attempt to control the feral Australian population of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) and the subsequent illegal release of MYXV in Europe. In the European rabbit, MYXV causes a disease with an exceedingly high mortality rate, named myxomatosis, which is passively transmitted by biting arthropod vectors. MYXV still has a great impact on European rabbit populations around the world. In contrast, only a single cutaneous lesion, restricted to the point of inoculation, is seen in its natural long-term host, the South-American Sylvilagus brasiliensis and the North-American S. Bachmani. Apart from being detrimental for European rabbits, however, MYXV has also become of interest in human medicine in the last two decades for two reasons. Firstly, due to the strong immune suppressing effects of certain MYXV proteins, several secreted virus-encoded immunomodulators (e.g. Serp-1) are being developed to treat systemic inflammatory syndromes such as cardiovascular disease in humans. Secondly, due to the inherent ability of MYXV to infect a broad spectrum of human cancer cells, the live virus is also being developed as an oncolytic virotherapeutic to treat human cancer. In this review, an update will be given on the current status of MYXV in rabbits as well as its potential in human medicine in the twenty-first century.

  6. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Masmudur M.; Madlambayan, Gerard J.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been extensively used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo “purging” strategy with oncolytic myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy. PMID:20211576

  7. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  8. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens.

  9. Wilms' Tumor With Intra-Atrial Extension: Treatment and Management.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Anna; Augustyn, Cyprian; Stankowski, Tomasz; Walek, Ewa; Kowalski, Jan P; Koltowski, Piotr; Cichon, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Wilms' tumor is the most common renal cancer in children. It can grow for a long time without any characteristic symptoms, causing only fever, abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting, which is the reason why it is often discovered accidentally. In 1% to 4% of the cases, nephroblastoma leads to complications in the form of intravascular and intra-atrial extension. We present a case of a five-year-old boy with Wilms' tumor extending into the inferior vena cava, right atrium, and then prolapsing through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle.

  10. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  11. Simultaneous Removal of Right Lung Hydatid Cyst and Repair of Atrial Septal Defect in a Single Session.

    PubMed

    Tong, Guang; Lin, Xi; Ma, Tao; Wang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is the larval stage of echinococcosis caused by the canine tapeworm Echinococcus species, and the lung is the most common site of occurrence. Atrial septal defect is a common congenital heart disease with an incidence of 100 per 100,000 live births. To our knowledge, we report for the first time a case of coexistence of right lung hydatid cyst and atrial septal defect that were both treated with one-stage surgery.

  12. Acceleration of ventricular rate by amiodarone in atrial fibrillation associated with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheinman, Bryan D; Evans, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Amiodarone has proved to be a valuable drug in atrial fibrillation associated with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. When it was administered to a patient with this syndrome in atrial fibrillation, who had previously suffered an inferior myocardial infarction, the ventricular rate accelerated from 170 to 230 beats/minute. This unusual case emphasises the need for full electrophysiological assessment of patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome for whom amiodarone treatment is being considered. Imagesp1000-a PMID:6812745

  13. Q-I/IIA-OS formula for predicting left atrial pressure in mitral stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Yiğitbaşi, Ömer; Nalbantgil, İstemi; Birand, Ahmet; Terek, Ahmet

    1970-01-01

    The relation of the phonocardiographic time intervals (Q-I) and (IIA-OS) and the use of two formulas (Q-I, IIA-OS difference versus their ratio) for estimation of left atrial pressure were investigated in 70 cases of pure mitral stenosis. It was noted that, in cases with normal blood pressure and pluse rate, there was a fair correlation of the two intervals to left atrial pressure. In our studies the best correlation was obtained by using the ratio of these two intervals (Q-I)/(IIA-OS). These results indicate that it is possible to use a new formula and equation that are dependable for phonocardiographic evaluation of left atrial pressure. PMID:5433316

  14. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect Complicated by Eisenmenger Syndrome and the Role of Vasodilator Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatworn, Amornpol; Bendaly, Edgard; Prescott-Focht, Julia A.; Clark, Richard; Jonsson, Orvar

    2016-01-01

    Sinus venosus atrial septal defect is a rare congenital, interatrial communication defect at the junction of the right atrium and the vena cava. It accounts for 5–10% of cases of all atrial septal defects. Due to the rare prevalence and anatomical complexity, diagnosing sinus venous atrial septal defects poses clinical challenges which may delay diagnosis and treatment. Advanced cardiac imaging studies are useful tools to diagnose this clinical entity and to delineate the anatomy and any associated communications. Surgical correction of the anomaly is the primary treatment. We discuss a 43-year-old Hispanic female patient who presented with dyspnea and hypoxia following a laparoscopic myomectomy. She had been diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy nine years ago at another hospital. Transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomographic angiography of the chest confirmed a diagnosis of sinus venosus atrial septal defect. She was also found to have pulmonary arterial hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome. During a hemodynamic study, she responded to vasodilator and she was treated with Ambrisentan and Tadalafil. After six months, her symptoms improved and her pulmonary arterial hypertension decreased. We also observed progressive reversal of the right-to-left shunt. This case illustrates the potential benefit of vasodilator therapy in reversing Eisenmenger physiology, which may lead to surgical repair of the atrial septal defect as the primary treatment. PMID:27974976

  15. Risk of Atrial Fibrillation or Flutter Associated with Periodontitis: A Nationwide, Population-Based, Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter in patients with periodontitis (PD) in comparison with individuals without PD. Methods We used the 1999–2010 Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database to identify cases of PD in the year 2000 matching (1:1) with persons without PD during 1999–2000 according to sex and individual age as the control group. Using Cox proportional regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders, including age, sex, and comorbidities at baseline, and average annual number of ambulatory visits and dental scaling frequency during the follow-up period, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to examine the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in PD patients in comparison with the control group. Subgroup analyses according to age, gender, or comorbidities were conducted to study the robustness of the association and investigate possible interaction effects. Results We enrolled 393,745 patients with PD and 393,745 non-PD individuals. The incidence rates of atrial fibrillation or flutter were 200 per 105 years among the PD group and 181 per 105 years in the non-PD group (incidence rate ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06–1.14). After adjusting for potential confounders, we found an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in the PD group compared with the non-PD group (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.25–1.36). The greater risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in the PD group remained significant across all disease subgroups except hyperthyroidism and sleep apnea. Conclusion The present study results indicate an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in patients with PD. Lack of individual information about alcohol consumption, obesity, and tobacco use was a major limitation. PMID:27798703

  16. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-09-03

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiac impedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50-300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz - 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  17. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiacimpedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50–300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz − 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  18. Atrial fibrillation in elderly: particularities of management.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Ioana Dana; Bucur, Ionela Mirela; Rusu, R I; Ungureanu, G

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), a common and serious cardiac rhythm disturbance, is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality in the population. Currently about 2.3 million people in the US are diagnosed with AF and, based of the US census, this number is expected to rise to 5.6 million by 2050. It doubles in prevalence with each decade of age, reaching almost 9% at age 80-89 years. It has increased in prevalence over the calendar decades, reaching 'epidemic' proportions. The risk of stroke increases from 1.5% in patients with atrial fibrillation from 50-59 years of age to up to 23.5% for such patients aged 80-89 years. Although the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is usually straightforward, effective treatment is not. We aimed to discuss how rhythm control of atrial fibrillation can best be achieved in elderly patients, the controversy over the rhythm versus rate control, and prevention of thromboembolism.

  19. Atrial conduction delay predicts atrial fibrillation in paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia patients after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Xin; Rong, Bing; Zhu, Qing; Zheng, Zhaotong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could predict atrial fibrillation (AF) for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) patients after successful treatment by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Echocardiography examination was performed on 524 consecutive PSVT patients (15 patients were excluded). Left atrial dimension, right atrial diameter and intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were measured before ablation. Patients were divided into group A (n = 32): occurrence of AF after the ablation and group B (n = 477): remained in sinus rhythm during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to estimate the predictive value of intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay. Both intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were higher in group A than in group B (4.79 ± 0.30 msec vs. 4.56 ± 0.32 msec; 21.98 ± 1.32 msec vs. 20.01 ± 1.33; p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that intra- and inter-atrial conduction were significant influential factors for the occurrence of AF (odds ratio [OR] = 13.577, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.469-48.914; OR = 2.569, 95% CI, 1.909-3.459, p < 0.05). The ROC cure analysis revealed that intra-atrial conduction delay ≥ 4.45 msec and inter-atrial conduction delay ≥ 20.65 were the most optimal cut-off value for predicting AF in PSVT patients after RFCA. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could effectively predict AF in post-ablation PSVT patients.

  20. Presence of accessory left atrial appendage/diverticula in a population with atrial fibrillation compared with those in sinus rhythm: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Troupis, John; Crossett, Marcus; Scneider-Kolsky, Michal; Nandurkar, Dee

    2012-02-01

    Accessory left atrial appendages and atrial diverticula have an incidence of 10-27%. Their association with atrial fibrillation needs to be confirmed. This study determined the prevalence, number, size, location and morphology of accessory left atrial appendages/atrial diverticula in patients with atrial fibrillation compared with those in sinus rhythm. A retrospective analysis of 47 consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation who underwent 320 multidetector Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) was performed. A random group of 47 CCTA patients with sinus rhythm formed the control group. The presence, number, size, location and morphology of accessory left atrial appendages and atrial diverticula in each group were analysed. Twenty one patients had a total of 25 accessory left atrial appendages and atrial diverticula in the atrial fibrillation group and 22 patients had a total of 24 accessory left atrial appendages and atrial diverticula in the sinus rhythm group. Twenty-one atrial diverticula were identified in 19 patients in the atrial fibrillation group and 19 atrial diverticula in 17 patients in the sinus rhythm group. The mean length and width of accessory left atrial appendage was 6.9 and 4.7 mm, respectively in the atrial fibrillation group and 12 and 4.6 mm, respectively, in the sinus rhythm group, P = ns (not significant). The mean length and width of atrial diverticulum was 4.7 and 3.6 mm, respectively in the atrial fibrillation group and 6.2 and 5 mm, respectively in the sinus rhythm group (P = ns). Eighty-four % and 96% of the accessory left atrial appendages/atrial diverticula in the atrial fibrillation and sinus rhythm groups were located along the right anterosuperior left atrial wall. Accessory left atrial appendages and atrial diverticula are common structures with similar prevalence in patients with atrial fibrillation and sinus rhythm.

  1. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation - an update].

    PubMed

    Antz, Matthias; Hullmann, Bettina; Neufert, Christian; Vocke, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    The correct anticoagulation regimen for prevention of thromboembolic events is essential in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, only a minority of patients receives anticoagulation according to the guidelines. The current guidelines are intended to make the indication for anticoagulation more simple and are summarized in the present article. This includes recommendations for chronic anticoagulation, prevention of thromboembolic events after cardioversion and in ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  2. Arterial embolism in thyrotoxicosis with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Staffurth, J S; Gibberd, M C; Fui, S N

    1977-01-01

    In 262 patients with thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation there were 26 episodes of arterial embolism (17 cerebral and nine elsewhere) in 21 patients. Twelve incidents occurred with active thyrotoxicosis, three on reversion to sinus rhythm, and 11 after the patients were euthyroid. This important complication is more common than is realised, and most patients should be put on prophylactic anticoagulants when first seen with atrial fibrillation. PMID:902055

  3. Atrial fibrillation cardioversion following acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Dario; Čerkez-Habek, Jasna; Barić, Hrvoje; Gradišer, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and it is an independent risk for serious events. Acupuncture has been growing in popularity in the West, and there are reports of its benefits in treating AF. We report a 57-year-old man who was admitted after having an allergic reaction to amiodarone administered to treat paroxysmal AF with fast ventricular response. Cardioversion with intravenous propafenone was uneventful. Before an attempt of electric cardioversion, he was treated with acupuncture as additional therapy to peroral propafenone. After acupuncture treatment consisting of 10 treatments during 30 days period, both immediate cardioversion to sinus rhythm and no paroxysmal AF during 30 days period were recorded. PMID:26593171

  4. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  5. Antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation: new insights.

    PubMed

    Le Heuzey, J Y

    2012-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation are quickly increasing, mainly due to the ageing of the population. Atrial fibrillation is, to date, a problem of public health. Atrial fibrillation is associated to a five-fold risk of stroke, which may be identified by score risks, such as CHADS(2) score. The classical antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation is based on vitamin K antagonists. Trials made in the 90's have clearly shown that vitamin K antagonists were able to decrease stroke risk by about 60%. New oral anticoagulants are now available on the market to treat patients with atrial fibrillation. These drugs are dabigatran which has demonstrated an interest in the RE-LY trial. Two doses may be prescribed, 110 mg bid and 150 mg bid. Anti Xa have also demonstrated an interest : rivaroxaban in the ROCKET AF trial and apixaban in the AVERROES (versus aspirin) and ARISTOTLE trials. In the future these drugs will have a major place in the armamentarium used to treat patients with atrial fibrillation. In all these trials a decrease in intra cranial haemorrhages has been demonstrated. In the everyday practice it will be necessary to be very cautious in patients with impaired renal function, as all these drugs are eliminated by kidneys.

  6. [No Hodgkin Linfoma diagnosis with intra-atrial infiltration].

    PubMed

    Alcocer Gamba, Marco Antonio; León González, Salvador; Castro Montes, Eliodoro; Loarca Piña, Luis Martín; Lugo Gavidia, Leslie Marisol; García Hernández, Enrique; González Galindo, Ulises; Paredes Serrano, Miguel Isaías

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare entities in clinical practice, with an incidence of 0.05%. Approximately 75% are benign and 25% malignant. Among these, Lymphomas are uncommon, representing about 0.25%. The non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in extranodal tissues in 20% of the cases and 80% of these non-Hodgkin lymphomas are composed of diffuse B cells. The extranodal presentation is most frequent in young adults, with a high degree of malignancy and rapid growth. It can present with primary infiltration of various organs; cardiac involvement occurs in 20 to 28% of cases, usually located in the right chambers and with nonspecific symptoms, depending on the location and extent of the tumor. The diagnostic test in these cases is undoubtedly the biopsy of the lymph node or the affected tissue. We present the case of non-Hodgkin disease of diffuse large cells, with right intra-atrial involvement in a 23-year-old-female patient, who presented with progressive dyspnea. A transesophageal echocardiography was performed and an intra-atrial tumor mass was detected. A biopsy was performed, by femoral venous catheterization, allowing the establishment of the histopathological diagnosis and treatment. At a one year follow up, the patient shows complete remission.

  7. Treating brain tumor–initiating cells using a combination of myxoma virus and rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Zhou, Hongyuan; Maxwell, Lori; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John J.P.; Stechishin, Owen; Luchman, Artee; Weiss, Samuel; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Hamilton, Mark G.; Rabinovich, Brian A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Smallwood, Sherin; Senger, Donna L.; Bell, John; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) poses a significant barrier to therapy in certain subpopulation such as the tumor-initiating cell population, being shown to be refractory to conventional therapies. Oncolytic virotherapy has the potential to target multiple compartments within the tumor and thus circumvent some of the barriers facing conventional therapies. In this study, we investigate the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus (MYXV) alone and in combination with rapamycin in vitro and in vivo using human brain tumor–initiating cells (BTICs). Methods We cultured fresh GBM specimens as neurospheres and assayed their growth characteristics in vivo. We then tested the susceptibility of BTICs to MYXV infection with or without rapamycin in vitro and assessed viral biodistribution/survival in vivo in orthotopic xenografts. Results The cultured neurospheres were found to retain stem cell markers in vivo, and they closely resembled human infiltrative GBM. In this study we determined that (i) all patient-derived BTICs tested, including those resistant to temozolomide, were susceptible to MYXV replication and killing in vitro; (ii) MYXV replicated within BTICs in vivo, and intratumoral administration of MYXV significantly prolonged survival of BTIC-bearing mice; (iii) combination therapy with MYXV and rapamycin improved antitumor activity, even in mice bearing “advanced” BTIC tumors; (iv) MYXV treatment decreased expression of stem cell markers in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Our study suggests that MYXV in combination with rapamycin infects and kills both the BTICs and the differentiated compartments of GBM and may be an effective treatment even in TMZ-resistant patients. PMID:23585629

  8. Myxoma virus therapy for human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kinn, Veronica G; Hilgenberg, Valerie A; MacNeill, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a devastating tumor of young people that is difficult to cure. To determine if oncolytic virus therapy can improve outcomes in individuals with RMS, myxoma virus expressing a red fluorescent protein (MYXV-red) was evaluated for antitumoral effects using a murine model of RMS. Fluorescent protein was expressed in four RMS cell lines inoculated with MYXV-red, indicating that these cells were semipermissive to MYXV infection. MYXV-red replication and cytopathic effects were further evaluated using human embryonal RMS (CCL-136) cells. Logarithmic growth of MYXV-red and significant cell death were observed 72 hours after inoculation with MYXV. The oncolytic effects of MYXV-red were then studied in nude mice that were injected subcutaneously with CCL-136 cells to establish RMS xenografts. Once tumors measured 5 mm in diameter, mice were treated with multiple intratumoral injections of MXYV-red or saline. The average final tumor volume and rate of tumor growth were significantly decreased, and median survival time was significantly increased in MYXV-red-treated mice (P-values =0.0416, 0.0037, and 0.0004, respectively). Histologic sections of MYXV-red-treated tumors showed increased inflammation compared to saline-treated tumors (P-value =0.0002). In conclusion, MXYV-red treatment of RMS tumors was successful in individual mice as it resulted in decreased tumor burden in eight of eleven mice with nearly complete tumor remission in five of eleven mice. These data hold promise that MYXV-red treatment may be beneficial for people suffering from RMS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of RMS tumors using an oncolytic poxvirus.

  9. A whole-genome RNA interference screen for human cell factors affecting myxoma virus replication.

    PubMed

    Teferi, Wondimagegnehu M; Dodd, Kristopher; Maranchuk, Rob; Favis, Nicole; Evans, David H

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) provides an important model for investigating host-pathogen interactions. Recent studies have also highlighted how mutations in transformed human cells can expand the host range of this rabbit virus. Although virus growth depends upon interactions between virus and host proteins, the nature of these interactions is poorly understood. To address this matter, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens for genes affecting MYXV growth in human MDA-MB-231 cells. By using siRNAs targeting the whole human genome (21,585 genes), a subset of human phosphatases and kinases (986 genes), and also a custom siRNA library targeting selected statistically significant genes ("hits") and nonsignificant genes ("nonhits") of the whole human genome screens (88 genes), we identified 711 siRNA pools that promoted MYXV growth and 333 that were inhibitory. Another 32 siRNA pools (mostly targeting the proteasome) were toxic. The overall overlap in the results was about 25% for the hits and 75% for the nonhits. These pro- and antiviral genes can be clustered into pathways and related groups, including well-established inflammatory and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, as well as clusters relating to β-catenin and the Wnt signaling cascade, the cell cycle, and cellular metabolism. The validity of a subset of these hits was independently confirmed. For example, treating cells with siRNAs that might stabilize cells in G(1), or inhibit passage into S phase, stimulated MYXV growth, and these effects were reproduced by trapping cells at the G(1)/S boundary with an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6. By using 2-deoxy-D-glucose and plasmids carrying the gene for phosphofructokinase, we also confirmed that infection is favored by aerobic glycolytic metabolism. These studies provide insights into how the growth state and structure of cells affect MYXV growth and how these factors might be manipulated to advantage in oncolytic virus therapy.

  10. Modulation of the Myxoma Virus Plaque Phenotype by Vaccinia Virus Protein F11

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) produces large plaques consisting of a rapidly expanding ring of infected cells surrounding a lytic core, whereas myxoma virus (MYXV) produces small plaques that resemble a focus of transformed cells. This is odd, because bioinformatics suggests that MYXV carries homologs of nearly all of the genes regulating Orthopoxvirus attachment, entry, and exit. So why does MYXV produce foci? One notable difference is that MYXV-infected cells produce few of the actin microfilaments that promote VACV exit and spread. This suggested that although MYXV carries homologs of the required genes (A33R, A34R, A36R, and B5R), they are dysfunctional. To test this, we produced MYXV recombinants expressing these genes, but we could not enhance actin projectile formation even in cells expressing all four VACV proteins. Another notable difference between these viruses is that MYXV lacks a homolog of the F11L gene. F11 inhibits the RhoA-mDia signaling that maintains the integrity of the cortical actin layer. We constructed an MYXV strain encoding F11L and observed that, unlike wild-type MYXV, the recombinant virus disrupted actin stress fibers and produced plaques up to 4-fold larger than those of controls, and these plaques expanded ∼6-fold faster. These viruses also grew to higher titers in multistep growth conditions, produced higher levels of actin projectiles, and promoted infected cell movement, although neither process was to the extent of that observed in VACV-infected cells. Thus, one reason for why MYXV produces small plaques is that it cannot spread via actin filaments, although the reason for this deficiency remains obscure. A second reason is that leporipoxviruses lack vaccinia's capacity to disrupt cortical actin. PMID:22514354

  11. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  12. Histological evaluation of intratumoral myxoma virus treatment in an immunocompetent mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Rosalinda A; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Roy, Edward J; MacNeill, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Two recombinant myxoma viruses (MYXV expressing a fluorescent protein [MYXV-Tred] and MYXV-Tred encoding murine interleukin-15 [MYXV-IL15]) were evaluated for therapeutic effects in an aggressive B16F10 melanoma model in immunocompetent mice. It was hypothesized that continuous expression of IL-15 within a tumor would recruit cytotoxic effector cells to induce an antitumor immune response and improve treatment efficacy. Weekly intratumoral injections were given to evaluate the effect of treatment on the median survival time of C57BL/6 mice bearing established B16F10 melanomas. Mice that received MYXV-Tred or MYXV-IL15 lived significantly longer than mice given treatment controls. Unexpectedly, the median survival time of MYXV-IL15-treated mice was similar to that of MYXV-treated mice. At 1, 2, and 4 days postinoculation, viral plaque assays detected replicating MYXV-Tred and MYXV-IL15 within treated tumors. At these time points in MYXV-IL15-treated tumors, IL-15 concentration, lymphocyte grades, and cluster of differentiation-3+ cell counts were significantly increased when compared to other treatment groups. However, viral titers, recombinant protein expression, and lymphocyte numbers within the tumors diminished rapidly at 7 days postinoculation. These data indicate that treatment with recombinant MYXV should be repeated at least every 4 days to maintain recombinant protein expression within a murine tumor. Additionally, neutrophilic inflammation was significantly increased in MYXV-Tred- and MYXV-IL15-treated tumors at early time points. It is speculated that neutrophilic inflammation induced by intratumoral replication of recombinant MXYV contributes to the antitumoral effect of MYXV treatment in this melanoma model. These findings support the inclusion of neutrophil chemotaxins in recombinant poxvirus oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:25866742

  13. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the patient's immune response to the virus infection limits the therapy's utility, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using non-specific pharmacological inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumours, and robust monocyte, T and NK cell infiltration 3 days following MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumour-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumour-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of CPA-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multi-faceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with CPA-mediated lymphoablation. PMID:25336188

  14. Modulation of the myxoma virus plaque phenotype by vaccinia virus protein F11.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Evans, David H

    2012-07-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) produces large plaques consisting of a rapidly expanding ring of infected cells surrounding a lytic core, whereas myxoma virus (MYXV) produces small plaques that resemble a focus of transformed cells. This is odd, because bioinformatics suggests that MYXV carries homologs of nearly all of the genes regulating Orthopoxvirus attachment, entry, and exit. So why does MYXV produce foci? One notable difference is that MYXV-infected cells produce few of the actin microfilaments that promote VACV exit and spread. This suggested that although MYXV carries homologs of the required genes (A33R, A34R, A36R, and B5R), they are dysfunctional. To test this, we produced MYXV recombinants expressing these genes, but we could not enhance actin projectile formation even in cells expressing all four VACV proteins. Another notable difference between these viruses is that MYXV lacks a homolog of the F11L gene. F11 inhibits the RhoA-mDia signaling that maintains the integrity of the cortical actin layer. We constructed an MYXV strain encoding F11L and observed that, unlike wild-type MYXV, the recombinant virus disrupted actin stress fibers and produced plaques up to 4-fold larger than those of controls, and these plaques expanded ∼6-fold faster. These viruses also grew to higher titers in multistep growth conditions, produced higher levels of actin projectiles, and promoted infected cell movement, although neither process was to the extent of that observed in VACV-infected cells. Thus, one reason for why MYXV produces small plaques is that it cannot spread via actin filaments, although the reason for this deficiency remains obscure. A second reason is that leporipoxviruses lack vaccinia's capacity to disrupt cortical actin.

  15. Myxoma Virus Infection Promotes NK Lysis of Malignant Gliomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mcfadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas. PMID:23762498

  16. Histological evaluation of intratumoral myxoma virus treatment in an immunocompetent mouse model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Doty, Rosalinda A; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Roy, Edward J; MacNeill, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Two recombinant myxoma viruses (MYXV expressing a fluorescent protein [MYXV-Tred] and MYXV-Tred encoding murine interleukin-15 [MYXV-IL15]) were evaluated for therapeutic effects in an aggressive B16F10 melanoma model in immunocompetent mice. It was hypothesized that continuous expression of IL-15 within a tumor would recruit cytotoxic effector cells to induce an antitumor immune response and improve treatment efficacy. Weekly intratumoral injections were given to evaluate the effect of treatment on the median survival time of C57BL/6 mice bearing established B16F10 melanomas. Mice that received MYXV-Tred or MYXV-IL15 lived significantly longer than mice given treatment controls. Unexpectedly, the median survival time of MYXV-IL15-treated mice was similar to that of MYXV-treated mice. At 1, 2, and 4 days postinoculation, viral plaque assays detected replicating MYXV-Tred and MYXV-IL15 within treated tumors. At these time points in MYXV-IL15-treated tumors, IL-15 concentration, lymphocyte grades, and cluster of differentiation-3+ cell counts were significantly increased when compared to other treatment groups. However, viral titers, recombinant protein expression, and lymphocyte numbers within the tumors diminished rapidly at 7 days postinoculation. These data indicate that treatment with recombinant MYXV should be repeated at least every 4 days to maintain recombinant protein expression within a murine tumor. Additionally, neutrophilic inflammation was significantly increased in MYXV-Tred- and MYXV-IL15-treated tumors at early time points. It is speculated that neutrophilic inflammation induced by intratumoral replication of recombinant MXYV contributes to the antitumoral effect of MYXV treatment in this melanoma model. These findings support the inclusion of neutrophil chemotaxins in recombinant poxvirus oncolytic virotherapy.

  17. Myxoma Virus Oncolytic Efficiency Can Be Enhanced Through Chemical or Genetic Disruption of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.; Favis, Nicole A.; Agopsowicz, Kate C.; Hitt, Mary M.; Evans, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L+) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies. PMID:24391902

  18. Myxoma virus infection promotes NK lysis of malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas.

  19. Myxoma virus therapy for human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a nude mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kinn, Veronica G; Hilgenberg, Valerie A; MacNeill, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a devastating tumor of young people that is difficult to cure. To determine if oncolytic virus therapy can improve outcomes in individuals with RMS, myxoma virus expressing a red fluorescent protein (MYXV-red) was evaluated for antitumoral effects using a murine model of RMS. Fluorescent protein was expressed in four RMS cell lines inoculated with MYXV-red, indicating that these cells were semipermissive to MYXV infection. MYXV-red replication and cytopathic effects were further evaluated using human embryonal RMS (CCL-136) cells. Logarithmic growth of MYXV-red and significant cell death were observed 72 hours after inoculation with MYXV. The oncolytic effects of MYXV-red were then studied in nude mice that were injected subcutaneously with CCL-136 cells to establish RMS xenografts. Once tumors measured 5 mm in diameter, mice were treated with multiple intratumoral injections of MXYV-red or saline. The average final tumor volume and rate of tumor growth were significantly decreased, and median survival time was significantly increased in MYXV-red-treated mice (P-values =0.0416, 0.0037, and 0.0004, respectively). Histologic sections of MYXV-red-treated tumors showed increased inflammation compared to saline-treated tumors (P-value =0.0002). In conclusion, MXYV-red treatment of RMS tumors was successful in individual mice as it resulted in decreased tumor burden in eight of eleven mice with nearly complete tumor remission in five of eleven mice. These data hold promise that MYXV-red treatment may be beneficial for people suffering from RMS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of RMS tumors using an oncolytic poxvirus. PMID:27579297

  20. Development of rapid preexcited ventricular response to atrial fibrillation in a patient with intermittent preexcitation.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Lee W; Steinberg, Leonard A; Prystowsky, Eric N; Padanilam, Benzy J

    2013-03-01

    Intermittent preexcitation during sinus rhythm is indicative of an accessory pathway at a very low risk for sudden death. We present the case of a 49-year-old man with intermittent preexcitation who subsequently developed rapid atrial fibrillation with a shortest preexcited R-R interval of 230 milliseconds. Electrophysiology study showed intermittent preexcitation at baseline and 1:1 anterograde accessory pathway conduction to 220 milliseconds in the presence of 1 mcg/min isoproterenol infusion. The pathway was successfully ablated at the lateral mitral annulus. Accessory pathways highly sensitive to catecholamines may show intermittent preexcitation at baseline with potential for rapid conduction during atrial fibrillation and sudden death.

  1. Randomised trial of two approaches to screening for atrial fibrillation in UK general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stephen; Mant, David

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a common and treatable cause of stroke that often remains unrecognised. Screening has been suggested but there is very little evidence concerning the uptake of screening in the elderly population at risk, nor of the optimal method of screening in a general practice setting AIM: To compare the uptake and effectiveness of two methods of screening for atrial fibrillation in general practice--systematic nurse-led screening and prompted opportunistic case finding. DESIGN OF STUDY: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Patients aged 65 to 100 years (n = 3,001) from four general practices within the MRC general practice framework. METHOD: Each of the four study practices were selected from one quartile, after ranking all framework practices according to the small area standardised mortality ratio of the geographical area served. Patients were randomised either to nurse-led screening or to prompted opportunistic casefinding. The proportion of patients assessed and the proportion found to have atrial fibrillation were compared. The sensitivity and specificity of clinical assessment of pulse are also reported. RESULTS: Substantially more patients had their pulse assessed through systematic screening by invitation (1,099/1,499 [73%]) than through opportunistic case finding (439/1,502 [29%], difference = 44%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 41% to 47%). Atrial fibrillation was detected in 67 (4.5%) and 19 (1.3%) patients respectively (difference = 3.2%, 95% CI= 2.0 to 4.4). Invitation to nurse-led screening achieved significantly higher assessment rates than case finding in all practices; however, the proportion of patients assessed in the case-finding arm varied markedly between practices (range = 8% to 52%). The number needed to screen to identify one additional patient with atrial fibrillation was 31 (95% CI = 23 to 50). The proportion of screened patients with atrial fibrillation receiving anticoagulation treatment was 25%, although in the

  2. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and clinically reversible cor pulmonale in a horse with complicated recurrent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Hanka, J; van den Hoven, R; Schwarz, B

    2015-01-01

    Cor pulmonale is considered an uncommon complication in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). This case report describes the history, clinical and further examination findings, treatment, progression and outcome of a horse diagnosed with cor pulmonale and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation of 2 days duration due to a severe exacerbation of RAO. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of RAO induced pulmonary hypertension in a horse causing atrial fibrillation. However, even severe cardiac changes due to respiratory dysfunction seem to be largely reversible in horses.

  3. Atrial septal defect repair gone wrong.

    PubMed

    Bloomingdale, Richard; Ashraf, Said; Cardozo, Shaun

    2017-02-01

    Isolated atrial septal defect (ASD) accounts for 13% of congenital heart disorders. The anatomic location, size, and coexistence of other cardiac anomalies determine outcomes of repair. Surgical closure was the first-choice treatment until the 1990s and remains the only treatment for large defects. We describe a case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent surgical repair for an ASD as a child in 1959. She presented with dyspnea to the hospital almost 53 years after the surgery. Diagnostic cardiac imaging revealed interesting anatomy of the repair surgery. Transthoracic echocardiography showed areas of flow signal across the patch consistent with surgical perforation of the patch to reduce symptoms of superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome. Despite intervention, severe dilation of the SVC along with a thrombus is seen. CT angiography of the heart showed the ASD patch occluding the ostium of the SVC instead of patching the ASD. Transesophageal echocardiography showed malpositioned patch allowing the sinus venosus ASD to remain patent.

  4. Astrocyte elevated gene-1 regulates CCL3/CCR5-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via Erk1/2 and Akt signaling in cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Fang, Changcun; Pang, Xinyan

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) has been reported as a key mediator that is involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. However, the mechanisms underlying CCL3/CCR5-AEG-1 pathway-mediated EMT in cardiac myxoma (CM) has not been well featured till now. We used immnohistochemistry and immunoblotting to assess the expression of CCR5 and AEG-1 in 30 cases of CM tissues and cells. Subsequently, cultured CM cells were treated with si-AEG-1 or si-CCR5 and then subjected to in vitro assays. We observed that CCR5 and AEG-1 proteins were highly expressed in CM tissues (73.3 and 76.7%, respectively) and closely correlated with tumor size (>5 cm). Importantly, we validated the expression of AEG-1, p-Erk1/2, p-Akt, vimentin, N-cadherin and MMP2 increased in the CM cell with CCL3 treatment in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. When CM cells were treated with si-CCR5, the expression of AEG-1, p-Erk1/2, p-Akt, vimentin, N-cadherin and MMP2 was downregulated. In addition, when CM cells were treated with si-AEG-1, the expression of p-Erk1/2, p-Akt, vimentin, N-cadherin and MMP2 was also downregulated. Using the cell cycle and proliferation assay, the knockdown of AEG-1 inhibited the entry of G1 into S phase and the proliferation capacity of CM cells. In conclusion, AEG-1 mediates CCL3/CCR5-induced EMT development via both Erk1/2 and Akt signaling pathway in CM patients, which indicates CCL3/CCR5-AEG-1-EMT pathway could be suggested as a useful target to affect the progression of CM.

  5. [Outcome of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in children. Transesophageal study of anterograde permeability of the accessory pathway and of atrial vulnerability].

    PubMed

    Villain, E; Attali, T; Iserin, L; Aggoun, Y; Kachaner, J

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-nine children with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) were evaluated by transoesophageal electrophysiological studies to determine the quality of anterograde-conduction in the accessory pathway and the atrial vulnerability. The study group included 15 neonates, 1 to 30 days old, and 14 children from 5 to 15 years of age; Anterograde conduction through the bundle of Kent was tested by incremental transoesophageal atrial pacing and by the determination of the shortest conducted cycle with preexcited RR waves; bursts of atrial pacing were then used to try to trigger an atrial arrhythmia. In the group of the 15 neonates, 11 had accessory pathways capable of conduction to the ventricules at frequencies > 300/min (stimulation cycle < or = 2.00 ms) but no atrial arrhythmias could be induced. The older children had slower conduction in the accessory pathways with the shortest conducted cycle length > 200 ms in 11/14 cases; on the other hand, atrial fibrillation was easily induced in 4 children, all over 12 years of age. The risk of syncope by rapid conduction of an atrial arrhythmia through the accessory pathway is negligeable in young children, including those on digoxin. This study suggests that this low risk is explained more by the absence of atrial vulnerability than by the electrophysiological properties of the accessory pathways.

  6. Treatment strategy for treating atrial-esophageal fistula: esophageal stenting or surgical repair?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bing; Cen, Xue-Jiang; Qian, Lin-Yan; Pang, Jie; Zou, Hai; Ding, Ya-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atrial-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare severe disease, which may be associated with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF) or intraoperative radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation (IRAAF). Clinical Findings: We reported a case of a 67-year-old man with AEF following RFCA of AF, who treated with esophageal stenting and surgical repair. Outcomes: He was attacked by out-of-control sepsis and infectious shock after surgery and died. Literature review: We analyzed 57 relevant articles about AEF from 2003 to 2015 by searching PubMed database. According literatures, the most common symptoms were fever, rigor, sepsis, and neurologic symptoms. Chest computer tomography (CT) and contrast enhanced CT may be the reliable noninvasive diagnosis methods because of high sensitive for AEF. Conclusion: Make a definition diagnosis in time with early primary surgical repair may save their lives. Conservative treatment or esophageal stenting alone may not be a better choice for AEF patients. PMID:27787367

  7. Effect of exercise on ventricular response to atrial fibrillation in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Crick, J C; Davies, D W; Holt, P; Curry, P V; Sowton, E

    1985-01-01

    Ten patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome underwent cardiac electrophysiological study extended to include the induction of atrial fibrillation at maximum exercise in the upright position. This was performed using a new temporary bipolar lead with a helical active fixation tip for atrial pacing. The highest rate of atrioventricular conduction via the accessory pathway was greater during exercise than at rest in all 10 patients (mean increase 28%). In three cases the resulting ventricular rate exceeded 300 beats/min, but no patient had severe symptoms or ventricular arrhythmias. The exercise induced enhancement of accessory pathway conduction may significantly but unpredictably affect the risk from spontaneous atrial fibrillation especially in patients with coronary artery disease or in those taking antiarrhythmic drugs. The test procedure was sufficiently simple and well tolerated to be included in our routine electrophysiological investigation. PMID:4015920

  8. Sudden fetal death due to dualism of the sino-atrial node.

    PubMed

    Pusiol, Teresa; Roncati, Luca; Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Taddei, Fabrizio; Piscioli, Francesco; Ottaviani, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    First, we report a sudden fetal death at 33(+3)weeks due to sino-atrial node dualism. The female stillborn was delivered by induced labor. The postmortem examination of the cardiac conduction system revealed a dualism of the sino-atrial node, associated with fragmentation of the atrio-ventricular node and His bundle. These abnormalities of the cardiac conduction system represent the morphological substrate for the development of malignant arrhythmias. In particular, the dualism of the sino-atrial node can cause the dissociation of the longitudinal nodal impulse into two distinct ways of different pulse generation, resulting in supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. This observation suggests new avenues of research on the pathogenesis of the sudden unexpected fetal death. Moreover, our findings confirm the need for an accurate postmortem examination, including serial sectioning of the cardiac conduction system, in every case of unexplained fetal death, following standardized autoptic protocols.

  9. Direct transatrial pericardiocentesis for tamponade caused by left atrial perforation after trans-septal puncture.

    PubMed

    Picard, Fabien; Millán, Xavier; de Hemptinne, Quentin; L L'allier, Philippe

    2016-07-07

    Trans-septal puncture is associated with risks of serious complications. We report a case of an obese 52-year-old man with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who underwent preoperative coronary angiography and cardiac catheterisation complicated by left atrial perforation. We describe a direct transatrial pericardiocentesis approach to treating cardiac tamponade.

  10. Left circumflex coronary artery occlusion due to a left atrial appendage closure device

    PubMed Central

    Katona, András; Temesvári, András; Szatmári, András; Forster, Tamás; Fontos, Géza

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure is spreading, and a large number of patients with this procedure have concomitant coronary artery disease. With the presented case it could be concluded that coronary angiography is recommended before LAA closure. PMID:25848378

  11. Atrial Arrhythmias and Scintigraphic “D-shape” Sign in Pulmonary Artery Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando-Castagnetto, Federico; Ricca-Mallada, Roberto; Selios, Valentina; Ferrando, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension significantly changes biventricular anatomy and physiology, frequently evolving to clinical deterioration and right ventricular failure. The case of a woman developing atrial arrhythmias complicating dipyridamole stress in concomitance with scintigraphic “D-shaped” left ventricle is briefly reported. Although rare, our finding may suggest that nonselective vasodilators should be used with caution in this clinical setting. PMID:28217026

  12. Applying non-linear dynamics to atrial appendage flow data to understand and characterize atrial arrhythmia

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Grimm, R.A.; Katz, R.; Thomas, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand and characterize left atrial appendage flow in atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation and flutter are the most common cardiac arrhythmias affecting 15% of the older population. The pulsed Doppler velocity profile data was recorded from the left atrial appendage of patients using transesophageal echocardiography. The data was analyzed using Fourier analysis and nonlinear dynamical tools. Fourier analysis showed that appendage mechanical frequency ({ital f{sub f}}) for patients in sinus rhythm was always lower (around1 Hz) than that in atrial fibrillation (5-8 Hz). Among patients with atrial fibrillation spectral power below {ital f{sub f}} was significantly different suggesting variability within this group of patients. Results that suggested the presence of nonlinear dynamics were: a) the existence of two arbitrary peak frequencies {ital f{sub 1}, f{sub 2}}, and other peak frequencies as linear combinations thereof ({ital mf{sub 1}{+-}nf{sub 2}}), and b) the similarity between the spectrum of patient data and that obtained using the Lorenz equation. Nonlinear analysis tools, including Phase plots and differential radial plots, were also generated from the velocity data using a delay of 10. In the phase plots, some patients displayed a torus-like structure, while others had a more random-like pattern. In the differential radial plots, the first set of patients (with torus-like phase plots) showed fewer values crossing an arbitrary threshold of 10 than did the second set (8 vs. 27 in one typical example). The outcome of cardioversion was different for these two set of patients. Fourier analysis helped to: differentiate between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation, understand the characteristics of the wide range of atrial fibrillation patients, and provide hints that atrial fibrillation could be a nonlinear process. Nonlinear dynamical tools helped to further characterize and sub-classify atrial fibrillation.

  13. Association of genetic variants with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yamase, Yuichiro; Kato, Kimihiko; Horibe, Hideki; Ueyama, Chikara; Fujimaki, Tetsuo; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Arai, Masazumi; Watanabe, Sachiro; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2016-02-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified various genes and loci that confer susceptibility to coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction among Caucasian populations. As myocardial ischemia is an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation, we hypothesized that certain polymorphisms may contribute to the genetic susceptibility to atrial fibrillation through affecting the susceptibility to coronary artery disease. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible association of atrial fibrillation in Japanese individuals with 29 polymorphisms identified as susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction in the meta-analyses of GWASs in Caucasian populations. The study subjects comprised 5,470 Japanese individuals (305 subjects with atrial fibrillation and 5,165 controls). Genotypes for 29 polymorphisms were determined by a method that combines the polymerase chain reaction and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes with suspension array technology. Comparisons of the allele frequencies by the χ(2) test revealed that rs599839 (G→A) of the proline/serine-rich coiled-coil 1 gene (PSRC1, P=0.0084) and rs11556924 (C→T, Arg363His) of the zinc finger, C3HC-type containing 1 gene (ZC3HC1, P=0.0076) were significantly (P<0.01) associated with atrial fibrillation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and the prevalence of smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia revealed that rs599839 (P=0.0043; odds ratio, 1.56; dominant model) and rs11556924 (P=0.0043; odds ratio, 1.93; dominant model) were significantly associated with atrial fibrillation, with the minor G and T alleles, respectively, representing risk factors for this condition. PSRC1 and ZC3HC1 may thus be susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation in Japanese individuals.

  14. Effect of phenylephrine infusion on atrial electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, J. W.; Basta, M.; Fletcher, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of changes in autonomic tone induced by phenylephrine infusion on atrial refractoriness and conduction. DESIGN: Left and right atrial electrophysiological properties were measured before and after a constant phenylephrine infusion designed to increase sinus cycle length by 25%. SUBJECTS: 20 patients, aged 53 (SD 6) years, undergoing electrophysiological study for investigation of idiopathic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (seven patients) or for routine follow up after successful catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (13 patients). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in left and right atrial effective refractory periods, atrial activation times, and frequency of induction of atrial fibrillation. RESULTS: Phenylephrine (mean dose 69 (SD 18) mg/min) increased mean blood pressure by 22 (12) mm Hg (range 7 to 44) and lengthened sinus cycle length by 223 (94) ms (20 to 430). Left atrial effective refractory period lengthened following phenylephrine infusion from 250 (25) to 264 (21) ms (P < 0.001) but there was no significant change in right atrial effective refractory period: 200 (20) v 206 (29), P = 0.11. There was a significant relation between the effect of phenylephrine on sinus cycle length and on right atrial refractoriness (r = 0.6, P = 0.005) with shortening of right atrial refractoriness in patients with the greatest prolongation in sinus cycle length. During phenylephrine infusion, the right atrial stimulus to left atrial activation time at the basic pacing cycle length of 600 ms was unchanged, at 130 (18) v 131 (17) ms, but activation delay with a premature extrastimulus increased: 212 (28) v 227 (38) ms, P = 0.002. Atrial fibrillation was induced by two of 58 refractory period measurements at baseline and by 12 of 61 measurements during phenylephrine infusion (P < 0.01). Phenylephrine increased the difference between left and right atrial refractory periods by 22.8 (19.4) ms in the five patients with induced atrial

  15. Ultrasound guidance for distal insertion of ventriculo-atrial shunt catheters: technical note.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sameer A; McGirt, Matthew; Woodworth, Graeme; Wang, Paul; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2009-04-01

    Ventriculo-atrial (VA) shunts are often used for CSF diversion in situations involving abdominal pathology that preclude the use of ventriculo-peritoneal shunts. Distal (venous) catheters of VA shunts have historically been inserted using a cut-down on the internal jugular vein (IJV). Less invasive placement of atrial catheters may minimize operative times and attenuate post-operative incisional discomfort. We describe a method for atrial catheter placement using ultrasound guidance to visualize the IJV and facilitate percutaneous venous puncture in 17 adult patients (23 total insertions) undergoing treatment for hydrocephalus or pseudotumor cerebri. The IJV and carotid artery were visualized by ultrasound in 23 (100%) cases. Venous penetration and successful atrial catheter placement was achieved on the first attempt in 23 (100%) cases. Pneumothorax, carotid artery puncture or need for venous cut-down occurred in no cases. The utilization of ultrasound guidance for distal VA shunt catheter insertion may increase comfort with this procedure and ultimately decrease complication rate and operative time.

  16. Neonatal atrial flutter after insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marcos Moura; Tavares, Wládia Gislaynne de Sousa; Furtado, Maria Mônica Alencar Araripe; Fontenele, Maria Marcia Farias Trajano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe a case of neonatal atrial flutter after the insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter, reporting the clinical presentation and reviewing the literature on this subject. Case description: A late-preterm newborn, born at 35 weeks of gestational age to a diabetic mother and large for gestational age, with respiratory distress and rule-out sepsis, required an umbilical venous access. After the insertion of the umbilical venous catheter, the patient presented with tachycardia. Chest radiography showed that the catheter was placed in the position that corresponds to the left atrium, and traction was applied. The patient persisted with tachycardia, and an electrocardiogram showed atrial flutter. As the patient was hemodynamically unstable, electric cardioversion was successfully applied. Comments: The association between atrial arrhythmias and misplaced umbilical catheters has been described in the literature, but in this case, it is noteworthy that the patient was an infant born to a diabetic mother, which consists in another risk factor for heart arrhythmias. Isolated atrial flutter is a rare tachyarrhythmia in the neonatal period and its identification is essential to establish early treatment and prevent systemic complications and even death. PMID:26525686

  17. Echocardiographic evaluation of patent foramen ovale and atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Hari, Pawan; Pai, Ramdas G; Varadarajan, Padmini

    2015-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common variant present in up to 25% of the population. Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a direct communication between the 2 atrial chambers, of which the ostium secundum variety is the most common. This manuscript is an in depth review of the complex atrial septation, the diagnosis of PFO and ASD and its clinical and therapeutic implications.

  18. [Atrial defibrillators or implantable atrioverters. Initial results].

    PubMed

    Lévy, S; Taramasco, V; Corbelli, J L; Mistretta, R; Dolla, E; Ricard, P

    1998-07-01

    The atrial defibrillator is a new non-pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) for restoration of sinus rhythm. This device has two programmable modes: automatic or activated by the physician or patient. In the automatic mode, the device delivers a shock synchronous with the R wave to restore sinus rhythm when AF is detected. Two patients with paroxysmal AF resistant to pharmacological therapy were included in a study to assess the efficacy and safety of the atrial defibrillator in the mode activated by the physician. The device implanted in the pectoral region is connected to 3 electrodes, two for atrial defibrillation and sensing positioned in the coronary sinus and right atrium respectively and a sensing and pacing electrode in the right ventricle. The right ventricle is paced if a post-shock pause is detected. It is possible to interrogate the device with a programmer using its Holter function and so determine the number of episodes of AF sensed and treated. The number, intensity and energy of the shocks and the parameters of ventricular stimulation are programmable. In these two patients, the atrial defibrillator effectively reduced prolonged episodes of AF with a follow-up of 12 and 7 months. No pro-arrhythmic effects were observed. Further clinical evaluation is under way to assess this new mode of treatment, including the mode activated by the patient, safety and tolerance of the shocks. In our two patients, the treatment of prolonged episodes of AF was followed by reduction of many short or asymptomatic episodes.

  19. Restoration of Atrial Mechanical Function after Successful Radio-Frequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Background: Atrial mechanical dysfunction and its recovery time course after successful radiofrequency ablation of chronic atrial flutter (AFL) has been largely unknown. We serially evaluated left atrial function by echocardiography after successful ablation of chronic atrial flutter. Methods: In 13 patients with chronic AFL, mitral E wave A wave, and the ratio of A/E velocity were measured at 1 day, 1 month, 3 months and 6–12 months after successful radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Doppler tissue imaging (DTI) technique was also used to avoid load-dependent variation in the flow velocity pattern. Results: Left atrial mechanical function, assessed by A wave velocity and the annular motion, was depressed at 1 day, but improved significantly at 1 month and maintained through 6–12 months after the ablation. Left atrial size did not change significantly. Conclusion: Left atrial mechanical function was depressed immediately after successful RF ablation of chronic AFL, but it improved significantly after 1 month and was maintained over one year. PMID:11590904

  20. [Antithrombotic therapy in atrial arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ariel

    2004-02-15

    The principal complication of the atrial arrythmias is the thrombo-embolic accident, notably the cerebro-vascular accident. The efficacity of the oral anticoagulants in reducing cerebro-vascular accidents has been demonstrated in numerous studies. This is significantly superior to that obtained with the anti-platelet drugs. However, the anti-vitamin K drugs (warfarin) carry a risk of serious haemorrhage of around 5% per year. This restricts the proposal of this treatment to patients with an elevated risk of vascular accidents: age, diabetes, previous cerebro-vascular accidents, and cardiac failure are the risk factors. Nevertheless, the risk of haemorrhage is responsible for an under prescription of the anticoagulants in the elderly. This explains the interest aroused by alternative therapeutics: the results of trials on ximelagatran, a direct anti-thrombin, are promising. In patients with an arrythmia, cardioversion carries a thrombo-embolic risk of around 1%. This risk is reduced by prior anticoagulant treatment. The procedure for this treatment is orientated by a trans-oesophageal echocardiogram. The incertitude of the duration of anticoagulant therapy without cardioversion calls for respect of the arrythmia. The treatment of this is limited to control of the cardiac rhythm and anticoagulant treatment.

  1. Cardiovascular Disease Update: Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    McDivitt, Johnathan D; Barstow, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. The prevalence increases with age, especially in the seventh and eighth decades of life. AF also is associated with multiple risk factors and conditions that are managed commonly in family medicine settings, such as hypertension and diabetes. Rhythm control and rate control are primarily equivalent for mortality rate, but patients treated for rhythm control have more hospitalizations; however, rhythm control may be a viable option for select patients. Beta blockers and nondihydropyridine calcium channel blockers can be used to achieve rate control. Pharmacotherapy or electrical cardioversion can be used to achieve rhythm control, and antiarrhythmic drugs are used to maintain sinus rhythm. Catheter ablation is an option for symptomatic patients whose AF is refractory to standard treatment. The CHA2DS2-VASc score should be used to predict the risk of stroke for patients with AF. Patients with nonvalvular AF and a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack or CHA2DS2-VASc scores of 2 or greater should be treated with warfarin or novel oral anticoagulants. Patients with valvular AF should be treated with warfarin.

  2. Is there any indication for an intracardiac defibrillator for the treatment of atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Lévy, S; Richard, P

    1994-11-01

    The experience gained using intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias has prompted the development of an automatic atrial defibrillator capable of detecting and automatically terminating atrial fibrillation (AF). Experimental studies in sheep have shown that it is possible to terminate AF with energies ranging from < 1 to 7 joules [J], using biphasic shocks. The best electrode configuration using intracardiac catheters and/or a subcutaneous patch was two catheters, one in the right atrium and the other in the coronary sinus. Current studies in man focus on the answers to three questions. First, can the experimental results of atrial defibrillation derived from healthy anesthetized sheep without spontaneous AF be extrapolated to AF in man with areas of fibrosis within the atria and/or underlying heart disease in 80% of cases? Preliminary studies in man suggest that cardioversion of AF of short duration is feasible using a mean energy of 2 J. Second, are these energies well tolerated in an awake nonsedated patient? Energies < 1 J were well tolerated, but pain resulting from higher energies needs further investigation. Third, is low-energy atrial defibrillation safe, i.e., is there a risk of ventricular arrhythmias induced by an atrial shock? Experimental results in sheep have shown that the risk of R wave synchronized shock to induce ventricular arrhythmias was only present when the preceding RR interval was shorter than 300 msec. The risk of proarrhythmia in man is undergoing evaluation and must be sufficiently low (< 0.1) before sanctioning implantation of a stand-alone (without associated ventricular defibrillator) automatic atrial defibrillator. Preliminary data on 1212 shocks showed no proarrhythmia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation in Swedish men

    PubMed Central

    Torén, Kjell; Schiöler, Linus; Söderberg, Mia; Giang, Kok Wai; Rosengren, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate whether psychosocial stress defined as high strain based on the job demand–control model increases risk for atrial fibrillation. Methods The present study comprised 6035 men born between 1915 and 1925 and free from previous coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation and stroke at baseline (1974–1977). Work-related psychosocial stress was measured using a job-exposure matrix for the job demand–control model based on occupation at baseline. The participants were followed from baseline examination until death, hospital discharge or 75 years of age, using the Swedish national register on cause of death and the Swedish hospital discharge register for any registration for atrial fibrillation, resulting in the identification of 436 cases. Data were analysed with Cox regression models with atrial fibrillation as the outcome using high strain as the explanatory variable adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes and socioeconomic status. Results There was an increased risk for atrial fibrillation in relation to high strain (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.003 to 1.75). When the four categories of the job-strain model were included and low strain was used as reference, the risk for high strain decreased (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.82). Conclusions Exposure to occupational psychosocial stress defined as high strain may be associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation. The observed increase in risk is small and residual confounding may also be present. PMID:25523937

  4. A Whole-Genome RNA Interference Screen for Human Cell Factors Affecting Myxoma Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Teferi, Wondimagegnehu M.; Dodd, Kristopher; Maranchuk, Rob; Favis, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) provides an important model for investigating host-pathogen interactions. Recent studies have also highlighted how mutations in transformed human cells can expand the host range of this rabbit virus. Although virus growth depends upon interactions between virus and host proteins, the nature of these interactions is poorly understood. To address this matter, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens for genes affecting MYXV growth in human MDA-MB-231 cells. By using siRNAs targeting the whole human genome (21,585 genes), a subset of human phosphatases and kinases (986 genes), and also a custom siRNA library targeting selected statistically significant genes (“hits”) and nonsignificant genes (“nonhits”) of the whole human genome screens (88 genes), we identified 711 siRNA pools that promoted MYXV growth and 333 that were inhibitory. Another 32 siRNA pools (mostly targeting the proteasome) were toxic. The overall overlap in the results was about 25% for the hits and 75% for the nonhits. These pro- and antiviral genes can be clustered into pathways and related groups, including well-established inflammatory and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, as well as clusters relating to β-catenin and the Wnt signaling cascade, the cell cycle, and cellular metabolism. The validity of a subset of these hits was independently confirmed. For example, treating cells with siRNAs that might stabilize cells in G1, or inhibit passage into S phase, stimulated MYXV growth, and these effects were reproduced by trapping cells at the G1/S boundary with an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6. By using 2-deoxy-d-glucose and plasmids carrying the gene for phosphofructokinase, we also confirmed that infection is favored by aerobic glycolytic metabolism. These studies provide insights into how the growth state and structure of cells affect MYXV growth and how these factors might be manipulated to advantage in oncolytic virus therapy. PMID

  5. Increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial fibrosis in transgenic goats expressing transforming growth factor - B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in people with significant morbidity and mortality. There is a strong association between atrial fibrosis and AF. Transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1) is an essential mediator of atrial fibrosis in animal models and human pat...

  6. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Sridhar, Arun; Györke, Sandor; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two NOS isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of NOS 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for NOS in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of NOS activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed. PMID:22536189

  7. Practice implications of the Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne B

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common and complex cardiac arrhythmias. Using currently available evidence, leading medical societies have established recommendations for the optimal management of atrial fibrillation. These guidelines have recently been updated by 4 consensus groups: the European Society of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and a task force of 3 societies from the United States: the American College of Cardiology Foundation, the American Heart Association, and the Heart Rhythm Society. The present review focused on the similarities and differences among these recently updated guidelines. Key revisions included updated information on newer treatments for rhythm control, treatment options to reduce atrial fibrillation complications, and updated anticoagulant management for thromboprophylaxis.

  8. Aneurysm of the Left Atrial Appendage

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Solomon; Nayak, Vijaya M.

    2001-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman underwent excision of an aneurysm of the left atrial appendage, which had been causing cerebrovascular embolic episodes. We attribute the aneurysm to congenital dysplasia of the musculi pectinati in the left atrial appendage and of the bands of atrial muscle from which they arise. In Appendix I, we draw attention to the morphologically similar arrangements of inner and outer bands that emanate from a common transverse interatrial band and yield morphologically similar medial, descending, and ascending palm-leaf arrangements of musculi pectinati. In addition, we observe that the strap-like arrangements of musculi in both atria connect the outer band with the para-annular segment of the inner band. In Appendix II, we briefly review the literature concerning musculi pectinati and related bands. PMID:11453121

  9. A case of Carney complex presenting as acute testicular pain

    PubMed Central

    Alleemudder, Adam; Pillai, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with testicular pain but was found to have bilateral testicular lesions later confirmed as Sertoli cell tumors. Genetic testing confirmed a PRKAR1A gene mutation consistent with Carney complex, a rare genetic disorder characterized by skin lesions, myxomas, and multiple endocrine neoplasms. A review of the condition is made highlighting the association with testicular tumors, particularly of Sertoli cell origin. PMID:27453662

  10. Cardiovascular MR imaging findings of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection to the portal vein in a patient with right atrial isomerism.

    PubMed

    Koplay, Mustafa; Paksoy, Yahya; Erol, Cengiz; Arslan, Derya; Kivrak, Ali Sami; Karaaslan, Sevim

    2012-12-01

    Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) is a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in which the pulmonary veins fail to join to the left atrium and drain directly to the right atrium or to one of the systemic veins. This anomaly is frequently seen together with complex cardiac anomalies especially as a part of right atrial isomerism syndrome. Atrial isomerism is called that the same morphological structure of both atria. We reported a very rare case demonstrating TAPVC between the portal vein and the pulmonary veins in a patient with right atrial isomerism by magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Interstitial orchitis with impaired steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testes of rabbits infected with an attenuated strain of myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Fountain, S; Holland, M K; Hinds, L A; Janssens, P A; Kerr, P J

    1997-05-01

    The pathogenesis of infertility associated with acute viral orchitis was investigated in a rabbit model. Infection of postpubertal male European rabbits with an attenuated strain of myxoma virus caused systemic disease with viral replication to high titres in the testes. Infected rabbits developed an interstitial orchitis and epididymitis. This was associated with degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium, decreased serum testosterone concentrations and increased serum LH concentrations. Virus was localized within the interstitial cells. Clearance of infectious virus from the testis occurred between day 20 and day 30 after infection, although viral DNA could still be detected by polymerase chain reaction at 120 days. Viral clearance was associated with a return to normal serum testosterone and LH concentrations. Anti-sperm antibodies were present in the serum as early as 5 days after infection and declined during the recovery phase. Rabbits were infertile at 60 days but returned to normal fertility 60-90 days after infection.

  12. [The concise history of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Tamás

    2007-01-01

    The author reviews the history of atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. The chaotic irregularity of arterial pulse was clearly acknowledged by most of physicians of the ancient China, Egypt and Greece. William Harvey (1578-1657), who first described the circulatory system appropriately, was probably the first to describe fibrillation of the auricles in animals in 1628. The French "clinical pathologist", Jean Baptist de Sénac (1693-1770) was the first who assumed a correlation between "rebellious palpitation" and stenosis of the mitral valve. Robert Adams (1791-1875) also reported in 1827 the association of irregular pulses and mitral stenosis. The discovery of digitalis leaf in 1785 by William Withering (1741-1799) brought relief to patients with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure by reducing the ventricular rate. From an analysis of simultaneously recorded arterial and venous pressure curves, the Scottish Sir James Mackenzie (1853-11925) demonstrated that a presystolic wave cannot be seen during "pulsus irregularis perpetuus", a term very first used by Heinrich Ewald Hering (1866-1948). Arthur Cushny (1866-1926) noted the similarity between pulse curves in clinical "delirium cordis" and those in dogs with atrial fibrillation. The first human ECG depicting atrial fibrillation was published by Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) in 1906. The proof of a direct connection between absolute arrhythmia and atrial fibrillation was established by two Viennese physicians, Carl Julius Rothberger and Heinrich Winterberg in 1909. Sir Thomas Lewis (1881-1945), the father of modem electrocardiography, studied electrophysiological characteristics of atrial fibrillation and has shown that its basic perpetuating mechanism is circus movement of electrical impulse (re-entry). After him, the major discoveries relating to the pathophysiology and clinical features of atrial fibrillation in the 20th century stemmed from Karel Frederick Wenckebach

  13. Whole Exome Sequencing in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, Steven A.; Weng, Lu-Chen; Christophersen, Ingrid E.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Mohler, Peter J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Muzny, Donna; Psaty, Bruce M.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Arking, Dan E.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a morbid and heritable arrhythmia. Over 35 genes have been reported to underlie AF, most of which were described in small candidate gene association studies. Replication remains lacking for most, and therefore the contribution of coding variation to AF susceptibility remains poorly understood. We examined whole exome sequencing data in a large community-based sample of 1,734 individuals with and 9,423 without AF from the Framingham Heart Study, Cardiovascular Health Study, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, and NHLBI-GO Exome Sequencing Project and meta-analyzed the results. We also examined whether genetic variation was enriched in suspected AF genes (N = 37) in AF cases versus controls. The mean age ranged from 59 to 73 years; 8,656 (78%) were of European ancestry. None of the 99,404 common variants evaluated was significantly associated after adjusting for multiple testing. Among the most significantly associated variants was a common (allele frequency = 86%) missense variant in SYNPO2L (rs3812629, p.Pro707Leu, [odds ratio 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.13–1.43, P = 6.6x10-5]) which lies at a known AF susceptibility locus and is in linkage disequilibrium with a top marker from prior analyses at the locus. We did not observe significant associations between rare variants and AF in gene-based tests. Individuals with AF did not display any statistically significant enrichment for common or rare coding variation in previously implicated AF genes. In conclusion, we did not observe associations between coding genetic variants and AF, suggesting that large-effect coding variation is not the predominant mechanism underlying AF. A coding variant in SYNPO2L requires further evaluation to determine whether it is causally related to AF. Efforts to identify biologically meaningful coding variation underlying AF may require large sample sizes or populations enriched for large genetic effects. PMID:27589061

  14. M148R and M149R are two virulence factors for myxoma virus pathogenesis in the European rabbit.

    PubMed

    Blanié, Sophie; Mortier, Jérémy; Delverdier, Maxence; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2009-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). MYXV has a linear double-stranded DNA genome that encodes several factors important for evasion from the host immune system. Among them, four ankyrin (ANK) repeat proteins were identified: M148R, M149R, M150R and M-T5. To date, only M150R and M-T5 were studied and characterized as critical virulence factors. This article presents the first characterization of M148R and M149R. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusions allowed us to localize them in a viral context. Whereas M149R is only cytoplasmic, interestingly, M148R is in part located in the nucleolus, a unique feature for an ANK repeat poxviral protein. In order to evaluate their implication in viral pathogenicity, targeted M148R, M149R, or both deletions were constructed in the wild type T1 strain of myxoma virus. In vitro infection of rabbit and primate cultured cells as well as primary rabbit cells allowed us to conclude that M148R and M149R are not likely to be implicated in cell tropism or host range functions. However, in vivo experiments revealed that they are virulence factors since after infection of European rabbits with mutant viruses, a delay in the onset of clinical signs, an increase of survival time and a dramatic decrease in mortality rate were observed. Moreover, histological analysis suggests that M148R plays a role in the subversion of host inflammatory response by MYXV.

  15. Antithrombotic Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    You, John J.; Singer, Daniel E.; Howard, Patricia A.; Lane, Deirdre A.; Eckman, Mark H.; Fang, Margaret C.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Schulman, Sam; Go, Alan S.; Hughes, Michael; Spencer, Frederick A.; Manning, Warren J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The risk of stroke varies considerably across different groups of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Antithrombotic prophylaxis for stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. We provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment based on net clinical benefit for patients with AF at varying levels of stroke risk and in a number of common clinical scenarios. Methods: We used the methods described in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines article of this supplement. Results: For patients with nonrheumatic AF, including those with paroxysmal AF, who are (1) at low risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 [congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 years, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack] score of 0), we suggest no therapy rather than antithrombotic therapy, and for patients choosing antithrombotic therapy, we suggest aspirin rather than oral anticoagulation or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; (2) at intermediate risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of 1), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, and we suggest oral anticoagulation rather than aspirin or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; and (3) at high risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of ≥ 2), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, aspirin, or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Where we recommend or suggest in favor of oral anticoagulation, we suggest dabigatran 150 mg bid rather than adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist therapy. Conclusions: Oral anticoagulation is the optimal choice of antithrombotic therapy for patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS2 score of ≥ 2). At lower levels of stroke risk, antithrombotic treatment decisions will require a more individualized

  16. Lunar influence on atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, M; Valachova, A

    1996-08-01

    The most popular periodicities in biology and medicine-the circadians and circannuals-stem undoubtedly from the Earth's rotation and its revolution around the sun. The problem is how to explain the existence of circaseptan, i.e. 5-9-day, and other infradian rhythms. They may correspond to the lunar cycles and their 2nd to 6th harmonics. To test such hypothesis, the calendar dates of 127 attacks of atrial fibrillation in one male subject (M.M.) between 1980 and 1994 were transformed into the days numbered 0-29 for the synodic, and 0-26 for tropic lunar cycle. The daily frequencies obtained in this way were smoothed by moving averages of three successive days each. Considerable fluctuations of frequencies of attacks during both cycles were visible by inspection of the corresponding graphs, called lunar plexograms. Thus, a conspicuous nadir is found under the full moon in the synodic cycle, and a marked peak shortly after the extreme southern position of the moon in the tropic cycle. Halberg's cosinor analysis testing the presence of the 1st to 6th harmonic of either lunar cycle rejected the null hypothesis at the alpha = 0.05 level for all harmonics. Accordingly, the occurrence of attacks was cycling with the period lengths of synodic and tropic lunar cycles, and with those of their 1/2-1/6 period lengths, i.e. with a cluster of approximately circa(di)-septan rhythms. This conclusion is supported by similar findings obtained earlier for various medical and biological events.

  17. Dabigatran etexilate in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Vora, Amit

    2013-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects millions worldwide. Stroke is the most devastating complication of AF and is associated with a huge disease burden. As a preventive measure, anticoagulant therapy is recommended for most AF patients based on presence of stroke risk factors. For the past six decades warfarin remained the gold standard for stroke prevention in AF (SPAF). However, it is associated with numerous limitations such as a high risk of drug-drug, drug-food interactions and need for frequent INR (2-3) monitoring. Novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) dabigatran etexilate is a selective, specific, reversible direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved in India for SPAF and primary venous thromboembolism prevention. The efficacy and safety of dabigatran in AF has been established the "Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulant Therapy (RE-LY)", a randomized clinical trial. RE-LY (n = 18,113) demonstrated that the efficacy of dabigatran 110 mg BID was as good as well controlled warfarin and dabigatran 150 mg BID reduced the risk of ischaemic stroke by 25% (P = 0.03). Till date, 150mg dabigatran is the only NOAC offering a superior reduction in most commonly seen ischemic strokes due to AF compared to warfarin. Additionally, both doses of dabigatran significantly reduced the risk of total bleeds, intracranial, and life threatening bleeds versus warfarin (p < 0.05). Dabigatran has advantages over warfarin including predictable pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile, minimal drug-drug and no drug-food interactions while no monitoring is needed.The 150 mg dose of dabigatran should be considered in younger patients with a low risk of bleeding and good renal function to achieve a superior ischemic stroke reduction, whereas, the 110 mg dose should be considered in elderly patients, those with mild to moderate renal function or those with high risk of bleeding.

  18. Noninvasive ECG as a tool for predicting termination of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chiarugi, Franco; Varanini, Maurizio; Cantini, Federico; Conforti, Fabrizio; Vrouchos, Giorgos

    2007-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and entails an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Prediction of the termination of an AF episode, based on noninvasive techniques, can benefit patients, doctors and health systems. The method described in this paper is based on two-lead surface electrocardiograms (ECGs): 1-min ECG recordings of AF episodes including N-type (not terminating within an hour after the end of the record), S-type (terminating 1 min after the end of the record) and T-type (terminating immediately after the end of the record). These records are organised into three learning sets (N, S and T) and two test sets (A and B). Starting from these ECGs, the atrial and ventricular activities were separated using beat classification and class averaged beat subtraction, followed by the evaluation of seven parameters representing atrial or ventricular activity. Stepwise discriminant analysis selected the set including dominant atrial frequency (DAF, index of atrial activity) and average HR (HRmean, index of ventricular activity) as optimal for discrimination between N/T-type episodes. The linear classifier, estimated on the 20 cases of the N and T learning sets, provided a performance of 90% on the 30 cases of a test set for the N/T-type discrimination. The same classifier led to correct classification in 89% of the 46 cases for N/S-type discrimination. The method has shown good results and seems to be suitable for clinical application, although a larger dataset would be very useful for improvement and validation of the algorithms and the development of an earlier predictor of paroxysmal AF spontaneous termination time.

  19. Atrial fibrillation and stroke: prevalence in different types of stroke and influence on early and long term prognosis (Oxfordshire community stroke project)

    PubMed Central

    Sandercock, P.; Bamford, J.; Dennis, M.; Burn, J.; Slattery, J.; Jones, L.; Boonyakarnkul, S.; Warlow, C.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine in patients with first ever stroke whether atrial fibrillation influences clinical features, the need to perform computed tomography, and prognosis. DESIGN--Observational cohort study with maximum follow up of 6.5 years. SETTING--Primary care, based on 10 general practices in urban and rural Oxfordshire. SUBJECTS--Consecutive series of 675 patients with first ever stroke registered in the Oxfordshire community stroke project. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence of atrial fibrillation by type of stroke; effect of atrial fibrillation on case fatality rate and risk of recurrent stroke, vascular death, and death from all causes. RESULTS--Prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 17% (95% confidence interval 14% to 20%) for all stroke types (115/675), 18% (15% to 21%) for cerebral infarction (97/545), 11% (4% to 11%) for primary intercerebral haemorrhage (7/66), and 0% (0 to 11%) for subarachnoid haemorrhage (0/33). For patients with cerebral infarction the 30 day case fatality rate was significantly higher with atrial fibrillation (23%) than with sinus rhythm (8%); the risk of early recurrent stroke (within 30 days) was 1% with atrial fibrillation and 4% with sinus rhythm. In patients who survived at least 30 days the average annual risk of recurrent stroke was 8.2% (5.9% to 10.9%) with sinus rhythm and 11% (6.0% to 17.3%) with atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS--After a first stroke atrial fibrillation was not associated with a definite excess risk of recurrent stroke, either within 30 days or within the first few years. Survivors with and without atrial fibrillation had a clinically important absolute risk of further serious vascular events. PMID:1493391

  20. An improved method for echographic detection of left atrial enlargement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. R.; Harrison, D. C.; Popp, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Echographic dimensions of the aortic root and left atrium were compared in 170 patients in order to assess dilation of the left atrium with reference to the relatively nondistensible fibrous aortic root. In 50 patients without cause for left atrial or aortic enlargement, the ratio of left atrial/aortic root dimensions was 0.87 to 1.11. In 80 patients with known cause for left atrial enlargement, the left atrial/aortic root ratio was greater than or equal to 1.17. In 40 patients with isolated valve disease, dilation of both the aortic root and the left atrium resulted in a left atrial/aortic root dimension ratio less than 1.17 in some patients. Despite this consideration, the comparison of left atrial and aortic root dimension appears to be as specific as, and more sensitive than, previously proposed methods for the evaluation of left atrial enlargement.

  1. Digitalis does not improve left atrial mechanical dysfunction after successful electrical cardioversion of chronic atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yujing, Wang; Congxin, Huang; Shaning, Yang; Lijun, Jin; Xiaojun, Hu; Gang, Wu; Qiang, Xie

    2010-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether administration of digitalis could improve mechanical function of left atrial appendage (LAA) and left atrium prospectively in patients with atrial stunning. Fifty-four consecutive patients in whom atrial stunning was observed immediately after cardioversion of chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) were randomized into digitalis or control group for 1 week following cardioversion. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) were performed prior to, immediately following, 1 day after and 1 week after cardioversion to measure transmitral flow velocity and LAA flow velocity. Electrical cardioversion of AF elicited significantly slower left atrial appendage peak emptying velocity (LAA-PEV) and peak filling velocity (LAA-PFV) immediately following cardioversion in both groups. 1 day post cardioversion, there were no significant differences in transmitral E wave, A wave, E/A ratio, LAA-PEV, LAA-PFV or left atrial appendage ejection fraction (LAA-EF) between digitalis and control groups. 1 week post cardioversion, no significant differences were found in transmitral E wave, A wave, E/A ratio, LAA-PEV, LAA-PFV or LAA-EF between the two groups. The occurrence rates of spontaneous echo contrast were not significantly different between digitalis and control groups one day and one week post cardioversion. In conclusion, digitalis did not improve left atrial and appendage mechanical dysfunction following cardioversion of chronic AF. Digitalis did not prevent the development of spontaneous echo contrast in left atrial chamber and appendage. This may be due to the fact that digitalis aggravates intracellular calcium overload induced by chronic AF and has a negative effect on ventricular rate.

  2. Computational models of atrial cellular electrophysiology and calcium handling, and their role in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Heijman, Jordi; Erfanian Abdoust, Pegah; Voigt, Niels; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2016-02-01

    The complexity of the heart makes an intuitive understanding of the relative contribution of ion channels, transporters and signalling pathways to cardiac electrophysiology challenging. Computational modelling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has proven useful to integrate experimental findings, extrapolate results obtained in expression systems or animal models to other systems, test quantitatively ideas based on experimental data and provide novel hypotheses that are experimentally testable. While the bulk of computational modelling has traditionally been directed towards ventricular bioelectricity, increasing recognition of the clinical importance of atrial arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, has led to widespread efforts to apply computational approaches to understanding atrial electrical function. The increasing availability of detailed, atrial-specific experimental data has stimulated the development of novel computational models of atrial-cellular electrophysiology and Ca(2+) handling. To date, more than 300 studies have employed mathematical simulations to enhance our understanding of atrial electrophysiology, arrhythmogenesis and therapeutic responses. Future modelling studies are likely to move beyond current whole-cell models by incorporating new data on subcellular architecture, macromolecular protein complexes, and localized ion-channel regulation by signalling pathways. At the same time, more integrative multicellular models that take into account regional electrophysiological and Ca(2+) handling properties, mechano-electrical feedback and/or autonomic regulation will be needed to investigate the mechanisms governing atrial arrhythmias. A combined experimental and computational approach is expected to provide the more comprehensive understanding of atrial arrhythmogenesis that is required to develop improved diagnostic and therapeutic options. Here, we review this rapidly expanding area, with a particular focus on Ca(2+) handling, and

  3. Incidence and modes of onset of early reinitiation of atrial fibrillation after successful internal cardioversion, and its prevention by intravenous sotalol

    PubMed Central

    Tse, H; Lau, C; Ayers, G

    1999-01-01

    beats with preceding normal heart rate. Intravenous sotalol was effective in preventing ERAF in most cases.


Keywords: atrial fibrillation; low energy cardioversion; sotalol PMID:10455082

  4. Effect of years of endurance exercise on risk of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Myrstad, Marius; Nystad, Wenche; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Thelle, Dag S; Stigum, Hein; Aarønæs, Marit; Ranhoff, Anette H

    2014-10-15

    Emerging evidence suggests that endurance exercise increases the risk for atrial fibrillation (AF) in men, but few studies have investigated the dose-response relation between exercise and risk for atrial arrhythmias. Both exposure to exercise and reference points vary among studies, and previous studies have not differentiated between AF and atrial flutter. The aim of this study was to assess the risk for atrial arrhythmias by cumulative years of regular endurance exercise in men. To cover the range from physical inactivity to long-term endurance exercise, the study sample in this retrospective cohort study was based on 2 distinct cohorts: male participants in a long-distance cross-country ski race and men from the general population, in total 3,545 men aged ≥ 53 years. Arrhythmia diagnoses were validated by electrocardiograms during review of medical records. Regular endurance exercise was self-reported by questionnaire. A broad range of confounding factors was available for adjustment. The adjusted odds ratios per 10 years of regular endurance exercise were 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.29) for AF and 1.42 (95% confidence interval 1.20 to 1.69) for atrial flutter. In stratified analyses, the associations were significant in cross-country skiers and in men from the general population. In conclusion, cumulative years of regular endurance exercise were associated with a gradually increased risk for AF and atrial flutter.

  5. Relationship between body mass index and left atrial appendage thrombus in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cohoon, Kevin P; McBane, Robert D; Ammash, Naser; Slusser, Joshua P; Grill, Diane E; Wysokinski, Waldemar E

    2016-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation and obesity are two major growing epidemics in the United States and globally. Obese people are at the increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation. The contribution of obesity as an independent risk factor for stroke in the setting of atrial fibrillation remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients with increased body mass index (BMI) would be at increased risk for the development of left atrial appendage thrombus (LAAT). Consecutive, anticoagulation naïve patients with NVAF referred for a transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) between January 1, 2007 and October 21, 2009 were approached for study participation. All clinical, laboratory, and TEE measurement data were collected prospectively. Within a group of 400 anticoagulation naïve NVAF patients (mean age 63 ± 15 years, 28 % women; 17 % with LAAT) the prevalence of LAAT was similar across all BMI categories (normal 13 %, overweight 19 %, obese 16 %, morbidly obese 16 %; p = 0.71). Despite a higher CHADS2 score and a higher prevalence of both hypertension and diabetes mellitus, elevated BMI was not an independent predictor of LAAT when analyzed as either a continuous variable, across BMI WHO categories, a dichotomous variable stratified at values above versus below 27 kg/m(2), or BMI stratified on atrial fibrillation duration. Despite a higher prevalence of major risk factors for thromboembolism, the prevalence of LAAT was not increased in overweight, obese, and morbidly obese patients.

  6. The effect of asanguinous cardioplegic arrest on atrial preservation using atrial ATP as a marker.

    PubMed

    Hines, G L; Scheaffer, P; Williams, L; Mantell, P; Cheifitz, P

    1990-01-01

    Changes in atrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the presence of postoperative arrhythmias were studied in 14 patients during routine coronary artery bypass grafting to 1) attempt to evaluate atrial preservation, and 2) determine if a relationship exists between changes in ATP and the development of postoperative arrhythmias. Atrial biopsies were obtained at the time of cannulation (preischemic sample) and after the removal of the aortic crossclamp (postischemic sample). Methods of myocardial protection included systemic hypothermia (28 degrees C), periodic reinfusion of crystalloid cardioplegia into the aortic root and completed vein grafts, and iced slush in the pericardial well. Atrial temperature was monitored. Preischemic ATP was 0.412 +/- 0.32 mu mol/gm, and the postischemic value was 0.220 +/- 0.13 mu mol/gm (p less than .02). Atrial temperature routinely decreased to 13-18 degrees C after cardioplegic infusion but rose to 24 degrees C between infusions. There was no correlation between postoperative supraventricular arrhythmias (4 patients) and changes in ATP. In conclusion, routine coronary artery bypass grafting with standard methods of cardiac preservation does not appear to satisfactorily preserve atrial tissue. The clinical correlation and significance of this remains to be elucidated.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atrial Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Mathias; Linz, Benedikt; Böhm, Michael; Linz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with relevant morbidity and mortality. Besides hypertension, valvular disease and cardiomyopathy, mainly ischemic and dilated, also other conditions like obesity, alcohol abusus, genetic factors and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are discussed to contribute to the progression from paroxysmal to persistent AF. The prevalence of OSA among patients with AF is 40-50%. OSA is characterized by periodic or complete cessation of effective breathing during sleep due to obstruction of the upper airways. Obstructive respiratory events result in acute intrathoracic pressure swings and profound changes in blood gases together leading to atrial stretch and acute sympatho-vagal dysbalance resulting in acute apnea related to electrophysiological and hemodynamic alterations. Additionally, repetitive obstructive events in patients with OSA may lead to sympathetic and neurohumoral activation and subsequent structural and functional changes in the atrium creating an arrhythmogenic substrate for AF in the long run. This review focuses on the acute and chronic effects of negative thoracic pressure swings, changes in blood pressure and sympatho-vagal dysbalance induced by obstructive respiratory events on atrial electrophysiology and atrial structure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:25004989

  8. Atrial Model Development and Prototype Simulations: CRADA Final Report on Tasks 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.; Zhang, X.; Villongco, C.; Lightstone, F.; Richards, D.

    2016-10-28

    The goal of this CRADA was to develop essential tools needed to simulate human atrial electrophysiology in 3-dimensions using an anatomical image-based anatomy and physiologically detailed human cellular model. The atria were modeled as anisotropic, representing the preferentially longitudinal electrical coupling between myocytes. Across the entire anatomy, cellular electrophysiology was heterogeneous, with left and right atrial myocytes defined differently. Left and right cell types for the “control” case of sinus rhythm (SR) was compared with remodeled electrophysiology and calcium cycling characteristics of chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF). The effects of Isoproterenol (ISO), a beta-adrenergic agonist that represents the functional consequences of PKA phosphorylation of various ion channels and transporters, was also simulated in SR and cAF to represent atrial activity under physical or emotional stress. Results and findings from Tasks 3 & 4 are described. Tasks 3 and 4 are, respectively: Input parameters prepared for a Cardioid simulation; Report including recommendations for additional scenario development and post-processing analytic strategy.

  9. [Large atrial septal defects in adults: results of attempted systematic percutaneous closure].

    PubMed

    Petit, J; Losay, J; Lambert, V; Piot, J D; Bertaux, X

    2006-05-01

    Percutaneous closure of ostium secundum atrial septal defects became routine practice from 1998 but remained limited by the size of their diameter at balloon calibration. In March 2004, after an experience of 551 patients, the maximum admissible diameter (40 mm), the biggest size available of the Amplatzer prosthesis, could often be exceeded. The essential anatomical condition was the presence of a circumferential edge--even minimal--except adjacent to the aorta where its absence was not a problem. From 31/03/04 to 31/12/05, 17 patients, 17 to 58 years of age, were included and underwent attempted percutaneous closure by the usual protocol. The insertion of the prosthesis was difficult in every case. It required the use of several techniques to orientate the prosthesis in a satisfactory plane without risking tearing part of the residual atrial septum. The attempt was successful in 16 of the 17 patients. The one failure occurred in a patient with complete absence of a posterior edge. The postoperative course was uncomplicated without residual shunt or displacement of the occluder in the follow-up studies. The authors conclude that very big atrial septal defects with diameters of over 40 mm may be closed percutaneously with the Amplatzer device with a reasonable chance of success. These attempts do not expose the patient to any particular risk and the results, in successful attempts, are comparable to those observed in smaller atrial septal defects.

  10. Stroke as the First Manifestation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Jussi; Mustonen, Pirjo; Kiviniemi, Tuomas; Hartikainen, Juha E. K.; Palomäki, Antti; Hartikainen, Päivi; Nuotio, Ilpo; Ylitalo, Antti; Airaksinen, K. E. Juhani

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation may remain undiagnosed until an ischemic stroke occurs. In this retrospective cohort study we assessed the prevalence of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack as the first manifestation of atrial fibrillation in 3,623 patients treated for their first ever stroke or transient ischemic attack during 2003–2012. Two groups were formed: patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and patients with new atrial fibrillation diagnosed during hospitalization for stroke or transient ischemic attack. A control group of 781 patients with intracranial hemorrhage was compiled similarly to explore causality between new atrial fibrillation and stroke. The median age of the patients was 78.3 [13.0] years and 2,009 (55.5%) were women. New atrial fibrillation was diagnosed in 753 (20.8%) patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack, compared to 15 (1.9%) with intracranial hemorrhage. Younger age and no history of coronary artery disease or other vascular diseases, heart failure, or hypertension were the independent predictors of new atrial fibrillation detected concomitantly with an ischemic event. Thus, ischemic stroke was the first clinical manifestation of atrial fibrillation in 37% of younger (<75 years) patients with no history of cardiovascular diseases. In conclusion, atrial fibrillation is too often diagnosed only after an ischemic stroke has occurred, especially in middle-aged healthy individuals. New atrial fibrillation seems to be predominantly the cause of the ischemic stroke and not triggered by the acute cerebrovascular event. PMID:27936187

  11. Effectiveness of Early Invasive Therapy for Atrial Tachycardia in Adult Atrial-Baffle Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Ali N.; Morrison, Justin; Daniels, Curt J.; Kalbfleisch, Steven; Kertesz, Naomi J.

    2017-01-01

    Adults who underwent complex atrial baffling as children via Mustard or Senning procedures are at heightened risk for atrial arrhythmias. Antiarrhythmic therapies are typically ineffective in this population. Accordingly, our team of pediatric and adult electrophysiologists investigated the effectiveness of early invasive transbaffle-access techniques to perform early radiofrequency ablation at the source of these clinically significant arrhythmias. For this retrospective study, we selected 11 adult survivors of atrial baffling (mean age, 34 ± 9 yr) who underwent clinically indicated electrophysiologic study after no more than one trial of antiarrhythmic therapy. Using transbaffle-access techniques and 3-dimensional mapping of the venous atria, we found 12 inducible arrhythmias in 10 patients: intra-atrial reentrant tachycardia (n=6), atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (n=3), focal atrial tachycardia (n=2), and repetitive double firing of the atrioventricular node (n=1). Defining success as short- and midterm freedom from arrhythmia, we analyzed outcomes of radiofrequency ablation at 1 and 6 months. At 1 month, ablation was 100% successful. At 6 months, after 11 ablations in 9 patients, 5 patients had no clinical recurrence, 2 had improved arrhythmia control from minimal medical therapy, and 2 were to undergo repeat study for recurrent tachycardia. In the recurrence-free patients, arrhythmias during electrophysiology study matched the types found clinically before the study. To our knowledge, this is the largest one-year cohort of adult survivors of atrial baffling to have undergone study by a combined pediatric–adult electrophysiology team. We conclude that early invasive transbaffle access for ablating diverse atrial tachyarrhythmias was effective in these patients. PMID:28265208

  12. [Differences in atrial remodelling between right and left atria in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Tamargo Menéndez, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation starts in the left atrium and from there the activity invades the atrial tissues and causes an inhomogeneous shortening the duration of atrial action potential duration and refractoriness. The purpose of this study was to compare the voltage-dependent potassium currents in human cells isolated from the right and left atria and to determine whether electrical remodeling produced by chronic atrial fibrillation (CAF) differentially affects voltage-dependent potassium currents involved in atrial repolarization in each atrium as compared to sinus rhythm (SR). The currents were recorded using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. We found that in atrial cardiomyocytes of patients both in SR and in CAF there are three types of cells according to their main voltage-dependent repolarizing potassium current: the Ca(2+)-independent 4-aminopyridine sensitive component of the transient outward current (I(to1)) and the ultrarapid (I(Kur)), rapid (I(Kr)) and slow (I(Ks)) components of the delayed rectifier current. CAF differentially modified the proportion of these 3 types of cells on each atrium: CAF reduced the I(to1) more markedly in the left than in the right atria, while I(Kur) was more markedly reduced in the right than in the left atria. Interestingly, in both atria, CAF markedly increased the I(Ks). This increase was enhanced by isoproterenol and suppressed by atenolol. These changes produce a non-uniform shortening of atrial repolarization that facilitates the reentry of the cardiac impulse and the perpetuation of the arrhythmia.

  13. 78 FR 11207 - Clinical Study Designs for Surgical Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability... Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation.'' This guidance provides FDA's recommendations on clinical trial designs for surgical ablation devices intended for the treatment of atrial...

  14. [Atrial fibrillation as consequence and cause of structural changes of atria].

    PubMed

    Aparina, O P; Chikhireva, L N; Stukalova, O V; Mironova, N A; Kashtanova, S Iu; Ternovoĭ, S K; Golitsyn, S P

    2014-01-01

    Changes of atrial structure and function are the contributors of atrial fibrillation clinical course, complications and treatment effectiveness. Effects of inflammation and mechanical stretch on atrial structural remodeling leading to atrial fibrillation are reviewed in the article. Contemporary invasive and non-invasive methods of evaluation (including late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with atrial structural remodeling in atrial fibrillation are also described.

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ayman A.; Saliba, Walid I.; Barakat, Amr; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed; Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Hakim, Ali; Tarakji, Khaldoun; Baranowski, Bryan; Cantillon, Daniel; Dresing, Thomas; Tchou, Patrick; Martin, David O.; Varma, Niraj; Bhargava, Mandeep; Callahan, Thomas; Niebauer, Mark; Kanj, Mohamed; Chung, Mina; Natale, Andrea; Lindsay, Bruce D.; Wazni, Oussama M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Various ablation strategies of persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF) have had disappointing outcomes, despite concerted clinical and research efforts, which could reflect progressive atrial fibrillation–related atrial remodeling. Methods and Results Two-year outcomes were assessed in 1241 consecutive patients undergoing first-time ablation of PersAF (2005–2012). The time intervals between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the ablation procedures were determined. Patients had echocardiograms and measures of B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein before the procedures. The median diagnosis-to-ablation time was 3 years (25th–75th percentiles 1–6.5). With longer diagnosis-to-ablation time (based on quartiles), there was a significant increase in recurrence rates in addition to an increase in B-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.01), C-reactive protein levels (P<0.0001), and left atrial size (P=0.03). The arrhythmia recurrence rates over 2 years were 33.6%, 52.6%, 57.1%, and 54.6% in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively (Pcategorical<0.0001). In Cox Proportional Hazard analyses, B-type natriuretic peptide levels, C-reactive protein levels, and left atrial size were associated with arrhythmia recurrence. The diagnosis-to-ablation time had the strongest association with the ablation outcomes which persisted in multivariable Cox analyzes (hazard ratio for recurrence per +1Log diagnosis-to-ablation time 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.14–1.43; P<0.0001; hazard ratio fourth versus first quartile 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.68–3.65; Pcategorical<0.0001). Conclusions In patients with PersAF undergoing ablation, the time interval between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the catheter ablation procedure had a strong association with the ablation outcomes, such as shorter diagnosis-to-ablation times were associated with better outcomes and in direct association with markers of atrial remodeling. PMID:26763227

  16. Atrial septal defects in Florida panthers.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M W; Dunbar, M R; Buergelt, C D; Homer, B L; Roelke-Parker, M E; Taylor, S K; King, R; Citino, S B; Glass, C

    1999-07-01

    Ostium secundum atrial septal defects (ASDs) were observed in six (3 M, 3 F) of 33 (20 M, 13 F) (18%) Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) necropsied by veterinary pathologists between 1985 and 1998. A seventh ASD was found in a female panther necropsied in the field and is included in the pathological description but not the prevalence of ASDs in Florida panthers. One panther (FP205) with severe ASD also had tricuspid valve dysplasia (TVD). Atrial septal defects and/or TVD are believed to have caused or contributed to the deaths of three (9%) Florida panthers in this study. Mean diameter +/- SD of ASDs was 9.0 +/- 4.7 mm (range 3 to 15 mm). Gross pathological changes attributed to ASDs/TVD in severely affected panthers (ASD > or = 10 mm) (n = 4) included mild right ventricular dilatation (n = 3) and hypertrophy (n = 2), mild to severe right atrial dilatation (n = 2), and acute pulmonary edema (n = 3). Panthers with mild ASDs (ASD < or = 5 mm) (n = 3) had no other detectable gross pathological changes associated with the ASDs. Histological examination of lungs of three panthers with severe ASDs revealed mild to moderate dilatation with fibrosis and smooth muscle atrophy of the tunica media of medium to large caliber arteries (n = 2), interstitial and/or pleural fibrosis (n = 2), perivascular fibrosis (n = 1), and acute to chronic edema (n = 3). Twenty-six necropsied panthers were examined one or more times while living; medical records were retrospectively evaluated. Antemortem radiographic, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic examinations were performed on two panthers with severe ASDs (FP20 and FP205). Thoracic radiographic abnormalities in both included right heart enlargement, and in FP205 (severe ASD and TVD), mild pulmonary overperfusion. Electrocardiographic examination of FP205 revealed a right ventricular hypertrophy pattern, while FP205 had a normal electrocardiogram. Echocardiographic examination of FP20 revealed marked right atrial dilatation

  17. Lack of prevention of heart failure by serial electrical cardioversion in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tuinenburg, A; Van Gelder, I C; Den Berg, M P V.; Brugemann, J; De Kam, P J; Crijns, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the occurrence of heart failure complications, and to identify variables that predict heart failure in patients with (recurrent) persistent atrial fibrillation, treated aggressively with serial electrical cardioversion and antiarrhythmic drugs to maintain sinus rhythm.
DESIGN—Non-randomised controlled trial; cohort; case series; mean (SD) follow up duration 3.4 (1.6) years.
SETTING—Tertiary care centre.
SUBJECTS—Consecutive sampling of 342 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (defined as > 24 hours duration) considered eligible for electrical cardioversion.
INTERVENTIONS—Serial electrical cardioversions and serial antiarrhythmic drug treatment, after identification and treatment of underlying cardiovascular disease.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—heart failure complications: development or progression of heart failure requiring the institution or addition of drug treatment, hospital admission, or death from heart failure.
RESULTS—Development or progression of heart failure occurred in 38 patients (11%), and 22 patients (6%) died from heart failure. These complications were related to the presence of coronary artery disease (p < 0.001, risk ratio 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6 to 6.5), rheumatic heart disease (p < 0.001, risk ratio 5.0, 95% CI 2.4 to 10.2), cardiomyopathy (p < 0.001, risk ratio 5.0, 95% CI 2.0 to 12.4), atrial fibrillation for < 3 months (p = 0.04, risk ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.0 to 3.7), and poor exercise tolerance (New York Heart Association class III at inclusion, p < 0.001, risk ratio 3.5, 95% CI 1.9 to 6.7). No heart failure complications were observed in patients with lone atrial fibrillation.
CONCLUSIONS—Aggressive serial electrical cardioversion does not prevent heart failure complications in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. These complications are predominantly observed in patients with more severe underlying cardiovascular disease. Randomised

  18. Inter-Subject Variability in Human Atrial Action Potential in Sinus Rhythm versus Chronic Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Carlos; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Wettwer, Erich; Loose, Simone; Simon, Jana; Ravens, Ursula; Pueyo, Esther; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Aims Human atrial electrophysiology exhibits high inter-subject variability in both sinus rhythm (SR) and chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF) patients. Variability is however rarely investigated in experimental and theoretical electrophysiological studies, thus hampering the understanding of its underlying causes but also its implications in explaining differences in the response to disease and treatment. In our study, we aim at investigating the ability of populations of human atrial cell models to capture the inter-subject variability in action potential (AP) recorded in 363 patients both under SR and cAF conditions. Methods and Results Human AP recordings in atrial trabeculae (n = 469) from SR and cAF patients were used to calibrate populations of computational SR and cAF atrial AP models. Three populations of over 2000 sampled models were generated, based on three different human atrial AP models. Experimental calibration selected populations of AP models yielding AP with morphology and duration in range with experimental recordings. Populations using the three original models can mimic variability in experimental AP in both SR and cAF, with median conductance values in SR for most ionic currents deviating less than 30% from their original peak values. All cAF populations show similar variations in GK1, GKur and Gto, consistent with AF-related remodeling as reported in experiments. In all SR and cAF model populations, inter-subject variability in IK1 and INaK underlies variability in APD90, variability in IKur, ICaL and INaK modulates variability in APD50 and combined variability in Ito and IKur determines variability in APD20. The large variability in human atrial AP triangulation is mostly determined by IK1 and either INaK or INaCa depending on the model. Conclusion Experimentally-calibrated human atrial AP models populations mimic AP variability in SR and cAF patient recordings, and identify potential ionic determinants of inter-subject variability in

  19. Staged transthoracic approach to persistent atrial fibrillation (TOP-AF): study protocol for a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Persistent atrial fibrillation frequently shows multiple different electrophysiological mechanisms of induction. This heterogeneity causes a low success rate of single procedures of ablation and a high incidence of recurrence. Surgical ablation through bilateral thoracotomy demonstrates better results after a single procedure. Prospective observational studies in inhomogeneous populations without control groups report a remarkable 90% of success with hybrid or staged procedures of surgical ablation coupled with catheter ablation. In this trial, we will examine the hypothesis that a staged approach involving initial minimally invasive surgical ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation, followed by a second percutaneous procedure in case of recurrence, has a higher success rate than repeated percutaneous procedures. Methods/Design This is a controlled (2:1) randomized trial comparing use of a percutaneous catheter with minimally invasive transthoracic surgical ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation. The inclusion and exclusion criteria, definitions, and treatment protocols are those reported by the 2012 Expert Consensus Statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation. Patients will be randomized to either percutaneous catheter (n = 100) or surgical (n = 50) ablation as the first procedure. After 3 months, they are re-evaluated, according to the same guidelines, and receive a second procedure if necessary. Crossover will be allowed and data analyzed on an “intention-to-treat” basis. Primary outcomes are the incidence of sinus rhythm at 6 and 12 months and the proportions of patients requiring a second procedure. Discussion The use of a staged strategy combining surgical and percutaneous approaches might be more favorable in treatment of persistent atrial fibrillation than the controversial single percutaneous ablation. Trial registration ISRCTN08035058 Reg 06.20.2013 PMID:24885377

  20. Initial experience with single lead intracardial cardioversion for refractory atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    van de Klippe, H.A.; Allaart, C.P.; Ruiter, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Background Chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia, associated with a substantial morbidity (thromboemboli, worsening left ventricular function). Established therapy for pharmacological refractory AF is high-energy trans-thoracic electric cardioversion (TTCV), but this strategy is ineffective for 10-30% of the patients. The purpose of the present study is to establish the safety and efficacy of low-energy intracardiac cardioversion (ICCV) with a relatively new balloon-guided single-catheter system with dual chamber pacing possibility for this group of patients. Methods Patients in whom an attempt to restore sinus rhythm (SR) by TTCV under antiarrhythmic therapy failed were eligible for the study. For the ICCV-attempt, a single flow-guided atrial cardioversion catheter was used. Low-energy biphasic shocks of increasing energy (6-15 J) were delivered, if necessary in combination with intravenous amiodarone, until SR was restored. In case of early recurrence of AF, another attempt was made with immediate post-shock overdrive pacing (AOO) in order to suppress premature atrial activity. Results Initially, 14 of the 16 treated patients (90%) were converted to SR successfully. In eight patients additional amiodarone i.v. was administered and in six patients atrial overpacing was used after ICCV. In seven and five patients, respectively, these strategies were successful. Long-term follow-up (1-3 months) showed that in nine patients (56%) SR was preserved; eight of them on oral amiodarone. No adverse events were seen during the procedure and follow-up, especially no bleedings, despite puncturing under adequate anticoagulation therapy. Conclusion ICCV using a single atrial cardioversion catheter is a safe and effective method to restore SR in patients in whom TTCV failed previously. Long-term follow-up of this procedure is comparable to that of other studies. Results are influenced by antiarrhythmic drug therapy, compliance and patient selection. Images

  1. A prospective randomized study to assess the efficacy of rate and site of atrial pacing on long-term development of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chu-Pak; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Ngarmukos, Tachapong; Kim, You-Ho; Kong, Chi-Woon; Omar, Razali; Sriratanasathavorn, Charn; Munawar, Muhammad; Kam, Ruth; Lee, Kathy Lf; Lau, Elizabeth Oi-Yan; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2009-09-01

    The Septal Pacing for Atrial Fibrillation Suppression Evaluation (SAFE) study is a single-blinded, parallel randomized designed multicenter study in pacemaker indicated patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective is to evaluate whether the site of atrial pacing--conventional right atrial appendage versus low atrial septal--with or without atrial overdrive pacing will influence the development of persistent AF. The study will provide a definitive answer to whether a different atrial pacing site or the use of AF suppression pacing or both can give incremental antiarrhythmic benefit when one is implanting a device for a patient with a history of paroxysmal AF.

  2. Pheochromocytoma diagnosed after anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation procedure: a giant in disguise.

    PubMed

    Galvão Braga, Carlos; Ribeiro, Sílvia; Martins, Juliana; Arantes, Carina; Ramos, Vítor; Primo, João; Magalhães, Sónia; Correia, Adelino

    2014-04-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-producing tumor, discovered incidentally in 50% of cases. We present the case of a 44-year-old male with a history of paroxysmal palpitations. Baseline ECG, transthoracic echocardiogram and ECG stress test showed no relevant alterations. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was detected on 24-hour Holter ECG. After antiarrhythmic therapy, the patient remained symptomatic, and was accordingly referred for electrophysiological study and atrial fibrillation ablation. Anticoagulation was initiated before the procedure. After ablation and still anticoagulated, he complained of hematospermia. The abdominal and pelvic imaging study showed a 10-cm left adrenal mass, predominantly cystic, compatible with pheochromocytoma, which was confirmed after biochemical tests (increased urine metanephrines and plasma catecholamines). Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy scanning confirmed localized disease in the adrenal gland, excluding other uptake foci. Following appropriate preoperative management, surgical resection of the giant mass was performed successfully and without complications.

  3. Galectin-3 as a marker of interstitial atrial remodelling involved in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Vílchez, Juan Antonio; Lahoz, Álvaro; Romero-Aniorte, Ana I.; Jover, Eva; García-Alberola, Arcadio; Jara-Rubio, Rubén; Martínez, Carlos M.; Valdés, Mariano; Marín, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Remodelling in the atria could appear as a result of hypertension, diabetes or ischaemic heart disease. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a mediator of profibrotic pathways and a potential biomarker of cardiac remodelling. We prospectively recruited consecutive patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Preoperative Gal-3 levels were determined from serum samples, and the presence of fibrosis was assessed from atrial appendage tissue samples obtained during cardiac surgery. We included 100 patients with aortic valve or ischaemic heart diseases and 15 controls with permanent AF. Gal-3 levels were associated with sex, left atrial volume, previous cardiac disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, NYHA and NT-proBNP. We observed differences in serum Gal-3 concentrations between patients and controls with permanent AF (p = 0.020). We performed ROC curves related to fibrosis and established a cutoff point for Gal-3 >13.65 ng/ml. Multivariate analyses showed previous cardiac disease, NYHA scale and high Gal-3 to be independent predictors of fibrosis. After adjustment for confounding factors, atrial fibrosis remained the only independent factor for the development of AF (p = 0.022). High Gal-3 serum levels predict fibrosis of the atrial appendage. NYHA scale and previous cardiac disease were also associated with tissue fibrosis in patients undergoing surgery. Atrial fibrosis was the only independent predictor for post-operative AF occurrence in our model after correcting for confounding factors. PMID:28079145

  4. Association of Atrial Fibrillation with Morphological and Electrophysiological Changes of the Atrial Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Matějková, Adéla; Šteiner, Ivo

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. For long time it was considered as pure functional disorder, but in recent years, there were identified atrial locations, which are involved in the initiation and maintenance of this arrhythmia. These structural changes, so called remodelation, start at electric level and later they affect contractility and morphology. In this study we attempted to find a possible relation between morphological (scarring, amyloidosis, left atrial (LA) enlargement) and electrophysiological (ECG features) changes in patients with AF. We examined grossly and histologically 100 hearts of necropsy patients - 54 with a history of AF and 46 without AF. Premortem ECGs were evaluated. The patients with AF had significantly heavier heart, larger LA, more severely scarred myocardium of the LA and atrial septum, and more severe amyloidosis in both atria. Severity of amyloidosis was higher in LAs vs. right atria (RAs). Distribution of both fibrosis and amyloidosis was irregular. The most affected area was in the LA anterior wall. Patients with a history of AF and with most severe amyloidosis have more often abnormally long P waves. Finding of long P wave may contribute to diagnosis of a hitherto undisclosed atrial fibrillation.

  5. The role of left atrial receptors in the diuretic response to left atrial distension

    PubMed Central

    Ledsome, J. R.; Linden, R. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. The diuretic response to distension of the whole left atrium caused by obstruction of the mitral orifice has been compared with the effects of distension (by means of small balloons) of the left pulmonary vein/left atrial junctions. 2. Distension of the pulmonary vein/atrial junctions caused an increase in heart rate and a diuresis similar to but smaller than that caused by mitral obstruction. 3. Section of both ansae subclaviae prevented the increase in heart rate produced by distension of the pulmonary vein/left atrial junctions but had little effect on the diuretic response either to pulmonary vein distension or to mitral obstruction. 4. A diuretic response to mitral obstruction could be demonstrated after all nerves from the lungs had been cut but not after the vagus nerves had been cut at levels likely to interrupt the majority of afferent fibres from left atrial receptors. 5. The results support the view that stimulation of left atrial receptors is a major factor in the production of a diuretic response to mitral obstruction. PMID:5698283

  6. Energetic metabolism during acute stretch-related atrial fibrillation Shortened title: atrial fibrillation and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kalifa, J; Maixent, JM; Chalvidan, T; Dalmasso, C; Colin, D; Cozma, D; Laurent, P; Deharo, JC; Djiane, P; Cozzone, P; Bernard, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and methods Perturbations in energetic metabolism and impaired atrial contractility may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Besides, atrial stretch is commonly associated with AF. However, the atrial energetics of stretch-related AF are poorly understood. Here, we measured indicators of energy metabolism during acute-stretch related AF. PCr, adenine nucleotides and derivatives concentrations as well as the activity of the F0F1-ATPase and Na,K-ATPase were obtained after one hour of stretch and/or AF in isolated rabbit hearts and compared to control hearts without stretch and AF. Results After one hour of stretch-related AF, the total adenine nucleotides pool was significantly lower (42.2±2.6 versus 63.7±8.3 µmol/g protein in control group, p<0.05) and the PCr/ATP ratio significantly higher (2.3±0.3 vs 1.1± 0.1 in control group p<0.05), because of ATP, ADP and AMP decrease and PCr increase. The sum of high energy phosphate compounds did not change. There were no significant differences in F0F1-ATPase nor Na,K-ATPase activity between the groups. Conclusions Results show that in this experimental model, acute-stretch related AF induces specific modifications of atrial myocytes energetics that may play a pivotal role in the perpetuation of the arrhythmia. PMID:18553177

  7. Distinct contractile and molecular differences between two goat models of atrial dysfunction: AV block-induced atrial dilatation and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Greiser, Maura; Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Harks, Erik; El-Armouche, Ali; Boknik, Peter; de Haan, Sunniva; Verheyen, Fons; Verheule, Sander; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Ravens, Ursula; Nattel, Stanley; Allessie, Maurits A; Dobrev, Dobromir; Schotten, Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    Atrial dilatation is an independent risk factor for thromboembolism in patients with and without atrial fibrillation (AF). In many patients, atrial dilatation goes along with depressed contractile function of the dilated atria. While some mechanisms causing atrial contractile dysfunction in fibrillating atria have been addressed previously, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atrial contractile remodeling in dilated atria are unknown. This study characterized in vivo atrial contractile function in a goat model of atrial dilatation and compared it to a goat model of AF. Differences in the underlying mechanisms were elucidated by studying contractile function, electrophysiology and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ load in atrial muscle bundles and by analyzing expression and phosphorylation levels of key Ca2+-handling proteins, myofilaments and the expression and activity of their upstream regulators. In 7 chronically instrumented, awake goats atrial contractile dysfunction was monitored during 3 weeks of progressive atrial dilatation after AV-node ablation (AV block goats (AVB)). In open chest experiments atrial work index (AWI) and refractoriness were measured (10 goats with AVB, 5 goats with ten days of AF induced by repetitive atrial burst pacing (AF), 10 controls). Isometric force of contraction (FC), transmembrane action potentials (APs) and rapid cooling contractures (RCC, a measure of SR Ca2+ load) were studied in right atrial muscle bundles. Total and phosphorylated Ca2+-handling and myofilament protein levels were quantified by Western blot. In AVB goats, atrial size increased by 18% (from 26.6+/-4.4 to 31.6+/-5.5 mm, n=7 p<0.01) while atrial fractional shortening (AFS) decreased (from 18.4+/-1.7 to 12.8+/-4.0% at 400 ms, n=7, p<0.01). In open chest experiments, AWI was reduced in AVB and in AF goats compared to controls (at 400 ms: 8.4+/-0.9, n=7, and 3.2+/-1.8, n=5, vs 18.9+/-5.3 mmxmmHg, n=7, respectively, p<0.05 vs control). FC of isolated right

  8. Extreme variation in the atrial septation of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona)

    PubMed Central

    de Bakker, Desiderius M; Wilkinson, Mark; Jensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Caecilians (order Gymnophiona) are elongate, limbless, snake-like amphibians that are the sister-group (closest relatives) of all other recent amphibians (frogs and salamanders). Little is known of their cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, but one nearly century old study suggests that Hypogeophis (family Indotyphlidae), commonly relied upon as a representative caecilian species, has atrial septation in the frontal plane and more than one septum. In contrast, in other vertebrates there generally is one atrial septum in the sagittal plane. We studied the adult heart of Idiocranium (also Indotyphlidae) using immunohistochemistry and confirm that the interatrial septum is close to the frontal plane. Additionally, a parallel right atrial septum divides three-fourths of the right atrial cavity of this species. Idiocranium embryos in the Hill collection reveal that atrial septation initiates in the sagittal plane as in other tetrapods. Late developmental stages, however, see a left-ward shift of visceral organs and a concordant rotation of the atria that reorients the atrial septa towards the frontal plane. The gross anatomies of species from six other caecilian families reveal that (i) the right atrial septum developed early in caecilian evolution (only absent in Rhinatrematidae) and that (ii) rotation of the atria evolved later and its degree varies between families. In most vertebrates a prominent atrial trabeculation associates with the sinuatrial valve, the so-called septum spurium, and the right atrial septum seems homologous to this trabeculation but much more developed. The right atrial septum does not appear to be a consequence of body elongation because it is absent in some caecilians and in snakes. The interatrial septum of caecilians shares multiple characters with the atrial septum of lungfishes, salamanders and the embryonic septum primum of amniotes. In conclusion, atrial septation in caecilians is based on evolutionarily conserved structures but

  9. Atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: mechanisms, embolic risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ajith G; Fischer, Avi G

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with an increased incidence of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in HCM with a prevalence of 20% and an annual incidence of two percent per year. Increased left atrial size and volume along with impaired left atrial function confer an increased likelihood of AF. The onset of AF is often accompanied by a decrease in functional status in conjunction with an increased risk of stroke and overall mortality.

  10. Juxtaposed atrial appendages: A curiosity with some clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Pradhan, Priya; Agarwal, Ravi; Sivakumar, Kothandum

    2016-01-01

    If the atrial appendages lie adjacent to each other on same side of the great arteries, instead of encircling their roots, they are referred as juxtaposed. Right juxtaposition of atrial appendages is less common than left juxtaposition. The images demonstrate the classical radiological, echocardiographic, and surgical images of juxtaposed atrial appendages. Their clinical incidence, associations, and relevance during interventional and surgical procedures are discussed. PMID:27212860

  11. Extreme variation in the atrial septation of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Desiderius M; Wilkinson, Mark; Jensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Caecilians (order Gymnophiona) are elongate, limbless, snake-like amphibians that are the sister-group (closest relatives) of all other recent amphibians (frogs and salamanders). Little is known of their cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, but one nearly century old study suggests that Hypogeophis (family Indotyphlidae), commonly relied upon as a representative caecilian species, has atrial septation in the frontal plane and more than one septum. In contrast, in other vertebrates there generally is one atrial septum in the sagittal plane. We studied the adult heart of Idiocranium (also Indotyphlidae) using immunohistochemistry and confirm that the interatrial septum is close to the frontal plane. Additionally, a parallel right atrial septum divides three-fourths of the right atrial cavity of this species. Idiocranium embryos in the Hill collection reveal that atrial septation initiates in the sagittal plane as in other tetrapods. Late developmental stages, however, see a left-ward shift of visceral organs and a concordant rotation of the atria that reorients the atrial septa towards the frontal plane. The gross anatomies of species from six other caecilian families reveal that (i) the right atrial septum developed early in caecilian evolution (only absent in Rhinatrematidae) and that (ii) rotation of the atria evolved later and its degree varies between families. In most vertebrates a prominent atrial trabeculation associates with the sinuatrial valve, the so-called septum spurium, and the right atrial septum seems homologous to this trabeculation but much more developed. The right atrial septum does not appear to be a consequence of body elongation because it is absent in some caecilians and in snakes. The interatrial septum of caecilians shares multiple characters with the atrial septum of lungfishes, salamanders and the embryonic septum primum of amniotes. In conclusion, atrial septation in caecilians is based on evolutionarily conserved structures but

  12. Focal para-hisian atrial tachycardia with dual exits

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance Jesuraj, M.; Sharada, K.; Sridevi, C.; Narasimhan, C.

    2013-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardias (AT) in the right atrium (RA) tend to cluster around the crista terminalis, coronary sinus (CS) region, tricuspid annulus, and para-hisian region. In most cases, the AT focus can be identified by careful activation mapping, and completely eliminated by radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation. However, RF ablation near the His bundle (HB) carries a risk of inadvertent damage to the atrioventricular (AV) conduction system. Here we describe a patient with an AT originating in the vicinity of the AV node, which was successfully ablated earlier from non-coronary aortic cusp (NCC), and recurred with an exit from para-hisian location. Respiratory excursions of the catheter were associated with migration to the area of HIs. This was successfully ablated during controlled apnoea, using 3D electroanatomic mapping. PMID:23993015

  13. [Patient selection for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the program of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients referred to the AF Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology. Specific inclusion criteria are required for RFCA of AF. If the patient fulfills it, then an electrophysiological study is performed. A transseptal approach and special mapping catheters are used to detect abnormal electrical activity (AEA). Pulmonary vein isolation is performed at the ostium/ antrum of those veins with AEA if the patient had paroxysmal AF. Global pulmonary vein isolation with some additional lines guided by electroanatomical mapping is performed in the case of chronic AF. Postoperative follow-up includes consultation, ECG and Holter monitoring at 1, 3, 6 and 12-month. RFCA is a useful and relatively safe procedure for the treatment of AF and the only one with curative potential.

  14. [Axillary approach for surgical closure of atrial septal defect].

    PubMed

    Gil-Jaurena, J M; Castillo, R; Zabala, J I; Conejo, L; Cuenca, V; Picazo, B

    2013-08-01

    Mid-line sternotomy is the routine approach for surgical repair of congenital heart diseases. However, its noticeable scar is a constant reminder of having undergone heart surgery. Several alternative approaches have been developed for simple cardiac conditions to hide the scar. Our series, consisting of 26 patients with axillary closure of atrial septal defect, is presented. The median age was 5.45 years (range 3-13), and median weight was 19.84 Kg. (range 13-37). The defect was closed directly in 13 cases, and with an autologous pericardial patch in the other 13. The number of surgical steps and time taken were the same as in median sternotomy. Functional recovery, intensive care unit stay, and hospital discharge were also standard. The cosmetic result, assessed both by patients and relatives, was excellent.

  15. Coherex WAVECREST I Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-13

    Non-valvular Paroxysmal, Persistent, or Permanent Atrial Fibrillation; LAA Anatomy Amenable to Treatment by Percutaneous Technique; Anticoagulation Indication for Potential Thrombus Formation in the Left Atrium

  16. Hemodynamic forces regulate developmental patterning of atrial conduction.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Michael C; Louie, Jonathan D; Mikawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous action potential conduction through the atrial chambers of the heart can lead to severe cardiac arrhythmia. To date, however, little is known regarding the mechanisms that pattern proper atrial conduction during development. Here we demonstrate that atrial muscle functionally diversifies into at least two heterogeneous subtypes, thin-walled myocardium and rapidly conducting muscle bundles, during a developmental window just following cardiac looping. During this process, atrial muscle bundles become enriched for the fast conduction markers Cx40 and Nav1.5, similar to the precursors of the fast conduction Purkinje fiber network located within the trabeculae of the ventricles. In contrast to the ventricular trabeculae, however, atrial muscle bundles display an increased proliferation rate when compared to the surrounding myocardium. Interestingly, mechanical loading of the embryonic atrial muscle resulted in an induction of Cx40, Nav1.5 and the cell cycle marker Cyclin D1, while decreasing atrial pressure via in vivo ligation of the vitelline blood vessels results in decreased atrial conduction velocity. Taken together, these data establish a novel model for atrial conduction patterning, whereby hemodynamic stretch coordinately induces proliferation and fast conduction marker expression, which in turn promotes the formation of large diameter muscle bundles to serve as preferential routes of conduction.

  17. The role of myocardial wall thickness in atrial arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, John; Rajani, Ronak; Chubb, Henry; Gabrawi, Mark; Varela, Marta; Wright, Matthew; Niederer, Steven; O'Neill, Mark D

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the structure and electrical behaviour of the left atrium are known to occur with conditions that predispose to atrial fibrillation (AF) and in response to prolonged periods of AF. We review the evidence that changes in myocardial thickness in the left atrium are an important part of this pathological remodelling process. Autopsy studies have demonstrated changes in the thickness of the atrial wall between patients with different clinical histories. Comparison of the reported tissue dimensions from pathological studies provides an indication of normal ranges for atrial wall thickness. Imaging studies, most commonly done using cardiac computed tomography, have demonstrated that these changes may be identified non-invasively. Experimental evidence using isolated tissue preparations, animal models of AF, and computer simulations proves that the three-dimensional tissue structure will be an important determinant of the electrical behaviour of atrial tissue. Accurately identifying the thickness of the atrial may have an important role in the non-invasive assessment of atrial structure. In combination with atrial tissue characterization, a comprehensive assessment of the atrial dimensions may allow prediction of atrial electrophysiological behaviour and in the future, guide radiofrequency delivery in regions based on their tissue thickness.

  18. Inferior wall diverticulum of left ventricle coexisting with mental retardation and atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Henry; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Jiao; Tong, Yiru; Shanewise, Jack S

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of congenital inferior wall left ventricular diverticulum (LVD), atrial septal defect and mental retardation detected by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. The combination of three features strongly suggests that genetic factors play important role in the pathogenesis of the disorder. Most LVDs are asymptomatic. Echocardiographers and cardiac anesthesiologists should be aware of this anomaly, and include it in the differential diagnosis of abnormally shaped ventricular wall and seek other congenital abnormalities if LVD is detected.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation and Transient Ischemic Attack Encountered in the Management of Snake Bite

    PubMed Central

    Sogut, Ozgur; Kaya, Halil; Gokdemir, Mehmet T; Sayhan, Mustafa B; Halis, Nurkal

    2010-01-01

    Thousands of snake bites occur in the world each year, with hundreds of patients receiving antivenom. Incidence rates for immediate hypersensitivity reactions associated with the use of antivenom range vary. This is a case report of a patient with atrial fibrillation (AF) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) induced by vigrous snake bite that was suspected to be caused by the treatment of subcutaneous epinephrine, due to immediate hypersensitivity reaction following the administration of antivenom treatment.

  20. Association of Duodenal Atresia, Malrotation, and Atrial Septal Defect in a Down-Syndrome Patient

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, F; Sica, M; Mariscoli, F; Bindi, E; Mazzei, O; Ferrara, F; Messina, M

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal atresia is the frequent cause of neonatal intestinal obstruction. The association between duodenal atresia, intestinal malrotation, cardiac anomalies and Down syndrome is infrequently reported. We present a prenatally suspected case of duodenal atresia which was associated with malrotation and atrial septal defect in a patient of Down syndrome. Duodenotomy and resection of web was performed in addition to Ladd’s procedure. Postoperative course remained uneventful. PMID:27170921

  1. [Atrial fibrillation concomitant with valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease frequently have atrial fibrillation(AF) due to elevated pressure and dilatation of the left and right atria and pulmonary veins. Guidelines for valvular heart disease and AF recommend that surgical treatment for the valvular heart disease should be performed concomitantly with AF surgery. The Full-Maze procedure has evolved into the gold standard of treatment for medically refractory AF. In addition to the pulmonary vein isolation, the right and left atrial incisions of the Full-Maze procedure are designed to block potential macroreentrant pathways. According to the mechanisms of AF with valvular heart disease, the Full-Maze procedure is more effective for the patients than the pulmonary vein isolation alone.

  2. Effects of APD Dispersion on Atrial Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigmond, Edward; Kuo, Samuel; Trayanova, Natalia

    2002-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia with dispersion of refractoriness being postulated as a mechanism promoting its formation. The distribution of action potential duration (APD) over the atria, however, remains unmapped under both normal and pathological conditions. The purpose of this computer study was to investigate how APD heterogenity interacts with morphological barriers to produce reentry. Reentries were first initiated in a 2D sheet of atrial tissue. The effects of incorporating APD heterogeneity and periodic boundary conditions, to better mimic physiological conditions, on reentry were ascertained. Analysis was extended to a morphologically realistic 3D model wherein several APD distributions were simulated. Comparisons between the 2D and 3D models demonstrated that the sheet behaviour was insufficient to capture the complex behaviour. Regional differences in APD, aided by anatomical barriers, were found to affect the formation and stabilization of reentrant circuits, as well as lead to the fractionation of wavefronts.

  3. [Atrial fibrillation ablation: application of nurse methodology].

    PubMed

    Ramos-González-Serna, Amelia; Mateos-García, M Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of atrial fibrillation involves applying radiofrequency energy wave by a catheter that causes a circumferential lesion to achieve electrical isolation and voltage drop in the interior. It is mainly applied when there is resistance to treatment and recurrence of symptoms affecting the quality of life of patients. The nurse is an important part of the multidisciplinary team who care for patients who undergo this procedure. The provision of comprehensive nursing care should include nursing procedures prior to, during, and after treatment to ensure the careful and systematic quality required. The aims of this article are: to provide specialised knowledge on the procedure of atrial fibrillation ablation, to describe the preparation of the electrophysiology laboratory, analyse nursing care and develop a standardized care plan for patients on whom this procedure is performed using the NANDA (North American Nursing Association) taxonomy and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification).

  4. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-07

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization.

  5. Lipid-altering therapy and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Justin M; Majmudar, Maulik; Tompkins, Christine; Blumenthal, Roger S; Marine, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia with significant morbidity and public health cost. Because of limitations of efficacy and safety of conventional antiarrhythmic agents, alternative therapies for AF are needed. The potential antiarrhythmic properties of lipid-altering therapy, including the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and fish oils, are increasingly recognized, particularly in light of their potential anti-inflammatory properties. This review examines the known effects of lipid-altering therapy on atrial arrhythmias in both experimental and clinical settings. Inflammatory states, such as post-cardiac surgery and AF of recent onset, show promise as targets. In contrast, lipid-lowering therapy is less likely to affect longstanding persistent AF. Current recommendations for the use of lipid-altering therapy for prevention and treatment of AF are summarized.

  6. Long-Term Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Monrad, Maria; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Christensen, Jeppe Schultz; Ketzel, Matthias; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Loft, Steffen; Sørensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The few studies conducted on short-term effects of air pollution on episodes of atrial fibrillation indicate a positive association, though not consistently. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term impact of traffic-related air pollution on incidence of atrial fibrillation in the general population. Methods: In the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort of 57,053 people 50–64 years old at enrollment in 1993–1997, we identified 2,700 cases of first-ever hospital admission for atrial fibrillation from enrollment to end of follow-up in 2011. For all cohort members, exposure to traffic-related air pollution assessed as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) was estimated at all present and past residential addresses from 1984 to 2011 using a validated dispersion model. We used Cox proportional hazard model to estimate associations between long-term residential exposure to NO2 and NOx and risk of atrial fibrillation, after adjusting for lifestyle and socioeconomic position. Results: A 10 μg/m3 higher 10-year time-weighted mean exposure to NO2 preceding diagnosis was associated with an 8% higher risk of atrial fibrillation [incidence rate ratio: 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 1.14] in adjusted analysis. Though weaker, similar results were obtained for long-term residential exposure to NOx. We found no clear tendencies regarding effect modification of the association between NO2 and atrial fibrillation by sex, smoking, hypertension or myocardial infarction. Conclusion: We found long-term residential traffic-related air pollution to be associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation. Accordingly, the present findings lend further support to the demand for abatement of air pollution. Citation: Monrad M, Sajadieh A, Christensen JS, Ketzel M, Raaschou-Nielsen O, Tjønneland A, Overvad K

  7. Sequential Hybrid Procedure for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bulava, Alan; Mokracek, Ales; Hanis, Jiri; Kurfirst, Vojtech; Eisenberger, Martin; Pesl, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation yields an unsatisfactorily high number of failures. The hybrid approach has recently emerged as a technique that overcomes the limitations of both surgical and catheter procedures alone. Methods and Results We investigated the sequential (staged) hybrid method, which consists of a surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency ablation procedure followed by radiofrequency catheter ablation 6 to 8 weeks later using the CARTO 3 mapping system. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age 62±7 years, 32 males) with long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (41±34 months) and a dilated left atrium (>45 mm) were included and prospectively followed in an unblinded registry. During the electrophysiological part of the study, all 4 pulmonary veins were found to be isolated in 36 (72%) patients and a complete box‐lesion was confirmed in 14 (28%) patients. All gaps were successfully re‐ablated. Twelve months after the completed hybrid ablation, 47 patients (94%) were in normal sinus rhythm (4 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation required propafenone and 1 patient underwent a redo catheter procedure). The majority of arrhythmias recurred during the first 3 months. Beyond 12 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences detected. The surgical part of the procedure was complicated by 7 (13.7%) major complications, while no serious adverse events were recorded during the radiofrequency catheter part of the procedure. Conclusions The staged hybrid epicardial–endocardial treatment of long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation seems to be extremely effective in maintenance of normal sinus rhythm compared to radiofrequency catheter or surgical ablation alone. Epicardial ablation alone cannot guarantee durable transmural lesions. Clinical Trial Registration URL: www.ablace.cz Unique identifier: cz‐060520121617 PMID:25809548

  8. Atrial Fibrillation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French ( ... Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Arabic (العربية) Atrial Fibrillation (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health ...

  9. Predictive value of various Doppler-derived parameters of atrial conduction time for successful atrial fibrillation ablation

    PubMed Central

    Valtuille, Lucas; Choy, Jonathan B; Becher, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Various Doppler-derived parameters of left atrial electrical remodeling have been demonstrated to predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after AF ablation. The aim of this study was to compare three Doppler-derived measures of atrial conduction time in patients undergoing AF ablation, and to investigate their predictive value for successful procedure. In 32 prospectively enrolled patients undergoing the first AF ablation, atrial conduction time was estimated by measuring the time delay between the onset of P-wave on the surface ECG to the peak of the a′-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler and color-coded tissue Doppler imaging of the left atrial lateral wall, and to the peak of the A-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler of the mitral inflow. There was a significant difference in the baseline atrial conduction time measured by different echocardiographic techniques. Most (88%) patients had normal or only mildly dilated left atrium. At 6 months, 12 patients (38%) had recurrent AF/atrial tachycardia. The duration of history of AF was the only predictor of AF/atrial tachycardia recurrence following the first AF ablation (P=0.024; OR 1.023, CI 1.003–1.044). A combination of normal left atrial volume and history of paroxysmal AF of ≤48 months was associated with the best outcome. Predictive value of the Doppler derived parameters of atrial conduction time may be reduced in the early stages of left atrial remodeling. Future studies may determine which echocardiographic parameter correlates best with the extent of left atrial remodeling and is most predictive of successful AF ablation. PMID:26795694

  10. Is percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage comparable to anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Uslar, Thomas; Anabalón, Jaime

    2015-08-17

    For most atrial fibrillation patients oral anticoagulation constitutes the standard treatment to prevent stroke. However, they carry a risk of bleeding, which is why alternative treatments have been put into practice, such as percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage. It is not clear whether this is as effective as the conventional treatment with anticoagulants. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including only one pertinent randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion may decrease stroke and mortality, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The effect on other outcomes is not clear because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  11. Percutaneous epicardial ablation of incessant atrial tachycardia originating from the left atrial appendage

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ji-Eun; Park, Tae Young

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with antiarrhythmic drug-refractory atrial tachycardia (AT). Holter recording demonstrated incessant episodes of AT followed by a long sinus pause. Electrophysiologic study revealed that the earliest endocardial activation was observed at the neck of the left atrial appendage (LAA). After unsuccessful endocardial ablation, epicardial access via a percutaneous subxiphoid approach demonstrated that the earliest epicardial atrial activation was observed on the opposite site to the endocardial LAA neck suggestive of ligament of Marshall (LOM) muscle sleeve as regarding the epicardial sharp potentials under guidance of a circular mapping catheter. Application of radiofrequency (RF) energy at this site terminated the tachycardia. After tachycardia ablation, the sinus pause also resolved. PMID:28066659

  12. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... records the electrical activity of the heart an echocardiogram (echo), which uses sound waves to create a ... check on your progress and may repeat an echocardiogram at these visits. In most cases, teens who ...

  13. Atrial fibrillation in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with rising incidence. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among patients with AF. This observation has prompted significant research in understanding the relationship between OSA and AF. Multiple studies support a role of OSA in the initiation and progression of AF. This association has been independent of obesity, body mass index and hypertension. Instability of autonomic tone and wide swings in intrathoracic pressure are seen in OSA. These have been mechanistically linked to initiation of AF in OSA patients by lowering atrial effective refractory period, promoting pulmonary vein discharges and atrial dilation. OSA not only promotes initiation of AF but also makes management of AF difficult. Drug therapy and electrical cardioversion for AF are less successful in presence of OSA. There has been higher rate of early and overall recurrence after catheter ablation of AF in patients with OSA. Treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure has been shown to improve control of AF. However, additional studies are needed to establish a stronger relationship between OSA treatment and success of AF therapies. There should be heightened suspicion of OSA in patients with AF. There is a need for guidelines to screen for OSA as a part of AF management. PMID:23802045

  14. Right atrial thrombi: Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Beregi, Jean-Paul; Aumegeat, Valerie; Loubeyre, Christophe; Coullet, Jean-Michel; Asseman, Philippe; Debacker-Steckelorom, Caroline; Bauchart, Jean-Jacques; Liu Pengcheng; Thery, Claude

    1997-03-15

    The current therapeutic options for right atrial thrombi-surgical embolectomy and thrombolysis- are associated with high mortality and such patients often have contraindications to these therapeutic options. the purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endovascular right atrial embolectomy. Two patients with contraindications to thrombolysis and surgery were treated by a femoral approach. A catheter was placed in the right atrium, under fluoroscopic control, and a basket device was used to trap the thrombus. The location and extent of the thrombus was established before the procedure by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and the procedure was performed with TEE and fluoroscopy. Thrombi were withdrawn in the basket into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and a filter was inserted by a jugular approach and positioned in the IVC, just above the thrombi. The basket was removed leaving the thrombus below the filter. One patient died immediately after the procedure. In conclusion, endovascular extraction of right atrial thrombi may represent a potential therapeutic alternative, particularly in patients with contraindications to thrombolysis and surgery.

  15. Atrial fibrillation: effects beyond the atrium?

    PubMed

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Casadei, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained clinical arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity, mostly secondary to heart failure and stroke, and an estimated two-fold increase in premature death. Efforts to increase our understanding of AF and its complications have focused on unravelling the mechanisms of electrical and structural remodelling of the atrial myocardium. Yet, it is increasingly recognized that AF is more than an atrial disease, being associated with systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and adverse effects on the structure and function of the left ventricular myocardium that may be prognostically important. Here, we review the molecular and in vivo evidence that underpins current knowledge regarding the effects of human or experimental AF on the ventricular myocardium. Potential mechanisms are explored including diffuse ventricular fibrosis, focal myocardial scarring, and impaired myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve. The complex relationship between AF, systemic inflammation, as well as endothelial/microvascular dysfunction and the effects of AF on ventricular calcium handling and oxidative stress are also addressed. Finally, consideration is given to the clinical implications of these observations and concepts, with particular reference to rate vs. rhythm control.

  16. Dronedarone in the management of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, TS Mohamed; Bharani, K; Chetty, C Madhusudhana; Gauthaman, K

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of tachyarrhythmia caused by multiple re-entrant wave forms within the atria and bombarding the atrioventricular node several times making it beat in a rapid, disorganized fashion termed “fibrillation”. In atrial fibrillation, atria beat more than 300 times per minute. The arrhythmatous condition needs to be controlled, as humans cannot withstand this rapid and chaotic beating of the heart. New investigational drugs like Dronedarone® are being used. Dronedarone is the most recent antiarrhythmic drugs. It was approved by US-FDA on July 2nd 2009 and is available in the USA as Multaq tablets (400 mg). Dronedarone falls under the category of multiple ion channel blocker. It mainly targets the repolarization currents, making them less active and hence prolonging the action potential duration (APD). Dronedarone also exhibits antiadrenergic activity, thus reducing the pace of the pacemaker. Dronedarone has been proven to be a safer and efficacious AAD, evidenced by both animal and human studies. These studies showed that there was prolongation of the APD and absence of QT interval prolongation with long term administration of the drug. Also there was reduced thyroid hormone receptor expression. Dronedarone is significantly safer and effective in maintaining the sinus rhythm and reducing the ventricular proarrhythmias, justifying it for the long term treatment of atrial fibrillation compared to other antiarrhythmic drugs. PMID:27147833

  17. [Pharmacological rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported that there is no significant difference in survival rate between rhythm control and rate control strategies in combination of with anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation. Even in patients with atrial fibrillation and with heart failure there is no significant difference in survival rate between both strategies. There is no need of strict rate control. In patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, lemient rate control(resting heart rate of below 110 beats per minute) is as effective as strict rate control (< 70 beats per minute) and easier to achieve. Digitalis, beta-blockers and Ca channel blockers are used for rate control treatments. Digitalis is the only drug that has both decreasing ventricular response by suppressing atrioventricular conduction and inotropic effects. However, digitalis can not suppress heart rates during exercise. Beta-blockers and Ca channel blockers can suppress heart rates not only at rest but also during exercise. Ca channel blockers can not be used for patients with heart failure due to reduction in contractility of heart muscle. It has been reported that cardiac function and survival rate can be improved by beta-blockers in patients with heart failure if starting low dose and increasing gradually.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation: The Science behind Its Defiance

    PubMed Central

    Czick, Maureen E.; Shapter, Christine L.; Silverman, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia in the world, due both to its tenacious treatment resistance, and to the tremendous number of risk factors that set the stage for the atria to fibrillate. Cardiopulmonary, behavioral, and psychological risk factors generate electrical and structural alterations of the atria that promote reentry and wavebreak. These culminate in fibrillation once atrial ectopic beats set the arrhythmia process in motion. There is growing evidence that chronic stress can physically alter the emotion centers of the limbic system, changing their input to the hypothalamic-limbic-autonomic network that regulates autonomic outflow. This leads to imbalance of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, most often in favor of sympathetic overactivation. Autonomic imbalance acts as a driving force behind the atrial ectopy and reentry that promote AF. Careful study of AF pathophysiology can illuminate the means that enable AF to elude both pharmacological control and surgical cure, by revealing ways in which antiarrhythmic drugs and surgical and ablation procedures may paradoxically promote fibrillation. Understanding AF pathophysiology can also help clarify the mechanisms by which emerging modalities aiming to correct autonomic imbalance, such as renal sympathetic denervation, may offer potential to better control this arrhythmia. Finally, growing evidence supports lifestyle modification approaches as adjuncts to improve AF control. PMID:27699086

  19. Animal studies of epicardial atrial ablation.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, Richard B; Lee, Anson M; Melby, Spencer J; Voeller, Rochus K; Gaynor, Sydney L; Sakamoto, Shun-Ichiro; Damiano, Ralph J

    2009-12-01

    The Cox maze procedure is an effective treatment of atrial fibrillation, with a long-term freedom from recurrence greater than 90%. The original procedure was highly invasive and required cardiopulmonary bypass. Modifications of the procedure that eliminate the need for cardiopulmonary bypass have been proposed, including use of alternative energy sources to replace cut-and-sew lesions with lines of ablation made from the epicardium on the beating heart. This has been challenging because atrial wall muscle thickness is extremely variable, and the muscle can be covered with an epicardial layer of fat. Moreover, the circulating intracavitary blood acts as a potential heat sink, making transmural lesions difficult to obtain. In this report, we summarize the use of nine different unidirectional devices (four radiofrequency, two microwave, two lasers, one cryothermic) for creating continuous transmural lines of ablation from the atrial epicardium in a porcine model. We define a unidirectional device as one in which all the energy is applied by a single transducer on a single heart surface. The maximum penetration of any device was 8.3 mm. All devices except one, the AtriCure Isolator pen, failed to penetrate 2 mm in some nontransmural sections. Future development of unidirectional energy sources should be directed at increasing the maximum depth and the consistency of penetration.

  20. Analysis of immune cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with atrial fibrillation or sinus rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Smorodinova, Natalia; Bláha, Martin; Melenovský, Vojtěch; Rozsívalová, Karolína; Přidal, Jaromír; Ďurišová, Mária; Pirk, Jan; Kautzner, Josef; Kučera, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and despite obvious clinical importance remains its pathogenesis only partially explained. A relation between inflammation and AF has been suggested by findings of increased inflammatory markers in AF patients. Objective The goal of this study was to characterize morphologically and functionally CD45-positive inflammatory cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with AF as compared to sinus rhythm (SR). Methods We examined 46 subjects (19 with AF, and 27 in SR) undergoing coronary bypass or valve surgery. Peroperative bioptic samples of the left and the right atrial tissue were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results The number of CD3+ T-lymphocytes and CD68-KP1+ cells were elevated in the left atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR. Immune cell infiltration of LA was related to the rhythm, but not to age, body size, LA size, mitral regurgitation grade, type of surgery, systemic markers of inflammation or presence of diabetes or hypertension. Most of CD68-KP1+ cells corresponded to dendritic cell population based on their morphology and immunoreactivity for DC-SIGN. The numbers of mast cells and CD20+ B-lymphocytes did not differ between AF and SR patients. No foci of inflammation were detected in any sample. Conclusions An immunohistochemical analysis of samples from patients undergoing open heart surgery showed moderate and site-specific increase of inflammatory cells in the atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR, with prevailing population of monocyte-macrophage lineage. These cells and their cytokine products may play a role in atrial remodeling and AF persistence. PMID:28225836

  1. Neuronally released vasoactive intestinal polypeptide alters atrial electrophysiological properties and may promote atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yutao; Chao, Zhi-Yang James; Yan, Wen; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Yin, Xiaomeng; Mathuria, Nilesh; Patel, Mehul; Fan, Christopher; Sun, Junping; Wu, Geru; Wang, Suwei; Elayda, MacArthur; Gao, Lianjun; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Lin, Shien-Fong; Cheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vagal hyperactivity promotes atrial fibrillation (AF), which has been almost exclusively attributed to acetylcholine. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and acetylcholine are neurotransmitters co-released during vagal stimulation. Exogenous VIP has been shown to promote AF by shortening action potential duration (APD), increasing APD spatial heterogeneity, and causing intra-atrial conduction block. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of neuronally released VIP on atrial electrophysiologic properties during vagal stimulation. METHODS We used a specific VIP antagonist (H9935) to uncover the effects of endogenous VIP released during vagal stimulation in canine hearts. RESULTS H9935 significantly attenuated (1) the vagally induced shortening of atrial effective refractory period and widening of atrial vulnerability window during stimulation of cervical vagosym-pathetic trunks (VCNS) and (2) vagal effects on APD during stimulation through fat-pad ganglion plexus (VGPS). Atropine completely abolished these vagal effects during VCNS and VGPS. In contrast, VGPS-induced slowing of local conduction velocity was completely abolished by either VIP antagonist or atropine. In pacing-induced AF during VGPS, maximal dominant frequencies and their spatial gradients were reduced significantly by H9935 and, more pronouncedly, by atropine. Furthermore, VIP release in the atria during vagal stimulation was inhibited by atropine, which may account for the concealment of VIP effects with muscarinic blockade. CONCLUSION Neuronally released VIP contributes to vagal effects on atrial electrophysiologic properties and affects the pathophysiology of vagally induced AF. Neuronal release of VIP in the atria is inhibited by muscarinic blockade, a novel mechanism by which VIP effects are concealed by atropine during vagal stimulation. PMID:25748673

  2. Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Manifest Different Waveform Characteristics: Implications for Characterizing Tachycardias

    PubMed Central

    Biviano, Angelo B.; Ciaccio, Edward J.; Fleitman, Jessica; Knotts, Robert; Lawrence, John; Haynes, Norrisa; Cyrille, Nicole; Hickey, Kathleen; Iyer, Vivek; Wan, Elaine; Whang, William; Garan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTON Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation patients often manifest atrial tachycardias (AT) with atypical ECG morphologies that preclude accurate localization and mechanism. Diagnostic maneuvers used to define ATs during electrophysiology studies can be limited by tachycardia termination or transformation. Additional methods of characterizing post-AF ablation ATs are required. METHODS AND RESULTS We evaluated the utility of noninvasive ECG signal analytics in post-ablation AF patients for the following features: 1) Localization of ATs (i.e., right versus left atrium), and 2) Identification of common left AT mechanisms (i.e., focal vs. macroreentrant). Atrial waveforms from the surface ECG were used to analyze: 1) Spectral organization, including dominant amplitude (DA) and mean spectral profile (MP), and 2) Temporospatial variability, using temporospatial correlation coefficients. We studied 94 ATs in 71 patients who had undergone prior pulmonary vein isolation for AF and returned for a second ablation: 1) right atrial cavotricuspid-isthmus dependent (CTI) ATs (n=21); 2) left atrial macroreentrant ATs (n=41) and focal ATs (n=32). Right CTI ATs manifested higher DAs and lower MPs than left ATs, indicative of greater stability and less complexity in the frequency spectrum. Left macroreentrant ATs possessed higher temporospatial organization than left focal ATs. CONCLUSIONS Noninvasively recorded atrial waveform signal analyses show that right ATs possess more stable activation properties than left ATs, and left macroreentrant ATs manifest higher temporospatial organization than left focal ATs. Further prospective analyses evaluating the role these novel ECG-derived tools can play to help localize and identify mechanisms of common ATs in AF ablation patients are warranted. PMID:26228873

  3. Efficacy of anticoagulation in resolving left atrial and left atrial appendage thrombi: A transesophageal echocardiographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaber, W. A.; Prior, D. L.; Thamilarasan, M.; Grimm, R. A.; Thomas, J. D.; Klein, A. L.; Asher, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for evaluation of the left atrium and the left atrial appendage (LAA) for the presence of thrombi. Anticoagulation is conventionally used for patients with atrial fibrillation to prevent embolization of atrial thrombi. The mechanism of benefit and effectiveness of thrombi resolution with anticoagulation is not well defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a TEE database of 9058 consecutive studies performed between January 1996 and November 1998 to identify all patients with thrombi reported in the left atrium and/or LAA. One hundred seventy-four patients with thrombi in the left atrial cavity (LAC) and LAA were identified (1.9% of transesophageal studies performed). The incidence of LAA thrombi was 6.6 times higher than LAC thrombi (151 vs 23, respectively). Almost all LAC thrombi were visualized on transthoracic echocardiography (90.5%). Mitral valve pathology was associated with LAC location of thrombi (P <.0001), whereas atrial fibrillation or flutter was present in most patients with LAA location of thrombi. Anticoagulation of 47 +/- 18 days was associated with thrombus resolution in 80.1% of the patients on follow-up TEE. Further anticoagulation resulted in limited additional benefit. CONCLUSIONS: LAC thrombi are rare and are usually associated with mitral valve pathology. Transthoracic echocardiography is effective in identifying these thrombi. LAA thrombi occur predominantly in patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter. Short-term anticoagulation achieves a high rate of resolution of LAA and LAC thrombi but does not obviate the need for follow-up TEE.

  4. [A clinical case of hemangioma of the face and tongue concurrent with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome complicated by cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disturbances].

    PubMed

    Konovalova, K I; Elfimova, E M; Butorova, E A; Aksenova, A V; Galitsin, P V; Bulkina, O S; Litvin, A Yu; Chazova, I E

    The paper describes a clinical case of a female patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the presence of congenital hemangioma of the face, soft palate, and tongue concurrent with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, and sinoatrial block (maximally up to 3.9 sec). Continuous positive airway pressure therapy could reduce the number of paroxysms of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia and eliminate sinoatrial block.

  5. Myxoma virus sensitizes cancer cells to gemcitabine and is an effective oncolytic virotherapeutic in models of disseminated pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wennier, Sonia Tusell; Liu, Jia; Li, Shoudong; Rahman, Masmudur M; Mona, Mahmoud; McFadden, Grant

    2012-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a novel oncolytic virus that has been shown to replicate in pancreatic cancer cells, but its efficacy in animal models of pancreatic cancer has not been determined. The efficacy of MYXV as monotherapy or in combination with gemcitabine was evaluated in intraperitoneal dissemination (IPD) models of pancreatic cancer. The effects of an intact immune system on the efficacy of MYXV therapy was tested by comparing immunodeficient versus immunocompetent murine models and combination therapy with gemcitabine was also evaluated. In cell culture, MYXV replication was robust in a broad range of pancreatic cancer cells and also showed increased oncolysis in combination with gemcitabine. In animal models, MYXV treatment conferred survival benefits over control or gemcitabine-treated cohorts regardless of the cell line or animal model used. MYXV monotherapy was most effective in an immunocompetent IPD model, and resulted in 60% long-term survivors. In Pan02 engrafted immunocompetent IPD models, sequential treatment in which MYXV was administered first, followed by gemcitabine, was the most effective and resulted in 100% long-term survivors. MYXV is an effective oncolytic virus for pancreatic cancer and can be combined with gemcitabine to enhance survival, particularly in the presence of an intact host immune system.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia targeting by myxoma virus in vivo depends on cell binding but not permissiveness to infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Madlambayan, Gerard J; Bartee, Eric; Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Meacham, Amy; Scott, Edward W; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2012-05-01

    Some oncolytic viruses, such as myxoma virus (MYXV), can selectively target malignant hematopoietic cells, while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. This capacity for discrimination creates an opportunity to use oncolytic viruses as ex vivo purging agents of autologous hematopoietic cell grafts in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses select malignant hematopoietic cells are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how MYXV specifically targets human AML cells. MYXV prevented chloroma formation and bone marrow engraftment of two human AML cell lines, KG-1 and THP-1. The reduction in human leukemia engraftment after ex vivo MYXV treatment was dose-dependent and required a minimum MOI of 3. Both AML cell lines demonstrated MYXV binding to leukemia cell membranes following co-incubation: however, evidence of productive MYXV infection was observed only in THP-1 cells. This observation, that KG-1 can be targeted in vivo even in the absence of in vitro permissive viral infection, contrasts with the current understanding of oncolytic virotherapy, which assumes that virus infection and productive replication is a requirement. Preventing MYXV binding to AML cells with heparin abrogated the purging capacity of MYXV, indicating that binding of infectious virus particles is a necessary step for effective viral oncolysis. Our results challenge the current dogma of oncolytic virotherapy and show that in vitro permissiveness to an oncolytic virus is not necessarily an accurate predictor of oncolytic potency in vivo.

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Targeting by Myxoma Virus In Vivo Depends on Cell Binding But Not Permissiveness to Infection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Madlambayan, Gerard J.; Bartee, Eric; Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Meacham, Amy; Scott, Edward W.; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Some oncolytic viruses, such as myxoma virus (MYXV), can selectively target malignant hematopoietic cells, while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. This capacity for discrimination creates an opportunity to use oncolytic viruses as ex vivo purging agents of autologous hematopoietic cell grafts in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses select malignant hematopoietic cells are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how MYXV specifically targets human AML cells. MYXV prevented chloroma formation and bone marrow engraftment of two human AML cell lines, KG-1 and THP-1. The reduction in human leukemia engraftment after ex vivo MYXV treatment was dose-dependent and required a minimum MOI of 3. Both AML cell lines demonstrated MYXV binding to leukemia cell membranes following co-incubation: however, evidence of productive MYXV infection was observed only in THP-1 cells. This observation, that KG-1 can be targeted in vivo even in the absence of in vitro permissive viral infection, contrasts with the current understanding of oncolytic virotherapy, which assumes that virus infection and productive replication is a requirement. Preventing MYXV binding to AML cells with heparin abrogated the purging capacity of MYXV, indicating that binding of infectious virus particles is a necessary step for effective viral oncolysis. Our results challenge the current dogma of oncolytic virotherapy and show that in vitro permissiveness to an oncolytic virus is not necessarily an accurate predictor of oncolytic potency in vivo. PMID:22341701

  8. Inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on the cell growth of cardiac myxomas via the PTEN and PHLPP2 phosphatase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing-Li; Yang, Ding-You; Tan, Duan-Jun; Yao, Heng-Chen; Chai, Wenhui; Peng, Li

    2013-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a molecule with strong proliferative effects, and statins have been reported to exhibit antitumor effects based on clinical and experimental studies. However, their effects on cardiac myxoma (CM) cells and the underlying signaling mechanism(s) are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether the protein/lipid phosphatases and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase 1 and 2 (PHLPP1 and 2) are involved in the proliferative effect of IGF-1 on CM cells and the pharmacological impact of atorvastatin. The activity of PTEN and PHLPPs was determined using specific substrate diC16PIP3 and pNPP. We found that IGF-1 enhanced CM cell proliferation and inhibited both PTEN and PHLPP2 activity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Atorvastatin acted counter to IGF-1 and reversed the above effects mediated by IGF-1. Both IGF-1 and atorvastatin did not affect the activity of PHLPP1 and the protein expression of the three phosphatases. The results suggest that IGF-1 may exert its proliferative effects by negatively regulating the PTEN/PHLPP2 signaling pathway in CM cells, and atorvastatin may be a potential drug for the treatment of CM by enhancing the activity of PTEN and PHLPP2.

  9. Atrial Heterogeneity Generates Re-entrant Substrate during Atrial Fibrillation and Anti-arrhythmic Drug Action: Mechanistic Insights from Canine Atrial Models

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Marta; Hancox, Jules C.; Aslanidi, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-arrhythmic drug therapy is a frontline treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF), but its success rates are highly variable. This is due to incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action of specific drugs on the atrial substrate at different stages of AF progression. We aimed to elucidate the role of cellular, tissue and organ level atrial heterogeneities in the generation of a re-entrant substrate during AF progression, and their modulation by the acute action of selected anti-arrhythmic drugs. To explore the complex cell-to-organ mechanisms, a detailed biophysical models of the entire 3D canine atria was developed. The model incorporated atrial geometry and fibre orientation from high-resolution micro-computed tomography, region-specific atrial cell electrophysiology and the effects of progressive AF-induced remodelling. The actions of multi-channel class III anti-arrhythmic agents vernakalant and amiodarone were introduced in the model by inhibiting appropriate ionic channel currents according to experimentally reported concentration-response relationships. AF was initiated by applied ectopic pacing in the pulmonary veins, which led to the generation of localized sustained re-entrant waves (rotors), followed by progressive wave breakdown and rotor multiplication in both atria. The simulated AF scenarios were in agreement with observations in canine models and patients. The 3D atrial simulations revealed that a re-entrant substrate was typically provided by tissue regions of high heterogeneity of action potential duration (APD). Amiodarone increased atrial APD and reduced APD heterogeneity and was more effective in terminating AF than vernakalant, which increased both APD and APD dispersion. In summary, the initiation and sustenance of rotors in AF is linked to atrial APD heterogeneity and APD reduction due to progressive remodelling. Our results suggest that anti-arrhythmic strategies that increase atrial APD without increasing its dispersion are

  10. A brief overview of surgery for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Maze procedure was the first surgical technique developed to ablate, rather than isolate, atrial fibrillation and was first performed clinically in 1987. The experimental and clinical electrophysiological maps on which the Maze procedure was based demonstrated the presence of two or more large (5-6 cm diameter) macro-reentrant circuits during established atrial fibrillation (AF). Eleven years later, focal triggers were identified, primarily in and around the pulmonary veins, and were shown to be responsible for the induction of individual episodes of AF. Thus, it became clear that episodes of paroxysmal AF could be treated in most patients by isolating or ablating the region of the pulmonary veins, but that once AF became non-paroxysmal and thus dependent upon the macro-reentrant circuits for its maintenance, it would still be necessary to perform some type of additional procedure to interrupt those circuits. Approximately 100,000 patients who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), aortic valve replacement (AVR) or mitral valve surgery in the US also have associated AF, but only 20% of them undergo a concomitant procedure to ablate the AF. However, multiple studies have demonstrated that treating the AF at the time of these other primary operations results in an improved quality of life, fewer long-term strokes and improved long-term survival while adding no risk to the overall surgical procedure. Moreover, the major cardiology and surgery societies recommend that concomitant AF surgery be performed in all cases when feasible. Patients undergoing CABG and AVR who have paroxysmal AF should undergo pulmonary vein isolation, while those with non-paroxysmal AF (persistent or long-standing persistent AF) should have a Maze procedure. Patients undergoing mitral valve surgery who have either paroxysmal AF or non-paroxysmal AF should undergo a Maze procedure. PMID:24516803

  11. Effect of whiskey on atrial vulnerability and "holiday heart".

    PubMed

    Engel, T R; Luck, J C

    1983-03-01

    Vulnerability to atrial fibrillation and flutter was examined in 11 alcohol abusers who did not have cardiomyopathy or manifest heart failure. Atrial extrastimulation was done with rapid pacing (drive cycle length 500 ms) to facilitate induction of atrial vulnerability, seen in four alcohol abusers. The remaining seven were retested 30 minutes after drinking 60 to 120 ml of 86 proof whiskey (ethanol blood levels were 49 to 101 mg/100 ml but pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained normal in all) and atrial fibrillation or flutter was induced in three of the drinkers. Three nondrinkers, symptomatic with sinus bradycardia but not in heart failure, were found not to be vulnerable to atrial fibrillation or flutter, but flutter was induced in two of the three after drinking whiskey. Whiskey did not alter atrial functional refractory periods (mean +/- standard error of the mean 297 +/- 14 to 290 +/- 12 ms) or widen the dispersion among three disparate right atrial sites (57 +/- 13 to 47 +/- 12 ms). Thus, whiskey enhanced vulnerability to atrial fibrillation and flutter in patients without heart failure or cardiomyopathy, substantiating the "holiday heart" syndrome.

  12. Atrial rate and rhythm abnormalities in a patient with hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Jonathan; Thiagarajah, Prashan; Schweitzer, Paul; Rachko, Maurice; Hanon, Sam

    2009-05-15

    A 67 year old man presented with a serum potassium of 7.7 mEq/L and slow atrial flutter with variable A-V block and peaked T waves. Initial treatment for hyperkalemia was followed by an increase in the atrial flutter rate to 300 beats per minute. After hemodialysis the rhythm converted to sinus.

  13. Dynamics of Focal Fibrillation Waves during Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lanters, Eva A H; Allessie, Maurits A; DE Groot, Natasja M S

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and appearance of focal fibrillation waves on the right and left atrial epicardial surface were visualized during 10 seconds of persistent atrial fibrillation in a 71-year-old woman with valvular heart disease. The frequent, nonrepetitive, widespread, and capricious distribution of focal waves suggests that transmural conduction of fibrillation waves is most likely the mechanism underlying focal fibrillation waves.

  14. Acute Gastric Volvulus and Atrial Fibrillation with RVR: A Coincidence or Association

    PubMed Central

    Salh, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare and life-threatening condition that involves the abnormal rotation of the stomach around its axis by more than 180°. The association between acute gastric volvulus and atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response is rare with only few cases that have been reported. Our patient was an 86-year-old female who presented with upper abdominal pain, distension, nausea, and shortness of breath. Clinical and laboratory workup revealed acute gastric volvulus with diaphragmatic hernia. On presentation, she was also in atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response. She was successfully treated by laparotomy with reduction of the gastric volvulus and repair of the diaphragmatic hernia, with significant improvement. PMID:28373916

  15. Association Between the Left Atrial and Left Atrial Appendages Systole Strain Rate in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Changming; OuYang, Minzhi; Kong, Demiao; Zhou, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this research was to explore the association between the left atrial (LA) and left atrial appendages (LAA) systole strain rate (SSR) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), and to provide evidence to aid in the assessment of disease progression. Material/Methods A total of 180 patients with AF were selected for the study (130 patients with paroxysmal AF (Par AF) and 50 patients with persistence AF (PerAF). In addition, 60 healthy individuals were selected as a control group. The total and side wall SSRs were calculated. Results The total SSR in the control group was higher than in the ParAF and PerAF groups (2.87±0.45 vs. 2.15±0.56 vs. 1.92±0.62 and 6.24±1.61 vs. 4.45±1.42 vs. 3.66±1.55). The total SSR of LAA was correlated with that of LA in the AF patient groups and the control group; the correlation coefficients were 0.720, 0.563, and 0.421. However, the ratio of total SSR of LAA to that of LA was not significant statistically different among the three groups (2.24±0.41 vs. 2.35±0.58 vs. 2.03±0.56). The posterior wall had the lowest SSRs in the control group and ParAF group. Conclusions The SSRs of AF patients were lower than that of healthy individuals, and the degree was associated with disease progression. The SSR was different in different side walls, and gradually shorten with disease progression. PMID:27988786

  16. The complexity of atrial fibrillation newly diagnosed after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: advances and uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Cerasuolo, Joshua O.; Cipriano, Lauren E.; Sposato, Luciano A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Atrial fibrillation is being increasingly diagnosed after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Patient characteristics, frequency and duration of paroxysms, and the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke associated with atrial fibrillation detected after stroke and TIA (AFDAS) may differ from atrial fibrillation already known before stroke occurrence. We aim to summarize major recent advances in the field, in the context of prior evidence, and to identify areas of uncertainty to be addressed in future research. Recent findings Half of all atrial fibrillations in ischemic stroke and TIA patients are AFDAS, and most of them are asymptomatic. Over 50% of AFDAS paroxysms last less than 30 s. The rapid initiation of cardiac monitoring and its duration are crucial for its timely and effective detection. AFDAS comprises a heterogeneous mix of atrial fibrillation, possibly including cardiogenic and neurogenic types, and a mix of both. Over 25 single markers and at least 10 scores have been proposed as predictors of AFDAS. However, there are considerable inconsistencies across studies. The role of AFDAS burden and its associated risk of stroke recurrence have not yet been investigated. Summary AFDAS may differ from atrial fibrillation known before stroke in several clinical dimensions, which are important for optimal patient care strategies. Many questions remain unanswered. Neurogenic and cardiogenic AFDAS need to be characterized, as it may be possible to avoid some neurogenic cases by initiating timely preventive treatments. AFDAS burden may differ in ischemic stroke and TIA patients, with distinctive diagnostic and treatment implications. The prognosis of AFDAS and its risk of recurrent stroke are still unknown; therefore, it is uncertain whether AFDAS patients should be treated with oral anticoagulants. PMID:27984303

  17. Atrial metabolism and tissue perfusion as determinants of electrical and structural remodelling in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Opacic, Dragan; van Bragt, Kelly A; Nasrallah, Hussein M; Schotten, Ulrich; Verheule, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common tachyarrhythmia in clinical practice. Over decades of research, a vast amount of knowledge has been gathered about the causes and consequences of AF related to cellular electrophysiology and features of the tissue structure that influence the propagation of fibrillation waves. Far less is known about the role of myocyte metabolism and tissue perfusion in the pathogenesis of AF. However, the rapid rates of electrical activity and contraction during AF must present an enormous challenge to the energy balance of atrial myocytes. This challenge can be met by scaling back energy demand and by increasing energy supply, and there are several indications that both phenomena occur as a result of AF. Still, there is ample evidence that these adaptations fall short of redressing this imbalance, which may represent a driving force for atrial electrical as well as structural remodelling. In addition, several 'metabolic diseases' such as diabetes, obesity, and abnormal thyroid function precipitate some well-known 'culprits' of the AF substrate such as myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis, while some other AF risk factors, such as heart failure, affect atrial metabolism. This review provides an overview of metabolic and vascular alterations in AF and their involvement in its pathogenesis.

  18. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards.

  19. Myxoma Virus M064 Is a Novel Member of the Poxvirus C7L Superfamily of Host Range Factors That Controls the Kinetics of Myxomatosis in European Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Moussatche, Nissin; Reinhard, Mary; Condit, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV) carries three tandem C7L-like host range genes (M062R, M063R, and M064R). However, despite the fact that the sequences of these three genes are similar, they possess very distinctive functions in vivo. The role of M064 in MYXV pathogenesis was investigated and compared to the roles of M062 and M063. We report that M064 is a virulence factor that contributes to MYXV pathogenesis but lacks the host range properties associated with M062 and M063. PMID:22379095

  20. Myxoma virus M064 is a novel member of the poxvirus C7L superfamily of host range factors that controls the kinetics of myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Moussatche, Nissin; Reinhard, Mary; Condit, Richard; McFadden, Grant

    2012-05-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV) carries three tandem C7L-like host range genes (M062R, M063R, and M064R). However, despite the fact that the sequences of these three genes are similar, they possess very distinctive functions in vivo. The role of M064 in MYXV pathogenesis was investigated and compared to the roles of M062 and M063. We report that M064 is a virulence factor that contributes to MYXV pathogenesis but lacks the host range properties associated with M062 and M063.

  1. Feasibility and safety of transeophageal atrial pacing stress echocardiography in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Maurizio; Golia, Giorgio; Rossi, Andrea; Zeni, Prisca; Gallo, Antonio; Marino, Paolo; Zardini, Piero

    2003-12-15

    To investigate the feasibility and safety of the transesophageal atrial pacing stress test combined with echocardiography (TAPSE) 1,727 TAPSE tests were performed on 1,641 patients consecutively referred to our echocardiographic laboratory for nonexercise stress testing (1,319 men; mean age 60 +/- 9 years; 34% of whom were outpatients). Wall motion abnormalities were present at baseline echocardiography in 975 cases (56%). TAPSE was feasible in 1,648 cases (95.4%). It was not feasible in 79 patients due to failure of positioning the transnasal catheter (n=11), the patient's intolerance of esophageal stimulation (n=24), failure to obtain any or stable atrial capture (n=36), or because the echocardiogram could not be evaluated at the peak of the test (n=8). TAPSE was diagnostic in 1,584 cases (96% of the feasible tests, 92% of all attempts). TAPSE was nondiagnostic in 64 cases (4% of the feasible tests) due to second-degree atrioventricular type I block resistance to atropine administration with failure to achieve 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate (n=59) or due to side effects, such as arrhythmias (n=3) or hypertension (n=2), which required premature interruption of the test. There were no major complications (death, myocardial infarction, or life-threatening arrhythmias). There were 28 instances of minor complications that comprised transient arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation (n=8), paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (n=6), automatic atrial tachycardia (n=1), sinus arrest (n=1), atrioventricular junctional rhythm (n=2), ectopic atrial rhythm (n=2), nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (maximum 6 beats, n=3), hypotension (n=1), and hypertension (n=4) leading to interruption of the test. Only 5 complications hampered a diagnostic result, whereas 18 occurred during or after a positive test and 5 during a negative, but diagnostic, test. Thus, TAPSE is a highly feasible and very safe stress test. It gives high percentage of diagnostic tests and

  2. Atrial fibrillation and gastroesophageal reflux disease: From the cardiologist perspective.

    PubMed

    Floria, Mariana; Drug, Vasile Liviu

    2015-03-14

    We have read with interest the paper by Roman C. and colleagues discussing the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease and atrial fibrillation. The review is presenting the available evidence for the common pathogenic mechanisms. However, from a cardiologist perspective, some available data were not highlighted in the review, cardiovascular involvement in gastroesophageal reflux is less assessed. Hypertension, obesity or diabetes mellitus are substrate for left atrial remodeling that initiate and sustained atrial fibrillation development. One of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in atrial fibrillation is the presence of a trigger. Gastroesophageal reflux could be only a trigger for this arrhythmia. We believe that atrial fibrillation should be considered as possible extraesophageal syndrome in the gastroesophageal reflux classification.

  3. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts. Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael; Watkins, Sharmila; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the findings of a panel of heart experts brought together to study if atrial arrhythmias more prevalent in astronauts, and potential risk factors that may predispose astronauts to atrial arrhythmias. The objective of the panel was to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, identify gaps in knowledge, and propose relevant research initiatives. While Atrial Arrhythmias occur in approximately the same percents in astronauts as in the general population, they seem to occur at younger ages in astronauts. Several reasons for this predisposition were given: gender, hypertension, endurance training, and triggering events. Potential Space Flight-Related Risk factors that may play a role in precipitating lone atrial fibrillation were reviewed. There appears to be no evidence that any variable of the space flight environment increases the likelihood of developing atrial arrhythmias during space flight.

  4. Blood pressure control versus atrial fibrillation management in stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Carmine; Sada, Lidia; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for atrial fibrillation which in turn is the most prevalent concomitant condition in hypertensive patients. While both these pathological conditions are independent risk factors for stroke, the association of hypertension and atrial fibrillation increases the incidence of disabling strokes. Moreover, documented or silent atrial fibrillation doubles the rate of cardiovascular death. Lowering blood pressure is strongly recommended, particularly for primary stroke prevention. However, a relatively small percentage of hypertensive patients still achieve the recommended blood pressure goals. The management of atrial fibrillation with respect to stroke prevention is changing. New oral anticoagulants represent a major advancement in long-term anticoagulation therapy in non valvular atrial fibrillation. They have several benefits over warfarin, including improved adherence to the anticoagulation therapy. This is an important issue since non-adherence to stroke prevention medications is a risk factor for first and recurrent strokes.

  5. Epicardial Atrial Ablation Using a Novel Articulated Robotic Medical Probe Via a Percutaneous Subxiphoid Approach.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takeyoshi; Degani, Amir; Zubiate, Brett; Wolf, Alon; Choset, Howie; Schwartzman, David; Zenati, Marco A

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Minimally invasive epicardial atrial ablation to cure atrial fibrillation through the use of a percutaneous subxiphoid approach currently has a lack of dedicated technology for intrapericardial navigation around the beating heart. We have developed a novel articulated robotic medical probe and performed preliminary experiments in a porcine preparation. METHODS: In five large, healthy pigs, the teleoperated robotic system was introduced inside the pericardial space through a percutaneous subxiphoid approach. Secondary visualization of the left atrium and left atrial appendage was achieved with the use of a 5-mm scope inserted through a left thoracic port. The operator actively controlled the path of the robot by using a master manipulator. The catheter, with an irrigated radiofrequency tip, was guided through the working port of the robot to achieve epicardial ablation of the left atrium. RESULTS: Access to the pericardial space and progression around the left atrium was successful in all cases, with no interference with the beating heart such as a fatal arrhythmia, unexpected bleeding, and hypotension. Epicardial ablation was successfully performed in all five cases. No adverse hemodynamic or electrophysiological events were noted during the trials. When the animals were killed, there was no visually detected injury on the surrounding mediastinal structures caused by ablation. Transmural ablation was confirmed by histopathology of the left atrium. CONCLUSIONS: We have developed a dedicated articulated robotic medical probe and successfully performed epicardial left atrial radiofrequency ablation. Based on the feedback from these preliminary experiments, the radius of curvature and proper visualization of the device are being improved in the next generation prototype.

  6. Neurothekeoma palpebrae: A report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Papalas, John A; Proia, Alan D; Hitchcock, Mike; Gandhi, Parag; Cummings, Thomas J

    2010-06-01

    Neurothekeoma palpebrae is the diagnostic term used to describe nerve sheath myxoma or neurothekeoma of the eyelid. Although these tumors are not uncommonly found in the head and neck region, eyelid involvement is very uncommon. We present 2 cases of cellular neurothekeoma and 1 case of nerve sheath myxoma occurring in the eyelid. Patient 1 was a 13-year-old girl with a left upper eyelid lesion of 6-months duration. Microscopic examination disclosed a cellular neurothekeoma with mild myxoid change and osteoclast-like multinucleated cells. Tumor cells infiltrated the orbicularis oculi muscle. The tumor cells were immunopositive for NKI.C3, CD34, and focally for S-100 protein. Multinucleated cells were reactive to CD68. Mart-1, smooth muscle actin, CD31, keratin, desmin, myogenin, synaptophysin, and neurofilament protein (NFP) were negative. Patient 2 was a 4-year-old girl with a left upper eyelid lesion diagnosed clinically as a chalazion. The lesion was incised. Five months later, the patient returned with a firm 5.5-mm nodule at the site. Excision revealed cellular neurothekeoma invading the orbicularis oculi. Tumor cells were NKI.C3 immunopositive and S-100 protein negative, and the multinucleated cells were CD68 positive. Patient 3 was a 70-year-old woman with a 10-year history of a subcutaneous right lower eyelid nodule which had recently changed color. The excised specimen demonstrated a hypocellular, well-circumscribed myxoid tumor surrounded by a thin rim of fibrous connective tissue. Tumor cells contained moderate amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm with irregular, hyperchromatic nuclei. Nucleoli and mitotic figures were not apparent. Tumor cells were NKI.C3 negative, and S100 protein and glial acidic fibrillary protein positive, consistent with a nerve sheath myxoma. Including our 3 cases, 10 cases of nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma occurring in the eyelid have been reported the English language literature. Although uncommon, these lesions should be

  7. Atrial-focused views improve the accuracy of two-dimensional echocardiographic measurements of the left and right atrial volumes: a contribution to the increase in normal values in the guidelines update.

    PubMed

    Kebed, Kalie; Kruse, Eric; Addetia, Karima; Ciszek, Boguslawa; Thykattil, Minnie; Guile, Brittney; Lang, Roberto M; Mor-Avi, Victor

    2017-02-01

    Current guidelines recommend that the atria be measured in 2D echocardiographic (2DE) apical views using the method-of-disks (MOD) or area-length (AL) technique as an alternative, although no definitive data exists that these are interchangeable. However, standard apical views maximize the long-axis of the left ventricle, rather than the dimensions of the atria, resulting in atrial foreshortening. We hypothesized that the increase in normal values of atrial volumes in the recent guidelines update was driven by data obtained using either the AL technique or dedicated atrial-focused views, which maximize the longitudinal dimension of the atria and thus provide larger volumes than the MOD measurements in standard apical views. We prospectively studied 30 patients (Philips iE33) to compare 2DE measurements of left and right atrial volumes (LAV, RAV) using the MOD and AL techniques in standard and atrial-focused views, against 3D echocardiography (3DE) derived volumes (QLab) as a reference. Compared to standard views, atrial-focused views provided significantly larger MOD volumes for both atria, which were in better agreement with 3DE, as reflected by higher correlation coefficients (LAV: r = 0.95 vs. 0.89; RAV: r = 0.89 vs. 0.84), smaller biases (LAV: -1 ml vs. 7 ml; RAV: 3 ml vs. 7 ml) and tighter limits of agreement. This was also the case for the AL measurements, which were minimally larger than the MOD values (NS) for both atria. In conclusion, atrial-focused views are a more accurate alternative to standard apical views, which provides larger volumes. This finding can explain the increase in the normal values in the recent guidelines update, which was mostly driven by the use of atrial-focused views, rather than by the differences between MOD and AL techniques. This understanding is essential in order to correctly integrate the revised normal values into clinical practice.

  8. Disturbed Left Atrial Function is Associated with Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Agca, Fahriye Vatansever; Ozluk, Ozlem Arican; Karaagac, Kemal; Demir, Serafettin; Peker, Tezcan; Kuzeytemiz, Mustafa; Senturk, Muhammed; Yılmaz, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension is the most prevalent and modifiable risk factor for atrial fibrillation. The pressure overload in the left atrium induces pathophysiological changes leading to alterations in contractile function and electrical properties. Objective In this study our aim was to assess left atrial function in hypertensive patients to determine the association between left atrial function with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Method We studied 57 hypertensive patients (age: 53±4 years; left ventricular ejection fraction: 76±6.7%), including 30 consecutive patients with PAF and 30 age-matched control subjects. Left atrial (LA) volumes were measured using the modified Simpson's biplane method. Three types of LA volume were determined: maximal LA(LAVmax), preatrial contraction LA(LAVpreA) and minimal LA volume(LAVmin). LA emptying functions were calculated. LA total emptying volume = LAVmax−LAVmin and the LA total EF = (LAVmax-LAVmin )/LAVmax, LA passive emptying volume = LAVmax− LAVpreA and the LA passive EF = (LAVmax-LAVpreA)/LAVmax, LA active emptying volume = LAVpreA−LAVmin and LA active EF = (LAVpreA-LAVmin )/LAVpreA. Results The hypertensive period is longer in hypertensive group with PAF. LAVmax significantly increased in hypertensive group with PAF when compared to hypertensive group without PAF (p=0.010). LAAEF was significantly decreased in hypertensive group with PAF as compared to hypertensive group without PAF (p=0.020). A' was decreased in the hypertensive group with PAF when compared to those without PAF (p = 0.044). Conclusion Increased LA volume and impaired LA active emptying function was associated with PAF in untreated hypertensive patients. Longer hypertensive period is associated with PAF. PMID:24676227

  9. Disrupted Calcium Release as a Mechanism for Atrial Alternans Associated with Human Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kelly C.; Bayer, Jason D.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, but our knowledge of the arrhythmogenic substrate is incomplete. Alternans, the beat-to-beat alternation in the shape of cardiac electrical signals, typically occurs at fast heart rates and leads to arrhythmia. However, atrial alternans have been observed at slower pacing rates in AF patients than in controls, suggesting that increased vulnerability to arrhythmia in AF patients may be due to the proarrythmic influence of alternans at these slower rates. As such, alternans may present a useful therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of AF, but the mechanism underlying alternans occurrence in AF patients at heart rates near rest is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how cellular changes that occur in human AF affect the appearance of alternans at heart rates near rest. To achieve this, we developed a computational model of human atrial tissue incorporating electrophysiological remodeling associated with chronic AF (cAF) and performed parameter sensitivity analysis of ionic model parameters to determine which cellular changes led to alternans. Of the 20 parameters tested, only decreasing the ryanodine receptor (RyR) inactivation rate constant (kiCa) produced action potential duration (APD) alternans seen clinically at slower pacing rates. Using single-cell clamps of voltage, fluxes, and state variables, we determined that alternans onset was Ca2+-driven rather than voltage-driven and occurred as a result of decreased RyR inactivation which led to increased steepness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release slope. Iterated map analysis revealed that because SR Ca2+ uptake efficiency was much higher in control atrial cells than in cAF cells, drastic reductions in kiCa were required to produce alternans at comparable pacing rates in control atrial cells. These findings suggest that RyR kinetics may play a critical role in altered Ca2+ homeostasis which drives proarrhythmic

  10. Prevalence of left atrial abnormalities in atrial fibrillation versus normal sinus patients

    PubMed Central

    Ketai, Loren H; Teague, Shawn D; Rissing, Stacy M

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) may be the cause or sequela of left atrial abnormalities and variants. Purpose To determine the prevalence of left atrial (LA) abnormalities in AF patients compared to normal sinus rhythm (NSR) patients. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 281 cardiac CT examinations from 2010 to 2012, excluding patients with prior pulmonary vein ablation, known coronary artery disease, prior coronary stent placement, or coronary artery bypass grafts. The first group consisted of 159 AF patients undergoing cardiac CT prior to pulmonary vein ablation and the second group consisted of 122 NSR patients evaluated with coronary CT angiography. Demographic data were collected. LA abnormalities were analyzed. Left atrial diameter was measured on an axial view. Results A total of 281 patients were included. The male gender has significantly higher prevalence of AF than female gender, P value <0.001. Patients with AF were significantly older (mean age, 57.4 years; standard deviation [SD], 11.8 years) than NSR patients (mean age, 53.4 years; SD, 13.6 years), P value, 0.01. The left atrial diameter was greater in the AF patients (mean diameter, 4.3 cm; SD, 0.82 cm) versus the NSR patients (3.4 cm; SD, 0.58 cm), P value, <0.0001. LA diverticulum was the most prevalent variant, occurring in 28.4% of the entire patient population followed by LA pouch, occurring in 24%. There was no significant between group differences in the prevalence of these or the remainder of the LA variants. Conclusion AF patients differed significantly from NSR patients in LA size, gender, and mean age. There was no statistical significance between the two groups with regard to the LA morphologic abnormalities other than size. PMID:27358747

  11. Right coronary artery perforation by an active-fixation atrial pacing lead resulting in life-threatening tamponade.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Eiichiro; Abe, Yukio; Komatsu, Ryushi; Naruko, Takahiko; Itoh, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac tamponade resulting from perforation of a cardiac chamber is a relatively rare complication of pacemaker implantation. We report the first case of perforation of the right coronary artery related to the implantation of a screw-in atrial pacing lead, presenting as life-threatening cardiac tamponade. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman with complete atrioventricular block and dyspnea on exertion. A permanent pacemaker was implanted with bipolar Medtronic active-fixation leads positioned in the right atrial appendage and at the right ventricular basal septum without any difficulty. Approximately 3.5 h after the procedure, the patient complained of nausea, and the systolic blood pressure decreased to less than 60 mmHg. Echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion. Because the effects of pericardiocentesis lasted for less than an hour, the patient underwent a thoracotomy. After evacuation of a massive hemopericardium, bright red blood was seen gushing out from the right coronary artery, which was located on the opposite site of the right atrial appendage where a small portion of the screw tip was observed to be penetrating the atrial wall. The right coronary artery perforation was repaired using autologous pericardium-reinforced 7-0 prolene mattress sutures. Perforation of the right coronary artery is a potential complication and should be part of the differential diagnosis of cardiac tamponade after pacemaker implantation.

  12. Right coronary artery perforation by an active-fixation atrial pacing lead resulting in life-threatening tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Eiichiro; Abe, Yukio; Komatsu, Ryushi; Naruko, Takahiko; Itoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade resulting from perforation of a cardiac chamber is a relatively rare complication of pacemaker implantation. We report the first case of perforation of the right coronary artery related to the implantation of a screw-in atrial pacing lead, presenting as life-threatening cardiac tamponade. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman with complete atrioventricular block and dyspnea on exertion. A permanent pacemaker was implanted with bipolar Medtronic active-fixation leads positioned in the right atrial appendage and at the right ventricular basal septum without any difficulty. Approximately 3.5 h after the procedure, the patient complained of nausea, and the systolic blood pressure decreased to less than 60 mmHg. Echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion. Because the effects of pericardiocentesis lasted for less than an hour, the patient underwent a thoracotomy. After evacuation of a massive hemopericardium, bright red blood was seen gushing out from the right coronary artery, which was located on the opposite site of the right atrial appendage where a small portion of the screw tip was observed to be penetrating the atrial wall. The right coronary artery perforation was repaired using autologous pericardium-reinforced 7-0 prolene mattress sutures. Perforation of the right coronary artery is a potential complication and should be part of the differential diagnosis of cardiac tamponade after pacemaker implantation. PMID:26550089

  13. Minimally invasive surgery for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Suwalski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) remains the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting nearly 2% of the general population worldwide. Minimally invasive surgical ablation remains one of the most dynamically evolving fields of modern cardiac surgery. While there are more than a dozen issues driving this development, two seem to play the most important role: first, there is lack of evidence supporting percutaneous catheter based approach to treat patients with persistent and long-standing persistent AF. Paucity of this data offers surgical community unparalleled opportunity to challenge guidelines and change indications for surgical intervention. Large, multicenter prospective clinical studies are therefore of utmost importance, as well as honest, clear data reporting. Second, a collaborative methodology started a long-awaited debate on a Heart Team approach to AF, similar to the debate on coronary artery disease and transcatheter valves. Appropriate patient selection and tailored treatment options will most certainly result in better outcomes and patient satisfaction, coupled with appropriate use of always-limited institutional resources. The aim of this review, unlike other reviews of minimally invasive surgical ablation, is to present medical professionals with two distinctly different, approaches. The first one is purely surgical, Standalone surgical isolation of the pulmonary veins using bipolar energy source with concomitant amputation of the left atrial appendage—a method of choice in one of the most important clinical trials on AF—The Atrial Fibrillation Catheter Ablation Versus Surgical Ablation Treatment (FAST) Trial. The second one represents the most complex approach to this problem: a multidisciplinary, combined effort of a cardiac surgeon and electrophysiologist. The Convergent Procedure, which includes both endocardial and epicardial unipolar ablation bonds together minimally invasive endoscopic surgery with electroanatomical mapping, to deliver best of

  14. A mutation in the atrial-specific myosin light chain gene (MYL4) causes familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Orr, Nathan; Arnaout, Rima; Gula, Lorne J; Spears, Danna A; Leong-Sit, Peter; Li, Qiuju; Tarhuni, Wadea; Reischauer, Sven; Chauhan, Vijay S; Borkovich, Matthew; Uppal, Shaheen; Adler, Arnon; Coughlin, Shaun R; Stainier, Didier Y R; Gollob, Michael H

    2016-04-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia, is a growing epidemic with substantial morbidity and economic burden. Mechanisms underlying vulnerability to AF remain poorly understood, which contributes to the current lack of highly effective therapies. Recognizing mechanistic subtypes of AF may guide an individualized approach to patient management. Here, we describe a family with a previously unreported syndrome characterized by early-onset AF (age <35 years), conduction disease and signs of a primary atrial myopathy. Phenotypic penetrance was complete in all mutation carriers, although complete disease expressivity appears to be age-dependent. We show that this syndrome is caused by a novel, heterozygous p.Glu11Lys mutation in the atrial-specific myosin light chain gene MYL4. In zebrafish, mutant MYL4 leads to disruption of sarcomeric structure, atrial enlargement and electrical abnormalities associated with human AF. These findings describe the cause of a rare subtype of AF due to a primary, atrial-specific sarcomeric defect.

  15. The Epidemiology of Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sacco, Simona; Tiseo, Cindy; Degan, Diana; Ornello, Raffaele; Carolei, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The burden of stroke is increasing due to aging population and unhealthy lifestyle habits. The considerable rise in atrial fibrillation (AF) is due to greater diffusion of risk factors and screening programs. The link between AF and ischemic stroke is strong. The subtype most commonly associated with AF is cardioembolic stroke, which is particularly severe and shows the highest rates of mortality and permanent disability. A trend toward a higher prevalence of cardioembolic stroke in high-income countries is probably due to the greater diffusion of AF and the control of atherosclerotic of risk factors.

  16. Science Linking Pulmonary Veins and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Saagar; Sacher, Frederic; Derval, Nicolas; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Hooks, Darren; Denis, Arnaud; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanistic basis of atrial fibrillation (AF). One of the most important discoveries in this context has been that pulmonary veins (PV) play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of AF. PV isolation has since become the most widely used technique for treatment of paroxysmal AF. Multiple studies have demonstrated that the electrophysiological and anatomical characteristics of PVs create a proarrhythmogenic substrate. The following review discusses the mechanistic links between PVs and AF. PMID:26835098

  17. Atrial conduction times and left atrial mechanical functions and their relation with diastolic function in prediabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Gudul, Naile Eris; Karabag, Turgut; Sayin, Muhammet Rasit; Bayraktaroglu, Taner; Aydin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to investigate atrial conduction times and left atrial mechanical functions, the noninvasive predictors of atrial fibrillation, in prediabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods Study included 59 patients (23 males, 36 females; mean age 52.5 ± 10.6 years) diagnosed with IFG or IGT by the American Diabetes Association criteria, and 43 healthy adults (22 males, 21 females; mean age 48.5 ± 12.1 years). Conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography were performed. The electromechanical delay parameters were measured from the onset of the P wave on the surface electrocardiogram to the onset of the atrial systolic wave on tissue Doppler imaging from septum, lateral, and right ventricular annuli. The left atrial volumes were calculated by the disk method. Left atrial mechanical functions were calculated. Results The mitral E/A and E’/A’ ratios measured from the lateral and septal annuli were significantly lower in the prediabetics compared to the controls. The interatrial and left atrial electromechanical delay were significantly longer in prediabetic group compared to the controls. Left atrial active emptying volume (LAAEV) and fraction (LAAEF) were significantly higher in the prediabetics than the controls. LAAEV and LAAEF were significantly correlated with E/A, lateral and septal E’/A’. Conclusions In the prediabetic patients, the atrial conduction times and P wave dispersion on surface electrocardiographic were longer before the development of overt diabetes. In addition, the left atrial mechanical functions were impaired secondary to a deterioration in the diastolic functions in the prediabetic patients. PMID:27919159

  18. Recovery of atrial systolic function after pharmacological conversion of chronic atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm: a Doppler echocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Jović, A.; Troskot, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the time course of the recovery of atrial mechanical function after pharmacological cardioversion of chronic atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 21 patients (12 male, 9 female, aged 37-77 years) with chronic atrial fibrillation (< 6 months) were followed up by serial transmitral pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Echocardiographic studies were performed within the first 24 hours and on day 8, 15, and 30 after cardioversion. RESULTS: There was a significant increase (mean (SD)) in the peak A-wave velocity (from 0.35 (0.10) on day 1 to 0.50 (1.73) on day 8, and thereafter a gradual increase to 0.61 (0.14) m/s on day 30). Similarly, integrated late atrial velocities increased from 4.50 (1.46) on day 1 to 5.61 (1.73) on day 8 and 5.97 (1.47) cm/s2 on day 30. The atrial contribution to total transmitral flow increased significantly from 26 (7)% immediately after conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm to 34 (7)% on day 30, indicating the haemodynamic benefit of the restoration of sinus rhythm. Left atrial diameter decreased but not significantly, from 4.11 (0.37) to 3.98 (0.34) cm (P < 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that restoration of atrial mechanical function after pharmacological cardioversion in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation is slow and gradual, as it is after electrical DC restoration of sinus rhythm. This time course may have important implications for determining how long treatment with anticoagulants and antiarrhythmic agents needs to continue in individual patients. It will also influence the clinical assessment of the haemodynamic benefit of restoring sinus rhythm in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. Images PMID:9038694

  19. ECG Segmentation and P-Wave Feature Extraction: Application to Patients Prone to Atrial Fibrillation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detection of patients prone to atrial fibrillation (AF), one of the most frequent arrhythmias. It focuses first on the segmentation of the...Keywords : atrial fibrillation , ECG segmentation, P-wave, hidden Markov model, wavelets, ECG database I. INTRODUCTION Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very... atrial thrombosis, with the subsequent risk of a stroke. The aim of this study is to try to automatically detect patients prone to atrial fibrillation (AF

  20. Left Atrial Mass Invasion from Pulmonary Neoplasm Extension via the Right Upper Pulmonary Vein Presenting as Ipsilateral Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Laureano, Raffaele; Briganti, Mariapia; Passaleva, Maria Teresa; Piani, Fiorella; Piga, Cecilia; Tatini, Stefano; Santoro, Giovanni Maria

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial invasion by lung cancer via haematogenous pathways is a relatively uncommon but potentially life-threatening event. While several cardiac complications of cardiac involvement have been previously described, the evolution towards cerebral stroke has been rarely reported. In this case report, we describe an atypical case of haematogenous metastatic invasion of the left atrium from pulmonary neoplasm extension presenting as an ipsilateral stroke whose ASCO classification changed during the clinical management. PMID:28053605